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Sample records for botrytis cinerea pathogenesis

  1. The role of pectin degradation in pathogenesis of Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, I.

    2007-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a fungal plant pathogen that causes soft rot in many plant species. During the infection process, from the moment a conidium lands on the plant surface until complete host colonization, the fungus secretes numerous enzymes and metabolites that may contribute to virulence. Among

  2. Deficiencies in jasmonate-mediated plant defense reveal quantitative variation in Botrytis cinerea pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Rowe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the described central role of jasmonate signaling in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens, the existence of intraspecific variation in pathogen capacity to activate or evade plant jasmonate-mediated defenses is rarely considered. Experimental infection of jasmonate-deficient and jasmonate-insensitive Arabidopsis thaliana with diverse isolates of the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea revealed pathogen variation for virulence inhibition by jasmonate-mediated plant defenses and induction of plant defense metabolites. Comparison of the transcriptional effects of infection by two distinct B. cinerea isolates showed only minor differences in transcriptional responses of wild-type plants, but notable isolate-specific transcript differences in jasmonate-insensitive plants. These transcriptional differences suggest B. cinerea activation of plant defenses that require plant jasmonate signaling for activity in response to only one of the two B. cinerea isolates tested. Thus, similar infection phenotypes observed in wild-type plants result from different signaling interactions with the plant that are likely integrated by jasmonate signaling.

  3. Infection strategies of Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, van J.A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a ubiquitous filamentous fungal pathogen of a wide range of plant species. The fungus is able to infect all aerial parts of its host plants to a certain extent. Infection may cause enormous damage both during plant growth and in the post-harvest phase (during cold storage or

  4. The autophagy-related gene BcATG1 is involved in fungal development and pathogenesis in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weichao; Zhang, Zhihui; Shao, Wenyong; Yang, Yalan; Zhou, Mingguo; Chen, Changjun

    2017-02-01

    Autophagy, a ubiquitous intracellular degradation process, is conserved from yeasts to humans. It serves as a major survival function during nutrient depletion stress and is crucial for correct growth and differentiation. In this study, we characterized an atg1 orthologue Bcatg1 in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays showed that the expression of BcATG1 was up-regulated under carbon or nitrogen starvation conditions. BcATG1 could functionally restore the survival defects of the yeast ATG1 mutant during nitrogen starvation. Deletion of BcATG1 (ΔBcatg1) inhibited autophagosome accumulation in the vacuoles of nitrogen-starved cells. ΔBcatg1 was dramatically impaired in vegetative growth, conidiation and sclerotial formation. In addition, most conidia of ΔBcatg1 lost the capacity to form the appressorium infection structure and failed to penetrate onion epidermis. Pathogenicity assays showed that the virulence of ΔBcatg1 on different host plant tissues was drastically impaired, which was consistent with its inability to form an appressorium. Moreover, lipid droplet accumulation was significantly reduced in the conidia of ΔBcatg1, but the glycerol content was increased. All of the defects of ΔBcatg1 were complemented by re-introduction of an intact copy of the wild-type BcATG1 into the mutant. These results indicate that BcATG1 plays a critical role in numerous developmental processes and is essential to the pathogenesis of B. cinerea. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  5. Interaction Between Botrytis Cinerea and Grapevine

    OpenAIRE

    Safni, Irda

    2002-01-01

    Hama-Irda Safni2 The fungus Botrytis sp. causes a serious disease on many important crops, such as strawberry, grapevine, onion, apples, and many ornamental plants. On grapevines, the causal pathogen is the fungus Botrytis cinerea or Botryotinia fuckeliana, a saprophytic mold of the grouping Ascomycetes

  6. A gapless genome sequence of the fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, Van Jan A.L.; Stassen, Joost H.M.; Mosbach, Andreas; Lee, Van Der Theo A.J.; Faino, Luigi; Farmer, Andrew D.; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Zhou, Shiguo; Seidl, Michael F.; Cottam, Eleanor; Edel, Dominique; Hahn, Matthias; Schwartz, David C.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Widdison, Stephanie; Scalliet, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Following earlier incomplete and fragmented versions of a genome sequence for the grey mould Botrytis cinerea, a gapless, near-finished genome sequence for B. cinerea strain B05.10 is reported. The assembly comprised 18 chromosomes and was confirmed by an optical map and a genetic map based on

  7. Sensitivity of Botrytis cinerea isolates against some fungicides used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During August 2004 and 2005, isolates of Botrytis cinerea were collected from table and wine grapes in the Trakya region, Turkey. They were tested for sensitivity to cyprodinil+fludioxonil, fenhexamid, procymidone, pyrimethanil and tebuconazole under laboratory conditions. Fungicide sensitivity tests showed that B. cinerea ...

  8. Ozone and infection of geranium flowers by Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Feder, W.A.; Perkins, I.

    1970-01-01

    Flowering plants of geranium cultivars were exposed to 0.2, 0.35, and 0.55 ppm ozone for 4-hr periods at 20/sup 0/C in a greenhouse fumigation chamber. Three fully-opened flower heads were sprayed with a spore suspension of Botrytis cinerea at 2000, 1000, or 500 spores/ml immediately before exposure to ozone began. Sterile distilled water was sprayed on noninoculated flower heads. All flowers were examined for evidence of infection 24 hr after the end of the ozone-exposure periods. All flower heads were then removed and placed in wet, loosely tied plastic bags and incubated at 20/sup 0/C for 72 hr, with examination at 24-hr intervals for evidence of infection. Ozone at 0.2 ppm did not injure the plants or prevent or inhibit flower infection by B. cinerea at all inoculum levels. Natural infection also occurred on some noninoculated flowers. Ozone at 0.35 ppm did not injure the plants or prevent infection, but did inhibit pathogenesis at the 500-spore/ml inoculum level and on noninoculated flowers. Ozone at 0.55 ppm caused moderate injury on all plants. Ozone at this level did not prevent infection, but did restrict pathogenesis on all inoculated and noninoculated flowers.

  9. Detection of Botrytis cinerea by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J A; Dickinson, M J; Boonham, N

    2010-12-01

    To develop a sensitive, rapid and simple method for detection of Botrytis cinerea based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) that would be suitable for use outside a conventional laboratory setting. A LAMP assay was designed based on the intergenic spacer of the B. cinerea nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA). The resulting assay was characterized in terms of sensitivity and specificity using DNA extracted from cultures. The assay consistently amplified 65 pg B. cinerea DNA. No cross-reactivity was observed with a range of other fungal pathogens, with the exception of the closely related species Botrytis pelargonii. Use of a novel real-time LAMP platform (the OptiGene Genie I) allowed detection of B. cinerea in infected rose petals, with amplification occurring in cut flowers, fruit and vegetables. © 2010 British Crown Copyright. Letters in Applied Microbiology 51, 650-657 © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Ozone injury and infection of potato leaves by Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Feder, W.A.; Perkins, I.; Glickman, M.

    1969-09-01

    Symptoms of ozone injury were observed on older leaves of potato cultivars Norland and Katahdin under experimental conditions. This symptom expression closely resembled flecks observed on potato leaves also blighted by Botrytis cinerea in the field. Inoculation of ozone-injured and noninjured potato leaves with B. cinerea showed that infection was more rapid and disease development more severe on ozone-injured leaves. Infection was frequently observed to originate in ozone-injured leaf areas. Ozone injury, under experimental conditions, appeared to increase the susceptibility of potato leaves to infection by B. cinerea. 6 references.

  11. Ozone injury increases infection of geranium leaves by Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Feder, W.A.; Perkins, I.

    1970-04-01

    Detached and attached, inoculated and noninoculated, ozone-injured and noninjured leaves from the lower, middle, and terminal regions of plants of geranium cultivars Enchantress and White Mountain were observed for infection by Botrytis cinerea. Previous exposure to ozone did not appreciably influence the susceptibility of leaves of either geranium cultivar to infection by B. cinerea, unless there was visible ozone injury. Ozone-injured, necrotic tissues on older attached and detached geranium leaves of both cultivars served as infection courts for B. cinerea. 14 references, 1 table.

  12. The time of infection of apples by Botrytis cinerea Pers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Bryk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The time of infection of apple fruits by Botrytis cinerea Pers. was studied. Artificial inoculations with conidial suspensions of B. cinerea were done at different stages of fruit developmment (flowers, sets, fruits. In autumn the apples were harvested and stored at a temperature of 2°C for 4 months after which rotting caused by B. cinerea was evaluated. B. cinerea presence in the calyx of apples was checked throughout the growing season. This was done by plating flowers, apple and set calyces on PDA medium. Latent infection of apples by B. cinerea was found. The infection took place in the orchard and the pathogen survived latently in the calyx; disease symptoms appeared in storage. Infection is possible during the whole vegetative season, but the most important time is flowering and just before or just after harvest of apples.

  13. Characterization of Botrytis cinerea isolates from chickpea: DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... fungus causes Botrytis gray mold (BGM) disease in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and can devastate the crop resulting in complete yield loss (Pande et al., 2005). Rapid evolution of the fungus including alterations in virulence and fungicide resistance contributes to frequent outbreaks of BGM. B. cinerea is ...

  14. Functional analysis of an extracellular catalase of Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.; Tenberge, K.B.; Vermeer, J.; Stewart, J.; Wagemakers, L.; Williamson, B.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2002-01-01

    There is evidence that the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea is exposed to oxidative processes within plant tissues. The pathogen itself also generates active oxygen species and H2O2 as pathogenicity factors. Our aim was to study how the pathogen may defend itself against cellular damage

  15. Botrytis cinerea: the cause of grey mould disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, B.; Tudzynski, B.; Tudzynski, P.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Botrytis cinerea (teleomorph: Botryotinia fuckeliana) is an airborne plant pathogen with a necrotrophic lifestyle attacking over 200 crop hosts worldwide. Although there are fungicides for its control, many classes of fungicides have failed due to its genetic plasticity. It has become

  16. ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinereais the causal agent of grey mould disease on a wide variety of crop plants. It is relatively insensitive to natural and synthetic fungitoxic compounds. This thesis describes how ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters contribute to protection by actively

  17. ABC transporters van Botrytis cinerea in biotische en abiotische interacties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2005-01-01

    Op 29 november 2004 promoveerde Henk-jan Schoonbeek aan Wageningen Universiteit op het proefschrift getiteld 'ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions'. Promotor was Prof. dr. ir. P.J.G.M. de Wit en co-promotor was dr.ir. M.A. de Waard, leerstoelgroep Fytopathologie,

  18. Characterization of Botrytis cinerea isolates from chickpea: DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eight isolates of Botrytis cinerea, causal organism of chickpea from eight different locations of western and eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP) of India were analyzed for morphological, cultural, virulence and genetic variations. Characterization of virulence and genetic variations of the isolates was based on their ...

  19. Factors influencing activity of triazole fungicides towards Botrytis cinerea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stehmann, C.; Waard, de M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The activity of triazole fungicides towards Botrytis cinerea was investigated in vitro (radial growth on fungicide-amended agar) and in vivo (foliar-sprayed tomato plants and dip-treated grapes). In both tests the benzimidazoles, benomyl and thiabendazole, and the dicarboximides, iprodione and

  20. Proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) system, ProteomeLab PF 2D, was employed to study the defence proteome of Arabidopsis following infection with the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. This system demonstrated differential protein expression in control and treated samples in some fractions.

  1. Endopolygalacturonases van Botrytis cinerea: karakteristieken in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krooshof, G.H.; Kester, H.C.M.; Burgers, K.; Benen, J.A.E.

    2003-01-01

    In dit artikel samenvattingen van lezingen van zeven presentaties van zestien onderzoekers van de KNPV-werkgroep Botrytis die op 18 september 2002 hun jaarlijkse bijeenkomst op het PPO Bomen in Boskoop hielden. De lezingen hadden de volgende onderwerpen: 1) Botrytis problems in hardy ornamentals; 2)

  2. Antifungal effect of 405-nm light on Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, K; Tanaka, S; Ibaraki, Y; Yoshimura, K; Ito, S

    2014-12-01

    There is very little information on the fungistatic or fungicidal effect of visible light. This study investigated the effect of 405-nm light, generated by a light-emitting diode array, on the economically important fungus Botrytis cinerea. The mycelial growth of B. cinerea was inhibited to the greatest extent by light at 405 and 415 nm and was negligibly inactivated at 450 nm, suggesting the presence of a photosensitizing compound that absorbs light mainly at wavelengths of 405-415 nm. Delta-aminolevulinic acid, a precursor of endogenous photosensitizer porphyrins, was used to determine the role of these porphyrins in 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of the fungus. Concentration-dependent inhibition of spore germination by delta-aminolevulinic acid and accumulation of singlet oxygen in the spores was observed when the spores were exposed to 405-nm light. These results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen could partially explain the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of B. cinerea. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly reduced by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that 405-nm light has a potential use for controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea. Grey mould (Botrytis cinerea) is a very successful necrotroph, causing serious losses in more than 200 crop hosts. This study investigated the antifungal effect of 405-nm light on this pathogen. Our results suggest that the excitation of endogenous porphyrins and subsequent accumulation of singlet oxygen contribute to the 405-nm light-mediated photoinactivation of grey mould. The development of symptoms in detached tomato leaves inoculated with B. cinerea spores was significantly inhibited by irradiation with 405-nm light, indicating that this wavelength of light has a potential use in controlling plant diseases caused by B. cinerea. © 2014 The Society for

  3. Biological Control of Botrytis cinerea by Volatiles of 'Isabella' Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakiotu, Eleni K; Thanassoulopoulos, Constantine C; Sfakiotakis, Evangelos M

    2004-09-01

    ABSTRACT The effect of volatiles from cv. Isabella (Vitis labrusca) on the growth of Botrytis cinerea was tested in vitro and in situ, in the latter case on 'Roditis' grapes (V. vinifera), at various temperatures. The goal of the research was to determine whether the volatiles emitted by Isabella grapes could be effective biocontrol agents of Botrytis cinerea. The closed Mariotte system was used as a bioassay method to analyze quantitatively the biological action of these volatiles on fungal growth and disease development. The in vitro experiments revealed the inhibitory action of the Isabella volatiles on the sporulation and sclerotia formation of the fungus, as well as the stimulating action of the Roditis volatiles on the sporulation of the fungus. The in situ study confirmed the antifungal action of the Isabella volatiles as they reduced the inoculum and pathogenicity of B. cinerea. The antibiotic action was more pronounced at 21 degrees C. The study indicates that Isabella volatiles act as biocontrol agents of B. cinerea.

  4. Pouvoir pathogène de Botrytis cinerea sur Catharanthus roseus à ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 avr. 2014 ... common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in eastern and southern Africa. Phytopathol. Pap., 34: 1-42. Anderson J.P., 1924. Botrytis cinerea in Alascka. Phytopathology, 14 : 152-155. Blakman J. P., 1972. Effect of plant age on inhibition of Botrytis cinerea spores by bacteria on beetroot leaves. Physiological Plant.

  5. Isolate dependency of Brassica rapa resistance QTLs to Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalist necrotrophic pathogens including Botrytis cinerea cause significant yield and financial losses on Brassica crops. However, there is little knowledge about the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions encoded by both host and pathogen genomes in this interaction. This potentially includes multiple layers of plant defense and pathogen virulence mechanisms that could complicate in breeding broad spectrum resistance within Brassica species. Glucosinolates are a diverse group of defense metabolites that play a key role in interaction between Brassica and biotic attackers. In this study, we utilized a collection of diverse B. cinerea isolates to investigate resistance within the B. rapa R500 x IMB211 recombinant inbred line population. We tested variation on lesion development and glucosinolate accumulation in parental lines and all population lines. We then mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL for both resistances to B. cinerea and defense metabolites in this population. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping demonstrate that the genetic basis of resistance to B. cinerea in B. rapa is isolate specific and polygenic with transgressive segregation that both parents contribute resistance alleles. QTLs controlling defensive glucosinolates are highly dependent on pathogen infection. An overlap of two QTLs identified between resistance to B. cinerea and defense metabolites also showed isolate specific effects. This work suggests that directly searching for resistance loci may not be the best approach at improving resistance in B. rapa to necrotrophic pathogen.

  6. Variation among volatile profiles induced by Botrytis cinerea infection of tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Botrytis blight caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea is probably the most common disease of greenhouse-grown crops like tomato. Botrytis blight in tomato plants is mainly detected by visual inspection or destructive biochemical and molecular determinations. These methods are time consuming and not

  7. Changes in volatile production during an infection of tomato plants by Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.; Miebach, M.; Kleist, E.; Henten, van E.J.; Wildt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Botrytis blight caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea is probably the most common disease of greenhouse-grown crops like tomato. Botrytis blight in tomato plants is mainly detected by visual inspection or destructive biochemical and molecular determinations. These methods are time consuming and not

  8. Grape Berry Colonization and Biological Control of Botrytis cinerea by Indigenous Vineyard Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis bunch rot, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is the most important disease of grape berries, especially during transportation and storage. Biological control is a potential means of postharvest management of Botrytis bunch rot. The study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that antagonistic yeast...

  9. Impact of essential oils on mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Grgić

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 22 essential oils (anise, thyme, cumin, peppermint, lavender, sage, lemon balm, rosemary, myrtle, cinnamon leaf, basil, white pine, eucalyptus, cedar, bergamot, mandarin, cypress, patchouli, ginger, bitter orange, sandalwood, camphor on the growth of gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea. The experiment was performed in vitro on PDA medium in 2 repetitions. Oils were applied in three amounts (3, 5 and 7 μl, and the mycelial growth was measured after three and nine days of incubation. All oils, except oils of bitter orange, sandalwood and camphor, have shown a certain antifungal activity. Compared to the water control, thyme and anise oil have shown the best antifungal activity, while for oils of bitter orange, sandalwood and camphor a stimulating effect on a growth of fungus B. cinerea was determined.

