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Sample records for botulinum toxin-a injections

  1. Multidose Botulinum Toxin A for Intralaryngeal Injection: A Cost Analysis.

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    Gilbert, Mark R; Young, VyVy N; Smith, Libby J; Rosen, Clark A

    2018-01-04

    Botulinum toxin A (BtxA) injection is the mainstay treatment for laryngeal dystonias. BtxA product labeling states that reconstituted toxin should be used within 4 hours on a single patient despite several studies that have demonstrated multidose BtxA to be safe and effective. Many insurance carriers mandate the use of an outside pharmacy which necessitates a single-use approach. This study compares the cost savings of multidose BtxA for laryngeal dystonia compared to single-use. This is a retrospective review and projected cost savings analysis. Records and billing information were reviewed for patients receiving BtxA for intralaryngeal injection at a single laryngology division in 2015. Inclusion criteria included CPT 64617 or J0585; exclusion criteria included CPT 64616. The price of BtxA 100 unit vial for calculation was $670. A total of 142 patients were seen for intralaryngeal BtxA injection resulting in 337 visits over 1 year. The average BtxA dose per visit was 2.86 units with an average of 3.06 procedure visits per year. The calculated cost of BtxA treatment using a single vial approach was found to be $2,050 per patient per year. If billed instead for $7/unit with 5 units wastage charge per visit, the yearly per patient charge is $168. Single vial-use of BtxA injection thus represents a 1,118% price increase versus multidose use. When estimated for yearly prevalence of spasmodic dysphonia, multidose BtxA use would save almost $100 million annually. Multidose botulinum toxin A application utilizing per unit billing is significantly less expensive than per single-use vial billing and would save the health-care system significant amount of money without any sacrifice in safety or effectiveness. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Intralesional botulinum toxin-A injection for the treatment of multiple eccrine hidrocystomas.

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    Gheisari, Mehdi; Hamedani, Behnaz; Robati, RezaM; Mozafari, Nikoo

    2018-01-31

    Multiple eccrine hidrocystomas (MEH) are benign cystic lesions of the sweat gland ducts. They are characterized by translucent, skin-colored or bluish dome-shaped papules on the face, causing cosmetic concern. Recently, botulinum toxin-A, because of its antiperspirant properties, has been used to treat facial MEH. However, there are only some case reports in the literature. Here, we conducted a prospective study to assess the efficacy and safety of intralesional injection of botulinum toxin-A (Dysport) for the treatment of MEH. Twenty patients (3 men and 17 women), aged from 31 to 75 years old, participated in this study. A 300 unit vial of botulinum toxin-A (Dysport, Ipsenn Biopharm, United Kingdom) was diluted with 4 ml of saline solution without preservative to achieve a concentration of 7.5U/.1 ml. Up to 1.5 unit of botulinum toxin was injected intradermally at the base of each lesion to raise a visible wheal. The patients were evaluated 7 days later, and any clinical changes or adverse effects were recorded. In all patients, more than 75% of eccrine hidrocystoma lesions resolved without any scaring. The result sustained for 2-5 months. In two patients mild smile asymmetry and in one patient lagophthalmos were noted approximately 5-7 days after injection that gradually resolved in 3 weeks. Intralesional botulinum toxin-A for treatment of multiple hidrocystomas is a simple and well-tolerated procedure. It is accompanied by excellent results, a good postoperative course, and no risk of scarring. It can be considered in patients who did not respond to other treatment or even as the first line therapy.

  3. Achalasia in Pregnancy: Botulinum Toxin A Injection of Lower Esophageal Sphincter

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    Nicole Hooft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia, a rare esophageal motility disorder that may cause malnutrition during pregnancy, can result in fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Many medical treatment regimens are contraindicated or not tolerated during pregnancy, and surgery is generally avoided due to potential risks to the fetus. Case Report. Severe, medically refractory achalasia in a 23-year-old pregnant woman that caused malnutrition was successfully managed by administering a botulinum toxin A injection to the lower esophageal sphincter. The injection was performed at approximately 14 weeks’ gestation and the patient reported clinically significant relief from dysphagia. She gained weight and ultimately delivered a healthy baby girl at term, but her symptoms returned a few months postpartum. She underwent a second treatment of botulinum toxin A injection, but it offered only one month of relief. Roughly eight months after delivery, the patient underwent a laparoscopic extended Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication. The patient resumed a normal diet one week postoperatively, and her baby has had no complications. Conclusion. This is only the second reported case of botulinum toxin A injection being used to treat achalasia in pregnancy. This treatment proved to be a safe temporary alternative without the risks of surgery and anesthesia during pregnancy.

  4. Severity of cerebral palsy and likelihood of adverse events after botulinum toxin A injections.

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    Swinney, Caitlyn M; Bau, Karen; Burton, Karen L Oakley; O'Flaherty, Stephen J; Bear, Natasha L; Paget, Simon P

    2018-05-01

    To determine the incidence of common adverse events after botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and to identify whether the severity of CP influences the incidence of adverse events. This was an observational study of patients attending a BoNT-A clinic at a tertiary paediatric hospital (2010-2014). Data examined included procedural adverse events at the time of injection and at follow-up. Systemic adverse events were defined as lower respiratory tract illnesses, generalized weakness, dysphagia, and death. Severity of CP was categorized by the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS). The relationships between GMFCS and adverse events were analysed using negative binomial regression models. In total, 591 children underwent 2219 injection episodes. Adverse events were reported during the procedure (130 [6%] injection episodes) and at follow-up (492 [22%] injection episodes). There were significantly increased rates of systemic adverse events in injection episodes involving children in GMFCS level IV (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 3.92 [95% confidence interval] 1.45-10.57]) and GMFCS level V (IRR 7.37 [95% confidence interval 2.90-18.73]; p<0.001). Adverse events after BoNT-A injections are common but mostly mild and self-limiting. Children in GMFCS levels IV and V are at increased risk of systemic adverse events. The relationship between CP severity and BoNT-A adverse events is complex and further research is required to better understand this relationship. Adverse events reported at the time of botulinum toxin A injection occurred in 6% of injection episodes. Adverse events were reported at follow-up in 22% of injection episodes. Children in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels IV and V have increased rates of systemic adverse events. Children in GMFCS levels IV and V report less local weakness and pain. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Application of Local Injection of Botulinum Toxin A in Cosmetic Patients with Congenital Drooping Mouth Corner.

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    Qian, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Kun; Lv, Wei; Hou, Ying; Cao, Qian; Fan, Ju-Feng

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clinical application and efficacy of local injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) at the depressor anguli oris in patients with congenital drooping mouth corner. From September 2013 to March 2015, 36 cosmetic patients received local injections of botulinum toxin A at the depressor anguli oris, with 1-3 injection sites in the moving region of the depressor anguli oris on each side. At each injection site, 2-4 U of BTX-A was injected, and the total dose for any unilateral treatment did not exceed 8 U. The change in the degree of drooping of the mouth corner before and after the injection was analyzed using statistical methods. The clinical efficacy, preservation time, and adverse reactions were observed. The degree of drooping of the mouth corners of the cosmetic patients before the treatment was compared with that at 1 month after using a paired t test, and the difference was statistically significant, with P injection. The local injection of BTX-A at the depressor anguli oris can effectively lift a drooping mouth corner, thereby improving the depressed, stern, and aged appearance of the face. The performance of this treatment is simple, safe, and easy to perform in clinical applications. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. Injection of Botulinum Toxin a to Upper Esophageal Sphincter for Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in Two Patients with Inclusion Body Myositis

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    Louis WC Liu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion body myositis (IBM is a progressive degenerative skeletal muscle disease leading to weakening and atrophy of both proximal and distal muscles. Dysphagia is reported in up to 86% of IBM patients. Surgical cricopharyngeal myotomy may be effective for cricopharyngeal dysphagia and there is one published report that botulinum toxin A, injected into the cricopharyngeus muscle using a hypopharyngoscope under general anesthesia, relieved IBM-associated dysphagia. This report presents the first documentation of botulinum toxin A injection into the upper esophageal sphincter using a flexible esophagogastroduodenoscope under conscious sedation, to reduce upper esophageal sphincter pressure and successfully alleviate oropharyngeal dysphagia in two IBM patients.

  7. The Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A Intramuscular Injections in After-Stroke Spasticity

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    Melek Karaçam

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Spasticity is a common dysfunction in stroke patients. It hinders the performance of everyday living activities and lowers the quality of life. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the effects of botulinum toxin A therapy on various aspects, such as muscle tone, pain, daily living activities and disability. METHODS: Fifteen patients with stroke presenting with focal spasticity in the botulinum toxin outpatient unit were evaluated. Results before and after treatment were evaluated by applying different scales. Modified Ashworth Scale was applied for the severity of spasticity. The Medical Council Research Scale was used to test muscle power, and the disability scoring scale, Visual Analogue Pain Scale and Barthel index were the other measures tested. RESULTS: It was found that therapy with botulinum toxin A was effective in spasticity. The increased muscle tone and the disability scores decreased prominently after the treatment (p< 0.05. Lower values in pain scores (p< 0.05 also contributed to better functional outcome (p< 0.01. Along with the significantly good outcome according to the scales, the higher scores in quality of life, feeling of well-being, good performance during the physiotherapy sessions, and less medications needed for spasticity were also indications in commencing the therapy of botulinum toxin A in spasticity. CONCLUSION: Spasticity is a complicated condition causing serious disability. Botulinum toxin A is a preferred therapy when there is an increased motor activity. The effects of the agent are reversible and reliable. The duration of the treatment is long-lasting. Since botulinum toxin A is easily applied and the outcome in focal spasticity is favorable, it is recommended as the first-line choice in the treatment of focal spasticity

  8. Strain sonoelastographic evaluation of biceps muscle intrinsic stiffness after botulinum toxin-A injection.

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    Aşkın, Ayhan; Kalaycı, Özlem Tuğçe; Bayram, Korhan Barış; Tosun, Aliye; Demirdal, Ümit Seçil; Atar, Emel; İnci, Mehmet Fatih

    2017-01-01

    The most commonly used clinical tools for measuring spasticity are modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Tardieu scale but both yield subjective rather than objective results. Ultrasound elastography (EUS) provides information on tissue stiffness and allows the qualitative or quantitative measurements of the mechanical properties of tissues. To assess the stiffness of biceps brachialis muscles in stroke patients by strain EUS and to investigate the sonoelastographic changes and its correlations with clinical evaluation parameters after botulinum toxin-A (BTA) injections. This is a prospective study. A total of 48 chronic stroke patients requiring BTA injections to biceps brachialis muscles were included in the study. All patients received injections with BTA to biceps brachialis muscles under ultrasound guidance. MAS, goniometric measurements, and strain EUS assessments were performed at preintervention and at 4-week postintervention. Strain index values of biceps muscle on the affected side were significantly increased compared with those on the unaffected side (p < 0.01). At 4 weeks after BTA injection, significant improvements were observed in MAS grades and goniometric measurements (p < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were also found between the MAS grades and strain index values in both pre-/postintervention period (p < 0.01). No significant correlations were observed between clinical parameters and strain EUS findings. Strain EUS is a promising diagnostic tool for assessing stiffness in spastic muscles, in establishing the treatment plan and monitoring the effectiveness of the therapeutic modality.

  9. Comparison between neurectomy and botulinum toxin A injection for denervated skeletal muscle.

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    Tsai, Feng-Chou; Hsieh, Ming-Shium; Chou, Chih-Ming

    2010-08-01

    Neurectomy and botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection cause denervated muscle atrophy, but questions remain about their clinical utility. We investigated time-series alterations of rat muscle weight, functional deficits, signaling pathways, and microscopic structures, to gain an understanding of the clinical implications. Between 2008 and 2009, the maximal calf circumference of patients for calf reduction either by neurectomy or BoNT-A injections were recorded for study. A rat skeletal muscle model was established through repeated or dose-adjusted BoNT-A injections and neurectomy. The survival, apoptosis pathways, functional deficits, and microscopic structures were investigated using Western blot, sciatic functional index (SFI), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The rat muscle weight ratio of the BoNT-A group had recovered to 89.3 +/- 3.8% by week 58, but it never recovered in the neurectomy group. Muscle weight reduction by BoNT-A not only depended on the dose, but additive effects were also obtained through repeated injections. Rat SFI demonstrated rapid recovery in both groups. Molecular expressions showed a coherent and biphasic pattern. p-Akt and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were upregulated significantly, with a peak at 8 weeks in the neurectomy group (p structure disruption and sarcomere discontinuity in the neurectomy and BoNT-A groups, respectively. We demonstrated that denervation induced lasting muscle weight and structural changes of different degrees. Muscle weight reduction by BoNT-A was related to frequency and dose. AIF-mediated caspase-independent apoptosis was significantly different for neurectomy and BoNT-A injection.

  10. Effects of treadmill running on rat gastrocnemius function following botulinum toxin A injection.

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    Tsai, Sen-Wei; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chen, Hsiao-Lin; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Chang, Yin-Yi

    2012-02-01

    Exercise can improve and maintain neural or muscular function, but the effects of exercise in physiological adaptation to paralysis caused by botulinum toxin A has not been well studied. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned into control and treadmill groups. The rats assigned to the treadmill group were trained on a treadmill three times per week with the running speed set at 15 m/min. The duration of training was 20 min/session. Muscle strength, nerve conduction study and sciatic functional index (SFI) were used for functional analysis. Treadmill training improved the SFI at 2, 3, and 4 weeks (p = 0.01, 0.004, and 0.01, respectively). The maximal contraction force of the gastrocnemius muscle in the treadmill group was greater than in the control group (p properties of muscle contraction strength, CMAP amplitude, and the recovery of SFI. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Botulinum toxin A injection for chronic anal fissures and anal sphincter spasm improves quality of life in recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

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    Cassandra Chaptini, MBBS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a 20-year-old female with generalized, severe, recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa who developed secondary chronic anal fissures. This resulted in anal sphincter spasm and severe, disabling pain. She was treated with five botulinum toxin A injections into the internal anal sphincter over a period of 2 years and gained marked improvement in her symptoms. This case demonstrates the successful use of botulinum toxin A injections to relieve anal sphincter spasm and fissuring, with long-term improvement.

  12. Multilevel Botulinum Toxin A (Abobotulinum Toxin A Injections in Spastic Forms of Cerebral Palsy: Retrospective Analysis of 8 Russian Centers Experience

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    O. A. Klochkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The contemporary application of Botulinum toxin A (BTA in cerebral palsy (CP implies multilevel injections both in on-label and off-label muscles. However, there is no single international opinion on the effective and safe dosages, target muscles, and intervals between the injections.Objective: Our aim was to analyze the Russian multicenter independent experience of single and repeated multilevel injections of Abobotulinum toxin А in patients with spastic forms of CP.Methods: 8 independent referral CP-centers (10 hospitals in different regions of Russia. Authors evaluated intervals between the injections, dosages of the BTA for the whole procedure, for the body mass, for the each muscle, and functional segment of the extremities.Results: 1872 protocols of effective BTA injections (1–14 repeated injections for 724 patients with spastic CP were included. The age of the patients was between 8 months to 17 years 4 months at the beginning of the treatment (with a mean of 3 years 10 months. Multilevel BTA injections were indicated for the majority (n = 634, 87.6% of the patients in all the centers. The medians of the dosages for the first BTA injection were between 30–31 U/kg (500 U, the repeated injections doses up to 45 U/kg (1000 U (in most centers. The median intervals between the repeated injections were 180–200 days in 484 (66.9% patients and 140–180 days in 157 (24.7% patients. In 2 centers, children with GMFCS IV–V were injected more often than others.Conclusion: Multilevel BTA injections were indicated for the most patients. The initial dose of Abobotulinum toxin A was 30–31 U/kg. The repeated injections dose could increase up to 40 U/kg. The repeated injections were done in 140–200 days after the previous injection.

  13. Kinematic aiming task: measuring functional changes in hand and arm movements after botulinum toxin-A injections in children with spastic hemiplegia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rameckers, E.A.A.; Speth, L.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Vles, J.S.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe different aspects of a kinematic aiming task (KAT) as a quantitative way to assess changes in arm movements within 2 wks after botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A) injections in children with spastic hemiplegia. DESIGN: Intervention study randomized clinical trial; follow-up within 4 wks

  14. Safety and efficacy of repeated injections of botulinum toxin A in peripheral neuropathic pain (BOTNEP): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

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    Attal, Nadine; de Andrade, Daniel C; Adam, Frédéric; Ranoux, Danièle; Teixeira, Manoel J; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Raicher, Irina; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; Bouhassira, Didier

    2016-05-01

    Data from previous studies suggest that botulinum toxin A has analgesic effects against peripheral neuropathic pain, but the quality of the evidence is low. We aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of repeated administrations of botulinum toxin A in patients with neuropathic pain. We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial at two outpatient clinics in France (Clinical Pain Centre, Ambroise Paré Hospital, APHP, Boulogne-Billancourt, and Neurological Centre, Hôpital Dupuytren, Limoges) and one in Brazil (Neurological Department, Hospital das Clínicas da FMUSP, São Paulo). Patients aged 18-85 years with peripheral neuropathic pain were randomly assigned (1:1) by block randomisation, according to a centralised schedule, to receive two subcutaneous administrations of botulinum toxin A (up to 300 units) or placebo, 12 weeks apart. All patients and investigators were masked to treatment assignment. The primary outcome was the efficacy of botulinum toxin A versus placebo, measured as the change from baseline in self-reported mean weekly pain intensity over the course of 24 weeks from the first administration. The primary efficacy analysis was a mixed-model repeated-measures analysis in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01251211. Between Oct 2, 2010, and Aug 2, 2013, 152 patients were enrolled, of whom 68 were randomly assigned (34 per group), and 66 (37 [56%] men) were included in the primary analysis (34 in the botulinum toxin A group and 32 in the placebo group). Botulinum toxin A reduced pain intensity over 24 weeks compared with placebo (adjusted effect estimate -0·77, 95% CI -0·95 to -0·59; pbotulinum toxin A group and 17 (53%) of those in the placebo group (p=1·0). Severe pain was experienced by ten (29%) participants in the botulinum toxin A group and 11 (34%) in the placebo group (p=0·8). Two administrations of botulinum toxin A, each of which comprised several injections, have a

  15. Effects of botulinum toxin A injection on healing and tensile strength of ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons.

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    Tuzuner, Serdar; Özkan, Özlenen; Erin, Nuray; Özkaynak, Sibel; Cinpolat, An; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-04-01

    Tendon lacerations are most commonly managed with surgical repair. Postoperative complications such as adhesions and ruptures often occur with immobilization. Early postoperative mobilization is therefore advised to minimize complications and time required to return to daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) can be used to enhance healing and prevent rupture in mobilized animals with Achilles tenotomy. Twenty-seven rabbits were divided into 3 groups, namely, I, II, and III, after surgical 1-sided Achilles tenotomy and end-to-end repair. The control group for biomechanical comparisons consisted of randomly selected contralateral (unoperated) healthy Achilles tendons. Group I received BoNT-A (4 U/kg) injection into the calf muscles. One week later, electromyographical confirmation was performed to establish the effects of injection. Surgery was then performed. Animals in the second group (n = 9, group II) were immobilized with a cast postoperatively. The third group (n = 9, group III) was mobilized immediately with no cast or BoNT-A. Tendons were harvested and gap formation or ruptures as well as strength of the repaired tendon were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Achilles tendons healed in all animals injected with BoNT-A, whereas all were ruptured in group III. All Achilles tendons of animals in groups I and II healed. However, group I repaired tendons were biomechanically equivalent to healthy tendons, whereas group II repaired tendons demonstrated significantly decreased tensile strength (P = 0.009). The present study suggests that local injection of BoNT-A can be used for treatment of tendon rupture and may replace the use of cast for immobilization. However, further studies are needed to determine whether BoNT-A injection can have a beneficial effect on the healing of tendon repairs in humans.

  16. Long-term follow-up of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin-A injections for sialorrhea in neurological dysphagia.

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    Barbero, Pierangelo; Busso, Marco; Tinivella, Marco; Artusi, Carlo Alberto; De Mercanti, Stefania; Cucci, Angele; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo; Calvo, Andrea; Chio', Adriano; Durelli, Luca; Clerico, Marinella

    2015-12-01

    Literature provides reports only of a limited follow-up single injection of botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) in patients with sialorrhea. The aim of our study is to evaluate the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for severe sialorrhea secondary to neurological dysphagia. We enrolled 38 severe adult sialorrhea patients referred consecutively to the neurology unit and performed bilateral parotid and submandibular gland BoNT-A injections under ultrasound guidance. The outcomes of the study were reduction of sialorrhea, duration of therapeutic effect, and subjective patient- and caregiver-reported satisfaction. A total of 113 BoNT-A administrations were given during the study period with a mean duration of follow-up of 20.2 ± 4.4 months. We observed a significant decrease from baseline in mean number of daily aspirations and a significant improvement in patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes following ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections (p < 0.001 vs baseline for all comparisons) and the mean duration of the efficacy was 5.6 ± 1 months. No major treatment-related adverse events occurred and a low incidence of minor adverse events was reported. This study confirms the long-lasting efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided BoNT-A injections for sialorrhea, regardless of the causative neurological disorder. These results should encourage the use of BoNT-A in the treatment of severe sialorrhea and highlight the role of ultrasound guidance to obtain optimal results in terms of safety and reproducible outcomes.

  17. Short-term muscle atrophy caused by botulinum toxin-A local injection impairs fracture healing in the rat femur.

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    Hao, Yongqiang; Ma, Yongcheng; Wang, Xuepeng; Jin, Fangchun; Ge, Shengfang

    2012-04-01

    Damaged bone is sensitive to mechanical stimulation throughout the remodeling phase of bone healing. Muscle damage and muscular atrophy associated with open fractures and subsequent fixation are not beneficial to maintaining optimum conditions for mechanical stability. The aim of this study was to investigate whether local muscle atrophy and dysfunction affect fracture healing in a rat femur fracture model. We combined the rat model of a short period atrophy of the quadriceps with femur fracture. Forty-four-month-old male Wistar rats were adopted for this study. Two units of botulinum toxin-A (BXTA) were administered locally into the right side of the quadriceps of each rat, while the same dose of saline was injected into the contralateral quadriceps. After BXTA had been fully absorbed by the quadriceps, osteotomy was performed in both femurs with intramedullary fixation. Gross observation and weighing of muscle tissue, X-ray analysis, callus histology, and bone biomechanical testing were performed at different time points up to 8 weeks post-surgery. Local injection of BXTA led to a significant decrease in the volume and weight of the quadriceps compared to the control side. At the eighth week, the left side femurs of the saline-injected quadriceps almost reached bony union, and fibrous calluses were completely calcified into woven bone. However, a gap was still visible in the BXTA-treated side on X-ray images. As showed by bone histology, there were no mature osseous calluses or woven bone on the BXTA-treated side, but a resorption pattern was evident. Biomechanical testing indicated that the femurs of the BXTA-treated side exhibited inferior mechanical properties compared with the control side. The inferior outcome following BXTA injection, compared with saline injection, in terms of callus resistance may be the consequence of unexpected load and mechanical unsteadiness caused by muscle atrophy and dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. Sustained improvement of reading symptoms following botulinum toxin A injection for convergence insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunte, Jon Peiter; Holmes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    .008) at near, although 2 patients had a temporary intermittent esotropia in the distance with diplopia associated with difficulty driving. At 6 months, when the pharmacological effect of botulinum toxin had completely worn off, patients still maintained a small reduction of exodeviation (median 4 PD, p=0...

  19. Botulinum toxin A injections and occupational therapy in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Lidman, Git; Nachemson, Ann; Peny-Dahlstrand, Marie; Himmelmann, Kate

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of repeated botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections combined with occupational therapy, including a splint, compared with occupational therapy alone on hand function in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP), in all International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains. This was a randomized controlled study, population-based and evaluator-blinded for primary outcome (October 2004 to September 2010). Twenty children (14 males; median age 3y 1mo) with USCP, recruited at a rehabilitation centre in Sweden, were assigned to one of two parallel groups using concealed allocation. In the course of one year, 10 children received occupational therapy, while 10 received repeated BoNT-A plus occupational therapy (BoNT-A/OT). Primary outcome (Assisting Hand Assessment [AHA]), and secondary outcome measures (range of movement [ROM], and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure), were measured at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. AHA revealed a superior effect in the BoNT-A/OT group at 12 months: 6 out of 10 improved compared with 1 out of 10 in the occupational therapy group (poccupational therapy alone for bimanual performance in young children with USCP. Active ROM and goal performance improved in both groups. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

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    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  1. Physical therapies as an adjunct to Botulinum toxin-A injection of the upper or lower limb in adults following neurological impairment

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    Kinnear Bianca Z

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spasticity of muscles is a common consequence of central nervous system impairment. Traditionally, neurological rehabilitation for spasticity has involved occupational and physical therapy; however, increasingly Botulinum toxin–A injections may be provided. Injection effects are temporary. Consequently, understanding the effect of adjunct physical therapies will help inform multimodal rehabilitation decisions. Presently, these effects are not known. This systematic review will identify and summarize evidence on physical therapies used after Botulinum toxin-A injection to improve motor function in adults with neurological impairments. Method Systematic searching of seven electronic databases will occur to identify relevant randomized trials. Available trial data will be extracted into a list of pre-defined primary outcomes, including range of movement, spasticity and functional limb use. Pre-defined secondary outcomes will also be reviewed where trials have these data available for reporting. Effects will be expressed as mean differences or standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals (CI. Where possible, comparable results will be meta-analyzed, and a summary of the available pool of evidence produced. All randomized controlled trials will be rated using the PEDro methodological quality scale. Where possible, study data will be meta-analyzed using RevMan 5 Software. The protocol was registered in PROSPERO international prosepective register of systematic reviews (PROSPERO 2011:CRD42011001491. Discussion Review results will be the most comprehensive answer available to the following question: Are physical therapies clinically effective after Botulinum toxin-A injections in adults with neurological spasticity? Results will inform healthcare providers and managers who determine who gets access to and provision of Botulinum toxin-A injection and whether this is done with or without physical therapies. Results

  2. The effect of botulinum toxin A (Botox) injections used to treat limb spasticity on speech patterns in children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy: A report of two cases.

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    Workinger, Marilyn Seif; Kent, Raymond D; Meilahn, Jill R

    2017-05-19

    Botulinum toxin A (Btx-A) injections are used to treat limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP) resulting in improved gross and fine motor control. This treatment has also been reported to have additional functional effects, but the effect of treatment on speech has not been reported. This report presents results of longitudinal speech evaluation of two children with CP given injections of Btx-A for treatment of limb spasticity. Speech evaluations were accomplished at baseline (date of injections) and 4- and 10-weeks post-injections. Improvements in production of consonants, loudness control, and syllables produced per breath were found. Parental survey also suggested improvements in subjects' speech production and willingness to speak outside the testing situation. Future larger studies are warranted to assess the nature of the changes observed related to Btx-A.

  3. Treatment of displaced mandibular condylar fracture with botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbay, Ercan; Cevik, Cengiz; Damlar, Ibrahim; Altan, Ahmet

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this case report is to discuss the effect on condylar reduction of botulinum toxin A treatment used in a child with displaced fracture at condylar neck of mandible. A 3-years old boy was admitted to our clinic for incomplete fracture of mandibular symphysis and displaced condylar fracture at the left side. An asymmetrical occlusal splint with intermaxillary fixation was used instead of open reduction and internal fixation because of incomplete fracture of symphysis and possible complications of condyle surgery. However, it was observed that condylar angulation persisted despite this procedure. Thus, botulinum toxin A was administered to masseter, temporalis and pterygoideus medialis muscles. At the end of first month, it was seen that mandibular condyle was almost completely recovered and that fusion was achieved. In conclusion, Botulinum A toxin injection aiming the suppression of masticatory muscle strength facilitates the reduction in the conservative management of displaced condyle in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Botulinum toxin injection - larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Injection laryngoplasty; Botox - larynx: spasmodic dysphonia-BTX; Essential voice tremor (EVT)-btx; Glottic insufficiency; Percutaneous electromyography - guided botulinum toxin treatment; Percutaneous indirect laryngoscopy - guided botulinum toxin treatment; ...

  5. An Accelerated Multi-Modality Rehabilitation Protocol Combined with Botulinum Toxin-A Injection in Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Ferdi; Balaban, Birol

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of Adult Idiopathic Toe Walking (AITW) is very rare in clinical practice. High quality studies regarding AITW and its treatment options have not been conducted previously. A 28-year-old male patient complaining of lower leg pain was referred to outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Physical examination revealed a gait abnormality of insufficient heel strike at initial contact. The aetiology was investigated and the patient’s walking parameters were assessed using a computerized gait analysis system. The AITW was diagnosed. Botulinum toxin-A (Dysport®) was injected to the bilateral gastrocnemius muscles. A combined 10-days rehabilitation program was designed, including a daily one-hour physiotherapist supervised exercise program, ankle dorsiflexion exercises using an EMG-biofeedback unit assisted virtual rehabilitation system (Biometrics) and virtual gait training (Rehawalk) every other day. After treatment, the patient was able to heel strike at the initiation of the stance phase of the gait. Ankle dorsiflexion range of motions increased. The most prominent improvement was seen in maximum pressure and heel force. In addition center of pressure evaluations were also improved. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case, of AITW treated with combined botulinum toxin, exercise and virtual rehabilitation systems. This short report demonstrates the rapid effect of this 10-days combined therapy. PMID:27504395

  6. GRIN: "GRoup versus INdividual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: an assessor-masked randomised comparison trial": study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rachel E; Johnston, Leanne M; Boyd, Roslyn N; Sakzewski, Leanne; Kentish, Megan J

    2014-02-07

    Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of physical disability in childhood. Spasticity is a significant contributor to the secondary impairments impacting functional performance and participation. The most common lower limb spasticity management is focal intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A accompanied by individually-delivered (one on one) physiotherapy rehabilitation. With increasing emphasis on improving goal-directed functional activity and participation within a family-centred framework, it is timely to explore whether physiotherapy provided in a group could achieve comparable outcomes, encouraging providers to offer flexible models of physiotherapy delivery. This study aims to compare individual to group-based physiotherapy following intramuscular Botulinum Toxin-A injections to the lower limbs for ambulant children with cerebral palsy aged four to fourteen years. An assessor-masked, block randomised comparison trial will be conducted with random allocation to either group-based or individual physiotherapy. A sample size of 30 (15 in each study arm) will be recruited. Both groups will receive six hours of direct therapy following Botulinum Toxin-A injections in either an individual or group format with additional home programme activities (three exercises to be performed three times a week). Study groups will be compared at baseline (T1), then at 10 weeks (T2, efficacy) and 26 weeks (T3, retention) post Botulinum Toxin-A injections. Primary outcomes will be caregiver/s perception of and satisfaction with their child's occupational performance goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure) and quality of gait (Edinburgh Visual Gait Score) with a range of secondary outcomes across domains of the International Classification of Disability, Functioning and Health. This paper outlines the study protocol including theoretical basis, study hypotheses and outcome measures for this assessor-masked, randomised comparison trial comparing group versus

  7. Injection of high dose botulinum-toxin A leads to impaired skeletal muscle function and damage of the fibrilar and non-fibrilar structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Lauridsen, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum-toxin A (BoNT/A) is used for a wide range of conditions. Intramuscular administration of BoNT/A inhibits the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction from presynaptic motor neurons causing muscle-paralysis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high...

  8. Intra-articular injection of Botulinum toxin A reduces neurogenic inflammation in CFA-induced arthritic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Kaile; Chu, Xiao; Li, Tieshan; Shen, Nana; Fan, Chenglei; Niu, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Xiaochen; Hu, Luoman

    2017-02-01

    Currently, administration of Botulinum toxin Type A (BoNT/A) to treat arthritic pain has promising efficacy in clinical research. However, the mechanisms underlying anti-neurogenic inflammation mediated by BoNT/A remains unclear. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness in macro and micro levels and to explore the causal mechanism of BoNT/A. Wistar rats (n = 60) were injected with 50ul complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in the left ankle joint capsule to establish a model of chronic monoarthritis. Pain behaviour (Evoked pain assessment) and infrared thermal imaging testing were performed at the macroscopic level to assess the effectiveness of analgesia and anti-inflammation. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were used at the microscopic level in an attempt to determine the mechanisms of anti-nociceptive or anti-inflammatory effects of BoNT/A. Additionally, hematoxylin-eosin staining was also used to visualise the cartilage and the synovial degenerative conditions of arthritis. By comparing the outcome of the evoked pain test and immunofluorescence staining, there was a significant improvement in BoNT/A compared with the normal saline (NS) injected control group. In addition, thermal variations showed that the temperature of ipsilateral ankle joint increased between 1 and 2 weeks following injection of CFA, but decreased after 3 weeks (still above the contralateral side). However, the temperature showed no difference between the BoNT/A group and NS group after treatment. The expression of IL-1β or TNF-α in the ankle synovial tissue was significantly decreased in the BoNT/A group compared to the NS group (p < 0.05). Based on the HE assessment, cartilage degeneration and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the BoNT/A group was alleviated compared to the NS group after treatment. In conclusion, we proposed the hypothesis that intra-articular BoNT/A administration does play an important role in anti-neurogenic inflammation. The

  9. The Effect of Botulinum Toxin A Injections in the Spine Muscles for Cerebral Palsy Scoliosis, Examined in a Prospective, Randomized Triple-blinded Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christian; Pedersen, Søren Anker; Kristensen, Billy B; Gosvig, Kasper; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2015-12-01

    A prospective, randomized triple-blinded cross-over design treating with either botulinum toxin A (BXT) or saline (NaCl). To examine the efficacy of BTX treatment in cerebral palsy scoliosis (CPS). Intramuscular injections with BTX have been used off label in treating CPS. 1 prospective study has been conducted, demonstrating in both radiological and clinical improvement, whereas showing no side effects or complications. Subjects (brace-treated CPS between 2 and 18 yr) were injected using ultrasonic-guidance with either NaCl or BTX in selected spine muscles with 6 mo intervals (block randomization, sealed envelope). Radiographs of the spine and clinical follow-up were captured before and 6 weeks after each injection. Primary outcome parameter was radiological change in Cobb angle, where a 7° change was regarded as an effect (1 SD). Radiological parameters were measured before and 6 weeks after treatment by 3 experienced doctors separately. Moreover, clinical results were evaluated by the pediatric quality of life score and systematic open questioning of the parents about the child's wellbeing. Subjects, researchers, and monitors were blinded during the trial. Appropriate permissions (2008-004584-19) and no funding were obtained. 16 cerebral palsy patients (GFMCS III-V) with CPS were consecutively included, whereas 6 patients were excluded. There were no drop-outs to follow-up, but 1 possible serious adverse event of pneumonia resulting in death was recorded and the study was terminated. No significant radiological or clinical changes were detected when compared with NaCl injections using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank test. No positive radiological or clinical effects were demonstrated by this treatment, except for the parent's initial subjective but positive appraisal of the effect. However, the study was terminated due to 1 possible severe adverse event and scheduled numbers needed to treat (hence power) were not reached. 1.

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxin Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... botulinum neurotoxin as much art as it is science. It is in your best interest to locate the most well-trained and experienced doctor you can find. Before making an appointment to receive botulinum neuro toxin injections, ask the office personnel which doctor ...

  11. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Sphincters Spasms with Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Brisinda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A inhibits neuromuscular transmission. It has become a drug with many indications. The range of clinical applications has grown to encompass several neurological and non-neurological conditions. One of the most recent achievements in the field is the observation that botulinum toxin A provides benefit in diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Although toxin blocks cholinergic nerve endings in the autonomic nervous system, it has also been shown that it does not block non-adrenergic non-cholinergic responses mediated by nitric oxide. This has promoted further interest in using botulinum toxin A as a treatment for overactive smooth muscles and sphincters. The introduction of this therapy has made the treatment of several clinical conditions easier, in the outpatient setting, at a lower cost and without permanent complications. This review presents current data on the use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of pathological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Inconsistency in the definition of urinary tract infection after intravesical botulinum toxin A injection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Andrew W; Adelstein, Sarah A; Chen, Andrew; Lucioni, Alvaro; Kobashi, Kathleen C; Lee, Una J

    2018-04-10

    In order to more accurately examine the rate of urinary tract infection following onabotulinumtoxinA injection of the bladder, we systematically reviewed the literature for definitions of urinary tract infection utilized in series that reported on onabotulinumtoxinA injections and assessed them for consistency with guideline statements defining urinary tract infections. A systematic review of the literature was performed via query using MEDLINE and EMBASE. We included original studies that reported on adult idiopathic overactive bladder and/or neurogenic detrusor overactivity patients who underwent cystoscopy with injection of onabotulinumtoxinA and had urinary tract infection as a reported outcome. 299 publications were identified, of which 50 met the inclusion criteria. 27 studies (54%) defined their urinary tract infection diagnostic criteria, and 10 different definitions were noted amongst these studies. None of the OAB studies used a definition which met the European Association of Urology criteria for urinary tract infection. Only 2 of the 10 studies on neurogenic bladder patients used a urinary tract infection definition consistent with National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research standards. Definitions for urinary tract infections are heterogeneous and frequently absent in the literature reporting on onabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of overactive bladder and/or neurogenic bladder. Given the potential for post procedure urinary symptoms in this setting, explicit criteria are imperative to establish the true urinary tract infection rate following treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Feasibility of a Day-Camp Model of Modified Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy with and without Botulinum Toxin A Injection for Children with Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Ann-Christin; Shaw, Karin; Ponten, Eva; Boyd, Roslyn; Krumlinde-Sundholm, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the feasibility of modified constraint-induced (CI) therapy provided in a 2-week day-camp model with and without intramuscular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections for children with congenital cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with congenital hemiplegia, Manual Ability Classification System (MACS)…

  14. Bruxism secondary to brain injury treated with Botulinum toxin-A: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Maaytah, Mohammed; Jerjes, Waseem; Upile, Tahwinder; Swinson, Brian; Hopper, Colin; Ayliffe, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We report a successful treatment of bruxism in a patient with anoxic brain injury using botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A). On examination the mouth opening was 0 mm, no feeding was possible through the mouth. Botulinum toxin was injected into the masseter and temporalis; great improvement in trismus and bruxism was noted after 3 weeks. One further treatment improved the mouth opening on the following week and the patient was discharged from our care to be reviewed when required. PMID:17123443

  15. Incidental Treatment of a Subclinical Chronic Tension-Type Headache by Cosmetic Use of Botulinum Toxin A: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iselin Saltvig

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache is a common disorder of the nervous system; chronic headache in particular may affect quality of life negatively. The pathophysiology is multifactorial and not completely elucidated. Studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of botulinum toxin A on chronic migraine headaches, but failed to show the same effect on chronic tension-type headaches. Methods: We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who after receiving cosmetic injections with botulinum toxin A for fine lines of the forehead experienced relief of subclinical tension-type headaches. Conclusions: Although the effect of botulinum toxin A on chronic tension-type headaches is limited, several studies demonstrate its pain-modulating effects, and as such it is worth paying attention to this potential beneficial effect when performing cosmetic injections with botulinum toxin A.

  16. Botulinum toxin a can positively impact first impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Steven H; Lieberman, Elliot D; Thakkar, Nirav N; Larimer, Karen A; Anstead, Amy

    2008-06-01

    BACKGROUND First impression is influenced by facial appearance and improved by cosmetic surgery. OBJECTIVE We wanted to determine if treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTxnA) would improve first impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women received BTxnA in the forehead. Photos were taken prior to, and 1 week after, final BTxnA injection in smiling and relaxed poses. Photos were divided into books with each subject represented only once. Evaluators completed a survey rating first impression on various measures of success for each photo. RESULTS No differences were seen for social skills, financial, or relationship success scales. A significant decrease in first impression scores between treatment photos was seen for academic performance and occupational success. However, analysis of between-subject effects found that "smile/relax" accounted for the decreased score in both scales. Significant increases in first impression scores were seen for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales where smile/relax and BTxnA contributed significantly to the improved scores. CONCLUSIONS BTxnA improved first impression scores for dating success, attractiveness, and athletic success scales. Academic performance and occupational success scores were not affected by BTxnA when the smile/relax variable was included. The smile/relax variable was a more important predictor for academic performance and occupational success scores.

  17. Botulinum toxin A, brain and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Ivica; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is one of the most potent toxins known and a potential biological threat. At the same time, it is among the most widely used therapeutic proteins used yearly by millions of people, especially for cosmetic purposes. Currently, its clinical use in certain types of pain is increasing, and its long-term duration of effects represents a special clinical value. Efficacy of BoNT/A in different types of pain has been found in numerous clinical trials and case reports, as well as in animal pain models. However, sites and mechanisms of BoNT/A actions involved in nociception are a matter of controversy. In analogy with well known neuroparalytic effects in peripheral cholinergic synapses, presently dominant opinion is that BoNT/A exerts pain reduction by inhibiting peripheral neurotransmitter/inflammatory mediator release from sensory nerves. On the other hand, growing number of behavioral and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the requirement of axonal transport for BoNT/A's antinociceptive action. In addition, toxin's enzymatic activity in central sensory regions was clearly identified after its peripheral application. Apart from general pharmacology, this review summarizes the clinical and experimental evidence for BoNT/A antinociceptive activity and compares the data in favor of peripheral vs. central site and mechanism of action. Based on literature review and published results from our laboratory we propose that the hypothesis of peripheral site of BoNT/A action is not sufficient to explain the experimental data collected up to now. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Botulinum Toxin A for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients: In Microsurgical Patients BTX Injections in Major Salivary Glands Temporarily Reduce Salivary Production and the Risk of Local Complications Related to Saliva Stagnation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolo Corradino

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence could become major complications compromising the surgery or the reconstructive outcome. In fact the formation of oro-cutaneous fistula may cause infection, failure of the free flap, or the patient’s death with carotid blow-out syndrome. Botulinum injections in the major salivary glands, four days before surgery, temporarily reduces salivation during the healing stage and thus could reduce the incidence of saliva-related complications. Forty three patients with oral cancer were treated with botulinum toxin A. The saliva quantitative measurement and the sialoscintigraphy were performed before and after infiltrations of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands. In all cases there was a considerable, but temporary, reduction of salivary secretion. A lower rate of local complications was observed in the post-operative period. The salivary production returned to normal within two months, with minimal side effects and discomfort for the patients. The temporary inhibition of salivary secretion in the post-operative period could enable a reduction in saliva-related local complications, in the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas, and improve the outcome of the surgery as well as the quality of residual life in these patients.

  19. Botulinum toxin A for oral cavity cancer patients: in microsurgical patients BTX injections in major salivary glands temporarily reduce salivary production and the risk of local complications related to saliva stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, Bartolo; Di Lorenzo, Sara; Moschella, Francesco

    2012-10-24

    In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection) and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence) could become major complications compromising the surgery or the reconstructive outcome. In fact the formation of oro-cutaneous fistula may cause infection, failure of the free flap, or the patient’s death with carotid blow-out syndrome. Botulinum injections in the major salivary glands, four days before surgery, temporarily reduces salivation during the healing stage and thus could reduce the incidence of saliva-related complications. Forty three patients with oral cancer were treated with botulinum toxin A. The saliva quantitative measurement and the sialoscintigraphy were performed before and after infiltrations of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands. In all cases there was a considerable, but temporary, reduction of salivary secretion. A lower rate of local complications was observed in the post-operative period. The salivary production returned to normal within two months, with minimal side effects and discomfort for the patients. The temporary inhibition of salivary secretion in the post-operative period could enable a reduction in saliva-related local complications, in the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas, and improve the outcome of the surgery as well as the quality of residual life in these patients.

  20. Effectiveness of botulinum toxin A in treatment of refractory erythromelalgia

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    Kuan-Hsiang Lin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Erythromelalgia is characterized by intense burning pain, erythema, and heat in affected areas after precipitating factors such as warm temperature or stress. It is refractory to treatment in some situations. We describe a woman with adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung and medically refractory erythromelalgia. The symptoms of erythromelalgia presented as refractory to any medical treatment. Due to the unresponsive nature of her condition, botulinum toxin type A (onabotulinumtoxin A was injected over both of her cheeks, periodically for six cycles. Her symptoms responded dramatically to subcutaneous and intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A. Repetitive injection demonstrated consistent and reproducible responses, and the efficacy was maintained for approximately 1 month. No adverse effects or complications were noted. Botulinum toxin type A might be safe and effective as an alternative treatment for refractory erythromelalgia, but further large-scale studies are required.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of botulinum toxin A injections when used to improve ease of care and comfort in children with cerebral palsy whom are non-ambulant: a double blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorley Megan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy (CP whom are non-ambulant are at risk of reduced quality of life and poor health status. Severe spasticity leads to discomfort and pain. Carer burden for families is significant. This study aims to determine whether intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A combined with a regime of standard therapy has a positive effect on care and comfort for children with CP whom are non-ambulant (GMFCS IV/V, compared with standard therapy alone (cycle I, and whether repeated injections with the same regime of adjunctive therapy results in greater benefits compared with a single injecting episode (cycle II. The regime of therapy will include serial casting, splinting and/or provision of orthoses, as indicated, combined with four sessions of goal directed occupational therapy or physiotherapy. Method/design This study is a double blind randomized controlled trial. Forty participants will be recruited. In cycle I, participants will be randomized to either a treatment group who will receive BoNT-A injections into selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, or a control group who will undergo sham injections. Both groups will receive occupational therapy and /or physiotherapy following injections. Groups will be assessed at baseline then compared at 4 and 16 weeks following injections or sham control. Parents, treating clinicians and assessors will be masked to group allocation. In cycle II, all participants will undergo intramuscular BoNT-A injections to selected upper and/or lower limb muscles, followed by therapy. The primary outcome measure will be change in parent ratings in identified areas of concern for their child’s care and comfort, using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM. Secondary measures will include the Care and Comfort Hypertonicity Scale (ease of care, the Cerebral Palsy Quality of Life Questionnaire (CP QoL–Child (quality of life, the Caregiver Priorities and Child

  2. The use of botulinum toxin A in the treatment of functional epiphora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Karl W; Matthews, Bethan N; Fitt, Alan W; Sandramouli, S

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hitherto undescribed effects of botulinum toxin A injected into the lacrimal gland in patients with functional epiphora. A prospective non-comparative interventional case series study was designed to include patients with functional epiphora who presented to the Oculoplastic unit at the Wolverhampton and Midland Counties Eye Infirmary. Botulinum toxin A (2.5-5 units) was injected into the palpebral lobe of the lacrimal gland on the worst affected side via a transconjunctival approach under topical anaesthesia. Patients underwent a Schirmer test and provided a subjective evaluation of their epiphora symptoms, indoors and outdoors, at baseline and at 1, 4 and 13 weeks after injection. The mean score for symptoms indoors and outdoors was calculated. Fourteen patients agreed to take part in the study. Subjective epiphora scores improved in 8 out of the 11 patients (72.7%) who completed 13 weeks of follow-up. Schirmer test results showed objective reduction in tearing from baseline but did not strongly correlate with the subjective epiphora scores. Transient mild ptosis and diplopia were experienced by two patients. The results from this small pilot study are encouraging, although larger, controlled trials are needed to assess the optimal dose of BTX-A, its long-term efficacy and safety, and the role of multiple injections.

  3. Deeper than skin deep - The effect of botulinum toxin-A on emotion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, J-C; Papa, G; Foroni, F

    2016-08-01

    The effect of facial botulinum Toxin-A (BTX) injections on the processing of emotional stimuli was investigated. The hypothesis, that BTX would interfere with processing of slightly emotional stimuli and less with very emotional or neutral stimuli, was largely confirmed. BTX-users rated slightly emotional sentences and facial expressions, but not very emotional or neutral ones, as less emotional after the treatment. Furthermore, they became slower at categorizing slightly emotional facial expressions under time pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Adductor laryngeal breathing dystonia in NBIA treated with botulinum toxin-A

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    Vinod Rai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA presented with episodic inspiratory stridor. A 10-year-old boy presented with 3-year history of gradually progressive spastic gait and generalized dystonia (involving all four limbs, neck, jaw, and speech. MRI brain showed "Eye of Tiger" sign. He recently developed severe inspiratory stridor associated with almost gasping respiration. Direct video laryngoscopy showed paradoxical vocal cord closure during inspiration. He was treated with EMG-guided botulinum toxin-A injection given into bilateral thyroarytenoid muscles, resulting in dramatic response with complete disappearance of the stridor within a week. The effect lasted 18 months.

  5. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy or bimanual occupational therapy following injection of Botulinum toxin-A to improve bimanual performance in young children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy: a randomised controlled trial methods paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imms Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of Botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A for treatment of upper limb spasticity in children with cerebral palsy has become routine clinical practice in many paediatric treatment centres worldwide. There is now high-level evidence that upper limb BoNT-A injection, in combination with occupational therapy, improves outcomes in children with cerebral palsy at both the body function/structure and activity level domains of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Investigation is now required to establish what amount and specific type of occupational therapy will further enhance functional outcomes and prolong the beneficial effects of BoNT-A. Methods/Design A randomised, controlled, evaluator blinded, prospective parallel-group trial. Eligible participants were children aged 18 months to 6 years, diagnosed with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy and who were able to demonstrate selective motor control of the affected upper limb. Both groups received upper limb injections of BoNT-A. Children were randomised to either the modified constraint-induced movement therapy group (experimental or bimanual occupational therapy group (control. Outcome assessments were undertaken at pre-injection and 1, 3 and 6 months following injection of BoNT-A. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment. Secondary outcomes included: the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test; Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory; Canadian Occupational Performance Measure; Goal Attainment Scaling; Pediatric Motor Activity Log; modified Ashworth Scale and; the modified Tardieu Scale. Discussion The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomised controlled trial comparing the effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (a uni-manual therapy versus bimanual occupational therapy (a bimanual therapy on improving bimanual upper limb performance of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy following

  6. Botulinum Toxin A Injection to the Bladder Neck and Urethra for Medically Refractory Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men Without Prostatic Obstruction

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    Jing-Liang Chen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: Bladder neck and urethral BoNT-A injections improved LUTS and increased Qmax in men with a small prostate. Our findings suggest that bladder neck and urethral dysfunction may play a role in LUTS in men without BPH.

  7. The effect of botulinum toxin A injections in the spine muscles for cerebral palsy scoliosis, examined in a prospective, randomized triple-blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Christian; Pedersen, Søren Anker; Kristensen, Billy B

    2015-01-01

    serious adverse event of pneumonia resulting in death was recorded and the study was terminated. No significant radiological or clinical changes were detected when compared to NaCl injections using Wilcoxon matched pair signed-rank test. CONCLUSION: No positive radiological or clinical effects were...

  8. A Single-blind, Split-face, Randomized, Pilot Study Comparing the Effects of Intradermal and Intramuscular Injection of Two Commercially Available Botulinum Toxin A Formulas to Reduce Signs of Facial Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Priya; Sapra, Sheetal; Khanna, Julie; Mraud, Kelli; Bonadonna, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effectiveness of intradermal botulinum toxin type A injection in improving skin texture and midface lift while reducing pore size and sebum production, as well as investigate the differences in effectiveness between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA using intradermal and intramuscular injection methods. Design: A 16-week, single-blind, split-face, randomized study. Each patient served as their own control, receiving onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA randomized to either the left or right side of the face. Patients received intradermal botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 0 and intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections at Week 2. Participants: Ten women aged 35 to 65 years who exhibited static rhytids in the glabellar and periorbital area. Measurements: The primary endpoint was efficacy of split-face treatment of intradermal and intramuscular onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA as assessed by a blinded evaluator using baseline and post-treatment photographs. The secondary endpoints included safety as assessed by adverse events and patient satisfaction measured by questionnaires completed at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A led to a statistically significant improvement in skin texture (p=0.004) while also resulting in mild midface lift (p=0.024), but did not provide a significant reduction of pore size and sebum production. There was no statistically significant difference between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA when injected intradermally or intramuscularly. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of botulinum toxin type A appears to be a safe and effective therapy that provides an improvement in facial skin texture and midface lift. Registry: clinicaltrials.gov (ID#: NCT02907268). PMID:28367260

  9. Botulinum Toxin A Injections Into Pelvic Floor Muscles Under Electromyographic Guidance for Women With Refractory High-Tone Pelvic Floor Dysfunction: A 6-Month Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Darlene; El-Khawand, Dominique; Ginzburg, Natasha; Wehbe, Salim; O'Hare, Peter; Whitmore, Kristene

    2015-01-01

    High-tone pelvic floor dysfunction (HTPFD) is a debilitating chronic pain disorder for many women with significant impact on their quality of life (QoL). Our objective was to determine the efficacy of electromyography-guided onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox; Allergan, Irvine, Calif) injections in treating patient's perception of pelvic pain and improving QoL measurement scores. This is a prospective pilot open-label study of women with chronic pelvic pain and HTPFD who have failed conventional therapy between January 2011 and August 2013. Botox injections (up to 300 U) were done using needle electromyography guidance, from a transperineal approach, to localize spastic pelvic floor muscles (PFMs). Data were collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injections. This included demographics; Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for pain and dyspareunia; validated questionnaires for symptoms, QoL, and sexual function; Global Response Assessment scale for pelvic pain; digital examination of PFM for tone and tenderness; and vaginal manometry. Side effects were also recorded. Out of 28 women who enrolled in the study, 21 completed the 6-month follow-up and qualified for analysis. The mean (SD) age was 35.1 (9.4) years (range, 22-50 years), and the mean (SD) body mass index was 25 (4.4). Comorbidities included interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (42.9%) and vulvodynia (66.7%). Overall, 61.9% of subjects reported improvement on Global Response Assessment at 4 weeks and 80.9% at 8, 12, and 24 weeks post injection, compared with baseline. Of the subjects who were sexually active at baseline, 58.8% (10/17), 68.8% (11/16), 80% (12/15), and 83.3% (15/18) reported less dyspareunia at 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. Dyspareunia Visual Analog Scale score significantly improved at weeks 12 (5.6, P = 0.011) and 24 (5.4, P = 0.004) compared with baseline (7.8). Two of the 4 patients who avoided sexual activity at baseline secondary to dyspareunia resumed and tolerated

  10. Drooling in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial of incobotulinum toxin A and meta-analysis of Botulinum toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Geisbush, Thomas; Tarulli, Andrew; Raynor, Elizabeth; Gautam, Shiva; Tarsy, Daniel; Gronseth, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Botulinum toxins are a therapeutic option for drooling in Parkinson's Disease (PD). The aims of this study were to: 1. evaluate the efficacy of incobotulinum toxin A for drooling in PD. 2. Perform a meta-analysis of studies of Botulinum toxins for drooling in PD. 1. Primary study: Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, cross over trial. Incobotulinum toxin (100 units) or saline was injected into the parotid (20 units) and submandibular (30 units) glands. Subjects returned monthly for three evaluations after each injection. Outcome measures were saliva weight and Drooling Frequency and Severity Scale. 2. Systematic review of literature, followed by inverse variance meta-analyses using random effects models. 1. Primary Study: Nine of 10 subjects completed both arms. There was no significant change in the primary outcome of saliva weight one month after injection in the treatment period compared to placebo period (mean difference, gm ± SD: -0.194 ± 0.61, range: -1.28 to 0.97, 95% CI -0.71 to 0.32). Secondary outcomes also did not change. 2. Meta-analysis of six studies demonstrated significant benefit of Botulinum toxin on functional outcomes (effect size, Cohen's d: -1.32, CI -1.86 to -0.78). The other studies used a higher dose of Botulinum toxin A into the parotid glands. This study did not demonstrate efficacy of incobotulinum toxin A for drooling in PD, but lacked precision to exclude moderate benefit. The parotid/submandibular dose-ratio may have influenced results. Studies evaluating higher doses of incobotulinum toxin A into the parotid glands may be useful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing adverse effects of intra-articular botulinum toxin A in healthy Beagle dogs: A placebo-controlled, blinded, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Helka M; Jokinen, Tarja S; Syrjä, Pernilla; Junnila, Jouni; Hielm-Björkman, Anna; Laitinen-Vapaavuori, Outi

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the clinical, cytological, and histopathological adverse effects of intra-articularly injected botulinum toxin A in dogs and to study whether the toxin spreads from the joint after the injection. A longitudinal, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial was conducted with six healthy laboratory Beagle dogs. Stifle joints were randomized to receive either 30 IU of onabotulinum toxin A or placebo in a 1:1 ratio. Adverse effects and spread of the toxin were examined by evaluating dynamic and static weight-bearing of the injected limbs, by assessing painless range of motion and pain on palpation of joints, and by performing synovial fluid analysis, neurological examination, and electrophysiological recordings at different examination time-points in a 12-week period after the injections. The dogs were then euthanized and autopsy and histopathological examination of joint structures and adjacent muscles and nerves were performed. Intra-articular botulinum toxin A did not cause local weakness or injection site pain. Instead, static weight-bearing and painless range of motion of stifle joints decreased in the placebo limbs. No clinically significant abnormalities associated with intra-articular botulinum toxin A were detected in the neurological examinations. Electrophysiological recordings showed low compound muscle action potentials in two dogs in the botulinum toxin A-injected limb. No significant changes were detected in the synovial fluid. Autopsy and histopathological examination of the joint and adjacent muscles and nerves did not reveal histopathological adverse effects of the toxin. Intra-articular botulinum toxin A does not produce significant clinical, cytological, or histopathological adverse effects in healthy dogs. Based on the electrophysiological recordings, the toxin may spread from the joint, but its clinical impact seems to be low.

  12. A botulinum toxin A treatment algorithm for de novo management of torticollis and laterocollis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupsch, Andreas; Müngersdorf, Martina; Paus, Sebastian; Stenner, Andrea; Jost, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Few studies have investigated the injection patterns for botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of heterogeneous forms of cervical dystonia (CD). This large, prospective, open-label, multicentre study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of 500 U botulinum toxin A for the initial treatment according to a standardised algorithm of the two most frequent forms of CD, predominantly torticollis and laterocollis. Design Patients (aged ≥18 years) with CD not previously treated with botulinum neurotoxin therapy were given one treatment with 500 U Dysport, according to a defined intramuscular injection algorithm based on clinical assessment of direction of head deviation, occurrence of shoulder elevation, occurrence of tremor (all evaluated using the Tsui rating scale) and hypertrophy of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Results In this study, 516 patients were enrolled, the majority of whom (95.0%) completed treatment. Most patients had torticollis (78.1%). At week 4, mean Tsui scores had significantly decreased by −4.01, −3.76 and −4.09 points in the total, torticollis and laterocollis populations, respectively. Symptom improvement was equally effective between groups. Tsui scores remained significantly below baseline at week 12 in both groups. Treatment was well tolerated; the most frequent adverse events were muscular weakness (13.8%), dysphagia (9.9%) and neck pain (6.6%). Conclusions Dysport 500 U is effective and well tolerated for the de novo management of a range of heterogeneous forms of CD, when using a standardised regimen that allows tailored dosing based on individual symptom assessment. Clinical trials information (NCT00447772; clinicaltrials.gov) PMID:22021883

  13. Isosorbide dinitrate ointment vs botulinum toxin A (Dysport®) as the primary treatment for chronic anal fissure: a randomized multicentre study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkel, A.E.M.; Rosman, C.; Koop, R.; van Duijvendijk, P.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Klaase, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Nitric oxide donors, such as isosorbide dinitrate ointment (ISDN), are considered as first-choice agents in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. Injection with botulinum toxin A in the internal anal sphincter is often used as a second-line therapy, although it may give better results and fewer

  14. Botulinum toxin A for treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Biering-Sørensen, Fin

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs).......To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical botulinum toxin A (BTA) in the treatment of severe neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) with incontinence in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCLs)....

  15. Healing of rotator cuff tendons using botulinum toxin A and immobilization in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilotra, Mohit N; Shorofsky, Michael J; Stein, Jason A; Murthi, Anand M

    2016-03-15

    We evaluated effects of botulinum toxin A (Botox) and cast immobilization on tendon healing in a rat model. Injection of Botox into rat supraspinatus was hypothesized to reduce muscle active force and improved healing. Eighty-four supraspinatus tendons were surgically transected and repaired in 42 Sprague-Dawley rats (transosseous technique). After repair, supraspinatus muscle was injected with saline or Botox (3 or 6 U/kg). Half the shoulders were cast-immobilized for the entire postoperative period; half were allowed free cage activity. Histology was examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. A healing zone cross-sectional area was measured, and biomechanical testing of repair strength and tendon viscoelastic properties was conducted at 4 and 12 weeks. Botox alone and cast immobilization alone exhibited increased ultimate load compared with controls (saline injection, no immobilization) at 4 weeks. No difference in ultimate load occurred between Botox-only and cast-only groups. At 12 weeks, the Botox (6 U/kg) plus cast immobilization group was significantly weakest (p < 0.05). A trend was shown toward decreased healing zone cross-sectional areas in casted groups. Supraspinatus Botox injection after rotator cuff repair might help protect the repair. However, cast immobilization plus Botox administration is harmful to rotator cuff healing in a rat tendon model.

  16. Dynamic Model of Applied Facial Anatomy with Emphasis on Teaching of Botulinum Toxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Frota Boggio, MD, PhD

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion:. By making it possible to interrelate anatomy of a function, body painting is proposed in the present study as an innovative method, which in a demonstrative and highly didactic manner presents great potential as a teaching tool in the application of botulinum toxin A.

  17. Botulinum Toxin A as an Adjunct to Abdominal Wall Reconstruction for Incisional Hernia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltanizadeh, Sinor; Helgstrand, Frederik; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Repair of large incisional hernias remains a surgical and costly challenge. Temporary paralysis of the lateral abdominal wall muscles with topical administration of botulinum toxin A (BTA) is a new therapeutic concept, which may obviate the need for component separation technique (CST...

  18. Botulinum Toxin-A Dosing Trends for Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia at a Single Institution Over 10 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Joseph P; Barrow, Emily M; Hapner, Edie R; Klein, Adam M; Johns, Michael M

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to identify the changes in dosing of botulinum toxin-A for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) over a prolonged period. This is a retrospective chart review. One hundred thirteen subjects treated for ADSD from 2003 to 2013 were identified from a clinical database. Subject age, gender, and total injection dose amount were all recorded for all subjects who had at least 10 injections. Fifty-four subjects met criteria for inclusion. There were no age or gender differences in the starting dose for subjects. Dosing decreased significantly compared with the second dose (5.05 ± 1.623 Units), by the sixth dose (4.26 ± 1.698 Units), and continued through the 10th dose (4.08 ± 2.019 Units) (P < 0.005 for all). Botulinum toxin-A dosing for ADSD decreases consistently over subsequent injections after the initial two dose titrations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  20. Muscle selection for treatment of cervical dystonia with botulinum toxin - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, S. W. R.; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Kamphuis, D. J.; Tijssen, M. A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is the most common form of (primary) dystonia. Intramuscular injections with botulinum toxin are the first line of treatment for cervical dystonia. To optimise the treatment response to botulinum toxin correct muscles should be

  1. Safety of Botulinum Toxin A in Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy in a Pragmatic Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mitsou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aimed to examine the safety of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A treatment in a paediatric multidisciplinary cerebral palsy clinic. In a sample of 454 patients who had 1515 BoNT-A sessions, data on adverse events were available in 356 patients and 1382 sessions; 51 non-fatal adverse events were reported (3.3% of the total injections number, 8.7% of the patients. On five occasions, the adverse reactions observed in GMFCS V children were attributed to the sedation used (rectal midazolam plus pethidine; buccal midazolam and resulted in prolongation of hospitalization. Of the reactions attributed to the toxin, 23 involved an excessive reduction of the muscle tone either of the injected limb(s or generalized; others included local pain, restlessness, lethargy with pallor, disturbance in swallowing and speech production, seizures, strabismus, excessive sweating, constipation, vomiting, a flu-like syndrome and emerging hypertonus in adjacent muscles. Their incidence was associated with GMFCS level and with the presence of epilepsy (Odds ratio (OR = 2.74 − p = 0.016 and OR = 2.35 − p = 0.046, respectively but not with BoNT-A dose (either total or per kilogram. In conclusion, treatment with BoNT-A was safe; adverse reactions were mostly mild even for severely affected patients. Their appearance did not necessitate major changes in our practice.

  2. Anticholinergic versus botulinum toxin A comparison trial for the treatment of bothersome urge urinary incontinence: ABC trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Anthony G; Brubaker, Linda; Richter, Holly E; Nygaard, Ingrid; Paraiso, Marie Fidela; Menefee, Shawn A; Schaffer, Joseph; Wei, John; Chai, Toby; Janz, Nancy; Spino, Cathie; Meikle, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This trial compares the change in urgency urinary incontinence episodes over 6 months, tolerability and cost effectiveness between women receiving daily anticholinergic therapy plus a single intra-detrusor injection of saline versus a single intra-detrusor injection of 100 U of botulinum toxin A plus daily oral placebo tablets. We present the rationale and design of a randomized-controlled trial, Anticholinergic versus Botulinum Toxin, Comparison Trial for the Treatment of Bothersome Urge Urinary Incontinence: ABC trial, conducted by the NICHD-funded Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. We discuss the innovative nature of this trial and the challenges related to choice of patient population, maintaining masking, cost effectiveness, ethical considerations, measuring adherence, and placebo development and testing. Enrollment began in April, 2010. 242 participants will be randomized and primary outcome data analysis is anticipated to begin in mid 2012. Several challenges in the trial design are discussed. Randomization to placebo intra-detrusor injections may limit recruitment, potentially impacting generalizability. Other challenges included the heavy marketing of drugs for overactive bladder which could impact recruitment of drug-naïve women. In addition, anticholinergic medications often cause dry mouth, making masking difficult. Finally, adverse reporting of transient urinary retention is challenging as there is no standardized definition; yet this is the most common adverse event following intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injection. The ABC trial will help women with urgency urinary incontinence balance efficacy, side effects and cost of anticholinergic medication versus botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injection. The results have the potential to fundamentally change the therapeutic approach to this condition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The broadening application of chemodenervation in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (Part II): an open-label experience with botulinum toxin-A (Dysport®) injections for oromandibular, lingual, and truncal-axial dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Raymond L; Ng, Arlene R; Santos, Mary Mildred Delgado-Delos; Fernandez, Hubert H

    2011-01-01

    While the majority of chemodenervation clinics worldwide typically use botulinum toxins for the treatment of common conditions such as blepharopsams, cervical dystonia, limb dystonia, and spasticity, the unusually high concentration of X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP) has allowed us to collect and describe our experience in the use of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) on rarer dystonic patterns. BoNT-A (Dysport®) was injected in a total 109 dystonias of XDP. Our cohort included: 50 cases in the oromandibular area (jaw opening: 32 cases, jaw closing: 12 cases, and jaw deviation: 6 cases); 35 cases in the lingual area (tongue protrusion: 27 cases and tongue curling: 8 cases); and, 24 cases in the truncal-axial area (flexor: 12 cases, extensor: 7 cases, and lateral-extensor: 5 cases). Interestingly, pain, often a nonprominent symptom of dystonias, was frequently reported in 40/50 XDP cases with oromandibular dystonia and 18/24 XDP cases with truncal-axial dystonia. All BoNT-A procedures were performed under electromyography guidance. A "high potency, low dilution" BoNT-A protocol was applied for oromandibular, lingual, cranial, cervical, and distal limb dystonias; whereas for dystonias of the abdominal, paraspinal, and proximal limb muscles, a "low potency, high dilution" BoNT-A injection protocol was applied. Outcomes measures included: the global dystonia rating scale (DRS) and pain visual analog scale (VAS) reduction at week 4; duration of BoNT-A effects; and, side effect profile. The median DRS score after 4 weeks was 3 ("substantial improvement") for oromandibular and lingual dystonias and 2 ("moderate improvement") for truncal-axial dystonias. Pain reduction was significantly reduced (75%-80% in oromandibular; 30%-80% in truncal-axial dystonias). The median duration of BoNT-A effect was 16 weeks for oromandibular, 12 weeks for lingual, and 11 weeks for truncal-axial dystonias. Compared to a generally safe and well-tolerated BoNT-A injections for truncal

  4. Using family and staff experiences of a botulinum toxin-A service to improve service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, K L O; Bau, K; Lewis, J; Aroyan, K R; Botha, B; Botman, A G M; Stewart, K; Waugh, M-C A; Paget, S P

    2017-11-01

    The decision for families to proceed with botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A) injections for managing childhood conditions involving hypertonia can be complex. Family-centred care is a service model that facilitates supporting families in this decision-making process. Understanding families' experiences of services is critical to developing family-centred care. The aim of this project was therefore to increase understanding of the experiences of families of children attending a BoNT-A service in order to improve the service and its family-centred approach to care. Sixteen staff of a BoNT-A service participated in a patient journey mapping exercise. Nine families of the service participated in in-depth interviews. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data from the staff session and interviews were analysed independently using grounded, hermeneutic thematic analysis. Staff sessions revealed 5 core themes that related to impacting on the family experience. Family interviews revealed 4 core themes, with 7 subthemes and 1 latent theme. Areas of importance identified by families relating to BoNT-A treatment included acknowledgement of individual needs, care coordination, empowerment of families and patients, consistency in service delivery, and the distressing nature of appointment and decision-making. Comparison of the data from the staff patient journey mapping and family interviews suggested that staff have a good but incomplete understanding of the factors important to families, highlighting the need for consumer engagement in establishing family-centred care. The themes identified can guide the provision of family-centred BoNT-A injection clinics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Use of botulinum toxin-A for musculoskeletal pain in patients with whiplash associated disorders [ISRCTN68653575

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    Juan Francisco J

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whiplash associated disorder is commonly linked to motor vehicle accidents and sports injuries. Cervical injury is attributed to rapid extension followed by neck flexion. The exact pathophysiology of whiplash is uncertain but probably involves some degree of aberrant muscle spasms and may produce a wide range of symptoms. The most commonly prescribed pharmacological agents for initial treatment of whiplash-associated pain are oral muscle relaxants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, potential systemic adverse effects limit these agents. Physical interventions such as mobilization, manipulation, and exercises have proved beneficial for pain and dysfunction but only on a time-limited basis. Little evidence suggests that physical therapy specifically aimed at the musculature (e.g., transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, ultrasonography, heat, ice, and acupuncture improves prognosis in acute whiplash associated disorder. A new approach to treatment is the use of botulinum toxin, which acts to reduce muscle spasms. Methods/design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial and botulinum toxin-A (Botox® injections will be compared with placebo injections. The primary objective is to determine the efficacy of Botox® in the management of musculoskeletal pain in whiplash associated disorders. Discussion Botulinum toxin type-A toxin has been studied in small trials on whiplash associated disorder patients and has generally been found to relieve pain and improve range of motion. Specifically, we seek to assess the efficacy of Botox® in reducing pain and to improve the cervical spine range of movement, during the 6-month trial period.

  6. Thickened Saliva after Effective Management of Drooling with Botulinum Toxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Corrie E.; van Hulst, Karen; van den Hoogen, Frank J. A.; van Limbeek, Jacques; Roeleveld, Nel; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Rotteveel, Jan J.; Jongerius, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic cerebral palsy (CP); Gross Motor Function…

  7. Thickened saliva after effective management of drooling with botulinum toxin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; van Hulst, K.; van den Hoogen, F.J.; van Limbeek, J.; Roeleveld, N.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. Method: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17y, mean age 9y 10mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6) quadriplegic

  8. Thickened saliva after effective management of drooling with botulinum toxin A.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Hulst, K. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Limbeek, J. van; Roeleveld, N.; Veerman, E.C.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the rheological properties of saliva after submandibular botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injections. METHOD: We enrolled 15 children (11 males and six females; age range 3-17 y, mean age 9 y 10 mo) diagnosed with spastic (n=9) or dyskinetic (n=6)

  9. Effects of Botulinum Toxin-A and Goal-Directed Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy GMFCS Levels I & II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwing, Kristina; Thews, Karin; Haglund-Åkerlind, Yvonne; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate short and long-term effects of botulinum toxin-A combined with goal-directed physiotherapy in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A consecutive selection of 40 children, ages 4-12 years, diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral CP, and classified in GMFCS levels I-II. During the 24 months, 9 children received one BoNT-A injection, 10 children two injections, 11 children three injections, and 10 children received four injections. 3D gait analysis, goal-attainment scaling, and body function assessments were performed before and at 3, 12, and 24 months after initial injections. A significant but clinically small long-term improvement in gait was observed. Plantarflexor spasticity was reduced after three months and remained stable, while passive ankle dorsiflexion increased after 3 months but decreased slightly after 12 months. Goal-attainment gradually increased, reached the highest levels at 12 months, and levels were maintained at 24 months. The treatments' positive effect on spasticity reduction was identified, but did not relate to improvement in gait or goal-attainment. No long-term positive change in passive ankle dorsiflexion was observed. Goal attainment was achieved in all except four children. The clinical significance of the improved gait is unclear. Further studies are recommended to identify predictors for positive treatment outcome.

  10. Failure of botulinum toxin injection for neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Switch of toxin versus second injection of the same toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Castel-Lacanal, Evelyne; Manunta, Andréa; Roumiguié, Mathieu; Marque, Philippe; Rischmann, Pascal; Gamé, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a second injection of the same toxin versus switching to a different botulinum toxin A after failure of a first detrusor injection in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The charts of all patients who underwent detrusor injections of botulinum toxin A (either abobotulinumtoxinA or onabotulinumtoxinA) for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. Patients in whom a first detrusor injection had failed were included in the present study. They were managed by a second injection of the same toxin at the same dosage or by a new detrusor injection using a different botulinum toxin A. Success was defined as a resolution of urgency, urinary incontinence and detrusor overactivity in a patient self-catheterizing seven times or less per 24 h. A total of 58 patients were included for analysis. A toxin switch was carried out in 29 patients, whereas the other 29 patients received a reinjection of the same toxin at the same dose. The success rate was higher in patients who received a toxin switch (51.7% vs. 24.1%, P = 0.03). Patients treated with a switch from abobotulinumtoxinA to onabotulinumtoxinA and those treated with a switch from onabotulinumtoxinA to abobotulinumtoxinA had similar success rates (52.9% vs. 50%, P = 0.88). After failure of a first detrusor injection of botulinum toxin for neurogenic detrusor overactivity, a switch to a different toxin seems to be more effective than a second injection of the same toxin. The replacement of onabotulinumtoxin by abobotulinumtoxin or the reverse provides similar results. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  11. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Khatkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key conditions for achieving the desirable result during botulinum toxin therapy for muscular dystonia, spasticity, and other diseases accompanied by spasm, pain, and autonomic dysfunction (dystonias, spasticity, etc. is the proper administration of the agent into the muscles directly involved in the pathological process. The exact entry of botulinum toxin into the target muscles is essential for successful and safe treatment because its injection into a normal muscle may cause side effects. The most common errors are the incorrect depth and incorrect direction of a needle on insertion. Therefore, the exact injection of the agent particularly into the shallow and deep muscles is a difficult task even for an experienced specialist and requires the use of controlling methods.The European Consensus on Botulinum Toxin Therapy points out that various injection techniques are needed for the better identification of necessary muscles. However, there are currently no reports on the clear advantage of any technique. In our country, injections using palpation and anatomical landmarks have been widely used in routine practice so far; electromyographic monitoring and electrostimulation have been less frequently applied. In recent years, the new method ultrasound-guided injection has continued to grow more popular. This effective, accessible, and easy-to-use method makes it possible to manage a real-time injection process and to ensure the exact entry of the agent into the muscle. This paper is dedicated to a comparative analysis of different injection methods and to a description of the ultrasound-guided technique and its advantages over others. 

  12. Focal treatment of spasticity using botulinum toxin A in cerebral palsy cases of GMFCS level V: evaluation of adverse effects

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    Ana Paula Tedesco

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To report on the experience of injections of botulinum toxin A (BTA in a series of patients with cerebral palsy of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS level V.Methods:This was a retrospective case series study on 33 patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V who received 89 sessions of BTA application (of which 84 were Botox® and five were other presentations, in which the basic aim was to look for adverse effects.Results:The mean number of application sessions per patient was three, and the mean age at the time of each injection was 4 + 6 years (range: 1.6–13 years. The muscles that most frequently received injections were the gastrocnemius, hamstrings, hip adductors, biceps brachii and finger flexors. The mean total dose was 193 U and the mean dose per weight was 12.5 U/kg. Only one patient received anesthesia for the injections and no sedation was used in any case. No local or systemic adverse effects were observed within the minimum follow-up of one month.Conclusion:The absence of adverse effects in our series was probably related to the use of low doses and absence of sedation or anesthesia. According to our data, BTA can be safely used for patients with cerebral palsy of GMFCS level V, using low doses and preferably without sedation or anesthesia.

  13. Preoperative Botulinum toxin A enabling defect closure and laparoscopic repair of complex ventral hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Acevedo, Omar; Elstner, Kristen E; Jacombs, Anita S W; Read, John W; Martins, Rodrigo Tomazini; Arduini, Fernando; Wehrhahm, Michael; Craft, Colette; Cosman, Peter H; Dardano, Anthony N; Ibrahim, Nabeel

    2018-02-01

    Operative management of complex ventral hernia still remains a significant challenge for surgeons. Closure of large defects in the unprepared abdomen has serious pathophysiological consequences due to chronic contraction and retraction of the lateral abdominal wall muscles. We report outcomes of 56 consecutive patients who had preoperative Botulinum toxin A (BTA) abdominal wall relaxation facilitating closure and repair. This was a prospective observational study of 56 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided BTA into the lateral abdominal oblique muscles prior to elective ventral hernia repair between November 2012 and January 2017. Serial non-contrast abdominal CT imaging was performed to evaluate changes in lateral oblique muscle length and thickness. All hernias were repaired laparoscopically, or laparoscopic-open-laparoscopic (LOL) using intraperitoneal onlay mesh. 56 patients received BTA injections at predetermined sites to the lateral oblique muscles, which were well tolerated. Mean patient age was 59.7 years, and mean BMI was 30.9 kg/m 2 (range 21.8-54.0). Maximum defect size was 24 × 27 cm. A subset of 18 patients underwent preoperative pneumoperitoneum as an adjunct procedure. A comparison of pre-BTA to post-BTA imaging demonstrated an increase in mean lateral abdominal wall length from 16.1 cm to 20.1 cm per side, a mean gain of 4.0 cm/side (range 1.0-11.7 cm/side) (p LOL primary closure was achieved in all cases, with no clinical evidence of raised intra-abdominal pressures. One patient presented with a new fascial defect 26 months post-operative. Preoperative BTA to the lateral abdominal wall muscles is a safe and effective technique for the preparation of patients prior to operative management of complex ventral hernias. BTA temporary flaccid paralysis relaxes, elongates and thins the chronically contracted abdominal musculature. This in turn reduces lateral traction forces facilitating laparoscopic repair and fascial closure of large

  14. Botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal dyspnea.

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    Woisard, Virginie; Liu, Xuelai; Bes, Marie Christine Arné; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion

    2017-02-01

    Data, regarding the use of botulinum toxin (BT-A) in laryngeal dyspnea, are scarce, coming from some cases reports in the literature, including Vocal fold paralysis, laryngeal dystonia, vocal cord dysfunction also called paradoxical motion of the vocal fold (PMVF), and post-neuroleptic laryngeal dyskinesia. There is no consensus regarding the muscles and the doses to inject. The aim of this study is to present a retrospective review of patients treated in our ENT Department by BT-A injection in this indication. This study is a retrospective study describing patients who underwent an injection of botulinum toxin for laryngeal dyspnea in the ENT Department from 2005 to 2015 years. The inclusion criteria were a dyspnea associated with a laryngeal dysfunction, confirmed by flexible fiberoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. Information concerning the causes of the dyspnea, the botulinum toxin BT-A injections procedure, post-injection follow-up, and respiratory outcome were collected for all patients included. In the group of 13 patients included, the main cause identified as principal factor linked with the short breath was: a bilateral VF paralysis (Patel et al., Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 130:686-689, 7), laryngeal dystonia (Balkissoon and Kenn, Semin Respir Crit Care Med 33:595-605, 2), Anxiety syndrome associated with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or asthma (Marcinow et al., Laryngoscope 124:1425-1430, 3), and an isolated asthma (Zwirner et al., Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 254:242-245, 1). Nine out of the thirteen patients were improved by the injections. A BT-A-induced stable benefit for four patients led them to stop the injections in the follow-up. Good outcome was observed in five other patients (main cause: bilateral VP paralysis), allowing a progressive lengthening of the delay between BT-A injections. Four patients did not report a positive risk/benefit ratio after BT-A injections; two of them (with bilateral VF paralysis), because of respiratory side effects and

  15. Comparação entre os métodos de injeção de toxina botulínica em músculo ocular externo com o uso do eletromiógrafo e com o uso da pinça de Mendonça Electromyograph assistance and Mendonça's forceps - a comparison between two methods of botulinum toxin A injection into the extraocular muscle

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    Tomás Fernando Scalamandré Mendonça

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar dois métodos de aplicação de toxina botulínica A (TBA em músculo ocular externo: com auxílio de eletromiógrafo (EMG e com a pinça de Mendonça. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados no Departamento de Oftalmologia da UNIFESP 29 pacientes que apresentavam estrabismo e baixa acuidade visual em um olho. Foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo I - 17 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por meio de injeção com auxílio da pinça de Mendonça e grupo II - 12 pacientes que receberam a toxina botulínica A por injeção guiada pelo eletromiógrafo. Os pacientes dos dois grupos foram avaliados no 7º e no 14º dia após aplicação. Compararam-se os resultados dos dois grupos neste período de tempo. Os testes de correlação de Friedman e Mann-Whitney foram usados para análise estatística. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença estatística entre as médias de desvio pré-aplicação e em pelo menos um período (7º ou 14º dia após aplicação, tanto no grupo dos pacientes em que foi utilizada a pinça, quanto no grupo de pacientes em que foi utilizado o eletromiógrafo. Não houve diferença estatística dos desvios pré-aplicação e pós-aplicação entre os dois grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os dois métodos de aplicação da toxina botulínica A são equivalentes e portanto, o uso da pinça de Mendonça pode ser método alternativo ao uso do eletromiógrafo, para guiar a injeção de toxina botulínica A.PURPOSE: To compare two methods of botulinum toxin A (BTA injection into the extraocular muscle (EOM: the electromyographically (EMG guided injection and the injection using Mendonça's forceps. METHODS: Twenty-nine (29 patients with strabismus and low visual acuity in one eye were examined at the Department of Ophthalmology of UNIFESP. They were divided into 2 groups - group I with 17 patients receiving the botulinum toxin A injection using Mendonça's forceps, and group II with 12 patients receiving the toxin with electromyographical

  16. Botulinum toxin in parkinsonism: The when, how, and which for botulinum toxin injections.

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    Cardoso, Francisco

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a review of the use of injections of botulinum toxin in the management of selected symptoms and signs of Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism. Sialorrhea is defined as inability to control oral secretions, resulting in excessive saliva in the oropharynx. There is a high level of evidence for the treatment of sialorrhea in parkinsonism with injections of different forms of botulinum toxin type A as well as botulinum toxin type B. Tremor can be improved by the use of botulinum toxin injections but improved tremor control often leads to concomitant motor weakness, limiting its use. Levodopa induced dyskinesias are difficult to treat with botulinum toxin injections because of their variable frequency and direction. Apraxia of eyelid opening, a sign more commonly seen in progressive supranuclear palsy and other tauopathies, often improves after botulinum toxin injections. Recent data suggest that regardless of the underlying mechanism, pain in parkinsonism can be alleviated by botulinum toxin injections. Finally, freezing of gait, camptocormia and Pisa syndrome in parkinsonism almost invariably fail to respond to botulinum toxin injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure

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    Akkaya S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sezen Akkaya,1 Hatice Kübra Kökcen,1 Tuğba Atakan2 1Fatih Sultan Mehmet Education and Training Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Bostanci, Istanbul, 2Aksaray Hospital, Ophthalmology Clinics, Konya, Turkey Abstract: We report a case of unilateral transient mydriasis and ptosis after botulinum toxin injection applied by a medical doctor for a cosmetic procedure. A 36-year-old nurse was referred to our eye clinic with unilateral mydriasis and ptosis in the right eye 3 days after botulinum toxin injection for a cosmetic procedure. Botulinum toxin was applied to her eye by a doctor at her hospital who was not an ophthalmologist. She was treated with topical apraclonidine 0.5% ophthalmic solution. Her ptosis decreased to 2 mm with apraclonidine and her visual axis improved. Mydriasis was present for 3 weeks and then disappeared. Mild ptosis continued for 3 months, then resolved completely. Patients seeking treatment with botulinum toxin A for cosmetic purposes should be warned about the possibility of ptosis and mydriasis after injection. If these side effects are seen, the patient must be referred to an ophthalmologist for appropriate management. Keywords: botulinum toxin, mydriasis, ptosis

  18. Contralateral botulinum toxin injection to improve facial asymmetry after acute facial paralysis.

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    Kim, Jin

    2013-02-01

    The application of botulinum toxin to the healthy side of the face in patients with long-standing facial paralysis has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique that improves facial symmetry at rest and during facial motion, but our experience using botulinum toxin therapy for facial sequelae prompted the idea that botulinum toxin might be useful in acute cases of facial paralysis, leading to improve facial asymmetry. In cases in which medical or surgical treatment options are limited because of existing medical problems or advanced age, most patients with acute facial palsy are advised to await spontaneous recovery or are informed that no effective intervention exists. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin treatment for facial asymmetry in 18 patients after acute facial palsy who could not be optimally treated by medical or surgical management because of severe medical or other problems. From 2009 to 2011, nine patients with Bell's palsy, 5 with herpes zoster oticus and 4 with traumatic facial palsy (10 men and 8 women; age range, 22-82 yr; mean, 50.8 yr) participated in this study. Botulinum toxin A (Botox; Allergan Incorporated, Irvine, CA, USA) was injected using a tuberculin syringe with a 27-gauge needle. The amount injected per site varied from 2.5 to 3 U, and the total dose used per patient was 32 to 68 U (mean, 47.5 +/- 8.4 U). After administration of a single dose of botulinum toxin A on the nonparalyzed side of 18 patients with acute facial paralysis, marked relief of facial asymmetry was observed in 8 patients within 1 month of injection. Decreased facial asymmetry and strengthened facial function on the paralyzed side led to an increased HB and SB grade within 6 months after injection. Use of botulinum toxin after acute facial palsy cases is of great value. Such therapy decreases the relative hyperkinesis contralateral to the paralysis, leading to greater symmetric function. Especially in patients with medical

  19. A randomized controlled trial of botulinum toxin A for treating neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Lv, Chang-An; Tian, Li; Jin, Lian-Jin; Sun, Ping; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    To assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTA) for treating neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 44 patients with SCI with neuropathic pain were randomly divided into the intervention group and the placebo group, each group 21 patients. The subjects in the intervention group received BTA (200 U subcutaneous injection, once daily) at the painful area, whereas those in the placebo group were administered a saline placebo. This study was conducted from December 2014 to November 2016. The primary outcome was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes were measured using the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and World Health Organization quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. All outcome measurements were performed before and after 4 and 8 weeks of intervention. Forty-one participants completed the study. The intervention with BTA showed greater efficacy than placebo in decreasing the VAS score after week 4 and week 8 of treatment. Significant differences in the SF-MPQ and WHOQOL-BREF were also found between the 2 groups. The results of this study demonstrated that BTA might decrease intractable neuropathic pain for patients with SCI.

  20. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin injection therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

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    Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Shimoda, Ryo; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Iwakiri, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is an accepted treatment modality for esophageal achalasia in western countries. This pilot study aimed to clarify the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection for esophageal achalasia in Japanese patients. We enrolled 10 patients diagnosed with esophageal achalasia between 2008 and 2014. A total of 100 U botulinum toxin A was divided into eight aliquots and injected around the esophagogastric junction. We compared the lower esophageal sphincter pressure before and 1 week after treatment. Scores of subjective symptoms for esophageal achalasia were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) before and after 1 week of follow-up of treatment. Barium passage was improved in barium esophagography and passage of contrast agent was also improved. Mean Eckardt score was reduced from 5.5 to 1.6 after treatment (ptreatment (p = 0.002). One week after treatment, mean VAS score was reduced from 10 to 3.9 (pachalasia was safe and effective with few complications. Therefore, botulinum toxin could be used as minimally invasive therapy for esophageal achalasia in Japan.

  1. Botulinum toxin A is effective to treat tension-type headache caused by hemifacial spasm.

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    Mizuma, Atsushi; Nagata, Eiichiro; Yasuda, Takashi; Kouchi, Maiko; Nakayama, Taira; Honma, Kazunari; Tokuoka, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Yasuhisa; Nogawa, Shigeru; Takizawa, Shunya

    2017-10-01

    We examined the relationship between hemifacial spasm (HFS; a form of cranio-cervical dystonia) and chronic primary headache, including tension-type headache (TTH). We also examined whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A) therapy for HFS ameliorates concomitant TTH. Fifty-one HFS patients receiving BoNT/A therapy were recruited. Patients' characteristics (including age, gender, chronic headache history, exercise habits, stiff neck, cervical spondylolysis history), stress factors, worsening/new onset of headache associated with HFS, and dose of BoNT/A were examined. We diagnosed headache types according to The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition, beta. Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) scores for headache severity were compared between the 6-week baseline before BoNT/A therapy and 6-week follow-up after BoNT/A therapy. Of 51 patients with HFS, 17 (33.3%) reported worsening or new onset of headache (especially TTH) associated with HFS (Group-S), and 34 were not aware of headache (Group-N). Twelve patients (70.6%) in group-S reported improvement of headache after BoNT/A therapy. NRS (from 7 [5-9] to 0 [0-5], pheadache (odds ratio 28.53: 2.96-275.10, pheadache, especially TTH, is associated with HFS. BoNT/A therapy for HFS may also be indirectly effective for treatment of TTH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Plastic changes in spinal synaptic transmission following botulinum toxin A in patients with post-stroke spasticity.

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    Kerzoncuf, Marjorie; Bensoussan, Laurent; Delarque, Alain; Durand, Jacques; Viton, Jean-Michel; Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2015-11-01

    The therapeutic effects of intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin-type A on spasticity can largely be explained by its blocking action at the neuromuscular junction. Botulinum toxin-type A is also thought to have a central action on the functional organization of the central nervous system. This study assessed the action of botulinum toxin-type A on spinal motor networks by investigating post-activation depression of the soleus H-reflex in post-stroke patients. Post-activation depression, a presynaptic mechanism controlling the synaptic efficacy of Ia-motoneuron transmission, is involved in the pathophysiology of spasticity. Eight patients with chronic hemiplegia post-stroke presenting with lower limb spasticity and requiring botulinum toxin-type A injection in the ankle extensor muscle. Post-activation depression of soleus H-reflex assessed as frequency-related depression of H-reflex was investigated before and 3, 6 and 12 weeks after botulinum toxin-type A injections in the triceps surae. Post-activation depression was quantified as the ratio between H-reflex amplitude at 0.5 and 0.1 Hz. Post-activation depression of soleus H-reflex, which is reduced on the paretic leg, was affected 3 weeks after botulinum toxin-type A injection. Depending on the residual motor capacity of the post-stroke patients, post-activation depression was either restored in patients with preserved voluntary motor control or further reduced in patients with no residual voluntary control. Botulinum toxin treatment induces synaptic plasticity at the Ia-motoneuron synapse in post-stroke paretic patients, which suggests that the effectiveness of botulinum toxin-type A in post-stroke rehabilitation might be partly due to its central effects.

  3. The resurgence of botulinum toxin injection for strabismus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Marielle; Engel, J Mark

    2017-09-01

    The present review discusses recent advances in the use of botulinum toxin for the management of strabismus in children. Botulinum toxin injection produces similar results compared to surgery for certain subtypes of strabismus, especially acute onset esotropia. It may be more effective in many subtypes of esotropia where surgery has been less reliable, including partially accommodative esotropia, esotropia associated with cerebral palsy, and thyroid eye disease. Small retrospective studies have demonstrated the efficacy of botulinum toxin in the treatment of many types of pediatric strabismus, providing some guidance for clinicians to determine which patients would benefit most from this intervention. Although administration of botulinum toxin is generally accepted as a reasonable option in select cases, many strabismus surgeons have not fully embraced the treatment, in part because of perceived disadvantages compared to surgery and difficulty in identifying subsets with the highest potential for therapeutic success. A recent study compared the administration of botulinum toxin in children with acute-onset esotropia to surgical correction and found botulinum toxin had a statistically equal success rate, but with the advantage of significantly less time under general anesthesia. In addition, botulinum toxin has been recently tried in patients with partially accommodative esotropia, esotropia associated with cerebral palsy, cyclic esotropia, and in patients with thyroid eye disease. The present review will discuss current clinical recommendations based on recent studies on the use of botulinum toxin in children with strabismus.

  4. Budget impact analysis of botulinum toxin A therapy for upper limb spasticity in the United Kingdom

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    Abogunrin S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seye Abogunrin,1 Linda Hortobagyi,2 Edit Remak,3 Jerome Dinet,4 Sylvie Gabriel,5 Abdel Magid O Bakheit6 1Meta Research, 2Health Economics, Evidera, London, UK; 3Health Economics, Evidera, Budapest, Hungary; 4Health Economics and Outcomes Research (Global, 5Global Market Access and Pricing, Ipsen Pharma, Boulogne-Billancourt, France; 6Neurological Rehabilitation, Moseley Hall Hospital, Birmingham, UK Background: Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A is an effective treatment for patients with upper limb spasticity (ULS, which is a debilitating feature of upper motor neuron lesions. BoNT-A preparations available in the UK are associated with different costs. Methods: We developed a budget impact model to assess the effect of changing market shares of different BoNT-A formulations – abobotulinumtoxinA, onabotulinumtoxinA, and incobotulinumtoxinA – and best supportive care, from the UK payer perspective, over a 5-year time horizon. Epidemiological and resource use data were derived from published literature and clinical expert opinion. One-way sensitivity analyses were performed to determine parameters most influential on budget impact. Results: Base-case assumptions showed that an increased uptake of abobotulinumtoxinA resulted in a 5-year savings of £6,283,829. Treatment with BoNT-A costs less than best supportive care per patient per year, although treating a patient with onabotulinumtoxinA (£20,861 and incobotulinumtoxinA (£20,717 cost more per patient annually than with abobotulinumtoxinA (£19,800. Sensitivity analyses showed that the most influential parameters on budget were percentage of cerebral palsy and stroke patients developing ULS, and the prevalence of stroke. Conclusion: Study findings suggest that increased use of abobotulinumtoxinA for ULS in the UK could potentially reduce total ULS cost for the health system and society. Keywords: stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury 

  5. Treatment of chronic pain associated with nocturnal bruxism with botulinum toxin. A prospective and randomized clinical study

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    Al-Wayli, Hessa

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in the treatment of pain associated with nocturnal bruxism. Material and Methods Fifty subjects reporting nocturnal bruxism were recruited for a randomized clinical trial. Twenty five bruxers were injected with botulinum toxin in both masseters, and twenty five were treated with traditional methods of treating bruxism. Patients were evaluated at 3rd week, 2nd and 6th month and one year after injection and then used to calculate bruxism events. Bruxism symptoms were investigated using questionnaires. Results Mean pain score due to Bruxism events in the masseter muscle decreased significantly in the botulinum toxin injection group A (P =0.000, highly significant). However, in the conventional treatment group, mean pain score does not show improvement with time (p>0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that botulinum toxin injection reduced the mean pain score and number of bruxism events, most likely by decreasing the muscle activity of masseter rather than affecting the central nervous system. Key words:Temporomandibular pain, nocturnal bruxism, botulinum toxin. PMID:28149474

  6. Efficacy of a potential trivalent vaccine based on Hc fragments of botulinum toxins A, B, and E produced in a cell-free expression system.

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    Zichel, R; Mimran, A; Keren, A; Barnea, A; Steinberger-Levy, I; Marcus, D; Turgeman, A; Reuveny, S

    2010-05-01

    Botulinum toxins produced by the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum are the most potent biological toxins in nature. Traditionally, people at risk are immunized with a formaldehyde-inactivated toxin complex. Second generation vaccines are based on the recombinant carboxy-terminal heavy-chain (Hc) fragment of the neurotoxin. However, the materialization of this approach is challenging, mainly due to the high AT content of clostridial genes. Herein, we present an alternative strategy in which the native genes encoding Hc proteins of botulinum toxins A, B, and E were used to express the recombinant Hc fragments in a cell-free expression system. We used the unique property of this open system to introduce different combinations of chaperone systems, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and reducing/oxidizing environments directly to the expression reaction. Optimized expression conditions led to increased production of soluble Hc protein, which was successfully scaled up using a continuous exchange (CE) cell-free system. Hc proteins were produced at a concentration of more than 1 mg/ml and purified by one-step Ni(+) affinity chromatography. Mice immunized with three injections containing 5 microg of any of the in vitro-expressed, alum-absorbed, Hc vaccines generated a serum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titer of 10(5) against the native toxin complex, which enabled protection against a high-dose toxin challenge (10(3) to 10(6) mouse 50% lethal dose [MsLD(50)]). Finally, immunization with a trivalent HcA, HcB, and HcE vaccine protected mice against the corresponding trivalent 10(5) MsLD(50) toxin challenge. Our results together with the latest developments in scalability of the in vitro protein expression systems offer alternative routes for the preparation of botulinum vaccine.

  7. Why do females use botulinum toxin injections?

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    Carter Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Botulinum toxin (BT use for enhancing the facial features has become a commonly accepted form of aesthetic intervention. This study conducted a self-report survey of female BT users in order to explore the motivating factors in its use (cost-benefit analysis. Settings and Design: This is a cross-sectional exploratory pilot study. Materials and Methods: Self-report questionnaires were administered to 41 consecutive clients attending an independent medical practice for BT injections for cosmetic purposes. All the participants were females and represented a range of age groups from the 20s to above 60s. Items in the nonstandardized questionnaire elicited questions relating to the reasons for and against BT use. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis was used rather than inferential statistics, and involved ranking the responses according to the most likely reasons for using BT and disadvantages of its use. Results: In general, the primary motivating factor for BT use was to improve self-esteem, and the greatest disadvantage involved financial costs associated with the procedure. Conclusions: The main findings of this study suggest that females who use BT for aesthetic purposes are motivated by personal psychological gains (intrapersonal attributes rather than social gains (interpersonal factors. In other words, they do not believe that having BT will equate to being treated any better by other people but would rather provide them with confidence and satisfaction regarding their self-image.

  8. Botulinum toxin A for the treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in multiple sclerosis patients

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    S. Deffontaines-Rufin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO is common in patients who suffer from multiple sclerosis (MS. When the usual pharmacological treatment fails, botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections can be proposed. The safety and efficacy of this treatment are already well known, but only a few studies focus on its use in patients with MS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-one patients with MS underwent their first BTX-A injection for refractory NDO. They had clinical and urodynamic cystometry assessment before and three months after injection. The patients were divided in three groups according to treatment efficacy: full success (total urinary continence, no overactive detrusor, improvement, or total failure (urge incontinence and overactive detrusor. RESULTS: 77% of the patients had clinical improvement or full success of the treatment with a reduction of their urgency and incontinence. Significant urodynamic improvement after treatment was shown on different parameters: volume at first involuntary bladder contraction (p = 0.0000001, maximum cystometric capacity (p = 0.0035, maximum detrusor pressure (p = 0.0000001. 46% of the patients were in the "full success" group. 31% of the patients had a partial improvement. 23% of the patients had no efficacy of the treatment. Duration of MS was a predictive factor of treatment failure (p = 0.015. CONCLUSIONS: Despite that a full success was obtained in 46% of the cases, BTX-A injection therapy failed to treat refractory NDO in 23% of patients suffering from MS. Duration of the disease was a predictive factor for an inefficient treatment. The injection therapy should be considered as soon as oral anticholinergic drugs fail to reduce NDO.

  9. Efficacy of Repeated Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections for Spastic Equinus in Children with Cerebral Palsy-A Secondary Analysis of the Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Hong, Bo Young; Chang, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sang-Jee; Lee, Soyoung; Park, Joo Hyun; Kwon, Jeong-Yi

    2017-08-21

    Botulinum toxin A is considered an important tool to control spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. Several factors are known to affect the efficacy of botulinum toxin, such as dosage, appropriate muscle selection and application, age, and accompanying therapy. A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, prospective phase III clinical trial of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of dynamic equinus in 144 children with cerebral palsy was performed to compare the efficacies of letibotulinumtoxin A and onabotulinumtoxin A. Secondary analyses were performed to evaluate factors that affected the outcome, focusing on the number of times injections were repeated. Effectiveness was defined as a change of 2 or more in the physician's rating scale. Multivariate regression analyses were performed with multiple variables. The first injection of botulinum toxin A significantly improved D subscale of Gross Motor Function Measure-88 scores at 3 months compared to repeated injections ( p < 0.05). After 6 months, patients who had one injection or none before the study showed significantly better outcomes than those who had more than one injection in terms of observational gait scores.

  10. Assessing the immediate impact of botulinum toxin injection on impedance of spastic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Shin, Henry; Li, Le; Magat, Elaine; Li, Sheng; Zhou, Ping

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immediate impacts of Botulinum Toxin A (BoNT-A) injections on the inherent electrical properties of spastic muscles using a newly developed electrical impedance myography (EIM) technique. Impedance measures were performed before and after a BoNT-A injection in biceps brachii muscles of 14 subjects with spasticity. Three major impedance variables, resistance (R), reactance (X) and phase angle (θ) were obtained from three different configurations, and were evaluated using the conventional EIM frequency at 50kHz as well as multiple frequency analysis. Statistical analysis demonstrated a significant decrease of resistance in the injected muscles (Multiple-frequency: R pre =25.17±1.94Ohm, R post =23.65±1.63Ohm, ptoxin effects on the muscle. This study demonstrated high sensitivity of the EIM technique in the detection of alterations to muscle composition. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Eficácia do resfriamento da pele no alívio da dor desencadeada pela injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A nas distonias faciais Skin cooling efficacy on pain relief in periocular injections with botulinum toxin A in facial dystonias

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    Paula Barros Bandeira de Mello Monteiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia do resfriamento da pele com gelo no alívio da dor desencadeada pela injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A na região periocular em pacientes portadores de distonia facial. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo prospectivo, 13 pacientes receberam injeção de toxina botulínica tipo A em região glabelar (m. prócero e periocular (m. orbicular para tratamento de distonia facial. Antes das aplicações, um lado da região glabelar foi resfriado com gelo durante 5 minutos, enquanto no outro lado foi aplicada pomada Epitezan®, funcionando como placebo. A aplicação foi feita primeiramente no lado resfriado. Após a aplicação em cada um dos lados os pacientes foram instruídos a dar uma nota para a dor desencadeada pela injeção, em uma escala de 0 a 10 onde 0 era ausência de dor e 10 a dor mais intensa. RESULTADOS: A média das notas dadas pelos pacientes à dor desencadeada pela injeção no lado onde foi aplicado placebo foi 3,92 ± 3,28. No local onde foi aplicado gelo a média das notas foi de 2,92 ± 2,18 (p PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of skin cooling with ice on pain relief in periocular injection with botulinum toxin type A in patients with facial dystonias. METHODS: In this prospective study, 13 patients received botulinum toxin type A injection in glabela (procerus m. and periocular region (orbicular m. for facial dystonias treatment. Before the injections, one side of the glabela was submitted to a 5-minute cooling period, while the opposite side had Epitezan® cream applied, as a placebo. The application was done at the cooled side first. After the application on each side the patients were instructed to rate the pain associated with the injection on a scale from 0 to 10, with 0 indicating no pain and 10 the worst pain. RESULTS: The average pain score on the side where cold was applied was 3,92 ± 3,28, while on the control side the average pain score was 2,92 ± 2,18 (p < 0,0166. CONCLUSION: In this study

  12. Botulinum toxin

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    Nigam P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin, one of the most poisonous biological substances known, is a neurotoxin produced by the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. C. botulinum elaborates eight antigenically distinguishable exotoxins (A, B, C 1 , C 2 , D, E, F and G. All serotypes interfere with neural transmission by blocking the release of acetylcholine, the principal neurotransmitter at the neuromuscular junction, causing muscle paralysis. The weakness induced by injection with botulinum toxin A usually lasts about three months. Botulinum toxins now play a very significant role in the management of a wide variety of medical conditions, especially strabismus and focal dystonias, hemifacial spasm, and various spastic movement disorders, headaches, hypersalivation, hyperhidrosis, and some chronic conditions that respond only partially to medical treatment. The list of possible new indications is rapidly expanding. The cosmetological applications include correction of lines, creases and wrinkling all over the face, chin, neck, and chest to dermatological applications such as hyperhidrosis. Injections with botulinum toxin are generally well tolerated and side effects are few. A precise knowledge and understanding of the functional anatomy of the mimetic muscles is absolutely necessary to correctly use botulinum toxins in clinical practice.

  13. Treatment of Palatal Myoclonus with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mursalin M. Anis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Palatal myoclonus is a rare cause of pulsatile tinnitus in patients presenting to the otolaryngology office. Rhythmic involuntary contractions of the palatal muscles produce the pulsatile tinnitus in these patients. Treatment of this benign but distressing condition with anxiolytics, anticonvulsants, and surgery has been largely unsuccessful. A few investigators have obtained promising results with botulinum toxin injection into the palatal muscles. We present a patient with palatal myoclonus who failed conservative treatment with anxiolytics. Unilateral injection of botulinum toxin into her tensor veli palatini muscle under electromyographic guidance resolved pulsatile tinnitus in her ipsilateral ear and unmasked pulsatile tinnitus in the contralateral ear. A novel method of following transient postinjection symptoms using a diary is presented in this study. Botulinum toxin dose must be titrated to achieve optimal results in each individual patient, analogous to titrations done for spasmodic dysphonia. Knowledge of the temporal onset of postinjection side effects and symptomatic relief may aid physicians in dose titration and surveillance. We present suggestions on titrating the botulinum toxin dose to optimal levels. A review of the literature on the use of botulinum toxin for palatal myoclonus and some common complications are discussed.

  14. Botulinum toxin A and B raise blood flow and increase survival of critically ischemic skin flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Dennis F; Schweizer, Riccardo; Zhang, Shengye; Kamat, Pranitha; Contaldo, Claudio; Rieben, Robert; Eberli, Daniel; Giovanoli, Pietro; Erni, Dominique; Plock, Jan A

    2013-10-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) A and B are commonly used for aesthetic indications and in neuromuscular disorders. New concepts seek to prove efficacy of BTX for critical tissue perfusion. Our aim was to evaluate BTX A and B in a mouse model of critical flap ischemia for preoperative and intraoperative application. BTX A and B were applied on the vascular pedicle of an axial pattern flap in mice preoperatively or intraoperatively. Blood flow, tissue oxygenation, tissue metabolism, flap necrosis rate, apoptosis assay, and RhoA and eNOS expression were endpoints. Blood-flow measurements 1 d after the flap operation revealed a significant reduction to 53% in the control group, while flow was maintained or increased in all BTX groups (103%-129%). Over 5 d all BTX groups showed significant increase in blood flow to 166-187% (P < 0.01). Microdialysis revealed an increase of glucose and reduced lactate/pyruvate ratio and glycerol levels in the flap tissue of all BTX groups. This resulted in significantly improved tissue survival in all BTX groups compared with the control group (62% ± 10%; all P < 0.01): BTX A preconditioning (84% ± 5%), BTX A application intraoperatively (88% ± 4%), BTX B preconditioning (91% ± 4%), and intraoperative BTX B treatment (92% ± 5%). This was confirmed by TUNEL assay. Immunofluorescence demonstrated RhoA and eNOS expression in BTX groups. All BTX applications were similarly effective, despite pharmacologic dissimilarities and different timing. In conclusion, we were able to show on a vascular, tissue, cell, and molecular level that BTX injection to the feeding arteries supports flap survival through ameliorated blood flow and oxygen delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal Phonatory Characteristics after Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kimberly V.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study investigated the long-term effects of a Botulinum Toxin Type A injection on the glottal competency of a man with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Results suggest that change in degree of glottal adduction over time can be observed even when vocal instability is present within each recording session. (CR)

  16. Botulinum toxin uses in strabismus: A review of the injections performed during one year in a general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrín, E; Arranz Márquez, E; Yebra González, L; García Gil de Bernabé, J

    2016-03-01

    To analyse the indications, dosage and efficacy of botulinum toxin A injection performed in patients in a Strabismus Department. In this prospective study, botulinum toxin A was injected into 28 patients diagnosed with strabismus. Data was obtained from the records of patients that were evaluated during 2013 in the Strabismus Unit of Rey Juan Carlos Hospital (Móstoles, Madrid, Spain) in order to assess the indications and dosage of botulinum toxin A use in strabismus, as well as its clinical effect and differences in paediatric and adult patients. The outcomes in the last visit, at least 14 months after the injections, were analysed. An analysis was performed on the data from 11 children, 6 females (54.5%), and 17 adults, 11 males (64%). The mean age was 4.42±3.48 years and 58.71±18.07 years in the children and adult groups, respectively. The majority of cases in both groups were esotropia (81.8% in children and 47.1% in adults). However the pathologies in the adult group were quite heterogeneous, including 4 patients with exotropia (26.5%), 4 with hypertropia (26.5%), and one with isolated nystagmus (5.9%). The mean number of the botulinum toxin injections in children was 1.45±0.93, although 72.7% received a single injection. In the adult group, the mean number of injections was 3.27±1.41. There was a statistically significant difference between pre- and post-injection in the tropia and phoria measurements in children and adults group (Ptoxin injection, whereas 2 needed surgery for diplopia correction. Botulinum toxin is a very useful tool in the management of strabismus, obtaining better sensory and motor results in children, but it is also effective as a symptomatic treatment in some types of strabismus in adults. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Correction of Malocclusion by Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection into Masticatory Muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Hyun; Kim, Seong-Gon

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a neurotoxin, and its injection in masticatory muscles induces muscle weakness and paralysis. This paralytic effect of BTX induces growth retardation of the maxillofacial bones, changes in dental eruption and occlusion state, and facial asymmetry. Using masticatory muscle paralysis and its effect via BTX, BTX can be used for the correction of malocclusion after orthognathic surgery and mandible fracture. The paralysis of specific masticatory muscles by BTX injection r...

  18. A型肉毒毒素治疗抽动障碍%Botulinum toxin A in treatment of tic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琳; 万新华; 李力波

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of Chinese botulinum toxin A(CBTX-A)injection in the treatment of motor tics in patients with tic disorder.Methods Twenty-five patients(20 male,5 female)were treated with CBTX-A in the sites of their most problematic motor tics.Before treatment the data of Yale Global Tic Severityb Scale(YGTSS)was collected.All patients were assessed at least 3 times after 1 week,4 weeks and within 12-month period.At each visit the following data were collected:YGTSS,Jankovic clinical rating scale,time to response,duration of response,global impression of changes by patients,presence of premonitory sensory tic component and side effects.Results Total number of treatment sessions was 29.The mean response time was 5.0 days.The mean duration of response was 4.6 months.The mean peak effect response in Jankovic clinical rating scale was 3.4.Based on YGTSS,62.1% (18/29)was rated as marked improvement,34.5%(10/29)as moderate improvement and only 3.4% (1/29)as no effect.85.7%(18/21)patients had less premonitory sensation symptoms(mean benefit 72.4%(20%-100%)).Weakness in the site of injection and rash were the main side effect. Conclusion CBTX-A is an effective and safe treatment for motor tics associated with tic disorder.%目的 探讨A型肉毒毒素治疗抽动障碍患者运动性抽动症状的疗效.方法 25例抽动障碍患者(男性20例,女性5例)接受国产A型肉毒毒素注射,治疗主要针对患者最突出的运动性抽动的表现.治疗前进行耶鲁综合抽动严重程度量表(YGTSS)基线评分,治疗1、4周和1年内分别进行YGTSS和Jankovic评分,并记录疗效的潜伏期、持续时间、副作用、患者的主观感觉和感觉先兆的变化以及再次注射情况.结果 在25例患者总共29人次的治疗中,肉毒毒素疗效平均潜伏期5.0 d,平均总体疗效持续4.6个月,平均最佳疗效Jankovic评分3.4分,根据YGTSS减分率统计62.1%(18/29)明显有效,34.5%(10/29)好转,3.4%(1/29)无效.85

  19. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

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    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  20. Botulinum toxin type A injections for the management of muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delanois Ronald E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of hip adductor, tensor fascia lata, and rectus femoris muscle contractures following total hip arthroplasties are quite common, with some patients failing to improve despite treatment with a variety of non-operative modalities. The purpose of the present study was to describe the use of and patient outcomes of botulinum toxin injections as an adjunctive treatment for muscle tightness following total hip arthroplasty. Methods Ten patients (14 hips who had hip adductor, abductor, and/or flexor muscle contractures following total arthroplasty and had been refractory to physical therapeutic efforts were treated with injection of botulinum toxin A. Eight limbs received injections into the adductor muscle, 8 limbs received injections into the tensor fascia lata muscle, and 2 limbs received injection into the rectus femoris muscle, followed by intensive physical therapy for 6 weeks. Results At a mean final follow-up of 20 months, all 14 hips had increased range in the affected arc of motion, with a mean improvement of 23 degrees (range, 10 to 45 degrees. Additionally all hips had an improvement in hip scores, with a significant increase in mean score from 74 points (range, 57 to 91 points prior to injection to a mean of 96 points (range, 93 to 98 at final follow-up. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events. Conclusion Botulinum toxin A injections combined with intensive physical therapy may be considered as a potential treatment modality, especially in difficult cases of muscle tightness that are refractory to standard therapy.

  1. Temporomandibular Myofacial Pain Treated with Botulinum Toxin Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Mor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and outlines of the role of botulinum toxin (BoNT in the treatment of myofacial TMD. This manuscript includes a brief history of the use of BoNT in the treatment of pain, the mechanism of action of BoNT, and the techniques for injections, adverse effects and contraindications when using BoNT to treat mayofacial pain caused by TMD.

  2. Botulinum neurotoxin formulations: overcoming the confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samizadeh S

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Souphiyeh Samizadeh,1 Koenraad De Boulle2 1Great British Academy of Aesthetic Medicine, London, UK; 2Aalst Dermatology Clinic, Aalst, Belgium Abstract: Botulinum toxin A is produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria and is used for various therapeutic and cosmetic purposes. Botulinum toxin A injections are the most popular nonsurgical procedure worldwide. Despite an increased demand for botulinum toxin A injections, the clinical pharmacology and differences in formulation of commonly available products are poorly understood. The various products available in the market are unique and vary in terms of units, chemical properties, biological activities, and weight, and are therefore not interchangeable. For safe clinical practice and to achieve optimal results, the practitioners need to understand the clinical issues of potency, conversion ratio, and safety issues (toxin spread and immunogenicity. In this paper, the basic clinical pharmacology of botulinum toxin A and differences between onabotulinum toxin A, abobotulinum toxin A, and incobotulinum toxin A are discussed. Keywords: botulinum toxin, botulinum neurotoxin, moiety, protein complexes

  3. Effect of botulinum toxin A and nitroglycerin on random skin flap survival in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Kourosh; Tabatabaie, Omid Reza; Salehifar, Ebrahim; Amanlou, Massoud; Khorasani, Ghasemali

    2016-01-01

    A suitable pharmacological substitute for the well-established surgical delay technique for random skin flaps to increase viability has been elusive. To evaluate the effects of nitroglycerin and botulinum toxin type A on random flap survival in a rat model. The present controlled experimental study was performed in the four groups of rats. One week after intervention in each group, the flap was raised and kept in situ, and flap necrosis was evaluated through follow-up. Group 1 received intradermal botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) and topical nitroglycerin 2%; group 2 received BTX-A and topical Vaseline (Unilever, USA); group 3 received topical nitroglycerin and intradermal normal saline; and group 4 received topical Vaseline and intradermal normal saline. BTX-A reduced the area of necrosis compared with control (24% versus 56% respectively; P<0.001). Nitroglycerin application was associated with a trend toward improved flap viability (42% versus 56%; P=0.059). The combination of topical nitroglycerin and BTX-A, compared with Vaseline and BTX-A, was associated with decreased flap necrosis (16.1% versus 24%, respectively), although it was not statistically significant (P=0.45). BTX-A was effective in reducing distal flap necrosis. The effect of BTX-A was significantly more pronounced than nitroglycerin ointment.

  4. Crystal structure of a catalytically active, non-toxic endopeptidase derivative of Clostridium botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyer, Geoffrey; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; James, Peter L; Marks, Philip M H; Chaddock, John A; Acharya, K Ravi

    2009-03-27

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) modulate cholinergic nerve terminals to result in neurotransmitter blockade. BoNTs consists of catalytic (LC), translocation (Hn) and cell-binding domains (Hc). The binding function of the Hc domain is essential for BoNTs to bind the neuronal cell membrane, therefore, removal of the Hc domain results in a product that retains the endopeptidase activity of the LC but is non-toxic. Thus, a molecule consisting of LC and Hn domains of BoNTs, termed LHn, is a suitable molecule for engineering novel therapeutics. The structure of LHA at 2.6 A reported here provides an understanding of the structural implications and challenges of engineering therapeutic molecules that combine functional properties of LHn of BoNTs with specific ligand partners to target different cell types.

  5. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    OpenAIRE

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates, for the first time, adaptive plastic changes in the stretch reflex circuitry following denervation induced by botulinum toxin injection. The study also demonstrates alterations of the elastic properties of the muscles following botulinum injection.

  6. Office-based endoscopic botulinum toxin injection in laryngeal movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderbay, A; Righini, C A; Castellanos, P F; Atallah, I

    2018-06-01

    Botulinum toxin injection is widely used for the treatment of laryngeal movement disorders. Electromyography-guided percutaneous injection is the technique most commonly used to perform intralaryngeal botulinum toxin injection. We describe an endoscopic approach for intralaryngeal botulinum toxin injection under local anaesthesia without using electromyography. A flexible video-endoscope with an operating channel is used. After local anaesthesia of the larynx by instillation of lidocaine, a flexible needle is inserted into the operating channel in order to inject the desired dose of botulinum toxin into the vocal and/or vestibular folds. Endoscopic botulinum toxin injection under local anaesthesia is a reliable technique for the treatment of laryngeal movement disorders. It can be performed by any laryngologist without the need for electromyography. It is easy to perform for the operator and comfortable for the patient. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus botulinum toxin injection in chronic migraine prophylaxis: a pilot randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehata HS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hatem S Shehata, Eman H Esmail, Ahmad Abdelalim, Shaimaa El-Jaafary, Alaa Elmazny, Asmaa Sabbah, Nevin M Shalaby Neurology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Background: Chronic migraine is a prevalent disabling disease, with major health-related burden and poor quality of life. Long-term use of preventive medications carries risk of side effects. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A injection as preventive therapies for chronic migraine. Methods: A pilot, randomized study was conducted on a small-scale sample of 29 Egyptian patients with chronic migraine, recruited from Kasr Al-Aini teaching hospital outpatient clinic and diagnosed according to ICHD-III (beta version. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups; 15 patients received BTX-A injection following the Phase III Research Evaluating Migraine Prophylaxis Therapy injection paradigm and 14 patients were subjected to 12 rTMS sessions delivered at high frequency (10 Hz over the left motor cortex (MC, M1. All the patients were requested to have their 1-month headache calendar, and they were subjected to a baseline 25-item (beta version Henry Ford Hospital Headache Disability Inventory (HDI, Headache Impact Test (HIT-6, and visual analogue scale assessment of headache intensity. The primary efficacy measures were headache frequency and severity; secondary measures were 25-item HDI, HIT-6, and number of acute medications. Follow-up visits were scheduled at weeks 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 after baseline visit. Results: A reduction in all outcome measures was achieved in both the groups. However, this improvement was more sustained in the BTX-A group, and both the therapies were well tolerated. Conclusion: BTX-A injection and rTMS have favorable efficacy and safety profiles in chronic migraineurs. rTMS is of comparable efficacy to BTX-A injection in chronic migraine

  8. YouTube Videos on Botulinum Toxin A for Wrinkles: A Useful Resource for Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Katharine; Doong, Judy; Trang, Trinh; Joo, Sarah; Chien, Anna L

    2017-12-01

    Patients interested in botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for wrinkles search for videos on YouTube, but little is known about the quality and reliability of the content. The authors examined the quality, reliability, content, and target audience of YouTube videos on BTX for wrinkles. In this cross-sectional study, the term "Botox" was searched on YouTube. Sixty relevant videos in English were independently categorized by 2 reviewers as useful informational, misleading informational, useful patient view, or misleading patient view. Disagreements were settled by a third reviewer. Videos were rated on the Global Quality Scale (GQS) (1 = poor, 5 = excellent). Sixty-three percent of the BTX YouTube videos were useful informational (GQS = 4.4 ± 0.7), 33% as useful patient view (GQS = 3.21 ± 1.2), 2% as misleading informational (GQS = 1), and 2% as misleading patient view (GQS = 2.5). The large number of useful videos, high reliability, and the wide range of content covered suggests that those who search for antiwrinkle BTX videos on YouTube are likely to view high-quality content. This suggests that YouTube may be a good source of videos to recommend for patients interested in BTX.

  9. Modulation of urinary bladder innervation: TRPV1 and botulinum toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrua, Ana; Avelino, António; Cruz, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The persisting interest around neurotoxins such as vanilloids and botulinum toxin (BoNT) derives from their marked effect on detrusor overactivity refractory to conventional antimuscarinic treatments. In addition, both are administered by intravesical route. This offers three potential advantages. First, intravesical therapy is an easy way to provide high concentrations of pharmacological agents in the bladder tissue without causing unsuitable levels in other organs. Second, drugs effective on the bladder, but inappropriate for systemic administration, can be safely used as it is the case of vanilloids and BoNT. Third, the effects of one single treatment might be extremely longlasting, contributing to render these therapies highly attractive to patients despite the fact that the reasons to the prolonged effect are still incompletely understood. Attractive as it may be, intravesical pharmacological therapy should still be considered as a second-line treatment in patients refractory to conventional oral antimuscarinic therapy or who do not tolerate its systemic side effects. However, the increasing off-label use of these neurotoxins justifies a reappraisal of their pharmacological properties.

  10. Survey of Botulinum Toxin Injections in Anticoagulated Patients: Korean Physiatrists' Preference in Controlling Anticoagulation Profile Prior to Intramuscular Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yongjun; Park, Geun-Young; Park, Jihye; Choi, Asayeon; Kim, Soo Yeon; Boulias, Chris; Phadke, Chetan P; Ismail, Farooq; Im, Sun

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate Korean physiatrists' practice of performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and to assess their preference in controlling the bleeding risk before injection. As part of an international collaboration survey study, a questionnaire survey was administered to 100 Korean physiatrists. Physiatrists were asked about their level of experience with botulinum toxin injection, the safe international normalized ratio range in anticoagulated patients undergoing injection, their tendency for injecting into deep muscles, and their experience of bleeding complications. International normalized ratio injection by 41% of the respondents. Thirty-six respondents replied that the international normalized ratio should be lowered to sub-therapeutic levels before injection, and 18% of the respondents reported that anticoagulants should be intentionally withheld and discontinued prior to injection. In addition, 20%-30% of the respondents answered that they were uncertain whether they should perform the injection regardless of the international normalized ratio values. About 69% of the respondents replied that they did have any standardized protocols for performing botulinum toxin injection in patients using anticoagulants. Only 1 physiatrist replied that he had encountered a case of compartment syndrome. In accordance with the lack of consensus in performing intramuscular botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients, our survey shows a wide range of practices among many Korean physiatrists; they tend to avoid botulinum toxin injection in anticoagulated patients and are uncertain about how to approach these patients. The results of this study emphasize the need for formulating a proper international consensus on botulinum toxin injection management in anticoagulated patients.

  11. Treatment of chronic tension-type headache with botulinum toxin: a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padberg, M.; de Bruijn, S. F. T. M.; de Haan, R. J.; Tavy, D. L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is increasingly advocated as effective treatment in chronic tension-type headache. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to prove efficacy of botulinum toxin in chronic tension-type headache. Patients were randomly assigned to receive botulinum toxin (maximum

  12. Practical Aspects of Botulinum Toxin-A Treatment in Patients With Overactive Bladder Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hou Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A injection is an effective treatment for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB that is refractory to antimuscarinics. An injectable dose of 100 U has been suggested to achieve the optimal balance of benefit and safety in patients with OAB. BoNT-A (total volume of 10 mL was administered as evenly distributed intradetrusor injections (5 U across 20 sites approximately 1 cm apart (0.5 mL per site using a flexible or rigid cystoscope. Treatment with BoNT-A was generally well tolerated by most patients, and most treatment-related adverse events were localized to the urinary tract. The prevalence of OAB increases with age, and elderly patients are more vulnerable to complications. The short-term efficacy of intravesical BoNT-A injection for refractory OAB with no treatment-related complications in the elderly population has been documented. Frail elderly patients can experience the same treatment results, such as significantly improved urgent urinary incontinence and quality of life, as young and nonfrail elderly patients with 100-U BoNT-A injections. However, increased risk of larger postvoid residual (PVR urine and lower long-term success rates were noted in frail elderly patients; around 11% had acute urinary retention, while 60% had PVR urine volume >150 mL after treatment. In addition, intravesical injection of BoNT-A effectively decreased urgency symptoms in elderly patients with OAB and central nervous system lesions. The adverse effects were acceptable, while the long-term effects were comparable to those in patients with OAB without central nervous system lesions. Nonetheless, the possibility of longstanding urinary retention and chronic catheterization in this vulnerable population requires careful evaluation before treatment with intravesical BoNT-A. In conclusion, the current findings indicate that intravesical BoNT-A is an effective and safe treatment for OAB in elderly patients.

  13. Effectiveness of resistance training in combination with botulinum toxin-A on hand and arm use in children with cerebral palsy: a pre-post intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvrum Ann-Kristin G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this pilot study was to examine the effects of additional resistance training after use of Botulinum Toxin-A (BoNT-A on the upper limbs in children with cerebral palsy (CP. Methods Ten children with CP (9–17 years with unilaterally affected upper limbs according to Manual Ability Classification System II were assigned to two intervention groups. One group received BoNT-A treatment (group B, the other BoNT-A plus eight weeks resistance training (group BT. Hand and arm use were evaluated by means of the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function (Melbourne and Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA. Measures of muscle strength, muscle tone, and active range of motion were used to assess neuromuscular body function. Measurements were performed before and two and five months after intervention start. Change scores and differences between the groups in such scores were subjected to Mann–Whitney U and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests, respectively. Results Both groups had very small improvements in AHA and Melbourne two months after BoNT-A injections, without differences between groups. There were significant, or close to significant, short-term treatment effects in favour of group BT for muscle strength in injected muscles (elbow flexion strength, p = .08 and non-injected muscles (elbow extension and supination strength, both p = .05, without concomitant increases in muscle tone. Active supination range improved in both groups, but more so in group BT (p = .09. There were no differences between the groups five months after intervention start. Conclusions Resistance training strengthens non-injected muscles temporarily and may reduce short-term strength loss that results from BoNT-A injections without increasing muscle tone. Moreover, additional resistance training may increase active range of motion to a greater extent than BoNT-A alone. None of the improvements in neuromuscular impairments further

  14. Alteration of Skin Mechanical Properties in Patients Undergoing Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections of Forehead Rhytides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Peiru; Zhang, Zheng; Grassetti, Luca; Perdanasari, Aurelia Trisliana; Torresetti, Matteo; Pu, Zheming; Zhang, Yan; Han, Sheng; Marsili, Riccardo; Zhang, Yi Xin; di Benedetto, Giovanni; Lazzeri, Davide

    2016-06-01

    Although application of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) for the treatment of forehead rhytides has become very popular, the effects of its intramuscular injections on the skin mechanical properties remain unclear. We prospectively investigated the alterations in the mechanical properties of the skin of patients who received intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for forehead rhytides and compared two injection doses. Of the 42 enrolled patients, one randomly assigned half received intramuscular injections of two units (group I), and the other half received four units (group II) of BTX-A in each injection point. The baseline and post-treatment skin mechanical parameters, including gross elasticity (R2), net elasticity (R5), viscoelastic ratio (R6) and biological elasticity (R7), were measured using the Cutometer(®) and compared. Treatment with BTX-A resulted in significant overall alterations in the mechanical properties of skin at the injection sites of both treatment groups during the 16-week period, and no significant differences were observed between groups. Significant decreases in biological elasticity, net elasticity and viscoelasticity properties were observed at 2 weeks follow-up and began to recover at that time. All of the skin mechanical properties recovered to baseline levels by 16 weeks of follow-up in both dosage groups, which indicates that the higher dosage (4 units) did not delay relapse compared to the two-unit dosage. We concluded that intramuscular injections of BTX-A significantly regulated the gross elasticity, net elasticity, functional elasticity and viscoelastic elasticity at the injection point over a radius of 1.5 cm at 2, 4 and 8 weeks follow-up. The alteration in the skin measurements had completely diminished by the 16-week follow-up. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or

  15. Botulinum toxin injections for low-back pain and sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Zeeshan; Boulias, Chris; Gordon, Allan; Ismail, Farooq; Sheean, Geoffrey; Furlan, Andrea D

    2011-01-19

    Adequate relief from low-back pain (LBP) is not always possible. Emerging evidence suggests a role for botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injections in treating pain disorders. Proponents of BoNT suggest its properties can decrease muscle spasms, ischemia and inflammatory markers, thereby reducing pain. To determine the effects of botulinum toxin injections in adults with LBP. We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, issue 3) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL to August 2009; screened references from included studies; consulted with content experts and Allergan. We included published and unpublished randomised controlled trials without language restrictions We included randomised trials that evaluated BoNT serotypes versus other treatments in patients with non-specific LBP of any duration. Two review authors selected the studies, assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane Back Review Group criteria, and extracted the data using standardized forms. We performed a qualitative analysis due to lack of data. We excluded evidence from nineteen studies due to non-randomisation, incomplete or unpublished data. We included three randomised trials (N =123 patients). Only one study included patients with chronic non-specific LBP; the other two examined unique subpopulations. Only one of the three trials had a low risk of bias and demonstrated that BoNT injections reduced pain at three and eight weeks and improved function at eight weeks better than saline injections. The second trial showed that BoNT injections were better than injections of corticosteroid plus lidocaine or placebo in patients with sciatica attributed to piriformis syndrome. The third trial concluded that BoNT injections were better than traditional acupuncture in patients with third lumbar transverse process syndrome. Both studies with high risk of bias had several key limitations. Heterogeneity of the studies prevented meta-analysis. There is low quality evidence that BoNT injections improved pain, function

  16. Botulinum Toxin A and Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: Pathophysiology and Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Fong Jhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of onabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A for the treatment of lower urinary tract diseases (LUTD has increased markedly in recent years. The indications for BoNT-A treatment of LUTD now include neurogenic or idiopathic detrusor overactivity, interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and voiding dysfunction. The mechanisms of BoNT-A action on LUTDs affect many different aspects. Traditionally, the effects of BoNT-A were believed to be attributable to inhibition of acetylcholine release from the presynaptic efferent nerves at the neuromuscular junctions in the detrusor or urethral sphincter. BoNT-A injection in the bladder also regulated sensory nerve function by blocking neurotransmitter release and reducing receptor expression in the urothelium. In addition, recent studies revealed an anti-inflammatory effect for BoNT-A. Substance P and nerve growth factor in the urine and bladder tissue decreased after BoNT-A injection. Mast cell activation in the bladder also decreased. BoNT-A-induced improvement of urothelium function plays an important mitigating role in bladder dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in urothelium decreased after BoNT-A injection, as did apoptosis. Studies also revealed increased apoptosis in the prostate after BoNT-A injection. Although BoNT-A injection has been widely used to treat different LUTDs refractory to conventional treatment, currently, onabotulinumtoxinA has been proven effective only on urinary incontinence due to IDO and NDO in several large-scale clinical trials. The effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on other LUTDs such as interstitial cystitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia, dysfunctional voiding or detrusor sphincter dyssynergia have not been well demonstrated.