  10. Mechanisms and strategies of plant defense against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbuQamar, Synan; Moustafa, Khaled; Tran, Lam Son

    2017-03-01

    Biotic factors affect plant immune responses and plant resistance to pathogen infections. Despite the considerable progress made over the past two decades in manipulating genes, proteins and their levels from diverse sources, no complete genetic tolerance to environmental stresses has been developed so far in any crops. Plant defense response to pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea, is a complex biological process involving various changes at the biochemical, molecular (i.e. transcriptional) and physiological levels. Once a pathogen is detected, effective plant resistance activates signaling networks through the generation of small signaling molecules and the balance of hormonal signaling pathways to initiate defense mechanisms to the particular pathogen. Recently, studies using Arabidopsis thaliana and crop plants have shown that many genes are involved in plant responses to B. cinerea infection. In this article, we will review our current understanding of mechanisms regulating plant responses to B. cinerea with a particular interest on hormonal regulatory networks involving phytohormones salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene (ET) and abscisic acid (ABA). We will also highlight some potential gene targets that are promising for improving crop resistance to B. cinerea through genetic engineering and breeding programs. Finally, the role of biological control as a complementary and alternative disease management will be overviewed.

  11. Thyme and Savory Essential Oil Efficacy and Induction of Resistance against Botrytis cinerea through Priming of Defense Responses in Apple

    OpenAIRE

    Houda Banani; Leone Olivieri; Karin Santoro; Angelo Garibaldi; Maria Lodovica Gullino; Davide Spadaro

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of thyme and savory essential oils were investigated against Botrytis cinerea on apple fruit. Apples treated with thyme and savory essential oils showed significantly lower gray mold severity and incidence. Thyme essential oil at 1% concentration showed the highest efficacy, with lower disease incidence and smaller lesion diameter. The expression of specific pathogenesis-related (PR) genes PR-8 and PR-5 was characterized in apple tissues in response to thyme oil application and B...

  12. Analyses of genetic and pathogenic variability among Botrytis cinerea isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sarita; Tayal, Pamil; Sharma, Esha; Kapoor, Rupam

    2014-11-01

    Seventy nine isolates of Botrytis cinerea were collected from different host plants and different locations of India and Nepal. All the isolates were identified as B. cinerea based on morphological features and were confirmed using B. cinerea specific primers. Differentiation among the isolates was assessed using morphological, genetic and biochemical approaches. To analyze morphological variability, differences in conidial size, presence or absence of sclerotia and their arrangement were observed. Genetic variability was characterized using RAPD analysis, presence or absence of transposons and mating type genes. Cluster analysis based on RAPD markers was used for defining groups on the basis of geographical region and host. The biochemical approach included determining differences in concentration of oxalic acid and activity of lytic enzymes. All the isolates were categorized into different pathogenic groups on the basis their variable reaction towards chickpea plants. Isolates with higher concentration of oxalic acid and greater activity of lytic enzymes were generally more pathogenic. Pathogenicity was also correlated to transposons. Isolates containing transposa group showed some degree of correlation with pathogenic behavior. However, isolates could not be grouped on the basis of a single approach which provides evidence of their wide diversity and high evolution potential. Sensitivity of sampled isolates was also tested against five botryticides. Most of the isolates from same region were inhibited by a particular fungicide. This feature provided interesting cues and would assist in devising novel and more effective measures for managing the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Zn(II) biosorption properties of Botrytis cinerea biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunali, Sibel; Akar, Tamer

    2006-04-17

    The study was aimed of determining the Zn(II) sorption performance of Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea) biomass as a new biosorbent. Heat inactivated biomass was used in the determination of optimum conditions. The rate and extent of accumulation were effected by pH, contact time and initial zinc ion concentrations. The uptake capacity of B. cinerea was increased by chemical and physical pretreatment of the cells when compared with the native biomass. The maximum removal of Zn(II) at pH 5.0-6.0 was found to be 12.98+/-0.9623 mg g-1 at initial Zn(II) ion concentration of 100 mg l-1 by heat inactivated biomass. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models were used to evaluate the data and regression constants were derived. The biosorbent was regenerated using 10 mM HCl solution, with up to 98% recovery and reused five times in biosorption-desorption cycles successively. Competitive biosorption experiments were performed with zinc in the presence of copper, cadmium and nickel ions simultaneously. The nature of the possible cell-metal ions interactions was also evaluated by chemical and instrumental analysis including infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersion analysis.

  14. The role of ethylene and wound signaling in resistance of tomato to Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díaz, J.; Have, ten A.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene, jasmonate, and salicylate play important roles in plant defense responses to pathogens. To investigate the contributions of these compounds in resistance of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, three types of experiments were conducted: (a) quantitative

  15. Inhibition of Botrytis cinerea spore germination and mycelia growth by frequency-specific sound

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Bae, DongWon; Bae, Hanhong; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Jin A; Shin, Sung Chul; Park, Sung Han; Park, Soo-Chul

    2013-01-01

    The effect of sound waves on mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea was investigated to explore whether frequency-specific sound could be used as a practical alternative to chemical fungicides to control plant diseases...

  16. [Inhibition effects of wood vinegar on Alternaria panax and Botrytis cinerea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-guo; Han, Lian-hua; Wu, Song-quan; Piao, Ren-zhe; Liu, Hai-feng

    2014-09-01

    Less fungicides could be used to biocontrol Alternaria panax and Botrytis cinerea, this experiment can offer preliminary theory for wood vinegar as a botanic fungicide. The in vitro inhibition activities of wood vinegar on Alternaria panax and Botrytis cinerea were tested by using mycelial growth rate method and spore germination method. Inhibition of mycelium growth rate to Alternaria panax was 100% when the concentration of wood vinegar was no less than 3.0%, while the inhibition of mycelium growth rate and spore germination rate were 70.68% and 84.47%, respectively, at concentration of wood vinegar 2.25%. Inhibition of mycelium growth rate and spore germination rate to Botrytis cinerea were 100% when the concentration of wood vinegar was no less than 2.25%. Wood vinegar concentration of no less than 2.25% can be used as a biocontrol agent of Alternaria panax and Botrytis cinerea, it is useful for the further field trial.

  17. Effects of ozone on the sporulation, germination, and pathogenicity of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, C.R.; Weidensaul, T.C.

    1978-02-01

    Studies were initiated to determine if Botrytis cinerea conidia remain viable when grown in vivo and in vitro in the presence of ambient ozone levels and whether ozonized conidia retain pathogenicity. Experimental materials and methods used are described.

  18. Modulators of membrane drug transporters potentiate the activity of the DMI fungicide oxpoconazole against Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, de M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Modulators known to reduce multidrug resistance in tumour cells were tested for their potency to synergize the fungitoxic activity of the fungicide oxpoconazole, a sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI), against Botrytis cinerea Pers. Chlorpromazine, a phenothiazine compound known as a calmodulin

  19. Effects of fudioxonil on Botrytis cinerea and on grapevine defence response

    OpenAIRE

    Anne-Noëlle PETIT; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Leroux, Pierre; Baillieul, Fabienne; Panon, Marie-Laure; Clément, Christophe; Fontaine, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is mainly controlled by applying fungicides at three crop stages: the end of flowering (BBCH 68), bunch closure (BBCH 77) and the beginning of veraison (BBCH 81). The phenylpyrroles derivative fudioxonil is among the most effective fungicides registered to control Botrytis cinerea. Its effectiveness was investigated in relation to spray timing, fungicide resistance and defence responses of grapevine. Frequencies of B. cinerea strains which were resistant to fung...

  20. Role of temperature and free moisture in onion flower blight. [Botrytis squamosa; Botrytis cinerea; and Botrytis allii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, G.R.; Lorbeer, J.W.

    1986-06-01

    The cardinal temperatures at which onion umbels were blighted (after inoculation when two-thirds of the florets were open) with Botrytis squamosa, B. cinerea, and B. allii (isolated from blighted onion florets) were near 9, 21, and 27 C for B. squamosa, near 12, 21, and 30 C for B. cinerea, and near 9, 24, and 30 C for B. allii. The cardinal temperatures for mycelial growth (potato-dextrose agar) of B. squamosa, B. cinerea, and B. allii were near 5, 22, and 30 C for each fungus. The cardinal temperatures for conidial germination (on purified water agar) were near 6, 15, and 30 C for B. squamosa; 3, 18, and 33 C for B. cinerea; and 6, 24, and 33 C for B. allii. When the duration of free moisture on umbels after inoculation with the three pathogens was increased from 0 to 96 hr. the percentages of unopened florets, open florets, and immature seed capsules blighted at 21 C were increased significantly. Free moisture durations of 12-24, 6-12, and 6-12 hr were necessary for blighting of unopen florets, open florets, and immature seed capsules, respectively, by each pathogen at 21 C. A positive correlation between the amount of July rainfall and the natural incidence of onion flower blight was observed in Orange County, New York, from 1976 to 1981. 10 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  1. Optimizing chemically induced resistance in tomato against Botrytis cinerea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, Estrella; Beardon, Emily G; Ravnskov, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-inducing chemicals can offer broad-spectrum disease protection in crops, but can also affect plant growth and interactions with plant-beneficial microbes. We have evaluated different application methods of ß-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) for long-lasting induced...... resistance in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. In addition, we have studied non-target effects on plant growth and root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Germinating seeds for one week in BABA- or JA-containing solutions promoted seed germination efficiency, did not affect plant growth......, and induced resistance in 4 week-old plants. When formulating BABA and JA in carboxymethyl cellulose seed coating, only BABA was able to induce resistance in 4 week-old plants. Root treatment of 1 week-old seedlings with BABA or JA also induced resistance in 4 week-old plants. However, this seedling treatment...

  2. Towards consumer-friendly cisgenic strawberries which are less susceptible to Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaart, J.G.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of genetically modified (GM) strawberries which are less susceptible to fruit rot caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. To achieve Botrytis resistance, a polygalacuronase inhibiting protein (PGIP) gene has been isolation from strawberry and was characterised.

  3. Sodium hypochlorite: A promising agent for reducing Botrytis cinerea infection on rose flowers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnish, A.J.; Morris, K.L.; Theije, de A.; Mensink, M.G.J.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.; Reid, M.S.; Jiang, C.Z.; Woltering, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a fungal pathogen that greatly reduces the postharvest quality of rose flowers. A postharvest dip in 200 µL L-1 sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 10 s at 20 °C provided the greatest control of B. cinerea on ‘Akito’ and ‘Gold Strike’ flowers. NaOCl derived from Clorox® Ultra

  4. Beheersing en bestrijding van Botrytis cinerea en van Penicillium in Euphorbia fulgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, J.P.; Hazendonk, A.; Bosker, I.; Slootweg, C.; Hoope, ten M.

    2002-01-01

    De bloeiwijze van Euphorbia fulgens kent twee belangrijke schimmelbelagers, die problemen in de teelt veroorzaken: Botrytis cinerea en Penicillium. B. cinerea geeft schade in de vorm van smet of pokken, die op de bloemblaadjes verschijnen. Dit zijn kleine donkerbruine/zwarte plekjes van ongeveer 1

  5. Multiple criteria-based screening of Trichoderma isolates for biological control of Botrytis cinerea on tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventy-two isolates of Trichoderma were obtained from Hubei Province of China and identified to species based on the ITS-rDNA sequences. The isolates were initially tested for invasive growth on the colonies of Botrytis cinerea in the dual cultures with B. cinerea on potato dextrose agar at 20°C. T...

  6. Heat-induced oxidative injury contributes to inhibition of Botrytis cinerea spore germination and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    The inhibitory effect of a heat treatment (HT) on Botrytis cinerea, a major postharvest fungal pathogen, and the possible mode of action were investigated. Spore germination and germ tube elongation of B. cinerea were both increasingly and significantly inhibited by a HT (43 degrees C) for 10, 20 o...

  7. Fungicide resistance phenotypes in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Understanding fungicide- resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of preharvest fungicide programs for contro...

  8. Key factors to inoculate Botrytis cinerea in tomato plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álefe Vitorino Borges

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies addressing the biological control of Botrytis cinerea have been unsuccessful because of fails in inoculating tomato plants with the pathogen. With the aim of establishing a methodology for inoculation into stems, experiments were designed to assess: i. the aggressiveness of pathogen isolates; ii. the age at which tomato plants should be inoculated; iii. the susceptibility of tissues at different stem heights; iv. the need for a moist chamber after inoculation; and v. the effectiveness of gelatin regarding inoculum adhesion. Infection with an isolate from tomato plants that was previously inoculated into petioles and then re-isolated was successful. An isolate from strawberry plants was also aggressive, although less than that from tomato plants. Tomato plants close to flowering, at 65 days after sowing, and younger, middle and apical stem portions were more susceptible. There was positive correlation between lesion length and sporulation and between lesion length and broken stems. Lesion length and the percentage of sporulation sites were reduced by using a moist chamber and were not affected by adding gelatin to the inoculum suspension. This methodology has been adopted in studies of B. cinerea in tomato plants showing reproducible results. The obtained results may assist researchers who study the gray mold.

  9. Simultaneous Silencing of Xylanase Genes in Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor García

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The endo-β-1,4-xylanase BcXyn11A is one of several plant cell-wall degrading enzymes that the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea secretes during interaction with its hosts. In addition to its enzymatic activity, this protein also acts as an elicitor of the defense response in plants and has been identified as a virulence factor. In the present work, other four endoxylanase coding genes (Bcxyn11B, Bcxyn11C, Bcxyn10A, and Bcxyn10B were identified in the B. cinerea genome and the expression of all five genes was analyzed by Q-RT- PCR in vitro and in planta. A cross-regulation between xylanase genes was identified analyzing their expression pattern in the ΔBcxyn11A mutant strain and a putative BcXyn11A-dependt induction of Bcxyn10B gene was found. In addition, multiple knockdown strains were obtained for the five endoxylanase genes by transformation of B. cinerea with a chimeric DNA construct composed of 50-nt sequences from the target genes. The silencing of each xylanase gene was analyzed in axenic cultures and during infection and the results showed that the efficiency of the multiple silencing depends on the growth conditions and on the cross-regulation between them. Although the simultaneous silencing of the five genes was observed by Q-RT-PCR when the silenced strains were grown on medium supplemented with tomato extract, the endoxylanase activity measured in the supernatants was reduced only by 40%. Unexpectedly, the silenced strains overexpressed the Bcxyn11A and Bcxyn11C genes during the infection of tomato leaves, making difficult the analysis of the role of the endo-β-1,4-xylanases in the virulence of the fungus.

  10. Simultaneous Silencing of Xylanase Genes in Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Néstor; González, Mario A.; González, Celedonio; Brito, Nélida

    2017-01-01

    The endo-β-1,4-xylanase BcXyn11A is one of several plant cell-wall degrading enzymes that the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea secretes during interaction with its hosts. In addition to its enzymatic activity, this protein also acts as an elicitor of the defense response in plants and has been identified as a virulence factor. In the present work, other four endoxylanase coding genes (Bcxyn11B, Bcxyn11C, Bcxyn10A, and Bcxyn10B) were identified in the B. cinerea genome and the expression of all five genes was analyzed by Q-RT- PCR in vitro and in planta. A cross-regulation between xylanase genes was identified analyzing their expression pattern in the ΔBcxyn11A mutant strain and a putative BcXyn11A-dependt induction of Bcxyn10B gene was found. In addition, multiple knockdown strains were obtained for the five endoxylanase genes by transformation of B. cinerea with a chimeric DNA construct composed of 50-nt sequences from the target genes. The silencing of each xylanase gene was analyzed in axenic cultures and during infection and the results showed that the efficiency of the multiple silencing depends on the growth conditions and on the cross-regulation between them. Although the simultaneous silencing of the five genes was observed by Q-RT-PCR when the silenced strains were grown on medium supplemented with tomato extract, the endoxylanase activity measured in the supernatants was reduced only by 40%. Unexpectedly, the silenced strains overexpressed the Bcxyn11A and Bcxyn11C genes during the infection of tomato leaves, making difficult the analysis of the role of the endo-β-1,4-xylanases in the virulence of the fungus. PMID:29312413

  11. Novel hypovirulence-associated RNA mycovirus in the plant pathogenic fungus botrytis cinerea: molecular and biological characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea is a pathogenic fungus causing gray mold disease on numerous economically important crops and ornamental plants. This study was conducted to characterize the biological and molecular features of a novel RNA mycovirus, Botrytis cinerea RNA virus 1 (BcRV1), in the hypovirulent strain ...

  12. Thyme and Savory Essential Oil Efficacy and Induction of Resistance against Botrytis cinerea through Priming of Defense Responses in Apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Banani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of thyme and savory essential oils were investigated against Botrytis cinerea on apple fruit. Apples treated with thyme and savory essential oils showed significantly lower gray mold severity and incidence. Thyme essential oil at 1% concentration showed the highest efficacy, with lower disease incidence and smaller lesion diameter. The expression of specific pathogenesis-related (PR genes PR-8 and PR-5 was characterized in apple tissues in response to thyme oil application and B. cinerea inoculation. After 6 h of pathogen inoculation, thyme essential oil induced a 2.5-fold increase of PR-8 gene expression compared to inoculated fruits. After 24 h of inoculation, PR-8 was highly induced (7-fold in both thyme oil-treated and untreated apples inoculated with B. cinerea. After 48 h of inoculation, PR-8 expression in thyme-treated and inoculated apples was 4- and 6-fold higher than in inoculated and water-treated apples. Neither thyme oil application nor B. cinerea inoculation markedly affected PR-5 expression. These results suggest that thyme oil induces resistance against B. cinerea through the priming of defense responses in apple fruit, and the PR-8 gene of apple may play a key role in the mechanism by which thyme essential oil effectively inhibits gray mold in apple fruit.

  13. Effect of calcium on cell-wall degrading enzymes of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasanuma, Izumi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Effective anti-Botrytis strategies leading to reduce pesticides on strawberries are examined to provide the protection that is harmless to humans, higher animals and plants. Calcium treatments significantly inhibited the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The intracellular polygalacturonase and CMCase showed low activities in B. cinerea cultivated by medium containing calcium. On the other hand, calcium-stimulated β-glucosidases production occurred. Our findings suggest that the calcium treatments keep CMCase activity low and cause low activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes of B. cinerea in the late stage of growth.