  17. Botulinum toxin a in the treatment of chronic tension-type headache with cervical myofascial trigger points: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R Norman; Cottrill, Jerod; Gagnon, Christine M; Smitherman, Todd A; Weinland, Stephan R; Tann, Beverley; Joseph, Petra; Lee, Thomas S; Houle, Timothy T

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BT-A) as a prophylactic treatment for chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) with myofascial trigger points (MTPs) producing referred head pain. Although BT-A has received mixed support for the treatment of TTH, deliberate injection directly into the cervical MTPs very often found in this population has not been formally evaluated. Patients with CTTH and specific MTPs producing referred head pain were assigned randomly to receive intramuscular injections of BT-A or isotonic saline (placebo) in a double-blind design. Daily headache diaries, pill counts, trigger point pressure algometry, range of motion assessment, and responses to standardized pain and psychological questionnaires were used as outcome measures; patients returned for follow-up assessment at 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months, and 3 months post injection. After 3 months, all patients were offered participation in an open-label extension of the study. Effect sizes were calculated to index treatment effects among the intent-to-treat population; individual time series models were computed for average pain intensity. The 23 participants reported experiencing headache on a near-daily basis (average of 27 days/month). Compared with placebo, patients in the BT-A group reported greater reductions in headache frequency during the first part of the study (P = .013), but these effects dissipated by week 12. Reductions in headache intensity over time did not differ significantly between groups (P = .80; maximum d = 0.13), although a larger proportion of BT-A patients showed evidence of statistically significant improvements in headache intensity in the time series analyses (62.5% for BT-A vs 30% for placebo). There were no differences between the groups on any of the secondary outcome measures. The evidence for BT-A in headache is mixed, and even more so in CTTH. However, the putative technique of injecting BT-A directly into the ubiquitous MTPs in CTTH is partially supported

  18. Pneumothorax complicating botulinum toxin injection in the body of a dilated oesophagus in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used for an increasing number of indications in the field of gastroenterology. We report a case in which injection of botulinum toxin in the dilated tubular oesophagus in a patient with achalasia was complicated by a pneumothorax necessitating suction drainage

  19. Effect of a clown's presence at botulinum toxin injections in children: a randomized, prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgaard; Kibæk, Maria; Martinussen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the presence of a hospital clown during pediatric procedures has rarely been evaluated. In a pediatric ward, botulinum toxin injection is a painful procedure and a stressful experience for the child. We undertook a study of the effect of the presence of a hospital clown on children...... treated with botulinum toxin in an outpatient setting....

  20. Outcomes of intradetrusor onabotulinum toxin A injection in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurture, Gregory; Peyronnet, Benoit; Feigin, Andrew; Biagioni, Milton C; Gilbert, Rebecca; Rosenblum, Nirit; Frucht, Steven; Di Rocco, Alessandro; Nitti, Victor W; Brucker, Benjamin M

    2018-05-16

    To assess the safety and efficacy of intradetrusor onabotulinum toxin A injections for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). All PD patients who underwent intradetrusor injections of onabotulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) for storage symptoms between 2010 and 2017 were included in a retrospective study. A 100 U dose of BoNT-A (Botox®, Allergan Irvine, CA) was used for the first injection in all patients. The primary endpoint was clinical success defined as any subjective improvement in OAB symptoms self-assessed by the patients 4 weeks after the injections. Out of 24 patients analyzed, 19 reported improvement of their OAB symptoms 4 weeks after the first injection (79.2%) with complete resolution of urgency urinary incontinence in seven patients (29.1%; P < 0.001). The average post-void residual (PVR) increased significantly after the first injection from 17.6 to 125.3 mL (P < 0.001). Three of the patients had to start clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) after the first injection (12.5%). Out of 49 injections in total, only five caused incomplete bladder emptying requiring the use of CIC (10.2%). Higher pre-injection PVR was significantly associated with both a lower chance of symptomatic improvement (P = 0.04) and a higher risk of incomplete bladder emptying with institution of CIC (P = 0.047). Intradetrusor injections of BoNT-A 100 U appeared as a safe and effective option in PD patients with OAB symptoms and a low PVR before the injection. Higher preoperative PVR was the strongest predictor of both treatment failure and postoperative urinary retention requiring CIC. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Seniority of neurobladder and effectiveness of a first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacout, M; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Popoff, M; Verollet, D; Lebreton, F; Amarenco, G

    2015-09-01

    Intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin is one of the second-line therapy of neurologenic detrusor overactivity. In 26% to 66% of the cases, intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin is inefficient in order to reduce overactive bladder symptoms and/or overactive detrusor. The objective of this study is to determine whether it exists a link between the efficacy of the first IDBT and the length of neurological detrusor overactivity symptoms. Retrospective study on 79 patients which have a first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin between January 2001 and December 2013. Inclusion criteria were patients older than 18 and having neurological detrusor overactivity. There is no significant difference of intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin efficacy according to duration of urinary symptoms in the general neurologigal population (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, spinal cord compression, ischemic pathology, infectious pathology) with the mean age being 46 years. On the contrary, the length of evolution of neurological detrusor overactivity symptoms before the intradetrusor botox injection therapy and the efficiency of the first intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin seem to be correlated with negative results in patients with multiple sclerosis. The duration of urinary symptoms is a predictive factor of primary failure of intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin in multiple sclerosis patients, in univariate analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Botox facial slimming/facial sculpting: the role of botulinum toxin-A in the treatment of hypertrophic masseteric muscle and parotid enlargement to narrow the lower facial width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Woffles T L

    2010-02-01

    Botulinum toxin A is a highly efficacious and cost-effective, nonsurgical option for reducing the width and shape of the lower face and jawline. The results can vary from the subtlest thinning of the face to an extremely thin, cachectic appearance. Many nuances can be achieved. The administration is simple, and the process takes barely 5 minutes in an office setting. Botulinum toxin A can also be effectively used to reduce the bulk of an enlarged parotid gland without affecting saliva production. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Keratoconus progression is not inhibited by reducing eyelid muscular force with botulinum toxin A treatment: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adimara da Candelaria Renesto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate whether reducing eyelid muscular force through the administration of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A to the orbicularis oculi muscles of patients with keratoconus affected corneal parameters indicative of disease progression. Methods: In this prospective parallel randomized clinical trial, 40 eyes of 40 patients with keratoconus were randomized into equally sized control and BTX-A groups. Patients in the BTX-A group received subcutaneous BTX-A injections into the orbicularis muscle. The control group received no intervention. Palpebral fissure height, best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, and corneal topographic parameters were evaluated at baseline and at 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-ups. Results: The mean ± standard deviation vertical palpebral fissure heights were 9.74 ± 1.87 mm and 9.45 ± 1.47 mm at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups, respectively, and 10.0 ± 1.49 mm and 9.62 ± 1.73 mm at 18 months, with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.337. BSCVA values were 0.63 ± 0.56 and 0.60 ± 0.27 at baseline in the control and BTX-A groups (p=0.643, and 0.52 ± 0.59 and 0.45 ± 0.26 at 18 months, again with no significant difference between the groups (p=0.452. In addition, there were no statistical differences between the groups at 18 months for the three keratometry topographic parameters: flattest (K1, steepest (K2, and mean (Km keratometry (p=0.562. Conclusion: BTX-A inhibition of eyelid force generation did not result in detectable changes in corneal parameters in keratoconic patients during 18 months of follow-up.

  4. Botulinum toxin, a new treatment modality for chronic idiopathic constipation in children: long-term follow-up of a double-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshtgar, Alireza S; Ward, Harry C; Sanei, Ahmad; Clayden, Graham S

    2007-04-01

    Myectomy of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has been performed on some children after failure of medical treatment to treat idiopathic constipation. The aim of this study was to compare botulinum toxin injection with myectomy of the IAS in the treatment of chronic idiopathic constipation and soiling in children. This was a double-blind randomized trial. Patients between 4 and 16 years old were included in the study if they had failed to respond to laxative treatment and anal dilatation for chronic idiopathic constipation. All study patients had anorectal manometry and anal endosonography under ketamine anesthesia. Outcome was measured using a validated symptom severity (SS) scoring system, with scores ranging from 0 to 65. Of 42 children, 21 were randomized to the botulinum group and 21 were randomized to the myectomy group. At the 3-month follow-up, the median preoperative SS score improved from 34 (range = 19-47) to 20 (range = 2-43) in the botulinum group (P 41) for the botulinum group and the myectomy group, respectively (P IAS for chronic idiopathic constipation and fecal incontinence in children.

  5. Increased levels of SV2A botulinum neurotoxin receptor in clinical sensory disorders and functional effects of botulinum toxins A and E in cultured human sensory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Y

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Yiangos Yiangou1 Uma Anand1,2, William R. Otto2, Marco Sinisi3, Michael Fox3, Rolfe Birch3 Keith A. Foster4, Gaurav Mukerji1,5, Ayesha Akbar1,6, Sanjiv K. Agarwal5, Praveen Anand11Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London; 2Histopathology Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, London Research Institute, London; 3Peripheral Nerve Injury Unit, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore; 4Syntaxin Ltd, Oxford; 5Department of Urology; 6Department of Gastroenterology, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, London, United Kingdom Background: There is increasing evidence that botulinum neurotoxin A may affect sensory nociceptor fibers, but the expression of its receptors in clinical pain states, and its effects in human sensory neurons, are largely unknown.Methods: We studied synaptic vesicle protein subtype SV2A, a receptor for botulinum neurotoxin A, by immunostaining in a range of clinical tissues, including human dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, peripheral nerves, the urinary bladder, and the colon. We also determined the effects of botulinum neurotoxins A and E on localization of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, and functional sensitivity to capsaicin stimuli in cultured human dorsal root ganglion neurons.Results: Image analysis showed that SV2A immunoreactive nerve fibers were increased in injured nerves proximal to the injury (P = 0.002, and in painful neuromas (P = 0.0027; the ratio of percentage area SV2A to neurofilaments (a structural marker was increased proximal to injury (P = 0.0022 and in neuromas (P = 0.0001, indicating increased SV2A levels in injured nerve fibers. In the urinary bladder, SV2A nerve fibers were found in detrusor muscle and associated with blood vessels, with a significant increase in idiopathic detrusor overactivity (P = 0.002 and painful bladder syndrome (P = 0.0087. Colon biopsies showed numerous SV2A-positive nerve fibers, which were increased in quiescent

  6. Endocardial botulinum toxin injection into ganglionated plexi in order to reduce atrial fibrillation inducibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. Г. Стрельников

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Prior animal studies suggest that botulinum toxin injection into the epicardial fat pads can suppress atrial fibrillation (AF inducibility. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of endocardial botulinum toxin injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial left atrial ganglionated plexi (GP for preventing AF.Methods. Twenty-four dogs were separated into 3 groups: endocardial approach for botulinum toxin (Xeomin, Germany injection into epicardial fat pads and intramyocardial GPs; endocardial approach for placebo injection (0.9% normal saline; control 1; n = 8 and epicardial approach for botulinum toxin injection (control 2; n = 8.Results. A mean of 6.9±1.7 intramyocardial injections (10 U/0.2 mL at each and 3 injections (50 U/1 mL at each were administered into each site exhibiting a positive vagal response and into each epicardial fat pad in all groups (p>0.05 between groups.The injections of botulinum toxin demonstrated dramatic prolongation of ERP in all PV-atrial junctions. This effect correlated with less pronounced ERP shortening in response to vagal nerve stimulation. Suppression of AF inducibility was observed at 7 days after endocardial botulinum toxin injections. The level of AF inducibility was: at 7 days – 57% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 14 days – 61% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 1 month – 38% (p<0.001 vs placebo; p<0.001 vs baseline; at 3 months – 23% (p = 0.003; p = 0.06 vs baseline. There were no differences between botulinum groups (p>0.05 for all. The effect of AF suppression disappeared at 3 months. No procedure-related complications occurred.Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection into intramyocardial GPs and epicardial fat pads by an endocardial approach is feasible and safe. It provides complete removal of cardiac vagal responses and reliably reduces vulnerability to atrial fibrillation.

  7. Bupivacaine and botulinum toxin to treat comitant strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Moreira Hopker

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the change in ocular motility and muscle thickness measured with ultrasonography after intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin A. METHODS: Eight patients (five female were enrolled to measure ocular motility prior and 1, 7, 30 and 180 days after one injection of 2 ml of 1.5% bupivacaine and 2.5 U of botulinum toxin A in agonist and antagonist muscles, respectively, of eight amblyopic eyes. Muscle thickness was measured prior and on days 1, 7 and 30 after injection using 10-MHz ultrasonography (eyelid technique. RESULTS: Mean change in alignment was 10 prism diopters after 180 days (n=6. An average increase of 1.01 mm in muscle thickness was observed after 30 days of bupivacaine injection and 0.28 mm increase was observed after botulinum toxin A injection, as measured by ultrasonography. Lateral rectus muscles injected with bupivacaine had a mean increase of 1.5 mm in muscle thickness. CONCLUSION: In this study, a change in ocular motility was observed after 180 days of intramuscular injection of bupivacaine and botulinum toxin in horizontal extraocular muscles. Overall, there was an increase of muscle thickness in both botulinum toxinum A and bupivacaine injected muscles after 30 days of injection when measured by ultrasonography. This change was more pronounced on lateral rectus muscles after bupivacaine injection.

  8. Aplicación de la toxina botulínica A para el tratamiento del síndrome de Frey Application of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of Frey’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mareque Bueno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome Aurículo-temporal también conocido como sudoración gustativa o síndrome de Frey, es una entidad caracterizada por sudoración y enrojecimiento de la piel del territorio inervado por el nervio aurículo-temporal durante las comidas. El síndrome de Frey es probablemente una secuela inevitable en la cirugía de la glándula parótida. Una vez que se presenta se perpetua durante toda la vida si no se realiza tratamiento. Realizando el test de Minor tras cirugía sobre la glándula parótida ha sido publicado que el 100% son positivos, y que el 50% son sintomáticos percibiendo la sudoración durante las comidas, y alrededor de un 15% consideran sus síntomas graves. En el siguiente articulo presentamos los resultados de nuestro estudio que consistió en la inyección intradérmica de toxina botulínica A a nuestros pacientes con síndrome de Frey y el seguimiento. Los resultados han sido desaparición de los síntomas durante un periodo medio de 16 meses con cierta variabilidad individual. Con estos resultados podría considerarse la inyección de toxina botulínica A como ténica de elección para el síndrome de Frey ya establecido.The auriculotemporal syndrome, also known as gustatory sweating or Frey’s syndrome, is a condition characterized by sweating and flushing of the cutaneous territory innervated by the auriculotemporal nerve while eating. Frey’s syndrome is probably an inevitable sequela of parotid gland surgery. Once it appears, it persists for the rest of the patient’s life if not treated. It has been reported that performance on the Minor test after parotid gland surgery is 100% positive and 50% of patients are symptomatic, experiencing sweating during meals. About 15% consider their symptoms serious. In this article we present the results of our study of the treatment of Frey’s syndrome by intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A and the follow-up of the patients. The patients’ symptoms disappeared during

  9. Usefulness of intra-articular botulinum toxin injections. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenioui, Hichem; Houvenagel, Eric; Catanzariti, Jean François; Guyot, Marc Alexandre; Agnani, Olivier; Donze, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    Botulinum toxin is a proven and widely used treatment for numerous conditions characterized by excessive muscular contractions. Recent studies have assessed the analgesic effect of botulinum toxin in joint pain and started to unravel its mechanisms. We searched the international literature via the Medline database using the term "intraarticular botulinum toxin injection" combined with any of the following terms: "knee", "ankle", "shoulder", "osteoarthritis", "adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder". Of 16 selected articles about intraarticular botulinum toxin injections, 7 were randomized controlled trials done in patients with osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, or chronic pain after joint replacement surgery. Proof of anti-nociceptive effects was obtained in some of these indications and the safety and tolerance profile was satisfactory. The studies are heterogeneous. The comparator was usually a glucocorticoid or a placebo; a single study used hyaluronic acid. Pain intensity was the primary outcome measure. The number of randomized trials and sample sizes are too small to provide a satisfactory level of scientific evidence or statistical power. Unanswered issues include the effective dosage and the optimal dilution and injection modalities of botulinum toxin. Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Safety of Ultrasound-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injections for Sialorrhea as Performed by Pediatric Otolaryngologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Chun, Robert H; Sulman, Cecille G; Conley, Stephen F

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate incidence of complications and hospital readmission as a result of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin injections to manage sialorrhea. Case series with chart review. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin. A case series with chart review was performed of all cases of ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin by pediatric otolaryngologists from March 5, 2010, to September 26, 2014,. Primary outcomes included complications such as dysphagia, aspiration pneumonia, and motor paralysis. Secondary outcomes included hospitalization, intubation, and nasogastric tube placement. There were 48 patients, 111 interventions, and 306 intraglandular injections identified. Botulinum toxin type A and type B were utilized in 4 and 107 operative interventions, respectively. Type A was injected into 4 parotid and 4 submandibular glands, utilizing doses of 20 U per parotid and 30 U per submandibular gland. Type B was injected into 98 parotid and 200 submandibular glands, with average dosing of 923 U per parotid and 1170 U per submandibular gland, respectively. There were 2 instances of subjectively worsening of baseline dysphagia that self-resolved. No cases were complicated by aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. No patients required hospital readmission, intubation, or nasogastric tube placement. Prior published data indicated 16% complication incidence with ultrasound-guided injection of botulinum toxin. Our study found a low complication rate (0.6%) with ultrasound-guided injections of botulinum toxin to manage sialorrhea, without cases of aspiration pneumonia or motor paralysis. Of 306 intraglandular injections, there were 2 cases of worsening baseline subjective dysphagia that self-resolved. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  11. Intramural injection with botulinum toxin significantly elongates the pig esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Heidi Fhær; Jensen, Thorbjørn Søren Rønn; Rasmussen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment of long-gap esophageal atresia (LGEA) is challenging. Methods which facilitate stretching of the esophageal pouches may allow primary anastomosis. Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) blocks acetylcholine release in neuromuscular junctions, thereby causing muscle relaxation. We...

  12. Sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection to prevent pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackert, Thilo; Klaiber, Ulla; Hinz, Ulf; Kehayova, Tzveta; Probst, Pascal; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K; Schneider, Lutz; Strobel, Oliver; Michalski, Christoph W; Ulrich, Alexis; Sauer, Peter; Büchler, Markus W

    2017-05-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula represents the most important complication after distal pancreatectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a preoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the sphincter of Oddi to prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula (German Clinical Trials Register number: DRKS00007885). This was an investigator-initiated, prospective clinical phase I/II trial with an exploratory study design. We included patients who underwent preoperative endoscopic sphincter botulinum toxin injection (100 units of Botox). End points were the feasibility, safety, and postoperative outcomes, including postoperative pancreatic fistula within 30 days after distal pancreatectomy. Botulinum toxin patients were compared with a control collective of patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy without botulinum toxin injection by case-control matching in a 1:1 ratio. Between February 2015 and February 2016, 29 patients were included. All patients underwent successful sphincter of Oddi botulinum toxin injection within a median of 6 (range 0-10) days before operation. One patient had an asymptomatic, self-limiting (48 hours) increase in serum amylase and lipase after injection. Distal pancreatectomy was performed in 24/29 patients; 5 patients were not resectable. Of the patients receiving botulinum toxin, 7 (29%) had increased amylase levels in drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 (the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula grade A) without symptoms or need for reintervention. Importantly, no clinically relevant fistulas (International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery grades B/C) were observed in botulinum toxin patients compared to 33% postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B/C in case-control patients (P botulinum toxin injection is a novel and safe approach to decrease the incidence of clinically relevant postoperative pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy. The results of

  13. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Response to botulinum toxin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Cannito

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael P Cannito, Joel C Kahane, Lesya ChornaSchool of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, USAAbstract: Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age.Keywords: vocal aging, adductor spasmodic dysphonia, botulinum toxin, voice quality, speech fluency

  14. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Injections in the Treatment of Various Types of Facial Region Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Çoban

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Local injection of botulinum toxin is a highly effective treatment option for a wide range of movement disorders and there are reliable sources of information on its indications, effects and safety in clinical practice. In this study, we report our experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of facial region disorders. METHODS: Patients who had been followed in the Botulinum Toxin Outpatient Clinic of the Neurology Department were retrospectively evaluated. Two preparations of botulinum toxin type A (BT-A were used. The efficacy of BT-A injections was rated according to the improvement in symptoms as follows: marked - 75-100% improvement, good - 50-74%, moderate - 25-49%, and insufficient - less than 25% symptom relief. RESULTS: One hundred eighty-two patients (73 male, 109 female with various facial region disorders were included. The efficacy rates for patients who had very good and good improvement were high in the treatment of blepharospasm, hemifacial spasm, facial synkinesis, and Meige syndrome and moderate for oromandibular dystonia and hypersalivation. Ptosis was the most common side effect. CONCLUSION: According to our results, botulinum toxin was very effective treatment for blepharospasm, Meige syndrome, hemifacial spasm and facial synkinesis, whereas it demonstrated good efficacy in oromandibular dystonia and hypersalivation

  15. Development of an inventory of goals using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health in a population of non-ambulatory children and adolescents with cerebral palsy treated with botulinum toxin A

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Linda; Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2018-01-01

    Background In the management of hypertonicity in children with cerebral palsy (CP), goals should be clearly identified in order to evaluate the effectiveness of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) treatment, specifically in non-ambulatory children and adolescents, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), level IV or V. A retrospective chart review (Mesterman et al., 2013) identified the need for the development of a set of specific and meaningful goals linked to the International Classifica...

  16. Muscle disuse caused by botulinum toxin injection leads to increased central gain of the stretch reflex in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Hultborn, Hans; Naslund-Koch, Lui

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (Btx) is used in children with cerebral palsy and other neurological patients to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in the central gain of the stretch reflex circuitry in response to botulinum toxin injection...

  17. Electromyography-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection Into the Cricothyroid Muscles in Bilateral Vocal Fold Abductor Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Akyildiz, Serdar; Erdinc, Munevver; Ozturk, Kerem; Ogut, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis (BVFAP) both deteriorates quality of life and may cause life-threatening respiratory problems. The aim of this study was to reduce respiratory symptoms in BVFAP patients using cricothyroid (CT) botulinum toxin (BTX) injection. Methods Before and 2 weeks and 4 months after bilateral BTX injection into the CT muscles under electromyography; alterations in respiratory, acoustic, aerodynamic and quality of life parameters were evaluated in BVFAP ...

  18. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used to diminish spasticity and reduce the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats...... received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the non-injected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, the Achilles tendon was cut...... and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force (Mmax) evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused...

  19. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Response to botulinum toxin injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannito, Michael P; Kahane, Joel C; Chorna, Lesya

    2008-01-01

    Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age. PMID:18488884

  20. Vocal aging and adductor spasmodic dysphonia: response to botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannito, Michael P; Kahane, Joel C; Chorna, Lesya

    2008-01-01

    Aging of the larynx is characterized by involutional changes which alter its biomechanical and neural properties and create a biological environment that is different from younger counterparts. Illustrative anatomical examples are presented. This natural, non-disease process appears to set conditions which may influence the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injection and our expectations for its success. Adductor spasmodic dysphonia, a type of laryngeal dystonia, is typically treated using botulinum toxin injections of the vocal folds in order to suppress adductory muscle spasms which are disruptive to production of speech and voice. A few studies have suggested diminished response to treatment in older patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia. This retrospective study provides a reanalysis of existing pre-to-post treatment data as function of age. Perceptual judgments of speech produced by 42 patients with ADSD were made by two panels of professional listeners with expertise in voice or fluency of speech. Results demonstrate a markedly reduced positive response to botulinum toxin treatment in the older patients. Perceptual findings are further elucidated by means of acoustic spectrography. Literature on vocal aging is reviewed to provide a specific set of biological mechanisms that best account for the observed interaction of botulinum toxin treatment with advancing age.

  1. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Park, Jae Hong; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Seung Won

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group) and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group). Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI) before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable. PMID:25383369

  2. Treatment Efficacy of Electromyography versus Fiberscopy-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection in Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients: A Prospective Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Wook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group. Methods. Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD, who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Results. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P>0.05. There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Conclusion. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  3. Treatment efficacy of electromyography versus fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injection in adductor spasmodic dysphonia patients: a prospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Park, Jae Hong; Park, Ki Nam; Lee, Seung Won

    2014-01-01

    This study prospectively evaluates and compares the treatment efficacy of botulinum toxin injection under electromyography guidance (EMG group) and percutaneous botulinum toxin injection under flexible fiberscopic guidance (fiberscopy group). Thirty patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), who had never received treatment, were randomly allocated into EMG- or fiberscopy-guided botulinum toxin injections between March 2008 and February 2010. We assessed acoustic and aerodynamic voice parameters, and the voice handicap index (VHI) before injection and at 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. The mean total dosage of botulinum toxin was similar for both groups: 1.7 ± 0.5 U for the EMG group and 1.8 ± 0.4 U for the fiberscopy group (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in outcomes between the two groups in either the duration of effectiveness or complications such as breathy voice and aspiration. Botulinum toxin injection under fiberscopic guidance is a viable alternative to EMG-guided botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia when EMG equipment is unavailable.

  4. Botulinum toxin A versus B in sialorrhea: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, crossover pilot study in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidubaldi, Arianna; Fasano, Alfonso; Ialongo, Tamara; Piano, Carla; Pompili, Maurizio; Mascianà, Roberta; Siciliani, Luisa; Sabatelli, Mario; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2011-02-01

    Either botulinum toxins (BoNTs) A and B have been used for improving drooling in different neurological conditions. Consecutive patients affected by Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's Disease (PD) accompanied by severe drooling were randomized to receive botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) or B (BoNT-B) injections into the salivary glands. Following the first treatment, when sialorrhea returned to baseline (at least three months after the first injection), subjects were re-treated with the other serotype. Ultrasound-guided injections into parotid and submandibular glands were bilaterally performed: total doses were 250 U BoNT-A (Dysport) and 2500 U BoNT-B (Neurobloc). Objective (cotton roll weight) and subjective (ad hoc clinical scales) evaluations were performed at baseline, after 1 and 4 weeks, and every 4 weeks until drooling returned to baseline. Twenty-seven patients (15 ALS and 12 PD) were enrolled, fourteen completed the study. BoNT-A and BoNT-B treatments gave both subjective and objective improvements in all patients. The latency was significantly shorter after BoNT-B treatments (3.2 ± 3.7 days) compared to BoNT-A (6.6 ± 4.1 days; P = 0.002). The mean benefit duration was similar at 75 and 90 days for BoNT-A and BoNT-B, respectively (P = NS). The only toxin-related side effect was a change to saliva thickness. Either 250 U Dysport or 2500 U Neurobloc have similar effectiveness and safety in controlling sialorrhea. BoNT-B has a shorter latency and comparable duration. Cost analysis, considering the doses used in this study protocol favored BoNT-B treatment. Copyright © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  5. Muscle structure and stiffness assessment after botulinum toxin type A injection. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathevon, L; Michel, F; Decavel, P; Fernandez, B; Parratte, B; Calmels, P

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum toxin type A manages spasticity disorders in neurological central diseases. Some studies have reported that it might induce muscle changes. We present a literature review abiding by the PRISMA statement guidelines. The purpose was to explore the structural and passive biomechanical muscle properties after botulinum toxin type A injections in healthy and spastic limb muscles, on animals and humans, as well as methods for evaluating these properties. We searched the PubMed and Cochrane Library databases using the following keywords: "Botulinum toxin" AND ("muscle structure" OR "muscle atrophy") and, "Botulinum toxin" AND "muscle elasticity". From the 228 initially identified articles, 21 articles were included. Histological analyses were performed, especially on animals. A neurogenic atrophy systematically occurred. In humans, one year after a single injection, the histological recovery remained incomplete. Furthermore, 2D ultrasound analyses showed a reduction of the gastrocnemius thickness and pennation angle. MRI volumetric analysis evidenced muscular atrophy six months or one year after a single injection. Passive muscle stiffness depends on these structural changes. On the short term, the biomechanical analysis showed an elastic modulus increase in animals whereas no change was recorded in humans. On the short term, ultrasound elastography imaging showed a decreased elastic modulus. To date, few data are available, but all show a structural and mechanical muscle impact post injections, specifically muscle atrophy which can linger over time. Further studies are necessary to validate this element, and the possibility of change must be taken into account particularly with repeated injections. Thus, in clinical practice, 2D ultrasound and ultrasound elastography are two non-invasive techniques that will help physicians to develop an efficient long term monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Botulinum toxin injections for new onset bilateral vocal fold motion impairment in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekbom, Dale C; Garrett, C Gaelyn; Yung, Katherine C; Johnson, Felicia L; Billante, Cheryl R; Zealear, David L; Courey, Mark S

    2010-04-01

    Review of clinical experience and results using botulinum toxin type A (BTX) for the management of adult patients with respiratory compromise due to new onset bilateral vocal fold motion impairment (BVFMI). Retrospective case series. The records of 11 patients from two institutions with respiratory compromise due to bilateral vocal fold motion impairment were reviewed. Age, sex, etiology of motion impairment, subjective response to BTX injections, changes in pulmonary function studies pre- and postinjection when available, the dosage of botulinum toxin required to achieve response, the number of injections per patient, and complications were reported. All patients were over 18 years old. There were three male and eight female subjects. The etiology of BVFMI was due to previous anterior cervical surgery in nine patients and prolonged intubation in two. Ten patients reported symptomatic improvement and returned for an average of nine injections over the 10-year period of study. The most common interval between injections was 3 months. In all patients the dose required to achieve symptomatic improvement was at least 2.5 mouse units injected into each vocal fold. One patient without relief of symptoms had bilateral cricoarytenoid joint fixation. Complications were limited to moderate dysphagia in one patient and breathy dysphonia in all patients. BTX injection into the vocal folds provides temporary relief of symptoms in airway obstruction in adult patients with BVFMI. Patients require an average of 2.5 units of botulinum injection into each vocal fold and have an average length of response of 3 months. BTX injection may be used as a form of temporary relief of airway obstruction in patients wishing to avoid ablative surgery or tracheotomy.

  7. Sacral neuromodulation and Botulinum toxin A for refractory idiopathic overactive bladder: a cost-utility analysis in the perspective of Italian Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertapelle, Maria Paola; Vottero, Mario; Popolo, Giulio Del; Mencarini, Marco; Ostardo, Edoardo; Spinelli, Michele; Giannantoni, Antonella; D'Ausilio, Anna

    2015-08-01

    To assess the relative cost-effectiveness of two therapeutic strategies: one starting with sacral neuromodulation (SNM) versus one starting with Botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for the management of refractory incontinent idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB) patients, from the perspective of the Italian National Health Service (INHS). Direct medical costs (2011) and benefits (quality-adjusted life years-QALYs) were assessed over a ten-year time frame adapting to the Italian practice a published Markov model. Clinical inputs were based on the published literature and on the expert opinion. Resource consumption rates were provided by clinical experts; unit costs were collected from a single hospital accounting and from standard tariff lists and public prices. Interventional procedures and management of adverse events were costed through a micro-costing approach. The primary outcome was incremental costs per QALYs gained (i.e. differential costs divided by differential benefits). Deterministic (DSA) and probabilistic (PSA) sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the model. Starting with SNM appears to be cost effective (i.e. under 40.000/QALY) from year three (21,259/QALY) onwards and becomes dominant (i.e. more effective and less costly) at year ten: cumulative costs were 32,975 for early SNM and 33,309 for early BTX-A, while cumulative QALYs were 7.52 and 6.93, respectively. At year ten, DSA suggests the results robustness and 99.8 % of the PSA iterations fell within the cost-effectiveness threshold. A therapeutic strategy starting with SNM may be considered cost effective in the midterm and cost saving in the long-term treatment of idiopathic OAB from the INHS perspective.

  8. Factors Influencing Goal Attainment in Patients with Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity Following Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A in Real-Life Clinical Practice: Sub-Analyses from the Upper Limb International Spasticity (ULIS-II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens Fheodoroff

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this post-hoc analysis of the ULIS-II study, we investigated factors influencing person-centred goal setting and achievement following botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A treatment in 456 adults with post-stroke upper limb spasticity (ULS. Patients with primary goals categorised as passive function had greater motor impairment (p < 0.001, contractures (soft tissue shortening [STS] (p = 0.006 and spasticity (p = 0.02 than those setting other goal types. Patients with goals categorised as active function had less motor impairment (0.0001, contracture (p < 0.0001, spasticity (p < 0.001 and shorter time since stroke (p = 0.001. Patients setting goals for pain were older (p = 0.01 with more contractures (p = 0.008. The proportion of patients achieving their primary goal was not impacted by timing of first-ever BoNT-A injection (medium-term (≤1 year vs. longer-term (>1 year post-stroke (80.0% vs. 79.2% or presence or absence of severe contractures (76.7% vs. 80.6%, although goal types differed. Earlier BoNT-A intervention was associated with greater achievement of active function goals. Severe contractures impacted negatively on goal achievement except in pain and passive function. Goal setting by patients with ULS is influenced by impairment severity, age and time since stroke. Our findings resonate with clinical experience and may assist patients and clinicians in selecting realistic, achievable goals for treatment.

  9. Botulinum neurotoxin type A injections for vaginismus secondary to vulvar vestibulitis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolasi, Laura; Frasson, Emma; Cappelletti, Jee Yun; Vicentini, Silvana; Bordignon, Monia; Graziottin, Alessandra

    2009-11-01

    To investigate whether botulinum neurotoxin type A improves vaginismus and study its efficacy with repeated treatments. Outpatients were referred because standard cognitive-behavioral and medical treatment for vaginismus and vulvar vestibular syndrome failed. From this group, we prospectively recruited consecutive women (n=39) whose diagnostic electromyogram (EMG) recordings from the levator ani muscle showed hyperactivity at rest and reduced inhibition during straining. These women were followed for a mean (+/-standard deviation) of 105 (+/-50) weeks. Recruited patients underwent repeated cycles of botulinum neurotoxin type A injected into the levator ani under EMG guidance and EMG monitoring thereafter. At enrollment and 4 weeks after each cycle, women were asked about sexual intercourse; underwent EMG evaluation and examinations to grade vaginal resistance according to Lamont; and completed a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the Female Sexual Function Index Scale, a quality-of-life questionnaire (Short-Form 12 Health Survey), and bowel and bladder symptom assessment. At 4 weeks after the first botulinum neurotoxin type A cycle, the primary outcome measures (the possibility of having sexual intercourse, and levator ani EMG hyperactivity) both improved, as did the secondary outcomes, Lamont scores, VAS, Female Sexual Function Index Scales, Short-Form 12 Health Survey, and bowel-bladder symptoms. These benefits persisted through later cycles. When follow-up ended, 63.2% of the patients completely recovered from vaginismus and vulvar vestibular syndrome, 15.4% still needed reinjections (censored), and 15.4% had dropped out. Botulinum neurotoxin type A is an effective treatment option for vaginismus secondary to vulvar vestibular syndrome refractory to standard cognitive-behavioral and medical management. After patients received botulinum neurotoxin type A, their sexual activity improved and reinjections provided sustained benefits. III.

  10. Botulinum toxin therapy in Frey's syndrome: a retrospective study of 440 treatments in 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, S; Jerowski, M; Ludwig, L; Fischer-Krall, E; Beutner, D; Grosheva, M

    2017-04-01

    Frey's syndrome is characterised as sweating, redness and warmth of the parotideal area and is often treated with botulinum toxin A. The objective of this retrospective study was to prove whether the toxin dosage and time-to-treatment intervals change after repeated botulinum toxin injections. The charts of patients, who were treated for Frey's syndrome during the last 16 years, were assessed. Three brands of botulinum toxin A were available for therapy. The Minor test was used to confirm the sweating before each treatment and to determine the toxin dosage. Constant amount of botulinum toxin was injected per cm 2 of the affected area. Patients consulted our department for the next treatment as soon as they felt disturbed by recurring sweating and when the sweating was objectively evident in the Minor test. Time intervals between treatments and injected toxin dosages were assessed. In total, 100 patients received 440 treatments in 16 years. Repeated injections, median 4.0, were carried out in 70.5% of patients. Median time interval to the first injection was 2.8 years. Median time interval between treatments was 12.0 months and showed to be steady (anova, P = .49, F = 1.01). Duration of effect of botulinum toxin on Frey's syndrome was long-lasting and stable with no significantly different time intervals between treatments. The extent of the sweating area did not vary significantly after repeated treatments and required a constant dose of botulinum toxin A. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Botulinum toxin injection for hypercontractile or spastic esophageal motility disorders: may high-resolution manometry help to select cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjoux, S; Brochard, C; Roman, S; Gincul, R; Pagenault, M; Ponchon, T; Ropert, A; Mion, F

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic injections of botulinum toxin in the cardia or distal esophagus have been advocated to treat achalasia and spastic esophageal motility disorders. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate whether manometric diagnosis using the Chicago classification in high-resolution manometry (HRM) would be predictive of the clinical response. Charts of patients with spastic and hypertensive motility disorders diagnosed with HRM and treated with botulinum toxin were retrospectively reviewed at two centers. HRM recordings were systematically reanalyzed, and a patient's phone survey was conducted. Forty-five patients treated between 2008 and 2013 were included. Most patients had achalasia type 3 (22 cases). Other diagnoses were jackhammer esophagus (8 cases), distal esophageal spasm (7 cases), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (5 cases), nutcracker esophagus (1 case), and 2 unclassified cases. Botulinum toxin injections were performed into the cardia only in 9 cases, into the wall of the distal esophagus in 19 cases, and in both locations (cardia and distal esophagus) in 17 cases. No complication occurred in 31 cases. Chest pain was noticed for less than 7 days in 13 cases. One death related to mediastinitis occurred 3 weeks after botulinum toxin injection. Efficacy was assessed in 42 patients: 71% were significantly improved 2 months after botulinum toxin, and 57% remained satisfied for more than 6 months. No clear difference was observed in terms of response according to manometric diagnosis; however, type 3 achalasia previously dilated and with normal integrated relaxation pressure (4s-integrated relaxation pressure botulinum toxin. Endoscopic injections of botulinum toxin may be effective in some patients with spastic or hypercontractile esophageal motility disorders. The manometric Chicago classification diagnosis does not seem to predict the results. Prospective randomized trials are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from

  12. Botulinum Toxin Injection for Internal Rotation Contractures in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy. A Minimum 5-Year Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijnisveld, Bouke J; van Wijlen-Hempel, Marie S; Hogendoorn, Simone; de Boer, Kees S; Malessy, Martijn J A; Keurentjes, J Christiaan; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    Brachial plexus birth palsy is frequently associated with internal rotation contractures of the shoulder as a result of muscle imbalance. The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in the subscapular (SC) muscle on external rotation and the need for tendon transfer for external rotation of the shoulder. A prospective comparative study was performed including 15 consecutive patients treated with BTX-A and a historic control group of 67 patients with mean age 30 months (SD 10). The BTX-A injection (2 IU/kg body weight) was performed immediately following MRI under general anesthesia in the SC muscle. Passive external rotation, the need for tendon transfer surgery, glenohumeral deformity, and muscle degeneration were evaluated. The hazard ratio for no relapse of internal rotation contracture after BTX-A injection compared with no BTX-A injection was calculated. In the BTX-A group, the passive external rotation in adduction increased from -1 degree (95% CI, -10 to 8) to 32 degrees (95% CI, 17-46) at 3 months and 6 patients were indicated for surgery compared with a decline from -2 degrees (95% CI, -7 to 3) to -11 degrees (95% CI, -17 to -6) in the control group with 66 indications for surgery. At 5 years of follow-up, 10 patients in the BTX-A group were indicated for surgery with a hazard ratio of 4.0 (95% CI, 1.9 to 8.4). BTX-A injection in the SC muscle of brachial plexus birth palsy patients can reduce internal rotation contractures and subsequently the need for tendon transfer surgery. At 5 years of follow-up a relapse was seen in 67% of the patients treated with BTX-A. Because at MRI less SC degeneration was found in the good responders on BTX-A treatment, this group seems to be the best target group. Further research is needed on patient selection for BTX-A injection including glenohumeral deformity, SC degeneration, as well as doses of BTX-A to be used. Level II-prospective comparative study.

  13. Unilateral versus bilateral thyroarytenoid Botulinum toxin injections in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upile, Tahwinder; Elmiyeh, Behrad; Jerjes, Waseem; Prasad, Vyas; Kafas, Panagiotis; Abiola, Jesuloba; Youl, Bryan; Epstein, Ruth; Hopper, Colin; Sudhoff, Holger; Rubin, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In this preliminary prospective study, we compared unilateral and bilateral thyroarytenoid muscle injections of Botulinum toxin (Dysport) in 31 patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia, who had undergone more than 5 consecutive Dysport injections (either unilateral or bilateral) and had completed 5 concomitant self-rated efficacy and complication scores questionnaires related to the previous injections. We also developed a Neurophysiological Scoring (NPS) system which has utility in the treatment administration. Method and materials Data were gathered prospectively on voice improvement (self-rated 6 point scale), length of response and duration of complications (breathiness, cough, dysphagia and total voice loss). Injections were performed under electromyography (EMG) guidance. NPS scale was used to describe the EMG response. Dose and unilateral/bilateral injections were determined by clinical judgment based on previous response. Time intervals between injections were patient driven. Results Low dose unilateral Dysport injection was associated with no significant difference in the patient's outcome in terms of duration of action, voice score (VS) and complication rate when compared to bilateral injections. Unilateral injections were not associated with any post treatment total voice loss unlike the bilateral injections. Conclusion Unilateral low dose Dysport injections are recommended in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia. PMID:19852852

  14. Unilateral versus bilateral thyroarytenoid Botulinum toxin injections in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Jesuloba

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives In this preliminary prospective study, we compared unilateral and bilateral thyroarytenoid muscle injections of Botulinum toxin (Dysport in 31 patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia, who had undergone more than 5 consecutive Dysport injections (either unilateral or bilateral and had completed 5 concomitant self-rated efficacy and complication scores questionnaires related to the previous injections. We also developed a Neurophysiological Scoring (NPS system which has utility in the treatment administration. Method and materials Data were gathered prospectively on voice improvement (self-rated 6 point scale, length of response and duration of complications (breathiness, cough, dysphagia and total voice loss. Injections were performed under electromyography (EMG guidance. NPS scale was used to describe the EMG response. Dose and unilateral/bilateral injections were determined by clinical judgment based on previous response. Time intervals between injections were patient driven. Results Low dose unilateral Dysport injection was associated with no significant difference in the patient's outcome in terms of duration of action, voice score (VS and complication rate when compared to bilateral injections. Unilateral injections were not associated with any post treatment total voice loss unlike the bilateral injections. Conclusion Unilateral low dose Dysport injections are recommended in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

  15. Dramatic changes in muscle contractile and structural properties after 2 botulinum toxin injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Viviane B; Suzuki, Kentaro P; Bremner, Shannon N; Lieber, Richard L; Ward, Samuel R

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin is frequently administered serially to maintain therapeutic muscle paralysis, but the effect of repeated doses on muscle function are largely unknown. This study characterized the muscle response to 2 onabotulinum toxin (BoNT) injections separated by 3 months. Animal subjects received a single toxin injection (n = 8), 2 BoNT injections separated by 3 months (n = 14), or 1 BoNT and 1 saline injection separated by 3 months (n = 8). The functional effect of 2 serial injections was exponentially greater than the effect of a single injection. While both groups treated with a single BoNT injection had decreased torque in the injected leg by approximately 50% relative to contralateral legs, the double BoNT injected group had decreased torque by over 95% relative to the preinjection level. Both single and double BoNT injections produced clear signs of fiber-type grouping. These experiments demonstrate a disproportionately greater effect of repeated BoNT injections. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prospective randomised controlled trial comparing trigone-sparing versus trigone-including intradetrusor injection of abobotulinumtoxinA for refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-05-01

    Botulinum toxin A is effective for treatment of idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO). The trigone is generally spared because of the theoretical risk of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), although studies assessing injection sites are lacking.

  17. The point-touch technique for botulinum toxin injection in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: quality of life assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morzaria, S; Damrose, E J

    2011-07-01

    Botulinum toxin injection under electromyographic guidance is the 'gold standard' for adductor spasmodic dysphonia treatment. The point-touch technique, an alternative injection method which relies on anatomical landmarks, is cheaper, quicker and more accessible, but has not yet gained widespread acceptance due to concerns about patient satisfaction. To assess swallowing and voice-related quality of life following point-touch botulinum toxin injection in adductor spasmodic dysphonia patients. Stanford University Voice and Swallowing Center. Prospective case series (evidence level four). Consecutive adductor spasmodic dysphonia patients with a stable botulinum toxin dose-response relationship were recruited prospectively. The Eating Assessment Tool and Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaires were completed pre-treatment and at 10 and 30 per cent completion of the injection cycle, respectively. Thirty-seven patients completed follow up. The mean total botulinum toxin dose was 0.88 units. Pre-treatment Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaire results reflected the burden of disease. Post-treatment Eating Assessment Tool and Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaire results were collected at 2.53 and 7.84 weeks, respectively; the former showed an increase in dysphagia, albeit statistically insignificant, while the latter showed significantly improved scores (both domain and total). The point-touch technique is a viable alternative for botulinum toxin injection in the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

  18. [Botulinum toxin: An important complement for facial rejuvenation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Louarn, C

    2017-10-01

    The improved understanding of the functional anatomy of the face and of the action of the botulinum toxin A leads us to determine a new injection procedure which consequently decreases the risk of eyebrow and eyelid ptosis and increases the toxin's injection possibilities and efficiencies. With less units of toxin, the technique herein described proposes to be more efficient on more muscles: variable toxin injections concentration adapted to each injected muscle are used. Thanks to a new procedure in the upper face, toxin A injection can be quite close to an endoscopic surgical action. In addition, interesting results are achievable to rejuvenate the lateral canthus with injection on the upper lateral tarsus, to rejuvenate the nose with injection at the alar base, the jawline and the neck region. Lastly, a smoothing effect on the skin (meso botox) is obtained by the anticholinergic action of the toxin A on the dermal receptors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Alternative Approach to Traumatic Stensen’s Duct Injuries Accompanied by Glandular Involvement: Botulinum Toxin Injection to the Gland in Conjunction with Microsurgical Repair of the Duct in an Acute Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Çalış

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of a simultaneous application of botulinum toxin to the parotid gland in conjunction with the microsurgical repair of the duct in an acute setting and to encourage using botulinum toxin as a first-line option to prevent future complications associated with glandular involvement. Material and Methods: Three patients who were referred to the Plastic Surgery Clinic by the emergency room of the Hacettepe University Hospital after maxillofacial trauma are reviewed in this study. Exploration of the facial nerve and Stensen’s duct was planned for all patients within the first 72 hours after their injuries. After intraoral catheterization of the Stensen’s duct through the papilla using an epidural catheter, microsurgical end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Concurrently, 100 units of botulinum toxin A was injected at standardized eight points to the parotid gland. Results: Postoperative magnetic resonance (MR sialography revealed patency in all patients at the end of postoperative first year. The mean postoperative parotid volume of the injured and non-injured sides were 19.82±10.55 cm3 and 17.79±10.98 cm3, respectively, and the results were found to be comparable. Fibrillation potentials in the postoperative electromyography recordings and clinical examination demonstrated nerve regeneration. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin A appears to be effective in treating duct injuries accompanied by glandular involvement in an acute setting, as well as in preventing long-term complications.

  20. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of various botulinum toxin A doses and concentrations in spastic foot after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available No recommended guidelines currently exist for the therapeutic concentration or dose of botulinum toxin type A (BTXA injected into the muscle to treat limb spasticity. Therefore, in this randomized controlled trial, we explored the safety and efficacy of two concentrations and two doses of BTXA in the treatment of spastic foot after stroke to optimize this treatment in these patients. Eligible patients (n = 104 were randomized into four groups. The triceps surae and tibialis posterior on the affected side were injected with BTXA at one of two doses (200 U or 400 U and two concentrations (50 U/mL or 100 U/mL. The following assessments were conducted before as well as 4 days and 1, 2, 4, and 12 weeks after treatment: spasticity, assessed using the modified Ashworth scale; basic functional mobility, assessed using a timed up and go test; pace, assessed using a 10-meter timed walking test; and the ability to walk, assessed using Holden's graded scale and a visual analog scale. The reported results are based on the 89 patients that completed the study. We found significant differences for the two doses and concentrations of BTXA to improve the ability of patients to walk independently, with the high-dose/low-concentration combination providing the best effect. Onset and duration of the ameliorating effects of BTXA were 4–7 days and 12 weeks, respectively. Thus, BTXA effectively treated foot spasms after stroke at an optimal dose of 400 U and concentration of 50 U/mL.

  1. Participation of pro- and anti-nociceptive interleukins in botulinum toxin A-induced analgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zychowska, Magdalena; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia; Marinelli, Sara; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) shows antinociceptive properties, and its clinical applications in pain therapy are continuously increasing. BoNT/A specifically cleaves SNAP-25, which results in the formation of a non-functional SNARE complex, thereby potently inhibiting the release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, including those involved in nociception. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of BoNT/A (300pg/paw) on pain-related behavior and the levels of glial markers and interleukins in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Glial activity was also examined after repeated intraperitoneal injection of minocycline combined with a single BoNT/A injection. Our results show that a single intraplantar BoNT/A injection did not influence motor function but strongly diminished pain-related behaviors in naïve and CCI-exposed rats. Additionally, microglial inhibition using minocycline enhanced the analgesic effects of BoNT/A. Western blotting results suggested that CCI induces the upregulation of the pronociceptive proteins IL-18, IL-6 and IL-1β in the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord and DRG, but no changes in the levels of the antinociceptive proteins IL-18BP, IL-1RA and IL-10 were observed. Interestingly, BoNT/A injection suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of IL-18 and IL-1β in the spinal cord and/or DRG and increased the levels of IL-10 and IL-1RA in the DRG. In summary, our results suggest that BoNT/A significantly attenuates pain-related behavior and microglial activation and restores the neuroimmune balance in a CCI model by decreasing the levels of pronociceptive factors (IL-1β and IL-18) and increasing the levels of antinociceptive factors (IL-10 and IL-1RA) in the spinal cord and DRG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Rapid Detection of Clostridium botulinum Toxins A, B, E, and F in Clinical Samples, Selected Food Matrices, and Buffer Using Paramagnetic Bead-Based Electrochemiluminescence Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rivera, Victor R; Gamez, Frank J; Keener, William K; White, Jill A; Poli, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    Sensitive and specific electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assays were used to detect Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins serotypes A, B, E, and F in undiluted human serum, undiluted human urine, assay buffer, and selected food matrices...

  3. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is used with the intention of diminishing spasticity and reducing the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the noninjected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed, 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, and the Achilles tendon was cut and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex-mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused severe atrophy of the triceps surae muscle at all time points. The force generated by stretch reflex activity was also strongly diminished but not to the same extent as the maximal muscle force at 2 and 4 wk, signifying a relative reflex hyperexcitability. Passive muscle stiffness was unaltered at 1 wk but increased at 2, 4, and 8 wk (P botulinum toxin causes a relative increase in reflex stiffness, which is likely caused by compensatory neuroplastic changes. The stiffness of elastic elements in the muscles also increased. The data are not consistent with the ideas that botulinum toxin is an efficient antispastic medication or that it may prevent development of contractures. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. 125I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin: pharmacokinetics in cats after intramuscular injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegand, H.; Erdmann, G.; Wellhoener, H.H.

    1976-01-01

    On unilateral injection of sublethal doses of 125 I-botulinum A neurotoxin (BTA) into one gastrocnemius muscle of the cat we found after 48 h: a disto-proximal gradient of radioactivity (RA) hat developed in the sciatic nerve of the injected side. The ventral roots of the spinal cord half segments supplying the injected muscle showed a higher RA than the ventral roots of the contralateral control side. The spinal cord half segments innervating the injected muscle had a RA much higher than the corresponding segments of the contralateral side. However, a small rise of RA was also observed in the contralateral half segments. In histoautoradiographs of the (ligatured) ventral roots the RA was strictly confined to the intraaxonal space of a few nerve fibres. On injection of equal doses of 125 I-BTA into either gastrocnemius muscle we found after 38 h: direct stimulation of only one of the injected muscles caused the RA to reach a higher level in the spinal cord half segments ipsilateral to the stimulated muscle than in the spinal cord half segments of the non-stimulated side. Unilateral stimulation of one gastrocnemius nerve under the influence of gallamine or unilateral antidromic stimulation of the dorsal roots L7, S1 failed to cause a difference in RA between stimulated and non-stimulated side. (orig.) [de

  5. /sup 125/I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin: pharmacokinetics in cats after intramuscular injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegand, H; Erdmann, G; Wellhoener, H H [Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.

    1976-01-01

    On unilateral injection of sublethal doses of /sup 125/I-botulinum A neurotoxin (BTA) into one gastrocnemius muscle of the cat we found after 48 h: a disto-proximal gradient of radioactivity (RA) hat developed in the sciatic nerve of the injected side. The ventral roots of the spinal cord half segments supplying the injected muscle showed a higher RA than the ventral roots of the contralateral control side. The spinal cord half segments innervating the injected muscle had a RA much higher than the corresponding segments of the contralateral side. However, a small rise of RA was also observed in the contralateral half segments. In histoautoradiographs of the (ligatured) ventral roots the RA was strictly confined to the intraaxonal space of a few nerve fibres. On injection of equal doses of /sup 125/I-BTA into either gastrocnemius muscle we found after 38 h: direct stimulation of only one of the injected muscles caused the RA to reach a higher level in the spinal cord half segments ipsilateral to the stimulated muscle than in the spinal cord half segments of the non-stimulated side. Unilateral stimulation of one gastrocnemius nerve under the influence of gallamine or unilateral antidromic stimulation of the dorsal roots L7, S1 failed to cause a difference in RA between stimulated and non-stimulated side.

  6. No change in calf muscle passive stiffness after botulinum toxin injection in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusaini, Adel A A; Crosbie, Jack; Shepherd, Roberta B; Dean, Catherine M; Scheinberg, Adam

    2011-06-01

    Stiffness and shortening of the calf muscle due to neural or mechanical factors can profoundly affect motor function. The aim of this study was to investigate non-neurally mediated calf-muscle tightness in children with cerebral palsy (CP) before and after botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection. Sixteen children with spastic CP (seven females, nine males; eight at Gross Motor Function Classification System level I, eight at level II; age range 4-10 y) and calf muscle spasticity were tested before and during the pharmaceutically active phase after injection of BoNT-A. Measures of passive muscle compliance and viscoelastic responses, hysteresis, and the gradient of the torque-angle curve were computed and compared before and after injection. Although there was a slight, but significant increase in ankle range of motion after BoNT-A injection and a small, significant decrease in the torque required to achieve plantigrade and 5° of dorsiflexion, no significant difference in myotendinous stiffness or hysteresis were detected after BoNT-A injection. Despite any effect on neurally mediated responses, the compliance of the calf muscle was not changed and the muscle continued to offer significant resistance to passive motion of the ankle. These findings suggest that additional treatment approaches are required to supplement the effects of BoNT-A injections when managing children with calf muscle spasticity. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  7. The Effect of Intramural Botulinum Toxin Injections on the Elongation of the Piglet Oesophagus Is Time Dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakholdt Dibbern, Christian; Rose, Morten; Ellebæk, Mark Bremholm

    2017-01-01

    Introduction One in 4,000 infants is born with oesophageal atresia. Approximately 15% of these have a long gap oesophageal atresia, where primary anastomosis is difficult or impossible. Previous studies have shown an effect of intramural botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injections on the elongation...

  8. Effect of whole-body vibration and insulin-like growth factor-I on muscle paralysis-induced bone degeneration after botulinum toxin injection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, Anja; Lechner, Philipp; Ratiu, Oana; Reuter, Sven; Hamann, Nina; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Schönau, Eckhard; Bloch, Wilhelm; Beccard, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    Botulinum toxin A (BTX)-induced muscle paralysis results in pronounced bone degradation with substantial bone loss. We hypothesized that whole-body vibration (WBV) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) treatment can counteract paralysis-induced bone degradation following BTX injections by activation of the protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Female C57BL/6 mice (n = 60, 16 weeks) were assigned into six groups (n = 10 each): SHAM, BTX, BTX+WBV, BTX+IGF-I, BTX+WBV+IGF-I, and a baseline group, which was killed at the beginning of the study. Mice received a BTX (1.0 U/0.1 mL) or saline (SHAM) injection in the right hind limb. The BTX+IGF-I and BTX+WBV+IGF-I groups obtained daily subcutaneous injections of human IGF-I (1 μg/day). The BTX+WBV and BTX+WBV+IGF-I groups underwent WBV (25 Hz, 2.1 g, 0.83 mm) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Femora were scanned by pQCT, and mechanical properties were determined. On tibial sections TRAP staining, static histomorphometry, and immunohistochemical staining against Akt, phospho-Akt, IGF-IR (IGF-I receptor), and phospho-IGF-IR were conducted. BTX injection decreased trabecular and cortical bone mineral density. The WBV and WBV+IGF-I groups showed no difference in trabecular bone mineral density compared to the SHAM group. The phospho-IGF-IR and phospho-Akt stainings were not differentially altered in the injected hind limbs between groups. We found that high-frequency, low-magnitude WBV can counteract paralysis-induced bone loss following BTX injections, while we could not detect any effect of treatment with IGF-I.

  9. Comparative study between botulinum toxin injection and partial division of puborectalis for treating anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mohamed; Youssef, Tamer; Mahdy, Tarek; Omar, Waleed; Moneim, Hesham Abdul; El Nakeeb, Ayman; Youssef, Mohamed

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of partial division of puborectalis (PDPR) versus local botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection in treating patients with anismus. This prospective randomized study included 30 male patients suffering from anismus. Diagnosis was made by clinical examination, barium enema, colonoscopy, colonic transit time, anorectal manometry, balloon expulsion test, defecography, and electromyography. Patients were randomized into: group I which included 15 patients who were injected with BTX-A and group II which included 15 patients who underwent bilateral PDPR. Follow-up was conducted for about 1 year. Improvement was considered when patients returned to their normal habits. BTX-A injection achieved initial success in 13 patients (86.7%). However, long-term success persisted only in six patients (40%). This was in contrast to PDPR which achieved initial success in all patients (100%) with a long-term success in ten patients (66.6%). Recurrence was observed in seven patients (53.8%) and five patients (33.4%) following BTX-A injection and PDPR, respectively. Minor degrees of incontinence were confronted in two patients (13.3%) following PDPR. BTX-A injection seems to be successful for temporary treatment of anismus.

  10. Botulinum toxin type-A injection to treat patients with intractable anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Zhen-Ning; He, Lei; Gao, Ge; Zhai, Qing; Yin, Zhi-Tao; Zeng, Xian-Dong

    2014-09-21

    To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injection to the puborectalis and external sphincter muscle in the treatment of patients with anismus unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. This retrospective study included 31 patients suffering from anismus who were unresponsive to simple biofeedback training. Diagnosis was made by anorectal manometry, balloon expulsion test, surface electromyography of the pelvic floor muscle, and defecography. Patients were given botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection and pelvic floor biofeedback training. Follow-up was conducted before the paper was written. Improvement was evaluated using the chronic constipation scoring system. BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training achieved success in 24 patients, with 23 maintaining persistent satisfaction during a mean period of 8.4 mo. BTX-A injection combined with pelvic floor biofeedback training seems to be successful for intractable anismus.

  11. Botulinum Toxin Type a Injection, Followed by Home-Based Functional Training for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Toru; Kakuda, Wataru; Taguchi, Kensuke; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Sase, Yousuke; Abo, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been reported to be an effective treatment for limb spasticity after stroke. However, the reduction in the spasticity after BoNT-A injection alone does not ensure an improvement in the active motor function of the affected limb. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical effects of a BoNT-A injection,…

  12. Clinical outcomes of individualized botulinum neurotoxin type A injection techniques in patients with essential blepharospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Youngje; Nam, Sang Min; Lew, Helen

    2015-04-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes following botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) treatment with an individualized injection technique based on the types of spasms and to compare the results of the individualized injection technique with those of the conventional injection technique in the same patients. From November 2011 to July 2013, 77 BoNT-A injections were performed in 38 patients. Eighteen patients were treated with conventional BoNT-A injections before 2011, and 20 patients were referred to our hospital for unsatisfactory results after a conventional injection technique. We classified the patients by spasm-dominant sites: the lateral orbital area, representing the orbital orbicularis-dominant group (ODG); the glabella, representing the corrugator-dominant group (CDG); and the ptosis, representing the palpebral part of the orbicularis-dominant group (PDG). We increased the injection dose into the spasm-dominant sites of the blepharospasm groups. We assessed subjective symptom scores (functional disability score, FDS) after treatment. This study included 38 patients (26 women, 12 men; mean age, 60.6 ± 10.9 years). There were 21 patients in the ODG, 10 patients in the CDG, and 7 patients in the PDG. Mean ages were 59.7 ± 12.6, 59.8 ± 8.5, and 66.8 ± 9.0 years, and mean BoNT-A injection dose was 38.8 ± 11.2, 38.8 ± 11.2, and 38.8 ± 10.8 U in each group, respectively (p = 0.44, 0.82 Kruskal-Wallis test). Mean FDS after injection was 1.7 ± 0.7 in the ODG, 1.4 ± 0.8 in the CDG, and 1.2 ± 0.3 in the PDG. There were significant differences in reading and job scale among the three groups. In a comparison between the conventional and individualized injection techniques, there was a significant improvement in mean FDS and in the reading scale in the PDG with the individualized injection technique. The success rate was 92.1% in the conventional injection group and 94.1% in the individualized injection group. The individualized injection technique of Bo

  13. Muscle changes can account for bone loss after botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Sarah L; Boyd, Steven K; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2010-12-01

    Studies to date have assumed that botulinum toxin type A (BTX) affects bone indirectly, through its action on muscle. We hypothesized that BTX has no discernable effect on bone morphometry, independent of its effect on muscle. Therefore, we investigated whether BTX had an additional effect on bone when combined with tenotomy compared to tenotomy in isolation. Female BALB/c mice (n = 73) underwent one of the following procedures in the left leg: BTX injection and Achilles tenotomy (BTX-TEN), BTX injection and sham surgery (BTX-sham), Achilles tenotomy (TEN), or sham surgery (sham). BTX groups were injected with 20 μL of BTX (1 U/100 g) in the posterior lower hindlimb. At 4 weeks, muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and tibial bone morphometry were assessed using micro-CT. Each treatment, other than sham, resulted in significant muscle and bone loss (P properties. We found that BTX injection resulted in more adverse muscle and bone effects than tenotomy and that effects were amplified when the procedures were combined. However, between-group differences in bone could be accounted for by MCSA. We conclude that any independent effect of BTX on bone morphometry is likely small or negligible compared with the effect on muscle.