  14. Incidencia de infecciones quiescentes de Botrytis cinerea en flores y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MolinaG. Gilma Sandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Se aisló Botrytis cinerea de flores y frutos asintomáticos de mora de castilla ( Rubus glaucus Benth. en  seis estados fenológicos desde botón cerrado hasta fruto maduro. Estas infecciones quiescentes ocurrieron raramente en botones florales cerrados, pero cuando éstos abren las estructuras florales aparecen colonizadas. La alta frecuencia de infecciones quiescentes en frutos en desarrollo y frutos maduros es atribuible a infecciones tempranas en estructuras florales. Inoculaciones hechas con conidias de B. cinerea marcadas con calcofluor produjeron infecciones en todos los estados fenológicos; la germinación de conidias en los seis estados fenológicos se inició a las 10 horas después de

  15. Modulating plant primary amino acid metabolism as a necrotrophic virulence strategy: the immune-regulatory role of asparagine synthetase in Botrytis cinerea-tomato interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Hamed; De Vleesschauwer, David; Aziz, Aziz; Höfte, Monica

    2014-01-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of the "gray mold" disease on a broad range of hosts. As an archetypal necrotroph, B. cinerea has evolved multiple virulence strategies for inducing cell death in its host. Moreover, progress of B. cinerea colonization is commonly associated with induction of senescence in the host tissue, even in non-invaded regions. In a recent study, we showed that abscisic acid deficiency in the sitiens tomato mutant culminates in an anti-senescence defense mechanism which effectively contributes to resistance against B. cinerea infection. Conversely, in susceptible wild-type tomato a strong induction of senescence could be observed following B. cinerea infection. Building upon this earlier work, we here discuss the immune-regulatory role of a key senescence-associated protein, asparagine synthetase. We found that infection of wild-type tomato leads to a strong transcriptional upregulation of asparagine synthetase, followed by a severe depletion of asparagine titers. In contrast, resistant sitiens plants displayed a strong induction of asparagine throughout the course of infection. We hypothesize that rapid activation of asparagine synthetase in susceptible tomato may play a dual role in promoting Botrytis cinerea pathogenesis by providing a rich source of N for the pathogen, on the one hand, and facilitating pathogen-induced host senescence, on the other.

  16. Function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bang; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-02-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in regulating biological processes in fungi. In this study, we mainly investigated the biological functions of Rho3 in Botrytis cinerea, and found that deletion of the rho3 from B. cinerea significantly suppressed vegetative growth and conidiation, reduced appressorium formation and decreased virulence. Microscopy analysis revealed that the distance between septa was increased in the Δrho3 mutant. In addition, mitochondria were suggested to be the main sources of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in B. cinerea based on dual staining with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and MitoTracker orange. The Δrho3 mutant showed less accumulation of ROS in the hyphae tips compared to the WT strain of B. cinerea. These results provide the novel evidence to ascertain the function of small GTPase Rho3 in regulating growth, conidiation and virulence of B. cinerea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. BcMctA, a putative monocarboxylate transporter, is required for pathogenicity in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhifeng; Gao, Nana; Wang, Qian; Ren, Yun; Wang, Kun; Zhu, Tingheng

    2015-11-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters have a central role in mammalian metabolism, but rarely reported in phytopathogenic fungi. In this study, a putative monocarboxylate transporter gene in Botrytis cinerea [B. cinerea MctA (BcMctA)] was identified in the research of a B. cinerea transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertional mutant (74). Disruption of the gene decreased the growth rate on the medium with monocarboxylate (acetate or pyruvate) as the sole carbon sources, but not affected on lactate. The pyruvate contents in BcmctA deletion mutants decreased about 35 % compared with the wild strain. Besides, the conidial yield was increased about two times in BcmctA disruption mutant. The pathogenicity assay indicated that disruption of BcmctA significantly reduced the virulence of B. cinerea on cucumber and tomato leaves. Our results demonstrated that BcMctA is related to pyruvate uptake and pathogenicity of B. cinerea on cucumber and tomato leaves.

  18. Ethylene perception and NEP-like protein production by Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuesta Arenas, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea can infect more than 200 plant species, including a wide range of economically important crops. During pathogen infection, plants release ethylene and it has been hypothesized that ethylene may predispose host tissue for infection by inducing senescence and ripening. This thesis

  19. Molecular mechanism of BjCHI1-mediated plant defense against Botrytis cinerea infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gao, Ying; Zhao, Kaijun

    2017-01-01

    .... Our recent studies revealed that expression of BjCHI1 mRNA is largely induced upon infection of Botrytis cinerea via a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BjMYB1 interacting with a W box-like element (Wbl-4...

  20. Botrytis cinerea endopolygalacturonase genes are differentially expressed in various plant tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.; Oude Breuil, W.; Wubben, J.P.; Visser, J.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of blight, rot, and gray mold on many plant species, secretes various endopolygalacturonases during all stages of infection. The expression pattern of the encoding genes (Bcpg 1-6) was studied on four hosts: tomato, broad bean, apple, and courgette (also known as

  1. Functional analysis of hydrophobin genes in sexual development of Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhem, R.B.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small secreted fungal proteins that play roles in growth and development of filamentous fungi, i.e. in the formation of aerial structures and the attachment of hyphae to hydrophobic surfaces. In Botrytis cinerea, three hydrophobin genes have been identified. Studies by Mosbach et

  2. Necrotizing activity of five Botrytis cinerea endopolygalacturonases produced in Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, I.; Krooshof, G.H.; Wagemakers, L.; Joosten, R.; Benen, J.A.E.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2005-01-01

    Five Botrytis cinerea endopolygalacturonase enzymes (BcPGs) were individually expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified to homogeneity and biochemically characterized. While the pH optima of the five enzymes were similar (approximately pH 4.5) the maximum activity of individual enzymes differed

  3. NADPH oxidases are involved in differentiation and pathogenicity in Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segmüller, N.; Kokkelink, L.; Giesbert, S.; Odinius, D.; Kan, van J.; Tudzynski, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidases have been shown to be involved in various differentiation processes in fungi. We investigated the role of two NADPH oxidases in the necrotrophic phytopathogenic fungus, Botrytis cinerea. The genes bcnoxA and bcnoxB were cloned and characterized;

  4. [Isolation of Actinomycete DF02 from Composting and Its Application in Biological Control of Botrytis cinerea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-jun; Min, Chang-li; Yang, Yan

    2015-08-01

    To isolate and identify the biocontrol actinomycete from composting, and to investigate its potted control effect against Botrytis cinerea. Actinomycetes were isolated from composting by pour plate method. Inhibitory activities of acti- nomycetes were determined by dilution plate method and cylinder plate method. Strain with high activities was identified based on mor- phology and biochemical characterization and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. And its potted control effect was also investigated. 31 strains of actinomycetes were isolated, three of them had inhibitory effects on the test strains. Of which, the strain DF02 showed antagonistic to five plant pathogenic fungi of all the tested strains, and its inhibitory effect on Botrytis cinerea was the strongest. The results of potted control effect test showed that the protective and therapeutic efficacy of the fermentation suspension to Botrytis cinerea was 58.47% and 53.83%, respectively. According to taxonomic identification, the strain DF02 was identified as Strepto- myces neopeptinius. Strain DF02 is a biocontrol actinomycete with broad development potential, and these results provide ex- perimental basis for the biocontrol of Botrytis cinerea.

  5. Determination of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea from strawberry in the Central Coast Region of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    A study was conducted in 2013 to investigate the occurrence of fungicide resistance in Botrytis cinerea populations in California’s northern strawberry growing region; specifically in Watsonville and Salinas. In mid-May, 59 samples consisting of a single diseased fruit or plant part with gray mold s...

  6. Selection, fitness, and control of grape isolates of Botrytis cinerea variably sensitive to fenhexamid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of 683 Botrytis cinerea isolates collected from a fungicide-trial vineyard, 31 were classified as putatively resistant to fenhexamid (EC50 =0.1 ug/ml). For the resistant isolates that survived and sporulated in culture, colony expansion and conidial germination frequency was significantly reduced re...

  7. First report of pyrimethanil resistance in Botrytis cinerea from stored apples in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. (teleomorph Botryotinia fuckeliana [de Bary] Whetzel) causes gray mold on apple fruit which is an economically significant disease. A survey of commercial packinghouses in Washington State revealed that gray mold accounted for 28% of the decayed apples in storage. Fungici...

  8. Practical resistance to fenhexamid Botrytis cinerea isolates from grapevines in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenhexamid is a fungicide used to control Botrytis cinerea on grapes worldwide. Resistance appears to be of a quantitative rather than qualitative nature, with minimum EC50 values that define a resistant phenotype proposed as exceeding 0.1 mg/L by some workers and 0.4 mg/L by others. However, little...

  9. Ulocladium atrum 385: Een veelbelovende kandidaat voor de biologische bestrijding van Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhl, J.; Molhoek, W.M.L.

    2002-01-01

    De schimmel Ulocladium atrum is geselecteerd als een antagonist van Botrytis cinerea. De ecologische eigenschappen van deze antagonist en de toepassingen op bovengrondse plantendelen worden in dit artikel beschreven. Gegevens bij de bijgaande figuren: 1) Effect van Ucladium atrum op de grauwe

  10. Comparative analysis of techniques for detection of quiescent Botrytis cinerea in grapes by quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to detect and monitor pathogen colonization, but early attempts to apply the technology to quiescent Botrytis cinerea infections of grape berries identified some specific limitations. In this study, four DNA extraction methods, two tissue-grinding methods, two gra...

  11. Decay resistance to Botrytis cinerea and quality characteristics during storage of raspberry genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspberries are a delicate, high value crop with an extremely short shelf life exacerbated by postharvest decay caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. European red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) is the most widely grown. Yellow (R. idaeus L.), black (R. occidentalis L.) and purple raspberries (R. ×neglectus ...

  12. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea gene transiently expressed in planta, encodes a mitochondrial protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Kan, van Jan A.L.; Benito, Ernesto P.

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression

  13. An aspartic proteinase gene family in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea contains members with novel features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.; Dekkers, E.; Kay, J.; Phylip, L.H.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea, an important fungal plant pathogen, secretes aspartic proteinase (AP) activity in axenic cultures. No cysteine, serine or metalloproteinase activity could be detected. Proteinase activity was higher in culture medium containing BSA or wheat germ extract, as compared to minimal

  14. Physiological variability and in vitro antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea causing botrytis gray mold of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosen, M. I.; Ahmed, A. U.; Islam, M. R.

    2010-07-01

    Physiological variability was studied in 10 isolates of Botrytis cinerea causing botrytis gray mold of chickpea, collected from diverse agro climatic areas in Bangladesh. The optimum temperature and pH for the best mycelial radial growth of B. cinerea were 20 degree centigrade and 4.5, respectively. The mycelial radial growth increased with the temperature up to 20 degree centigrade thereafter it decreased gradually up to 30 degree centigrade and no growth was observed at 35 degree centigrade. Chickpea dextrose agar (CDA) medium supported the highest mycelial radial growth (79.17 mm). The quickest (in 5 days) sclerotia initiation was recorded on chickpea destrose agar and lentil dextrose agar (LDA) culture media while the highest number of spores (2.5104 mL{sup -}1) were recorded on LDA medium. The antagonist Trichoderma harzianum was found to be a good bio-control agent against B. cinerea. Among the seven fungicides Bavistin 50 WP (Carbendazim), CP-Zim 50 WP (Carbendazim), Sunphanate 70 WP (Thiophanate methyl) and Rovral 50 WP (Iprodione) were the most effective to inhibit the mycelial radial growth of B. cinerea at 500 mg L{sup -}1 concentration. (Author) 13 refs.

  15. Sequencing and transcriptional analysis of the biosynthesis gene cluster of abscisic acid-producing Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shu, Dan; Yang, Jie; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Tan, Hong

    2014-09-29

    Botrytis cinerea is a model species with great importance as a pathogen of plants and has become used for biotechnological production of ABA. The ABA cluster of B. cinerea is composed of an open reading frame without significant similarities (bcaba3), followed by the genes (bcaba1 and bcaba2) encoding P450 monooxygenases and a gene probably coding for a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (bcaba4). In B. cinerea ATCC58025, targeted inactivation of the genes in the cluster suggested at least three genes responsible for the hydroxylation at carbon atom C-1' and C-4' or oxidation at C-4' of ABA. Our group has identified an ABA-overproducing strain, B. cinerea TB-3-H8. To differentiate TB-3-H8 from other B. cinerea strains with the functional ABA cluster, the DNA sequence of the 12.11-kb region containing the cluster of B. cinerea TB-3-H8 was determined. Full-length cDNAs were also isolated for bcaba1, bcaba2, bcaba3 and bcaba4 from B. cinerea TB-3-H8. Sequence comparison of the four genes and their flanking regions respectively derived from B. cinerea TB-3-H8, B05.10 and T4 revealed that major variations were located in intergenic sequences. In B. cinerea TB-3-H8, the expression profiles of the four function genes under ABA high-yield conditions were also analyzed by real-time PCR.

  16. Molecular characterization of a novel endornavirus from the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fangmin; Zhou, Ziliang; Wu, Mingde; Li, Guoqing

    2017-01-01

    The complete sequence of a novel endornavirus (Botrytis cinerea endornavirus 1, BcEV1) from the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea strain HBtom-372 was determined. The BcEV1 coding strand is 11,557 nucleotides long, possessing an open reading frame (ORF) that codes for a polyprotein of 3,787 amino acid residues and lacks a site-specific nick. The polyprotein contains viral methyltransferase (MTR) domain, a cysteine-rich region (CRR), two putative viral helicase (DEXDc-like and Hel-1) domains, and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase_2 (RdRp_2) domain. In phylogenetic analysis, BcEV1 clustered with several fungal endornaviruses, forming an independent clade, and it was detected in 4.2 % of B. cinerea strains collected from central China.

  17. Aquaporin8 regulates cellular development and reactive oxygen species production, a critical component of virulence in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Bang; Li, Boqiang; Li, Hua; Zhang, Zhanquan; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2016-03-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are ubiquitous in nearly all organisms, mediating selective and rapid flux of water across biological membranes. The role of AQPs in phytopathogenic fungi is poorly understood. Orthologs of AQP genes in Botrytis cinerea were identified and knocked out. The effects of AQPs on hyphal growth and conidiation, formation of infection structures and virulence on plant hosts were examined. The role of AQP8 in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, distribution and transport were further determined. Among eight AQPs, only AQP8 was essential for the ability of B. cinerea to infect plants. AQP8 was demonstrated to be an intrinsic plasma membrane protein, which may function as a channel and mediate hydrogen peroxide uptake. Deletion of AQP8 in B. cinerea completely inhibited the development of conidia and infection structures, and significantly affected noxR expression. Further observations revealed that both AQP8 and noxR impacted ROS distribution in the hyphal tips of B. cinerea. Moreover, AQP8 affected the expression of a mitochondrial protein, NQO1. A knockout mutant of NQO1 was observed to display reduced virulence. These data lead to a better understanding of the important role of AQP8 in the development and pathogenesis of plant pathogens. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Recent Advances in the Study of the Plant Pathogenic Fungus Botrytis cinerea and its Interaction with the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Luis; Plaza, Verónica; Larrondo, Luis F; Canessa, Paulo

    2017-01-01

    The primary contact between the fungal phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea and its host takes place at the cell surface of both organisms. The fungal cell wall is generally composed of an inner skeletal layer consisting of various polysaccharides surrounded by a layer of glycoproteins. Some of these glycoproteins have structural or enzymatic functions, or are involved in conidial adhesion. After landing on the host surface and sensing appropriate signals, B. cinerea conidia produce a germ tube and secrete phytotoxic fungal metabolites and cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs), facilitating host penetration. In fact, 118 genes encoding putative Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes (CAZymes) have been identified in the B. cinerea genome. This large enzymatic repertoire could explain, at least in part, the ability of B. cinerea to infect a vast number of plant species. In recent years, several genes and signaling factors have been identified as playing key roles in pathogenesis, particularly in appressorium formation and penetration. These include the NOX Complex, MAPK cascades, heterotrimeric G proteins, histidine kinases and cAMP signaling pathways. Some of these pathways could also be responsible for controlling the expression and secretion of CWDEs and/or secondary metabolites during infection. Herein, putative virulence factors that are linked to the cell wall, as well as recentlydescribed genes and components that allow the sensing of environmental cues, are highlighted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Molecular identification of Botrytis cinerea, Botrytis paeoniae and Botrytis pseudocinerea associated with gray mould disease in peonies (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) in Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Gastón; Campos, Felipe; Salgado, Daisy; Galdames, Rafael; Gilchrist, Lucy; Chahin, Gabriela; Andrade, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    In Chile, the peony is the most important ornamental flower exported from the country. Gray mould is a phytopathological problem of this crop. This disease is caused by Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis paeoniae. We carried out the first survey of Botrytis species associated with peony gray mould in Southern Chile to estimate the diversity of these pathogens. Diseased peony leaves were collected from seven locations in Southern Chile covering a distance of 300km. The Botrytis isolates obtained were studied by morphological and molecular methods. Finally, a PCR assay using primers based on the necrosis and ethylene-inducing protein gene (nep1) was used to specifically identify B. paeoniae. Seventeen isolates belonging to Botrytis genus were obtained, and all of them were pathogenic to peonies when inoculated in plants grown in a greenhouse. Morphological analyses showed that four isolates shared common characteristics, which distinguish them from the rest. Homology and phylogenetic analysis of G3PDH, as well as determination of the Bc-hch allele, allowed us to identify 12 isolates as B. cinerea, 4 as B. paeoniae and one isolate as Botrytis pseudocinerea. The PCR assay was found to be specific to B. paeoniae, amplifying a single band of 470bp. Three Botrytis species involved in peony gray mould disease are present in Chile. This is the first time that both B. paeoniae and B. pseudocinerea have been reported to be present in the country and also that they affect peonies. Finally, to our knowledge, the PCR based method herein described is the first of its kind to be used to identify B. paeoniae. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological control of Botrytis cinerea on tomato plants using Streptomyces ahygroscopicus strain CK-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, B B; Cheng, Y; Liu, Y; Liu, B H; Zhang, K C

    2015-12-01

    We developed a real-time PCR assay to specifically detect and quantify the efficacy of a biological fungicide from Streptomyces ahygroscopicus var. wuyiensis on tomato leaves. This fungicide, the natural secondary metabolite wuyiencin, is an antifungal agent against Botrytis cinerea. Specific primers were designed based on the β-actin gene sequences, which were used to detect a 303 bp fragment from B. cinerea isolates. Our assay is highly sensitive and can be used to reliably detect and quantify as little as 1·75 pg of B. cinerea DNA. We used this detection method to monitor the progression of B. cinerea infection in inoculated plant material under preventive (wuyiencin) and nonpreventive treatment. After 5 days, plants under preventive treatment exhibited a sharp decrease in fungal biomass and no symptoms, whereas plants under nonpreventive treatment displayed severe disease symptoms. The results demonstrate that wuyiencin has significant effects on B. cinerea in tomato plants and that real-time PCR is a reliable method for evaluating the effects of Streptomyces wuyiensis CK-15 on B. cinerea. Botrytis cinerea commonly produces latent or nonsymptomatic infection on and within plant tissues, which can develop into symptomatic infection when triggered by changes in environmental conditions or host plant physiology. In this study, we develop a specific, sensitive real-time PCR assay for detecting and quantifying B. cinerea on tomato leaves to determine the control efficacy of Streptomyces ahygroscopicus var. wuyiensis as a biological fungicide. Our findings demonstrate that wuyiencin has significant effects on B. cinerea in tomato plants and that real-time PCR is a reliable method for evaluating the effects of biological fungicides on plant pathogens. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Fungicide-driven evolution and molecular basis of multidrug resistance in field populations of the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmer, M.; Leroch, M.; Mosbach, A.; Walker, A.S.; Fillinger, S.; Mernke, D.; Schoonbeek, H.J.; Pradier, J.M.; Leroux, P.; Waard, de M.A.; Hahn, M.