  14. A new mouse model for renal lesions produced by intravenous injection of diphtheria toxin A-chain expression plasmid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shingo

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various animal models of renal failure have been produced and used to investigate mechanisms underlying renal disease and develop therapeutic drugs. Most methods available to produce such models appear to involve subtotal nephrectomy or intravenous administration of antibodies raised against basement membrane of glomeruli. In this study, we developed a novel method to produce mouse models of renal failure by intravenous injection of a plasmid carrying a toxic gene such as diphtheria toxin A-chain (DT-A gene. DT-A is known to kill cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. Methods An expression plasmid carrying the cytomegalovirus enhancer/chicken β-actin promoter linked to a DT-A gene was mixed with lipid (FuGENE™6 and the resulting complexes were intravenously injected into adult male B6C3F1 mice every day for up to 6 days. After final injection, the kidneys of these mice were sampled on day 4 and weeks 3 and 5. Results H-E staining of the kidney specimens sampled on day 4 revealed remarkable alterations in glomerular compartments, as exemplified by mesangial cell proliferation and formation of extensive deposits in glomerular basement membrane. At weeks 3 and 5, gradual recovery of these tissues was observed. These mice exhibited proteinuria and disease resembling sub-acute glomerulonephritis. Conclusions Repeated intravenous injections of DT-A expression plasmid DNA/lipid complex caused temporary abnormalities mainly in glomeruli of mouse kidney. The disease in these mice resembles sub-acute glomerulonephritis. These DT-A gene-incorporated mice will be useful as animal models in the fields of nephrology and regenerative medicine.

  15. Changes in contractile properties of muscles receiving repeat injections of botulinum toxin (Botox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Rafael; Vaz, Marco Aurélio; Youssef, Aliaa Rehan; Longino, David; Herzog, Walter

    2011-01-04

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is a frequently used therapeutic tool to denervate muscles in the treatment of neuromuscular disorders. Although considered safe by the US Food and Drug Administration, BTX-A can produce adverse effects in target and non-target muscles. With an increased use of BTX-A for neuromuscular disorders, the effects of repeat injections of BTX-A on strength, muscle mass and structure need to be known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the changes in strength, muscle mass and contractile material in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Twenty NZW rabbits were divided into 4 groups: control and 1, 3 and 6 months of unilateral, repeat injections of BTX-A into the quadriceps femoris. Outcome measures included knee extensor torque, muscle mass and the percentage of contractile material in the quadriceps muscles of the target and non-injected contralateral hindlimbs. Strength in the injected muscles was reduced by 88%, 89% and 95% in the 1, 3 and 6 months BTX-A injected hindlimbs compared to controls. Muscle mass was reduced by 50%, 42% and 31% for the vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF) and vastus medialis (VM), respectively, at 1 month, by 68%, 51% and 50% at 3 months and by 76%, 44% and 13% at 6 months. The percentage of contractile material was reduced for the 3 and 6 months animals to 80-64%, respectively, and was replaced primarily by fat. Similar, but less pronounced results were also observed for the quadriceps muscles of the contralateral hindlimbs, suggesting that repeat BTX-A injections cause muscle atrophy and loss of contractile tissue in target muscles and also in non-target muscles that are far removed from the injection site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cutaneous cooling to manage botulinum toxin injection-associated pain in patients with facial palsy: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucks, N; Thomas, A; Hallam, M J; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum toxin injections are an effective, well-established treatment to manage synkinesis secondary to chronic facial palsy, but they entail painful injections at multiple sites on the face up to four times per year. Cutaneous cooling has long been recognised to provide an analgesic effect for cutaneous procedures, but evidence to date has been anecdotal or weak. This randomised controlled trial aims to assess the analgesic efficacy of cutaneous cooling using a cold gel pack versus a room-temperature Control. The analgesic efficacy of a 1-min application of a Treatment cold (3-5 °C) gel pack versus a Control (room-temperature (20 °C)) gel pack prior to botulinum toxin injection into the platysma was assessed via visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of pain before, during and after the procedure. Thirty-five patients received both trial arms during two separate clinic appointments. Cold gel packs provided a statistically significant reduction in pain compared with a room-temperature Control (from 26.4- to 10.2-mm VAS improvement (p injected or the order in which the Treatment or Control gel packs were applied. Cryoanalgesia using a fridge-cooled gel pack provides an effective, safe and cheap method for reducing pain at the botulinum toxin injection site in patients with facial palsy. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pilot cohort study of endoscopic botulinum neurotoxin injection in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, George; Gandhy, Rita; Barlow, Carrolee

    2017-11-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as dysphagia, postprandial bloating, and defecatory straining are common in Parkinson's Disease (PD) and they impact quality of life. Endoscopic botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection has been used in the treatment of dysphagia, gastroparesis and chronic anismus. To examine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of endoscopically delivered BoNT injection to distal esophagus, pylorus or anal canal aiming at relieving regional gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PD. This is a retrospective open cohort pilot study to assess the clinical response to endoscopic BoNT injection on selected PD patients with symptoms and identifiable abnormalities on high-resolution manometry and wireless motility capsule, to generate early uncontrolled data on feasibility, tolerability, safety and efficacy. Baseline symptoms and response to therapy were assessed by questionnaires. Fourteen PD patients (10 M:4 F), mean age 73 (range: 62-93) were treated. Three patients had esophageal Botox for ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) (n = 1), esophago-gastric junction outlet obstruction (EGJOO) & IEM (n = 1), and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) (n = 1). Nine patients were treated with pyloric BoNT injection for gastroparesis with mean gastric transit time of 21.2 h; range 5.2-44.2 h. Two patients received anal Botox for defecatory dyssynergia ((Type I) (n = 1) and overlap (slow-transit and dyssynergic) constipation (n = 1). Endoscopic BoNT injection (100-200 units) was well tolerated and there were no significant adverse events. Endoscopic BoNT injection to esophagus, pylorus or anal canal is safe, well-tolerated and leads to symptomatic improvement that lasts up to several months. The procedure can be repeated as needed and combined with other therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recovery of rat muscle size but not function more than 1 year after a single botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Samuel R; Minamoto, Viviane B; Suzuki, Kentaro P; Hulst, Jonah B; Bremner, Shannon N; Lieber, Richard L

    2018-03-01

    Neurotoxin injection is used to treat a wide variety of neuromuscular disorders. The purpose of this study was to measure the functional and structural properties of botulinum toxin-injected adult rat skeletal muscle over nearly the entire lifespan. Ten groups of animals were subjected to either neurotoxin injection [Botox, Type A (BT-A); Allergan, Irvine, California] or saline solution injection. Neurotoxin-injected animals (n = 90) were analyzed at different time-points: 1 week; 1 month; 3 months; 6 months; 12 months; or 18 months. In spite of the recovery of structural features, such as muscle mass and fiber area, dorsiflexion torque production remained significantly depressed by 25%, even at 12 months after neurotoxin injection. The data demonstrate that, after a single BT-A injection, although gross muscle morphology recovered over a 12-month time period, loss of contractile function did not recover. Muscle Nerve 57: 435-441, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Characterizing the Lateral Border of the Frontalis for Safe and Effective Injection of Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, You-Jin; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Jae-Gi; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kim, Sung-Taek; Tansatit, Tanvaa; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2016-03-01

    The forehead is a common site for injection of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) to treat hyperactive facial muscles. Unexpected side effects of BoNT-A injection may occur because the anatomy of the forehead musculature is not fully characterized. The authors described the lateral border of the frontalis in terms of facial landmarks and reference lines to determine the safest and most effective forehead injection sites for BoNT-A. The hemifaces of 49 embalmed adult Korean cadavers were dissected in a morphometric analysis of the frontalis. L2 was defined in terms of FT (the most protruding point of the frontotemporal region), L0 (the line connecting the infraorbital margin with the tragus), and L1 (the line parallel to L0 and passing through FT) such that L2 was positioned 45° from L1 and passed through FT. The distance from FT to the superior margin of the orbicularis oculi was 12.3 ± 3.3 mm. The frontalis extended more than 5 cm along L2 in 49 of 49 cases (100%), more than 6 cm in 47 cases (95.9%), more than 7 cm in 34 cases (69.4%), more than 8 cm in 11 cases (22.4%), and more than 9 cm in 3 cases (6.1%). The lateral border of the frontalis ran parallel to and within 1 cm of the medial side of L2. Surface anatomy mapping can assist with predicting the lateral border of the frontalis to minimize the side effects and maximize the efficiency of BoNT-A injections into the forehead. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Mechano- and metabosensitive alterations after injection of botulinum toxin into gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Rouzi, Talifujiang; Grelot, Laurent; Magalon, Guy; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate effects of motor denervation by Clostridium botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A) on the afferent activity of fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were randomized in two groups, 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle. Locomotor activity was evaluated once per day during 12 days with a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats (sciatic functional index). At the end of the functional assessment period, electrophysiological tests were used to measure muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to chemical (KCl and lactic acid) injections, electrically induced fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations. Additionally, ventilatory response was recorded during repetitive muscle contractions. Then, rats were sacrificed, and the BoNT/A-injected muscles were weighed. Twelve days postinjection we observed a complete motor denervation associated with a significant muscle atrophy and loss of force to direct muscle stimulation. In the BoNT/A group, the metabosensitive responses to KCl injections were unaltered. However, we observed alterations in responses to EIF and to 1 mM of lactic acid (which induces the greatest activation). The ventilatory adjustments during repetitive muscle activation were abolished, and the mechanosensitive fiber responses to tendon vibrations were reduced. These results indicate that BoNT/A alters the sensorimotor loop and may induce insufficient motor and physiological adjustments in patients in whom a motor denervation with BoNT/A was performed. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Case Report: Impact of Botulinum Toxin Injection on Function of Affected Upper Extremity in A Patient, 16 Years after Stroke

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    Malek Amini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Case report Impact of Botulinum Toxin injection on function of affected upper extremity in a patient after 16 years since stroke (CVA. Botulinum toxin injection is one the treatments in spasticity reduction and consequently in recovery of upper limb function in stroke patients. The purpose of this case study is to report the effect of Botulinum toxin injection on upper extremity function after 16 years of stroke. Materials & Methods: The patient was a 63-year-old man who has had a cerebrovascular accident that happened in the left hemisphere about 16 years ago, and as a result, a paresis in dominant hand and arm. Although the patient was able to perform simple movements but he was complaining about the slowness and stiffness in the movements. To treat spasticity the Botulinum toxin type A was used. Injection into selected muscles of hemiparetic upper limb was done by a specialist physician and was between 50-150IU based on specific volume of each muscle. After injection, the patient was monitored for 3 months and at the end of each month, the assessments were reevaluated. During this period, although research team suggested the patient to continue the rehabilitation but for personal reasons he didn’t participate in any treatment and didn`t receive any other antispasmodic medications. Results: An increase in range of motion was seen in all joints but this improvement was not significant. The greatest improvement in passive and active range of motion was seen in Metacarpophalengeal joints. At the end of each month, compared to the first month the recovery of function in upper extremity was significant. Maximum recovery of upper extremity function was related to the hand section of fugl-meyer assessment. At the end of the first month, spasticity significantly decreased so that the patient was able to extend all his joints more easily than before injection. Although spasticity never reached zero. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin injection

  2. Análise vocal em pacientes com disfonia espasmódica nos momentos pré e pós tratamento com toxina Botulínica A Vocal analysis in patients with spasmodic dysphonia before and after treatment with Botulinum toxin A

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    Ana Cristina Côrtes Gama

    2012-10-01

    the parameters. CONCLUSION: there was significant improvement of the vocal analysis after treatment and, therefore, injections of botulinum toxin A were effective in the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia in this group.

  3. Office-based Electromyography-guided Botulinum Toxin Injection to the Cricopharyngeus Muscle: Optimal Patient Selection and Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Go-Woon; Rho, Young-Soo; Kwon, Kee-Hwan; Chung, Eun-Jae

    2017-05-01

    This retrospective study was carried out to investigate the effectiveness and safety of office-based electromyography-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the cricopharyngeus muscle of patients who did not show upper esophageal sphincter passage in a swallowing study in spite of maximal swallowing rehabilitation. Thirty-six patients who showed no or limited ability to oral feed after maximum swallowing rehabilitation were enrolled. Video fluoroscopic swallowing study, flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing, disability rating scale, penetration aspiration score, and National Institutes of Health swallowing safety scale were used in the evaluation of dysphagia. Success was defined as nondependence on gastrostomy for patients who previously were dependent on gastrostomy and improvement in disability rating scale score after botulinum toxin injections. The total success rate was 63.9%. The complication rate was very low, with only 1 patient showing temporary unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Botulinum toxin injection was more effective in patients with cranial nerve IX or X palsy than in those without it ( P = .006). This procedure can be a simple, safe, and effective tool in patients with cricopharyngeal dysfunction after swallowing rehabilitation, especially for cranial nerve IX or X palsy.

  4. A literature review on the efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin: An injection in post-stroke spasticity

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    Majid Ghasemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A variety of techniques for the management of spasticity have been suggested, including positioning, cryotherapy, splinting and casting, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, and medical management by pharmacological agents, Botulinum toxin A (BTA is now the pharmacological treatment of choice in focal spasticity. BTA by blocking acetylcholine release at neuromuscular junctions accounts for its therapeutic action to relieve spasticity. Methods: A computerized search of Pub Med was carried out to find the latest result about efficacy of BTA in management of post stroke spasticity. Result: Among 84 articles were found, frothy of them included in this review and divided to lower and upper extremity. Conclusions: BTA is a treatment choice in reducing tone and managing post stroke spasticity .

  5. Predicting Improvement in Writer's Cramp Symptoms following Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection Therapy

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    Mallory Jackman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Writer's cramp is a specific focal hand dystonia causing abnormal posturing and tremor in the upper limb. The most popular medical intervention, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A therapy, is variably effective for 50–70% of patients. BoNT-A non-responders undergo ineffective treatment and may experience significant side effects. Various assessments have been used to determine response prediction to BoNT-A, but not in the same population of patients. Methods: A comprehensive assessment was employed to measure various symptom aspects. Clinical scales, full upper-limb kinematic measures, self-report, and task performance measures were assessed for nine writer's cramp patients at baseline. Patients received two BoNT-A injections then were classified as responders or non-responders based on a quantified self-report measure. Baseline scores were compared between groups, across all measures, to determine which scores predicted a positive BoNT-A response. Results: Five of nine patients were responders. No kinematic measures were predictably different between groups. Analyses revealed three features that predicted a favorable response and separated the two groups: higher than average cramp severity and cramp frequency, and below average cramp latency. Discussion: Non-kinematic measures appear to be superior in making such predictions. Specifically, measures of cramp severity, frequency, and latency during performance of a specific set of writing and drawing tasks were predictive factors. Since kinematic was not used to determine the injection pattern and the injections were visually guided, it may still be possible to use individual patient kinematics for better outcomes. 

  6. Nonallergic Eyelid Edema After Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection: Case Report and Review of Literature.

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    Chang, Yin-Shuo; Chang, Chang-Cheng; Shen, Jen-Hsiang; Chen, Yu-Tsung; Chan, Karen Kar-Wun

    2015-09-01

    Periocular botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) injections are generally safe. Ptosis is the most common adverse effect, whereas eyelid edema is rarely reported. There is no consensus on the latter's incidence, clinical course, or treatment strategy. Here we managed a 59-year-old woman who received BoNTA injections to her forehead, glabella, and eye corner. At 3-day follow-up, she presented with painless, nonpruritic, bilateral periorbital edema, and erythema. Preliminary diagnosis was a local allergic reaction, and topical corticosteroid was administered, but upon lack of improvement, edema secondary to venous and lymphatic congestion was hypothesized, and she was advised to apply hot pads over her eyes, blink frequently, and massage the area. Her eyelid edema resolved 2 weeks later. At 4-month follow-up, the patient requested and received another course of BoNTA at half the dose. Frequent blinking was instructed, and the patient reported a satisfactory outcome with no adverse effects. In our literature review, incidence of BoNTA-induced eyelid edema was 1.4% and showed Asian tendency. Although rare, BoNTA-induced periorbital edema is self-limiting, and normally resolves in 2 to 4 weeks without medical treatment. Patients at risk for edema, including Asian ethnicity, dermatochalasis, and poor periocular muscle tone, are advised to receive injections at half the dosage. Examination of the function and tone of the orbicularis oculi and levator palpebrae superioris muscles before treatment is recommended, and application of hot pads over the eyes, frequent blinking in the morning, and self-massage of the affected area to increase venous return have demonstrated to improve outcome.

  7. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis

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    Alsantali A

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Adel Alsantali Department of Dermatology, King Fahd Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Background: Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods: In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Results: Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group (p<0.05. The average pain score on the hands where EMLA cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81, whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9 in the ice group. Conclusion: In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated.Keywords: ice, local anesthetics, EMLA, palmar hyperhidrosis, Botox injection, pain reduction

  8. [Prophylaxis of recurring low-flow priapism : Experimental botulinum neurotoxin injection into the ischiocavernosus muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, G; Stenner, A

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of recurring low-flow priapism with the usual medications is still unsatisfactory. The case of an otherwise healthy young man experiencing low-flow priapism at the age of 31 is presented. A reason for his condition could not be identified. Over the course of several months, he required emergency urological treatment more than ten times. Treatment with cyproterone acetate (Androcur® 50 mg/day) stopped the spontaneous erections, but resulted in erectile impotence, reduced motivation, decreased interest in sex, weight gain of 10 kg, breast enlargement combined with touch sensitivity on both sides, and hair loss on both legs. In addition, the patient complained about painful cramps in his pelvic muscles. After appropriate explanations he agreed to try botulinum neurotoxin injections into both ischiocavernosus muscles. The objective was to reduce muscle tone in order to improve venous drainage of blood from the penis. The latest relapse of priapism occurred more than 6 months ago.

  9. Electromyography-Guided Botulinum Toxin Injection Into the Cricothyroid Muscles in Bilateral Vocal Fold Abductor Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Ibrahim; Akyildiz, Serdar; Erdinc, Munevver; Ozturk, Kerem; Ogut, Fatih

    2017-06-01

    Bilateral vocal fold abductor paralysis (BVFAP) both deteriorates quality of life and may cause life-threatening respiratory problems. The aim of this study was to reduce respiratory symptoms in BVFAP patients using cricothyroid (CT) botulinum toxin (BTX) injection. Before and 2 weeks and 4 months after bilateral BTX injection into the CT muscles under electromyography; alterations in respiratory, acoustic, aerodynamic and quality of life parameters were evaluated in BVFAP patients with respiratory distress. For the respiratory evaluation modified Borg scale and spirometry, for the voice and aerodynamic evaluations Voice Handicap Index-30 (VHI-30), GRBAS, acoustic analysis (sound pressure level, F0, jitter%, shimmer%, noise-to-harmonic ratio) and maximum phonation time and for the quality of life assessment Short Form-36 (SF-36) form were used. All patients were female with a mean age of 47±8.1 years. There was a mean time of 11.8±5.5 (minimum 2, maximum 23) months between BVFAP development and BTX injection. In all cases, other than one case with unknown aetiology, the cause of vocal fold paralysis was prior thyroid surgery. In total 18.6±3.1 units of BTX were applied to the CTs. In the preinjection period, and the 2nd week and 4th month after injection, the Borg dyspnea scale was 7.3/5.3/5.0, FIV1 (forced inspiratory volume in one second) was 1.7/1.7/1.8 L, peak expiratory flow (PEF) was 1.4/1.7/2.1 L/sec, maximum phonation time was 7.0/6.4/6.2 seconds and VHI-30 was 63.2/52.2/61.7 respectively. There was no significant alteration in acoustic analysis parameters. Many of the patients reported transient dysphagia within the first week. There were insignificant increases in SF-36 sub-scale values. After BTX injection, improvements in the mean Borg score, PEF and FIV1 values and SF-36 sub-scale scores showed the restricted success of this approach. This modality may be kept in mind as a transient treatment option for patients refused persistent tracheotomy or

  10. Early Botulinum Toxin Injections in Infants With Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review of Safety and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourseul, Jean-Sébastien; Molina, Anais; Lintanf, Mael; Houx, Laetitia; Chaléat-Valayer, Emmanuelle; Pons, Christelle; Brochard, Sylvain

    2018-06-01

    To report current evidence regarding the safety of intramuscular botulinum toxin injection (BTI) in children with orthopedic- and neurologic-related musculoskeletal disorders >2 years of age. PubMed, Cochrane Library, and ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently selected studies based on predetermined inclusion criteria. Data relating to the aim were extracted. Methodologic quality was graded independently by 2 reviewers using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the Downs and Black evaluation tool for non-RCTs. Level of evidence was determined using the modified Sackett scale. Data of 473 infants were analyzed. Fifty-five infants had cerebral palsy, 112 had obstetric brachial plexus palsy, 257 had clubfoot, and 44 had congenital torticollis. No studies reported any severe adverse event that could be attributed to the BTI. The rate of mild to moderate adverse events reported varied from 5% to 25%. Results regarding efficacy were preliminary, dependent on the pathology, and limited by the small number of studies and their low levels of evidence. BTI is already widely used as an early treatment for this age group. The safety profile of BTI in infants appears similar to that of older children and risks appear more related to the severity of the pathology and the location of the injections than to the toxin itself. Regarding effectiveness, other studies with higher levels of evidence should be carried out for each specific pathology. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative trial of ice application versus EMLA cream in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsantali, Adel

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is a safe and effective therapy for palmar hyperhidrosis, but the associated pain from injections limits the usefulness of this method of treatment. To evaluate the efficacy of Eutectic Mixture of Local Anesthetics (EMLA) cream versus ice application in alleviation of pain during botulinum toxin injections for palmar hyperhidrosis. In this prospective study, 23 patients underwent palm Botox injections to treat their excessive sweating. In each patient, EMLA cream was applied to one palm and ice was applied directly before the injections in the other palm. Pain was evaluated using a Visual Analog Scale. Statistically, there was a significant difference in pain control between EMLA cream group and ice application group ( p cream was applied was 8.9 (SD=0.81), whereas it was 4.8 (±0.9) in the ice group. In this study, the successful use of ice application in reducing pain by 40% in comparison to EMLA cream during Botox toxin injection for palmar hyperhidrosis is demonstrated.

  12. SiMa Cells for a Serotype Specific and Sensitive Cell-Based Neutralization Test for Botulinum Toxin A and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Nicola; Rajagopal, Shalini; Stickings, Paul; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2017-07-20

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs), of which there are seven serotypes, are among the most potent neurotoxins, with serotypes A, B and E causing human botulism. Antitoxins form the first line of treatment for botulism, and functional, highly sensitive in vitro methods for toxin neutralization are needed to replace the current in vivo methods used for determination of antitoxin potency. In this preliminary proof of concept study, we report the development of a neutralization test using the neuroblastoma SiMa cell line. The assay is serotype specific for either BoNT/A or BoNT/E, which both cleave unique sequences on SNAP-25 within SiMa cells. The end point is simple immunodetection of cleaved SNAP-25 from cell lysates with antibodies detecting only the newly exposed sequence on SNAP-25. Neutralizing antibodies prevent the toxin-induced cleavage of SNAP-25. The toxin neutralization assay, with an EC50 of ~2 mIU/mL determined with a standardized reference antiserum, is more sensitive than the mouse bioassays. Relevance was demonstrated with commercial and experimental antitoxins targeting different functional domains, and of known in vivo neutralizing activities. This is the first report describing a simple, specific, in vitro cell-based assay for the detection of neutralizing antibodies against BoNT/A and BoNT/E with a sensitivity exceeding that of the mouse bioassay.

  13. Vitreous hemorrhage and Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment that developed after botulinum toxin injection to the extraocular muscle: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Han, Jinu; Han, Sueng-Han; Lee, Sung Chul; Kim, Min

    2017-12-13

    The authors report a case of a rare complication that occurred after botulinum toxin injection to the extraocular muscle, which was easily overlooked and successfully corrected by surgery. A 34-year-old female patient visited our clinic for diplopia and ocular motility disorder after removal of an epidermoid tumor of the brain. At her initial visit, her best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/20 for both eyes. An alternate cover test showed 45 prism-diopter esotropia and 3 prism-diopter hypertropia in the right eye. Following 6 months of observation, the deviation of the strabismus did not improve, and botulinum toxin was injected into the right medial rectus (RMR). After 6 days, she visited our clinic with decreased visual acuity of her right eye. The BCVA was found to be 20/50 for her right eye. Funduscopic examination presented a retinal tear inferonasal to the optic disc with preretinal hemorrhage. Subretinal fluid nasal to the fovea was seen on optical coherence tomography (OCT). Barrier laser photocoagulation was done around the retinal tear; however, her visual acuity continued to decrease, and vitreous hemorrhage and subretinal fluid at the lesion did not improve. In addition, a newly developed epiretinal membrane was seen on OCT. An alternate cover test presented 30 prism-diopter right esotropia. 19 weeks after RMR botulinum toxin injection, she received pars plana vitrectomy, membranectomy, endolaser barrier photocoagulation, and intravitreal bevacizumab (Avastin®) injection. After 4 months, her visual acuity improved to 20/20, and only 4 prism-diopter of right hypertropia and 3 prism-diopter of exotropia were noted. Vitreous opacity and the epiretinal membrane were completely removed, as confirmed by funduscopic and examination. Sudden loss of vision after injection of botulinum toxin into the extraocular muscle may suggest a serious complication, and a prompt, thorough ophthalmic examination should be performed. If improvements are not observed

  14. Is there enough evidence to use botulinum toxin injections for bruxism management? A systematic literature review.

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    De la Torre Canales, Giancarlo; Câmara-Souza, Mariana Barbosa; do Amaral, Camilla Fraga; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues; Manfredini, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to conduct a systematic review of the literature assessing the effects of botulinum toxin (BoNT-A) injections in the management of bruxism. Search for articles involved the PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, Cochrane, Scielo and Lilacs databases. Specific terms were used and the search carried out from 1980 to March 2016 by three independent researchers. Randomized controlled studies (RCTs), prospective and before-after studies that applied BoNT-A at the masseter and/or temporalis muscles were included. Three RCTs and two uncontrolled before-after studies out of 904 identified citations were included in this review. All five articles dealt with sleep bruxism and featured a small sample size. None of them was about awake bruxism. Two randomized clinical trials were double-blinded, with a control group using saline solution. Two studies used polysomnography/electromyography for sleep bruxism diagnosis, whilst others were based on history taking and clinical examination. All studies using subjective evaluations for pain and jaw stiffness showed positive results for the BoNT-A treatment. In contrast, the two studies using objective evaluations did not demonstrate any reduction in bruxism episodes, but a decrease in the intensity of muscles contractions. Despite the paucity of works on the topic, BoNT-A seems to be a possible management option for sleep bruxism, minimizing symptoms and reducing the intensity of muscle contractions, although further studies are necessary especially as far as the treatment indications for bruxism itself is concerned. BoNT-A has been increasingly diffused in dentistry over recent years, being also used for pain management in patients with bruxism. Nonetheless, there is no consensus about its effects in this disorder.

  15. Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacture-Derived Needle Guide for Injection of Botulinum Toxin into the Lateral Pterygoid Muscle in Patients with Oromandibular Dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of botulinum toxin administration into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle of patients with jaw opening dystonia by using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM)-derived needle guide. A total of 17 patients with jaw opening dystonia were enrolled. After the patient's computed tomography (CT) scan was imported and fused with a scan of a plaster cast model of the maxilla, the optimal needle insertion site over the lateral pterygoid muscle was determined using the NobelClinician software. A total of 13 patients were injected both with and without the guide, and 4 patients underwent guided injection alone. The therapeutic effects of botulinum toxin injection and its associated complications were statistically compared between the guided and unguided procedures using paired t test. Botulinum toxin therapy was performed 42 and 32 times with and without the guides, respectively. The needle was easily inserted without any complications in all procedures. There was a significant difference (P < .001) between the mean comprehensive improvements observed with (66.3%) and without (54.4%) the guides. The findings suggest that the use of needle guides during the injection of botulinum toxin into the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle is very useful for aiding the accurate and safe administration of botulinum toxin therapy for jaw opening dystonia.

  16. Sensation of Cold during the Ice Water Test Corresponds to the Perception of Pain during Botulinum Toxin Bladder Wall Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, André; Hüsch, Tanja; Doggweiler, Regula; Buse, Stephan; Haferkamp, Axel

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the association of bladder cold sensation (BCS) during the ice water test (IWT) and pain perception when botulinum toxin injections (BTI) are administered into the bladder wall. In 86 patients with idiopathic overactive bladder, the BCS during the IWT was investigated. Patients were divided into 2 groups: with and without BCS. During subsequent administration of BTI, the number of perceived and painful injections as well as the pain levels on a 0-100 pain scale were compared in both groups using Student t test. Thirty-five patients reported a BCS, while 51 did not. After 10 BTI, the mean number of perceived injections was 7.9 in patients with and 2.4 in patients without BCS (p sensation (p perceptions of cold and pain in the urinary bladder may use similar receptors and neuronal pathways. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. The effect and complication of botulinum toxin type a injection with serial casting for the treatment of spastic equinus foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Joung; Sung, In Young; Jang, Dae Hyun; Yi, Jin Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2011-06-01

    To identify the effect of serial casting combined with Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection on spastic equinus foot. Twenty-nine children with cerebral palsy who had equinus foot were recruited from the outpatient clinic of Rehabilitation Medicine. The children were divided into 2 groups, one of which received serial casting after BTX-A injection, and the other which only received BTX-A injection. Serial casting started 3 weeks after the BTX-A injection, and was changed weekly for 3 times. Spasticity of the ankle joint was evaluated using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS), and the modified Tardieu scale (MTS). Gait pattern was measured using the physician's rating scale (PRS). The degree of ankle dorsiflexion and the MAS improved significantly until 12 weeks following the BTX-A injection in the serial casting group (pcasting. Our study demonstrated that the effect of BTX-A injection with serial casting was superior and lasted longer than the effect of BTX-A injection only in patients with spastic equinus foot. We therefore recommend BTX-A injection with serial casting for the treatment of equinus foot. However, physicians must also consider the possible complications associated with serial casting.

  18. Patient Perceived Benefit in Facial Aesthetic Procedures: FACE-Q as a Tool to Study Botulinum Toxin Injection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Brian L; Wilson, Anthony J; Taglienti, Anthony J; Chang, Catherine S; Folsom, Nancy; Percec, Ivona

    2016-07-01

    There are numerous methods of assessing patient satisfaction with botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. As the use of aesthetic neuromodulation increases both in breadth and number of procedures, there is a need for more comprehensive tools to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. The FACE-Q is a recently validated patient-reported outcome instrument that can be used to measure patient perceptions of botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation. This study used the FACE-Q to assess patient satisfaction following botulinum toxin type A neuromodulation of the glabellar rhytids. 57 female patients completed the FACE-Q, a survey that evaluates patients' satisfaction with their facial appearance. After this baseline survey, the patients received injections of one of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Dublin, Ireland), abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport, Galderma, Lausanne, Switzerland), or incobotulinumtoxinA (Xeomin, Merz Pharmaceuticals, Frankfurt am Main, Germany) in the glabella. Two weeks post-injection, the patients completed the FACE-Q again. The percentage changes in patient responses were tabulated to determine how neuromodulation affects patient satisfaction with their facial appearance. The percentage changes for each of the neurotoxin groups were compared to determine if patient satisfaction with neuromodulation varies with the type of neurotoxin. Patient satisfaction with their overall facial appearance increased by 28% following neuromodulation. Patients stated that they believe they look an average of 5.6 years younger post-neuromodulation. There were no significant differences among the treatment groups. The FACE-Q demonstrates that patients are more satisfied by their overall facial appearance and age appearance following neuromodulation of their glabellar rhytids. Patients are equally satisfied with the improvement of their facial appearance regardless of which neurotoxin they received. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE 2: Therapeutic. © 2016 The

  19. What Clinical Strategies Are Applied for Botulinum Toxin Injection in the Oromandibular Region?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Dalager, Torben; Møller, Eigild

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) inhibits the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in muscles or salivary glands. With reduced activation, the muscle activity or secretion decreases. Indications for medical, non‐cosmetic use of BoNT in the orofacial area include among others...

  20. Evaluation of the protective effect of Botulinum toxin type A injection on otitis media with effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalım, Ömer Faruk; Yıldırım, Yavuz Selim; Doğan, Remzi; Tuğrul, Selhattin; Gedik, Özge; Özturan, Orhan

    2017-09-01

    This study makes an analysis of the effect of Botulinum toxin type A on otitis media with effusion in rats. As part of the study, 24 male Wistar Albino rats were divided into three groups: Group 1: Botulinum toxin Type A and Histamıne (intratympanic 0.2 ml = 20 unit BTA); Group 2: Saline and Histamine (intratympanic 0.2 ml 0.9%); Group 3: Histamine (intratympanic 0.2 ml). Histamine (intratympanic 0.2 ml) was administered into the right ear for all groups. DPOAE and ABR tests were carried out on days 5, 10, 15 and 20 from the beginning of the study. There was no significant difference between DPOAE and ABR scores of the groups. In each group, the DPOAE scores for the right ear significantly decreased on day 5 when compared to the basal scores. In each group, there was no significant difference between days 5, 10 and 15 for the right ear. Botulinum toxin type A blocked the secretion of glands in the middle ear and showed no effect to prevent the formation of serous otitis. In addition, it was found out that Botulinum toxin did not lead to any morphological change in the cochlea.

  1. Botulinum Neurotoxin Injection for the Treatment of Recurrent Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation with and without Neurogenic Muscular Hyperactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Yoshida

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes following intramuscular injection of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT in patients with recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation, with and without muscle hyperactivity due to neurological diseases. Thirty-two patients (19 women and 13 men, mean age: 62.3 years with recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation were divided into two groups: neurogenic (8 women and 12 men and habitual (11 women and 1 man. The neurogenic group included patients having neurological disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease or oromandibular dystonia, that are accompanied by muscle hyperactivity. BoNT was administered via intraoral injection to the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle. In total, BoNT injection was administered 102 times (mean 3.2 times/patient. The mean follow-up duration was 29.5 months. The neurogenic group was significantly (p < 0.001 younger (47.3 years than the habitual group (84.8 years and required significantly (p < 0.01 more injections (4.1 versus 1.7 times to achieve a positive outcome. No significant immediate or delayed complications occurred. Thus, intramuscular injection of BoNT into the lateral pterygoid muscle is an effective and safe treatment for habitual temporomandibular joint dislocation. More injections are required in cases of neurogenic temporomandibular joint dislocation than in those of habitual dislocation without muscle hyperactivity.

  2. Comparison of clinical marking and ultrasound-guided injection of Botulinum type A toxin into the masseter muscles for treating bruxism and its cosmetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada-Gaon, Natacha; Wortsman, Ximena; Peñaloza, Osvaldo; Carrasco, Juan Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Botulinum toxin type A has been used for treating the hypertrophy of the masseter muscles and its cosmetic effects. Ultrasound is increasingly used in dermatology, along with the guidance of mini-invasive procedures. To evaluate the role of ultrasound for guiding the application of Botulinum A toxin in patients with cosmetic alterations due to bruxism, correlate the clinical landmarks with the ultrasound findings, and study the effect on the symptoms, cosmetics, and quality of life. Twenty individuals with bruxism and cosmetic alterations underwent an ultrasound-guided injection of Botulinum toxin type A in each masseter muscle. Clinical and ultrasound marking of the procedure was compared. Clinical and sonographic evaluation was performed at the time of injection and 3 months later. Ten normal individuals underwent ultrasound of the masseter muscles as a control group. Up to 65% of individuals showed anatomical variants of the salivary glands. The method for clinically marking the skin showed a frequently erroneous location of the anterior point (up to 40% of cases) that was proven by ultrasound to be out of the muscle. In 20% of cases, ultrasound showed that the needle should be longer to enter the muscle. After injection, most of the patients demonstrated a decrease of the symptoms and cosmetic and quality of life improvements. Ultrasound can be a potent tool for guiding the injection of Botulinum toxin into the masseter muscles. It may contribute to a more personalized procedure, better cosmetic results, and help to avoid potential complications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Role of Botulinum Toxin in Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Mascarenhas, Sonia S; Hashmi, Aqeel; Prokop, Larry J; John, Vineeth; Okusaga, Olaoluwa; Singh, Balwinder

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this review was to consolidate the evidence concerning the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (onabotulinumtoxinA) in depression. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Scopus through May 5, 2014, for studies evaluating the efficacy of botulinum toxin A in depression. Only randomized controlled trials were included in the meta-analysis. A pooled mean difference in primary depression score, and pooled odds ratio for response and remission rate with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using the random-effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran Q test and χ statistic. Of the 639 articles that were initially retrieved, 5 studies enrolling 194 subjects (age 49±9.6 y) were included in the systematic review, and 3 randomized controlled trials enrolling 134 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis showed a significant decrease in mean primary depression scores among patients who received botulinum toxin A compared with placebo (-9.80; 95% CI, -12.90 to -6.69) with modest heterogeneity between the studies (Cochran Q test, χ=70). Response and remission rates were 8.3 and 4.6 times higher, respectively, among patients receiving botulinum toxin A compared with placebo, with no heterogeneity between the studies. The 2 studies excluded from the meta-analysis also found a significant decrease in primary depression scores in patients after receiving botulinum toxin A. A few subjects had minor side effects, which were similar between the groups receiving botulinum toxin and those receiving placebo. This study suggests that botulinum toxin A can produce significant improvement in depressive symptoms and is a safe adjunctive treatment for patients receiving pharmacotherapy for depression. Future trials are needed to evaluate the antidepressant effect per se of botulinum toxin A and to further elucidate the underlying antidepressant mechanism of botulinum toxin A.

  4. Physical Therapy for an Adult with Chronic Stroke after Botulinum Toxin Injection for Spasticity: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phadke, Chetan P.; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: In this case report, we describe the type and duration of a physical therapy and botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA) intervention directed at lower limb spasticity and the gait and balance improvement in a patient post-stroke. Treatment of focal spasticity with BoNTA intramuscular injections combined with physical therapy is recommended by rehabilitation experts. However, the optimal type and duration of physical therapy intervention to optimize any functional gains that follow chemodenervation induced by BoNTA has not been established. Method: One individual with chronic stroke who received BoNTA injections for upper and lower extremity spasticity was included. Physical therapy intervention consisted of 45- to 60-min sessions twice weekly for 12 weeks, based on the Bobath–neurodevelopmental therapy approach, and an activity-based home program. Results: After BoNTA injections and physical therapy, the patient made clinically significant improvements in balance and gait speed and became more independent with his ambulation. Conclusions: This case report demonstrates that physical therapy after BoNTA injections can result in significant functional improvements for individuals with spasticity after chronic stroke that may not be possible with BoNTA injections alone. PMID:25931655

  5. Side effects and potential risk factors of botulinum toxin type A intramuscular injections in knee flexion contractures of hemophiliacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; De la Corte-Rodriguez, Hortensia

    2017-07-01

    Knee flexion contracture (KFC) is a common complication of recurrent hemarthrosis in children and young adults with hemophilia. If the KFC is not prevented (by means of primary prophylaxis) and treated properly and early (be means of physical medicine and rehabilitation), it will become fixed. Areas covered: The aim of this article is to review the potential role of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) intramuscular injections for the treatment of KFC in people with hemophilia (PWH). Expert commentary: Although two recent reports have mentioned the benefits of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH with KFC, the data are still scant and too preliminary. The use of intramuscular injections of BTX-A in PWH today should not be recommended until more case studies/small series (ideally well-designed clinical trials) fully demonstrate that this is safe and effective. The risks of intramuscular injections to a hemophilia patient cannot be underestimated (iatrogenic muscle hematomas and pseudotumors). This paper calls the attention of hemophilia treaters on the potential risks of this apparently interesting technique. The current use of BTX-A intramuscular injections in KFC of PWH could make no sense. Raising false expectations in these patients should be avoided.

  6. The effects of intradermal botulinum toxin type a injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghasemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering the dramatic increasing rate of diabetes and consequently its related complications, most importantly diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN, challenges regarding proper treatment of DPN and its effect on the quality-of-life and care of diabetic patients, the aim of this current study is to evaluate the effect of intradermal botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A injections on pain symptoms of patients with diabetic neuropathic pain. Materials and Methods: In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial study, diabetic patients aged <70 years with neuropathic pain in both feet were enrolled. Diabetic neuropathy (DN in selected patients was diagnosed using DN4 questionnaire and nerve conduction velocity examinations. They randomized in two intervention (BTX-A injection/100 unit, N = 20 and placebo groups (normal saline injection, N = 20. The outcome of injection on diabetic neuropathic pain was assessed using neuropathy pain scale (NPS and visual analog scale (VAS score and compared in two studied groups. Results: There was no significant difference in DN4, NPS and VAS scales of studied population after intervention in the placebo group. Intradermal injection of BTX-A reduced NPS scores for all items except cold sensation (P = 0.05. It reduced DN4 scores for electric shocks, burning, pins and needles and brushing (P < 0.05. According to VAS scale 30% and 0% of patients in intervention and placebo groups have no pain after intervention (P = 0.01. Conclusion: Intradermal injection of BTX-A is a well-tolerated agent that has a significant effect on DPN pain.

  7. Muscle and bone follow similar temporal patterns of recovery from muscle-induced disuse due to botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Sarah L; Boyd, Steven K; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2010-01-01

    If muscle force is a primary source for triggering bone adaptation, with disuse and reloading, bone changes should follow muscle changes. We examined the timing and magnitude of changes in muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and bone architecture in response to muscle inactivity following botulinum toxin (BTX) injection. We hypothesized that MCSA would return to baseline levels sooner than bone properties following BTX injection. Female BALB mice (15 weeks old) were injected with 20 muL of BTX (1 U/100 g body mass, n=18) or saline (SAL, n=18) into the posterior calf musculature of one limb. The contralateral limb (CON) served as an internal control. MCSA and bone properties were assessed at baseline, 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks post-injection using in vivo micro-CT at the tibia proximal metaphysis (bone only) and diaphysis. Muscles were dissected and weighed after sacrifice. Significant GroupxLegxTime interactions indicated that the maximal decrease in MCSA (56%), proximal metaphyseal BV/TV (38%) and proximal diaphyseal Ct.Ar (7%) occurred 4 weeks after injection. There was no delay prior to bone recovery as both muscle and bone properties began to recover after this time, but MCSA and BV/TV remained 15% and 20% lower, respectively, in the BTX-injected leg than the BTX-CON leg 16 weeks post-injection. Gastrocnemius mass (primarily fast-twitch) was 14% lower in the BTX-injected leg than the SAL-injected leg, while soleus mass (primarily slow-twitch) was 15% greater in the BTX group than the SAL group. Our finding that muscle size and bone began to recover at similar times after BTX injection was unexpected. This suggested that partial weight-bearing and/or return of slow-twitch muscle activity in the BTX leg may have been sufficient to stimulate bone recovery. Alternatively, muscle function may have recovered sooner than MCSA. Our results indicated that muscle cross-sectional area, while important, may not be the primary factor associated with bone loss and recovery

  8. Evidence to Use Botulinum Toxin Injections in Tension-Type Headache Management: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieckiewicz, Mieszko; Grychowska, Natalia; Zietek, Marek; Wieckiewicz, Gniewko; Smardz, Joanna

    2017-11-15

    Tension-type headache (TTH) is the most common type of chronic recurring head pain. It can occur twice as often in women as in men. It is the most common type of headache. Its lifetime prevalence is 30% to 78% in the general population. TTH treatment should be multilevel. It often consists of taking pain medication, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, using biofeedback therapy, acupuncture, and attending behavioral therapy. Several clinical trials also suggest that botulinum toxin (BTX) may be an effective treatment option for such patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate if BTX can be used as a treatment method in TTH in the light of current medical literature. The authors searched the PubMed, EBSCOhost, OVID, Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases to identify relevant publications. The authors finally included 11 papers-prospective and retrospective cohort studies. Among most of the selected studies, there was a significant correlation between using BTX and reduction of TTH pain intensity and severity. By analyzing qualified studies, it can be concluded that botulinum toxin seems to be effective in TTH management.

  9. Evaluating the functional outcomes of ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections using the Euro-musculus approach for upper limb spasticity treatment in post-stroke patients; an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukavci, Raikan; Akturk, Semra; Ersoy, Yüksel

    2018-02-07

    Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injection is an effective treatment for spasticity. Euro-musculus spasticity approach is a new method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. The clinical outcomes of this practical approach is not yet available in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on spasticity and the functional outcomes of ultrasound guided botulinum toxin type A injections via the Euro-musculus spasticity approach to treat upper limb spasticity in post-stroke patients. An observational study. Inpatient post-stroke patients. Twenty five post-stroke patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were recruited. The ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections were administered into the spastic target muscles using the Euro-musculus spasticity approach, and all of the patients were enrolled in rehabilitation programmes after the injections. This research included the innervation zone and injection site figures and ultrasound images of each muscle in the upper limb. The degree of spasticity was assessed via the Modified Ashworth Scale and the upper limb motor function via the Fugl Meyer Upper Extremity Scale at the baseline and 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection. Significant decreases in the Modified Ashworth Scale scores of the upper limb flexor muscle tone measured 4 and 12 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A injection were found when compared to the baseline scores (pbotulinum toxin type A injection via the Euro- musculus spasticity approach is a practical and effective method for administering injections to the correct point of the correct muscle. Ultrasound-guided botulinum toxin type A injections combined with rehabilitation programmes decrease spasticity and improve the upper extremity motor functions in stroke patients. This new approach for ultrasound- guided botulinum toxin type A injection is very practical and effective method for upper

  10. Use of anatomic measurement to guide injection of botulinum toxin for the management of chronic lateral epicondylitis: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espandar, Ramin; Heidari, Pedram; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Saadat, Soheil; Farzan, Mahmood; Rostami, Mohsen; Yazdanian, Shideh; Mortazavi, S.M. Javad

    2010-01-01

    Background When using botulinum toxin for the management of lateral epicondylitis, injection at a fixed distance from an anatomic landmark could result in inadequate paralysis of the intended muscle. We assessed the effectiveness of injection of botulinum toxin using precise anatomic measurement in individual patients. Methods In this randomized placebo-controlled trial, 48 patients with chronic refractory lateral epicondylitis were randomly assigned to receive a single injection of either botulinum toxin (60 units) or placebo (normal saline). The site of injection was chosen as a distance one-third the length of the forearm from the tip of the lateral epicondyle on the course of the posterior interosseus nerve. The primary outcome measure was intensity of pain at rest, measured with the use of a 100-mm visual analogue scale, at baseline and at 4, 8 and 16 weeks after injection. Results Compared with the placebo group, the group given botulinum toxin had significant reductions in pain at rest during follow-up (decrease at 4 weeks 14.1 mm, 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.8–22.3; at 8 weeks 11.5 mm, 95% CI 2.0–21.0; at 16 weeks 12.6 mm, 95% CI 7.7–17.8; p = 0.01). As for the secondary outcomes, the intensity of pain during maximum pinch decreased in the botulinum toxin group; there was no difference in pain during maximum grip or in grip strength between the two groups. All but one of the patients in the intervention group experienced weakness in the extension of the third and fourth fingers at week 4 that resolved by week 16. No serious adverse events were reported. Interpretation The use of precise anatomic measurement to guide injection of botulinum toxin significantly reduced pain at rest in patients with chronic refractory lateral epicondylitis. However, the transient extensor lag makes this method inappropriate for patients whose job requires finger extension. (ClinicalTrials.gov trial register no. NCT00497913.) PMID:20421357

  11. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) and back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Mauro; Maggioni, G

    2004-02-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is defined as subacute or chronic pain with sensory, motor and autonomic symptoms referred from active trigger points with associated painful dysfunctions. Authors present the usefulness of botulinum toxin A or B (BoNT/A or BoNT/B) injected into target muscles since the toxin is capable of controlling not only the muscular spasm but mostly the pain by alternative mechanisms of action, which are discussed. Posology of BoNT, technical aspects and results are presented. BoNT represents an interesting and useful tool for an adequate management of patients with myofascial pain.

  12. The effects of onabotulinum toxin A injection into rectus femoris muscle in hemiplegic stroke patients with stiff-knee gait: a placebo-controlled, nonrandomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, Fatih; Balaban, Birol; Yaşar, Evren; Alaca, Rdvan; Tan, Arif Kenan

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the efficacy of onabotulinum toxin A (onabot) injection into the rectus femoris muscle with that of placebo in the treatment of hemiplegic stroke patients presenting with stiff-knee gait. Twenty-five chronic hemiparetic stroke patients presenting with a stiff-knee gait were included in this study. Fifteen patients received 100-125 U of onabot, and 10 patients received placebo into the rectus femoris muscle. Three-dimensional gait analysis, energy expenditure, 10-m and 6-min walk tests, and spasticity level of the rectus femoris were evaluated at baseline and 2 mos posttreatment. The mean age of patients who received onabot was 53.86 ± 14.74 yrs and of those who received placebo was 59.00 ± 8.11 yrs. At study onset, groups were similar with respect to all parameters (P > 0.05). We observed significant improvement in knee flexion (7 degrees average) during swing and a reduction in energy cost of 0.8-J/kg per meter response to injection of 100-125 U of onabot into the rectus femoris muscle. Onabot treatment significantly reduced muscle tone and improved knee kinematics, energy expenditure during walking, and functional assessments at 2 mos (P application of onabot into the rectus femoris muscle in stroke patients who presented with stiff-knee gait may be a treatment option to provide independent, safe, and less tiring ambulation.

  13. Botulinum toxin type a injections for cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain using an enriched protocol design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Andrea L; Wu, Irene I; Ferrante, F Michael

    2014-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is a regional condition of muscle pain and stiffness and is classically characterized by the presence of trigger points in affected musculature. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) has been shown to have antinociceptive properties and elicit sustained muscle relaxation, thereby possibly affording even greater relief than traditional strategies. Our goal was to determine whether direct injection of BoNT-A into painful muscle groups is effective for cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain. An enriched protocol design was used, wherein 114 patients with cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain underwent injection of BoNT-A to determine their response to the drug. Fifty-four responders were then enrolled in a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Pain scales and quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at routine follow-up visits until completion of the study after 26 weeks. Injection of BoNT-A into painful muscle groups improved average visual numerical pain scores in subjects who received a second dose of BoNT-A compared to placebo (P = 0.019 [0.26, 2.78]). Subjects who received a second dose of BoNT-A had a reduced number of headaches per week (P = 0.04 [0.07, 4.55]). Brief Pain Inventory interference scores for general activity and sleep were improved (P = 0.046 [0.038, 3.700] and 0.02 [0.37, 4.33], respectively) in those who received a second dose of BoNT-A. BoNT-A injected directly into painful muscle groups improves average pain scores and certain aspects of quality of life in patients experiencing severe cervical and shoulder girdle myofascial pain.

  14. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program. Evaluation of the Passive Protection Against Five Serotypes of Botulinum Toxin Provided by Botulinum Human Immune Globulin in an Animal Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    1998-01-01

    Pentavalent (ABCDE) botulinum toxoid vaccine is intended for use as a prophylactic measure to protect combat troops against the lethal effects of botulinum toxins A-E, a group of toxins considered to be a serious biological warfare threat...

  15. Dopamine, Noradrenaline and Serotonin Receptor Densities in the Striatum of Hemiparkinsonian Rats following Botulinum Neurotoxin-A Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, T; Zilles, K; Dikow, H; Hellfritsch, A; Cremer, M; Piel, M; Rösch, F; Hawlitschka, A; Schmitt, O; Wree, A

    2018-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) that causes a dopamine (DA) deficit in the caudate-putamen (CPu) accompanied by compensatory changes in other neurotransmitter systems. These changes result in severe motor and non-motor symptoms. To disclose the role of various receptor binding sites for DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin in the hemiparkinsonian (hemi-PD) rat model induced by unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) injection, the densities of D 1 , D 2 /D 3 , α 1 , α 2 , and 5HT 2A receptors were longitudinally visualized and measured in the CPu of hemi-PD rats by quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found a moderate increase in D 1 receptor density 3 weeks post lesion that decreased during longer survival times, a significant increase of D 2 /D 3 receptor density, and 50% reduction in 5HT 2A receptor density. α 1 receptor density remained unaltered in hemi-PD and α 2 receptors demonstrated a slight right-left difference increasing with post lesion survival. In a second step, the possible role of receptors on the known reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations in hemi-PD rats by intrastriatally injected Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) was analyzed by measuring the receptor densities after BoNT-A injection. The application of this neurotoxin reduced D 2 /D 3 receptor density, whereas the other receptors mainly remained unaltered. Our results provide novel data for an understanding of the postlesional plasticity of dopaminergic, noradrenergic and serotonergic receptors in the hemi-PD rat model. The results further suggest a therapeutic effect of BoNT-A on the impaired motor behavior of hemi-PD rats by reducing the interhemispheric imbalance in D 2 /D 3 receptor density. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intrastriatal injection of botulinum neurotoxin-A is not cytotoxic in rat brain - A histological and stereological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlan, Juliane; Brosig, Hans; Schmitt, Oliver; Mix, Eilhard; Wree, Andreas; Hawlitschka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, resulting in a deficiency of dopamine in the striatum and an increased release of acetylcholine by tonically active interneurons. Botulinum neurotoxin-A (BoNT-A) is well known for blocking transmitter release by cholinergic presynaptic terminals. Treating striatal hypercholinism by local application of BoNT-A could be a possible new local therapy option of PD. In previous studies of our group, we analyzed the effect of BoNT-A injection into the CPu of 6-OHDA lesioned hemiparkinsonian rats. Our studies showed that BoNT-A application in hemiparkinson rat model is capable of abolishing apomorphine induced rotations for approximately 3 months. Regularly occurring axonal swellings in the BoNT-A infiltrated striata were also discovered, which we named BoNT-A induced varicosities (BiVs). Résumé: Here we investigated the long-term effect of the injection of 1ng BoNT-A into the right CPu of naive Wistar rats on the number of ChAT-ir interneurons as well as on the numeric density and the volumetric size of the BiVs in the CPu. Significant differences in the number of ChAT-ir neurons between the right BoNT-A treated CPu and the left untreated CPu were not detected up to 12 month post BoNT-A injection. The numeric density of BiVs in the treated CPu reached a maximum 3 months after BoNT-A treatment and decreased afterwards, whereas the volume of single BiVs increased steadily throughout the whole time course of the experiment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Safety and efficacy of multiuse botulinum toxin vials for intralaryngeal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Emily M; Rosen, Clark A; Hapner, Edie R; Smith, Sarah; Hatcher, Jeanne L; Simpson, Blake; Johns, Michael M

    2015-05-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines maintain that single-use vials cannot be used for multiple patients. Botox product labeling states that the reconstituted toxin should be used within 4 hours on a single patient based on concerns of reduced potency, contamination, and consequent infections. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of using single-use vials in a multidose fashion. Prospective study and cohort chart review. A multi-institutional three-part study was performed between May 2013 and October 2013: 1) a summation of subjects' recall of their past experiences (symptoms/response) with previous multidose Botox injections, 2) a prospective study of intralaryngeal injections, and 3) a chart review of injection responses in a subset of the cohort. Seven hundred forty-three subjects receiving 6,216 injections demonstrated zero infection-related complications on retrospective chart review. One hundred seventy-nine subjects recalled 24.0% overall adverse events, 10.6% redness, 7.3% pain and swelling at the injection site, and 0% fever. One hundred seventy-four subjects prospectively reported 12.6% overall adverse events. The self-reported efficacy rate of Botox injection was 96.6%. The low rates of adverse events following the use of Botox in a multipatient fashion are consistent with other percutaneous injections. No evidence of infection was found with multidose Botox use. Given the low incidence of side effects and high success rate, Botox can be used both safely and effectively in a multipatient fashion. 4 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Injection of botulinum toxin type a to reduce saliva in patients with neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayse Manrique

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the effect of local injection of Botox® inpatients with neurological diseases, following our protocol for thetreatment of sialorrhea. Study design: clinical prospective study.Methods: Twenty-one patients with neurological diseases seen atthe Otorhinolaryngology of the Associação de Assistência à CriançaDeficiente. They were all submitted to local injection of Botox® insalivary glands and followed up for one year. The protocol consistsof a clinical questionnaire about inability to swallow saliva and itsrepercussions in general health and quality of life. Patients must nothave periodontal disease or intolerance to adverse effects ofanticholinergic agents and must not have used Botox® at least inthe last six months. The injection was ultrasonographically guidedand the dose was 30 U in one site of the submandibular glands, and20 U in two sites in each parotid gland. Results: Twenty-one patientswith sialorrhea resulting from several neurological diseases (chronicencephalopathy, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,neuromuscular diseases, cerebral tumor, trauma, aged 2 to 66 yearsold, were submitted to Botox® injection in their salivary glands. Weobserved a markedly improvement of sialorrhea in all but one patient.Seventeen patients had no complaints of sialorrhea or salivaaspiration for approximately four months with good repercussion intheir quality of life. No patient presented local or systemic effectswith local injection of Botox®. Conclusion: the injection of Botox® asindicated in the present study was able to reduce sialorrhea resultingfrom several neurological conditions.

  19. Treatment of achalasia: the short-term response to botulinum toxin injection seems to be independent of any kind of pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meining A

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been suggested that intrasphincteric injection of botulinum toxin (BTX may represent an alternative therapy to balloon dilatation in achalasia. The aim of the present study was to test the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections in achalasia patients, as assessed using lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LOSP and symptom scores, and to compare the response in patients with different types of pretreatment (no previous treatment, balloon dilatation, myotomy, BTX injection. Methods Forty patients who presented with symptomatic achalasia were treated with BTX injection (48 injections in 40 patients. Some of the patients had received prior treatment (seven with myotomy, seven with dilatation and eight with BTX. The symptoms were assessed using a global symptom score (0–10, which was evaluated before treatment, 1 week afterwards, and 1 month afterwards. Manometry was also carried out before and after treatment. Three different selections of patients were studied: all patients; untreated patients; and patients with prior BTX, dilatation, or myotomy. Results After BTX injection, there was a significant reduction in LOSP (before, 38.2 ± 11.3 mmHg; 1 week after, 20.5 ± 6.9 mmHg; 1 month after, 17.8 ± 6.8 mmHg; P Conclusions BTX injection offers an alternative treatment for achalasia which is safe and can be performed in an outpatient setting. The initial response to BTX, in terms of symptom scores and LOSP, appears to be independent of any prior treatment. A number of patients do not adequately respond to balloon dilatation or myotomy, which are the first-line treatment modalities in achalasia patients. BTX injection can be performed in these patients, and symptomatic benefit can be expected in the same percentages as with BTX injection in untreated patients.

  20. Anatomical recommendations for safe botulinum toxin injection into temporalis muscle: a simplified reproducible approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Kang; Bae, Jung-Hee; Hu, Kyung-Seok; Kato, Takafumi; Kim, Seong-Taek

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to simplify the anatomically safe and reproducible approach for BoNT injection and to generate a detailed topographic map of the important anatomical structures of the temporal region by dividing the temporalis into nine equally sized compartments. Nineteen sides of temporalis muscle were used. The topographies of the superficial temporal artery, middle temporal vein, temporalis tendon, and the temporalis muscle were evaluated. Also evaluated was the postural relations among the foregoing anatomical structures in the temporalis muscle, pivoted upon a total of nine compartments. The temporalis above the zygomatic arch exhibited an oblique quadrangular shape with rounded upper right and left corners. The distance between the anterior and posterior margins of the temporalis muscle was equal to the width of the temporalis rectangle, and the distance between the reference line and the superior temporalis margin was equal to its height. The mean ratio of width to height was 5:4. We recommend compartments Am, Mu, and Pm (coordinates of the rectangular outline) as areas in the temporal region for BoNT injection, because using these sites will avoid large blood vessels and tendons, thus improving the safety and reproducibility of the injection.

  1. Expression of apoptosis-regulating genes in the rat prostate following botulinum toxin type a injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgal Tiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onabotulinumtoxin A (OnabotA injection has been investigated as a novel treatment for benign prostatic enlargement caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. An OnabotA - induced volume reduction caused by sympathetic fibers impairment has been proposed as a potential mechanism of action. Our aim was to investigate the expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins in the rat prostate following OnabotA intraprostatic injection. Methods Adult Wistar rats were injected in the ventral lobes of the prostate with 10 U of OnabotA or saline. A set of OnabotA-injected animals was further treated with 0.5 mg/kg of phenylephrine (PHE subcutaneously daily. All animals were sacrificed after 1 week and had their prostates harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for Bax, Bcl-xL and caspase-3 proteins and visualized by the avidin-biotin method. The optical density of the glandular cells was also determined, with measurement of differences between average optical densities for each group. Results Saline-treated animals showed intense epithelial staining for Bcl-xL and a faint labelling for both Bax and Caspase-3. OnabotA-treated rats showed a reduced epithelial staining of Bcl-xL and a consistently increased Bax and Caspase-3 staining when compared with saline-treated animals. PHE-treated animals showed a stronger Bcl-xL staining and reduced staining of both Bax and Caspase-3 when compared to the OnabotA group. Mean signal intensity measurements for each immunoreaction confirmed a significant decrease of the signal intensity for Bcl-xL and a significant increase of the signal intensity for Bax and Caspase 3 in OnabotA-injected animals when compared with the control group. In OnabotA+PHE treated animals mean signal intensity for Bcl-xL, Bax and Caspase 3 immunoreactions was identical to that of the control animals. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that OnabotA activates apoptotic pathways in the rat prostate through a

  2. Identification of the factors that govern the ability of therapeutic antibodies to provide postchallenge protection against botulinum toxin: a model for assessing postchallenge efficacy of medical countermeasures against agents of bioterrorism and biological warfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Nasser, Zidoon; Olson, Rebecca M; Cao, Linsen; Simpson, Lance L

    2011-08-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are one of the major classes of medical countermeasures that can provide protection against potential bioweapons such as botulinum toxin. Although a broad array of antibodies are being evaluated for their ability to neutralize the toxin, there is little information that defines the circumstances under which these antibodies can be used. In the present study, an effort was made to quantify the temporal factors that govern therapeutic antibody use in a postchallenge scenario. Experiments were done involving inhalation administration of toxin to mice, intravenous administration to mice, and direct application to murine phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations. As part of this study, several pharmacokinetic characteristics of botulinum toxin and neutralizing antibodies were measured. The core observation that emerged from the work was that the window of opportunity within which postchallenge administration of antibodies exerted a beneficial effect increased as the challenge dose of toxin decreased. The critical factor in establishing the window of opportunity was the amount of time needed for fractional redistribution of a neuroparalytic quantum of toxin from the extraneuronal space to the intraneuronal space. This redistribution event was a dose-dependent phenomenon. It is likely that the approach used to identify the factors that govern postchallenge efficacy of antibodies against botulinum toxin can be used to assess the factors that govern postchallenge efficacy of medical countermeasures against any agent of bioterrorism or biological warfare.