    2009-01-01

    The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification

  2. Jasmonic Acid Oxidase 2 Hydroxylates Jasmonic Acid and Represses Basal Defense and Resistance Responses against Botrytis cinerea Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    .... Three jasmonic acid oxidases (JAOs) of the 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase family catalyze spe- cific oxidation of JA to 12OH-JA, and their genes are induced by wounding or infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea...

  3. Characterization of Postharvest Fungicide-Resistant Botrytis cinerea Isolates From Commercially Stored Apple Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurick, Wayne M; Macarisin, Otilia; Gaskins, Verneta L; Park, Eunhee; Yu, Jiujiang; Janisiewicz, Wojciech; Peter, Kari A

    2017-03-01

    Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold and is an economically important postharvest pathogen of fruit, vegetables, and ornamentals. Fludioxonil-sensitive B. cinerea isolates were collected in 2011 and 2013 from commercial storage in Pennsylvania. Eight isolates had values for effective concentrations for inhibiting 50% of mycelial growth of 0.0004 to 0.0038 μg/ml for fludioxonil and were dual resistant to pyrimethanil and thiabendazole. Resistance was generated in vitro, following exposure to a sublethal dose of fludioxonil, in seven of eight dual-resistant B. cinerea isolates. Three vigorously growing B. cinerea isolates with multiresistance to postharvest fungicides were further characterized and found to be osmosensitive and retained resistance in the absence of selection pressure. A representative multiresistant B. cinerea strain caused decay on apple fruit treated with postharvest fungicides, which confirmed the in vitro results. The R632I mutation in the Mrr1 gene, associated with fludioxonil resistance in B. cinerea, was not detected in multipostharvest fungicide-resistant B. cinerea isolates, suggesting that the fungus may be using additional mechanisms to mediate resistance. Results from this study show for the first time that B. cinerea with dual resistance to pyrimethanil and thiabendazole can also rapidly develop resistance to fludioxonil, which may pose control challenges in the packinghouse environment and during long-term storage.

  4. Microarray analysis of Arabidopsis WRKY33 mutants in response to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Arjun; Moustafa, Khaled; Al-Shamisi, Shamma; Alyan, Sofyan; Iratni, Rabah; AbuQamar, Synan

    2017-01-01

    The WRKY33 transcription factor was reported for resistance to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Using microarray-based analysis, we compared Arabidopsis WRKY33 overexpressing lines and wrky33 mutant that showed altered susceptibility to B. cinerea with their corresponding wild-type plants. In the wild-type, about 1660 genes (7% of the transcriptome) were induced and 1054 genes (5% of the transcriptome) were repressed at least twofold at early stages of inoculation with B. cinerea, confirming previous data of the contribution of these genes in B. cinerea resistance. In Arabidopsis wild-type plant infected with B. cinerea, the expressions of the differentially expressed genes encoding for proteins and metabolites involved in pathogen defense and non-defense responses, seem to be dependent on a functional WRKY33 gene. The expression profile of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid- and phytoprostane A1-treated Arabidopsis plants in response to B. cinerea revealed that cyclopentenones can also modulate WRKY33 regulation upon inoculation with B. cinerea. These results support the role of electrophilic oxylipins in mediating plant responses to B. cinerea infection through the TGA transcription factor. Future directions toward the identification of the molecular components in cyclopentenone signaling will elucidate the novel oxylipin signal transduction pathways in plant defense.

  5. Physiological and biochemical characteristics of laboratory induced mutants of Botrytis cinerea with resistance to fluazinam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenyong; Zhang, Yu; Ren, Weichao; Chen, Changjun

    2015-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic and filamentous fungus with a high risk of developing resistance to fungicides. The pyridinamine fungicide fluazinam has been reported to have excellent activity against B. cinerea and better effect on controlling gray mold. In this study, the physiological and biochemical characteristics of laboratory-induced mutants of B. cinerea with resistance to fluazinam has been investigated. Compared to the wild-type strains, the fluazinam-resistant mutants had a significant decrease in respiratory rate, glycerol, oxalate, and ATP contents, and an increase in ATPase activity and sensitivity to osmotic pressure, but did not differ in cell membrane permeability. Sequencing indicated that two parental strains and four resistant mutants were identical in the nucleotide sequence of F-ATPase gene. These results will enrich our understanding of the resistance mechanism of B. cinerea to fluazinam. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Proteome and transcript analysis of Vitis vinifera cell cultures subjected to Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadakova, K; Havelkova, M; Kurkova, B; Tlolkova, I; Kasparovsky, T; Zdrahal, Z; Lochman, J

    2015-04-24

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine resulting in significant reductions in yield and fruit quality. In order to examine the molecular mechanisms that characterize the interaction between B. cinerea and the host plant, the grapevine cytoplasmic proteome was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The interaction between Vitis vinifera cv. Gamay cells and B. cinerea was characterized by the increase in spot abundance of 30 proteins, of which 21 were successfully identified. The majority of these proteins were related to defence and stress responses and to cell wall modifications. Some of the modulated proteins have been previously found to be affected by other pathogens when they infect V. vinifera but interestingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were influenced by B. cinerea have not been shown to be modulated by any other pathogen studied to date. Transcript analysis using the quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction additionally revealed the up-regulation of several acidic, probably extracellular, chitinases. The results indicate that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are likely to be important mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Although gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important diseases of grapevine, little information is available about proteomic changes in this pathosystem. These results suggest that cell wall strengthening, accumulation of PR proteins and excretion of lytic enzymes are important molecular mechanisms in the defence of grapevine against B. cinerea. Surprisingly, the proteins related to cell wall modification that were modulated by B. cinerea have not been shown to be affected by any other pathogen studied to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea consists of two cryptic species, referred to as Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping, and Group I has been described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea. During a survey for Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Va...

  8. Quality loss in packed rose flowers due to Botrytis cinerea infection as related to temperature regimes and packaging design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Evelo, R.G.; Wilkinson, E.C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of package design and temperature treatment (cooling and rewarming) on the quality of rose flowers (cv. Sweet Promise) packed in five types of boxes were investigated, with special regard to fungus (Botrytis cinerea) infection. A significant increase of B. cinerea spotting was observed

  9. Pectin degradation by Botrytis cinerea: recognition of endopolygalacturonases by an Arabidopsis receptor and utilization of Dgalacturonic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisha Zhang, Lisha

    2013-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungal plant pathogenBotrytis cinerea is able to infect over 200 host plants and cause severe damage to crops, both pre- and post-harvest. B. cinerea often penetrates host leaf tissue at the anticlinal cell wall and subsequently grows into and through the middle lamella, which

  10. Baseline sensitivity to fluopyram and fungicide resistance phenotypes of botrytis cinerea populations from table grapes in california

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of table grapes grown in the Central Valley of California. Understanding fungicide-resistant phenotypes of B. cinerea is important to the development of pre-harvest fungicide programs for control of postharvest gray mold. Baseline s...

  11. The pOT and pLOB vector systems: Improving ease of transgene expression in Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, R.M.; Heneghan, M.N.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Bailey, A.M.; Foster, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines the construction of a novel vector system comprising interchangeable terminators, as well as a multiple cloning site (MCS), to facilitate the transformation of the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Previous molecular studies on B. cinerea have relied upon the pLOB1 based

  12. Attachment capability of antagonistic yeast Rhodotorula glutinis to Botrytis cinerea contributes to biocontrol efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boqiang eLi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhodotorula glutinis as an antagonism show good biocontrol performance against various postharvest diseases in fruits. In the present study, strong attachment capability of R. glutinis to spores and hyphae of Botrytis cinerea was observed. Further analysis showed that certain protein components on the yeast cell surface played critical role during the interaction between R. glutinis and B. cinerea. The components mainly distributed at the poles of yeast cells and might contain glycosylation modification, as tunicamycin treated yeast cells lost attachment capability to B. cinerea. To investigate contributions of attachment capability of R. glutinis to its biocontrol efficacy, yeast cells were mutagenized with 3% methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMS, and a mutant CE4 with stable non-attaching phenotype was obtained. No significant difference was found on colony, cell morphology, reproductive ability and capsule formation between the mutant and wild type. However, there was a distinct difference in India ink positive staining patterns between the two strains. Moreover, wild type strain of R. glutinis showed better performance on inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea than CE4 strain when yeast cells and B. cinerea were co-cultured in vitro. In biocontrol assay, both wild type and CE4 strains showed significant biocontrol efficacy against gray mould caused by B. cinerea in apple fruit, whereas, control effect of CE4 strain was lower than that of wild type. Our findings provided new evidences that attachment capability of R. glutinis to B. cinerea contributed to its biocontrol efficacy.

  13. Effects of Thaumatin-like proteins, chitinase and plant secondary metabolites on Botrytis cinerea development

    OpenAIRE

    Marcato, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    In this work the ability of the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea to counteract two plants antimicrobial proteins – a chitinase and a grape thaumatin-like protein (TLP) from grape– was characterized. These two proteins extracted from grape berries (cv. IM 6.0.13) were added to the B. cinerea culture. The growth of the fungus was not affected by these proteins which, as determined by RP-HPLC, were partially removed from the medium. It was observed that aspartic and serine protease p...

  14. Mycoviruses of Botrytis cinerea isolates from different hosts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rodríguez‐García, C; Medina, V; Alonso, A; Ayllón, M.A

    2014-01-01

    .... cinerea is difficult due to the appearance of fungicide‐resistant isolates, and the diversity in virulence due to genetic variability and, perhaps, the infection with mycoviruses or fungal viruses...

  15. Use of honeybees (Apis mellifera) to protect strawberry from grey mould (Botrytis cinerea)

    OpenAIRE

    Bevk, Danilo; Pirc, Manca; Dreo, Tanja; Treven, Vinko; Čokl, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    BICOPOLL is a CORE Organic II European project on protecting strawberries from its most important disease, the grey mould (Botrytis cinerea). Protective spores of fungi Gliocladium catenulatum in Prestop® Mix (PM) are delivered to the flowers of strawberry by honeybees. We assessed effectiveness of honeybees as vectors under field conditions. Flower visits of bees, and fruit yield were monitored and departing and returning bees and strawberry flowers were sampled. Bees visited strawberry flow...

  16. Genetic Diversity of Some Tunisian Botrytis cinerea Isolates Using Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    D. ben Ahmed; W. Hamada

    2005-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Botrytis cinerea in Tunisia was studied using molecular markers, and the level of resistance to the fungicide fenhexamid was shown. Isolates from different plants (grape, tomato, cucumber, onion, strawberry, gerbera and rose) and different parts of the country were analysed in order to determine whether the two groups, transposa and vacuma, that were detected in French vineyards, are also present in Tunisia. A combined PCR and Dot Blot method was developed...

  17. Conferred resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Lilium by overexpression of the RCH10 chitinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez de Cáceres González, Francisco F; Davey, Michael R; Cancho Sanchez, Ester; Wilson, Zoe A

    2015-07-01

    Transgenic Lilium lines have been generated by Agrobacterium -mediated transformation that have enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea as a consequence of ectopic expression of a rice chitinase gene. The production of ornamentals is an important global industry, with Lilium being one of the six major bulb crops in the world. The international trade in ornamentals is in the order of £60-75 billion and is expected to increase worldwide by 2-4% per annum. The continued success of the floriculture industry depends on the introduction of new species/cultivars with major alterations in key agronomic characteristics, such as resistance to pathogens. Fungal diseases are the cause of reduced yields and marketable quality of cultivated plants, including ornamental species. The fungal pathogen Botrytis causes extreme economic losses to a wide range of crop species, including ornamentals such as Lilium. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was used to develop Lilium oriental cv. 'Star Gazer' plants that ectopically overexpress the Rice Chitinase 10 gene (RCH10), under control of the CaMV35S promoter. Levels of conferred resistance linked to chitinase expression were evaluated by infection with Botrytis cinerea; sporulation was reduced in an in vitro assay and the relative expression of the RCH10 gene was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. The extent of resistance to Botrytis, compared to that of the wild type plants, showed a direct correlation with the level of chitinase gene expression. Transgenic plants grown to flowering showed no detrimental phenotypic effects associated with transgene expression. This is the first report of Lilium plants with resistance to Botrytis cinerea generated by a transgenic approach.

  18. Characterization of miRNAs associated with Botrytis cinerea infection of tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weibo; Wu, Fangli

    2015-01-16

    Botrytis cinerea Pers. Fr. is an important pathogen causing stem rot in tomatoes grown indoors for extended periods. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported as gene expression regulators related to several stress responses and B. cinerea infection in tomato. However, the function of miRNAs in the resistance to B. cinerea remains unclear. The miRNA expression patterns in tomato in response to B. cinerea stress were investigated by high-throughput sequencing. In total, 143 known miRNAs and seven novel miRNAs were identified and their corresponding expression was detected in mock- and B. cinerea-inoculated leaves. Among those, one novel and 57 known miRNAs were differentially expressed in B. cinerea-infected leaves, and 8 of these were further confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Moreover, five of these eight differentially expressed miRNAs could hit 10 coding sequences (CDSs) via CleaveLand pipeline and psRNAtarget program. In addition, qRT-PCR revealed that four targets were negatively correlated with their corresponding miRNAs (miR319, miR394, and miRn1). Results of sRNA high-throughput sequencing revealed that the upregulation of miRNAs may be implicated in the mechanism by which tomato respond to B. cinerea stress. Analysis of the expression profiles of B. cinerea-responsive miRNAs and their targets strongly suggested that miR319, miR394, and miRn1 may be involved in the tomato leaves' response to B. cinerea infection.

  19. Diterpenoids from Streptomyces sp. SN194 and Their Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yuhui; Yu, Zhiguo

    2016-11-16

    Botrytis cinerea is a serious phytopathogen affecting a wide range of crops around the world. Many fungicides targeting Botrytis cinerea have failed due to the pathogen's genetic plasticity. In an effort to search for new fungicides from natural products, two new diterpenoids, named chloroxaloterpin A, 1, and B, 2, were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces sp. SN194 along with four known diterpenoids, viguiepinol, 3, and oxaloterpins C-E, 4-6. Their structures were elucidated based on extensive MS, NMR, and X-ray crystallography analyses. Both the [(2-chlorophenyl)amino]carbonyl carbanic acyl group in 1 and the 2-[(2-chlorophenyl)amino]-2-oxo-acetyl group in 2 are discovered in natural products for the first time. All six compounds were tested against Botrytis cinerea, and chloroxaloterpin A, 1, and B, 2, demonstrated strong inhibitory activity against spore germination with EC50 of 4.40 and 4.96 μg/mL, respectively.

  20. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W. S.; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold. PMID:28096799

  1. Spread of Botrytis cinerea Strains with Multiple Fungicide Resistance in German Horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sabrina; Weber, Roland W S; Rieger, Daniel; Detzel, Peter; Hahn, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a major plant pathogen, causing gray mold rot in a variety of cultures. Repeated fungicide applications are common but have resulted in the development of fungal populations with resistance to one or more fungicides. In this study, we have monitored fungicide resistance frequencies and the occurrence of multiple resistance in Botrytis isolates from raspberries, strawberries, grapes, stone fruits and ornamental flowers in Germany in 2010 to 2015. High frequencies of resistance to all classes of botryticides was common in all cultures, and isolates with multiple fungicide resistance represented a major part of the populations. A monitoring in a raspberry field over six seasons revealed a continuous increase in resistance frequencies and the emergence of multiresistant Botrytis strains. In a cherry orchard and a vineyard, evidence of the immigration of multiresistant strains from the outside was obtained. Inoculation experiments with fungicide-treated leaves in the laboratory and with strawberry plants cultivated in the greenhouse or outdoors revealed a nearly complete loss of fungicide efficacy against multiresistant strains. B. cinerea field strains carrying multiple resistance mutations against all classes of site-specific fungicides were found to show similar fitness as sensitive field strains under laboratory conditions, based on their vegetative growth, reproduction, stress resistance, virulence and competitiveness in mixed infection experiments. Our data indicate an alarming increase in the occurrence of multiresistance in B. cinerea populations from different cultures, which presents a major threat to the chemical control of gray mold.

  2. Effectiveness of Different Classes of Fungicides on Botrytis cinerea Causing Gray Mold on Fruit and Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Oh Kim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen causing a major problem in the export and post-harvest of strawberries. Inappropriate use of fungicides leads to resistance among fungal pathogens. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sensitivity of B. cinerea to various classes of fungicide and to determine the effectiveness of different concentrations of commonly used fungicides. We thus evaluated the effectiveness of six classes of fungicide in inhibiting the growth and development of this pathogen, namely, fludioxonil, iprodione, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole, fenpyrazamine, and boscalid. Fludioxonil was the most effective (EC₅₀ < 0.1 μg/ml, and pyrimethanil was the least effective (EC₅₀ = 50 μg/ml, at inhibiting the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Fenpyrazamine and pyrimethanil showed relatively low effectiveness in inhibiting the germination and conidial production of B. cinerea. Our results are useful for the management of B. cinerea and as a basis for monitoring the sensitivity of B. cinerea strains to fungicides.

  3. Postharvest Biological Control of Botrytis cinerea on Kiwifruit by Volatiles of [Isabella] Grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakiotu, Eleni K; Thanassoulopoulos, Constantine C; Sfakiotakis, Evangelos M

    2004-12-01

    ABSTRACT The potential of volatile substances emitted by 'Isabella' grapes (Vitis labrusca) to control gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) on 'Hayward' kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) was studied. The closed Mariotte system was used as a bioassay method to analyze quantitatively the biological action of these volatiles on B. cinerea growth. In vivo experiments compared the effects of volatiles from 'Isabella' grapes versus volatiles from 'Roditis' grapes (V. vinifera) and a B. cinerea control on the growth and disease development of B. cinerea on kiwifruit. The effect of the volatiles on the growth of B. cinerea was tested at various temperatures and times of inoculation after the wounding of kiwifruit, as well as using various weights and developmental stages of the grapes. The 'Isabella' volatiles limited the incidence of infection by reducing both the inoculum density and the activity of the pathogen. The weight and developmental stage of the grapes were important in the degree of inhibitory action of the 'Isabella' volatiles. The inhibitory action was more pronounced at 21 degrees C irrespective of the inoculation time after wounding. The study shows the potential for successful biological control of B. cinerea on kiwifruit by volatiles from 'Isabella' grapes.

  4. Effect of Gamma Irradiation on Botrytis cinerea Causing Gray Mold and Cut Chrysanthemum Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Hee Chu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important postharvest fungal pathogens of cut flowers. Here, gamma irradiation, an alternative for phytosanitary purposes, and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC were used to control B. cinerea in a cut chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium Ramat. cultivar, ‘Baekma’, one of the cultivars susceptible to B. cinerea. Spore germination and mycelium growth of B. cinerea were inhibited by gamma irradiation in an inversely dose-dependent manner. A dose of 4 kGy completely inhibited the mycelium growth of B. cinerea. A significant change in flower quality (physical properties on chrysanthemum was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.2 kGy (p<0.05. Therefore, in this study, the integration of gamma ray (below 0.2 kGy and NaDCC, an eco-friendly form of chlorine, was investigated to control the disease with low dose of gamma irradiation dose. Interestingly, the gamma irradiated flowers showed more disease severity than the non-irradiated flowers. The combined treatment of gamma irradiation and NaDCC does not affect the severity of the fungal disease, whereas only 70 ppm of NaDCC treatment showed a significantly reduced severity. These results suggest that only chlorination treatment can be applied to control B. cinerea in cut chrysanthemum flowers.

  5. Large-Scale Transcriptome Analysis of Cucumber and Botrytis cinerea during Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Kong

    Full Text Available Cucumber gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is considered one of the most serious cucumber diseases. With the advent of Hi-seq technology, it is possible to study the plant-pathogen interaction at the transcriptome level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of RNA-seq to identify cucumber and B. cinerea differentially expressed genes (DEGs before and after the plant-pathogen interaction. In total, 248,908,688 raw reads were generated; after removing low-quality reads and those containing adapter and poly-N, 238,341,648 clean reads remained to map the reference genome. There were 3,512 cucumber DEGs and 1,735 B. cinerea DEGs. GO enrichment and KEGG enrichment analysis were performed on these DEGs to study the interaction between cucumber and B. cinerea. To verify the reliability and accuracy of our transcriptome data, 5 cucumber DEGs and 5 B. cinerea DEGs were chosen for RT-PCR verification. This is the first systematic transcriptome analysis of components related to the B. cinerea-cucumber interaction. Functional genes and putative pathways identified herein will increase our understanding of the mechanism of the pathogen-host interaction.

  6. Interactions involving ozone, Botrytis cinerea, and B. squamosa on onion leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rist, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Interactions involving Botrytis cinerea Pers., B. squamosa Walker, and ozone on onion (alium cepae L.) were investigated. Initially, threshold dosages of ozone required to predispose onion leaves to greater infection by B. cinerea and B. squamosa were determined under controlled conditions in an ozone-exposure chamber. Subsequent experiments supported the hypothesis that nutrients leaking out of ozone-injured cells stimulated lesion production by B. cinerea. The electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of onion plants which had been exposed to ozone were greater than the electrical conductivity of, and carbohydrate concentration in, dew collected from leaves of other, non-exposed onion plants. When conidia of B. cinerea were suspended in dew collected from leaves of plants which had been exposed to ozone and the resulting suspension atomized onto leaves of non-exposed plants, more lesions were induced than on leaves of other non-exposed plants inoculated with conidia suspended in dew collected from plants which had not been exposed to ozone. EDU protected onion leaves from ozone-induced predisposition to these fungi under controlled conditions. Experiments designed to detect interaction between B. cinerea and B. squamosa in onion leaf blighting indicated that such interaction did not occur. Leaves were blighted rapidly when inoculated with B. squamosa whether B. cinerea was present or absent.

  7. Large-Scale Transcriptome Analysis of Cucumber and Botrytis cinerea during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Weiwen; Chen, Nan; Liu, Tingting; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Jingqi; He, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Cucumber gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is considered one of the most serious cucumber diseases. With the advent of Hi-seq technology, it is possible to study the plant-pathogen interaction at the transcriptome level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of RNA-seq to identify cucumber and B. cinerea differentially expressed genes (DEGs) before and after the plant-pathogen interaction. In total, 248,908,688 raw reads were generated; after removing low-quality reads and those containing adapter and poly-N, 238,341,648 clean reads remained to map the reference genome. There were 3,512 cucumber DEGs and 1,735 B. cinerea DEGs. GO enrichment and KEGG enrichment analysis were performed on these DEGs to study the interaction between cucumber and B. cinerea. To verify the reliability and accuracy of our transcriptome data, 5 cucumber DEGs and 5 B. cinerea DEGs were chosen for RT-PCR verification. This is the first systematic transcriptome analysis of components related to the B. cinerea-cucumber interaction. Functional genes and putative pathways identified herein will increase our understanding of the mechanism of the pathogen-host interaction.

  8. Transformation of Botrytis cinerea by direct hyphal blasting or by wound-mediated transformation of sclerotia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ish - Shalom Shahar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botrytis cinerea is a haploid necrotrophic ascomycete which is responsible for 'grey mold' disease in more than 200 plant species. Broad molecular research has been conducted on this pathogen in recent years, resulting in the sequencing of two strains, which has generated a wealth of information toward developing additional tools for molecular transcriptome, proteome and secretome investigations. Nonetheless, transformation protocols have remained a significant bottleneck for this pathogen, hindering functional analysis research in many labs. Results In this study, we tested three different transformation methods for B. cinerea: electroporation, air-pressure-mediated and sclerotium-mediated transformation. We demonstrate successful transformation with three different DNA constructs using both air-pressure- and sclerotium-mediated transformation. Conclusions These transformation methods, which are fast, simple and reproducible, can expedite functional gene analysis of B. cinerea.

  9. Expansive phenotypic landscape of Botrytis cinerea shows differential contribution of genetic diversity and plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corwin, Jason A; Subedy, Anushriya; Eshbaugh, Robert

    2016-01-01

    and genetic diversity for virulence-associated phenotypes in a generalist plant pathogen, we grew a population of 15 isolates of Botrytis cinerea from throughout the world, under a variety of in vitro and in planta conditions. Under in planta conditions, phenotypic differences between the isolates were...... the phenotypic variation under in vitro experimental conditions to phenotypic variation during plant infection. This study indicates that there is a high level of phenotypic variation within B. cinerea that is controlled by a mixture of genetic variation, environment, and genotype × environment. This argues...... that future experiments into the pathogenicity of B. cinerea must account for the genetic and environmental variation within the pathogen to better sample the potential phenotypic space of the pathogen....

  10. Selection of halophilic bacteria for biological control of tomato gray mould caused by Botrytis cinerea

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    Imane BERRADA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Morocco, tomato gray mould caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers: Fr. is a serious threat for postharvest storage of tomatoes. Fifteen halophilic bacteria were evaluated for their antagonistic activity against B. cinerea: 11 Gram positive strains assigned to the genera Bacillus (9, Jeotgalibacillus (1 and Planococcus (1 and four Gram negative strains assigned to the genera Salinivibrio (1, Vibrio (2 and Photobacterium (1. In in vitro screening, 12 antifungal isolates secreted diffusible compounds, hydrolytic enzymes or volatile compounds. In vivo screening of the isolates, Bacillus safensis CCMM B582 and Bacillus oceanisediminis CCMM B584 showed permanent antagonistic activity on tomato fruits, with 100% inhibition of B. cinerea after 7 days. These two strains may offer potential for biological control of tomato gray mould.

  11. Suppression of Botrytis cinerea on necrotic grapevine tissues by early-season applications of natural products and biological control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Garrido, Carlos; Viñas, Inmaculada; Elmer, Philip A G; Usall, Josep; Teixidó, Neus

    2014-04-01

    Necrotic tissues within grape (Vitis vinifera) bunches represent an important source of Botrytis cinerea inoculum for Botrytis bunch rot (BBR) at harvest in vineyards. This research quantified the incidence of B. cinerea on necrotic floral and fruit tissues and the efficacy of biologically based treatments for suppression of B. cinerea secondary inoculum within developing bunches. At veraison (2009 and 2010), samples of aborted flowers, aborted fruits and calyptras were collected, and the incidence and sporulation of B. cinerea were determined. Aborted fruits presented significantly higher incidence in untreated samples. Early-season applications of Candida sake plus Fungicover®, Fungicover alone or Ulocladium oudemansii significantly reduced B. cinerea incidence on aborted flowers and calyptras by 46-85%. Chitosan treatment significantly reduced B. cinerea incidence on calyptras. None of the treatments reduced B. cinerea incidence on aborted fruits. Treatments significantly reduced sporulation severity by 48% or more. Treatments were effective at reducing B. cinerea secondary inoculum on necrotic tissues, in spite of the variable control on aborted fruits. This is the first report to quantify B. cinerea on several tissues of bunch trash and to describe the effective suppression of saprophytic B. cinerea inoculum by biologically based treatments. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Sensitivity of Botrytis cinerea Isolates Against Some Fungicides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Desen

    2012-01-26

    Jan 26, 2012 ... against the gray mold disease. The use of imazalil, procymidone, pyrimethanil, tebuconazole in Trakya region began in 1996. Cyprodinil+fludioxonil and fenhexamid have been using since 1998 and 2001, respectively. Although these fungicides have medium or low resistance risks of B. cinerea (Hilber and ...

  13. Erwinia carotovora elicitors and Botrytis cinerea activate defense responses in Physcomitrella patens

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    Bentancor Marcel

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular plants respond to pathogens by activating a diverse array of defense mechanisms. Studies with these plants have provided a wealth of information on pathogen recognition, signal transduction and the activation of defense responses. However, very little is known about the infection and defense responses of the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens, to well-studied phytopathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine: i whether two representative broad host range pathogens, Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (E.c. carotovora and Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea, could infect Physcomitrella, and ii whether B. cinerea, elicitors of a harpin (HrpN producing E.c. carotovora strain (SCC1 or a HrpN-negative strain (SCC3193, could cause disease symptoms and induce defense responses in Physcomitrella. Results B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora were found to readily infect Physcomitrella gametophytic tissues and cause disease symptoms. Treatments with B. cinerea spores or cell-free culture filtrates from E.c. carotovoraSCC1 (CF(SCC1, resulted in disease development with severe maceration of Physcomitrella tissues, while CF(SCC3193 produced only mild maceration. Although increased cell death was observed with either the CFs or B. cinerea, the occurrence of cytoplasmic shrinkage was only visible in Evans blue stained protonemal cells treated with CF(SCC1 or inoculated with B. cinerea. Most cells showing cytoplasmic shrinkage accumulated autofluorescent compounds and brown chloroplasts were evident in a high proportion of these cells. CF treatments and B. cinerea inoculation induced the expression of the defense-related genes: PR-1, PAL, CHS and LOX. Conclusion B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora elicitors induce a defense response in Physcomitrella, as evidenced by enhanced expression of conserved plant defense-related genes. Since cytoplasmic shrinkage is the most common morphological change observed in plant PCD, and that harpins and B

  14. Synthesis of linear Geranylphenols and their effect on mycelial growth of plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Luis; Taborga, Lautaro; Díaz, Katy; Olea, Andrés F; Peña-Cortés, Hugo

    2014-01-27

    Natural geranyl compounds are known to exhibit important biological activities. In this work a series of geranylphenols were synthesized to evaluate their effect on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. Geranyl derivatives were synthesized by direct geranylation reactions between the corresponding phenol derivatives and geraniol, using BF3.OEt2 as catalyst and AgNO3 as secondary catalyst. Previously reported molecules [geranylhydroquinone (2), geranylhydroquinone diacetate (6) and geranylphloroglucinol (9)], and new substances [(E)-4-(3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)benzene-1,2,3-triol (geranyl-pyrogallol, 7), (E)-4-(3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)benzene-1,2,3-triyl triacetate (8), (E)-2-(3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)benzene-1,3,5-triyl triacetate geranylphloroglucinol triacetate (10), 2,4-bis((E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)benzene-1,3,5-triyl triacetate (11), 2,6-bis((E)-3,7-dimethylocta-2,6-dienyl)-3,5-dihydroxyphenyl acetate (12)], were obtained. All compounds were characterized by IR, HRMS and NMR spectroscopic data. The inhibitory effect of the synthesized compounds on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea was tested in vitro. Excepting compound 11, all substances constrained the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. The antifungal activity depends on the chemical structure of geranylphenol derivatives. Compounds 2 and 9 were the more effective substances showing inhibition degrees higher than those obtained with the commercial fungicide Captan, even at lower concentrations. Monosubstitution on the aromatic nucleus by a geranyl chain seems to be more effective for the inhibition of mycelial growth than a double substitution. These results suggest that the new derivatives of geranylphenols have the ability to block the mycelial development of the plant pathogen B. cinerea and that this capacity depends strongly on the structural features and lipophilicity of the compounds.

  15. Biocontrol of Grey Mould Disease on Grape Caused by Botrytis cinerea with Autochthonous Wine Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Raspor

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocontrol activities of different yeast species and strains isolated from grape/must/wine environments have been compared to those of commercially available antagonistic yeast species of Candida oleophila. A total of 591 yeast isolates were tested in a preliminary screening on agar to select isolates showing inhibitory effect against Botrytis cinerea, the plant pathogen causing grey mould disease on grape. Yeast species Aureobasidium pullulans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Pichia guilliermondii showed, on average, higher biocontrol activity than commercially used yeast Candida oleophila. Furthermore, these three species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is potentially interesting biocontrol agent against grey mould of grapes, were selected for their inhibitory effects and assayed in vitro on different solid synthetic media for their antagonistic capacity towards B. cinerea. The results indicate that the composition of the medium had an impact on the biocontrol activity of yeast species and strains, as Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed the highest antagonistic activity against B. cinerea when tested on media with increased concentrations of glucose. The antagonistic activity of selected yeast strains was finally determined on wounded and sound grape berries of cultivars Rebula and Chardonnay for their ability to inhibit infection by B. cinerea moulds. Results suggest that antagonist yeasts with the potential to control B. cinerea on grape can be found among the microflora associated with the berries.

  16. Antifungal modes of action of tea tree oil and its two characteristic components against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, D; Wang, J; Shao, X; Xu, F; Wang, H

    2015-11-01

    The essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) has been evaluated as a potential eco-friendly antifungal agent against Botrytis cinerea. In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mode of action of tea tree oil (TTO) and its components against B. cinerea. Of the components we tested in contact phase, terpinen-4-ol had the highest antifungal activity, followed by TTO, α-terpineol, terpinolene, then 1,8-cineole. As one of characteristic components of TTO, terpinen-4-ol treatment led to pronounced alterations in mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, membrane permeability under scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and fluorescent microscope, and also reduced the ergosterol content of fungi. As another characteristic component, 1,8-cineole caused serious intracellular damage but only slightly affected B. cinerea otherwise. When terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole were used together, the synergistic antifungal activity was significantly higher than either component by itself. The results of our study confirmed that terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole act mainly on the cell membranes and organelles of B. cinerea, respectively, and when combined are similar to TTO in antifungal activity due to their differences. Understanding the mechanism of terpinen-4-ol and 1,8-cineole antifungal action to B. cinerea is helpful for investigation on their synergistic effect and explaining antifungal action modes of TTO. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Some Tunisian Botrytis cinerea Isolates Using Molecular Markers

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    D. ben Ahmed

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Botrytis cinerea in Tunisia was studied using molecular markers, and the level of resistance to the fungicide fenhexamid was shown. Isolates from different plants (grape, tomato, cucumber, onion, strawberry, gerbera and rose and different parts of the country were analysed in order to determine whether the two groups, transposa and vacuma, that were detected in French vineyards, are also present in Tunisia. A combined PCR and Dot Blot method was developed to identify the transposable elements Boty and Flipper that distinguish between these two B. cinerea groups. Both the transposa and vacuma groups, and isolates containing the transposable element Boty, were found in Tunisia. Moreover, analysis of the Bc-hch locus by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion identified only the B. cinerea group corresponding to one allelic type. Finally, by using the level of resistance shown by B. cinerea to the fungicide fenhexamid as a marker, it was confirmed that this was the only group of B. cinerea in the Tunisian population.