  3. Botulinum Toxin for Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Cengiz; Ismi, Onur

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a common clinical entity. Besides nasal obstruction, itching, and sneezing, one of the most important symptoms of rhinitis is nasal hypersecretion produced by nasal glands and exudate from the nasal vascular bed. Allergic rhinitis is an IgE-mediated inflammatory reaction of nasal mucosa after exposure to environmental allergens. Idiopathic rhinitis describes rhinitis symptoms that occur after non-allergic, noninfectious irritants. Specific allergen avoidance, topical nasal decongestants, nasal corticosteroids, immunotherapy, and sinonasal surgery are the main treatment options. Because the current treatment modalities are not enough for reducing rhinorrhea in some patients, novel treatment options are required to solve this problem. Botulinum toxin is an exotoxin generated by Clostridium botulinum. It disturbs the signal transmission at the neuromuscular and neuroglandular junction by inhibiting the acetylcholine release from the presynaptic nerve terminal. It has been widely used in neuromuscular, hypersecretory, and autonomic nerve system disorders. There have been a lot of published articles concerning the effect of this toxin on rhinitis symptoms. Based on the results of these reports, intranasal botulinum toxin A administration appears to be a safe and effective treatment method for decreasing rhinitis symptoms in rhinitis patients with a long-lasting effect. Botulinum toxin type A will be a good treatment option for the chronic rhinitis patients who are resistant to other treatment methods.

  4. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Caron

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1 untreated animals acting as control and 2 treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i no recovery (B0, ii 50% recovery (B50 and iii full recovery (B100. Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF, and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  5. Long-Term Effects of Botulinum Toxin Complex Type A Injection on Mechano- and Metabo-Sensitive Afferent Fibers Originating from Gastrocnemius Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Guillaume; Marqueste, Tanguy; Decherchi, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate long term effects of motor denervation by botulinum toxin complex type A (BoNT/A) from Clostridium Botulinum, on the afferent fibers originating from the gastrocnemius muscle of rats. Animals were divided in 2 experimental groups: 1) untreated animals acting as control and 2) treated animals in which the toxin was injected in the left muscle, the latter being itself divided into 3 subgroups according to their locomotor recovery with the help of a test based on footprint measurements of walking rats: i) no recovery (B0), ii) 50% recovery (B50) and iii) full recovery (B100). Then, muscle properties, metabosensitive afferent fiber responses to potassium chloride (KCl) and lactic acid injections and Electrically-Induced Fatigue (EIF), and mechanosensitive responses to tendon vibrations were measured. At the end of the experiment, rats were killed and the toxin injected muscles were weighted. After toxin injection, we observed a complete paralysis associated to a loss of force to muscle stimulation and a significant muscle atrophy, and a return to baseline when the animals recover. The response to fatigue was only decreased in the B0 group. The responses to KCl injections were only altered in the B100 groups while responses to lactic acid were altered in the 3 injected groups. Finally, our results indicated that neurotoxin altered the biphasic pattern of response of the mechanosensitive fiber to tendon vibrations in the B0 and B50 groups. These results indicated that neurotoxin injection induces muscle afferent activity alterations that persist and even worsen when the muscle has recovered his motor activity.

  6. Extra- and intramuscular nerve supply of the muscles of the anterior antebrachial compartment: applications for selective neurotomy and for botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, D; Parratte, B; Tatu, L; Vuiller, F; Monnier, G

    2005-12-01

    Hypertonia of the upper limb due to spasticity causes pronation of the forearm and flexion of wrist and fingers. Nowadays this spasticity is often treated with injections of botulinum toxin and sometimes with selective fascicular neurotomy. To correctly perform this microsurgical technique, it is necessary to get precise knowledge of the extramuscular nerve branching in order to be better able to select the motor branches which supply the muscles involved in spasticity. The same knowledge is required for botulinum toxin injections which must be made as near as possible to the zones where intramuscular nerve endings are the densest, which is also where neuromuscular junctions are the most numerous. Thus, it is necessary to better know these zones, but their knowledge remains today imprecise. The muscles of the anterior compartment of 30 forearms were dissected, first macroscopically, then microscopically, to study the extra- and intramuscular nerve supply and the distribution of terminal nerve ramifications. The results were then linked to surface topographical landmarks to indicate the precise location of motor branches for each muscle with the aim of proposing appropriate surgical approaches for selective neurotomies. Then for each muscle, the zones with the highest density of nerve endings were divided into segments, thus determining the optimal zones for botulinim toxin injections.

  7. Three-dimensional CT might be a potential evaluation modality in correction of asymmetrical masseter muscle hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Yeon A; Ahn, Byeong Heon; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    For correction of this asymmetrical hypertrophy, botulinum toxin type A (BTxA) injection is one of convenient treatment modalities. Unfortunately, physical examination of masseter muscle is not enough to estimate the exact volume of muscle hypertrophy difference. Two Koreans, male and female, of bilateral masseter hypertrophy with asymmetricity were evaluated. BTxA (NABOTA(®), Daewoong, Co. Ltd., Seoul, Korea) was injected at master muscle site with total 50 U (25 U at each side) and volume change was evaluated with three-dimensional (3D) CT image analysis. Maximum reduction of masseter hypertrophy was recognized at 2-month follow-up and reduced muscle size started to restore after 3 months. Mean reduction of masseter muscle volume was 36% compared with baseline. More hypertrophied side of masseter muscle presented 42% of volume reduction at 2-month follow-up but less hypertrophied side of masseter muscle showed 30% of volume shrinkage. In conclusion, 3D CT image analysis might be the exact evaluation tool for correction of asymmetrical masseter hypertrophy by botulinum toxin injection.

  8. Influence of injection of Chinese botulinum toxin type A on the histomorphology and myosin heavy chain composition of rat gastrocnemius muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Chen, Min; Hu, Xing-yue

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) is a metalloprotease that blocks synaptic transmission via the cleavage of a synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). It has gained widespread use as a treatment for cerebral palsy and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In China, Chinese botulinum toxin type A (CBTX-A), a type of BoNT/A, is in widespread clinical use. However, the changes in the morphological and biochemical properties of treated muscles and in remote muscles from the CBTX-A injection site are relatively unknown. Therefore, we investigated the changes in histomorphology and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition and distribution in rat gastrocnemius muscles after intramuscular injection of CBTX-A. The weakness of the injected muscles was assessed periodically to identify their functional deficiency. Muscle slices were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). MyHC isoform composition was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to uncover changes in morphological and biochemical properties. Our findings demonstrate that following injection of CBTX-A 5 U into rat gastrocnemius muscles, shifts in MyHC isoform composition emerged on the third day after injection and peaked in the fourth week. The composition remained distinctly different from that of the control group after the twelfth week. More specifically, there was a decrease in the proportion of the type IIb isoform and an increase in the proportions of type IIx, type IIa, and type I isoforms. Data revealed that CBTX-A led to a shift in MyHC composition towards slower isoforms and that the MyHC composition remained far from normal six months after a single injection. However, no noticeable remote muscle weakness was induced.

  9. Assessing the effectiveness of botulinum toxin injections for adductor spasmodic dysphonia: clinician and patient perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Maia N; Johns, Michael M; Klein, Adam M; Delgaudio, John M; Gilman, Marina; Hapner, Edie R

    2010-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of Botox treatment for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), the clinician and patient judge changes in voice symptoms and the effect on quality of life. Currently, there is no standard protocol for determining the effectiveness of Botox injections in treating ADSD. Therefore, clinicians use a variety of perceptual scales and patient-based self-assessments to determine patients' impressions of severity and changes after treatments. The purpose of this study was to assess clinician-patient agreement of the effects of Botox on voice quality and quality of life in ADSD. Retrospective chart review of 199 randomly selected patients since 2004. Results indicated a weak correlation between the patient's assessment of voice impairment (EIS) and patient's quality of life impairment (Voice-Related Quality of Life [V-RQOL]) in the mild-moderate dysphonia severity group and the moderate-to-severe dysphonia group. There was a weak correlation between the patient's assessment of voice impairment EIS and the clinician's perceptual judgment of voice impairment (Consensus Auditory Perceptual Evaluation of Voice [CAPE-V]) only in the moderate to severe dysphonia group. There was a weak correlation between the patient's quality of life impairment (V-RQOL) and the clinician's perceptual judgment of voice impairment (CAPE-V) only in the severe to profound dysphonia group. The poor relationship among commonly used outcome measures leads us to question how best to assess the effectiveness of Botox in ADSD. Clinicians are required to document treatment outcomes, making it important to use scales that are valid, reliable, and sensitive to change. Future research directions include examining relationships between measures both before and after Botox injections, examining the specific factors that determine quality of life changes, and further research on specific parameters of the CAPE-V as well as comparing perceptual and quality of life scales with acoustic

  10. The Anatomical Basis of Paradoxical Masseteric Bulging after Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Jin Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the detailed anatomical structures of the superficial part of the masseter and to elucidate the boundaries and locations of the deep tendon structure within the superficial part of the masseter. Forty-four hemifaces from Korean and Thai embalmed cadavers were used in this study. The deep tendon structure was located deep in the lower third of the superficial part of the masseter. It was observed in all specimens and was designated as a deep inferior tendon (DIT. The relationship between the masseter and DIT could be classified into three types according to the coverage pattern: Type A, in which areas IV and V were covered by the DIT (27%, 12/44; Type B, in which areas V and VI were covered by the DIT (23%, 10/44; and Type C, in which areas IV, V, and VI were covered by the DIT (50%, 22/44. The superficial part of the masseter consists of not only the muscle belly but also the deep tendon structure. Based on the results obtained in this morphological study, we recommend performing layer-by-layer retrograde injections into the superficial and deep muscle bellies of the masseter.

  11. Botulinum toxin in medicine and cosmetology – two hundred years’ history and new perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Małgorzata Zbrojkiewicz; Agata Lebiedowska; Barbara Błońska-Fajfrowska Barbara Błońska-Fajfrowska

    2018-01-01

    It has been nearly 200 years since the discovery of the botulinum toxin and the strain responsible for its synthesis Clostridium botulinum. Over this period, the knowledge about botulism and the use of botulinum toxin in medicine has been significantly expanded. Currently, eight serotypes of botulinum toxin (A-H) are known and they differ from each other by molecular weight, antigenic structure, immunogenicity, receptors, localization of coding genes and by the duration of the therapeutic ...

  12. [Botulinum toxin injection techniques in the lower third and middle of the face, the neck and the décolleté: the "Nefertiti lift"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassia, V; Beylot, C; Béchaux, S; Michaud, T

    2009-05-01

    Although correction of the dynamic wrinkles of the upper part of the face is the major indication for botulinum toxin, there are also many possibilities for the middle and lower thirds of the face and neck. However, these injections are more delicate and require an experienced operator who has excellent knowledge of the muscles of these regions, their functions, the antagonist actions exercised on other muscles, particularly in terms of the complex equilibrium of the mouth. An excessive dose, an inappropriate injection point, or a centering mistake can all easily be responsible for undesirable side effects. However, the results obtained, often with lower doses than in the superior part of the face, can be highly satisfactory, notably in erasing bunny lines, improvement of marionette lines, peau d'orange chin, attenuation of peribuccal lines, melomental folds, correction of a gummy smile, and facial asymmetries. In the neck it is possible to reduce platysmal bands, horizontal lines, and diagonal lines of the neck and décolleté. The face contours can also be improved by the Nefertiti lift. In the mid and lower regions of the face, botulinum toxin is often a complement to other esthetic techniques, particularly filling procedures.

  13. Headache and botulinum toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Porta, M.; Camerlingo, M.

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss clinical and international experience about botulinum toxins (BTX types A and B) in headache treatment. Data from literature suggest good results for the treatment of tensiontype headache, migraine and chronic tension–type headache. In the present paper mechanisms of action and injection sites will also be discussed.

  14. Diffusion of Botulinum Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Brodsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is generally agreed that diffusion of botulinum toxin occurs, but the extent of the spread and its clinical importance are disputed. Many factors have been suggested to play a role but which have the most clinical relevance is a subject of much discussion.Methods: This review discusses the variables affecting diffusion, including protein composition and molecular size as well as injection factors (e.g., volume, dose, injection method. It also discusses data on diffusion from comparative studies in animal models and human clinical trials that illustrate differences between the available botulinum toxin products (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, and rimabotulinumtoxinB.Results: Neither molecular weight nor the presence of complexing proteins appears to affect diffusion; however, injection volume, concentration, and dose all play roles and are modifiable. Both animal and human studies show that botulinum toxin products are not interchangeable, and that some products are associated with greater diffusion and higher rates of diffusion-related adverse events than others.Discussion: Each of the botulinum toxins is a unique pharmacologic entity. A working knowledge of the different serotypes is essential to avoid unwanted diffusion-related adverse events. In addition, clinicians should be aware that the factors influencing diffusion may range from properties intrinsic to the drug to accurate muscle selection as well as dilution, volume, and dose injected.

  15. Botulinum Neurotoxin A Injections Influence Stretching of the Gastrocnemius Muscle-Tendon Unit in an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Tuohy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum Neurotoxin A (BoNT-A injections have been used for the treatment of muscle contractures and spasticity. This study assessed the influence of (BoNT-A injections on passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Mouse gastrocnemius muscle (GC was injected with BoNT-A (n = 18 or normal saline (n = 18 and passive, non-destructive, in vivo load relaxation experimentation was performed to examine how the muscle-tendon unit behaves after chemical denervation with BoNT-A. Injection of BoNT-A impaired passive muscle recovery (15% vs. 35% recovery to pre-stretching baseline, p < 0.05 and decreased GC stiffness (0.531 ± 0.061 N/mm vs. 0.780 ± 0.037 N/mm, p < 0.05 compared to saline controls. The successful use of BoNT-A injections as an adjunct to physical therapy may be in part attributed to the disruption of the stretch reflex; thereby modulating in vivo passive muscle properties. However, it is also possible that BoNT-A injection may alter the structure of skeletal muscle; thus modulating the in vivo passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit.

  16. The Effect of Total Cumulative Dose, Number of Treatment Cycles, Interval between Injections, and Length of Treatment on the Frequency of Occurrence of Antibodies to Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Treatment of Muscle Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Abdel Magid O.; Liptrot, Anthea; Newton, Rachel; Pickett, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    A large cumulative dose of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A), frequent injections, a short interval between treatment cycles, and a long duration of treatment have all been suggested, but not confirmed, to be associated with a high incidence of neutralizing antibodies to the neurotoxin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these…

  17. Botulinum toxin in pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colhado, Orlando Carlos Gomes; Boeing, Marcelo; Ortega, Luciano Bornia

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is one of the most potent bacterial toxins known and its effectiveness in the treatment of some pain syndromes is well known. However, the efficacy of some of its indications is still in the process of being confirmed. The objective of this study was to review the history, pharmacological properties, and clinical applications of BTX in the treatment of pain of different origins. Botulinum toxin is produced by fermentation of Clostridium botulinum, a Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium. Commercially, BTX comes in two presentations, types A and B. Botulinum toxin, a neurotoxin with high affinity for cholinergic synapses, blocks the release of acetylcholine by nerve endings without interfering with neuronal conduction of electrical signals or synthesis and storage of acetylcholine. It has been proven that BTX can selectively weaken painful muscles, interrupting the spasm-pain cycle. Several studies have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of BTX-A in the treatment of tension headaches, migraines, chronic lumbar pain, and myofascial pain. Botulinum toxin type A is well tolerated in the treatment of chronic pain disorders in which pharmacotherapy regimens can cause side effects. The reduction in the consumption of analgesics and length of action of 3 to 4 months per dose represent other advantages of its use. However, further studies are necessary to establish the efficacy of BTX-A in chronic pain disorders and its exact mechanism of action, as well as its potential in multifactorial treatments.

  18. Gender differences in onabotulinum toxin A dosing for adductor spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Michael Z; Lerner, Benjamin A; Patel, Amit A; Blitzer, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of gender on onabotulinum toxin A dosing for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia symptoms. Retrospective review. A chart review of the senior author's database of botulinum toxin injections was performed. Patients diagnosed with adductor spasmodic dysphonia who received onabotulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injections to the thyroarytenoid muscle for at least 5 years were included for study. Patients who received alternate formulations of botulinum toxin (Myobloc, Dysport, or Xeomin) and patients with alternate diagnoses, such as abductor spasmodic dysphonia, tremor, and oromandibular dystonia, were excluded. The average BoNTA dose was calculated for each patient and statistical analysis was performed comparing the male and female groups. A total of 201 patients (52 males and 149 females) met inclusion criteria. The average follow-up times for the male and female groups were 10.2 ± 3.6 and 11.1 ± 4 years, respectively. The average BoNTA doses for the male and female groups were 0.6 ± 0.42 U and 1.3 ± 1.1 U, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed using an independent samples two-tailed t test yielding a P value of .0000000002. A large effect size was noted with Cohen's d = 0.85. The data from this retrospective chart review reveal a statistically and clinically significant correlation between female gender and higher average BoNTA dose for symptom control in adductor spasmodic dysphonia. Explanations for this observation are speculative and include a possible inverse relationship between optimal BoNTA dose and vocal fold mass and possibly greater neutralizing antibody formation among female patients. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:1131-1134, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  19. Use of Botulinum toxin in 55 children with cerebral palsy

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    Mohammadi M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BTA inhibits presynaptic release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction and has reportedly been successful in the treatment of spastic disorders.To evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin on cerebral palsied children with spastic or mixed type of the disease, especially those patiens having spasticity as a cardinal symptom without joint contracture, we designed the following study. Ninety-one cases (55 of referred patients to pediatic Neurology outpatient clinics of children’s Medical Center were given BTA injections in affected muscles of the lower limb. They were reevaluating 3 to 5 weeks and 3 months later for type of walking and range of affected joints’ movement. The study showed a clinically significant gait improvement in 71.2% of patients (P<0.0005 and also an overall increased range of motion in affected limbs after BTA injection (P<0.04. Side effects occurred only in two cases as transient generalized weakness, gent recurvatum and ptosis. Drug effectiveness was time-limited, lasting abot 3 months in all patients ( a golden time for rehabilitation therapists to improve the patients’ condition. Overall, BTA has improved both the type of walking as well as the range of joints motion in our patients. So its’ administration is suggested in cerebral palsied children if the spasticity is a major and disabling sign

  20. Ultrasound-Guided Injection of Botulinum Toxin Type A for Piriformis Muscle Syndrome: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Andrea Santamato

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS is caused by prolonged or excessive contraction of the piriformis muscle associated with pain in the buttocks, hips, and lower limbs because of the close proximity to the sciatic nerve. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A reduces muscle hypertonia as well as muscle contracture and pain inhibiting substance P release and other inflammatory factors. BoNT-A injection technique is important considering the difficult access of the needle for deep location, the small size of the muscle, and the proximity to neurovascular structures. Ultrasound guidance is easy to use and painless and several studies describe its use during BoNT-A administration in PMS. In the present review article, we briefly updated current knowledge regarding the BoNT therapy of PMS, describing also a case report in which this syndrome was treated with an ultrasound-guided injection of incobotulinumtoxin A. Pain reduction with an increase of hip articular range of motion in this patient with PMS confirmed the effectiveness of BoNT-A injection for the management of this syndrome.

  1. Negative effects of submandibular botulinum neurotoxin A injections on oral motor function in children with drooling due to central nervous system disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hulst, Karen; Kouwenberg, Carlyn V; Jongerius, Pieter H; Feuth, Ton; van den Hoogen, Franciscus J A; Geurts, Alexander C H; Erasmus, Corrie E

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to determine the incidence and nature of adverse effects on oral motor function after first injections of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) in submandibular glands for excessive drooling in children with central nervous system disorders; and (2) to identify independent predictors of these adverse effects. A cohort study involved 209 children (123 males, 86 females, aged 4-27y, median 8y 4mo), who received submandibular BoNT-A injections for drooling. Adverse effects were categorized into swallowing, eating, drinking, articulation, and other problems. Univariable logistic regression was used to study differences in patients with and without adverse effects. Possible predictors were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Transient adverse effects occurred in 33% of the 209 BoNT-A treatments. Almost 80% of these were mild, versus 8.7% severe. Approximately 54% of the adverse effects spontaneously resolved within 4 weeks; 3% still existed after 32 weeks. A diagnosis of cerebral palsy, higher range of BoNT-A dosage, and a pre-treatment drooling quotient <18% were found to be independent predictors of adverse effects. Before using submandibular BoNT-A injections for drooling, potential adverse effects should be discussed. Oral motor function needs to be monitored, because existing dysphagia may be worsened. The identified clinical predictors could be helpful to optimize patient selection. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Mac Keith Press.

  2. Botulinum toxin to improve results in cleft lip repair: a double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Shin Chang

    Full Text Available Most patients with facial scarring would value even a slight improvement in scar quality. Botulinum toxin A is widely used to alleviate facial dynamic rhytides but is also believed to improve scar quality by reducing wound tension during healing. The main objective was to assess the effect of Botulinum toxin on scars resultant from standardized upper lip wounds.In this double-blinded, randomized, vehicle-controlled, prospective clinical trial, 60 consecutive consenting adults undergoing cleft lip scar revision (CLSR surgery between July 2010 and March 2012 were randomized to receive botulinum toxin A (n = 30 or vehicle (normal saline; n = 30 injections into the subjacent orbicularis oris muscle immediately after wound closure. Scars were independently assessed at 6-months follow-up in blinded fashion using: Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and photographic plus ultrasound measurements of scar widths.58 patients completed the trial. All scar assessment modalities revealed statistically significantly better scars in the experimental than the vehicle-control group.Quality of surgical upper lip scars, which are oriented perpendicular to the direction of pull of the underlying orbicularis oris muscle, is significantly improved by its temporary paralysis during wound healing.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01429402.

  3. Combinatorial Strategies and High Throughput Screening in Drug Discovery Targeted to Channel of Botulinum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montel, Mauricio

    2004-01-01

    This program examines innovative approaches and powerful new technologies to identify selective and potent agents directed to prevent or relieve the neuroparalytic toxic actions of botulinum toxin A (BoNTA)1...

  4. Combined Effect Of Botulinum Toxin And Splinting On Motor Components And Function Of People With Stroke

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    Aryan Shamili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Spasticity is one of the problems following stroke. Due to this increase in muscle tone, patients are confronted to problems in motor control and difficulties in activities of daily living and complications such as shortness and contracture. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of Simultaneous use of both splint and botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A injection on spasticity, range of motion and upper extremity function in a 3-month period. Methods: The design of this study was a comparison between 3 groups of interventions, conducted in rehabilitation clinics in Tehran. Sixty people with chronic stroke were recruited. Based on the inclusion criteria, a total of 39 stroke patients after completing the consent forms were entered to intervention groups; splint or botulinum toxin injection or combined splint/botulinum toxin injection. They were followed up about 3 months and the evaluations were done monthly. Goniometry was the method to measure range of motion, and Modified Ashworth scale was used to examine the spasticity and the upper extremity function was scored based on Fugl-Meyer assessment.   Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17. And ANOVAs was used for comparison between groups and times.  Significance was set at 0.05. Results: All outcome measures improved within each group but the differences between splint group and BTX-A group and the BTX-A-splint group was not significant in most outcomes during 3 periods (first evaluation until end of the first month, the end of first month until the end of second month, the end of second month until the end of the third month (p> 0 / 05. The results also showed that the changes in elbow`s spasticity {p= 0.05} and wrist`s spasticity {p= 0.007} and upper extremity function { p = 0.04} were obvious between the three groups over the 3-months and the difference in the group of combined use of botulinum toxin and splint was more than other groups. Conclusion: In this

  5. [18F]fallypride-PET/CT Analysis of the Dopamine D₂/D₃ Receptor in the Hemiparkinsonian Rat Brain Following Intrastriatal Botulinum Neurotoxin A Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Teresa; Kurth, Jens; Hawlitschka, Alexander; Stenzel, Jan; Lindner, Tobias; Polei, Stefan; Hohn, Alexander; Krause, Bernd J; Wree, Andreas

    2018-03-06

    Intrastriatal injection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) results in improved motor behavior of hemiparkinsonian (hemi-PD) rats, an animal model for Parkinson's disease. The caudate-putamen (CPu), as the main input nucleus of the basal ganglia loop, is fundamentally involved in motor function and directly interacts with the dopaminergic system. To determine receptor-mediated explanations for the BoNT-A effect, we analyzed the dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor (D₂/D₃R) in the CPu of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced hemi-PD rats by [ 18 F]fallypride-PET/CT scans one, three, and six months post-BoNT-A or -sham-BoNT-A injection. Male Wistar rats were assigned to three different groups: controls, sham-injected hemi-PD rats, and BoNT-A-injected hemi-PD rats. Disease-specific motor impairment was verified by apomorphine and amphetamine rotation testing. Animal-specific magnetic resonance imaging was performed for co-registration and anatomical reference. PET quantification was achieved using PMOD software with the simplified reference tissue model 2. Hemi-PD rats exhibited a constant increase of 23% in D₂/D₃R availability in the CPu, which was almost normalized by intrastriatal application of BoNT-A. Importantly, the BoNT-A effect on striatal D₂/D₃R significantly correlated with behavioral results in the apomorphine rotation test. Our results suggest a therapeutic effect of BoNT-A on the impaired motor behavior of hemi-PD rats by reducing interhemispheric changes of striatal D₂/D₃R.

  6. [18F]fallypride-PET/CT Analysis of the Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor in the Hemiparkinsonian Rat Brain Following Intrastriatal Botulinum Neurotoxin A Injection

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    Teresa Mann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrastriatal injection of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A results in improved motor behavior of hemiparkinsonian (hemi-PD rats, an animal model for Parkinson’s disease. The caudate–putamen (CPu, as the main input nucleus of the basal ganglia loop, is fundamentally involved in motor function and directly interacts with the dopaminergic system. To determine receptor-mediated explanations for the BoNT-A effect, we analyzed the dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R in the CPu of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced hemi-PD rats by [18F]fallypride-PET/CT scans one, three, and six months post-BoNT-A or -sham-BoNT-A injection. Male Wistar rats were assigned to three different groups: controls, sham-injected hemi-PD rats, and BoNT-A-injected hemi-PD rats. Disease-specific motor impairment was verified by apomorphine and amphetamine rotation testing. Animal-specific magnetic resonance imaging was performed for co-registration and anatomical reference. PET quantification was achieved using PMOD software with the simplified reference tissue model 2. Hemi-PD rats exhibited a constant increase of 23% in D2/D3R availability in the CPu, which was almost normalized by intrastriatal application of BoNT-A. Importantly, the BoNT-A effect on striatal D2/D3R significantly correlated with behavioral results in the apomorphine rotation test. Our results suggest a therapeutic effect of BoNT-A on the impaired motor behavior of hemi-PD rats by reducing interhemispheric changes of striatal D2/D3R.

  7. Treatment of ovarian cancer ascites by intra-peritoneal injection of diphtheria toxin A chain-H19 vector: a case report

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    Abu-lail Rasha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ovarian cancer ascitic fluid, which contains malignant cells, is usually present in women with an advanced stage disease. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer ascitic fluid. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target expression of the diphtheria toxin fragment A gene in ovarian tumor cells under the control of H19 regulatory sequences. Case presentation A 64-year-old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with a stage IIIc epithelial ovarian cancer. She suffered from progressive disease, accumulation of malignant ascites that needed to be drained weekly, abdominal pain, vomiting, anorexia and severe weakness. Infusion of the diphtheria toxin A chain-H19 plasmid into the peritoneum of our patient resulted in complete resolution of the ascites with minimum adverse events. Conclusion On the basis of this preliminary experience, we are currently conducting an extensive Phase I study on a larger number of patients in order to assess the safety and preliminary efficacy of this novel patient-oriented treatment approach.

  8. Egg yolk antibodies for detection and neutralization of Clostridium botulinum type A neurotoxin.

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    Trott, D L; Yang, M; Gonzalez, J; Larson, A E; Tepp, W H; Johnson, E A; Cook, M E

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to determine the usefulness of an egg antibody platform for producing materials for the detection and neutralization of botulinum type A neurotoxin. Yield estimates for detection and neutralizing antibodies produced using methods described were calculated. Antibody specific to botulinum toxoid A (aToxoid) and toxin A (aBoNT/A) was produced by immunizing hens with botulinum toxoid A (toxoid) followed by increasing amounts of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) in Freund incomplete adjuvant. Egg yolks were extracted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for antibody detection and neutralization experiments. A model aToxoid/toxoid immunoassay using only egg yolk antibody was developed and had a detection limit of 1 pg/ml of toxoid. In an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of BoNT/A-specific antibody, the aBoNT/A contained more BoNT/A-specific antibody than did the aToxoid, and aBoNT/A was as effective as commercial rabbit antibody. The aToxoid provided no protection against BoNT/A in a standard mouse neutralization assay; however, 1 mg of PEG-extracted aBoNT/A neutralized 4,000 lethal doses of BoNT/A injected intraperitoneally. Based on these results, we calculated that in 1 month one hen could produce more than 100 liters of antibody detection reagents or enough antibody to neutralize approximately 11.6 million mouse lethal doses of botulinum toxin. Utilization of an egg antibody platform is potentially rapid (28 to 70 days) and scalable to kilogram quantities using current egg production facilities with as few as 1,000 hens.

  9. SPASTICITY PATTERNS OF HAND MUSCLES AND BOTULINUM TOXIN THERAPY APPLICATION IN PATIENTS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY WITH UPPER LIMB INVOLVEMENT

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    O. A. Klochkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective and safe method of treatment of local spasticity in patients with cerebral palsy (CP. Calculation of botulinum toxin A (BTA dosage based on the spasticity patterns and functional capabilities of the patient proved effective for the hypertonic lower limb muscle spasm treatment and is being applied to BTA injections in hand muscles more often. The article presents contemporary scientific data and results of the original study of BTA injections efficacy for pathologic tension reduction in hand muscles of 52 patients with CP. The authors give detailed description of the upper limb spasticity patterns, their frequency and role in the pathological movement pattern formation. The authors propose BTA dosage calculation for the functional segments of upper limbs, which allows minimizing the total amount of the administered drug and avoiding excessive weakness. The authors have also conducted a follow-up analysis of changes in hand muscle tone for the period of 6 months after the first BTA injection, compared results of botulinum toxin therapy at various clinical forms of CP and given recommendations on the optimum duration of the follow-up period.

  10. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injections in the Psoas Muscle of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Muscle Atrophy after Motor End Plate-Targeted Injections

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    Van Campenhout, Anja; Verhaegen, Ann; Pans, Steven; Molenaers, Guy

    2013-01-01

    MEP targeting during BoNT-A injections has been demonstrated to improve outcome. Two injection techniques of the psoas muscle--proximal MEP targeting versus a widely used more distal injection technique--are compared using muscle volume assessment by digital MRI segmentation as outcome measure. Method: 7 spastic diplegic children received…

  11. Intramural Injection with Botulinum Toxin Type A in Piglet Esophagus. The Influencer on Maximum Load and Elongation: A Dose Response Study.

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    Ellebæk, Mark Bremholm; Qvist, Niels; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Rasmussen, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Introduction The treatment of esophageal atresia (OA) is challenging. The main goal is to achieve primary anastomosis. We have previously demonstrated in a pig model that intramural injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) resulted in significant elongation of the esophagus during tensioning until bursting point. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the influence of different amounts of intramural BTX-A on the stretch-tension characteristics and histological changes of the esophagus in piglets. Materials and Methods A total of 52 piglets were randomized to four groups receiving 2, 4, or 8 units/kg of BTX-A or isotonic saline (placebo). After a 1-hour of rest the esophagus was harvested and subjected to a stretch-tension test and histological examination to assess changes in the density of presynaptic vesicles in the nerve cells. Results Overall, 9 of the 52 animals were excluded from analysis due to problems with the stretch-tension test or death from anesthesia. The maximum loads were higher in the BTX-A groups (2 units/kg: +2.1 N; 4 units/kg: +1.3 N; 8 units/kg: +1.9 N) than the placebo (p = 0.046). There were no significant differences in percentage elongation, or histology. Conclusions This study demonstrated that injection of 2 units/kg BTX-A into a nonanastomosed esophageal wall resulted in a modest increase in the maximum load achieved before bursting; this may be due to the muscle-relaxant effect of BTX-A. BTX-A injection produced no significant effects on elongation or esophageal histology. The clinical usefulness of BTX-A in treatment of OA is still unclear. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Comparison of posterior internal anal sphincter myectomy and intrasphincteric botulinum toxin injection for treatment of internal anal sphincter achalasia: a meta-analysis.

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    Friedmacher, Florian; Puri, Prem

    2012-08-01

    Internal anal sphincter (IAS) achalasia is a clinical condition with presentation similar to Hirschsprung's disease, but with the presence of ganglion cells on rectal suction biopsy (RSB). The diagnosis is made by anorectal manometry (ARM), which demonstrates the absence of the rectosphincteric reflex on rectal balloon inflation. The recommended treatment of choice is posterior IAS myectomy. Recently, intrasphincteric botulinum toxin (Botox) injection has been effectively used for treatment of IAS achalasia. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of posterior IAS myectomy with intrasphincteric Botox injection for treatment of IAS achalasia. A systematic literature search for relevant articles was conducted using the following databases: MEDLINE( ® ), EMBASE(®), ISI Web of Science(SM) and the Cochrane Library. A meta-analysis was performed with the studies where IAS achalasia was diagnosed based on the results of ARM and RSB. Odds ratio (OR) with 95 % confidence intervals were calculated. Sixteen prospective and retrospective studies, published from 1973 to 2009, were identified. A total of 395 patients with IAS achalasia were included in this meta-analysis. Fifty-eight percent of patients underwent IAS myectomy and 42 % Botox injection. Regular bowel movements were significantly more frequent after IAS myectomy (OR 0.53, [95 % CI 0.29-0.99]; p = 0.04). There was no significant difference in continued use of laxatives or rectal enemas (OR 0.92, [95 % CI 0.34-2.53], p = 0.89) and in overall complication rates between both procedures (OR 0.68, [95 % CI 0.38-1.21]; p = 0.19). Looking at specific complications, the rate of transient faecal incontinence was significantly higher after Botox injection (OR 0.07, [95 % CI 0.01-0.54]; p IAS myectomy (OR 0.56, [95 % CI 0.32-0.97]; p = 0.04 and OR 0.25, [95 % CI 0.15-0.41]; p IAS achalasia, posterior IAS myectomy appears to be a more effective treatment option compared to intrasphincteric

  13. The role of kinesiotaping combined with botulinum toxin to reduce plantar flexors spasticity after stroke.

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    Karadag-Saygi, Evrim; Cubukcu-Aydoseli, Koza; Kablan, Nilufer; Ofluoglu, Demet

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of kinesiotaping as an adjuvant therapy to botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection in lower extremity spasticity. This is a single-center, randomized, and double-blind study. Twenty hemiplegic patients with spastic equinus foot were enrolled into the study and randomized into 2 groups. The first group (n=10) received BTX-A injection and kinesiotaping, and the second group (n=10) received BTX-A injection and sham-taping. Clinical assessment was done before injection and at 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months. Outcome measures were modified Ashworth scale (MAS), passive ankle dorsiflexion, gait velocity, and step length. Improvement was recorded in both kinesiotaping and sham groups for all outcome variables. No significant difference was found between groups other than passive range of motion (ROM), which was found to have increased more in the kinesiotaping group at 2 weeks. There is no clear benefit in adjuvant kinesiotaping application with botulinum toxin for correction of spastic equinus in stroke.

  14. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of orofacial tardive dyskinesia : A single blind study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; van Harten, Peter N.; Bruggeman, Richard; Hoek, Hans W.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Orofacial tardive dyskinesia (OTD) is difficult to treat and Botulinium Toxin A (BTA) may be an option. Methods: In a single blind (raters were blind) study (N= 12, duration 33 weeks) OTD was treated with Botulinum Toxin A in three consecutive sessions with increasing dosages. The

  15. Prolonging the duration of masseter muscle reduction by adjusting the masticatory movements after the treatment of masseter muscle hypertrophy with botulinum toxin type a injection.

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    Wei, Jiao; Xu, Hua; Dong, Jiasheng; Li, Qingfeng; Dai, Chuanchang

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) is widely used for the clinical treatment of masseteric hypertrophy. Until now, few reports have discussed how to prolong the duration of its effectiveness. This study evaluated that purposely adjusting the masticatory movements is possible of postponing the masseter muscle rehypertrophy. Ninety-eight patients were randomly and equally divided into 2 groups, and 35 U BTX-A per side was injected into the masseters. The thickness and volume of the masticatory muscles were measured by ultrasound and computerized tomography, respectively. Patients in Group 1 were instructed to strengthen their masticatory effort during the denervated atrophic stage of the masseter (the interval was evaluated by real-time ultrasound monitoring), whereas patients in Group 2 were not given this instruction. When the masseter muscle began to recover, patients in both groups were instructed to reduce their chewing. The duration of the masseter muscle rehypertrophy was significantly prolonged in Group 1 patients. The thickness and the volume of the other masticatory muscles were significantly increased in Group 1 but were either slightly decreased or insignificantly different in Group 2. Purposely strengthening masticatory muscle movement during the denervated atrophic stage of the masseter can prolong the duration of masseter rehypertrophy.

  16. Two horizontal rectus eye muscle surgery combined with botulinum toxin for the treatment of very large angle esotropia. A pilot study.

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    Khan, Arif O

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a proposed new protocol for the primary treatment for very large angle esotropia: two muscle horizontal rectus muscle surgery with simultaneous botulinum toxin A injection in a small pilot study. Eight patients who had esotropia at near (ET') greater than 60 prism diopters (in actuality 70 to 100 prism diopters ET') underwent 2 muscle horizontal rectus surgery with simultaneous botulinum toxin A injection of the medial rectus intraoperatively. This was the only surgical procedure for all patients included in this report. Seven patients underwent bilateral medial rectus recession and bilateral injection, and one patient underwent a unilateral medial rectus recession / lateral rectus resection procedure with unilateral medial rectus injection. Postoperatively, 6 of the 8 patients demonstrated residual esotropia at near of less than 10 prism diopters and were considered "successful" by the conventional criteria of binocular alignment within 8 prism diopters of orthotropia. Two undercorrections occurred in patients with 100 and 85 prism diopters of preop ET' respectively. But 3 other patients with such large deviations had satisfactory results. All patients and families were satisfied with postoperative binocular alignment, so no further surgery was undertaken. The patient who underwent unilateral surgery had the least surgical effect and was the largest undercorrection, probably because only one medial rectus received a Botox injection. Considering only the bilateral cases, results were "successful" in 6 of 7 cases. Most patients suffered an extended period of Botox induced exotropia in the postop' period before recovery from the paresis. One patient had a transient, successfully treated, postoperative strabismic amblyopia while exotropic. Bilateral medial rectus recession with simultaneous botulinum injection is a safe and effective primary surgical procedure for very large angle esotropia. A more extensive study is indicated to

  17. Objective assessment of cortical activity changes in stroke patients before and after hand rehabilitation with and without botulinum toxin injection

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    Omnia A Abu-Bakr

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion BTX injection in spastic muscles of the wrist and hand, followed by a rehabilitation program led to greater clinical and functional improvement compared with implementing the rehabilitation program alone.

  18. Botulinum toxin's axonal transport from periphery to the spinal cord.

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    Matak, Ivica; Riederer, Peter; Lacković, Zdravko

    2012-07-01

    Axonal transport of enzymatically active botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) from periphery to the CNS has been described in facial and trigeminal nerve, leading to cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) in central nuclei. Aim of present study was to examine the existence of axonal transport of peripherally applied BTX-A to spinal cord via sciatic nerve. We employed BTX-A-cleaved SNAP-25 immunohistochemistry of lumbar spinal cord after intramuscular and subcutaneous hind limb injections, and intraneural BTX-A sciatic nerve injections. Truncated SNAP-25 in ipsilateral spinal cord ventral horns and dorsal horns appeared after single peripheral BTX-A administrations, even at low intramuscular dose applied (5 U/kg). Cleaved SNAP-25 appearance in the spinal cord after BTX-A injection into the sciatic nerve was prevented by proximal intrasciatic injection of colchicine (5 mM, 2 μl). Cleaved SNAP-25 in ventral horn, using choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT) double labeling, was localized within cholinergic neurons. These results extend the recent findings on BTX-A retrograde axonal transport in facial and trigeminal nerve. Appearance of truncated SNAP-25 in spinal cord following low-dose peripheral BTX-A suggest that the axonal transport of BTX-A occurs commonly following peripheral application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Paralysis of the orbicularis muscle of the eye using botulinum toxin type A in the treatment for dry eye.

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    Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Nava-Castaneda, Angel

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A injection to cause orbicularis eyelid muscle paralysis to improve dry eye signs and symptoms. A prospective, randomized, comparative eye-to-eye and interventional study was performed. Patients with dry eye symptoms and positive fluorescein corneal staining were included. Randomly one eyelid received a subcutaneous injection of botulinum toxin in the medial orbicularis muscle portion of the lower eyelid, and the other eye received placebo. The subjective evaluation was achieved with a questionnaire assessing symptoms, quality of vision and ocular comfort level. The objective evaluation included the measurement of the tear film break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer's test and corneal and conjunctival staining. Twenty patients were included with a mean age of 59.5 years. Two weeks after the botulinum toxin injection, all patients showed a decrease in the horizontal movement of the lower eyelid when blinking. The eyes in the active treatment group showed better scores compared with the sham group in four symptoms 4 weeks after the treatment. The TBUT was higher at 1 and 3 months in the active treatment group. The corneal and conjunctival staining were significantly lower in the active treatment group at 1 and 3 months, and the Schirmer's test showed better measurements in the same group at 2 weeks, 1 month and 3 months. There were no adverse events reported. The injection of botulinum toxin A in the medial part of the lower eyelid is an effective and safe procedure that temporally improves some of the signs and symptoms of patients with dry eye. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Tailored botulinum toxin type A injections in aesthetic medicine: consensus panel recommendations for treating the forehead based on individual facial anatomy and muscle tone

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    Anido J

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Javier Anido,1 Daniel Arenas,2 Cristina Arruabarrena,3 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil,4 Carlos Fajardo,5 Mar Mira,6 Javier Murillo,7 Natalia Ribé,8 Helga Rivera,9 Sofia Ruiz del Cueto,6 Helder Silvestre,10 Marisa Tirado11 1A-Clinic, Madrid, 2Hospital Cruz Roja, Madrid, 3Clinic Cristina Arruabarrena, San Sebastiá, 4Salamanca University, Salamanca, 5Clinic Fajardo, Malaga, 6Clinic Mira+Cueto, Madrid, 7Clinic CIR, Seville, 8Institute Natalia Ribé, Barcelona, 9Clinic Helga Rivera, Vigo, Spain; 10Clinic Europa, Lisbon, Portugal; 11Clinic Derma Alemar, Castellón, Spain Background: Facial lines and wrinkles are strongly influenced by individual differences in anatomy and muscle activity and no single injection protocol will suit all patients. However, there is only limited information in the published literature on how to develop a tailored approach to botulinum toxin treatment.Methods: An expert panel of physicians was convened to establish a consensus on developing an individualized approach to treatment of the forehead with incobotulinumtoxinA. Separate treatment protocols were developed for men and women and subdivided by background level of muscle activity: kinetic, hyperkinetic, and hypertonic. Each muscle tone category was then further subdivided to take account of individual characteristics that can influence treatment.Results: Consensus members describe how to perform a dynamic assessment to optimize the dose and injection technique for each patient. A tailored treatment protocol is described for men and women with a wide range of forehead presentations. For each presentation, units of toxin as well as the precise location of injection points were defined by creating a 12-zone map of the forehead.Conclusion: These recommendations depart from traditional consensus documents by providing detailed incobotulinumtoxinA injection protocols for the forehead based on the major parameters that differ between patients, including muscular anatomy, size, and

  1. [Definition of botulinum toxin failure in neurogenic detrusor overactivity: Preliminary results of the DETOX survey].

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    Peyronnet, B; Sanson, S; Amarenco, G; Castel-Lacanal, E; Chartier-Kastler, E; Charvier, K; Damphousse, M; Denys, P; de Seze, M; Egon, G; Even, A; Forin, V; Karsenty, G; Kerdraon, J; le Normand, L; Loche, C-M; Manunta, A; Mouracade, P; Phe, V; Previnaire, J-G; Ruffion, A; Saussine, C; Schurch, B; Game, X

    2015-12-01

    There is currently no guideline regarding the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to intra-detrusor botulinum toxin injections. The primary objective of the present study was to find a consensus definition of failure of botulinum toxin intra-detrusor injections for NDO. The secondary objective was to report current trends in the managment of NDO refractory to botulinum toxin. A survey was created, based on data drawn from current literature, and sent via e-mail to all the experts form the Group for research in neurourology in french language (GENULF) and from the comittee of neurourology of the French urological association (AFU). The experts who did not answer to the first e-mail were contacted again twice. Main results from the survey are presented and expressed as numbers and proportions. Out of the 42 experts contacted, 21 responded to the survey. Nineteen participants considered that the definition of failure should be a combination of clinical and urodynamics criteria. Among the urodynamics criteria, the persistence of a maximum detrusor pressure>40 cm H2O was the most supported by the experts (18/21, 85%). According to the vast majority of participants (19/21, 90.5%), the impact of injections on urinary incontinence should be included in the definition of failure. Regarding the management, most experts considered that the first line treatment in case of failure of a first intra-detrusor injection of Botox(®) 200 U should be a repeat injection of Botox(®) at a higher dosage (300 U) (15/20, 75%), regardless of the presence or not of urodynamics risk factors of upper tract damage (16/20, 80%). This work has provided a first overview of the definition of failure of intra-detrusor injections of botulinum toxin in the management of NDO. For 90.5% of the experts involved, the definition of failure should be clinical and urodynamic and most participants (75%) considered that, in case of failure of a first injection of Botox(®) 200 U

  2. Pelvic-Spinal Analysis and the Impact of Onabotulinum toxin A Injections on Spinal Balance in one Child With Cerebral Palsy

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    Emmanuelle Chaléat-Valayer MD

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In children with cerebral palsy, primary (eg, abnormal muscle tone and weakness and secondary impairments (eg, contractures can modify pelvic-spinal alignment. The main aim of this article was to establish a new approach to pelvic-spinal analysis in children with cerebral palsy, taking into account the whole pelvis-spine complex, illustrated by a case study. Methods: This is a case study of an ambulatory child with cerebral palsy (spastic diplegia who underwent analysis of the pelvic-spine complex from X-ray images taken in standing position from C2 to the proximal femur. Pelvic shape was characterized by the pelvic incidence angle, which is the sum of sacral slope and pelvic tilt, before and after the treatment by regular onabotulinumtoxinA injections into the hip flexors, and the use of soft lumbar brace over 5 years. Results: The sagittal balance of the spine was improved following the treatment, with a reduction in lumbar lordosis and sacral slope. The reduction in lumbar hyperextension likely reduced the risk of spondylolysis, low back pain, and degenerative spondylolisthesis in adulthood. Conclusion: A biomechanical approach to the evaluation of the pelvic-spinal complex offers new perspectives to increase the understanding of spinal balance in children with cerebral palsy, providing more options for treatment, such as onabotulinumtoxinA.

  3. Botulinum Toxin: Pharmacology and Therapeutic Roles in Pain States.

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    Patil, Shilpadevi; Willett, Olga; Thompkins, Terin; Hermann, Robert; Ramanathan, Sathish; Cornett, Elyse M; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-03-01

    Botulinum toxin, also known as Botox, is produced by Clostridium botulinum, a gram-positive anaerobic bacterium, and botulinum toxin injections are among the most commonly practiced cosmetic procedures in the USA. Although botulinum toxin is typically associated with cosmetic procedures, it can be used to treat a variety of other conditions, including pain. Botulinum toxin blocks the release of acetylcholine from nerve endings to paralyze muscles and to decrease the pain response. Botulinum toxin has a long duration of action, lasting up to 5 months after initial treatment which makes it an excellent treatment for chronic pain patients. This manuscript will outline in detail why botulinum toxin is used as a successful treatment for pain in multiple conditions as well as outline the risks associated with using botulinum toxin in certain individuals. As of today, the only FDA-approved chronic condition that botulinum toxin can be used to treat is migraines and this is related to its ability to decrease muscle tension and increase muscle relaxation. Contraindications to botulinum toxin treatments are limited to a hypersensitivity to the toxin or an infection at the site of injection, and there are no known drug interactions with botulinum toxin. Botulinum toxin is an advantageous and effective alternative pain treatment and a therapy to consider for those that do not respond to opioid treatment. In summary, botulinum toxin is a relatively safe and effective treatment for individuals with certain pain conditions, including migraines. More research is warranted to elucidate chronic and long-term implications of botulinum toxin treatment as well as effects in pregnant, elderly, and adolescent patients.

  4. Comparative assessment of therapeutic response to physiotherapy with or without botulinum toxin injection using diffusion tensor tractography and clinical scores in term diplegic cerebral palsy children.

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    Chaturvedi, Saurabh K; Rai, Yogita; Chourasia, Ankita; Goel, Puneet; Paliwal, Vimal K; Garg, Ravindra K; Rathore, Ram Kishore S; Pandey, Chandra M; Gupta, Rakesh K

    2013-08-01

    The present study was to compare the effects of combined therapy [botulinum (BTX) plus physiotherapy] with physiotherapy alone using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) derived fractional anisotropy (FA) values of motor and sensory fiber bundles and clinical grade of the disability to see the value of BTX in term children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Clinically diagnosed 36 children participated in the study. All these children were born at term, and had no history of seizures. The study was randomly categorized into two groups: group I (n=18) - physiotherapy alone and group II (n=18) - physiotherapy plus BTX injection. Quantitative diffusion tensor tractography on all these children was performed on motor and sensory fiber bundles on baseline as well as after 6months of therapy. Motor function and clinical grades were also measured by gross motor function measures (GMFM) scale on both occasions. We observed significant change in FA value in motor and sensory fiber bundle as well as in GMFM scores at 6months compared to baseline study in both the groups. However, delta change and relative delta change in FA values of sensory and motor fiber bundle as well as GMFM score between group I and group II was statistically insignificant. We conclude that addition of BTX to physiotherapy regimen does not influence the outcome at 6months with similar insult in children with term diplegic spastic CP. This information may influence management of diplegic CP especially in developing countries, where BTX is beyond the reach of these children. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration does not prevent bone loss resulting from muscle disuse in mice following botulinum toxin injection.

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    Manske, Sarah L; Good, Craig A; Zernicke, Ronald F; Boyd, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration enhances bone formation ostensibly by mimicking normal postural muscle activity. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether daily exposure to low-magnitude vibration (VIB) would maintain bone in a muscle disuse model with botulinum toxin type A (BTX). Female 16-18 wk old BALB/c mice (N = 36) were assigned to BTX-VIB, BTX-SHAM, VIB, or SHAM. BTX mice were injected with BTX (20 µL; 1 U/100 g body mass) into the left hindlimb posterior musculature. All mice were anaesthetized for 20 min/d, 5 d/wk, for 3 wk, and the left leg mounted to a holder. Through the holder, VIB mice received 45 Hz, ± 0.6 g sinusoidal acceleration without weight bearing. SHAM mice received no vibration. At baseline and 3 wk, muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) and tibial bone properties (epiphysis, metaphysis and diaphysis) were assessed by in vivo micro-CT. Bone volume fraction in the metaphysis decreased 12 ± 9% and 7 ± 6% in BTX-VIB and BTX-SHAM, but increased in the VIB and SHAM. There were no differences in dynamic histomorphometry outcomes between BTX-VIB and BTX nor between VIB and SHAM. Thus, vibration did not prevent bone loss induced by a rapid decline in muscle activity nor produce an anabolic effect in normal mice. The daily loading duration was shorter than would be expected from postural muscle activity, and may have been insufficient to prevent bone loss. Based on the approach used in this study, vibration does not prevent bone loss in the absence of muscle activity induced by BTX.

  6. High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration does not prevent bone loss resulting from muscle disuse in mice following botulinum toxin injection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Manske

    Full Text Available High-frequency, low-magnitude vibration enhances bone formation ostensibly by mimicking normal postural muscle activity. We tested this hypothesis by examining whether daily exposure to low-magnitude vibration (VIB would maintain bone in a muscle disuse model with botulinum toxin type A (BTX. Female 16-18 wk old BALB/c mice (N = 36 were assigned to BTX-VIB, BTX-SHAM, VIB, or SHAM. BTX mice were injected with BTX (20 µL; 1 U/100 g body mass into the left hindlimb posterior musculature. All mice were anaesthetized for 20 min/d, 5 d/wk, for 3 wk, and the left leg mounted to a holder. Through the holder, VIB mice received 45 Hz, ± 0.6 g sinusoidal acceleration without weight bearing. SHAM mice received no vibration. At baseline and 3 wk, muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA and tibial bone properties (epiphysis, metaphysis and diaphysis were assessed by in vivo micro-CT. Bone volume fraction in the metaphysis decreased 12 ± 9% and 7 ± 6% in BTX-VIB and BTX-SHAM, but increased in the VIB and SHAM. There were no differences in dynamic histomorphometry outcomes between BTX-VIB and BTX nor between VIB and SHAM. Thus, vibration did not prevent bone loss induced by a rapid decline in muscle activity nor produce an anabolic effect in normal mice. The daily loading duration was shorter than would be expected from postural muscle activity, and may have been insufficient to prevent bone loss. Based on the approach used in this study, vibration does not prevent bone loss in the absence of muscle activity induced by BTX.

  7. The use of fillers and botulinum toxin type A in combination with superficial glycolic acid (alpha-hydroxy acid) peels: optimizing injection therapy with the skin-smoothing properties of peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Marta I; Effron, Cheryl; Edison, Brenda L

    2007-01-01

    There are many procedures that a physician may utilize to improve the appearance and quality of the skin. Combining procedures can enhance the overall result and lead to increased patient satisfaction. Thus, it is important to choose procedures that will complement each other. Fillers or botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) can plump the skin and smooth lines and wrinkles but will do little for uneven tone, skin laxity, or radiance and clarity. These signs of aging can be addressed with superficial glycolic acid peels. Methods of combining injectable compounds with superficial glycolic acid peels were discussed at a dermatologist roundtable event and are summarized in this article.

  8. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program: Task 95-39: Methods Development and Validation of Two Mouse Bioassays for Use in Quantifying Botulinum Toxins (A, B, C, D and E) and Toxin Antibody Titers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olson, Carl

    1997-01-01

    Ths task was conducted for the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Development Activity (USAMMDA) to validate two mouse bioassays for quantify botulinum toxin potency and neutralizing antibodies to botulimun toxins...

  9. Review of botulinum toxin type A for the prophylactic treatment of chronic daily headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Evers

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Stefan EversDepartment of Neurology, University of Münster, Münster, GermanyAbstract: Botulinum toxin A is increasingly used in the treatment of idiopathic and symptomatic headache disorders. However, only few controlled trials are available and many trials can hardly be compared to each other because of different endpoints and different trial designs. In particular chronic daily headache, which is defined as an idiopathic headache occurring on more than 15 days per month for at least 3 months and a daily duration of at least 4 hours, is considered as a headache disorder with possible efficacy of botulinum toxin A. For the prophylactic treatment of chronic tension-type headache and chronic migraine, no sufficient positive evidence for a successful treatment can be obtained from randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials to date. For the treatment of chronic daily headache including medication overuse headache, there is some positive evidence for efficacy in a subgroup of patients. To date, the majority of double-blind and placebo-controlled studies do not suggest that botulinum toxin A is efficacious in the treatment of chronic idiopathic headache disorders. However, it is possible that some subgroups of patients with chronic daily headache will benefit from a long-term treatment with botulinum toxin A.Keywords: botulinum toxin A, chronic daily headache, chronic tension-type headache, chronic migraine

  10. Treatment of anismus in intractable constipation with botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallan, R I; Williams, N S; Melling, J; Waldron, D J; Womack, N R; Morrison, J F

    1988-09-24

    In seven patients with anismus the striated sphincter muscle complex was selectively weakened by local injection of Clostridium botulinum type A toxin. Symptom scores improved significantly and correlated with a significant reduction in the maximum voluntary and canal squeeze pressure and a significant increase in the anorectal angle on straining. Botulinum A toxin seems to be promising treatment for some patients with anismus.

  11. Value of botulinum toxin injections preceding a comprehensive rehabilitation period for children with spastic cerebral palsy: A cost-effectiveness study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. Schasfoort (Fabiënne); A.J. Dallmeijer (Annet); R.F. Pangalila (Robert); C. Catsman (Coriene); H.J. Stam (Henk); J.G. Becher (Jules); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); S. Polinder (Suzanne); J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); H.L.D. Horemans (Herwin); E.M. Sneekes (E.); Bolster, E. (Eline); Viola, I. (Irma); Beek, K. (Karlijn) van; J.M.A. Verheijden (Johannes)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Despite the widespread use of botulinum toxin in ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy, its value prior to intensive physiotherapy with adjunctive casting/orthoses remains unclear. Design: A pragmatically designed, multi-centre trial, comparing the effectiveness of

  12. Value of botulinum toxin injections preceding a comprehensive rehabilitation period for children with spastic cerebral palsy: A cost-effectiveness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schasfoort, Fabienne; Dallmeijer, Annet; Pangalila, Robert; Catsman, Coriene; Stam, Henk; Becher, Jules; Steyerberg, Ewout; Polinder, Suzanne; Bussmann, Johannes

    2018-01-10

    Despite the widespread use of botulinum toxin in ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy, its value prior to intensive physiotherapy with adjunctive casting/orthoses remains unclear. A pragmatically designed, multi-centre trial, comparing the effectiveness of botulinum toxin + intensive physiotherapy with intensive physiotherapy alone, including economic evaluation. Children with spastic cerebral palsy, age range 4-12 years, cerebral palsy-severity Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I-III, received either botulinum toxin type A + intensive physiotherapy or intensive physiotherapy alone and, if necessary, ankle-foot orthoses and/or casting. Primary outcomes were gross motor func-tion, physical activity levels, and health-related quality-of-life, assessed at baseline, 12 (primary end-point) and 24 weeks (follow-up). Economic outcomes included healthcare and patient costs. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with linear mixed models. There were 65 participants (37 males), with a mean age of 7.3 years (standard deviation 2.3 years), equally distributed across Gross Motor Function Classification System levels. Forty-one children received botulinum toxin type A plus intensive physio-therapy and 24 received intensive physiotherapy treatment only. At primary end-point, one statistically significant difference was found in favour of intensive physiotherapy alone: objectively measured percentage of sedentary behaviour (-3.42, 95% confidence interval 0.20-6.64, p=0.038). Treatment costs were significantly higher for botulinum toxin type A plus intensive physiotherapy (8,963 vs 6,182 euro, p=0.001). No statistically significant differences were found between groups at follow-up. The addition of botulinum toxin type A to intensive physiotherapy did not improve the effectiveness of rehabilitation for ambulatory children with spastic cerebral palsy and was also not cost-effective. Thus botulinum toxin is not recommended for use in improving gross

  13. Botulinum toxin type A in children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterman, Ronit; Gorter, Jan Willem; Harvey, Adrienne; Lockhart, Julia; McEwen-Hill, Jenny; Margallo, Karen; Goldie, Nancy

    2014-02-01

    This retrospective cohort study reviewed set goals and their outcomes of children and adolescents with severe cerebral palsy who received botulinum toxin A in 2008 and 2009. Sixty children (36 male, mean age 9 years) were included. They received on average 4 (range 1-7) treatments, with the dosage varying between 20 and 400 units per treatment (3-21 U/kg/body weight). Mild transient side effects were reported in 12 of 242 treatments with botulinum toxin A. Treatment goals were related to lower limb function (82%), range of motion (68%), positioning (33%), upper limb function (33%), and facilitating ease of care in dressing (30%), toileting, and diapering (22%). The treatment goals were reached in 60% to 85% by report of the parent and child dyad. Our findings suggest that botulinum toxin A should be considered as a treatment option in patients with cerebral palsy within Gross Motor Function Classification System levels IV and V.

  14. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of the consequences of bruxism on cervical spine musculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiels, P J; Batifol, D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertonia and hyperactivity of masticatory muscles are involved in pain and contractions of the cervical spine musculature, but their pathophysiology remains nonetheless unknown and its treatment far to be codified. In this study, 8 patients, showing disabling posterior neck muscle contractures linked with bruxism were prospectively treated and followed for an average 15 months period, after having received Injections of botulinum toxin A essentially in masticatory muscles. Injections were made every 3 months, varying from 10 to 100 U Botox* by muscles, without administrating more than 300 U Botox* in the same patient. The angle of cervical lordosis were calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in neutral position, good results being considered to be achieved in the case of a 2 point diminution of VAS score as well as at least a 5° positive gain in the curve. 7 patients out of 8 showed a real improvement in their symptoms after an average of 3 injections, showing a decrease of 4.5 points on the VAS score and an average increment of 15° in cervical lordosis. Although the follow-up period of patients was relatively short and the sample quite small, the general impression, confirmed by the patients' experience, seems to suggest a potential place for the use of botulinum toxin amongst the array of treatments which can be offered in certain selected cases which associate bruxism and posterior cervical contractions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of botulinum toxin in musculoskeletal pain [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/16j

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasvinder A Singh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic musculoskeletal pain is a common cause of chronic pain, which is associated with a total cost of $635 billion per year in the U.S. Emerging evidence suggests an anti-nociceptive action of botulinum toxin, independent of its muscle paralyzing action. This review provides a summary of data from both non-randomized and randomized clinical studies of botulinum toxin in back pain and various osteoarticular conditions, including osteoarthritis, tennis elbow, low back pain and hand pain. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs of small sizes provide evidence of short-term efficacy of a single intra-articular injection of 100 units of botulinum toxin A (BoNT/A for the relief of pain and the improvement of both function and quality of life in patients with chronic joint pain due to arthritis. Three RCTs studied intramuscular BoNT/A for tennis elbow with one showing a significant improvement in pain relief compared with placebo, another one showing no difference from placebo, and the third finding that pain and function improvement with BoNT/A injection were similar to those obtained with surgical release. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/A for low back pain found improvement in pain and function compared to placebo. Single RCTs using local injections of BoNT in patients with either temporomandibular joint (TMJ pain or plantar fasciitis found superior efficacy compared to placebo. One RCT of intramuscular BoNT/B in patients with hand pain and carpal tunnel syndrome found improvement in pain in both BoNT/B and placebo groups, but no significant difference between groups. Most evidence is based on small studies, but the use of BoNT is supported by a single, and sometimes up to three, RCTs for several chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This indicates that botulinum toxin may be a promising potential new treatment for chronic refractory musculoskeletal pain. Well-designed large clinical trials are needed.

  16. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of vocal fold nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jacqui E; Belafsky, Peter C

    2009-12-01

    Promising new techniques in the management of vocal fold nodules have been developed in the past 2 years. Simultaneously, the therapeutic use of botulinum toxin has rapidly expanded. This review explores the use of botulinum toxin in treatment of vocal nodules and summarizes current therapeutic concepts. New microsurgical instruments and techniques, refinements in laser technology, radiosurgical excision and steroid intralesional injections are all promising new techniques in the management of vocal nodules. Botulinum toxin-induced 'voice rest' is a new technique we have employed in patients with recalcitrant nodules. Successful resolution of nodules is possible with this technique, without the risk of vocal fold scarring inherent in dissection/excision techniques. Botulinum toxin usage is exponentially increasing, and large-scale, long-term studies demonstrate its safety profile. Targeted vocal fold temporary paralysis induced by botulinum toxin injection is a new, well tolerated and efficacious treatment in patients with persistent vocal fold nodules.

  17. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinastepe, Neslihan; Küçük, Burcu Bal; Oral, Koray

    2015-10-01

    Botulinum toxin, the most potent biological toxin, has been shown to be effective for a variety of disorders in several medical conditions, when used both therapeutically and cosmetically. In recent years, there has been a rising trend in the use of this pharmacological agent to control bruxing activity, despite its reported adverse effects. The aim of this review was to provide a brief overview to clarify the underlying essential ideas for the use of botulinum toxin in bruxism based on available scientific papers. An electronic literature search was performed to identify publications related to botulinum toxin and its use for bruxism in PubMed. Hand searching of relevant articles was also made to identify additional studies. Of the eleven identified studies, only two were randomized controlled trials, compared with the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on the reduction in the frequency of bruxism events and myofascial pain after injection. The authors of these studies concluded that botulinum toxin could be used as an effective treatment for reducing nocturnal bruxism and myofascial pain in patients with bruxism. Evidence-based research was limited on this topic. More randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm that botulinum toxin is safe and reliable for routine clinical use in bruxism.

  18. Update on botulinum toxin and dermal fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbos, Zachary J; Lipham, William J

    2010-09-01

    The art and science of facial rejuvenation is an ever-evolving field of medicine, as evidenced by the continual development of new surgical and nonsurgical treatment modalities. Over the past 10 years, the use of botulinum toxin and dermal fillers for aesthetic purposes has risen sharply. Herein, we discuss properties of several commonly used injectable products and provide basic instruction for their use toward the goal of achieving facial rejuvenation. The demand for nonsurgical injection-based facial rejuvenation products has risen enormously in recent years. Used independently or concurrently, botulinum toxin and dermal filler agents offer an affordable, minimally invasive approach to facial rejuvenation. Botulinum toxin and dermal fillers can be used to diminish facial rhytides, restore facial volume, and sculpt facial contours, thereby achieving an aesthetically pleasing, youthful facial appearance.

  19. Botulinum toxin type A-a novel treatment for provoked vestibulodynia? Results from a randomized, placebo controlled, double blinded study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christina Damsted; Giraldi, Annamaria; Lundvall, Lene

    2009-01-01

    to receive Botox (N = 32) or saline placebo (N = 32). Botulinum toxin A (20 I.E.) diluted in 0.5 mL saline or 0.5 mL saline was injected in the musculus bulbospongiosus at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pain was measured monthly on a visual analog scale (VAS) Likert scale. Sexual function was measured...... pain reduction (P placebo group...... in the vestibule of women diagnosed with vestibulodynia does not reduce pain, improve sexual functioning, or impact the quality of life compared to placebo and evaluated at 3 and 6 moths follow up. Both the Botox group and the placebo groups experienced a reduction in pain on the VAS Likert scale at 6 months...

  20. Botulinum Toxin A for Oral Cavity Cancer Patients: In Microsurgical Patients BTX Injections in Major Salivary Glands Temporarily Reduce Salivary Production and the Risk of Local Complications Related to Saliva Stagnation

    OpenAIRE

    Corradino, Bartolo; Lorenzo, Sara Di; Moschella, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    In patients suffering from oral cavity cancer surgical treatment is complex because it is necessary to remove carcinoma and lymph node metastasis (through a radical unilateral or bilateral neck dissection) and to reconstruct the affected area by means of free flaps. The saliva stagnation in the post-operative period is a risk factor with regard to local complications. Minor complications related to saliva stagnation (such as tissue maceration and wound dehiscence) could become major complicat...

  1. Treatment diary for botulinum toxin spasticity treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Iversen, Helle K; Frederiksen, Inge M S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a treatment diary for patients receiving spasticity treatment including botulinum toxin injection and physiotherapy and/or occupational therapy. The diary focuses on problems triggered by skeletal muscle overactivity; agreed goals for treatment and the patient...

  2. Evaluation of group versus individual physiotherapy following lower limb intra-muscular Botulinum Toxin-Type A injections for ambulant children with cerebral palsy: A single-blind randomized comparison trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rachel E; Johnston, Leanne M; Sakzewski, Leanne; Kentish, Megan J; Boyd, Roslyn N

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate efficacy of group (GRP) versus individual (IND) physiotherapy rehabilitation following lower limb intramuscular injections of Botulinum Toxin-Type A (BoNT-A) for ambulant children with cerebral palsy (CP). Following lower limb BoNT-A injections, 34 children were randomly allocated to GRP (n=17; mean age 7y8m SD 2.0; 13 males; Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) I=5, II=8, III=4) or IND physiotherapy (n=17; mean age 8y7m SD 2.0; 11 males; GMFCS I=9, II=5, III=3). Primary outcomes were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Edinburgh Visual Gait Score (EVGS) assessed at baseline, 10 and 26 weeks post intervention. There were no baseline differences between groups. GRP intervention had greater, but not clinically meaningful, improvement in COPM satisfaction (estimated mean difference EMD 1.7, 95% CI 0.4-3.1; pphysiotherapy (either GRP or IND) with an additional indirect dose (median 16 episodes) of individualized home programme activities following lower limb BoNT-A injections, however, was inadequate to drive clinically meaningful changes in lower limb motor outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Intoxication of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzicka, Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum toxin is an egzotoxin produced by Gram positive bacteria Clostridium botulinum. It is among the most potent toxins known. The 3 main clinical presentations of botulism are as follows: foodborne botulism, infant botulism and wound botulism. The main symptom of intoxication is flat muscles paralysis. The treatment is supportive care and administration of antitoxin. In prevention the correct preparing of canned food is most important. Botulinum toxin is accepted as a biological weapon. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  4. Treatment of proctalgia fugax with botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinelos, P; Kalomenopoulou, M; Christodoulou, K; Katsiba, D; Tsolkas, P; Pilpilidis, I; Papagiannis, A; Kapitsinis, I; Vasiliadis, I; Souparis, T

    2001-11-01

    Two recent studies described a temporal association between a high-amplitude and high-frequency myoelectrical activity of the anal sphincter and the occurrence of proctalgia, which suggest that paroxysmal hyperkinesis of the anus may cause proctalgia fugax. We describe a single case of proctalgia fugax responding to anal sphincter injection of Clostridium botulinum type A toxin. The presumed aetiology of proctalgia fugax is discussed and the possible mechanism of action of botulinum toxin (BTX) in this condition is outlined. Botulinum A toxin seems to be a promising treatment for patients with proctalgia fugax, and further trials appear to be worthwhile for this condition, which has been described as incurable.

  5. Systems analysis of transcriptional data provides insights into muscle's biological response to botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Kavitha; Mathewson, Margie; Minamoto, Viviane; Ward, Samuel R; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lieber, Richard L

    2014-11-01

    This study provides global transcriptomic profiling and analysis of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A)-treated muscle over a 1-year period. Microarray analysis was performed on rat tibialis anterior muscles from 4 groups (n = 4/group) at 1, 4, 12, and 52 weeks after BoNT-A injection compared with saline-injected rats at 12 weeks. Dramatic transcriptional adaptation occurred at 1 week with a paradoxical increase in expression of slow and immature isoforms, activation of genes in competing pathways of repair and atrophy, impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, and increased metal ion imbalance. Adaptations of the basal lamina and fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) occurred by 4 weeks. The muscle transcriptome returned to its unperturbed state 12 weeks after injection. Acute transcriptional adaptations resemble denervated muscle with some subtle differences, but resolved more quickly compared with denervation. Overall, gene expression across time correlates with the generally accepted BoNT-A time course and suggests that the direct action of BoNT-A in skeletal muscle is relatively rapid. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Botulinum toxin for treatment of the focal dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yusaku

    2017-07-29

    Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscles contraction causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. The precis diagnosis of dystonia is difficult for physicians because neurological brain imaging does not provide enough practical information. The diagnosis is depend on clinical experience of physicians. Botulinum toxin treatment is the accepted standard of care for patients with focal dystonia. Botulinum toxin treatment results in significant improvement of decreasing the symptom of dystonia. The success of treatment is dependent on muscle selection for treating involved muscles. Usually performance of botulinum toxin treatment is injected according to clinical experience of surface anatomy or clinical location method. However, the benefit of guidance of botulinum toxin treatment is improve outcome in dystonia. Injection techniques with ultra sound echogram or EMG guidance to identify dystonic muscles can be more benefit for patients.

  7. Botulinum Toxin and Muscle Atrophy: A Wanted or Unwanted Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Paul D; Couto, Rafael A; Isakov, Raymond; Yoo, Donald B; Azizzadeh, Babak; Guyuron, Bahman; Zins, James E

    2016-04-01

    While the facial rejuvenating effect of botulinum toxin type A is well known and widespread, its use in body and facial contouring is less common. We first describe its use for deliberate muscle volume reduction, and then document instances of unanticipated and undesirable muscle atrophy. Finally, we investigate the potential long-term adverse effects of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy. Although the use of botulinum toxin type A in the cosmetic patient has been extensively studied, there are several questions yet to be addressed. Does prolonged botulinum toxin treatment increase its duration of action? What is the mechanism of muscle atrophy and what is the cause of its reversibility once treatment has stopped? We proceed to examine how prolonged chemodenervation with botulinum toxin can increase its duration of effect and potentially contribute to muscle atrophy. Instances of inadvertent botulinum toxin-induced atrophy are also described. These include the "hourglass deformity" secondary to botulinum toxin type A treatment for migraine headaches, and a patient with atrophy of multiple facial muscles from injections for hemifacial spasm. Numerous reports demonstrate that muscle atrophy after botulinum toxin type A treatment occurs and is both reversible and temporary, with current literature supporting the notion that repeated chemodenervation with botulinum toxin likely responsible for both therapeutic and incidental temporary muscle atrophy. Furthermore, duration of response may be increased with subsequent treatments, thus minimizing frequency of reinjection. Practitioners should be aware of the temporary and reversible effect of botulinum toxin-induced muscle atrophy and be prepared to reassure patients on this matter. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Use of intradermal botulinum toxin to reduce sebum production and facial pore size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anil R

    2008-09-01

    Review the safety profile and subjective efficacy of intradermal botulinum toxin type A in facial pore size and sebum production. Retrospective analysis of 20 patients. Twenty consecutive patients with a single application of intradermal botulinum toxin type A were examined: Patients (17/20) noted an improvement in sebum production and a decrease in pores size at 1 month after injection. No complications were observed, and 17/20 patients were satisfied with the procedure. Preliminary data suggests that intradermal botulinum toxin may play a role in decreasing sebum production. Further quantitive study may be necessary to determine effects of intradermal botulinum toxin on pore size.

  9. Botulinum toxin in bruxism treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Piech

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bruxism is defined as abnormal, fixed, unconscious chewing organ function, deviating qualitatively and quantitatively from normal function. Another definition speaks of motor dysfunction in the mouth, characterized by grinding and clenching of the teeth, occurring during sleep. The etiology of this disorder has not been explained until now, but it is believed to be related to localized, mental, nervous and neurotransmitter disorders. Purpose: The aim of the study is to review literature and knowledge about the use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of bruxism. Methods of treatment: The patient reports to the physician usually after a distressing, difficult to locate pain. The basis for proper treatment is to detect parafunctions and to make the patient aware of their existence. Diagnostic symptoms include dentinal lesions, recesses, enamel cracks and abfractive cavities, as well as changes in the mucosal area of the cheeks. Treatment begins with the use of an occlusive therapy to relax muscles, reduce parafunction and relieve pain. In the form of severe pain, NSAIDs are introduced and, if necessary, anxiolytics, sedatives and antidepressants. In the absence of response to the treatment used, botulinum toxin type A injections are used. The dose of the agent depends on the initial muscle tone and the effect of decrease in its activity is maintained for 4 to 6 months. Conclusions: The use of botulinum toxin makes it possible to selectively exclude overactive muscles, which is a great advantage over other techniques. An additional benefit of this therapy is achieved good cosmetic effect, reversible effect and minimal amount of side effects.

  10. Topical botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-03-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indications have been for the management of axillary hyperhydrosis and facial rhytides. Traditional methods of botulinum toxin delivery have been needle-based. These have been associated with increased pain and cost. Newer methods of botulinum toxin formulation have yielded topical preparations that are bioactive in small pilot clinical studies. While there are some risks associated with topical delivery, the refinement and standardization of delivery systems and techniques for the topical administration of botulinum toxin using nanotechnology is anticipated in the near future.

  11. Botulinum toxin in medicine and cosmetology – two hundred years’ history and new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Zbrojkiewicz

    2018-04-01

    of coding genes and by the duration of the therapeutic effect. American physician Allan B. Scott was the first to demonstrate the use of botulinum toxin for medical purposes. Nowadays, botulinum toxin type A is widely used in medicine. Botulinum toxin injections are not only one of the most popular non-surgical aesthetic-cosmetic procedures, but are also widely used in neurology, ophthalmology and dermatology. The therapeutic potential of botulinum toxin has not been exhausted yet. Currently, many clinical trials are underway to extend the therapeutic indications of botulinum toxin and to improve its safety. Due to the huge development in medicine, botulinum toxin is today not only associated with aesthetic procedures and improvement in appearance, but also with raising the quality of life for people suffering from diseases with excessive muscle contraction and with other neuromuscular disorders.

  12. Efeitos adversos associados à aplicação de toxina botulínica na face: revisão sistemática com meta-análise Adverse effects associated with facial application of botulinum toxin: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Melissa Benetti Zagui

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a ocorrência dos efeitos adversos relacionados ao uso da toxina botulínica na face, por meio de revisão sistemática, usando meta-análise. MÉTODOS: Foi realizada pesquisa eletrônica de artigos publicados no MEDLINE e Cochrane Library até setembro de 2007. A ocorrência dos efeitos adversos foi verificada pela freqüência relativa para os relatos de casos e do risco relativo para os estudos randomizados. A heterogeneidade foi avaliada pelo teste Q e pelo índice I². Foi utilizado o teste de significância de Egger para identificar viés de publicação e a análise de sensibilidade para verificar o efeito dos viéses de publicação. RESULTADOS: Oito estudos randomizados e treze relatos de casos preencheram os critérios de inclusão. Na revisão sistemática dos relatos de casos, 1.003 pacientes foram estudados, dos quais 182 (18,14% apresentaram efeitos adversos. O efeito adverso mais freqüente foi a ptose palpebral ocorrendo em 34 (3,39% pacientes dos relatos de casos. Na meta-análise dos estudos randomizados, o risco relativo global para os efeitos adversos como cefaléia, ptose palpebral, reação local e infecção foi 1,07, 3,25, 0,99 e 0,94, respectivamente. Para todas as comparações, o valor de P foi maior que 0,05. CONCLUSÃO: O efeito adverso mais freqüente e que apresentou o maior risco relativo relacionado ao uso da toxina botulínica na face foi a ptose palpebral. A padronização dos efeitos adversos relatados é necessária a fim de melhor estabelecer as características dos mesmos.PURPOSE: To estimate the occurrence of adverse effects associated with the use of botulinum toxin by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: A systematic literature search of MEDLINE and Cochrane Library was conducted until September 2007. The occurrence of the adverse effects was estimated of the relative frequency for case report and of the relative risk for randomized trials. Heterogeneity was

  13. Correção de estrabismo paralítico por injeção de toxina botulínica Management of paralytic strabismus by injection of botulinum toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Wattiez

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar a ação da toxina botulínica em paralisias adquiridas de VI e III nervos. Pacientes e métodos: Foram tratados com toxina botulínica 15 pacientes, com diagnóstico de paralisia de VI e III nervos, aguda ou crônica. Foram estudados de forma prospectiva, durante os meses de agosto de 1998 a maio de 1999. O estudo incluiu, além da avaliação do estrabismo, avaliação oftalmológica completa. Os pacientes foram acompanhados por um período de 2 a 7 meses após a última aplicação. Resultados: Onze pacientes (73% apresentaram paralisias do VI nervo e 4 pacientes (27%, paralisias de III nervo. Seis casos foram agudos (40% e 9 casos (60%, crônicos. Cinco dos 6 casos agudos (83% conseguiram controlar o desvio com a toxina botulínica como único tratamento e obter fusão. Dos 9 casos crônicos, 2 casos (22% corrigiram o desvio só com a toxina, os outros 7, além da aplicação, foram submetidos à cirurgia, dos quais 4 casos (46% foram corrigidos e os outros 3 casos (32% não. Conclusão: Concluímos que nos casos em que houve força muscular residual, após a paralisia, e bom potencial de fusão, a toxina botulínica foi o melhor tratamento, pois foi possível controlar o desvio e obter fusão, sem cirurgia.Purpose: To evaluate the treatment by injection of botulinum toxin in acquired sixth and third nerve palsies. Methods: Fifteen patients were treated with botulinum toxin. They were studied prospectively during nine months, between August, 1998 and May, 1999. In addition to the strabismus examination, a complete ophthalmological evaluation was performed. The patients were followed for 2 to 7 months after the last injection or surgical procedure. Results: Eleven patients (73% presented with sixth nerve palsy and four (27% with third nerve palsy. Six cases were acute (40% and 9 cases (60% were chronic. Five acute cases (83% obtained ocular alignment and controlled the deviation with toxin. Two of nine chronic cases (22

  14. Alternative Approach to Traumatic Stensen’s Duct Injuries Accompanied by Glandular Involvement: Botulinum Toxin Injection to the Gland in Conjunction with Microsurgical Repair of the Duct in an Acute Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Mert Çalış; Zeynep Öz; Hakan Uzun; Burçe Özgen; Alp Çetin3; Ali Emre Aksu

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term results of a simultaneous application of botulinum toxin to the parotid gland in conjunction with the microsurgical repair of the duct in an acute setting and to encourage using botulinum toxin as a first-line option to prevent future complications associated with glandular involvement. Material and Methods: Three patients who were referred to the Plastic Surgery Clinic by the emergency room of the Hacettepe University Hospita...

  15. Treatment of Chronic Migraine with Focus on Botulinum Neurotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Schaefer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is the most common neurological disorder, and contributes to disability and large healthcare costs in the United States and the world. The treatment of migraine until recently has focused on medications, both abortive and prophylactic, but treatment of chronic migraine has been revolutionized with the introduction of botulinum toxin injection therapy. In this review, we explore the current understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and the evolution of the use of botulinum toxin therapy including proposed pathophysiological mechanisms through animal data. We also discuss the similarities and differences between three injection techniques.

  16. Botulinum Toxin in Parkinson Disease Tremor: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study With a Customized Injection Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Machado, Duarte; Richardson, Diana; Dubey, Divyanshu; Jabbari, Bahman

    2017-09-01

    In essential tremor and Parkinson disease (PD) tremor, administration of onabotulinumtoxinA via a fixed injection approach improves the tremor, but many patients (30%-70%) develop moderate to severe hand weakness, limiting the use of onabotulinumtoxinA in clinical practice. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA (IncoA) injection for the treatment of tremor in PD. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, 30 patients each received 7 to 12 (mean, 9) IncoA injections into hand and forearm muscles using a customized approach. The study was performed from June 1, 2012, through June 30, 2015, and participants were followed for 24 weeks. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by the tremor subsets of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Patient Global Impression of Change 4 and 8 weeks after each of the 2 sets of treatments. Hand strength was assessed using an ergometer. There was a statistically significant improvement in clinical rating scores of rest tremor and tremor severity 4 and 8 weeks after the IncoA injection and of action/postural tremor at 8 weeks. There was a significant improvement in patient perception of improvement at 4 and 8 weeks in the IncoA group. There was no statistically significant difference in grip strength at 4 weeks between the 2 groups. Injection of IncoA via a customized approach improved PD tremor on a clinical scale and patient perception, with a low occurrence of significant hand weakness. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT02419313. Copyright © 2017 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Efficacy and Side Effects of Oral Baclofen Versus Tizanidine Therapy with Adjuvant Botulinum Toxin Type A in Children With Cerebral Palsy and Spastic Equinus Foot Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Aksoy, Sefika N; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare the therapeutic response, including side effects, for oral baclofen versus oral tizanidine therapy with adjuvant botulinum toxin type A in a group of 64 pediatric patients diagnosed with static encephalopathy and spastic equinus foot deformity. Following botulinum toxin A treatment, clinical improvement led to the gradual reduction of baclofen or tizanidine dosing to one-third of the former dose. Gross Motor Functional Measure and Caregiver Health Questionnaire scores were markedly elevated post-botulinum toxin A treatment, with scores for the tizanidine (Gross Motor Functional Measure: 74.45 ± 3.72; Caregiver Health Questionnaire: 72.43 ± 4.29) group significantly higher than for the baclofen group (Gross Motor Functional Measure: 68.23 ± 2.66; Caregiver Health Questionnaire: 67.53 ± 2.67, P botulinum toxin A and a low dose of tizanidine in treating children with cerebral palsy appears to be more effective and has fewer side effects versus baclofen with adjuvant botulinum toxin A. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Botulinum toxin treatment for facial palsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Lui, Michael; Nduka, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Facial palsy may be complicated by ipsilateral synkinesis or contralateral hyperkinesis. Botulinum toxin is increasingly used in the management of facial palsy; however, the optimum dose, treatment interval, adjunct therapy and performance as compared with alternative treatments have not been well established. This study aimed to systematically review the evidence for the use of botulinum toxin in facial palsy. The Cochrane central register of controlled trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE(R) (1946 to September 2015) and Embase Classic + Embase (1947 to September 2015) were searched for randomised studies using botulinum toxin in facial palsy. Forty-seven studies were identified, and three included. Their physical and patient-reported outcomes are described, and observations and cautions are discussed. Facial asymmetry has a strong correlation to subjective domains such as impairment in social interaction and perception of self-image and appearance. Botulinum toxin injections represent a minimally invasive technique that is helpful in restoring facial symmetry at rest and during movement in chronic, and potentially acute, facial palsy. Botulinum toxin in combination with physical therapy may be particularly helpful. Currently, there is a paucity of data; areas for further research are suggested. A strong body of evidence may allow botulinum toxin treatment to be nationally standardised and recommended in the management of facial palsy. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax-a case report of successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Kofina, Konstantinia; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-11-01

    Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up control. Botulinum A toxin injection can reduce internal anal sphincter pressure, leading to relief of symptoms, and seems a promising option with minimal morbidity in cases on proctalgia fugax that does not respond to other current treatments.

  20. Comparação entre cirurgia e aplicações unilaterais e bilaterais de toxina botulínica para o tratamento dos estrabismos Comparison between surgery and unilateral and bilateral injections of botulinum toxin to treat strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes M. M. Villas Boas

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar a eficácia de 3 formas de tratamento para estrabismos de pequeno e médio ângulos: cirurgia, aplicações unilaterais e bilaterais de toxina botulínica. Métodos: Foram estudados 97 pacientes, divididos em três grupos. No grupo I foi feito um estudo prospectivo no qual 44 pacientes receberam injeção unilateral da toxina botulínica tipo A; no grupo II, 24 pacientes receberam injeção bilateral da toxina, e no grupo III foi feito estudo retrospectivo de 29 pacientes previamente operados de estrabismo. A eficácia dos tratamentos foi estudada segundo o percentual de correção do desvio ocular e segundo o índice de sucesso terapêutico, definido como um desvio residual de até 10 DP (dioptrias prismáticas. Resultados: Os percentuais de correção dos desvios horizontais, para longe, no 3º mês, foram: grupo I = 50,9%; grupo II = 55,8% e grupo III = 77,0%. Para perto, foram: 48,6%, 49,2% e 72,8%, respectivamente. Os índices de sucesso terapêutico foram: grupo I = 57,1%; grupo II = 68,4% e grupo III = 72,4%. Conclusão: Concluiu-se não ter havido diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os percentuais de correção do desvio ocular e o índice de sucesso terapêutico entre os três grupos estudados.Purpose: To compare the efficacy of three types of treatment for strabismus: surgery, unilateral and bilateral botulinum toxin injections. Methods: To compose groups I and II, a prospective study was carried out observing the pretreatment measurement of the deviation, repeated after 7, 30 and 90 days after the injection. To compose group III, a retrospective study was carried out. Results: The percentage of horizontal deviation correction for distance, in 3 months, was: group I = 50.9%; group II = 55.8%, and group III = 77.0%; for near, 48.6%, 49.2% and 72.8% respectively.The therapeutic success rate, defined as residual deviation of 10 PD (prism diopter or less, was: group I = 57.1%; group II = 68.4% and group III

  1. Botulinum toxin for motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Kirubakaran, Richard; Berman, Brian D

    2018-01-05

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome, or Tourette's syndrome, is defined as the presence of both motor and vocal (phonic) tics for more than 12 months, that manifest before the age of 18 years, in the absence of secondary causes. Treatment of motor and phonic tics is difficult and challenging. To determine the safety and effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treating motor and phonic tics in people with Tourette's syndrome, and to analyse the effect of botulinum toxin on premonitory urge and sensory tics. We searched the Cochrane Movement Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and two trials registers to 25 October 2017. We reviewed reference lists of relevant articles for additional trials. We considered all randomised, controlled, double-blind studies comparing botulinum toxin to placebo or other medications for the treatment of motor and phonic tics in Tourette's syndrome for this review. We sought both parallel group and cross-over studies of children or adults, at any dose, and for any duration. We followed standard Cochrane methods to select studies, assess risk of bias, extract and analyse data. All authors independently abstracted data onto standardized forms; disagreements were resolved by mutual discussion. Only one randomised placebo-controlled, double-blind cross-over study met our selection criteria. In this study, 20 participants with motor tics were enrolled over a three-year recruitment period; 18 (14 of whom had a diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome) completed the study; in total, 21 focal motor tics were treated. Although we considered most bias domains to be at low risk of bias, the study recruited a small number of participants with relatively mild tics and provided limited data for our key outcomes. The effects of botulinum toxin injections on tic frequency, measured by videotape or rated subjectively, and on premonitory urge, are uncertain (very low-quality evidence). The quality of evidence for adverse events following botulinum toxin was

  2. Topical Botulinum Toxin

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Ashley; Nasir, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline that capitalizes on the unique properties of matter engineered on the nanoscale. Vehicles incorporating nanotechnology have led to great strides in drug delivery, allowing for increased active ingredient stability, bioavailability, and site-specific targeting. Botulinum toxin has historically been used for the correction of neurological and neuromuscular disorders, such as torticollis, blepharospasm, and strabismus. Recent dermatological indicati...

  3. Experience with botulinum toxin in the treatment of cerebral palsy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute of Child Health, Red Cross War Memorial Children's. Hospital and University of .... A majority of the children in this study showed definite short- term benefit following botulinum toxin injection and this form of therapy constitutes ... repeated when necessary as long as the spasticity remains dynamic. Patients with ...

  4. Fidaxomicin Inhibits Clostridium difficile Toxin A-Mediated Enteritis in the Mouse Ileum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Hon Wai; Ho, Samantha; Hing, Tressia C.; Cheng, Michelle; Chen, Xinhua; Ichikawa, Yoshi; Kelly, Ciarán P.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common, debilitating infection with high morbidity and mortality. C. difficile causes diarrhea and intestinal inflammation by releasing two toxins, toxin A and toxin B. The macrolide antibiotic fidaxomicin was recently shown to be effective in treating CDI, and its beneficial effect was associated with fewer recurrent infections in CDI patients. Since other macrolides possess anti-inflammatory properties, we examined the possibility that fidaxomicin alters C. difficile toxin A-induced ileal inflammation in mice. The ileal loops of anesthetized mice were injected with fidaxomicin (5, 10, or 20 μM), and after 30 min, the loops were injected with purified C. difficile toxin A or phosphate-buffered saline alone. Four hours after toxin A administration, ileal tissues were processed for histological evaluation (epithelial cell damage, neutrophil infiltration, congestion, and edema) and cytokine measurements. C. difficile toxin A caused histologic damage, evidenced by increased mean histologic score and ileal interleukin-1β (IL-1β) protein and mRNA expression. Treatment with fidaxomicin (20 μM) or its primary metabolite, OP-1118 (120 μM), significantly inhibited toxin A-mediated histologic damage and reduced the mean histology score and ileal IL-1β protein and mRNA expression. Both fidaxomicin and OP-1118 reduced toxin A-induced cell rounding in human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblasts. Treatment of ileal loops with vancomycin (20 μM) and metronidazole (20 μM) did not alter toxin A-induced histologic damage and IL-1β protein expression. In addition to its well known antibacterial effects against C. difficile, fidaxomicin may possess anti-inflammatory activity directed against the intestinal effects of C. difficile toxins. PMID:24890583

  5. MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY OF CLOSTRIDIAL TOXINS - EXPRESSION OF MESSENGER-RNAS ENCODING TETANUS AND BOTULINUM NEUROTOXINS IN APLYSIA NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOCHIDA, S; POULAIN, B; EISEL, U; BINZ, T; KURAZONO, H; NIEMANN, H; TAUC, L

    1990-01-01

    mRNAs encoding the light chain of tetanus and botulinum neurotoxins were transcribed, in vitro, from the cloned and specifically truncated genes of Clostridium tetani and Clostridium botulinum, respectively, and injected into presynaptic identified cholinergic neurons of the buccal ganglia of

  6. Ultrasound Guidance for Botulinum Neurotoxin Chemodenervation Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine E. Alter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Injections of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are prescribed by clinicians for a variety of disorders that cause over-activity of muscles; glands; pain and other structures. Accurately targeting the structure for injection is one of the principle goals when performing BoNTs procedures. Traditionally; injections have been guided by anatomic landmarks; palpation; range of motion; electromyography or electrical stimulation. Ultrasound (US based imaging based guidance overcomes some of the limitations of traditional techniques. US and/or US combined with traditional guidance techniques is utilized and or recommended by many expert clinicians; authors and in practice guidelines by professional academies. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of available guidance techniques including US as well as technical aspects of US guidance and a focused literature review related to US guidance for chemodenervation procedures including BoNTs injection.

  7. Botulinum toxin therapy for limb dystonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, D M; Aminoff, M J; Olney, R K

    1992-03-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of botulinum toxin in 17 patients with limb dystonias (10 with occupational cramps, three with idiopathic dystonia unrelated to activity, and two each with post-stroke and parkinsonian dystonia) in a placebo-controlled, blinded study. We identified affected muscles clinically and by recording the EMG from implanted wire electrodes at rest and during performance of tasks that precipitated abnormal postures. There were three injections given with graded doses of toxin (average doses, 5 to 10, 10 to 20, and 20 to 40 units per muscle) and one with placebo, in random order. Subjective improvement occurred after 53% of injections of botulinum toxin, and this was substantial in 24%. Only one patient (7%) improved after placebo injection. Subjective improvement occurred in 82% of patients with at least one dose of toxin, lasting for 1 to 4 months. Response rates were similar between clinical groups. Objective evaluation failed to demonstrate significant improvement following treatment with toxin compared with placebo. The major side effect was transient focal weakness after 53% of injections of toxin.

  8. Botulinum Toxin in Management of Limb Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Zakin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor is characterized by persistent, usually bilateral and symmetric, postural or kinetic activation of agonist and antagonist muscles involving either the distal or proximal upper extremity. Quality of life is often affected and one’s ability to perform daily tasks becomes impaired. Oral therapies, including propranolol and primidone, can be effective in the management of essential tremor, although adverse effects can limit their use and about 50% of individuals lack response to oral pharmacotherapy. Locally administered botulinum toxin injection has become increasingly useful in the management of essential tremor. Targeting of select muscles with botulinum toxin is an area of active research, and muscle selection has important implications for toxin dosing and functional outcomes. The use of anatomical landmarks with palpation, EMG guidance, electrical stimulation, and ultrasound has been studied as a technique for muscle localization in toxin injection. Earlier studies implemented a standard protocol for the injection of (predominantly wrist flexors and extensors using palpation and EMG guidance. Targeting of muscles by selection of specific activators of tremor (tailored to each patient using kinematic analysis might allow for improvement in efficacy, including functional outcomes. It is this individualized muscle selection and toxin dosing (requiring injection within various sites of a single muscle that has allowed for success in the management of tremors.

  9. Best Clinical Practice in Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Strobl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A is considered a safe and effective therapy for children with cerebral palsy (CP, especially in the hands of experienced injectors and for the majority of children. Recently, some risks have been noted for children with Gross Motor Classification Scale (GMFCS of IV and the risks are substantial for level V. Recommendations for treatment with BoNT-A have been published since 1993, with continuous optimisation and development of new treatment concepts. This leads to modifications in the clinical decision making process, indications, injection techniques, assessments, and evaluations. This article summarises the state of the art of BoNT-A treatment in children with CP, based mainly on the literature and expert opinions by an international paediatric orthopaedic user group. BoNT-A is an important part of multimodal management, to support motor development and improve function when the targeted management of spasticity in specific muscle groups is clinically indicated. Individualised assessment and treatment are essential, and should be part of an integrated approach chosen to support the achievement of motor milestones. To this end, goals should be set for both the long term and for each injection cycle. The correct choice of target muscles is also important; not all spastic muscles need to be injected. A more focused approach needs to be established to improve function and motor development, and to prevent adverse compensations and contractures. Furthermore, the timeline of BoNT-A treatment extends from infancy to adulthood, and treatment should take into account the change in indications with age.

  10. Reabilitação funcional e analgesia com uso de toxina botulínica A na síndrome dolorosa regional complexa tipo I do membro superior: relato de casos Rehabilitación funcional y analgesia con uso de toxina botulínica A en el síndrome doloroso regional compleja tipo I del miembro superior: relato de casos Functional rehabilitation and analgesia with botulinum toxin A in upper limb complex regional pain syndrome type I: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Rocha Lauretti

    2005-04-01

    acometido. Se relatan dos casos de SDRC donde la aplicación de toxina botulínica-A como fármaco coadyuvante contribuyó en la recuperación funcional motora del miembro acometido. RELATO DE LOS CASOS: Dos pacientes portadoras de SDRC tipo I fueron inicialmente evaluadas para control del dolor en miembro superior derecho. Ambas presentaban incapacidad para abrir la mano y dolor por la escala analógica numérica (EAN de 10 en reposo o cuando la mano o los dedos eran pasivamente manejados. Se inició secuencia de 5 bloqueos, del ganglio estrellado ipsilateral a intervalos semanales, con clonidina y lidocaína. Simultáneamente, durante la realización del tercer bloqueo del ganglio estrellado, fue administrado 75 UI de toxina botulínica A en los músculos flexores de las falanges y de la articulación del puño. Una semana después de aplicación de la toxina botulínica A, las pacientes presentaban relajamiento de las falanges y del puño, relataban facilidad para la ejecución de la fisioterapia pasiva y el dolor clasificado fue como 2 (EAN a la manipulación pasiva. Al término de la realización de la secuencia de bloqueos del ganglio estrellado, las pacientes fueron sometidas a 3 sesiones semanales de administración por vía venosa regional de clonidina, lidocaína y parecoxib. Después de 8 meses de evaluación las pacientes presentaron 70% y 80% de recuperación motora y funcional del miembro acometido. CONCLUSIONES: La aplicación por vía muscular de toxina botulínica A resultó en mejora del movimiento del miembro acometido, analgesia auxiliando en su recuperación funcional.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Functional inability of the affected limb is often added to alodynia and hyperalgesia in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS type I. Two CRPS cases are reported in which botulinum toxin A as coadjuvant drug has contributed to motor and functional recovery of the affected limb. CASE REPORTS: Two CRPS type I patients were initially evaluated for upper limb pain

  11. Computer-Assisted Communication Device for Botulinum-Intoxicated Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    development of small molecule therapeutics for botulinum neurotoxin and on the development of nerve agent pretreatments and therapies . He has published...Souayah, N., Karim, H., Kamin, S.S., McArdle, J. and Marcus, S. (2006) ‘Severe botulism after focal injection of botulinum toxin’, Neurology , Vol...67, pp.1855–1856. Tacket, C.O., Shandera, W.X., Mann, J.M., Hargrett, N.T. and Blake, P.A. (1984) ‘ Equine antitoxin use and other factors that

  12. Antipruritic effects of botulinum neurotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazerani, Parisa

    2018-01-01

    This review explores current evidence to demonstrate that botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exert antipruritic effects. Both experimental and clinical conditions in which botulinum neurotoxins have been applied for pruritus relief will be presented and significant findings will be highlighted. Potent....... Potential mechanisms underlying antipruritic effects will also be discussed and ongoing challenges and unmet needs will be addressed.......This review explores current evidence to demonstrate that botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) exert antipruritic effects. Both experimental and clinical conditions in which botulinum neurotoxins have been applied for pruritus relief will be presented and significant findings will be highlighted...

  13. Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Sections Botulinum Toxin (Botox) ... Facial Wrinkles How Does Botulinum Toxin (Botox) Work? Botulinum Toxin (Botox) for Facial Wrinkles Leer en Español: La ...

  14. Novel Treatment of Chronic Bladder Pain Syndrome and Other Pelvic Pain Disorders by OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is defined as pain in the pelvic organs and related structures of at least 6 months' duration. The pathophysiology of CPP is uncertain, and its treatment presents challenges. Botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), known for its antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant activity, has been used recently to treat refractory CPP with promising results. In patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, most studies suggest intravesical BoNT-A injection reduces bladder pain and increases bladder capacity. Repeated BoNT-A injection is also effective and reduces inflammation in the bladder. Intraprostatic BoNT-A injection could significantly improve prostate pain and urinary frequency in the patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Animal studies also suggest BoNT-A injection in the prostate decreases inflammation in the prostate. Patients with CPP due to pelvic muscle pain and spasm also benefit from localized BoNT-A injections. BoNT-A injection in the pelvic floor muscle improves dyspareunia and decreases pelvic floor pressure. Preliminary studies show intravesical BoNT-A injection is useful in inflammatory bladder diseases such as chemical cystitis, radiation cystitis, and ketamine related cystitis. Dysuria is the most common adverse effect after BoNT-A injection. Very few patients develop acute urinary retention after treatment.

  15. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax—a case report of successful treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Kofina, Konstantinia; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up ...

  16. Outcomes of Buccinator Treatment With Botulinum Toxin in Facial Synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyesh N; Owen, Scott R; Norton, Cathey P; Emerson, Brandon T; Bronaugh, Andrea B; Ries, William R; Stephan, Scott J

    2018-05-01

    The buccinator, despite being a prominent midface muscle, has been previously overlooked as a target in the treatment of facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin. To evaluate outcomes of patients treated with botulinum toxin to the buccinator muscle in the setting of facial synkinesis. Prospective cohort study of patients who underwent treatment for facial synkinesis with botulinum toxin over multiple treatment cycles during a 1-year period was carried out in a tertiary referral center. Botulinum toxin treatment of facial musculature, including treatment cycles with and without buccinator injections. Subjective outcomes were evaluated using the Synkinesis Assessment Questionnaire (SAQ) prior to injection of botulinum toxin and 2 weeks after treatment. Outcomes of SAQ preinjection and postinjection scores were compared in patients who had at least 1 treatment cycle with and without buccinator injections. Subanalysis was performed on SAQ questions specific to buccinator function (facial tightness and lip movement). Of 84 patients who received botulinum toxin injections for facial synkinesis, 33 received injections into the buccinator muscle. Of the 33, 23 met inclusion criteria (19 [82.6%] women; mean [SD] age, 46 [10] years). These patients presented for 82 treatment visits, of which 44 (53.6%) involved buccinator injections and 38 (46.4%) were without buccinator injections. The most common etiology of facial paralysis included vestibular schwannoma (10 [43.5%] participants) and Bell Palsy (9 [39.1%] participants). All patients had improved posttreatment SAQ scores compared with prebotulinum scores regardless of buccinator treatment. Compared with treatment cycles in which the buccinator was not addressed, buccinator injections resulted in lower total postinjection SAQ scores (45.9; 95% CI, 38.8-46.8; vs 42.8; 95% CI, 41.3-50.4; P = .43) and greater differences in prebotox and postbotox injection outcomes (18; 95% CI, 16.2-21.8; vs 19; 95% CI, 14.2-21.8; P

  17. Botulinum toxin in the treatment of refractory vaginismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazizadeh, Shirin; Nikzad, Masoomeh

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the efficacy of botulinum toxin injection to treat women with moderate and severe vaginismus. Twenty-four women referred to our clinic from February 2002 to February 2004 (mean age 25 years; range 19-34 years) with third- to fourth-degree vaginismus were recruited for this study. These women had previous unsuccessful treatments. Botulinum toxin (150-400 mIU) was injected into the puborectalis muscles in 3 sites on each side of the vagina. Twenty-three patients (95.8%) had vaginal examinations 1 week postoperatively that showed little or no vaginismus, 18 (75%) achieved satisfactory intercourse after the first injection, 4 (16.7%) had mild pain, 1 was cured after a second injection, 1 patient refused vaginal examination and did not attempt to have coitus, and another had no coitus as a result of her husband's secondary impotence. The women were followed up for a mean of 12.3 months (range 2-24 months), and there were no cases of recurrence. In refractory cases of vaginismus when conventional therapies have failed, local injection of botulinum toxin can be considered. III.

  18. [Botulinum toxin and rejuvenation of the eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpei, Ch; Miniconi, M-J; Brunner, C I; Besins, T; Braccini, F

    2013-01-01

    Treatments with botulinum toxin in the forehead and periorbital areas may induce disappointing or even paradoxical results. Our study, focused on this area aimed at refining injection techniques by analyzing muscular balances and comparing the effect according to injection doses and topography. This experimental study has been carried out in the form of 2 session workshops, with volunteers duly informed of the study contents and giving their informed consent. It was conducted by physicians and surgeons members of SAMCEP* (Société Avancée de Médecine et Chirurgie Esthétique et Plastique). The botulinum toxin was onabotulinumtoxin A. Results were evaluated 15 days after treatment, in regard to global eyebrow position, eyebrow head and tail position; muscle interactions; lines above the eyebrow. Eleven case reports and their results are shown and discussed. Our study underlines two important insights: muscle balances and "border areas", between orbicularis oculi and corrugator, key features for eyebrow head, and between frontalis and orbicularis oculifor eyebrow tail.

  19. Successful use of botulinum toxin type a in the treatment of refractory postoperative dyspareunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Amy J; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2009-08-01

    Refractory dyspareunia presents a challenging therapeutic dilemma. A woman with defecatory dysfunction and dyspareunia presented with stage 2 prolapse. She underwent laparoscopic and vaginal pelvic floor reconstruction with excision of endometriosis. The patient experienced increased dyspareunia and de novo vaginismus postoperatively that were refractory to trigger point injections, physical therapy, and medical and surgical management. She underwent botulinum toxin type A injections into her levator ani muscles, which allowed her to have sexual intercourse again after 2 years of apareunia with no recurrence of pain for 12 months. Injecting botulinum toxin into the levator ani muscles shows promise for postoperative patients who develop vaginismus and do not respond to conservative therapy.

  20. Botulinum toxin: bioweapon & magic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaked, Ram Kumar; Singh, Manglesh Kumar; Singh, Padma; Gupta, Pallavi

    2010-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins, causative agents of botulism in humans, are produced by Clostridium botulinum, an anaerobic spore-former Gram positive bacillus. Botulinum neurotoxin poses a major bioweapon threat because of its extreme potency and lethality; its ease of production, transport, and misuse; and the need for prolonged intensive care among affected persons. A single gram of crystalline toxin, evenly dispersed and inhaled, can kill more than one million people. The basis of the phenomenal potency of botulinum toxin is enzymatic; the toxin is a zinc proteinase that cleaves neuronal vesicle associated proteins responsible for acetylcholine release into the neuromuscular junction. As a military or terrorist weapon, botulinum toxin could be disseminated via aerosol or by contamination of water or food supplies, causing widespread casualties. A fascinating aspect of botulinum toxin research in recent years has been development of the most potent toxin into a molecule of significant therapeutic utility . It is the first biological toxin which is licensed for treatment of human diseases. In the late 1980s, Canada approved use of the toxin to treat strabismus, in 2001 in the removal of facial wrinkles and in 2002, the FDA in the United States followed suit. The present review focuses on both warfare potential and medical uses of botulinum neurotoxin.

  1. AbobotulinumtoxinA Efficacy and Safety in Children With Equinus Foot Previously Treated With Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Edward; Bonikowski, Marcin; Gormley, Mark; Volteau, Magali; Picaut, Philippe; Delgado, Mauricio R

    2018-05-01

    The effects of botulinum toxin are transient, and repeat injections are required in children with lower-limb spasticity. However, the efficacy of botulinum toxin in patients who have received previous injections has remained largely unexplored. We present subgroup analyses of a phase III study conducted in ambulatory children (aged two to 17) with spastic equinus foot. Patients were randomized to single doses of abobotulinumtoxinA 10 U/kg/leg, 15 U/kg/leg, or placebo injected into the gastrocnemius-soleus complex (one or both legs). The first analysis was prespecified to review the effect of abobotulinumtoxinA in children previously treated with botulinum toxin versus those children new to the treatment; a second post hoc analysis evaluated the effect of abobotulinumtoxinA in children who changed botulinum toxin formulation. Of the 241 randomized patients, 113 had previously received botulinum toxin, including 86 who had been treated with another formulation. In both analyses, muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) and the Physicians Global Assessment, at week 4, improved with abobotulinumtoxinA treatment versus placebo, regardless of baseline botulinum toxin status. Placebo responses in patients new to treatment were consistently higher than in the previously treated group. These results demonstrate similar abobotulinumtoxinA efficacy and safety profiles in children with spasticity who are new to botulinum toxin treatment and those children who were previously treated. The efficacy and safety of abobotulinumtoxinA treatment in these previously treated patients were comparable with the overall trial population, indicating that doses of 10 and 15 U/kg/leg are suitable starting doses for children with spasticity regardless of the previous botulinum toxin preparation used. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Bruxism, temporo-mandibular dysfunction and botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhani, L; Dichamp, J

    2003-07-01

    Tooth grinding and tooth clenching are unvoluntary mainly nocturnal habits that result in an hypertrophy of masseter and temporalis muscles with an unbalance between opening and closing muscles of the jaw and lead to an alteration of mandibular condyles movements and to hyper pressure in the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJ) which can generate severe pain. Intra muscular injections of botulinum toxin permit to restablish the balance between closing and opening muscles, to relieve pain, to treat masseteric hypertrophy with improvement of face outline and to recover a normal cinetic of temporo-mandibular joints. Moreover, botulinum toxin injections permit to quit habits of tooth grinding and clenching and one single session of injections is curative for 2/3 of the patients. There are no side effects apart from slight diffusion to superficial muscles of the face resulting in a "fixed" smile for about 6 to 8 weeks. So injections of botulinum toxin in masseter and temporalis muscles are an efficient treatment of bruxism and TMJ dysfunction, cheap with no lasting side effect.

  3. Evaluation of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The quail embryo was evaluated for use as a bioassay to detect biologically active botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). Day 15 of incubation embryos were injected with decreasing dosages of BoNT/A from 250 to 0.5 ng of toxin. At 1 day post-injection, embryos receiving 20 ng of BoNT or higher had m...

  4. Botox® after Botox® - a new approach to treat diplopia secondary to cosmetic botulinic toxin use: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Rodrigues Isaac

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for the treatment of diplopia secondary to cosmetic botulinum toxin A use is described. In this interventional case reports, two consecutive patients who developed diplopia after periocular cosmetic use of botulinum toxin A were treated with intramuscular botulinum toxin A injection into the antagonist extraocular muscle. Diplopia resolved in both patients in less than 1 week with no side effects or complications. In conclusion, the injection of intramuscular botulinum toxin A is an encouraging option for treatment of diplopia secondary to botulinum toxin A use for facial lifting.

  5. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  6. Botulinum toxin for treatment of restrictive strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Pilar S; Vera, Rebeca E; Mariñas, Laura G; Gómez de Liaño, Pilar S; Escribano, Jose V

    To study the types of acquired restrictive strabismus treated in a tertiary hospital and the outcome of treatment with botulinum toxin. We performed a 10-year retrospective study of patients with restrictive strabismus aged ≥18 years who were treated with botulinum toxin. Treatment was considered successful if the final vertical deviation was ≤5 PD, horizontal deviation ≤10 PD, with no head turn or diplopia. We included 27 cases (mean age, 61.9 years). Horizontal strabismus was diagnosed in 11.1%, vertical in 51.9%, and mixed in 37%. Strabismus was secondary to cataract surgery in 6 cases, high myopia in 6, orbital fractures in 5, retinal surgery in 5, Graves ophthalmopathy in 4, and repair of conjunctival injury in 1 case. Diplopia was diagnosed in all patients, head turn in 33.3%. The initial deviation was 14 PD (range, 2-40), the mean number of injections per patient was 1.6 (range, 1-3), and the mean dose was 9.5 IU (range, 2.5-22.5). At the end of follow-up, diplopia was recorded in 59.3%, head turn in 18.5%, surgical treatment in 51.9%, and need for prism glasses in 14.8%. Outcome was successful in 37% of patients (4 high myopia, 3 orbital fractures, 2 post-surgical retinal detachment, and 1 post-cataract surgery). Mean follow-up was 3±1.8 years. Vertical deviation was observed in half of the sample. The most frequent deviation was secondary to cataract surgery and high myopia. Treatment with botulinum toxin was successful in one-third of the patients at the end of follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Occlusion therapy of unilateral amblyopia with botulinum toxin induced ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkiadakis, Ioannis; Iliaki, Olga; Kalyvianaki, Maria I; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of botulinum toxin induced ptosis as an occlusion method to treat unilateral deep strabismic amblyopia in two uncooperative children, we injected 0.2 ml of diluted botulinum toxin in the levator palpaebrae; low sedation was necessary in one of the two children. In both cases a marked ptosis was achieved, which lasted about four weeks and then gradually resolved completely. The visual acuity of the ablyopic eye increased in both children, making patching easy thereafter. One child developed amblyopia in the injected eye, which was handled successfully using part-time occlusion. No other side effects were noted. Whether this new method could be a simple, safe and effective alternative method of occlusion for the treatment of deep amblyopia in uncooperative children needs to be proven with a larger series of children.

  9. Efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hu; Liao, Zhengyu; Wang, Yan; Liao, Lina; Lai, Wenli

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. Electronic databases (PubMed, Embase and Science Citation Index), websites (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov) and the literature database of SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe) were searched from January 1990 to April 2011 for randomised controlled trials or nonrandomised studies assessing the efficacy of botulinum toxins on bruxism. There was no language restriction. Through a predefined search strategy, we retrieved 28 studies from PubMed, 94 from Embase, 60 from the Science Citation Index, two ongoing clinical trials and two from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Of these, only four studies met our inclusion criteria and were finally included. Of the four included studies, two were randomised controlled trials and two were controlled before-and-after studies. These studies showed that botulinum toxin injections can reduce the frequency of bruxism events, decrease bruxism-induced pain levels and satisfy patients' self-assessment with regard to the effectiveness of botulinum toxins on bruxism. In comparison with oral splint, botulinum toxins are equally effective on bruxism. Furthermore, botulinum toxin injections at a dosage of bruxism and are safe to use. Therefore, they can be used clinically for otherwise healthy patients with bruxism. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  10. Determinants of responsiveness to botulinum toxin, casting, and bracing in the treatment of spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Rita; Majnemer, Annette; Benaroch, Thierry; Cantin, Marie-Andree

    2010-02-01

    The objective was to determine whether specific intrinsic (age, pattern of cerebral palsy [CP], child's motivation) and extrinsic (number of treatments, parenting stress) characteristics were associated with responsiveness to botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injections in children with CP 3 months after injection into the gastrocnemius muscle. Children with hemiplegia or diplegia recruited from a BoNT-A programme were evaluated before and 3 months following injection of BoNT-A into the gastrocnemius. Outcome measures included muscle tone, range of motion, gait pattern, level of ambulation, gross motor function, and functional independence. Determinants of responsiveness to BoNT-A considered were age, number of treatments, distribution of CP, parenting stress, and motivation. Thirty-one children were recruited (17 males, 14 females)--22 with hemiplegia and nine with diplegia. Twenty-eight were classified at Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level I and three at level III. The mean age was 6 years 4 months (SD 2y 11mo). Younger age (p=0.015) and fewer number (p=0.024) of BoNT-A treatments were associated with greater change in gross motor function. Child's motivation and parenting stress were significantly associated with improvements in muscle tone (p=0.006-0.017), passive range of motion (p=0.008-0.033), gait pattern (p=0.005-0.042), level of ambulation (p=0.001-0.043), and functional independence (p=0.004-0.027). The results indicate that child, family, and treatment characteristics influence the degree of responsiveness to BoNT-A treatment. The contribution of contextual factors (personal and environmental) on responsiveness may be underappreciated in children with CP.

  11. Efficacy of botulinum toxin type a in trigeminal neuralgia in a South Asian Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Chandragomi Caldera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin-A (BTX-A in trigeminal neuralgia (TN has been described. We evaluated effects of BTX-A in relieving pain in patients with refractory TN at National Hospital of Sri Lanka. Materials and Methods: Pain in patients with TN was assessed using a visual analog from 0 to 10. Three months after commencement of drug therapy with ≥2 drugs including one first-line drug (carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine, pain scores were re-assessed. Twenty-two patients who did not report improvement of ≥50% at 90 days' posttreatment were recruited. They were given adjunct BTX-A directly to the trigger point (if identified or intradermal. Pain scores were assessed at 10, 20, 30, 60, and 90 days' posttreatment. Results: There was a statistically significant improvement in mean pain scores at 10, 20, 30, 60, and 90 days' posttreatment (5.59 [standard deviation (SD = 2.7], 5.68 [SD = 2.6], 5.27 [SD = 3.2], 4.77 [SD = 3.7], and 5.32 [SD = 4.0] compared to pre-BTX-A treatment (7.14, SD = 2.2. Percentage reduction in mean pain score ranged from 20.4% to 33.1%. Maximum response was at day 60 post-BTX-A (50% had ≥50% reduction in pain. No significant difference was found in response with higher doses and injection strategy. Conclusion: Consistent statistically significant reductions in pain scores at the aforesaid intervals compared to pretreatment means that there is a place for BTX in refractory TN.

  12. Botulinum toxin: yesterday, today, tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Artemenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin (BoNT is a bacterial neurotoxin presented with seven serotypes that inhibit neurotransmitter release from nerve endings. The serotypes of BoNT are antigenically dissimilar, act via different, but interconnected mechanisms, and are not interchangeable. The activity of BoNT is associated with impaired neuroexocytosis occurring in several steps: from the binding of BoNT to its specific receptor on the axon terminal membrane to the proteolytic enzymatic cleavage of SNARE substrate. The effect of BoNT is considered to be restricted to the peripheral nervous system, but when given in particularly high doses, it has been recently shown to affect individual brain structures. In addition, by modulating peripheral afferentation, BoNT may influence the excitability of central neuronal structures at both spinal and cortical levels. Only BoNT serotypes A and B are used in clinical practice and aesthetic medicine. The type A has gained the widest acceptance as a therapeutic agent for more than 100 abnormalities manifesting themselves as muscular hyperactivity, hyperfunction of endocrine gland, and chronic pain. The effect of BoNT preparations shows itself 2-5 days after injection, lasts 3 months or more, and gradually decreases with as a result of pharmacokinetic and intracellular reparative processes. Biotechnology advances and potentialities allow purposefully modification of the protein molecular structure of BoNT, which expands the use and efficiency of performed therapy with neurotoxins. Recombinant technologies provide a combination of major therapeutic properties of each used BoNT serotype and expand indications for recombinant chimeric toxins.

  13. Botulinum toxin as a therapeutic agent to prevent relapse in deep bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mücke, Thomas; Löffel, Anja; Kanatas, Anastasios; Karnezi, Sandy; Rana, Majeed; Fichter, Andreas; Haarmann, Stephan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Loeffelbein, Denys John

    2016-05-01

    The etiology of deep bite is multifactorial. One of the causes is increased muscular activity. This makes the treatment of deep bite malocclusions difficult and often results in relapse in many cases. In this work we compared patients with surgical orthognathic treatment only and surgical orthognathic treatment with additional injections of botulinum toxin after mandibular advancement for class II division 2 malocclusion. This is a prospective study. Adult patients were assessed pretreatment (T1), posttreatment (T2), and long-term after 1 year (T3). In total, 32 patients (mean age, 30.7 years; 23 women and 9 men) reached the study end point (T3); 24 patients were treated without botulinum toxin and 8 patients received preoperative injections of botulinum toxin. Significant differences between both groups were observed, with a more stable result for the experimental group treated with botulinum toxin. In a selective group of adult patients with a class II division II incisor relationship and with a class II skeletal base, botulinum toxin injections can effectively prevent relapse. This may present an alternative to a conventional myotomy. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Botulinum Toxin and Surgery among Spasmodic Dysphonia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esch, Babette F; Wegner, Inge; Stegeman, Inge; Grolman, Wilko

    2017-02-01

    Objective The effect of botulinum toxin among patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD) is temporary. To optimize long-term treatment outcome, other therapy options should be evaluated. Alternative treatment options for AdSD comprise several surgical treatments, such as thyroarytenoid myotomy, thyroplasty, selective laryngeal adductor denervation-reinnervation, laryngeal nerve crush, and recurrent laryngeal nerve resection. Here, we present the first systematic review comparing the effect of botulinum toxin with surgical treatment among patients diagnosed with AdSD. Data Sources MEDLINE (PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Methods Articles were reviewed by 2 independent authors, and data were compiled in tables for analysis of the objective outcome (voice expert evaluation after voice recording), the subjective outcome (patient self-assessment scores), and voice-related quality of life (Voice Health Index scores). Results No clinical trials comparing both treatment modalities were identified. Single-armed studies evaluated either the effect of botulinum toxin or surgical treatment. Thirteen studies reported outcomes after botulinum toxin treatment (n = 419), and 9 studies reported outcomes after surgical treatment (n = 585 patients). A positive effect of bilateral botulinum toxin injections was found for the objective voice outcome, subjective voice outcome, and quality of life. The duration of the beneficial effect ranged from 15 to 18 weeks. Surgical treatment had an overall positive effect on objective voice improvement, subjective voice improvement, and quality of live. Conclusion No preference for one treatment could be demonstrated. Prospective clinical trials comparing treatment modalities are recommended to delineate the optimal outcomes by direct comparison.

  15. Reconstituting botulinum toxin drugs: shaking, stirring or what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Bigalke, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Most botulinum toxin (BT) drugs are stored as powders which need to be reconstituted with normal saline before clinical use. As botulinum neurotoxin (BNT), the therapeutically active ingredient, is a large double-stranded protein the process of reconstitution should be performed with special attention to mechanical stress applied. We wanted to test the mechanical stability of BNT during the reconstitution process. For this, 100 MU onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®), Irvine, CA, USA) was reconstituted with 2.0 ml of NaCl/H2O. Gentle reconstitution (GR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.90 × 70 mm injection needle, one cycle of injection-aspiration-injection and two gentle shakes of the vial. Aggressive reconstitution (AR) was performed with a 5 ml syringe, a 0.40 × 40 mm injection needle, ten injection-aspiration-injection cycles and 30 s of continuous shaking of the vial. AR increased the time to paralysis in the mouse hemidiaphragm assay (HDA) from 72.0 ± 4.6 to 106.0 ± 16.0 min (*p = 0.002, two-tailed t test after Kolmogorov-Smirnova test with Lilliefors correction for normal distribution). Construction of a calibration curve revealed that the increase in the time to paralysis was correlated with a loss of potency of from 100 to 58 MU (-42 %). BT users should use large diameter injection needles for reconstitution, apply two or three injection-aspiration-injection cycles and, maybe, shake the vials a few times to rinse the entire glass wall. Aggressive reconstitution with small diameter needles, prolonged injection-aspiration-injection and violent shaking should be avoided.

  16. Fatal Clostridium botulinum toxicosis in eleven Holstein cattle fed round bale barley haylage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, W J; Kerr, L A; Pringle, J K; Rohrbach, B W; Whitlock, R H

    2000-09-01

    Twenty-two lactating Holstein cattle in Tennessee had clinical signs of intoxication with preformed Clostridium botulinum toxin. These signs included weakness, paralysis of the tongue and chest muscles, abdominal breathing, and, in 11 of the 22 cows, death. Differential diagnoses included hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia, carbohydrate overload, and several toxicoses including mycotoxin, lead, nitrate, organophosphate, atropine or atropine-like alkaloid, and botulism. A diagnosis of botulism by the ingestion of preformed C. botulinum type B toxin was made by eliminating these other diseases, by finding C. botulinum type B spores in 3 bales of round bale barley haylage fed to these cattle, and by isolating preformed type B toxin from 1 of the 3 bales. Confirmation of the toxin type was made by demonstrating mouse lethality by intraperitoneal injection of specimen extracts with neutralization by C. botulinum type B antitoxin. The haylage, harvested green and encased in black plastic bags to facilitate fermentation, was presumably contaminated by the botulinum toxin when fermentation failed to produce enough acid to lower the pH to 4.5, the pH below which C. botulinum growth is inhibited. Farmers and ranchers who use round hay balers to produce haylage should be alert to this potential problem.

  17. Serial Casting as an Adjunct to Botulinum Toxin Type A Treatment in Children With Cerebral Palsy and Spastic Paraparesis With Scissoring of the Lower Extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Alper I; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether combination therapy of serial casting and botulinum toxin type A injection can further enhance the effects of botulinum toxin type A in children with cerebral palsy with scissoring of both legs. This study was a prospective and randomized trial. The children were divided into 2 groups, one of which received serial casting after botulinum toxin type A (n = 40), and the other which only received botulinum toxin type A (n = 40). Serial casting started 3 weeks after the botulinum toxin type A. Both groups received physiotherapy. Groups were assessed at baseline then compared at 6 and 12 weeks following the intervention. Significant improvements in Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and Caregiver Health Questionnaire were recorded in both groups ( P botulinum toxin type A in the serial casting group ( P botulinum toxin type A only group. These results suggest that serial casting after botulinum toxin type A can enhance the benefits of botulinum toxin type A in children with cerebral palsy.

  18. Use of botulinum A toxin for proctalgia fugax—a case report of successful treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriou, Marios; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Efthimiadis, Christoforos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proctalgia fugax is considered as intermittent anal pain of unknown etiology; a variety of treatments have been used, without, however, permanent results. Injection of botulinum A toxin is recently suggested as an alternative option. We present the case of a woman presenting proctalgia fugax that was untreatable through other current forms of treatment. After two administrations of botulinum A toxin, 80 units and 100 units each, the patient remained asymptomatic on 8-month follow-up control. Botulinum A toxin injection can reduce internal anal sphincter pressure, leading to relief of symptoms, and seems a promising option with minimal morbidity in cases on proctalgia fugax that does not respond to other current treatments. PMID:29218214

  19. Comparative effectiveness of botulinum toxin versus non-surgical treatments for treating lateral epicondylitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Yu-Chun; Han, Der-Sheng; Chang, Ke-Vin

    2018-02-01

    To explore the effectiveness of botulinum toxin compared with non-surgical treatments in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Data sources including PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Airity Library from the earliest record to February 2017 were searched. Study design, patients' characteristics, dosage/brand of botulinum toxin, injection techniques, and measurements of pain and hand grip strength were retrieved. The standardized mean differences (SMDs) in pain relief and grip strength reduction were calculated at the following time points: 2-4, 8-12, and 16 weeks or more after injection. Six randomized controlled trials (321 participants) comparing botulinum toxin with placebo or corticosteroid injections were included. Compared with placebo, botulinum toxin injection significantly reduced pain at all three time points (SMD, -0.729, 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.286 to -0.171; SMD, -0.446, 95% CI, -0.740 to -0.152; SMD, -0.543, 95% CI, -0.978 to -0.107, respectively). Botulinum toxin was less effective than corticosteroid at 2-4 weeks (SMD, 1.153; 95% CI, 0.568-1.737) and both treatments appeared similar in efficacy after 8 weeks. Different injection sites and dosage/brand did not affect effectiveness. Botulinum toxin decreased grip strength 2-4 weeks after injection, and high equivalent dose could extend its paralytic effects to 8-12 weeks. When treating lateral epicondylitis, botulinum toxin was superior to placebo and could last for 16 weeks. Corticosteroid and botulinum toxin injections were largely equivalent, except the corticosteroid injections were better at pain relief in the early stages and were associated with less weakness in grip in the first 12 weeks.

  20. [Spasm of the near reflex. Treatment with botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, P; Rojas, P; Gómez de Liaño, P; Franco Iglesias, G

    2015-05-01

    A 38-year old female with diplopia and esotropia, with limitation of ocular abduction in both eyes, with full abduction after doll's head rotation also being observed. She was diagnosed with spasm of the near reflex. Treatment with injections of botulinum toxin in both medial rectus has temporally resolved the convergence spasm. Near reflex spasm is characterized as miosis, pseudomyopia, and convergent strabismus that lead to diplopia, blurred vision, headache, and variable, progressive, and intermittent esotropia. As the spasm worsens there will be limited ocular versions and ductions simulating a sixth nerve palsy. Botulinum toxin may be effective in some cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Botulinum Toxin for the Treatment of Tremor and Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotia, Mitesh; Jankovic, Joseph

    2016-02-01

    The therapeutic applications of botulinum toxin (BoNT) have grown manifold since its initial approval in 1989 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of strabismus, blepharospasm, and other facial spasms. Although it is the most potent biologic toxin known to man, long-term studies have established its safety in the treatment of a variety of neurologic and nonneurologic disorders. Despite a paucity of randomized controlled trials, BoNT has been found to be beneficial in treating a variety of tremors and tics when used by clinicians skilled in the administration of the drug for these hyperkinetic movement disorders. Botulinum toxin injections can provide meaningful improvement in patients with localized tremors and tics; in some cases, they may be an alternative to other treatments with more undesirable adverse effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. [Contribution of botulinum toxin to maxillo-facial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batifol, D; de Boutray, M; Goudot, P; Lorenzo, S

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum toxin has a wide range of use in maxillo-facial surgery due to its action on muscles, on the glandular system, and against pain. It already has been given several market authorizations as indicated for: blepharospasm, spasmodic stiff neck, and glabellar lines. Furthermore, several studies are ongoing to prove its effectiveness and usefulness for many other pathologies: treatment of pain following cervical spine surgery; action on salivary glands after trauma, hypertrophy, or hyper-salivation; analgesic action (acknowledged but still being experimented) on neuralgia, articular pain, and keloids scars due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Botulinum toxin injections in the cervico-facial area are more and more used and should be to be correctly assessed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Botulinum toxin: The Midas touch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilpa, P S; Kaul, Rachna; Sultana, Nishat; Bhat, Suraksha

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin (BT) is a natural molecule produced during growth and autolysis of bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. Use of BT for cosmetic purposes has gained popularity over past two decades, and recently, other therapeutic uses of BT has been extensively studied. BT is considered as a minimally invasive agent that can be used in the treatment of various orofacial disorders and improving the quality of life in such patients. The objective of this article is to review the nature, mechanism of action of BT, and its application in various head and neck diseases.