  18. Antioxidant enzymes in chickpea colonized by Piriformospora indica participate in defense against the pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Om Prakash; Verma, Nidhi; Singh, Alok Kumar; Oelmüller, Ralf; Kumar, Manoj; Prasad, Durga; Kapoor, Rupam; Dua, Meenakshi; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2017-10-19

    Piriformospora indica, a root endophytic fungus, promotes growth of the economically important chickpea plant (Cicer arietinum Linn.) and protects it against the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Biomass and root development were found to be significantly improved in chickpea plants colonized with P. indica as compared to the plants grown without P. indica as well as from the plants infected with the B. cinerea. Our PCR analyses showed that gradual increase in the colonization of P. indica in the plants result in the inhibition of the colonization of B. cinerea. P. indica colonized plants showed increased antioxidant enzyme activities. Interestingly, there were pronounced decrease in the antioxidant enzyme activities in shoots infected with B. cinerea and colonized with P. indica in alternate and simultaneous mode as compared to plants infected with B. cinerea alone. We conclude that P. indica helps plants to overcome the disease load by enhancing antioxidant enzyme defense system. Our data suggest that, bio-protective action of P. indica might be mediated via systemic induction of antioxidant defense in the host plants.

  19. Attachment Capability of Antagonistic Yeast Rhodotorula glutinis to Botrytis cinerea Contributes to Biocontrol Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boqiang; Peng, Huaimin; Tian, Shiping

    2016-01-01

    Rhodotorula glutinis as an antagonism show good biocontrol performance against various post-harvest diseases in fruits. In the present study, strong attachment capability of R. glutinis to spores and hyphae of Botrytis cinerea was observed. Further analysis showed that certain protein components on the yeast cell surface played critical role during the interaction between R. glutinis and B. cinerea. The components mainly distributed at the poles of yeast cells and might contain glycosylation modification, as tunicamycin treated yeast cells lost attachment capability to B. cinerea. To investigate contributions of attachment capability of R. glutinis to its biocontrol efficacy, yeast cells were mutagenized with 3% methane-sulfonic acid ethyl ester (EMS), and a mutant CE4 with stable non-attaching phenotype was obtained. No significant difference was found on colony, cell morphology, reproductive ability, and capsule formation between the mutant and wild-type. However, there was a distinct difference in India ink positive staining patterns between the two strains. Moreover, wild-type strain of R. glutinis showed better performance on inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea than CE4 strain when yeast cells and B. cinerea were co-cultured in vitro. In biocontrol assay, both wild-type and CE4 strains showed significant biocontrol efficacy against gray mold caused by B. cinerea in apple fruit, whereas, control effect of CE4 strain was lower than that of wild-type. Our findings provided new evidences that attachment capability of R. glutinis to B. cinerea contributed to its biocontrol efficacy.

  20. Scatter: a novel family of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements in the fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongyuan; Shu, Dan; Luo, Di; Gong, Tao; Sun, Fenghui; Tan, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are short non-autonomous DNA transposons that play an important role in genome structure and function. Here, we described a novel family of MITEs, named Scatter, identified from the genomes of three strains of the fungus Botrytis cinerea (T4, B05.10, and TBC-A). Intact Scatter elements are typically an average of 247 bp, and contain 41 bp terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) and 2-bp "TA" target site duplications (TSDs). Based a search against the transposable elements database and GenBank, Scatter is a novel and potentially species-specific family of MITEs. Moderate heterogeneity in sequence and size of individual Scatter copies suggests that Scatter elements were not recently proliferated. Most integrated sites were conserved across all three strains tested and elements inserted at equivalent sites shared high identity at the nucleotide level. This conservation, in combination with the presence of a similar copy number (22-24), in B. cinerea strains tested suggests that Scatter may be a relic of an ancient transposition developed prior to the strain divergence of B. cinerea. Two unique insertion instances were observed, indicating that some copies of Scatter may have remained active following strain divergence of B. cinerea. Because only a few subtle insertion differences among B. cinerea strains were observed, Scatter may play only a minor role in the genetic diversity in B. cinerea species. Most Scatter elements appear to be inserted in potential regulatory regions of adjacent coding regions, highlighting their role in transcriptional regulation. The origin of Scatter remains to be addressed. Scatter is the first well-characterized family of MITEs in B. cinerea. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Effects of fudioxonil on Botrytis cinerea and on grapevine defence response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Noëlle PETIT

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false IT ZH-TW X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is mainly controlled by applying fungicides at three crop stages: the end of flowering (BBCH 68, bunch closure (BBCH 77 and the beginning of veraison (BBCH 81. The phenylpyrroles derivative fudioxonil is among the most effective fungicides registered to control Botrytis cinerea. Its effectiveness was investigated in relation to spray timing, fungicide resistance and defence responses of grapevine. Frequencies of B. cinerea strains which were resistant to fungicides were evaluated at harvest. The frequencies of resistant phenotypes were similar in all treatments except for a class of multidrug resistant strains (MDR 1 whose frequency increased after fudioxonil applications. None of the treatments tested induced defence responses in flowers/berries after fungicide application, suggesting that fudioxonil effectiveness was not related to a stimulation of plant defence processes. The standard program of three fungicide applications provided the best control of B. cinerea  in the Champagne region in comparison with a single treatment of fudioxonil at any of the crop stages tested.

  2. Interaction of Ulocladium atrum, a Potential Biological Control Agent, with Botrytis cinerea and Grapevine Plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Ronseaux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of biological control agent, Ulocladium atrum (isolates U13 and U16 in protecting Vitis vinifera L. cv. Chardonnay against gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, and simulation of the foliar defense responses was investigated. A degraded mycelium structure during cultural assay on potato dextrose agar revealed that U. atrum isolates U13 and U16 were both antagonistic to B. cinerea, mainly when isolates were inoculated two days before Botrytis. Under in vitro conditions, foliar application of U. atrum protected grapevine leaves against gray mold disease. An increase in chitinase activity was induced by the presence of U. atrum isolates indicating that the biological control agents triggered plant defense mechanisms. Moreover, U13 has the potential to colonize the grapevine plantlets and to improve their growth. The ability of U. atrum isolates to exhibit an antagonistic effect against B. cinerea in addition to their aptitude to induce plant resistance and to promote grapevine growth may explain a part of their biological activity. Hence, this study suggests that U. atrum provides a suitable biocontrol agent against gray mold in grapevines.

  3. pH modulation differs during sunflower cotyledon colonization by the two closely related necrotrophic fungi Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Rascle, Christine; Droux, Michel; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Poussereau, Nathalie

    2012-08-01

    During pathogenesis on sunflower cotyledons, Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum show a striking resemblance in symptom development. Based on pH change profiles, the colonization process of both fungi can be divided into two stages. The first stage is associated with a pH decrease, resulting from an accumulation of citric and succinic acids. The second stage is correlated with a pH increase, resulting from an accumulation of ammonia. In this article, we also report that oxalic acid is produced at the late stage of the colonization process and that ammonia accumulation is concomitant with a decrease in free amino acids in decaying tissues. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum produces eight-fold more oxalic acid and two-fold less ammonia than B. cinerea. Consequently, during sunflower cotyledon colonization by B. cinerea, pH dynamics differ significantly from those of S. sclerotiorum. In vitro assays support the in planta results and show that decreases in pH are linked to glucose consumption. At different stages of the colonization process, expression profiles of genes encoding secreted proteases were investigated. This analysis highlights that the expression levels of the B. cinerea protease genes are higher than those of S. sclerotiorum. This work suggests that the overt similarities of S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea symptom development have probably masked our recognition of the dynamic and potentially different metabolic pathways active during host colonization by these two necrotrophic fungi. © 2011 Bayer Crop Science. Molecular Plant Pathology © 2011 BSPP and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Botrytis californica, a new cryptic species in the B. cinerea species complex causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Margosan, D; Michailides, T J; Xiao, C L

    2016-01-01

    The Botrytis cinerea species complex comprises two cryptic species, originally referred to Group I and Group II based on Bc-hch gene RFLP haplotyping. Group I was described as a new cryptic species B. pseudocinerea During a survey of Botrytis spp. causing gray mold in blueberries and table grapes in the Central Valley of California, six isolates, three from blueberries and three from table grapes, were placed in Group I but had a distinct morphological character with conidiophores significantly longer than those of B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea We compared these with B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea by examining morphological and physiological characters, sensitivity to fenhexamid and phylogenetic analysis inferred from sequences of three nuclear genes. Phylogenetic analysis with the three partial gene sequences encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60) and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2) supported the proposal of a new Botrytis species, B. californica, which is closely related genetically to B. cinerea, B. pseudocinerea and B. sinoviticola, all known as causal agents of gray mold of grapes. Botrytis californica caused decay on blueberry and table grape fruit inoculated with the fungus. This study suggests that B. californica is a cryptic species sympatric with B. cinerea on blueberries and table grapes in California. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  5. Gray Mold on Saintpaulia ionantha Caused by Botrytis cinerea in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Moo Kim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea occurred on Saintpaulia ionantha in flower shop of the Jeonju city in Korea. Typical symptoms with brown water-soaked and rotting lesions were appeared on the flowers, leaves and petiole of infected plants. Many conidia spores appeared on the lesions under humid conditions. Colonies were grayish brown and sclerotial formation on potato dextrose agar. Conidia were one celled, mostly ellipsoidal or ovoid in shape, and were colorless to pale brown in color. The conidia were 7~14×5~9 μm in size. Based on pathogenicity and morphological characteristics of the isolated fungus, the causal fungus was identified as B. cinerea Persoon: Fries. Gray mold of S. ionantha was proposed to the name of this disease.

  6. Tea tree oil exhibits antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea by affecting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Shao, Xingfeng; Xu, Jiayu; Wei, Yingying; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2017-11-01

    In order to investigate the effects of tea tree oil (TTO) on mitochondrial morphology and function in Botrytis cinerea, mycelia were treated with TTO at different concentrations. TTO at 2ml/l severely damaged mitochondria, resulting in matrix loss and increased mitochondrial irregularity. Mitochondrial membrane permeability was increased by TTO, as evidenced by a decrease in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and an increase in extracellular ATP content. Increasing concentrations of TTO decreased the activities of enzymes related to mitochondrial function and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, affecting malic dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, ATPase, citrate synthetase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, while sharply increasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that mitochondrial damage, resulting in the disruption of the TCA cycle and accumulation of ROS, is involved in the mechanism of TTO antifungal activity against B. cinerea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nicotiana benthamiana MAPK-WRKY pathway confers resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Ishihama, Nobuaki; Nakano, Takaaki; Yoshioka, Miki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2016-06-02

    MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascade, a Nicotiana benthamiana mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, is an essential signaling pathway for plant immunity and involved in hypersensitive response (HR) accompanied by cell death. WRKY transcription factors as substrates of SIPK and WIPK have been isolated and implicated in HR cell death. Here, we show virus-induced gene silencing of WRKY genes compromised constitutively active MEK2-triggered cell death in N. benthamiana leaves. In general, HR cell death enhances susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea. However, the WRKY gene silencing elevated susceptibility to B. cinerea. These findings suggest that downstream WRKYs of MEK2-SIPK/WIPK cascade are required for cell death-dependent and -independent immunities in N. benthamiana.

  8. Pouvoir pathogène de Botrytis cinerea sur Catharanthus roseus à ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectifs : Ce travail vise à mettre en évidence le pouvoir pathogène de Botrytis cinerea vis-à-vis de Catharantus roseus, espèce ornementale et médicinale, à différents stades végétatifs. Méthodologie et résultats : Des plantules de 4 à 5 feuilles (Lot S1) et des plantes en fleurs (Lot S2) de C. roseus ont été inoculées par les ...

  9. Hexanoic acid protects tomato plants against Botrytis cinerea by priming defence responses and reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiti, Ivan; de la O Leyva, María; Vicedo, Begonya; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; López-Cruz, Jaime; García-Agustín, Pilar; Real, Maria Dolores; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2014-08-01

    Treatment with the resistance priming inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) protects tomato plants from Botrytis cinerea by activating defence responses. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR), we compared the expression profiles of three different conditions: Botrytis-infected plants (Inf), Hx-treated plants (Hx) and Hx-treated + infected plants (Hx+Inf). The microarray analysis at 24 h post-inoculation showed that Hx and Hx+Inf plants exhibited the differential expression and priming of many Botrytis-induced genes. Interestingly, we found that the activation by Hx of other genes was not altered by the fungus at this time point. These genes may be considered to be specific targets of the Hx priming effect and may help to elucidate its mechanisms of action. It is noteworthy that, in Hx and Hx+Inf plants, there was up-regulation of proteinase inhibitor genes, DNA-binding factors, enzymes involved in plant hormone signalling and synthesis, and, remarkably, the genes involved in oxidative stress. Given the relevance of the oxidative burst occurring in plant-pathogen interactions, the effect of Hx on this process was studied in depth. We showed by specific staining that reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in Hx+Inf plants was reduced and more restricted around infection sites. In addition, these plants showed higher ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione and ascorbate, and normal levels of antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that Hx protects tomato plants from B. cinerea by regulating and priming Botrytis-specific and non-specific genes, preventing the harmful effects of oxidative stress produced by infection. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Genomic analysis of the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelle Amselem

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are closely related necrotrophic plant pathogenic fungi notable for their wide host ranges and environmental persistence. These attributes have made these species models for understanding the complexity of necrotrophic, broad host-range pathogenicity. Despite their similarities, the two species differ in mating behaviour and the ability to produce asexual spores. We have sequenced the genomes of one strain of S. sclerotiorum and two strains of B. cinerea. The comparative analysis of these genomes relative to one another and to other sequenced fungal genomes is provided here. Their 38-39 Mb genomes include 11,860-14,270 predicted genes, which share 83% amino acid identity on average between the two species. We have mapped the S. sclerotiorum assembly to 16 chromosomes and found large-scale co-linearity with the B. cinerea genomes. Seven percent of the S. sclerotiorum genome comprises transposable elements compared to <1% of B. cinerea. The arsenal of genes associated with necrotrophic processes is similar between the species, including genes involved in plant cell wall degradation and oxalic acid production. Analysis of secondary metabolism gene clusters revealed an expansion in number and diversity of B. cinerea-specific secondary metabolites relative to S. sclerotiorum. The potential diversity in secondary metabolism might be involved in adaptation to specific ecological niches. Comparative genome analysis revealed the basis of differing sexual mating compatibility systems between S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. The organization of the mating-type loci differs, and their structures provide evidence for the evolution of heterothallism from homothallism. These data shed light on the evolutionary and mechanistic bases of the genetically complex traits of necrotrophic pathogenicity and sexual mating. This resource should facilitate the functional studies designed to better understand what makes these

  11. Thermal inactivation of Botrytis cinerea conidia in synthetic medium and strawberry puree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Rojas, R; Sosa-Morales, M E; López-Malo, A; Tang, J

    2012-04-16

    Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important post-harvest molds that cause quality deterioration of strawberries and other fruits even during refrigeration storage. This research studied the effects of thermal inactivation of B. cinerea in synthetic medium and strawberry puree using hot water baths at different temperatures. These media were studied in order to determine if results obtained in a solution with the major components of the fruit (synthetic media), are comparable to the ones obtained in fruit purees. The results demonstrated that B. cinerea spores can be inactivated by heat treatments using relatively low temperatures (42-46 °C). Inactivation curves were well described by first order kinetics (R² 0.91-0.99). B. cinerea conidia inoculated in synthetic medium required less time to achieve one log reduction in population than those inoculated in the fruit puree. D values were 22, 8.5, 4 and 1.4 min at 42, 44, 46 and 48 °C, respectively, in synthetic medium; while D values in strawberry puree were 44.9, 13.8, 4.7 and 1.4 min at 42, 44, 46 and 48 °C, respectively. The z values obtained were 4.15 and 5.08 °C for the strawberry puree and synthetic medium respectively, showing higher sensitivity of B. cinerea in fruit purees than in the synthetic medium. Thus, a change in the medium composition had a marked difference in the heat inactivation of B. cinerea conidia, and the results obtained in synthetic medium are not accurate to describe the behavior of the microorganism in the fruit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. DEWAX Transcription Factor Is Involved in Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Seulgi; Go, Young Sam; Choi, Hyo Ju; Park, Jeong Mee; Suh, Mi Chung

    2017-01-01

    The cuticle of land plants is the first physical barrier to protect their aerial parts from biotic and abiotic stresses. DEWAX, an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor, negatively regulates cuticular wax biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa overexpressing DEWAX and in Arabidopsis dewax mutant. Compared to wild type (WT) leaves, Arabidopsis DEWAX OX and dewax leaves were more and less permeable to toluidine blue dye, respectively. The ROS levels increased in DEWAX OX leaves, but decreased in dewax relative to WT leaves. Compared to WT, DEWAX OX was more resistant, while dewax was more sensitive to B. cinerea; however, defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000:GFP were inversely modulated. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses indicated that the expression of defense-related genes was upregulated in DEWAX OX, but downregulated in dewax relative to WT. Transactivation assay showed that DEWAX upregulated the expression of PDF1.2a, IGMT1, and PRX37. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that DEWAX directly interacts with the GCC-box motifs of PDF1.2a promoter. In addition, ectopic expression of DEWAX increased the tolerance to B. cinerea in C. sativa. Taken together, we suggest that increased ROS accumulation and DEWAX-mediated upregulation of defense-related genes are closely associated with enhanced resistance to B. cinerea in Arabidopsis and C. sativa.

  13. DEWAX Transcription Factor Is Involved in Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulgi Ju

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle of land plants is the first physical barrier to protect their aerial parts from biotic and abiotic stresses. DEWAX, an AP2/ERF-type transcription factor, negatively regulates cuticular wax biosynthesis. In this study, we investigated the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana and Camelina sativa overexpressing DEWAX and in Arabidopsis dewax mutant. Compared to wild type (WT leaves, Arabidopsis DEWAX OX and dewax leaves were more and less permeable to toluidine blue dye, respectively. The ROS levels increased in DEWAX OX leaves, but decreased in dewax relative to WT leaves. Compared to WT, DEWAX OX was more resistant, while dewax was more sensitive to B. cinerea; however, defense responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000:GFP were inversely modulated. Microarray and RT-PCR analyses indicated that the expression of defense-related genes was upregulated in DEWAX OX, but downregulated in dewax relative to WT. Transactivation assay showed that DEWAX upregulated the expression of PDF1.2a, IGMT1, and PRX37. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that DEWAX directly interacts with the GCC-box motifs of PDF1.2a promoter. In addition, ectopic expression of DEWAX increased the tolerance to B. cinerea in C. sativa. Taken together, we suggest that increased ROS accumulation and DEWAX-mediated upregulation of defense-related genes are closely associated with enhanced resistance to B. cinerea in Arabidopsis and C. sativa.

  14. The Homeobox BcHOX8 Gene in Botrytis Cinerea Regulates Vegetative Growth and Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Zsuzsanna; Rascle, Christine; Cimerman, Agnès; Viaud, Muriel; Billon-Grand, Geneviève; Choquer, Mathias; Bruel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. PMID:23133556

  15. The homeobox BcHOX8 gene in Botrytis cinerea regulates vegetative growth and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna Antal

    Full Text Available Filamentous growth and the capacity at producing conidia are two critical aspects of most fungal life cycles, including that of many plant or animal pathogens. Here, we report on the identification of a homeobox transcription factor encoding gene that plays a role in these two particular aspects of the development of the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Deletion of the BcHOX8 gene in both the B. cinerea B05-10 and T4 strains causes similar phenotypes, among which a curved, arabesque-like, hyphal growth on hydrophobic surfaces; the mutants were hence named Arabesque. Expression of the BcHOX8 gene is higher in conidia and infection cushions than in developing appressorium or mycelium. In the Arabesque mutants, colony growth rate is reduced and abnormal infection cushions are produced. Asexual reproduction is also affected with abnormal conidiophore being formed, strongly reduced conidia production and dramatic changes in conidial morphology. Finally, the mutation affects the fungus ability to efficiently colonize different host plants. Analysis of the B. cinerea genome shows that BcHOX8 is one member of a nine putative homeobox genes family. Available gene expression data suggest that these genes are functional and sequence comparisons indicate that two of them would be specific to B. cinerea and its close relative Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

  16. Proteomic analysis of mycelium and secretome of different Botrytis cinerea wild-type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Aloria, Kerman; Valero-Galván, José; Redondo, Inmaculada; Arizmendi, Jesús M; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V

    2014-01-31

    The necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is a very damaging phytopathogen of wide host range and environmental persistence. It is difficult to control because of its genetic versatility, expressed in the many phenotypical differences among isolates. The genomes of the B. cinerea B05.10 and T4 strains have been recently sequenced, becoming a model system for necrotrophic pathogens, and thus opening new alternatives for functional genomics analysis. In this work, the mycelium and secreted proteome of six wild-type strains with different host range, and grown in liquid minimal medium, have been analyzed by using complementary gel-based (1-DE and 2-DE) and gel-free/label-free (nUPLC-MS(E)) approaches. We found differences in the protein profiles among strains belonging to both the mycelium and the secretome. A total of 47 and 51 variable proteins were identified in the mycelium and the secretome, respectively. Some of them, such as malate dehydrogenase or peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase from the mycelium, and endopolygalacturonase, aspartic protease or cerato-platanin protein from the secretome have been reported as virulence factors, which are involved in host-tissue invasion, pathogenicity or fungal development. The necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is an important phytopathogen of wide host range and environmental persistence, causing substantial economic losses worldwide. In this work, the mycelium and secreted proteome of six B. cinerea wild-type strains with different host range have been analyzed by using complementary gel-based and gel-free/label-free approaches. Fungal genetic versatility was confirmed at the proteome level for both mycelium proteome and secreted proteins. A high number of hypothetical proteins with conserved domains related to toxin compounds or to unknown functions were identified, having qualitative differences among strains. The identification of hypothetical proteins suggests that the B. cinerea strains differ mostly in processes

  17. Filamentous fungi isolated from grape marc as antagonists of Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić-Petrović Jelena P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on the isolation and identification of three filamentous fungi from grape marc, and antifungal effect of their cell-free culture filtrates on the growth of Botrytis cinerea, causal agent of gray mold. Grape marc is a waste material that has been used as soil amendment in sustainable agriculture. Isolates originating from grape marc were identified on the basis of morphological features and internal transcribed spacer rDNA or β-tubulin gene sequencing. The presence of three different species, Penicillium paneum, Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus fumigatus has been detected expressing different effect on the growth of B. cinerea. The effect of crude culture filtrates of selected fungi on B. cinerea growth was tested. Heat sensitivity of the established inhibition effect was examined by autoclaving the crude culture filtrate prior to testing. Additional aim was to determine whether antifungal effect was influenced by previous exposure to B. cinerea in dual liquid cultures. Crude culture filtrate of A. fumigatus K16/2 showed the lowest suppression of B. cinerea growth. A maximal percentage inhibition achieved within the study was 38.2%, 39.8% and 23.8 for crude filtrates of P. paneum K7/1, P. chrysogenum K11/1 and A. fumigatus K16/2, respectively. Presence of B. cinerea in dual liquid culture induced significant increase in antifungal capacity of the culture filtrates in comparison to pure culture filtrates of the chosen isolates. The antifungal activity of all of the isolates’ culture filtrates retained after heat treatment suggesting the presence of some thermostable antifungal metabolites. The results indicate the complexity and specificity of the interaction between filamentous fungi and B. cinerea. Grape marc is a good source for isolation od B. cinerea fungal antagonists and their antifungal metabolites. Specificity of fungal-fungal interactions suggests that further research on the antagonistic mechanisms and

  18. [Research of chemotaxis response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax on total ginsenosides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Kun; Xu, Yong-hua; Lei, Feng-jie; Yin, Min-jing; Wang, Zhuang; Zhang, Ai-hua; Zhang, Lian-xue

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, three kinds of chemotactic parameters (concentration, temperature and pH) were determined by plate assay and spore germination method to research the chemotactic response of Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria panax, and their spores on total ginsenosides. The results showed that Botrytis cinerea had strong chemotactic response at the mid-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 20 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.293 0, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.476 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 53%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.452 6 g x L(-1); however, Alternaria panax had strong chemotactic response at the low-concentration of total ginsenosides (cultivation temperature was 25 degrees C and pH value was 6), and the data of chemotactic migration index (CMI) was 1.235 4, chemotactic growth rate (CGR) was 0.537 0, spore germination rate (SGR) was 67%, and dry weight of mycelial (DWM) was 0.494 8 g x L(-1). The results indicated that the low and middle concentration (2, 20 mg x L(-1)) of total ginsenosides had significant promoting effect on chemotactic response of these two pathogens, and the spore germination, mycelial growth rate, dry weight of mycelial of them were also significantly improved by this chemotactic response, whereas it decreased as the increase of total ginsenosides concentration.

  19. Apoplastic nucleoside accumulation in Arabidopsis leads to reduced photosynthetic performance and increased susceptibility against Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eDaumann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Interactions between plant and pathogen often occur in the extracellular space and especially nucleotides like ATP and NAD have been identified as key players in this scenario. Arabidopsis mutants accumulating nucleosides in the extracellular space were generated and studied with respect to susceptibility against Botrytis cinerea infection and general plant fitness determined as photosynthetic performance. The mutants used are deficient in the main nucleoside uptake system ENT3 and the extracellular nucleoside hydrolase NSH3. When grown on soil but not in hydroponic culture, these plants markedly accumulate adenosine and uridine in leaves. This nucleoside accumulation was accpmpanied by reduced photosystem II efficiency and altered expression of photosynthesis related genes. Moreover, a higher susceptibility towards Botrytis cinerea infection and a reduced induction of pathogen related genes PR1 and WRKY33 was observed. All these effects did not occur in hydroponically grown plants substantiating a contribution of extracellular nucleosides to these effects. Whether reduced general plant fitness, altered pathogen response capability or more direct interactions with the pathogen are responsible for these observations is discussed.

  20. Trichothecenes and aspinolides produced by Trichoderma arundinaceum regulate expression of Botrytis cinerea genes involved in virulence and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichoderma arundinaceum (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea (B05.10) produce the sesquiterpenoids harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively. Ta'Tri5, an HA non-producer mutant, produces high levels of the polyketide compounds aspinolides (Asp) B and C. We analyzed the role of HA and Asp in the B. ...

  1. Inadvertent gene silencing of argininosuccinate synthase (bcass1) in Botrytis cinerea by the pLOB1 vector system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, R.M.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Bailey, A.M.; Foster, G.D.

    2010-01-01

    For several years, researchers working on the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea and a number of other related fungi have routinely used the pLOB1 vector system, based on hygromycin resistance, under the control of the Aspergillus nidulans oliC promoter and what was reported to be the ß-tubulin (tubA)

  2. Functional analysis of ABC transporter genes from Botrytis cinerea identifies BcatrB as a transporter of eugenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.; Nistelrooy, van J.G.M.; Waard, de M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of multiple ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter genes from the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea in protection against natural fungitoxic compounds was studied by expression analysis and phenotyping of gene-replacement mutants. The

  3. Optimisation of techniques for quantification of Botrytis cinerea in grape berries and receptacles by quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to detect and monitor pathogen colonization, but early attempts to apply the technology to Botrytis cinerea infection of grape berries have identified limitations to current techniques. In this study, four DNA extraction methods, two grinding methods, two grape or...

  4. Botrydial and botcinins produced by Botrytis cinerea regulate expression of Trichoderma arundinaceum genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichoderma arundinaceum (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea produce the sesquiterpenes harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively, and also the polyketides aspinolides (Asp) and botcinines (Botc), respectively. In the present work, we analyzed the role of BOT and Botcs in the T. arundinaceum-B. cin...

  5. Genomic Analysis of the Necrotrophic Fungal Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Ernesto P.; Couloux, Arnaud; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Dyer, Paul S.; Fillinger, Sabine; Fournier, Elisabeth; Gout, Lilian; Hahn, Matthias; Kohn, Linda; Lapalu, Nicolas; Plummer, Kim M.; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Quévillon, Emmanuel; Sharon, Amir; Simon, Adeline; ten Have, Arjen; Tudzynski, Bettina; Tudzynski, Paul; Wincker, Patrick; Andrew, Marion; Anthouard, Véronique; Beffa, Rolland; Benoit, Isabelle; Bouzid, Ourdia; Brault, Baptiste; Chen, Zehua; Choquer, Mathias; Collémare, Jérome; Cotton, Pascale; Danchin, Etienne G.; Da Silva, Corinne; Gautier, Angélique; Giraud, Corinne; Giraud, Tatiana; Gonzalez, Celedonio; Grossetete, Sandrine; Güldener, Ulrich; Henrissat, Bernard; Howlett, Barbara J.; Kodira, Chinnappa; Kretschmer, Matthias; Lappartient, Anne; Leroch, Michaela; Levis, Caroline; Mauceli, Evan; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Oeser, Birgitt; Pearson, Matthew; Poulain, Julie; Poussereau, Nathalie; Quesneville, Hadi; Rascle, Christine; Schumacher, Julia; Ségurens, Béatrice; Sexton, Adrienne; Silva, Evelyn; Sirven, Catherine; Soanes, Darren M.; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Templeton, Matt; Yandava, Chandri; Yarden, Oded; Zeng, Qiandong; Rollins, Jeffrey A.; Lebrun, Marc-Henri; Dickman, Marty

    2011-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are closely related necrotrophic plant pathogenic fungi notable for their wide host ranges and environmental persistence. These attributes have made these species models for understanding the complexity of necrotrophic, broad host-range pathogenicity. Despite their similarities, the two species differ in mating behaviour and the ability to produce asexual spores. We have sequenced the genomes of one strain of S. sclerotiorum and two strains of B. cinerea. The comparative analysis of these genomes relative to one another and to other sequenced fungal genomes is provided here. Their 38–39 Mb genomes include 11,860–14,270 predicted genes, which share 83% amino acid identity on average between the two species. We have mapped the S. sclerotiorum assembly to 16 chromosomes and found large-scale co-linearity with the B. cinerea genomes. Seven percent of the S. sclerotiorum genome comprises transposable elements compared to cinerea. The arsenal of genes associated with necrotrophic processes is similar between the species, including genes involved in plant cell wall degradation and oxalic acid production. Analysis of secondary metabolism gene clusters revealed an expansion in number and diversity of B. cinerea–specific secondary metabolites relative to S. sclerotiorum. The potential diversity in secondary metabolism might be involved in adaptation to specific ecological niches. Comparative genome analysis revealed the basis of differing sexual mating compatibility systems between S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. The organization of the mating-type loci differs, and their structures provide evidence for the evolution of heterothallism from homothallism. These data shed light on the evolutionary and mechanistic bases of the genetically complex traits of necrotrophic pathogenicity and sexual mating. This resource should facilitate the functional studies designed to better understand what makes these fungi such successful and

  6. A circadian oscillator in the fungus Botrytis cinerea regulates virulence when infecting Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, Montserrat A; Canessa, Paulo; Müller-Esparza, Hanna; Larrondo, Luis F

    2015-07-14

    The circadian clock of the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana modulates defense mechanisms impacting plant-pathogen interactions. Nevertheless, the effect of clock regulation on pathogenic traits has not been explored in detail. Moreover, molecular description of clocks in pathogenic fungi--or fungi in general other than the model ascomycete Neurospora crassa--has been neglected, leaving this type of question largely unaddressed. We sought to characterize, therefore, the circadian system of the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea to assess if such oscillatory machinery can modulate its virulence potential. Herein, we show the existence of a functional clock in B. cinerea, which shares similar components and circuitry with the Neurospora circadian system, although we found that its core negative clock element FREQUENCY (BcFRQ1) serves additional roles, suggesting extracircadian functions for this protein. We observe that the lesions produced by this necrotrophic fungus on Arabidopsis leaves are smaller when the interaction between these two organisms occurs at dawn. Remarkably, this effect does not depend solely on the plant clock, but instead largely relies on the pathogen circadian system. Genetic disruption of the B. cinerea oscillator by mutation, overexpression of BcFRQ1, or by suppression of its rhythmicity by constant light, abrogates circadian regulation of fungal virulence. By conducting experiments with out-of-phase light:dark cycles, we confirm that indeed, it is the fungal clock that plays the main role in defining the outcome of the Arabidopsis-Botrytis interaction, providing to our knowledge the first evidence of a microbial clock modulating pathogenic traits at specific times of the day.

  7. A multiplex PCR assay for the detection and quantification of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, J D; Alexander, T W; Chatterton, S

    2016-05-01

    Traditional culture methods for identifying the plant fungal pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary and Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr. are slow and laborious. The goal of this study was to develop a multiplex real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to detect and quantify DNA from S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. A primer set (SsIGS_5) for S. sclerotiorum was designed that targeted the intergenic spacer (IGS) regions of the ribosomal DNA. Addition of a probe to the assay increased its specificity: when the primer/probe set was tested against 21 fungal species (35 strains), amplification was detected from all S. sclerotiorum strains and no other species. For qPCR, the SsIGS_5 primer and probe set exhibited a linear range from 7·0 ng to 0·07 pg target DNA (R(2)  = 0·99). SsIGS_5 was then multiplexed with a previously published primer/probe set for B. cinerea to develop a high-throughput method for the detection and quantification of DNA from both pathogens. When multiplexed, the sensitivity and specificity of both assays were not different from individual qPCR reactions. The multiplex assay is currently being used to detect and quantify S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea DNA from aerosol samples collected in commercial seed alfalfa fields. A primer and probe set for the quantification of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum DNA in a PCR assay was developed. The probe-based nature of this assay signifies an improvement over previous assays for this species by allowing multiplex reactions while maintaining high sensitivity. The primer/probe set was used in a multiplex real-time PCR assay for the quantification of S. sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea DNA, enabling rapid analysis of environmental samples. In crops susceptible to both pathogens, this multiplex assay can be used to quickly quantify the presence of each pathogen. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology. Reproduced with the permission of the Office of the

  8. Biological characteristics and resistance analysis of the novel fungicide SYP-1620 against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoke; Wu, Dongxia; Duan, Yabing; Ge, Changyan; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo; Chen, Changjun

    2014-09-01

    SYP-1620, a quinone-outside-inhibitor (QoI), is a novel broad-spectrum fungicide. In this study, 108 isolates of Botrytis cinerea from different geographical regions in Jiangsu Province of China were characterized for baseline sensitivity to SYP-1620. The curves of baseline sensitivity were unimodal with a mean EC50 value of 0.0130±0.0109 μg/mL for mycelial growth, 0.01147±0.0062 μg/mL for spore germination, respectively. The biological characterization of SYP-1620 against B. cinerea was determined in vitro. The results indicated that SYP-1620 has a strong inhibiting effect on spore germination, mycelial growth, and respiration. The protective and curative test of SYP-1620 suggested that protective effect was better than curative either on strawberry leaves or on cucumber leaves in vivo. In addition, the biological characterization of SYP-1620-resistant mutants of B. cinerea was investigated. SYP-1620 has no cross-resistance with other types of fungicide. Compared to the sensitive isolates, the resistant mutants had lower mycelial growth and virulence but not differ in mycelial dry weight. Sequencing indicated that SYP-1620 resistance was associated with a single point mutation (G143A) in the cytochrome b gene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expansive Phenotypic Landscape of Botrytis cinerea Shows Differential Contribution of Genetic Diversity and Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Jason A; Subedy, Anushriya; Eshbaugh, Robert; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    The modern evolutionary synthesis suggests that both environmental variation and genetic diversity are critical determinants of pathogen success. However, the relative contribution of these two sources of variation is not routinely measured. To estimate the relative contribution of plasticity and genetic diversity for virulence-associated phenotypes in a generalist plant pathogen, we grew a population of 15 isolates of Botrytis cinerea from throughout the world, under a variety of in vitro and in planta conditions. Under in planta conditions, phenotypic differences between the isolates were determined by the combination of genotypic variation within the pathogen and environmental variation. In contrast, phenotypic differences between the isolates under in vitro conditions were predominantly determined by genetic variation in the pathogen. Using a correlation network approach, we link the phenotypic variation under in vitro experimental conditions to phenotypic variation during plant infection. This study indicates that there is a high level of phenotypic variation within B. cinerea that is controlled by a mixture of genetic variation, environment, and genotype × environment. This argues that future experiments into the pathogenicity of B. cinerea must account for the genetic and environmental variation within the pathogen to better sample the potential phenotypic space of the pathogen.