  4. Botulinum toxin type A as treatment of partially accommodative esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Reyes, E M; Castillo-López, M G; Toledo-Silva, R; Vargas-Ortega, J; Murillo-Correa, C E; Aguilar-Ruiz, A

    2016-03-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a botulinum toxin type A injection in both medial rectus muscles in patients with partially accommodative esotropia. Residual deviation and stability of strabismus were evaluated at 18 months follow up. A prospective, analytical, quasi-experimental study was conducted on a cohort of 21 patients who underwent total cycloplegic refraction and with a residual deviation of at least 14 DP. A botulinum toxin type A dose of 5 IU was injected into each medial rectus muscle for a residual deviation greater than 18 DP, with a dose of 2.5 IU being used for a deviation between 14 and 18 DP. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to relate residual deviation to variables recorded as potential predictors. A total of 21 patients were included, 33.3% (n=7) males and 66.6% (n=14) females. Mean visual acuity was -.28±.25 logMAR for right eye (range 0 to -1) and -.42±.31 logMAR for left eye (range 0 to -1.3). Mean angle of residual deviation before application of botulinum toxin was 40.95±8.6DP without spectacles correction, and 22.3±7.99 DP with full cycloplegic refraction. Adverse effects were ptosis in 14.2% (n=3), diplopia 23.8% (n=5), and vertical deviation in 33% (n=7). One patient had a poor outcome, therefore required surgical treatment. At one year follow up, 85.71% of patients showed good results with esotropia of 12 DP or less, dropping to 71.43% at 18 months of follow up. Botulinum toxin type A is an effective long-term treatment with a good response in 71.43% of patients. No predictors of good response were demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. A pilot study to evaluate effectiveness of botulinum toxin in treatment of androgenetic alopecia in males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehdev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Androgenetic alopecia is a common form of alopecia with multifactorial etiology. Finasteride and minoxidil are approved by the FDA for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Balding scalp is believed to have relative microvascular insufficiency. Blood vessels in the scalp travel through the intramuscular plane. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin relaxes muscles and thereby increases blood flow in balding scalp. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin in androgenetic alopecia management. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in a tertiary care center. A total of 10 male patients with androgenetic alopecia meeting inclusion criteria of the study were included. In the scalp, 30 sites were injected with 5 U of botulinum toxin in each site. Preprocedure photograph taken and evaluation was done, which was repeated after 24 weeks. Efficacy was assessed by photography and self-assessment scoring was done by patients. Results: Of 10 patients, 8 had good to excellent response on photographic assessment. At the end of 24 weeks, 1 patient showed poor and 1 showed fair response to treatment. As per self-assessment, 7of 10 patients showed good to excellent response. Two patients had fair response and 1 patient showed poor response to treatment. Conclusion: Botulinum toxin was found to be safe and effective therapy for the management of androgenetic alopecia in this pilot study. Studies with larger sample size and randomized controlled trials are required to establish the role of botulinum toxin in the management of androgenetic alopecia.

  6. The innovative therapeutic application of botulinum toxin type A in urology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysoula Belai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the history of medical science the use of botulinum toxin was impressive. In the early 18th century it was defined as the neurotoxin implicated in the deadly disease botulism. Today, despite the toxic action finds application in the treatment of various diseases in a wide range of Medicine. Its use in urology was revolutionary in the treatment of neurogenic bladder, refractory idiopathic detrusor overactivity and other painful syndromes. The purpose of this review was to describe the treatment option of intravesical injection of botulinum toxin, in diseases of the urinary tract. The review showed that after many test applications under the experimental studies, the botulinum toxin type A has already established itself as the new treatment of choice after failure of conservative drug dealing in patients with neuro-urological symptoms of lower urinary tract. Cases of application of botulinum toxin in Urology are related to overactive bladder, neurogenic or idiopathic etiology, as bladder pain syndrome and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. According to the guidelines of the European Union directives Urology, the intravesical botulinum toxin injections are the most effective, minimally invasive treatment which results in reducing neurogenic hyperactivity of detrusor. In conclusion, this is a safe, easy and effective method that can be applied by health professionals, helping improve patients’ quality of life with neuro-urological diseases.

  7. Comparative study of biological activity of four botulinum toxin type A preparations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Myung Eun; Song, Dae Heon; Park, Joo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Units of available botulinum toxin preparations are not interchangeable, and the dose-conversion ratios between such preparations remain controversial. To compare the efficacy and safety of four botulinum toxin type A preparations. Murine gastrocnemius compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were recorded before and after injecting the four botulinum toxin preparations (onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, new botulinum toxin, and incobotulinumtoxinA). In all preparations, CMAP amplitudes decreased until 4 days after receiving the injection and then gradually recovered. On postinjection day 84, the amplitudes returned to baseline in all groups except the high-dose groups. CMAP amplitude in the contralateral limb also decreased up to postinjection days 4 to 7 and then gradually returned to baseline by postinjection day 28. The dose-conversion ratio between onabotulinumtoxinA and abobotulinumtoxinA was determined to be 1:2.6; previous reports of 1:3 were considered too high. A dose-conversion ratio between onabotulinumtoxinA and new botulinum toxin of 1:1 was deemed appropriate. OnabotulinumtoxinA and incobotulinumtoxinA demonstrated a dose-conversion ratio of 1:1.07. The efficacy of incobotulinumtoxinA was slightly lower than that of onabotulinumtoxinA. These dose-conversion ratios are applicable solely from an efficacy standpoint and not for safety. This study was conducted in mice, so it may not translate perfectly to human applications. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Diffusion, spread, and migration of botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Castaneda, Juan; Jankovic, Joseph; Comella, Cynthia; Dashtipour, Khashayar; Fernandez, Hubert H; Mari, Zoltan

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) is an acetylcholine release inhibitor and a neuromuscular blocking agent used for the treatment of a variety of neurologic and medical conditions. The efficacy and safety of BoNT depends on accurate selection and identification of intended targets but also may be determined by other factors, including physical spread of the molecule from the injection site, passive diffusion, and migration to distal sites via axonal or hematogenous transport. The passive kinetic dispersion of the toxin away from the injection site in a gradient-dependent manner may also play a role in toxin spread. In addition to unique properties of the various BoNT products, volume and dilution may also influence local and systemic distribution of BoNT. Most of the local and remote complications of BoNT injections are thought to be due to unwanted spread or diffusion of the toxin's biologic activity into adjacent and distal muscles. Despite widespread therapeutic and cosmetic use of BoNT over more than three decades, there is a remarkable paucity of published data on the mechanisms of distribution and its effects on clinical outcomes. The primary aim of this article is to critically review the available experimental and clinical literature and place it in the practical context. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Botulinum toxin for vaginismus treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana Rocha; Souza, Renan Pedra

    2012-01-01

    Vaginismus is characterized by recurrent or persistent involuntary contraction of the perineal muscles surrounding the outer third of the vagina when penile, finger, tampon, or speculum penetration is attempted. Recent results have suggested the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of vaginismus. Here, we assessed previously published data to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of botulinum toxin for vaginismus. We have carried out a systematic review followed by a meta-analysis. Our results indicate that botulinum toxin is an effective therapeutic option for patients with vaginismus (pooled odds ratio of 8.723 with 95% confidence interval limits of 1.942 and 39.162, p = 0.005). This may hold particularly true in treatment-refractory patients because most of the studies included in this meta-analysis have enrolled these subjects in their primary analysis. Botulinum toxin appears to bea reasonable intervention for vaginismus. However, this conclusion should be read carefully because of the deficiency of placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials and the quality issues presented in the existing ones.

  10. Botulinum toxin effect on salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Rotteveel, J.J.; Limbeek, J. van; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Hulst, K. van; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A in reducing salivary flow rate in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with severe drooling. METHODS: During a controlled clinical trial, single-dose BoNT injections into the submandibular salivary glands were compared

  11. Botulinum therapy for poststroke spasticity of the lower extremity (clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Krylova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the topical problem – the medical rehabilitation of patients with poststroke spasticity. It describes clinical cases of patients with poststroke spasticity of the upper and lower extremities who have received combined therapy using botulinum toxin type A (Botox injections.

  12. Influence of botulinum toxin on rabbit jaw muscle activity and anatomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, J.A.M.; Wang, J.; Lie, S.H.J.T.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Muscles can adapt their fiber properties to accommodate to new conditions. We investigated the extent to which a decrease in muscle activation can cause an adaptation of fiber properties in synergistic and antagonistic jaw muscles. Methods: Three months after the injection of botulinum

  13. Flagellar glycosylation in Clostridium botulinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twine, Susan M; Paul, Catherine J; Vinogradov, Evgeny; McNally, David J; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Mullen, James A; McMullin, David R; Jarrell, Harold C; Austin, John W; Kelly, John F; Logan, Susan M

    2008-09-01

    Flagellins from Clostridium botulinum were shown to be post-translationally modified with novel glycan moieties by top-down MS analysis of purified flagellin protein from strains of various toxin serotypes. Detailed analyses of flagellin from two strains of C. botulinum demonstrated that the protein is modified by a novel glycan moiety of mass 417 Da in O-linkage. Bioinformatic analysis of available C. botulinum genomes identified a flagellar glycosylation island containing homologs of genes recently identified in Campylobacter coli that have been shown to be responsible for the biosynthesis of legionaminic acid derivatives. Structural characterization of the carbohydrate moiety was completed utilizing both MS and NMR spectroscopy, and it was shown to be a novel legionaminic acid derivative, 7-acetamido-5-(N-methyl-glutam-4-yl)-amino-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-D-glycero-alpha-D-galacto-nonulosonic acid, (alphaLeg5GluNMe7Ac). Electron transfer dissociation MS with and without collision-activated dissociation was utilized to map seven sites of O-linked glycosylation, eliminating the need for chemical derivatization of tryptic peptides prior to analysis. Marker ions for novel glycans, as well as a unique C-terminal flagellin peptide marker ion, were identified in a top-down analysis of the intact protein. These ions have the potential for use in for rapid detection and discrimination of C. botulinum cells, indicating botulinum neurotoxin contamination. This is the first report of glycosylation of Gram-positive flagellar proteins by the 'sialic acid-like' nonulosonate sugar, legionaminic acid.

  14. Long-term outcomes of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic anal fissure: 5 years of follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbeiro, Sandra; Atalaia-Martins, Catarina; Marcos, Pedro; Gonçalves, Cláudia; Canhoto, Manuela; Arroja, Bruno; Silva, Filipe; Cotrim, Isabel; Eliseu, Liliana; Santos, Antonieta; Vasconcelos, Helena

    2017-03-01

    Chronic anal fissure is a frequent and disabling disease, often affecting young adults. Botulinum toxin and lateral internal sphincterotomy are the main therapeutic options for refractory cases. Botulinum toxin is minimally invasive and safer compared with surgery, which carries a difficult post-operative recovery and fecal incontinence risk. The long-term efficacy of Botulinum toxin is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of chronic anal fissure. This was a retrospective study at a single center, including patients treated with Botulinum toxin from 2005 to 2010, followed over at least a period of 5 years. All patients were treated with injection of 25U of Botulinum toxin in the intersphincteric groove. The response was registered as complete, partial, refractory and relapse. Botulinum toxin was administered to 126 patients, 69.8% ( n  = 88) were followed over a period of 5 years. After 3 months, 46.6% ( n  = 41) had complete response, 23.9% ( n  = 21) had partial response and 29.5% ( n  = 26) were refractory. Relapse was observed in 1.2% ( n  = 1) at 6 months, 11.4% ( n  = 10) at 1 year, 2.3% ( n  = 2) at 3 years; no relapse at 5 years. The overall success rate was 64.8% at 5 years of follow-up. Botulinum toxin was well tolerated by all patients and there were no complications. The use of Botulinum toxin to treat patients with chronic anal fissure was safe and effective in long-term follow-up.

  15. Botulinum toxin in preparation of oral cavity for microsurgical reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradino, Bartolo; Di Lorenzo, Sara; Mossuto, Carmela; Costa, Renato Patrizio; Moschella, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Infiltration of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands allows a temporary reduction of salivation that begins 8 days afterwards and returns to normal within 2 months. The inhibition of salivary secretion, carried out before the oral cavity reconstructive surgery, could allow a reduction of the incidence of oro-cutaneous fistulas and local complications. Saliva stagnation is a risk factor for patients who have to undergo reconstructive microsurgery of the oral cavity, because of fistula formation and local complications in the oral cavity. The authors suggest infiltration of botulinum toxin in the major salivary glands to reduce salivation temporarily during the healing stage. During the preoperative stage, 20 patients with oral cavity carcinoma who were candidates for microsurgical reconstruction underwent sialoscintigraphy and a quantitative measurement of the salivary secretion. Injection of botulinum toxin was carried out in the salivary glands 4 days before surgery. The saliva quantitative measurement was repeated 3 and 8 days after infiltration, sialoscintigraphy after 15 days. In all cases, the saliva quantitative measurement revealed a reduction of 50% and 70% of the salivary secretion after 72 h and 8 days, respectively. A lower rate of local complications was observed.

  16. Botulinum toxin for the management of bladder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurch, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    This review highlights a recent innovation in the medical treatment of detrusor overactivity (DO). Anticholinergics are usually the gold standard to treat bladder overactivity. Adverse effects and lack of efficacy are the two main causes for considering alternative treatments. Until recently, invasive surgery (mainly bladder augmentation) was the only available treatment option for patients with intractable DO. This article considers botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection as an alternative treatment to surgery in patients with DO who do not respond to anticholinergic therapy. To identify papers for inclusion in this review, we searched PubMed with the keywords 'botulinum toxin', 'overactive bladder', 'urinary incontinence' and 'neurogenic bladder' for the years 2000-5. Review articles were not included. Abstracts were cited only if they contained important new information. Experimental animal studies and articles or book chapters related to the use of botulinum toxin for other indications (such as achalasia and cervical dystonia) were analysed with regard to the mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin. From this review, it appears that BTX-A injection into the detrusor muscle is a very effective method for treating urinary incontinence secondary to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), as well as urinary incontinence due to idiopathic overactive bladder (IDO). In both conditions, the duration of effect seems to be at least 6 months. Overall success rates seem to be similar in both patient populations. For NDO, only one evidence-based medicine level 1 study is available, whereas for IDO, only evidence-based medicine level 3 or 4 studies have been published. Particularly in this latter indication, injection technique and outcome parameters vary from study to study and need to be standardised. Without randomised controlled studies aimed at comparing different techniques and dosages, it remains difficult to decide what technique is optimal for treating patients

  17. Optimal Dosing of Botulinum Toxin for Treatment of Chronic Anal Fissure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin Xin; Krishna, Sanjeev; Su'a, Bruce; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    Chronic anal fissures are associated with significant morbidity and reduced quality of life. Studies have investigated the efficacy of botulinum toxin with variable results; thus, there is currently no consensus on botulinum toxin dose or injection sites. This study aimed to systematically analyze trials studying the efficacy of botulinum toxin for treatment of chronic anal fissure to identify an optimum dosage and injection regimen. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. PubMed/Medline, Embase, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception to June 2015. All clinical trials that investigated the efficacy of botulinum toxin for chronic anal fissure were selected according to specific criteria. The interventions used were various doses of botulinum toxin. Clinical outcomes, dosage, and injection site data were evaluated with weighted pooled results for each dosage and 95% confidence intervals. There were 1158 patients, with 661 in botulinum toxin treatment arms, from 18 clinical trials included in this review. The outcomes of interest were 3-month healing, incontinence, and recurrence rates. Meta-regression analysis demonstrated a small decrease in healing rate (0.34%; 95% CI, 0-0.68; p = 0.048) with each increase in dosage, a small increase in incontinence rate (1.02 times; 95% CI, 1.0002-1.049; p = 0.048) with each increase in dosage and a small increase in recurrence rate (1.037 times; 95% CI, 1.018-1.057; p = 0.0002) with each increase in dosage. The optimum injection site could not be determined. This study was limited by weaknesses in the underlying evidence, such as variable quality, short follow-up, and a limited range of doses represented. Fissure healing with lower doses of botulinum toxin is as effective as with high doses. Lower doses also reduce the risk of incontinence and recurrence in the long term.

  18. Botulinum neurotoxin type A versus punctal plug insertion in the management of dry eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal A Bukhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the efficacies of punctal plug insertion and Botulinum toxin injection in dry eye disease not responding to topical medications. Materials and Methods: A non-controlled randomized clinical trial of two parallel groups of 60 dry eye patients seen in the clinic not responding to topical medications were divided into two groups. One group received punctal plugs and the other group received Botulinum toxin injections to prevent lacrimal tear drainage. Results: Of a total of 36 patients with a mean age of 44.5 years who received punctal plugs, 50% of them experienced improvements in the clinical manifestations of their disease. 12/36 (33.3% developed plug extrusion, and 6/36 (16.7% patients developed conjunctival erosions with irritation that necessitated plug removal within one week of insertion. A total of 24 patients with a mean age of 47.5 years received injections of Botulinum toxin. Of these, 83.3% had improvement in all of the clinical manifestations of dry eye. 4/24 (16.7% had no improvement in the degrees to which they experienced foreign body sensations, 33.3% reported shampoo entering the eye while showering. All of the patients who received Botulinum toxin injections were satisfied with the results of their treatment, whereas only 72.3% of the patients who received punctal plugs were satisfied with their results. Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin A injections can be a very good alternative to punctal plugs in improving the clinical manifestations of dry eye disease They are associated with the development of fewer and milder complications and with higher levels of patient satisfaction.

  19. Effects of X-irradiation on axonal sprouting induced by botulinum toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, S; Duchen, L W [National Hospital, London (UK); Hornsey, S [Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit

    1982-01-01

    The effect of X-irradiation on axonal sprouting of motor nerves induced by botulinum toxin was examined. Muscles of one leg in the mouse were X-irradiated (15Gy) prior to the injection of a locally paralysing dose of botulinum toxin. It was found that axonal sprouting occurred as expected, but the sprouts remained unmyelinated and many degenerated. Fewer new end-plates were formed, muscles remained more severely atrophied and supersensitive to acetylcholine and recovery of neuromuscular transmission was greatly delayed when compared with the effects of botulinum toxin alone. X-irradiation did not prevent sprouting but, probably by impairing Schwann cell proliferation, altered axon-Schwann cell relationships and prevented the maturation of newly-formed axons and the differentiation of new end-plates.

  20. Botulinum toxin in the management of sialorrhoea in acquired brain injury

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, A

    2016-06-01

    Sialorrhoea as a consequence of severe acquired brain injury can significantly negatively impact on quality of life. Medications used in its management have many side effects which can cause problems in the severely disabled. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment of sialorrhoea in a number of neurological conditions but may also have a role to play in the management of sialorrhoea following severe ABI. We report on 4 cases of sialorrhoea following acquired brain injury causing a variety of problems, whose parotid glands were injected with Botulinum toxin type A (Dysport) 50mu each, under ultrasound guidance. All cases had a clinically and statistically significant reduction in drooling as measured by the teacher drooling scale (p=0.005) and carers Visual Analogue Scale (p=0.012). There were no side effects reported. Botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for sialorrhoea associated with acquired brain injury.

  1. Botulinum as a Toxin for Treating Post-herpetic Neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    DING, Xu-Dong; ZHONG, Jing; LIU, Yan-Ping; CHEN, Hua-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Background: We aimed to study the curative effects of botulinum A toxin (BTX-A) on the treatment of post-herpetic neuralgia (PNH). Methods: We enrolled 58 PNH patients and treated them with hypodermic injection of BTX-A in Xiangyang No.1 People?s Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Hubei, China. We measured and compared the Visual Analog Score (VAS), Neuropathy Pain Scale (NPS), Quality of Life Scale (SF-36) score, PNH seizure severity degree, seizure duration, frequency of attack and the...

  2. Molecular Evolutionary Constraints that Determine the Avirulence State of Clostridium botulinum C2 Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Chellapandi, P

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 toxin along with botulinum neurotoxins. C2 toxin is belonged to binary toxin A family in bacterial ADP-ribosylation superfamily. A structural and functional diversity of binary toxin A family was inferred from different evolutionary constraints to determine the avirulence state of C2 toxin. Evolutionary genetic analyses revealed evidence of C2 toxin cluster evolution through horizontal gene transfer from the phage or plasmid origins, site-specific insertion by gene divergence, and homologous recombination event. It has also described that residue in conserved NAD-binding core, family-specific domain structure, and functional motifs found to predetermine its virulence state. Any mutational changes in these residues destabilized its structure-function relationship. Avirulent mutants of C2 toxin were screened and selected from a crucial site required for catalytic function of C2I and pore-forming function of C2II. We found coevolved amino acid pairs contributing an essential role in stabilization of its local structural environment. Avirulent toxins selected in this study were evaluated by detecting evolutionary constraints in stability of protein backbone structure, folding and conformational dynamic space, and antigenic peptides. We found 4 avirulent mutants of C2I and 5 mutants of C2II showing more stability in their local structural environment and backbone structure with rapid fold rate, and low conformational flexibility at mutated sites. Since, evolutionary constraints-free mutants with lack of catalytic and pore-forming function suggested as potential immunogenic candidates for treating C. botulinum infected poultry and veterinary animals. Single amino acid substitution in C2 toxin thus provides a major importance to understand its structure-function link, not only of a molecule but also of the pathogenesis.

  3. Clostridium botulinum in irradiated fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, G.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of the Cl. botulinum resp. its toxin are described with a view to a combined heat and radiation treatment for fish conservation. The method is tested in several laboratories on 10 different fish products. It is found that the spore former Cl. botulinum is a critical factor in this type of preservation which can hardly be overcome although this method has organoleptic advantages over heat pasteurization of fish. At a storage temperatue over 5 0 C, there is a strong increase in toxin; the same applies to fish with a high fat content. Under poor hygienic conditions, the risk is markedly increased. The author recommends strict control measures in the production and distribution of fish, i.e. cooling and salt treatment. (AJ) [de

  4. Molecular diversity of Clostridium botulinum and phenotypically similar strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenda, T; Kukier, E; Sieradzki, Z; Goldsztejn, M; Kwiatek, K

    2016-12-01

    This study was undertaken to examine phenotypic and genetic features of strains preliminary classified as Clostridium botulinum species. The phenotypic characteristics were assessed with different culture media and biochemical tests. The genetic characterization included detection of botulinum toxin genes by PCR and macrorestriction analysis with SmaI, XhoI and SacII by PFGE (Pulsed-field Gel Electrophoresis). Despite similar biochemical properties of all analysed strains, only 47% of them contained genes determining toxicity specific to C. botulinum species. The most valuable differentiation of C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains was obtained after SmaI digestion. The highest affinity was observed among C. botulinum type B profiles which was even up to 100%. It was found 100% of affinity between C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like strains, however, the similarity among C. botulinum and C. botulinum-like was generally lower than 80%.

  5. Botulinum toxin type A versus botulinum toxin type B for cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Gonçalo S; Castelão, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Filipe B; Marques, Raquel E; Ferreira, Joaquim; Sampaio, Cristina; Moore, Austen P; Costa, João

    2016-10-26

    , with a higher probability of benefit from BtA treatment. None of the trials were free of for-profit bias, nor did they provide information regarding registered study protocols. All trials evaluated the effect of a single Bt treatment session, and not repeated treatment sessions, using doses from 100 U to 250 U of BtA (all onabotulinumtoxinA, or Botox, formulations) and 5000 U to 10,000 U of BtB (rimabotulinumtoxinB, or Myobloc/Neurobloc).We found no difference between the two types of botulinum toxin in terms of overall efficacy, with a mean difference of -1.44 (95% CI -3.58 to 0.70) points lower on the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) for BtB-treated participants, measured at two to four weeks after injection. The proportion of participants with adverse events was also not different between BtA and BtB (BtB versus BtA risk ratio (RR) 1.40; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.96). However, when compared to BtA, treatment with BtB was associated with an increased risk of one adverse events of special interest, namely treatment-related sore throat/dry mouth (BtB versus BtA RR of 4.39; 95% CI 2.43 to 7.91). Treatment-related dysphagia (swallowing difficulties) was not different between BtA and BtB (RR 2.89; 95% CI 0.80 to 10.41). The two types of botulinum toxin were otherwise clinically non-distinguishable in all the remaining outcomes. The previous version of this review did not include any trials, since these were still ongoing at the time. Therefore, with this update we are able to change the conclusions of this review. There is low quality evidence that a single treatment session of BtA (specifically onabotulinumtoxinA) and a single treatment session of BtB (rimabotulinumtoxinB) are equally effective and safe in the treatment of adults with certain types of cervical dystonia. Treatment with BtB appears to present an increased risk of sore throat/dry mouth, compared to BtA. Overall, there is no clinical evidence from these single-treatment trials to support or

  6. A randomized trial of upper limb botulimun toxin versus placebo injection, combined with physiotherapy, in children with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Adriano; Maoret, Anna Rosa; Muzzini, Simonetta; Alboresi, Silvia; Lombardi, Francesco; Sgandurra, Giuseppina; Paolicelli, Paola Bruna; Sicola, Elisa; Cioni, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the efficacy of Botulinum Toxin A (BoNT-A), combined with an individualized intensive physiotherapy/orthoses treatment, in improving upper limb activity and competence in daily activity in children with hemiplegia, and to compare its effectiveness with that of non-pharmacological instruments. It was a Randomized Clinical Trial of 27 children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy, outpatients of two high speciality Centres for child rehabilitation. Each child was assigned by simple randomization to experimental group (BoNT-A) or control group (placebo). Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) was chosen as primary outcome measure; other measures were selected according to ICF dimensions. Participants were assessed at baseline (T0), at T1, T2, T3 (1-3-6 months after injection, respectively). Every patient was given a specific physiotherapeutic treatment, consisting of individualized goal directed exercises, task oriented activities, daily stretching manoeuvres, functional and/or static orthoses. BoNT-A group showed a significant increase of AHA raw scores at T2, compared to control group (T2-T0: p=.025) and functional goals achievement (GAS) was also slightly better in the same group (p=.033). Other measures indicated some improvement in both groups, without significant intergroup differences. Children with intermediate severity of hand function at House scale for upper limb impairment seem to have a better benefit from BoNT-A protocol. BoNT-A was effective in improving manipulation in the activity domain, in association with individualized goal-directed physiotherapy and orthoses; the combined treatment is recommended. The study brings more evidence for the efficacy of a combined treatment botulinum toxin injection-physiotherapy-orthoses, and it gives some suggestions for candidate selection and individualized treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors Associated with Therapeutic Efficacy of Intravesical OnabotulinumtoxinA Injection for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

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    Sheng-Mou Hsiao

    Full Text Available To analyze the predictors of therapeutic efficacy after intravesical botulinum toxin A injection for overactive bladder syndrome (OAB refractory to antimuscarinic therapy.All consecutively OAB patients, who visited the urologic outpatient clinics of a medical center and refractory to antimuscarinic treatment, were prospectively enrolled. All enrolled patients received intravesical injection of 100 U onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox. The Global Response Assessment (GRA score ≥ 2 at 3 months after Botox injection was defined as a successful treatment, otherwise failed.Overall, 89 patients received intravesical injection. Eighty patients, including 42 men and 38 women, had received follow-up at 3 months. The overall success rate was 63.8%. The global response assessment, urgency severity score, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence and frequency episodes, and functional bladder capacity improved after treatment. However, post-void residual volume (PVR increased, and voiding efficiency (VE decreased after treatment. Female gender (odds ratio = 3.75 was the only independent factor associated with the success. Female gender (coefficient = 0.74, low baseline overactive bladder symptoms score (coefficient = -0.12 and the presence of OAB-wet (coefficient = 0.79 were independent factors associated with therapeutic efficacy (i.e., GRA score. VE (odds ratio = 0.062 was the only predictor for a large PVR at 3 months. The optimum cutoff value of VE was <87% with the area under the ROC curve being 0.64 (sensitivity = 63.8%, specificity = 57.1%.The therapeutic effects of Botox can persist till 6 months after treatment. Female gender, low overactive bladder symptoms score and OAB-wet are associated better therapeutic efficacy, and low baseline VE is associated with large PVR. These findings can serve as an initial guide or assist in consultation regarding the treatment of OAB patients with Botox injection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01657409.

  8. Eighteen-point abobotulinum toxin a upper face rejuvenation: an eye plastic perspective on 845 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkouli, Mohsen Bahmani; Amani, Afsaneh; Jamshidian-Tehrani, Mansooreh; Yousefi, Sahar; Jazayeri, Anis Alsadat

    2014-01-01

    To report the method and results of 18-point Abobotulinum toxin A (ABO-BTA, Dysport) upper face rejuvenation on 845 subjects. In a retrospective chart review, all subjects (the first cycle of injection) with ABO-BTA upper face rejuvenation from 2003 to 2009 were included. Excluded were subjects with facial spastic disorders, injection after upper face lifting, and aberrant regeneration of facial nerves. Upper face rejuvenation included 18 points of injection at forehead creases (4), frown lines (5), bunny line (1), crow's feet (4 on both sides), and lower eyelid crease (4 on both sides). They were revisited in 10 to 14 days for assessment of the effects and possible touch-up injection. Demographics, year of injection, topical anesthetic usage, touch-up injection, and adverse effects (AE) were recorded. There were 845 subjects (85.8% women) whose age was below 40 in 49.3%. All but 68 (8%) were happy with the touch-up visit, 10 to 14 days after injection. Touch-up injection was performed in 8% of subjects mainly for the eyebrow asymmetry. AE (22/845, 2.6%) were bruise (15/845, 1.8%), blepharoptosis (3/845, 0.3%), remained eyebrow asymmetry after touch-up injection (2/845, 0.2%), and headache (2/845, 0.2%). They were significantly more in subjects with touch-up injection, younger than 40 years, and in the first and second year of experience (especially for the bruise). Eighteen-point ABO-BTA upper face rejuvenation had a low rate of AE in this series in which majority was bruise at the lateral canthal area. They were significantly more in the first years of experience, subjects younger than 40, and who had touch-up injections.

  9. Botulinum toxin for treating unilateral apraxia of eyelid opening in a patient with congenital myotonia

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    Estrella Fernández

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A 37-year-old female presented with severe apraxia of lid opening (ALO affecting the right upper lid associated with Becker congenital myotonia (MC. The patient had a history of right upper lid ptosis for 25 years that was exacerbated over the previous month with severe incapacity to open her right eye. No other associated neurological or ophthalmic symptoms were observed. The patient was treated with botulinum toxin (BoNT-A injection into the pretarsal and lateral canthus region of the orbicularis oculi of the affected eyelid. Treatment with BoNT-A is an effective method of managing ALO in Becker MC. This is the first case of unilateral ALO in the course of Becker MC that was successfully treated with injections of botulinum toxin.

  10. Pharmaceutical, biological, and clinical properties of botulinum neurotoxin type A products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frevert, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin injections are a valuable treatment modality for many therapeutic indications and have revolutionized the field of aesthetic medicine so that they are the leading cosmetic procedure performed worldwide. Studies show that onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, and incobotulinumtoxinA are comparable in terms of clinical efficacy. Differences between the products relate to the botulinum neurotoxin complexes, specific biological potency, and their immunogenicity. Protein complex size and molecular weight have no effect on biological activity, stability, distribution, or side effect profile. Complexing proteins and inactive toxin (toxoid) content increase the risk of neutralizing antibody formation, which can cause secondary treatment failure, particularly in chronic disorders that require frequent injections and long-term treatment. These attributes could lead to differences in therapeutic outcomes, and, given the widespread aesthetic use of these three neurotoxin products, physicians should be aware of how they differ to ensure their safe and effective use.

  11. Protein Receptor(s) of Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    therapeutic agent, which is a more effective drug in this form than the pure BoNT (12). Again, the molecular basis of the superior therapeutic efficacy of...neurotoxin B, Nat Struct Biol 7, 693-699 36. Hanson, M. A. and Stevens, R. C. (2000) Cocrystal structure of synaptobrevin-II bound to botulinum...designing novel drugs , Biochimie 82 (2000) 943-53. 21. L.A. Smith, Development of recombinant vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin, Toxicon 36 (1998) 539

  12. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of strabismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Fiona J; Noonan, Carmel P

    2017-03-02

    The use of botulinum toxin as an investigative and treatment modality for strabismus is well reported in the medical literature. However, it is unclear how effective it is in comparison to other treatment options for strabismus. The primary objective was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in the treatment of strabismus compared with alternative conservative or surgical treatment options. This review sought to ascertain those types of strabismus that particularly benefit from the use of botulinum toxin as a treatment option (such as small angle strabismus or strabismus with binocular potential, i.e. the potential to use both eyes together as a pair). The secondary objectives were to investigate the dose effect and complication rates associated with botulinum toxin. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2016), Embase (January 1980 to July 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to July 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 11 July 2016. We handsearched the British and Irish Orthoptic Journal, Australian Orthoptic Journal, proceedings of the European Strabismological Association (ESA), International Strabismological Association (ISA) and International Orthoptic Association (IOA) (www.liv.ac.uk/orthoptics/research/search.htm) and American Academy of Paediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus meetings (AAPOS). We contacted researchers who are active in this field for information about further

  13. Botulinum toxin-induced acute anterior uveitis in a patient with Behçet's disease under infliximab treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Hirofumi; Yagi, Syunsuke; Osada, Hiromu; Zako, Masahiro

    2017-05-04

    Injections of lipopolysaccharide in animal models generate acute anterior uveitis (also known as endotoxin-induced uveitis), but the effects of lipopolysaccharide injection are unknown in humans. We describe an unusual case in which acute anterior uveitis was dramatically activated subsequent to botulinum toxin injection in a patient with Behçet's disease but the acute anterior uveitis was satisfactorily attenuated by infliximab. A 53-year-old Japanese man had normal ocular findings at his regularly scheduled appointment. He had been diagnosed as having incomplete-type Behçet's disease 11 years before. Three years after the diagnosis he was given systemic infusions of 5 mg/kg infliximab every 8 weeks and he had not experienced a uveitis attack for 8 years with no treatment other than infliximab. Two days after the eye examination, he received intracutaneous botulinum toxin injections to treat axillary hyperhidrosis on both sides. Three hours after the injections, he noted rapidly increasing floaters in his right eye. Four days after the injections, his right eye showed severe acute anterior uveitis with deteriorated aqueous flare and anterior vitreous opacity. He received his scheduled infliximab injection, and the right acute anterior uveitis immediately attenuated. Botulinum toxin may have clinical effects similar to those of lipopolysaccharide in endotoxin-induced uveitis models. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that botulinum toxin may trigger acute anterior uveitis, although the precise mechanism is still unclear.

  14. Botulinum toxin alleviates dysphagia of patients with inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Aleksi; Airas, Laura; Jokela, Manu; Pulkkinen, Jaakko

    2017-09-15

    Oropharyngeal dysphagia is a disabling and undertreated symptom that often occurs in patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). In this study, we examined the effect of botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle (CPM) of patients with s-IBM and dysphagia. A single-center retrospective study involving 40 biopsy-proven s-IBM-patients treated in the District of Southwest Finland from 2000 to 2013. The incidence of dysphagia, rate of aspirations, rate of aspiration pneumonias and treatment results of dysphagia were analyzed. Patients treated for dysphagia were evaluated before and after surgery by video-fluoroscopy and/or using a questionnaire. Twenty-five of the 40 s-IBM patients (62.5%) experienced dysphagia. BoNT-A was injected a median of 2 times (range 1-7) in 12 patients with dysphagia. Before the injections 7 patients reported aspiration, none afterwards. The corresponding figures for aspiration pneumonia were 3 and 0. All of these patients had normal swallowing function 12months (median, range 2-60) after the last injection. BoNT-A injections to the CPM alleviate the dysphagia of s-IBM patients reversibly and appear to reduce the rate of aspiration effectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Role of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Clinical Management of Refractory Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara J. Singer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anterior knee pain is a highly prevalent condition affecting largely young to middle aged adults. Symptoms can recur in more than two thirds of cases, often resulting in activity limitation and reduced participation in employment and recreational pursuits. Persistent anterior knee pain is difficult to treat and many individuals eventually consider a surgical intervention. Evidence for long term benefit of most conservative treatments or surgical approaches is currently lacking. Injection of Botulinum toxin type A to the distal region of vastus lateralis muscle causes a short term functional “denervation” which moderates the influence of vastus lateralis muscle on the knee extensor mechanism and increases the relative contribution of the vastus medialis muscle. Initial data suggest that, compared with other interventions for anterior knee pain, Botulinum toxin type A injection, in combination with an active exercise programme, can lead to sustained relief of symptoms, reduced health care utilisation and increased activity participation. The procedure is less invasive than surgical intervention, relatively easy to perform, and is time- and cost-effective. Further studies, including larger randomized placebo-controlled trials, are required to confirm the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin type A injection for anterior knee pain and to elaborate the possible mechanisms underpinning pain and symptom relief.

  16. A Beautician’s Dystonia: Long-Lasting Effect of Botulinum Toxin

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    Siria Di Martino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for dystonia are not curative but symptomatic; the treatment of choice for focal dystonias is repeated botulinum toxin injections. Here, we present the case of a 46-year-old beautician with focal dystonia in her left hand that affected her ability to work. Pharmacological treatment with clonazepam and gabapentin failed to resolve her symptoms and was discontinued due to side effects (sleepiness, gastrointestinal disorders. Intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin (incobotulinumtoxinA, Xeomin into the extensor digitorum communis (35 U, flexor carpi radialis (35 U, and flexor digitorum superficialis (30 U muscles resulted in complete resolution of symptoms at clinical assessments at 1, 3, 6, and 10 months after the injections, confirmed by the results of surface electromyography 10 months after treatment. The patient was able to work again 1 month after treatment. No reinjection has been necessary at the last evaluation (12 months after treatment. In conclusion, botulinum toxin is an effective treatment for focal dystonia that can have long-lasting effects and can improve patients’ ability to work and quality of life.

  17. Quantitative analysis of the pendulum test: application to multiple sclerosis patients treated with botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, L; Monaldi, F; Paolucci, S; Iani, C; Lacquaniti, F

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop quantitative analytical methods in the application of the pendulum test to both normal and spastic subjects. The lower leg was released by a torque motor from different starting positions. The resulting changes in the knee angle were fitted by means of a time-varying model. Stiffness and viscosity coefficients were derived for each half-cycle oscillation in both flexion and extension, and for all knee starting positions. This method was applied to the assessment of the effects of Botulinum toxin A (BTX) in progressive multiple sclerosis patients in a follow-up study. About half of the patients showed a significant decrement in stiffness and viscosity coefficients.

  18. Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin: when and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzi, Rosamaria; Di Martino, Vincenzo; Inzirillo, Antonio; D'Avenia, Eugenio; Inzirillo, Maurizio; Cattaneo, Fabio; Cattaneo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin:when and why? The endoscopic treatment options of achalasia include botulinum toxin (BT) injection and pneumatic dilation (PD) of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). BT can reduce the LES pressure by blocking the release of acetylcoline from presynaptic cholinergic nerve terminals in the myenteric plexus. Although the procedure is safe and good initial response is reported, there is a wide variability in the duration of the response and the effect tends to decrease over time. BT is usually recommended for elderly patients or patients with comorbid illnesses, who are poor candidates for more invasive procedures. PD aims at tearing the muscle fibers of the LES and is considered the most effective nonsurgical treatment for achalasia. Technical details of the procedure vary in different institutions and in many clinical settings the choice between PD or minimally invasive surgical myotomy depends upon local expertise in the procedures. Further endoscopic treatment options such as submucosal esophageal myotomy or self-expanding metallic stents are being studied.

  19. Report of Allergic Reaction After Application of Botulinum Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Careta, Mariana Figueiroa; Delgado, Livia; Patriota, Régia

    2015-07-01

    Botulinum toxin is a widely used treatment with satisfactory results, and it is relatively safe in the doses used for cosmetic procedures. The authors report a case of allergic reaction to Chinese botulinum toxin serotype A (CBTX-A). Although this is a rare adverse event, it is nonetheless clinically relevant to healthcare professionals. A 44-year-old woman presented to the authors' hospital complaining of dynamic wrinkles. CBTX-A was used to treat her. Minutes after application, she developed urticarial plaques proximal to the injection site. The patient had an allergic reaction, as documented by a positive skin test, which was controlled by the administration of antihistamines and systemic corticosteroids. This report is intended to guide healthcare professionals faced with this type of adverse event regarding how to proceed without hindering the delivery and effectiveness of the treatment. When performed by a qualified health professional, this treatment brings excellent results in the vast majority of cases. 5 Risk. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Influence of Botulinum Toxin Therapy on Postural Control and Lower Limb Intersegmental Coordination in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

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    Bernard Dan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxin injections may significantly improve lower limb kinematics in gait of children with spastic forms of cerebral palsy. Here we aimed to analyze the effect of lower limb botulinum toxin injections on trunk postural control and lower limb intralimb (intersegmental coordination in children with spastic diplegia or spastic hemiplegia (GMFCS I or II. We recorded tridimensional trunk kinematics and thigh, shank and foot elevation angles in fourteen 3–12 year-old children with spastic diplegia and 14 with spastic hemiplegia while walking either barefoot or with ankle-foot orthoses (AFO before and after botulinum toxin infiltration according to a management protocol. We found significantly greater trunk excursions in the transverse plane (barefoot condition and in the frontal plane (AFO condition. Intralimb coordination showed significant differences only in the barefoot condition, suggesting that reducing the degrees of freedom may limit the emergence of selective coordination. Minimal relative phase analysis showed differences between the groups (diplegia and hemiplegia but there were no significant alterations unless the children wore AFO. We conclude that botulinum toxin injection in lower limb spastic muscles leads to changes in motor planning, including through interference with trunk stability, but a combination of therapies (orthoses and physical therapy is needed in order to learn new motor strategies.

  1. Antagonism of botulinum toxin-induced muscle weakness by aminopyridines in rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, M.; Scovill, J.; Deshpande, S.S.

    1993-05-13

    The effects of the potassium channel inhibitor and putative botulinum toxin antagonists 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) were investigated in vitro on the contractile and electrophysiological properties of rat diaphragm muscle. In the presence of 300 pM botulinum toxin A (BoTx A), twitches elicited by supramaximal nerve stimulation (0. 1 Hz) were reduced by over 80% in 3 hr. The time to block decreased with increases in temperature, toxin concentration and stimulation frequency. Addition of 4-AP or 3,4-DAP led to a prompt reversal of the BoTx A-induced depression of twitch tension. This reversal was concentration-dependent such that, in the presence of 1 mM 4-AP, reversal of the BoTx A-induced blockade was complete in 6.7 min. The beneficial effect of the APs were well maintained and persisted for up to 6 hr after addition. Application of 1 microns M neostigmine 1 hr after 3,4-DAP produced a further potentiation of twitch tensions, but this action lasted for < 5 min and led to the appearance of tetanic fade during repetitive stimulation. It is concluded that the APs are of benefit in antagonizing the muscle paralysis following exposure to botulinum toxin. Co-application of neostigmine, however, appears to confer no additional benefit.

  2. Differences in botulinum toxin dosing between patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia and essential voice tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbelo, Diana M; Duffy, Joseph R; Hughes Borst, Becky J; Ekbom, Dale; Maragos, Nicolas E

    2014-01-01

    To explore possible dose differences in average botulinum toxin (BTX) given to patients with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) compared with patients with essential voice tremor (EVT). A retrospective study compared the average BTX dose injected in equal doses to the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles of 51 patients with ADSD with 52 patients with EVT. Those with ADSD received significantly higher total doses (6.80 ± 2.79 units) compared with those with EVT (5.02 ± 1.65 units). Dose at time of first injection, age at time of first injection, gender, year of first injection, and average time between injections were included in multivariate analysis but did not interact with total average dose findings. Patients with ADSD may need relatively higher doses of BTX injections to bilateral TA muscles compared with patients with EVT. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Classification of Posture in Poststroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Potential Decision Tool for Botulinum Toxin A Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefter, Harald; Jost, Wolfgang H.; Reissig, Andrea; Zakine, Benjamin; Bakheit, Abdel Magid; Wissel, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    A significant percentage of patients suffering from a stroke involving motor-relevant central nervous system regions will develop a spastic movement disorder. Hyperactivity of different muscle combinations forces the limbs affected into abnormal postures or movement patterns. As muscular hyperactivity can effectively and safely be treated with…

  4. Factors influencing botulinum toxin dose instability in spasmodic dysphonia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, David E; Pechman, Amanda; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Lo, Kaming; Lundy, Donna S; Casiano, Roy R

    2015-05-01

    Many patients with spasmodic dysphonia (SD) see consistent effects from botulinum toxin (BTX) injections of the same dose, whereas others require dosage changes over time. We sought to determine whether demographics (age and gender) or environmental factors (smoking) affect the long-term stability of BTX dosing in these patients. Retrospective review. Charts of all patients undergoing BTX injection for adductor SD were reviewed. Dosage change, defined as whether there was any difference in total dosage used between two beneficial injections, was used as a measure of dosing stability. Beneficial injections were indicated by a voice rating score of at least three of four and any non-zero duration of improved voice. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, smoking status, or duration of treatment correlated with odds of having a dosage change. A total of 211 patients were ultimately included. Age, gender, and smoking status were all found to have no correlative effect on dosing stability. The only factor that was predictive of dose stability was the number of previous beneficial injections, as every additional injection led to decreased odds of a change in dosage for the next injection (odds ratio=0.964; 95% confidence interval=0.947-0.981). Dosage of BTX injections for long-term treatment of SD has a significant propensity to remain stable over time. Factors such as age, gender, and smoking status do not appear to influence the dosage stability. These findings should allow for better patient counseling regarding expectations for their long-term treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of stimulation intensity and botulinum toxin isoform on rat bladder strip contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher P; Boone, Timothy B; de Groat, William C; Chancellor, Michael B; Somogyi, George T

    2003-07-15

    The present experiments compared the inhibitory effects of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) and botulinum toxin D (BoNT-D) on neurally evoked contractions of rat bladder strips. We examined the effect of fatigue (trains of 100 shocks at 20Hz every 20s for 10min) followed by non-fatigue stimulation (trains of 100 shocks at 20Hz every 100s for 20min) on the onset of effect and potency of the two toxins. For non-fatigue experiments, strips were untreated (n=4); or incubated with 1.36nM BoNT-A (n=4). During fatigue experiments, strips were untreated (n=5); or treated with either 1.36nM BoNT-A (n=6) or 0.8nM BoNT-D (n=6). In non-fatigue experiments, BoNT-A produced significant decreases in contractile area after 1h of stimulation compared to untreated strips (PD bladder strips, were statistically significant (PD-treated strips, as a significant reduction (PD) and untreated bladder strips responded similarly to atropine, suggesting that the effects of BoNT result from inhibition of both acetylcholine and ATP release. Our results demonstrate that BoNT-D may be a more effective agent to inhibit transmitter release from autonomic nerves of the rat lower urinary tract. Moreover, in our hands, non-fatigue stimulation is as effective as fatigue stimulation in inhibiting bladder strip contractions.

  6. Molecular scaffold reorganization at the transmitter release site with vesicle exocytosis or botulinum toxin C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Elise F; Reese, Tom S; Wang, Gary Z

    2003-10-01

    Neurotransmitter release sites at the freeze-fractured frog neuromuscular junction are composed of inner and outer paired rows of large membrane particles, the putative calcium channels, anchored by the ribs of an underlying protein scaffold. We analysed the locations of the release site particles as a reflection of the scaffold structure, comparing particle distributions in secreting terminals with those where secretion was blocked with botulinum toxin A, which cleaves a small segment off SNAP-25, or botulinum toxin C1, which cleaves the cytoplasmic domain of syntaxin. In the idle terminal the inner and outer paired rows were located approximately 25 and approximately 44 nm, respectively, from the release site midline. However, adjacent to vesicular fusion sites both particle rows were displaced towards the midline by approximately 25%. The intervals between the particles along each row were examined by a nearest-neighbour approach. In control terminals the peak interval along the inner row was approximately 17 nm, consistent with previous reports and the spacing of the scaffold ribs. While the average distance between particles in the outer row was also approximately 17 nm, a detailed analysis revealed short 'linear clusters' with a approximately 14 nm interval. These clusters were enriched at vesicle fusion sites, suggesting an association with the docking sites, and were eliminated by botulinum C1, but not A. Our findings suggest, first, that the release site scaffold ribs undergo a predictable, and possibly active, shortening during exocytosis and, second, that at the vesicle docking site syntaxin plays a role in the cross-linking of the rib tips to form the vesicle docking sites.

  7. Análise estrutural da laringofaringe e suas implicações na miotomia do cricofaríngeo, na injeção de toxina botulínica e na dilatação por balão Laryngopharyngeal structural analysis and its morphofunctional correlation with cricopharyngeal myotomy, botulinum toxin injection and balloon dilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Melciades Barbosa Costa

    2003-06-01

    characteristics and relationships on 24 pieces obtained from adults' corpses of both sexes fixed in 10% formaldehyde solution. RESULTS: The cricopharyngeal muscle presenting its anterior-lateral insertion, with a C-shaped outline, on the posterior-lateral edge of the cricoid cartilage. This kind of morphology blocks the possibility to generate a predominant anterior and posterior high pressure during its contraction like that we find at the pharyngoesophageal transition. The observation of this kind of pressure has its explanation in a tweezers-like relationship exerted on one side by the vertebral body and on the other side by the posterior contour of the cricoid cartilage. CONCLUSIONS: The muscular organization of the laryngopharyngeal segment allowed us to sustain that a large myotomy of the pharyngoesophageal transition, that takes more than just the cricopharyngeal transversal fasciculus, hinders the ejection function in a region where the dimension do not need any parietal sectioning. Myotomy that encompasses only the transversal fasciculus can contribute to improve the pharyngoesophageal flux by a decrease of the local resistance. The efficiency of this myotomy depends mostly on some residual pharyngeal ejection force and also on a slight hyolaryngeal displacement. The transversal fasciculus of the cricopharyngeal muscle is a narrow strip of muscular mass to be injected by percutaneous way with solution of botulinum toxin; maybe endoscopically. For this reason, dose, dilution and injection sites have an important meaning in the cricopharyngeal therapeutics using botulinum toxin. The efficiency of this procedure, like myotomy, depends on some residual pharyngeal ejection force and on, at least, some hyolaryngeal displacement. The dilation of the pharyngoesophageal transition with pneumatic balloon does not seem to be an adequate procedure for a region that does not present a narrow lumen determined by fibrosis. For anatomical characteristics of the TFE region, mean pressure

  8. Botulinum toxin treatment for limb spasticity in childhood cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito ePavone

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available CP is the most common cause of chronic disability in childhood occurring in 2 to 2.5/1000 births. It is a severe disorder and a significant number of patients present cognitive delay and difficulty in walking. The use of botulinum toxin (BTX has become a popular treatment for CP especially for spastic and dystonic muscles while avoiding deformity and pain. Moreover, the combination of physiotherapy, casting, orthotics and injection of BTX may delay or decrease the need for surgical intervention while reserving single-event, multi-level surgery for fixed musculotendinous contractures and bony deformities in older children. This report highlights the utility of BTX in the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. We include techniques for administration, side effects and possible resistance as well as specific use in the upper and lower limbs muscles

  9. Botulinum Toxin in Secondarily Nonresponsive Patients with Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Niv; Tang, Christopher; Blitzer, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Chemodenervation with botulinum toxin (BoNT) has been effective and well tolerated for all types of dystonia for >30 years. We reviewed outcomes of our patients treated with BoNT serotype A (BoNT-A) for spasmodic dysphonia (SD) who became secondarily nonresponsive. We found that 8 of 1400 patients became nonresponsive to BoNT-A (0.57%), which is lower than the secondary nonresponse rate in other dystonias. After a cessation period, 4 of our patients resumed BoNT-A injections, and recurrence of immunoresistance was not seen in any of them. When compared with patients with other dystonias, patients with SD receive extremely low doses of BoNT. Small antigen challenge may explain the lower rate of immunoresistance and long-lasting efficacy after BoNT-A is restarted among secondary nonresponsive patients with SD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  10. Diagnosis and management with botulinum toxin in 11 cases of laryngeal synkinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekue, Asier; García-López, Isabel; Santiago, Susana; Del Palacio, Antonio; Gavilán, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Laryngeal synkinesis is a vocal fold movement disorder produced by a misdirected reinnervation after a recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Its symptoms differ greatly between patients, requiring diverse therapeutical approaches. We aim to describe our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of different laryngeal synkinesis presentations. 11 patients diagnosed between 2011 and 2014 in a tertiary referral center with laryngeal synkinesis confirmed by laryngeal electromyography were included in our study. All medical records and laryngoscopic and electromyographic data were reviewed retrospectively. Four patients had previous unilateral vocal fold palsy and seven had a bilateral palsy with different degrees of clinical involvement. All of them showed paradoxical movements during inhalation in videofibrolaryngoscopic examination. Laryngeal electromyography confirmed the diagnosis of laryngeal synkinesis. Dyspnea was the main presentation symptom. Three patients with mild symptoms were not treated. Patients with unilateral vocal fold immobility were successfully treated with periodic botulinum toxin injections. Patients with bilateral immobility had a good initial response to botulinum toxin, although in some of them, a posterior cordectomy had to be finally performed. In conclusion, laryngeal synkinesis is a heterogeneous clinic entity that appears in patients with unilateral or bilateral vocal fold paralysis. Videofibrolaryngoscopy and laryngeal electromyography are essential to a correct diagnosis. Botulinum toxin injections are the main treatment for symptomatic cases, even if in bilateral palsy cases more aggressive treatments are often required.

  11. [Medical care of patients with spasticity following stroke : Evaluation of the treatment situation in Germany with focus on the use of botulinum toxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkemeyer, L; Lux, G; Walendzik, A; Wasem, J; Neumann, A

    2017-08-01

    Upper limb spasticity is a common complication following stroke. Cohort studies found 19% of post-stroke patients had upper limb spasticity at 3 months and 38% of patients at 12 months. For focal spasticity, intramuscular injections of botulinum toxin are indicated. In Germany, it is assumed that patients with the described indication are undersupplied with botulinum toxin. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the medical care of patients with upper limb spasticity post-stroke with the focus on the use of botulinum toxin as one treatment option. A standardized questionnaire was developed and a postal survey of a representative national random sample of 800 neurologists to capture the actual medical care situation. The response rate amounted to 37% (n = 292). 59% of the neurologists surveyed had never used botulinum toxin. In total, 87% of neurologists noticed barriers regarding the use of botulinum toxin, where the amount of the doctor's remuneration in 40% and the lack of reimbursement of costs in off-label use in 60% were the most commonly used answers. The achievement of an advanced training in using botulinum toxin was also stated as a general obstacle for resident neurologists. Due to a response rate of 37% for the postal survey a selection bias cannot be excluded. Although botulinum toxin is recommended in the national treatment guidelines, many neurologists do not use botulinum toxin. The reasons can be seen from the barriers described.

  12. Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum A toxin. Results and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnering, R S

    1986-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm is characterized by unilateral, periodic, tonic contractions of facial muscles, thought to be caused by mechanical compression at the root-exit zone of the facial nerve. Electrophysiologic abnormalities such as ectopic excitation and synkinesis are typical. Although posterior fossa microsurgical nerve decompression is successful in bringing about relief of the spasm in most cases, it carries a risk to hearing. As an alternative treatment, 15 patients with hemifacial spasm were given a total of 41 sets of injections with botulinum A toxin, with a mean follow-up of 14.3 +/- 1.1 months. Relief of symptoms lasted a mean of 108.3 +/- 4.2 days. Mild transient lagophthalmos and ptosis were the only complications. Although the exact mechanism of its action and beneficial effect is speculative at this time, botulinum A toxin appears to offer an effective, safe alternative to more radical intracranial surgery for patients with hemifacial spasm.

  13. Botulinum toxin type B micromechanosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Montana, Vedrana; Chapman, Edwin R; Mohideen, U; Parpura, Vladimir

    2003-11-11

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) types A, B, E, and F are toxic to humans; early and rapid detection is essential for adequate medical treatment. Presently available tests for detection of BoNTs, although sensitive, require hours to days. We report a BoNT-B sensor whose properties allow detection of BoNT-B within minutes. The technique relies on the detection of an agarose bead detachment from the tip of a micromachined cantilever resulting from BoNT-B action on its substratum, the synaptic protein synaptobrevin 2, attached to the beads. The mechanical resonance frequency of the cantilever is monitored for the detection. To suspend the bead off the cantilever we use synaptobrevin's molecular interaction with another synaptic protein, syntaxin 1A, that was deposited onto the cantilever tip. Additionally, this bead detachment technique is general and can be used in any displacement reaction, such as in receptor-ligand pairs, where the introduction of one chemical leads to the displacement of another. The technique is of broad interest and will find uses outside toxicology.

  14. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    OpenAIRE

    Marius Alexandru Moga; Oana Gabriela Dimienescu; Andreea Bălan; Ioan Scârneciu; Barna Barabaș; Liana Pleș

    2018-01-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT...

  15. Botulinum Toxin Injections: A Treatment for Muscle Spasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sites. To treat soreness, you can take acetaminophen (brand name: Tylenol) or ibuprofen (brand names: Advil, Motrin). You can also put an ... Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care ...

  16. Bilateral versus posterior injection of botulinum toxin in the internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healing, defined as complete re-epithelisation of the fissure and absence of symptoms. A fissure was considered to ... low-up was completed. The mean length of follow-up was. 15.2 (standard deviation (SD) 4.3) months. ... The mean time to pain relief was 8.45 (standard deviation (SD) 7.41) days in group 1 and 7.20 (SD ...

  17. Protein Domain Analysis of C. botulinum Type A Neurotoxin and Its Relationship with Other Botulinum Serotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Shashi K.; Basavanna, Uma; Shukla, Hem D.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent poisons produced by seven serotypes of Clostridium botulinum. The mechanism of neurotoxin action is a multistep process which leads to the cleavage of one of three different SNARE proteins essential for synaptic vesicle fusion and transmission of the nerve signals to muscles: synaptobrevin, syntaxin, or SNAP-25. In order to understand the precise mechanism of neurotoxin in a host, the domain structure of the neurotoxin was analyzed among differe...

  18. Excellent response rate of anismus to botulinum toxin if rectal prolapse misdiagnosed as anismus ('pseudoanismus') is excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hompes, R; Harmston, C; Wijffels, N; Jones, O M; Cunningham, C; Lindsey, I

    2012-02-01

    Anismus causes obstructed defecation as a result of inappropriate contraction of the puborectalis/external sphincter. Proctographic failure to empty after 30 s is used as a simple surrogate for simultaneous electromyography/proctography. Botulinum toxin is theoretically attractive but efficacy is variable. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin to treat obstructed defecation caused by anismus. Botulinum toxin was administered, under local anaesthetic, into the puborectalis/external sphincter of patients with proctographic anismus. Responders (resolution followed by recurrence of obstructed defecation over a 1- to 2-month period) underwent repeat injection. Nonresponders underwent rectal examination under anaesthetic (EUA). EUA-diagnosed rectal prolapse was graded using the Oxford Prolapse Grade 1-5. Fifty-six patients were treated with botulinum toxin. Twenty-two (39%) responded initially and 21/22 (95%) underwent repeat treatment. At a median follow up of 19.2 (range, 7.0-30.4) months, 20/21 (95%) had a sustained response and required no further treatment. Isolated obstructed defecation symptoms (OR = 7.8, P = 0.008), but not proctographic or physiological factors, predicted response on logistic regression analysis. In 33 (97%) of 34 nonresponders, significant abnormalities were demonstrated at EUA: 31 (94%) had a grade 3-5 rectal prolapse, one had internal anal sphincter myopathy and one had a fissure. Exclusion of these alternative diagnoses revised the initial response rate to 96%. Simple proctographic criteria overdiagnose anismus and underdiagnose rectal prolapse. This explains the published variable response to botulinum toxin. Failure to respond should prompt EUA seeking undiagnosed rectal prolapse. A response to an initial dose of botulinum toxin might be considered a more reliable diagnosis of anismus than proctography. © 2011 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2011 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Botulinum Toxin in Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin on urodynamic parameters and quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Methods Thirty four adult patients with spinal cord injury and detrusor overactivity were selected. The patients received 300 units of botulinum toxin type A. The endpoints evaluated with the episodes of urinary incontinence and measured the maximum cystometric capacity, maximum amplitude of detrusor pressure and bladder compliance at the beginning and end of the study (24 weeks and evaluated the quality of life by applying the Qualiveen questionnaire. Results A significant decrease in the episodes of urinary incontinence was observed. All urodynamic parameters presented a significant improvement. The same was observed in the quality of life index and the specific impact of urinary problems scores from the Qualiveen questionnaire. Six patients did not complete the study, two due to incomplete follow-up, and four violated protocol and were excluded from the analyses. No systemic adverse events of botulinum toxin type A were reported. Conclusions A botulinum toxin type A showed a significantly improved response in urodynamics parameters and specific and general quality of life.

  20. Alterations in CNS Activity Induced by Botulinum Toxin Treatment in Spasmodic Dysphonia: An H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O PET Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S. Omar; Thomassen, Michael; Schulz, Geralyn M.; Hosey, Lara A.; Varga, Mary; Ludlow, Christy L.; Braun, Allen R.

    2006-01-01

    Speech-related changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured using H[subscript 2][superscript 15]O positron-emission tomography in 9 adults with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD) before and after botulinum toxin (BTX) injection and 10 age- and gender-matched volunteers without neurological disorders. Scans were acquired at rest…

  1. Influence of botulinum toxin on rabbit jaw muscle activity and anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, J A M; Wang, Jeffrey; Lie, S H J T J; Langenbach, Geerling E J

    2012-05-01

    Muscles can adapt their fiber properties to accommodate to new conditions. We investigated the extent to which a decrease in muscle activation can cause an adaptation of fiber properties in synergistic and antagonistic jaw muscles. Three months after the injection of botulinum toxin type A in one masseter (anterior or posterior) muscle changes in fiber type composition and fiber cross-sectional areas in jaw muscles were studied at the microscopic level. The injected masseter showed a steep increase in myosin type IIX fibers, whereas fast fibers decreased by about 50% in size. Depending on the injection site, both synergistic and antagonistic muscles showed a significant increase in the size of their fast IIA fibers, sometimes combined with an increased number of IIX fibers. Silencing the activity in the masseter not only causes changes in the fibers of the injected muscle but also leads to changes in other jaw muscles. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of sialorrhoea in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a clinical and neurophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilio, Francesca; Iacovelli, Elisa; Frasca, Vittorio; Gabriele, Maria; Giacomelli, Elena; Picchiori, Floriana; Soldo, Pietro; Cipriani, Anna Maria; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2010-08-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) has been proposed as an alternative treatment for sialorrhoea in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In an open-label prospective study, BoNT/A was injected into the parotid glands bilaterally using anatomic landmarks in 26 ALS patients with bulbar symptoms. Two weeks after injection the severity of sialorrhoea and the related disability were evaluated subjectively and objectively. A group of healthy subjects acted as controls for saliva production. Patients also underwent electrophysiological tests to evaluate possible toxin effects in the nearby non-injected muscles by comparing the amplitude of compound motor action potentials (cMAPs) elicited by electrical stimulation and recorded from the orbicularis oculi and masseter muscles. After BoNT/A injections, of the 26 patients treated, 23 reported that the severity of sialorrhoea improved and the disabling symptoms diminished. Cotton roll weight also decreased after BoNT/A injection, suggesting a reduction in saliva production. Two patients complained of dry mouth. BoNT/A injection left the cMAP amplitude unchanged, suggesting that botulinum toxin does not significantly affect the non-injected facial and masticatory muscles. In conclusion, intraparotid anatomically-guided BoNT/A injection is an effective, easy, and safe treatment for sialorrhoea in patients with bulbar symptoms related to ALS.

  3. Attempts to identify Clostridium botulinum toxin in milk from three experimentally intoxicated Holstein cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, R.B.; Puschner, B.; Walker, R.L.; Rocke, T.E.; Smith, S.R.; Cullor, J.S.; Ardans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Three adult lactating Holstein cows were injected in the subcutaneous abdominal vein with 175 ng/kg of body weight of Clostridium botulinum type C toxin (451 cow median toxic doses) to determine if this botulinum toxin crosses the blood–milk barrier. Whole blood (in sodium heparin) and clotted blood serum samples were taken at 0 min, 10 min, and 3, 6, 9, and 12 h postinoculation. Milk samples were taken at 0 min and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 h postinoculation. All samples were tested for the presence of the toxin using the mouse bioassay and immunostick ELISA test. The immunostick ELISA identified the toxin in whole blood and the mouse bioassay identified the toxin in serum at all times examined in all 3 animals. Toxin was not identified by either detection method in milk samples collected from the 3 animals. From these results, it appears that Clostridium botulinum type C toxin does not cross from the blood to the milk in detectable concentrations.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF ENZYME-LINKAGE IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AGAINST TYPE B OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Depamede

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNTs is one of the causes of economic loss in the livestock industry. This economic loss would be as a direct result when animals poisoned by BoNTs or indirectly when the livestock products are contaminated by BoNTs, which end up with the products are banned by authority. Therefore a routine surveillance of BoNTs in the farm and in livestock product processing industry is urgently needed. One of the most relatively quick and accurate methods to perform a routine detection of the presence of BoNTs is enzyme-linkage immunosorbant assay (ELISA. In this article we describe the results of the development of ELISA, using polyclonal antibodies against BoNTs-B produced locally. Antibodies were generated from six Balb/c mice with standard immunological methods. Mice were immunized three times for a period of 8 weeks with a commercial type B Clostridium botulinum toxoid at a dose of 100 ng per mouse per injection. The resulting antibody was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation 50% (w/v technique and a protein A column method. The results of this preliminary study indicated that the developed ELISA method capable of detecting type B Clostridium botulinum toxin up to 1.0 ng/ml.

  5. RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardhanan, Pavithra; Mello, Charlene M; Singh, Bal Ram; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Cai, Shuowei

    2013-12-15

    A surface plasmon resonance based RNA aptasensor for rapid detection of natively folded type A botulinum neurotoxin is reported. Using detoxified recombinant type A botulinum neurotoxin as the surrogate, the aptasensor detects active toxin within 90 min. The detection limit of the aptasensor in phosphate buffered saline, carrot juice, and fat free milk is 5.8 ng/ml, 20.3 ng/ml and 23.4 ng/ml, respectively, while that in 5-fold diluted human serum is 22.5 ng/ml. Recovery of toxin from disparate sample matrices are within 91-116%. Most significant is the ability of this aptasensor to effectively differentiate the natively folded toxin from denatured, inactive toxin, which is important for homeland security surveillance and threat assessment. The aptasensor is stable for more than 30 days and over 400 injections/regeneration cycles. Such an aptasensor holds great promise for rapid detection of active botulinum neurotoxin for field surveillance due to its robustness, stability and reusability. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Advantages of combined therapies in cosmetic medicine for the treatment of face aging: botulinum toxin, fillers and mesotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, F; Dohan Ehrenfest, D M

    2010-01-01

    Non surgical cosmetic medicine procedures for the face are developing considerably, as they deliver good results using simple, non invasive, atraumatic and reproducible techniques. Aesthetic mesotherapy, also known as anti-aging mesotherapy, uses intra-dermal injections of a nutritive and moisturizing solution to improve brightness, skin hydration and tonus, and also smooth out superficial wrinkles. Subcutaneous filler injections enable to fill wrinkles and folds; by using high density products it is also able to provide genuine facial volumetric reconstruction. Finally, botulinum toxin acts by reducing certain muscle contractions to smooth out expression lines and folds induced by facial dynamics. In this article, we explore the concept of combined therapy and describe our experience associating anti-aging mesotherapy (NCTF-135HA, Filorga, Paris, France), hyaluronic acid based fillers (X-HA3 and X-HA-Volume, Filorga, Paris, France) and botulinum toxin (Vistabel, Allergan, Irvine CA, USA). A therapy combining anti-aging mesotherapy, botulinum toxin and filler injections, offers full treatment of the 3 biological levels of the covering tissues. This non-invasive therapeutic strategy brings patient satisfaction through a global approach to facial aging.

  7. Comparison of Pneumatic Dilation with Pneumatic Dilation Plus Botulinum Toxin for Treatment of Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bakhshipour

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Among the therapeutic options for achalasia are pneumatic dilatation (PD, an appropriate long-term therapy, and botulinum toxin injection (BT that is a relatively short-term therapy. This study aimed to compare therapeutic effect of repetitive pneumatic dilation with a combined method (botulinum toxin injection and pneumatic dilation in a group of achalasia patients who are low responder to two initial pneumatic dilations. Thirty- four patients with documented primary achalasia that had low response to two times PD (<50% decrease in symptom score and barium height at 5 minute in timed esophagogram after 3month of late PD were randomized to receive pneumatic dilation (n=18 or botulinum toxin injection and pneumatic dilation by four weeks interval (n=16, PD and BT+PD groups respectively. Symptom scores were evaluated before and at 1, 6 and 12 months after treatment. Clinical remission was defined as a decrease in symptom score ≥ 50% of baseline. There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age and achalasia type. Remission rate of patients in BT-PD group in comparison with PD group were 87.5% vs. 67.1% (P = 0.7, 87.5% vs. 61.1% (P = 0.59 and 87.5% vs. 55.5% (P = 0.53 at 1, 6 and 12 months respectively .There were no major complications in either group. The mean symptom score decreased by 62.71% in the BT-PD group (P < 0.002 and 50.77% in the PD group (P < 0.01 at the end of the first year. Despite a better response rate in BT+PD group, a difference was not statistically significant. A difference may be meaningful if a large numbers of patients are included in the study.

  8. Effect of botulinum toxin type A injection on the expression of substance P, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scar%A型肉毒毒素对兔耳增生性瘢痕组织中P物质、β1转移生长因子、α平滑肌肌动蛋白的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琳; 邰宁正; 范志宏

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of botulinum toxin type A injection on the expres-sion of substance P, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scar. Methods The hyper-trophic sear model was established in 24 Japanese rabbits'ears. The wounds in ventral surface of ear were divided in Group I (lateral wounds) and Group S (medial wounds), 3 wounds each side per ear, totally 72 wounds each group. The wound-healing time and the growth of scar were observed and recorded. On post-wounding day 28, the wounds were created in another 6 rabbits in the same way and the normal skin were harvested as Group C. Likewise, the scar samples in Groups I and S were harvested. The mRNA expression of substance P, TGF-β1 and α-SMA were detected quantitatively by using real-time PCR and α-SMA was also detected with Western blot. Results No difference between the ratio of healed or infec-tious wounds on post-wounding day 14. The mRNA expression of SP, TGF-β1 and α-SMA in Group I was significantly lower than Group S, but higher than those in Group C (PI组>C组.结论 BTA注射不延迟创面愈合,并减少了兔耳增生瘢痕中SP、TGF-β1和α-SMA的mRNA表达,为其治疗增生性瘢痕的临床应用提供了一定的理论依据.

  9. Is Botulinum Toxin Type A a Valuable Adjunct During Femoral Lengthening? A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hoon; Shin, Soowan; Shin, Han Sol; Kim, Hyun Woo; Kim, Dong Wook; Lee, Dong Hoon

    2016-12-01

    Reduced joint ROM and distraction-induced pain are common complaints of patients who have undergone gradual femoral lengthening. Attempts to reduce the effects of lengthening on joint motion have included the use of botulinum toxin to reduce the muscle forces that restrict motion. The benefits of this approach during femoral lengthening, however, have not been conclusively established. We wished to evaluate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BtX-A) injection in the anterior thigh muscles during femoral distraction osteogenesis on adjacent joint ROM and distraction-induced pain. We asked: (1) Does injection of BtX-A in the quadriceps muscles lead to improved knee and hip motion during femoral lengthening? (2) Does injection of BtX-A reduce pain during femoral lengthening? A single-center, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted. Forty-four patients (88 femurs) undergoing bilateral femoral lengthening for familial short stature were included in the study. BtX-A (200 IU) was injected intraoperatively in the quadriceps muscles of one thigh. An equal volume of sterile normal saline was injected in the other thigh as a control. Selection of the limb receiving the toxin was randomized. Clinical evaluation included a VAS score for pain measurement, ROM evaluation of the hips and knees, and measurement of thigh circumference. Side-to-side differences were analyzed throughout the entire consolidation phase. No patients were lost to followup, leaving 44 patients (88 femurs). The mean followup was 26 months (range, 14-40 months). The distraction rate and final length of gain were similar between treated and control limbs. A priori power analysis suggested that 44 legs were required in each group to achieve statistical significance of 0.05 with 90% power to detect a 50% difference in treatment effect between treatment and control groups. There were no differences in hip ROM, knee ROM, or maximal thigh circumference between the two lower extremities

  10. Botulinum toxin in myotonia congenita: it does not help against rigidity and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Dirk; Adib Saberi, Fereshte

    2014-05-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) is a potent local muscle relaxant with analgetic properties. Myotonia congenita (MC) is a genetic disorder producing muscle rigidity and pain. BT injected into the trapezius produced mild paresis, but no effect on rigidity and pain. There were no signs of systemic effects. Lack of BT efficacy on MC rigidity confirms its origin from muscle membrane dysfunction rather than from inappropriate neuromuscular activation. Lack of BT efficacy on pain could be caused by lack of anti-rigidity effect. It could also be due to separate non-muscular pain mechanisms unresponsive to BT.

  11. An overview of the cosmetic treatment of facial muscles with a new botulinum toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiest, Luitgard G

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is used nowadays in a much more differentiated way with a much more individualized approach to the cosmetic treatment of patients. To the well known areas of the upper face new indications in the mid and lower face have been added. Microinjection techniques are increasingly used besides the classic intramuscular injection technique. BTX injections of the mid and lower face require small and smallest dosages. The perioral muscles act in concert to achieve the extraordinarily complex movements that control facial expressions, eating, and speech. As the mouth has horizontal as well as vertical movements, paralysis of these perioral muscles has a greater effect on facial function and appearance than does paralysis of muscles of the upper face, which move primarily in vertical direction. It is essential that BTX injections should achieve the desired cosmetic result with the minimum dose without any functional discomfort. In this paper the three-year clinical experience with average dosages for an optimal outcome in the treatment of facial muscles with a newly developed botulinum toxin type A (Xeomin) free from complexing proteins is presented.

  12. Characterization of Hemagglutinin Negative Botulinum Progenitor Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne R. Kalb

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botulism is a disease involving intoxication with botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs, toxic proteins produced by Clostridium botulinum and other clostridia. The 150 kDa neurotoxin is produced in conjunction with other proteins to form the botulinum progenitor toxin complex (PTC, alternating in size from 300 kDa to 500 kDa. These progenitor complexes can be classified into hemagglutinin positive or hemagglutinin negative, depending on the ability of some of the neurotoxin-associated proteins (NAPs to cause hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin positive progenitor toxin complex consists of BoNT, nontoxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNH, and three hemagglutinin proteins; HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17. Hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes contain BoNT and NTNH as the minimally functional PTC (M-PTC, but not the three hemagglutinin proteins. Interestingly, the genome of hemagglutinin negative progenitor toxin complexes comprises open reading frames (orfs which encode for three proteins, but the existence of these proteins has not yet been extensively demonstrated. In this work, we demonstrate that these three proteins exist and form part of the PTC for hemagglutinin negative complexes. Several hemagglutinin negative strains producing BoNT/A, /E, and /F were found to contain the three open reading frame proteins. Additionally, several BoNT/A-containing bivalent strains were examined, and NAPs from both genes, including the open reading frame proteins, were associated with BoNT/A. The open reading frame encoded proteins are more easily removed from the botulinum complex than the hemagglutinin proteins, but are present in several BoNT/A and /F toxin preparations. These are not easily removed from the BoNT/E complex, however, and are present even in commercially-available purified BoNT/E complex.

  13. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Dimienescu, Oana Gabriela; Bălan, Andreea; Scârneciu, Ioan; Barabaș, Barna; Pleș, Liana

    2018-04-21

    Botulinum toxins (BoNTs) are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G). Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X) has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  14. Therapeutic Approaches of Botulinum Toxin in Gynecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Alexandru Moga

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum toxins (BoNTs are produced by several anaerobic species of the genus Clostridium and, although they were originally considered lethal toxins, today they find their usefulness in the treatment of a wide range of pathologies in various medical specialties. Botulinum neurotoxin has been identified in seven different isoforms (BoNT-A, BoNT-B, BoNT-C, BoNT-D, BoNT-E, BoNT-F, and BoNT-G. Neurotoxigenic Clostridia can produce more than 40 different BoNT subtypes and, recently, a new BoNT serotype (BoNT-X has been reported in some studies. BoNT-X has not been shown to actually be an active neurotoxin despite its catalytically active LC, so it should be described as a putative eighth serotype. The mechanism of action of the serotypes is similar: they inhibit the release of acetylcholine from the nerve endings but their therapeutically potency varies. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A is the most studied serotype for therapeutic purposes. Regarding the gynecological pathology, a series of studies based on the efficiency of its use in the treatment of refractory myofascial pelvic pain, vaginism, dyspareunia, vulvodynia and overactive bladder or urinary incontinence have been reported. The current study is a review of the literature regarding the efficiency of BoNT-A in the gynecological pathology and on the long and short-term effects of its administration.

  15. Therapeutic applications of botulinum neurotoxins in head and neck disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alshadwi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Botulinum neurotoxin therapy provides viable alternatives to traditional treatment modalities for some conditions affecting the head and neck region that have neurological components. This therapy can overcome some of the morbidities associated with conventional therapy. More research is needed to determine the ideal doses of botulinum neurotoxin to treat different diseases affecting the head and neck regions.

  16. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Maréchal, Le Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B.; Lobato, Francisco C.F.; Silva, Rodrigo O.S.; Dorner, Martin B.; Fach, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of

  17. Botulinum toxin in the management of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabin, Jonathan A; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2015-08-01

    Complete flaccid facial paralysis, as well as the synkinetic and hyperkinetic sequelae of partial recovery, has significant impact on quality of life. Patients suffer from functional deficiencies, cosmetic deformity, discomfort and social consequences leading to emotional distress. Despite an extensive and sophisticated array of available interventions for facial reanimation, most patients have persistent issues that require consistent follow-up. In long-term management, botulinum toxin (BT) injection remains a critical tool in the treatment of the facial paralysis patient, particularly in the case of synkinesis, hyperkinesis and imbalance. We review the recent scientific literature and highlight key principles and developments in the use of BT in the management of facial paralysis, including less common applications for acute facial paralysis, hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. We reviewed the literature for the latest advances in the use of BT in facial paralysis, including applications and technique, as well as measurement tools and adjunct exercises. We also share our experience in treating our own patient population. BT continues to be a well tolerated and effective tool in the long-term management of facial paralysis, specifically in treating synkinesis, imbalance and hyperkinesis, as well as hyperlacrimation and pseudoptosis. Consistent measurement tools and adjunct neuromuscular retraining are crucial in the successful deployment of BT. Controversy exists as to whether BT should be used to manage facial paralysis during the acute phase, and whether BT application to the nonparalyzed face can improve long-term recovery in the paralyzed side.

  18. Botulinum Toxin for the Management of Sjögren Syndrome-Associated Recurrent Parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Luke M; Palme, Carsten E; Riffat, Faruque; Mahant, Neil

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent parotitis is a rare manifestation of Sjögren syndrome. The management of recurrent parotitis is challenging because conservative methods may be of limited efficacy and invasive approaches carry the risk of complications. Botulinum toxin has been shown to reduce salivary flow, and consequently, the results of its use in the management of recurrent parotitis have been encouraging. A 65-year-old female patient with recurrent parotitis due to Sjögren syndrome was referred to us, complaining of weekly bouts of inflammation. She required a course of antibiotics monthly to control bacterial superinfections. We treated her with onabotulinumtoxinA injections into both parotid glands at regular intervals. After her second injection cycle, she denied further inflammatory bouts, has not required antibiotics in more than 36 months, and denied any side effects. Botulinum toxin may be a safe and effective method of treating Sjögren syndrome-associated recurrent parotitis. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Botulinum toxin type-A in therapy of patients with anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Y; Avni, Y; Lukovetski, A; Wardi, J; Geva, D; Birkenfeld, S; Halpern, Z

    2001-12-01

    Anismus is a common cause of constipation and outlet obstruction. Standard therapy with laxatives or biofeedback has conflicting results. Surgical treatment gives poor results and has practically been abandoned. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of botulinum toxin type-A (Botox) injection to the puborectalis muscle in patients with anismus. Twenty-five patients (15 females; mean age, 23.2) with history of constipation and symptoms of outlet obstruction underwent anorectal perfusion manometry and video-proctography. All patients were found to have a nonrelaxing puborectalis muscle on both modalities. All have been unable to expel a rectal balloon. Each patient who participated in the study was randomly assigned to undergo local injection of Botox--10 units to each side of the puborectalis or 20 units to the posterior aspect of this muscle. Eight patients underwent further injections1-5 every 3 months in accordance with previous results. Follow-up was conducted 1, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. Straining, anorectal pain, and overall satisfaction were assessed on a visual analog scale. Weekly evacuation, fecal incontinence, and complications were recorded. At the weekly meeting, each patient underwent anorectal manometry with a balloon expulsion test. Manometric relaxation was achieved after the first injection in 18 patients (75 percent). Once relaxation was achieved, it lasted throughout the follow-up. Nine patients (37.5 percent) expelled the rectal balloon after the first injection. Seven of 16 patients who failed the first injection had an additional one. In 2 patients it was successful (28.6 percent). Symptom improvement of 29.2 percent in straining index was recorded during follow-up. In 3 patients (12.5 percent) pain developed after injection. No other complications were observed. Overall satisfaction with Botox injection results was observed in 58.3 percent. Botox injection to the puborectalis muscle has been found to have a limited

  20. Botulinum toxin for treatment of glandular hypersecretory disorders.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, T A

    2012-02-03

    SUMMARY: The use of botulinum toxin to treat disorders of the salivary glands is increasing in popularity in recent years. Recent reports of the use of botulinum toxin in glandular hypersecretion suggest overall favourable results with minimal side-effects. However, few randomised clinical trials means that data are limited with respect to candidate suitability, treatment dosages, frequency and duration of treatment. We report a selection of such cases from our own department managed with botulinum toxin and review the current data on use of the toxin to treat salivary gland disorders such as Frey\\'s syndrome, excessive salivation (sialorrhoea), focal and general hyperhidrosis, excessive lacrimation and chronic rhinitis.

  1. Cosmetic Effect of Botulinum Toxin In Focal Hyperhydrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhydrosis of axillae, palm and sole is not a very uncommon problem. It leads to great embarrassment and considerable emotional stress to the individuals. Botulinum toxins prevent the release of acetylcholine at nerve terminals, therefore, reduces sweat secretion. Six patients of axillary and 4 patients of palmer and planter hyperhydrosis were treated with botulinum toxin. All patients experienced relatively satisfactory reduction of hyperhydrosis for period ranging between 4-7 months. No adverse effects were observed. Botulinum toxin therefore can be considered as an effective treatment in focal hyperhydrosis.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cholera Toxin A-1 Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badshah Syed Lal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular dynamics (MD simulation study of the enzymatic portion of cholera toxin; cholera toxin A-1 polypeptide (CTA1 was performed at 283, 310 and 323 K. From total energy analysis it was observed that this toxin is stable thermodynamically and these outcomes were likewise confirmed by root mean square deviations (RMSD investigations. The Cα root mean square fluctuation (RMSF examinations revealed that there are a number of residues inside CTA1, which can be used as target for designing and synthesizing inhibitory drugs, in order to inactivate cholera toxin inside the human body. The fluctuations in the radius of gyration and hydrogen bonding in CTA1 proved that protein unfolding and refolding were normal routine phenomena in its structure at all temperatures. Solvent accessible surface area study identified the hydrophilic nature of the CTA1, and due to this property it can be a potential biological weapon. The structural identification (STRIDE algorithm for proteins was successfully used to determine the partially disordered secondary structure of CTA1. On account of this partially disordered secondary structure, it can easily deceive the proteolytic enzymes of the endoplasmic reticulum of host cells.

  3. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Jaw Motor Events during Sleep in Sleep Bruxism Patients: A Polysomnographic Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Young Joo; Lee, Moon Kyu; Kato, Takafumi; Park, Hyung Uk; Heo, Kyoung; Kim, Seong Taek

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on jaw motor episodes during sleep in patients with or without orofacial pain who did not respond to oral splint treatment. Methods: Twenty subjects with a clinical diagnosis of SB completed this study. Ten subjects received bilateral BoNT-A injections (25 U per muscle) into the masseter muscles only (group A), and the other 10 received the injections into both the masseter and temporalis muscles (group B). Video-polysomnographic (vPSG) recordings were made before and at 4 weeks after injection. Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) and orofacial activity (OFA) were scored and analyzed for several parameters (e.g., frequency of episodes, bursts per episode, episode duration). The peak amplitude of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the two muscles was also measured. Results: BoNT-A injection did not reduce the frequency, number of bursts, or duration for RMMA episodes in the two groups. The injection decreased the peak amplitude of EMG burst of RMMA episodes in the injected muscles (p < 0.001, repeated measure ANOVA) in both groups. At 4 weeks after injection, 9 subjects self-reported reduction of tooth grinding and 18 subjects self-reported reduction of morning jaw stiffness. Conclusions: A single BoNT-A injection is an effective strategy for controlling SB for at least a month. It reduces the intensity rather than the generation of the contraction in jaw-closing muscles. Future investigations on the efficacy and safety in larger samples over a longer follow-up period are needed before establishing management strategies for SB with BoNT-A. Citation: Shim YJ; Lee MK; Kato T; Park HU; Heo K; Kim ST. Effects of botulinum toxin on jaw motor events during sleep in sleep bruxism patients: a polysomnographic evaluation. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(3):291-298. PMID:24634627

  4. The efficiency of botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihut, Malgorzata; Ferendiuk, Ewa; Szewczyk, Michal; Kasprzyk, Katarzyna; Wieckiewicz, Mieszko

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction are often accompanied by symptoms of headache such as tension-type headache which is the most frequent spontaneous primary headache. Masseter muscle pain is commonly reported in this group. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficiency of intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections for treating masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. This prospective outcome study consisted of 42 subjects of both genders aged 19-48 years diagnosed with masseter muscle pain related to temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache. The subjects were treated by the intramuscular injection of 21 U (mice units) of botulinum toxin type A (Botox, Allergan) in the area of the greatest cross-section surface of both masseter bellies. Pain intensity was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS) and verbal numerical rating scale (VNRS) 1 week before the treatment and 24 weeks after the treatment. The obtained data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon matched pairs test (p ≤ 0,005). The results of this study showed a decrease in the number of referred pain episodes including a decrease in pain in the temporal region bilaterally, a reduction of analgesic drugs intake as well as a decrease in reported values of VAS and VNRS after injections (p = 0,000). The intramuscular botulinum toxin type A injections have been an efficient method of treatment for masseter muscle pain in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and tension-type headache.

  5. Progress on Botulinum Toxin Type A-Induced Pain Relief in the Field of Plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaona; Chen, Guocheng; Ren, Pengjie; Yang, Yan; Fan, Fei

    2017-11-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of Botulinum Toxin Type A (BTX-A) injections relieve pain in the field of plastic surgery and postoperative rehabilitation, and discuss the analgesic mechanism of BTX- A in plastics and related research progress. From appearance to September 1, 2016, PUBMED, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched, using the key words related to "Botulinum Toxin Type A" and "Pain." Furtherly, nonplastic surgery-related literature was excluded by manual screening. Eleven literatures met the inclusion criteria, including 6 prospective controlled cohorts, 4 patient series, and 1 retrospective cohort. These studies involved Lower Limb, Breast, Hallux, Amputees, and Temporomandibular joint disk disfigurement and enrolled 402 patients. Among the patients, 360 received intraoperative BTX-A injection at the time of the main surgical procedure, 16 injected postoperatively and 26 did not undergo surgery. And 85.32% reported pain alleviation and 69.96% got favorable side effects and no one occurred major adverse effects. But 1.83% accepted injections more than once. Mechanism analysis explained these studies' results and demonstrated the analgesic effectiveness of BTX-A in plastics with nociceptive pain, inflammatory pain, and neuropathic pain. The results suggest that BTX-A may induce postoperative pain associated with plastic surgeries relief. But the available data of outcome assessment involved in this review are inconsistent and failed to meet methodological rigor. And pain alleviations are influenced by many factors. So further randomized controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes are needed to support this practice, determine standard usage methods, and establish corresponding specification systems.

  6. An in vivo analysis of facial muscle change treated with botulinum toxin type A using digital image speckle correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Palmaccio, Samantha Palmaccio; Bui, Duc; Dagum, Alexander; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Been famous for clinical use from early 1980s, the neuromuscular blocking agent Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), has been used to reduce wrinkles for a long time. Only little research has been done to quantify the change of muscle contraction before and after injection and most research paper depend on subjective evaluation from both patients and surgeons. In our research, Digital Image Speckle Correlation (DISC) was employed to study the mechanical properties of skin, contraction mode of muscles (injected) and reaction of neighbor muscle group (un-injected).At the same time, displacement patterns (vector maps)generated by DISC can predict injection locus for surgeons who normally handle it depending only on visual observation.

  7. Botulinum Toxin Dosing Trends in Spasmodic Dysphonia Over a 20-year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namin, Arya W; Christopher, Kara M; Eisenbeis, John F

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to (1) identify the botulinum toxin (BTX) dosing trend in a cohort of patients who received at least 20 injections for the treatment of adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD), (2) describe two distinct BTX dosing trends in treating ADSD (a "classic" dosing trend that initially decreases before stabilizing, and a "fluctuating" dosing trend), and (3) determine if patients with the "classic" dosing trend differed in age or in dosing intervals from those with the "fluctuating" dosing trend. This is a retrospective case series. Of 149 patients who received a total of 2484 BTX injections for the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia in 1993-2013, 49 patients received at least 20 injections. The BTX dose and the interval between doses were recorded. The mean dose of injections 1-20 was determined. The age at initial injection, initial dose, and interval in days between treatments were compared for the "fluctuating" and "classic" groups. The cohort exhibits a significant decrease in dose during the first 10-15 injections. The "fluctuating" group had a significantly shorter interval between injections (mean interval = 97.09 days, SD = 29.41; mean interval = 136.90 days, SD = 43.76, P = 0.002). The mean age at initial dose was not significantly different between the "classic" and "fluctuating" groups. The average BTX dose of patients with ADSD who receive long-term injections significantly decreases during the initial 10-15 injections before stabilizing. Patients who exhibit the "fluctuating" dosing pattern have a significantly shorter interval between injections than those with the "classic" dosing pattern. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Botulinum toxin treatment of false vocal folds in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: Functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C Blake; Lee, Christopher T; Hatcher, Jeanne L; Michalek, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Supraglottic injection of botulinum toxin (Botox) has been described as an effective treatment for adductor spasmodic dysphonia (ADSD). Anecdotal evidence suggests that the patients have little to no breathiness after injection, but no formal longitudinal studies have been carried out to date. The purpose of this study was to examine the voice outcomes in patients with ADSD after supraglottic Botox injection. Retrospective case series. Patients with ADSD who were treated with supraglottic Botox injections completed a qualitative self-evaluation of voice function after injection using the percentage of normal function (PNF) scale, a validated, quantitative scale from 0% (no function) to 100% (normal function). Posttreatment voice improvement after injection was determined using a Voice Handicap Index-10 (VHI-10) questionnaire. A total of 198 supraglottic injections were performed between July 2011 and October 2014. Twenty-five questionnaires were completed. Mean postinjection PNF was 95.0% ± 8.4% and was significantly increased from the preinjection mean PNF (62.5%) ± 22.6% (P < 0.001). The mean best VHI-10 for all injections was 7.23. In 19 of 25 patients (76%), there was no reduction in PNF in the early postinjection period. In the remaining six patients (24%), the decline in mean vocal function was 9.2%. Supraglottic Botox injection is an effective treatment for ADSD. Postinjection voice is significantly improved, and the majority of patients do not experience breathy voice/decline in vocal function after injection. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Off Label Use of Botulinum Toxin in Children under Two Years of Age: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Druschel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of children with cerebral palsy with Botulinum Toxin is considered safe and effective, but is only approved for children older than two years of age. The effect of BoNT-A injection on juvenile skeletal muscle especially on neuromuscular junction density, distribution and morphology is poorly delineated and concerns of irreversible damage to the motor endplates especially in young children exist. In contrast, earlier treatment could be appropriate to improve the attainment of motor milestones and general motor development. This review systematically analyzes the evidence regarding this hypothesis. A database search, including PubMed and Medline databases, was performed and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing the efficacy of Botulinum Toxin in children younger than two years were identified. Two authors independently extracted the data and the methods of all identified trials were assessed. Three RCTs met the inclusion criteria. The results of the analysis revealed an improvement in spasticity of the upper and lower extremities as well as in the range of motion in the joints of the lower limbs. However, evidence of an improvement of general motor development could not be found, as the assessment of this area was not completely specified for this patient group. Based on available evidence it can not be concluded that Botulinum Toxin treatment in children younger than two years improves the achievement of motor milestones. However, there is evidence for the reduction of spasticity, avoiding contractures and delaying surgery. Due to some limitations, the results of this review should be cautiously interpreted. More studies, long-term follow up independent high-quality RCTs with effectiveness analyses are needed.

  10. Three-Dimensional Structure Determination of Botulinum Toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stevens, Ray

    1997-01-01

    ...) Based on the structure of the neurotoxin, understand the toxins mechanism of action. We have accomplished the first goal of determining the three-dimensional structure of the 150 kD botulinum neurotoxin serotype...

  11. Three-Dimensional Structure Determination of Botulinum Toxin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stevens, Ray

    1998-01-01

    ...) Based on the structure of the neurotoxin, understand the toxins mechanism of action. We have accomplished the first goal of determining the three-dimensional structure of the 150 kD botulinum neurotoxin serotype...

  12. Update on botulinum neurotoxin use in aesthetic dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Omer; Keller, Emily C; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum toxins are among the most widely studied and versatile drugs in the medicinal market. Since their extraction from Clostridium botulinum, they have been harnessed and incorporated into different formulations with varied properties and actions. These products have been used to treat countless disorders such as musculoskeletal disorders, headaches, and eye disorders, among many others. In the realm of aesthetic cutaneous medicine, the evolution and creativity in the use of botulinum toxins has been swift and ever changing. Knowledge of the science and innovation behind this toxin enables the user to provide the patient with a variety of treatment options founded in evidence-based medicine. This review will highlight the properties and actions of the newer, more recent neurotoxin preparations, as well as some of the latest and novel therapeutic applications of botulinum toxins.

  13. Historical Perspectives and Guidelines for Botulinum Neurotoxin Subtype Nomenclature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Peck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins are diverse proteins. They are currently represented by at least seven serotypes and more than 40 subtypes. New clostridial strains that produce novel neurotoxin variants are being identified with increasing frequency, which presents challenges when organizing the nomenclature surrounding these neurotoxins. Worldwide, researchers are faced with the possibility that toxins having identical sequences may be given different designations or novel toxins having unique sequences may be given the same designations on publication. In order to minimize these problems, an ad hoc committee consisting of over 20 researchers in the field of botulinum neurotoxin research was convened to discuss the clarification of the issues involved in botulinum neurotoxin nomenclature. This publication presents a historical overview of the issues and provides guidelines for botulinum neurotoxin subtype nomenclature in the future.

  14. Long-Term Resolution of Severe Ankle Contractures Using Botulinum Toxin, Serial Casting, Splinting, and Motor Retraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Joan; Stroud, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Serial casting for ankle contractures is traditionally performed in prone, a position that patients may not easily tolerate. Also, although serial casting is effective in correcting contracture, its effect dissipates quickly. This case report describes a procedure for performing casting for ankle contractures in a supine or sitting position. It also describes a process that enables the effect of serial casting to be maintained long term. Client Description: The client was an adult who had suffered traumatic brain injury and severe bilateral ankle contractures. Intervention: He received botulinum toxin and serial casting for his bilateral ankle contractures, one ankle at 8 months and the other at 13 months after the injury. He then underwent a programme of splinting and motor training. Measures and Outcome: The client gained more than 40° dorsiflexion for both ankles after receiving botulinum toxin injections and serial casting. The improvement in ankle range enabled him to progress to walking practice. Ankle splinting was gradually reduced. On discharge at 25 months post-injury, the ankle joint range was maintained. Implications: The use of botulinum toxin and serial casting, followed by an intensive programme of splinting and motor training, may be an option to consider for effective long-term resolution of severe contractures after acquired brain injury.

  15. Clinical Study of New Tetravalent (Type A, B, E, and F) Botulinum Toxoid Vaccine Derived from M Toxin in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Yasushi; Sugimoto, Nakaba; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Morokuma, Kazunori; Horikawa, Yoshikane; Ginnaga, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Takahashi, Motohide

    2017-07-24

    Botulinum toxin is the most poisonous substance known, and is believed to be a highly lethal as a biological weapon; researchers of the toxin are exposed to this hazard. Botulinum toxoid vaccines have been produced and used in Japan. However, since clinical studies involving these vaccines were conducted before establishment of the Ethical Guidelines for Clinical Research in Japan, their immunogenicity and safety were not systematically assessed. In this study, we produced a new tetravalent (type A, B, E, and F) botulinum toxoid vaccine, the first ever to be derived from M toxin, and conducted quality control tests with reference to the Minimum Requirements in Japan for adsorbed tetanus toxoid vaccine. Subsequently, a clinical study using the new vaccine in 48 healthy adult volunteers was conducted according to the guidelines in Japan. No clinically serious adverse event was noted. Neutralizing antibody titers for each type of toxin in the participants' sera, 1 month after the 4th injection were more than 0.25 IU/mL, indicating sufficient protection. This study demonstrated that the vaccine has marked immunogenicity and is safe for use in humans.

  16. Effect of botulinum toxin for eyelid retraction in dysthyroid ophthalmopathy as related to hypertrophy of intraorbital muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Noriko; Kozaki, Ai; Yu, Fumihiko; Inoue, Rishu; Maeda, Toshine; Inoue, Toyoko; Inoue, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the effect of botulinum toxin for eyelid retraction in dysthyroid ophthalmopathy with or without hypertrophy of intraorbital muscles. We reviewed 28 eyes of 23 cases who received injection of botulinum toxin for eyelid retraction. Eyelid retraction improved in 23 eyes (82%). The height of palpebral fissure ranged from 8 to 12 mm, average 10.8 mm, before treatment. It ranged from 5 to 12 mm, average 9.4 mm, 2 weeks after treatment. The difference was significant. By magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hypertrophy of levator and/or superior rectus muscle was present in 19 eyes and absent in 9 eyes. Eyelid retraction improved in 2 eyes (11%) in the former group and in one eye (11%) in the latter. Dalrymple sign was present in 28 eyes before and disappeared in 14 eyes after treatment. Graefe sign was present in 28 eyes before and disappeared in one eye after treatment. Botulinum toxin is effective for eyelid retraction and not for Graefe sign in dysthyroid ophthalmopathy. (author)

  17. Investigation of Clostridium botulinum group III's mobilome content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woudstra, Cédric; Le Maréchal, Caroline; Souillard, Rozenn; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Bano, Luca; Bayon-Auboyer, Marie-Hélène; Koene, Miriam; Mermoud, Isabelle; Brito, Roseane B; Lobato, Francisco C F; Silva, Rodrigo O S; Dorner, Martin B; Fach, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Clostridium botulinum group III is mainly responsible for botulism in animals. It could lead to high animal mortality rates and, therefore, represents a major environmental and economic concern. Strains of this group harbor the botulinum toxin locus on an unstable bacteriophage. Since the release of the first complete C. botulinum group III genome sequence (strain BKT015925), strains have been found to contain others mobile elements encoding for toxin components. In this study, seven assays targeting toxin genes present on the genetic mobile elements of C. botulinum group III were developed with the objective to better characterize C. botulinum group III strains. The investigation of 110 C. botulinum group III strains and 519 naturally contaminated samples collected during botulism outbreaks in Europe showed alpha-toxin and C2-I/C2-II markers to be systematically associated with type C/D bont-positive samples, which may indicate an important role of these elements in the pathogenicity mechanisms. On the contrary, bont type D/C strains and the related positive samples appeared to contain almost none of the markers tested. Interestingly, 31 bont-negative samples collected on farms after a botulism outbreak revealed to be positive for some of the genetic mobile elements tested. This suggests loss of the bont phage, either in farm environment after the outbreak or during laboratory handling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxina botulínica y su empleo en la patología oral y maxilofacial Botulinum toxin and its use in oral and maxillofacial pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martínez-Pérez

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: Las toxinas botulínicas son exotoxinas de la bacteria formadora de esporas Clostridim botulinum y los agentes causantes del botulismo. Cuando se inyecta en el músculo produce una parálisis flácida. El efecto clínico está directamente relacionado con la dosis y debe ajustarse para cada caso concreto. La Toxina botulínica ha demostrado en los más de veinte años en que se está utilizando que es un fármaco seguro. Las indicaciones de la toxina botulínica en la actualidad incluyen todas aquellas patologías que resultan de la hiperfunción muscular y la disfunción autonómica.Abstract: Botilinum toxins are exotoxins of the bacteria that form the Clostridium botulinum spores and the causative agents of botulism. When injected into the muscle flaccid paralysis is produced. The clinical effect is directly related with the dose and is should be adjusted for each particular case. over the last twenty years that it has been in use, the botulinum toxin has shown itself to be a reliable drug. Current indications for the use of botulinum toxin include all those pathologies which are the results of muscle hyperfunction and autonomic dysfunction.

  19. The convergence of medicine and neurotoxins: a focus on botulinum toxin type A and its application in aesthetic medicine--a global, evidence-based botulinum toxin consensus education initiative: part II: incorporating botulinum toxin into aesthetic clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Jean; Fournier, Nathalie; Kerscher, Martina; Ruiz-Avila, Javier; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R; Kaeuper, Gina

    2013-03-01

    The new world of safe aesthetic injectables has become increasingly popular with patients. Not only is there less risk than with surgery, but there is also significantly less downtime to interfere with patients' normal work and social schedules. Botulinum toxin (BoNT) type A (BoNTA) is an indispensable tool used in aesthetic medicine, and its broad appeal has made it a hallmark of modern culture. The key to using BoNTA to its best effect is to understand patient-specific factors that will determine the treatment plan and the physician's ability to personalize injection strategies. To present international expert viewpoints and consensus on some of the contemporary best practices in aesthetic BoNTA, so that beginner and advanced injectors may find pearls that provide practical benefits. Expert aesthetic physicians convened to discuss their approaches to treatment with BoNT. The discussions and consensus from this meeting were used to provide an up-to-date review of treatment strategies to improve patient results. Information is presented on patient management and assessment, documentation and consent, aesthetic scales, injection strategies, dilution, dosing, and adverse events. A range of product- and patient-specific factors influence the treatment plan. Truly optimized outcomes are possible only when the treating physician has the requisite knowledge, experience, and vision to use BoNTA as part of a unique solution for each patient's specific needs. © 2013 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Association of onabotulinum toxin A treatment with salivary pH and dental caries of neurologically impaired children with sialorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz Dos Santos, Beatriz; Dabbagh, Basma; Daniel, Sam J; Schwartz, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Sialorrhea is a common manifestation of several neurological disorders. The use of intraglandular onabotulinum toxin A (OBTXA) injection has been recognized to effectively treat sialorrhea. As OBTXA injection reduces salivary flow rate and alters salivary quality, its use may have a detrimental effect on oral health. To examine the effect of OBTXA injection on caries experience and salivary pH of neurologically impaired children with sialorrhea. Twenty-five children receiving OBTXA treatment and 25 control children were enrolled in the study. Whole saliva was collected to determine salivary pH. All participants underwent an interview on their dietary habits. Dental clinical examinations were carried out to evaluate caries experience and oral hygiene level. Overall, mean salivary pH value was significantly lower in the OBTXA group (6.92 ± 0.77) compared with the control group (7.36 ± 0.70). Caries activity was significantly higher in the OBTXA group (P = 0.01). The regression analyses showed a significant association between OBTXA treatment and salivary pH value (P = 0.03). Results from the logistic regression show that dental caries was significantly associated with OBTXA treatment (OR = 1.73, CI = 1.14-27.3). The study showed an intricate relationship between OBTXA treatment and oral findings. Hence, special dental care should be given to children receiving OBTXA treatment. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cellular and Matrix Response of the Mandibular Condylar Cartilage to Botulinum Toxin.

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    Eliane H Dutra

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cellular and matrix effects of botulinum toxin type A (Botox on mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC and subchondral bone.Botox (0.3 unit was injected into the right masseter of 5-week-old transgenic mice (Col10a1-RFPcherry at day 1. Left side masseter was used as intra-animal control. The following bone labels were intraperitoneally injected: calcein at day 7, alizarin red at day 14 and calcein at day 21. In addition, EdU was injected 48 and 24 hours before sacrifice. Mice were sacrificed 30 days after Botox injection. Experimental and control side mandibles were dissected and examined by x-ray imaging and micro-CT. Subsequently, MCC along with the subchondral bone was sectioned and stained with tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, EdU, TUNEL, alkaline phosphatase, toluidine blue and safranin O. In addition, we performed immunohistochemistry for pSMAD and VEGF.Bone volume fraction, tissue density and trabecular thickness were significantly decreased on the right side of the subchondral bone and mineralized cartilage (Botox was injected when compared to the left side. There was no significant difference in the mandibular length and condylar head length; however, the condylar width was significantly decreased after Botox injection. Our histology showed decreased numbers of Col10a1 expressing cells, decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis in the subchondral bone and mandibular condylar cartilage, decreased TRAP activity and mineralization of Botox injected side cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, we observed reduced proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan distribution and decreased expression of pSMAD 1/5/8 and VEGF in the MCC of the Botox injected side in comparison to control side.Injection of Botox in masseter muscle leads to decreased mineralization and matrix deposition, reduced chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and increased cell apoptosis in the MCC and subchondral bone.

  2. Botulinum Toxin as an Alternative to Treat the Spasm of the Near Reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laria, Carlos; Merino-Suárez, María L; Piñero, David P; Gómez-Hurtado, Arantxa; Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an eight-year-old girl with complaints of headaches and blurred vision (uncorrected visual acuity: 0.1 decimal) that showed on examination miotic pupils, pseudomyopia, no ocular motility restrictions, and no associated neurological disease. After initial treatment with cyclopentolate for two months, pseudomyopia persisted with an intermittent and variable esotropia. Spectacles of +1 both eyes and atropine 1% one drop daily were then prescribed. The situation improved and remained stable for several weeks, with pseudomyopia and esotropia reappearing later. Finally, botulinum toxin (2.5 iu Botox) was injected in the medial rectus muscle on two occasions and a visual therapy program based on the stimulation of fusional divergence, diplopia, and stereopsis consciousness was recommended. This prescription was combined with the use of atropine during the first few weeks. Orthotropia and corrected distance visual acuity of 1.0 were found three months after treatment. The evolution and clinical results of this case report suggest that botulinum toxin in combination with other therapeutic alternatives may be useful in the treatment of spasm of the near reflex.

  3. Critical analysis of the use of onabotulinumtoxinA (botulinum toxin type A in migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson CE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carrie E Robertson, Ivan GarzaDepartment of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: OnabotulinumtoxinA, a neurotoxin, has been studied in numerous trials as a novel preventive therapy for migraine headache. The data would support that it may be effective at reducing headache days in patients suffering from chronic migraine (≥15 headache days/month, with eight or more of those migraine headache days. The mechanism by which onabotulinumtoxinA exerts its effects on migraine is not yet understood. It is known to inhibit acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction, but this probably does not explain the observed antinociceptive properties noted in preclinical and clinical trials. This review will discuss the known mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin type A, and will review the available randomized, placebo-controlled trials that have looked at its efficacy as a migraine preventative. We also describe the onabotulinumtoxinA injection sites used at our institution.Keywords: botulinum toxin, prophylaxis, onabotulinumtoxinA, mechanism, migraine, prevention

  4. Initial North American experience with botulinum toxin type A for treatment of anismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, J S; Agachan, F; Wolff, B; Nogueras, J J; Wexner, S D

    1996-10-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A), produced by Clostridium botulinum, is a potent neurotoxin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of BTX-A for treatment of anismus. All patients treated with BTX-A for anismus were evaluated. Eligibility criteria included a history of chronic assisted evacuation (laxatives, enemas, or suppositories), demonstration of anismus by cinedefecogram and electromyography, and failure of a minimum of three sessions of supervised biofeedback therapy (BF). Contingent on body mass, 6 to 15 units of BTX-A was injected bilaterally under electromyography guidance into the external sphincter or the puborectalis muscle. Treatment was repeated as necessary for a maximum of three sessions during a three-month period. Success was considered as discontinuation of evacuatory assistance and was evaluated between one and three months and again at up to one year. Between July 1994 and May 1995, four patients ranging from 29 to 82 years in age (2 females, 2 males) had anismus that failed to respond to between 3 and 15 biofeedback sessions. All patients improved between one and three months after BTX-A injection, and two had sustained improvement for a range of three months to one year. There was no morbidity or mortality associated with BTX-A injection. BTX-A is extremely successful for temporary treatment of anismus that is refractory to BF management. However, because the mechanism of action is short, longer term results are only 50 percent successful. Hopefully, modifications in the strain of BTX-A and dose administered will allow longer periods of success or a repeat trial of BF. Nonetheless, this preliminary report is very encouraging in offering a method of managing this recalcitrant condition.

  5. Single-fiber electromyography analysis of botulinum toxin diffusion in patients with fatigue and pseudobotulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruet, Alexis; Durand, Marie Christine; Denys, Pierre; Lofaso, Frederic; Genet, François; Schnitzler, Alexis

    2015-06-01

    To characterize electromyographic abnormalities according to symptoms (asymptomatic, fatigue, pseudobotulism) reported 1 month after botulinum toxin injection. Retrospective, single-center study comparing single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG) in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC) or orbicularis oculi (OO) muscles. Hospital. Four groups of adults treated for spasticity or neurologic bladder hyperactivity (N=55): control group (asymptomatic patients: n=17), fatigue group (unusual fatigue with no weakness: n=15), pseudobotulism group (muscle weakness and/or visual disturbance: n=20), and botulism group (from intensive care unit of the same hospital: n=3). Not applicable. Mean jitter, percentage of pathologic fibers, and percentage of blocked fibers were compared between groups. SFEMG was abnormal for 17.6% of control patients and 75% of patients in the pseudobotulism group. There were no differences between the control and fatigue groups. Mean jitter, percentage of pathologic fibers, and percentage of blocked fibers of the EDC muscle were significantly higher in the pseudobotulism group than in the fatigue and control groups. There were no differences between groups for the OO muscle. The SFEMG results in the botulism group were qualitatively similar to those of the pseudobotulism group. SFEMG of the EDC muscle confirmed diffusion of the toxin into muscles distant from the injection site in the pseudobotulism group. SFEMG in the OO muscle is not useful for the diagnosis of diffusion. No major signs of diffusion of botulinum toxin type A were found away from the injection site in patients with fatigue but no motor weakness. Such fatigue may be related to other mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Saccharomyces boulardii protease inhibits Clostridium difficile toxin A effects in the rat ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagliuolo, I; LaMont, J T; Nikulasson, S T; Pothoulakis, C

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii, a nonpathogenic yeast, is effective in treating some patients with Clostridium difficile diarrhea and colitis. We have previously reported that S. boulardii inhibits rat ileal secretion in response to C. difficile toxin A possibly by releasing a protease that digests the intestinal receptor for this toxin (C. Pothoulakis, C. P. Kelly, M. A. Joshi, N. Gao, C. J. O'Keane, I. Castagliuolo, and J. T. LaMont, Gastroenterology 104: 1108-1115, 1993). The aim of this study was to purify and characterize this protease. S. boulardii protease was partially purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 and octyl-Sepharose. The effect of S. boulardii protease on rat ileal secretion, epithelial permeability, and morphology in response to toxin A was examined in rat ileal loops in vivo. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified S. boulardii protease revealed a major band at 54 kDa. Pretreatment of rat ileal brush border (BB) membranes with partially purified protease reduced specific toxin A receptor binding (by 26%). Partially purified protease digested the toxin A molecule and significantly reduced its binding to BB membranes in vitro (by 42%). Preincubation of toxin A with S. boulardii protease inhibited ileal secretion (46% inhibition, P < 0.01), mannitol permeability (74% inhibition, P < 0.01), and histologic damage caused by toxin A. Thus, S. boulardii protease inhibits the intestinal effects of C. difficile toxin A by proteolysis of the toxin and inhibition of toxin A binding to its BB receptor. Our results may be relevant to the mechanism by which S. boulardii exerts its protective effects in C. difficile infection in humans. PMID:8945570

  7. Epidemiologic Overview of Synkinesis in 353 Patients with Longstanding Facial Paralysis under Treatment with Botulinum Toxin for 11 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Alessandra Grassi; da Costa, Eduardo Fernandes; Ferreira, Marcus Castro; Remigio, Adelina Fatima do Nascimento; Moraes, Luciana Borsoi; Gemperli, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    Patients with longstanding facial paralysis often exhibit synkinesis. Few reports describe the prevalence and factors related to the development of synkinesis after facial paralysis. Botulinum toxin type A injection is an important adjunct treatment for facial paralysis-induced asymmetry and synkinesis. The authors assessed the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of patients with sequelae of facial paralysis treated with botulinum toxin type A injections to evaluate the prevalence of synkinesis and related factors. A total of 353 patients (age, 4 to 84 years; 245 female patients) with longstanding facial paralysis underwent 2312 botulinum toxin type A injections during an 11-year follow-up. Doses used over the years, previous treatments (electrical stimulation, operations), and how they correlated to postparalysis and postreanimation synkinesis were analyzed. There was a significant association between cause and surgery. Most patients with facial paralysis caused by a congenital defect, trauma, or a tumor underwent reanimation. There were no sex- or synkinesis-related differences in the doses used, but the doses were higher in the reanimation group than in the no-surgery group. Synkinesis was found in 196 patients; 148 (41.9 percent) presented with postparalysis synkinesis (oro-ocular, oculo-oral) and 58 (16.4 percent) presented with postreanimation synkinesis. Ten patients presented with both types. This study determined the high prevalence (55.5 percent) of synkinesis in patients with longstanding facial paralysis. Postparalysis synkinesis was positively associated with infectious and idiopathic causes, electrical stimulation, facial nerve decompression, and no requirement for surgery. Postreanimation synkinesis was present in 28.2 percent of reanimated patients and was significantly associated with microsurgical flaps, transfacial nerve grafting, masseteric-facial anastomosis, and temporalis muscle transfers.

  8. Botulinum toxin drugs: brief history and outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, D

    2016-03-01

    The global botulinum toxin (BT) market is currently undergoing rapid changes: this may be the time to review the history and the future of BT drug development. Since the early 1990s Botox(®) and Dysport(®) dominated the international BT market. Later, Myobloc(®)/NeuroBloc(®), a liquid BT type B drug, came out, but failed. Xeomin(®) is the latest major BT drug. It features removal of complexing proteins and improved neurotoxin purity. Several new BT drugs are coming out of Korea, China and Russia. Scientific challenges for BT drug development include modification of BT's duration of action, its transdermal transport and the design of BT hybrid drugs for specific target tissues. The increased competition will change the global BT market fundamentally and a re-organisation according to large indication groups, such as therapeutic and cosmetic applications, might occur.

  9. Botulinum toxin type a for chronic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Avi

    2010-03-01

    Chronic migraine (CM) is the leading cause of chronic daily headache, a common and debilitating headache syndrome. The management of CM patients is challenging, with only limited benefit from available oral preventive medications. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) has been used extensively to treat disorders associated with increased muscle tone. More recent scientific data support an analgesic effect of the toxin. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of BoNT make it an appealing candidate for migraine prevention. Results from older clinical trials on the efficacy of the toxin in CM were inconclusive. However, recent trials using more stringent inclusion criteria have shown positive results, supporting the use of the toxin in some patients with this disorder. This review summarizes the scientific data on the analgesic properties of BoNT, as well as the clinical data on the efficacy of the toxin in treating CM.

  10. [Applications of botulinum toxin in Neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro J

    2013-07-07

    At present, botulinum toxin (BT) is one of the most fundamental available drugs in Neurology, only comparable with levodopa. BT is currently used in those entities characterized by excessive muscle contraction, including dystonia and spasticity. In addition, BT has been used to control pain associated with increased muscle contraction in dystonia and spasticity, but also is useful to control chronic pain not associated with muscle contraction, such as chronic daily headache. Finally, BT is useful in sialorrhoea and bruxism. The mechanism of action is complex, mainly acting on terminal neuromuscular junction, but also exhibiting analgesic properties, probably through inhibition of pain neurotransmitters release. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a quail embryo model for the detection of botulinum toxin type A activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous microorganism which under certain anaerobic conditions can produce botulinum toxins. Due to concerns in regards to both food-borne illness and the potential use of botulinum toxin as a biological weapon, the capability to assess the amount of toxin in a food or...

  12. Testosterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection works by supplying synthetic testosterone to replace the testosterone that is normally ... as a pellet to be injected under the skin.Testosterone injection may control your symptoms but will ...

  13. Structural constraints-based evaluation of immunogenic avirulent toxins from Clostridium botulinum C2 and C3 toxins as subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisilla, A; Prathiviraj, R; Sasikala, R; Chellapandi, P

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum (group-III) is an anaerobic bacterium producing C2 and C3 toxins in addition to botulinum neurotoxins in avian and mammalian cells. C2 and C3 toxins are members of bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase superfamily, which modify the eukaryotic cell surface proteins by ADP-ribosylation reaction. Herein, the mutant proteins with lack of catalytic and pore forming function derived from C2 (C2I and C2II) and C3 toxins were computationally evaluated to understand their structure-function integrity. We have chosen many structural constraints including local structural environment, folding process, backbone conformation, conformational dynamic sub-space, NAD-binding specificity and antigenic determinants for screening of suitable avirulent toxins. A total of 20 avirulent mutants were identified out of 23 mutants, which were experimentally produced by site-directed mutagenesis. No changes in secondary structural elements in particular to α-helices and β-sheets and also in fold rate of all-β classes. Structural stability was maintained by reordered hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding patterns. Molecular dynamic studies suggested that coupled mutations may restrain the binding affinity to NAD(+) or protein substrate upon structural destabilization. Avirulent toxins of this study have stable energetic backbone conformation with a common blue print of folding process. Molecular docking studies revealed that avirulent mutants formed more favorable hydrogen bonding with the side-chain of amino acids near to conserved NAD-binding core, despite of restraining NAD-binding specificity. Thus, structural constraints in the avirulent toxins would determine their immunogenic nature for the prioritization of protein-based subunit vaccine/immunogens to avian and veterinary animals infected with C. botulinum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF BOTULINUM TOXIN TYPE B IN MOVEMENT DISORDERS AND AUTONOMIC SYMPTOMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-hua Wan; Kevin Dat Vuong; Joseph Jankovic

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate efficacy and safety of botulinum toxin type B (BTX-B) in treatment of movement disorders including blepharospasm, oromandibular dystonia, hemifacial spasm, tremor, tics, and hypersecretory disorders such as sialorrhea and hyperhidrosis.Methods A retrospective study of BTX-B injections in treatment of 58 patients with various neurological disorders was performed. The mean follow-up time was 0.9 ± 0.8 years. Results of the first and last treatment of patients with at least 3injection sessions were compared.Results The response of 58 patients to a total of 157 BTX-B treatment sessions was analyzed. Of the 157 treatment sessions, 120 sessions (76.4%) resulted in moderate or marked improvement while 17 sessions (10.8%) had no response.The clinical benefits after BTX-B treatment lasted an average of 14 weeks. Of the 41 patients with at least 3 injection sessions (mean 10 ± 8.6), most patients needed increased dosage upon the last session compared to the first session. Nineteen patients (32.8%) with 27 sessions (17.2%) reported adverse effects with BTX-B treatment.Conclusios Though most patients require increased dosage to maintain effective response after repeated injections,BTX-B is an effective and safe treatment drug for a variety of movement disorders, as well as drooling and hyperhidrosis.

  15. Botulinum toxin is detrimental to repair of a chronic rotator cuff tear in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilotra, Mohit; Nguyen, Thao; Christian, Matthew; Davis, Derik; Henn, R Frank; Hasan, Syed Ashfaq

    2015-08-01

    Re-tear continues to be a problem after rotator cuff repair. Intramuscular botulinum toxin (Botox) injection can help optimize tension at the repair site to promote healing but could have an adverse effect on the degenerated muscle in a chronic tear. We hypothesized that Botox injection would improve repair characteristics without adverse effect on the muscle in a chronic rotator cuff tear model. The supraspinatus tendon of both shoulders in 14 rabbits underwent delayed repair 12 weeks after transection. One shoulder was treated with intramuscular Botox injection and the other with a saline control injection. Six weeks after repair, outcomes were based on biomechanics, histology, and magnetic resonance imaging. Botox-treated repairs were significantly weaker (2.64 N) than control repairs (5.51 N, p = 0.03). Eighty percent of Botox-treated repairs and 40% of control repairs healed with some partial defect. Fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus was present in all shoulders (Goutallier Grade 3 or 4) but was increased in the setting of Botox. This study provides additional support for the rabbit supraspinatus model of chronic cuff tear, showing consistent fatty infiltration. Contrary to our hypothesis, Botox had a negative effect on repair strength and might increase fatty infiltration. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. An Open Study of Botulinum-A Toxin Treatment of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is a unilateral, recurrent, sharp facial pain disorder that is limited to the distribution of divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A for alleviating the frequency and severity of TN pain. Materials and Methods: This trial was performed as a before and after study. We treated 31 patients (15 male and 16 female with mean age of 52 year old that their diagnosis was made at least 4.5 years before. We injected BTX-A in various parts of face and particularly in the origin of mandibular and maxillary branches of trigeminal nerve. Injection volume was determined by the necessity and pain intensity measured with visual analog scale up to 100U. Patients were evaluated before and after the injection and were followed after week, and each month, for a three months period. Other related variables were recorded such as: toxin complications, pain status variations by brushing, chewing, cold weather and patient’s satisfaction with their therapy. Results: showed that after injection, pain intensity and frequency decreased after tooth brushing, chewing and cold weather (P

  17. Critical analysis of the use of onabotulinumtoxinA (botulinum toxin type A) in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carrie E; Garza, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    OnabotulinumtoxinA, a neurotoxin, has been studied in numerous trials as a novel preventive therapy for migraine headache. The data would support that it may be effective at reducing headache days in patients suffering from chronic migraine (≥15 headache days/month, with eight or more of those migraine headache days). The mechanism by which onabotulinumtoxinA exerts its effects on migraine is not yet understood. It is known to inhibit acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction, but this probably does not explain the observed antinociceptive properties noted in preclinical and clinical trials. This review will discuss the known mechanisms of action of botulinum toxin type A, and will review the available randomized, placebo-controlled trials that have looked at its efficacy as a migraine preventative. We also describe the onabotulinumtoxinA injection sites used at our institution.

  18. Purification and characterization of a novel subtype a3 botulinum neurotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepp, William H; Lin, Guangyun; Johnson, Eric A

    2012-05-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by Clostridium botulinum are of considerable importance due to their being the cause of human and animal botulism, their potential as bioterrorism agents, and their utility as important pharmaceuticals. Type A is prominent due to its high toxicity and long duration of action. Five subtypes of type A BoNT are currently recognized; BoNT/A1, -/A2, and -/A5 have been purified, and their properties have been studied. BoNT/A3 is intriguing because it is not effectively neutralized by polyclonal anti-BoNT/A1 antibodies, and thus, it may potentially replace BoNT/A1 for patients who have become refractive to treatment with BoNT/A1 due to antibody formation or other modes of resistance. Purification of BoNT/A3 has been challenging because of its low levels of production in culture and the need for innovative purification procedures. In this study, modified Mueller-Miller medium was used in place of traditional toxin production medium (TPM) to culture C. botulinum A3 (CDC strain) and boost toxin production. BoNT/A3 titers were at least 10-fold higher than those produced in TPM. A purification method was developed to obtain greater than 95% pure BoNT/A3. The specific toxicity of BoNT/A3 as determined by mouse bioassay was 5.8 × 10(7) 50% lethal doses (LD(50))/mg. Neutralization of BoNT/A3 toxicity by a polyclonal anti-BoNT/A1 antibody was approximately 10-fold less than the neutralization of BoNT/A1 toxicity. In addition, differences in symptoms were observed between mice that were injected with BoNT/A3 and those that were injected with BoNT/A1. These results indicate that BoNT/A3 has novel biochemical and pharmacological properties compared to those of other subtype A toxins.

  19. Efficacy of botulinum toxin in treating myofascial pain in bruxers: a controlled placebo pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Manfredini, Daniele; Salamone, Milena; Salmaso, Luigi; Tonello, Stefano; Ferronato, Giuseppe

    2008-04-01

    The present investigation is a preliminary double-blind, controlled placebo, randomized clinical trial with a six month follow-up period. The study aimed to assess the efficacy of type A botulinum toxin (Botox, Allergan, Inc. Irvine, CA) to treat myofascial pain symptoms and to reduce muscle hyperactivity in bruxers. Twenty patients (ten males, ten females; age range 25-45) with a clinical diagnosis of bruxism and myofascial pain of the masticatory muscles were enrolled in a double-blind, controlled placebo, randomized clinical trial, with a treatment group (ten subjects treated with botulinum toxin injections- BTX-A) and a control group (ten subjects treated with saline placebo injections). A number of objective and subjective clinical parameters (pain at rest and during chewing; mastication efficiency; maximum nonassisted and assisted mouth opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements; functional limitation during usual jaw movements; subjective efficacy of the treatment; tolerance of the treatment) were assessed at baseline time and at one week, one month, and six months follow-up appointments. Descriptive analysis showed that improvements in both objective (range of mandibular movements) and subjective (pain at rest; pain during chewing) clinical outcome variables were higher in the Botox treated group than in the placebo treated subjects. Patients treated with BTX-A had a higher subjective improvement in their perception of treatment efficacy than the placebo subjects. Differences were not significant in some cases due to the small sample size. Results from the present study supported the efficacy of BTX-A to reduce myofascial pain symptoms in bruxers, and provided pilot data which need to be confirmed by further research using larger samples.

  20. Botulinum toxin type A products are not interchangeable: a review of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brin MF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitchell F Brin,1,2 Charmaine James,3 John Maltman1 1Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 2Department of Neurology, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Allergan, Marlow, UKAbstract: Botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA products are injectable biologic medications derived from Clostridium botulinum bacteria. Several different BoNTA products are marketed in various countries, and they are not interchangeable. Differences between products include manufacturing processes, formulations, and the assay methods used to determine units of biological activity. These differences result in a specific set of interactions between each BoNTA product and the tissue injected. Consequently, the products show differences in their in vivo profiles, including preclinical dose response curves and clinical dosing, efficacy, duration, and safety/adverse events. Most, but not all, published studies document these differences, suggesting that individual BoNTA products act differently depending on experimental and clinical conditions, and these differences may not always be predictable. Differentiation through regulatory approvals provides a measure of confidence in safety and efficacy at the specified doses for each approved indication. Moreover, the products differ in the amount of study to which they have been subjected, as evidenced by the number of publications in the peer-reviewed literature and the quantity and quality of clinical studies. Given that BoNTAs are potent biological products that meet important clinical needs, it is critical to recognize that their dosing and product performance are not interchangeable and each product should be used according to manufacturer guidelines.Keywords: onabotulinumtoxinA, abobotulinumtoxinA, incobotulinumtoxinA, glabellar lines, non-interchangeability

  1. Occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum among healthy dairy animals: an emerging public health hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Hamza, Dalia A

    2016-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of human pathogenic Clostridium botulinum in the feces of dairy animals. Fecal samples were collected from 203 apparently healthy dairy animals (50 cattle, 50 buffaloes, 52 sheep, 51 goats). Samples were cultured to recover C. botulinum while human pathogenic C. botulinum strains were identified after screening of all C. botulinum isolates for the presence of genes that encode toxins type A, B, E, F. The overall prevalence of C. botulinum was 18.7% whereas human pathogenic C. botulinum strains (only type A) were isolated from six animals at the rates of 2, 2, 5.8, and 2% for cattle, buffaloes, sheep, and goats, respectively. High fecal carriage rates of C. botulinum among apparently healthy dairy animals especially type A alarm both veterinary and public health communities for a potential role which may be played by dairy animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen.

  2. Combinatorial Strategies and Hypothesis-Based Drug Design in Drug Discovery Targeted to the Protease and Channel Activities of Botulinum Toxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

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  3. Botulinum neurotoxin vaccines: Past history and recent developments.