  10. The novel elicitor AsES triggers a defense response against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hael-Conrad, V; Abou-Mansour, E; Díaz-Ricci, J-C; Métraux, J-P; Serrano, M

    2015-12-01

    AsES (Acremonium strictum Elicitor and Subtilisin) is a novel extracellular elicitor protein produced by the avirulent isolate SS71 of the opportunist strawberry fungal pathogen A. strictum. Here we describe the activity of AsES in the plant-pathogen system Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea. We show that AsES renders A. thaliana plants resistant to the necrotrophic pathogen B. cinerea, both locally and systemically and the defense response observed is dose-dependent. Systemic, but not local resistance is dependent on the length of exposure to AsES. The germination of the spores in vitro was not inhibited by AsES, implying that protection to B. cinerea is due to the induction of the plant defenses. These results were further supported by the findings that AsES differentially affects mutants impaired in the response to salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene, suggesting that AsES triggers the defense response through these three signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BcIEB1, a Botrytis cinerea secreted protein, elicits a defense response in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías, Marcos; González, Mario; González, Celedonio; Brito, Nélida

    2016-09-01

    BcIEB1 is a very abundant protein in the secretome of Botrytis cinerea but it has no known function and no similarity to any characterized protein family. Previous results suggested that this protein is an elicitor of the plant defense system. In this work we have generated loss-of-function B. cinerea mutants lacking BcIEB1 and we have expressed the protein in yeast to assay its activity on plants. Analysis of the Δbcieb1 mutants did not result in any observable phenotype, including no difference in the virulence on a variety of hosts. However, when BcIEB1 was applied to plant tissues it produced necrosis as well as a whole range of symptoms: inhibition of seedling growth in Arabidopsis and tobacco, ion leakage from tobacco leaf disks, a ROS burst, cell death and autofluorescence in onion epidermis, as well as the expression of defense genes in tobacco. Moreover, tobacco plants treated with BcIEB1 showed an increased systemic resistance to B. cinerea. A small 35-amino acids peptide derived from a conserved region of BcIEB1 is almost as active on plants as the whole protein. These results clearly indicate that BcIEB1 elicits plant defenses, probably as a consequence of its recognition as a pathogen associated molecular pattern. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antifungal activity of β-carbolines on Penicillium digitatum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Gabriela M; Cerioni, Luciana; González, M Micaela; Cabrerizo, Franco M; Rapisarda, Viviana A; Volentini, Sabrina I

    2017-04-01

    β-carbolines (βCs) are alkaloids widely distributed in nature that have demonstrated antimicrobial properties. Here, we tested in vitro six βCs against Penicillium digitatum and Botrytis cinerea, causal agents of postharvest diseases on fruit and vegetables. Full aromatic βCs (harmine, harmol, norharmane and harmane) exhibited a marked inhibitory effect on conidia germination at concentrations between 0.5 and 1 mM, while dihydro-βCs (harmalina and harmalol) only caused germination delay. Harmol showed the highest inhibitory effect on both fungal pathogens. After 24 h of exposure to 1 mM harmol, conidia revealed a severe cellular damage, exhibiting disorganized cytoplasm and thickened cell wall. Harmol antimicrobial effect was fungicidal on B. cinerea, while it was fungistatic on P. digitatum. Conidia membrane permeabilization was detected in treatments with harmol at sub-inhibitory and inhibitory concentrations, for both pathogens. In addition, residual infectivity of P. digitatum on lemons and B. cinerea on blueberries was significantly reduced after exposure to this alkaloid. It also inhibited mycelial growth, preventing sporulation at the highest concentration tested. These results indicate that harmol might be a promising candidate as a new antifungal molecule to control causal agents of fruit diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Botrytis cinerea protein O-mannosyltransferases play critical roles in morphogenesis, growth, and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario González

    Full Text Available Protein O-glycosylation is crucial in determining the structure and function of numerous secreted and membrane-bound proteins. In fungi, this process begins with the addition of a mannose residue by protein O-mannosyltransferases (PMTs in the lumen side of the ER membrane. We have generated mutants of the three Botrytis cinerea pmt genes to study their role in the virulence of this wide-range plant pathogen. B. cinerea PMTs, especially PMT2, are critical for the stability of the cell wall and are necessary for sporulation and for the generation of the extracellular matrix. PMTs are also individually required for full virulence in a variety of hosts, with a special role in the penetration of intact plant leaves. The most significant case is that of grapevine leaves, whose penetration requires the three functional PMTs. Furthermore, PMT2 also contributes significantly to fungal adherence on grapevine and tobacco leaves. Analysis of extracellular and membrane proteins showed significant changes in the pattern of protein secretion and glycosylation by the pmt mutants, and allowed the identification of new protein substrates putatively glycosylated by specific PMTs. Since plants do no possess these enzymes, PMTs constitute a promising target in the development of novel control strategies against B. cinerea.

  14. Modes of action for biological control of Botrytis cinerea by antagonistic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana HAIDAR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of beneficial bacteria in biocontrol of plant diseases, particularly those caused by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, has been investigated by testing many bacteria under laboratory and field conditions. Bacteria may protect plants against B. cinerea by direct antagonistic interactions between biocontrol agents and this pathogen, as well as indirect effects through the induction of host resistance. This review focuses on various bacteria that act as biological control agents (BCAs of B. cinerea and their associated mechanisms. The modes of action (MoAs include: i synthesis of anti-fungal metabolites, such as antibiotics, cell wall-degrading enzymes and volatile organic compounds (VOCs; ii competition for nutrients and/or a niche; and iii induction of host resistance. The challenge for development of BCAs is to reduce the variability of efficiency and to prove persistence under a large range of conditions. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of MoA for future applications of bacteria in the field and in post-harvest storage, as well as combination of different MoAs as a strategy to achieve a more regular efficacy.

  15. Development of Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr. on leaves of common poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kułek

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of Botrytis cinerea was assessed on six cultivars of common poinsettia, differing in the colour of bracts, and being in great demand among buyers of these ornamental plants. Resistance to this pathogen differed in the investigated poinsettias. Cultivar 'Malibu Red' (red bracts turned out to be most susceptible, while cv. 'Marblestar' (cream-pink and cv. 'Coco White' (white - relatively resistant to this fungus. After application of various inoculation methods (leaf discs, cut off leaves, whole plants the differences in resistance to B. cinerea were confirmed for two extreme cultivars - susceptible ('Malibu Red' and resistant ('Coco White', which indicated genetic background of this polymorphism. The rate of disease development on poinsettia leaves was affected by the amount of spores used for inoculation (optimum density of 3.5·105 B. cinerea conidia / ml suspension and the addition of stimulants (0.1 M glucose with 0.05 M KH2PO4, which facilitated germination and infection of the host tissue. The inoculated poinsettia leaves showed high stability of plasma membranes. In the susceptible cultivar, in spite of the development of necrotic spots, a significant increase in the membrane damage index (by 13% was found only on day 7 of the disease development.

  16. Use of 1-methylcyclopropene for the control of Botrytis cinerea on cut flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Seglie

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cut flowers are marketed for their ornamental characteristics making post-harvest flower life an important determinant of crop value. Botrytis cinerea is one of the most significant post-harvest fungal pathogens causing losses in ornamental plants. Disease caused by this fungus seems to be enhanced by the presence of a ethylene hormone, that both the plant and the fungus are known to synthesize. The aim of the experiment was to determine if 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP, an ethylene antagonist, could be used to reduce B. cinerea damage to cut flowers. Six cultivars of four ornamental species: Dianthus caryophyllus ‘Idra di Muraglia’, Rosa × hybrida ‘White Dew’ and ‘Ritz’, Ranunculus asiaticus ‘Saigon’ and ‘Green’, and Cyclamen persicum line ‘Halios Bianco Puro Compatto’ were given three concentrations of 1-MCP (0.38 μl L-1, 1.14 μL L-1, and 3.62 μL L-1 for 24 hours. Subsequently, 10 petals per cultivar were treated with a B. cinerea conidial suspension (5×103 conidia cm-2 and stored in air-tight vases. To evaluate B. cinerea development an arbitrary damage scale (1–7 was used. A high concentration of 1-MCP significantly reduced B. cinerea damage on D. caryophyllus ‘Idra di Muraglia’ and C. persicum ‘Halios White Pure Compact’ petals. In carnation, 1-MCP treatment slowed B. cinerea infection; its threshold level was reached three days after that of the control. In cyclamen, treated petals and control petals remained aesthetically good until day 53 and day 28 respectively. At low concentrations, 1-MCP slowed grey mould on R. × hybrida ‘Ritz’ for up to three days beyond the control. On the two buttercup cultivars ‘Green’ and ‘Saigon’, 1-MCP treatments were not effective. In conclusion, 1-MCP limited pathogen development; its effect depended on the species and the 1-MCP concentration. Further investigations will be performed to improve methods to reduce B. cinerea development on the petals of cut

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of Botrytis cinerea genes targeting plant cell walls during infections of different hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Morales-Cruz, Abraham; Amrine, Katherine C. H.; Labavitch, John M.; Powell, Ann L. T.; Cantu, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are barriers that impair colonization of host tissues, but also are important reservoirs of energy-rich sugars. Growing hyphae of necrotrophic fungal pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Botrytis, henceforth), secrete enzymes that disassemble cell wall polysaccharides. In this work we describe the annotation of 275 putative secreted Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZymes) identified in the Botrytis B05.10 genome. Using RNAseq we determined which Botrytis CAZymes were expressed during infections of lettuce leaves, ripe tomato fruit, and grape berries. On the three hosts, Botrytis expressed a common group of 229 potentially secreted CAZymes, including 28 pectin backbone-modifying enzymes, 21 hemicellulose-modifying proteins, 18 enzymes that might target pectin and hemicellulose side-branches, and 16 enzymes predicted to degrade cellulose. The diversity of the Botrytis CAZymes may be partly responsible for its wide host range. Thirty-six candidate CAZymes with secretion signals were found exclusively when Botrytis interacted with ripe tomato fruit and grape berries. Pectin polysaccharides are notably abundant in grape and tomato cell walls, but lettuce leaf walls have less pectin and are richer in hemicelluloses and cellulose. The results of this study not only suggest that Botrytis targets similar wall polysaccharide networks on fruit and leaves, but also that it may selectively attack host wall polysaccharide substrates depending on the host tissue. PMID:25232357

  18. Role of sterol 3-ketoreductase sensitivity in susceptibility to the fungicide fenhexamid in Botrytis cinerea and other phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debieu, Danièle; Bach, Jocelyne; Montesinos, Emeline; Fillinger, Sabine; Leroux, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The narrow-spectrum fungicide fenhexamid was introduced into French vineyards in 2000 to control grey mould caused by a complex of two cryptic species: Botrytis cinerea, the predominant species sensitive to fenhexamid, and Botrytis pseudocinerea, naturally resistant. Fenhexamid was suggested to inhibit the 3-ketoreductase involved at C-4 demethylation steps during ergosterol biosynthesis, as revealed by its effects on the B. cinerea sterol profile. Resistance monitoring studies have hitherto identified two B. cinerea fenhexamid-resistant phenotypes, both resulting from mutations in the erg27 gene encoding 3-ketoreductase. The role of 3-ketoreductase sensitivity in fungal susceptibility to fenhexamid was investigated by studying sterol profiles and microsomal 3-ketoreductase in various fungal strains. Fenhexamid does inhibit B. cinerea 3-ketoreductase activity. Erg27 mutations causing amino acid substitutions in or near the transmembrane domain strongly decrease the affinity of fenhexamid for 3-ketoreductase. Fenhexamid has very low affinities for 3-ketoreductase in inherently resistant species, whether closely related to B. cinerea, like B. pseudocinerea, or more distantly related, like Nectria haematococca. erg27 mutation and erg27 polymorphism may therefore contribute to the unfavourable binding of fenhexamid to its target, 3-ketoreductase, explaining the acquisition of fenhexamid resistance in B. cinerea and the narrow spectrum of this fungicide. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Fungicide resistance profiling in Botrytis cinerea populations from blueberries in California and Washington and their impact on control of gray mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is a major postharvest disease of blueberries grown in the Central Valley of California (CA) and western Washington State (WA). Sensitivities to boscalid, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, fludioxonil, and pyraclostrobin, representing five different fungicide classes, were...

  20. Solidago canadensis L. Essential Oil Vapor Effectively Inhibits Botrytis cinerea Growth and Preserves Postharvest Quality of Strawberry as a Food Model System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Shumin; Shao, Xingfeng; Wei, Yanzhen; Li, Yonghua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L. essential oil (SCLEO) against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits...

  1. Identification and Characterization of Botrytis Blossom Blight of Japanese Plums Caused by Botrytis cinerea and B. prunorum sp. nov. in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrada, Enrique E; Latorre, Bernardo A; Zoffoli, Juan P; Castillo, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Blossom blight is a destructive disease of plums (Prunus salicina) when humid and temperate weather conditions occur in Chile. Disease incidence ranging from 4 to 53% has been observed. Symptoms include light brown petal necrosis, starting as light brown mottles or V-shaped necrosis at the margins of the petals, progressing to the stamen and pistils. In this study, the etiology of blossom blight of plums was determined. High- and low-sporulating isolates of Botrytis were obtained consistently from blighted blossoms and apparently healthy flowers of plums. Based on colony morphology, conidial production and molecular phylogenetic analysis, these high- and low-sporulating isolates were identified as B. cinerea and B. prunorum sp. nov., respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the genes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat-shock protein 60 (HSP60), and DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit II (RPB2) grouped B. prunorum isolates in a single cluster, distantly from B. cinerea and other Botrytis species. The phylogenetic analysis of necrosis and ethylene-inducing protein (NEP1 and NEP2) genes corroborated these results. Analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and large-subunit (26S) ribosomal DNA and detection of Boty and Flipper transposable elements, were not useful to differentiate between these Botrytis species. Both species were pathogenic on plum flowers and the fruit of plums, apples, and kiwifruits. However, B. prunorum was less virulent than B. cinerea. These pathogens were re-isolated from inoculated and diseased tissues; thus, Koch's postulates were fulfilled, confirming its role in blossom blight of plums. B. cinerea was predominant, suggesting that B. prunorum may play a secondary role in the epidemiology of blossom blight in plums in Chile. This study clearly demonstrated that the etiology of blossom blight of plums is caused by B. cinerea and B. prunorum, which constitute a species complex living in sympatry on plums and possibly

  2. Antifungal Activity of Bacillus coagulans TQ33, Isolated from Skimmed Milk Powder, against Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Feng Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus coagulans TQ33 is isolated from the skimmed milk powder and has a broad antifungal activity against pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria solani, Phytophthora drechsleri Tucker, Fusarium oxysporum and Glomerella cingulata. The characteristics of active antifungal substances produced by B. coagulans TQ33 and its antifungal effects against the growth of plant pathogenic fungi has been evaluated. The effect of pH, temperature and protease on the antifungal activity of B. coagulans TQ33 was determined. The results of partial characterization of the antifungal compound indicated that its activity is likely to be due to the production of a proteinaceous substance together with other substances. The greenhouse trials suggest that B. coagulans TQ33 has a great potential for the control of plant pathogenic fungi.

  3. Growth Simulation and Discrimination of Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum Using Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Sun

    Full Text Available This research aimed to develop a rapid and nondestructive method to model the growth and discrimination of spoilage fungi, like Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum, based on hyperspectral imaging system (HIS. A hyperspectral imaging system was used to measure the spectral response of fungi inoculated on potato dextrose agar plates and stored at 28°C and 85% RH. The fungi were analyzed every 12 h over two days during growth, and optimal simulation models were built based on HIS parameters. The results showed that the coefficients of determination (R2 of simulation models for testing datasets were 0.7223 to 0.9914, and the sum square error (SSE and root mean square error (RMSE were in a range of 2.03-53.40×10(-4 and 0.011-0.756, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the HIS parameters and colony forming units of fungi were high from 0.887 to 0.957. In addition, fungi species was discriminated by partial least squares discrimination analysis (PLSDA, with the classification accuracy of 97.5% for the test dataset at 36 h. The application of this method in real food has been addressed through the analysis of Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum inoculated in peaches, demonstrating that the HIS technique was effective for simulation of fungal infection in real food. This paper supplied a new technique and useful information for further study into modeling the growth of fungi and detecting fruit spoilage caused by fungi based on HIS.

  4. Wounding induces local resistance but systemic susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in pepper plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Tania; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Veloso, Javier; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Díaz, José

    2015-03-15

    Cotyledon wounding in pepper caused the early generation of hydrogen peroxide both locally (cotyledons) and systemically (upper true leaves). However, 72 h later there is a different wound response between local and systemic organs, as shown by resistance to the pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea, that increased locally and decreased systemically. Signaling by ethylene and jasmonic acid was assessed by using two inhibitors: 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP, inhibitor of ethylene receptors) and ibuprofen (inhibitor of jasmonate biosynthesis). MCP did not affect the modulation of resistance levels to Botrytis by wounding, ruling out the involvement of ethylene signaling. Ibuprofen did not inhibit wound-induced resistance at the local level, but inhibited wound-induced systemic susceptibility. Moreover, changes of biochemical and structural defenses in response to wounding were studied. Peroxidase activity and the expression of a peroxidase gene (CAPO1) increased locally as a response to wounding, but no changes were observed systemically. Lignin deposition was induced in wounded cotyledons, but was repressed in systemic leaves of wounded plants, whereas soluble phenolics did not change locally and decreased systemically. The expression of two other genes involved in plant defense (CABPR1 and CASC1) was also differentially regulated locally and systemically, pointing to a generalized increase in plant defenses at the local level and a systemic decrease as a response to wounding. Wound-induced defenses at the local level coincided with resistance to the necrotroph fungus B. cinerea, whereas depleted defenses in systemic leaves of wounded plants correlated to induced susceptibility against this pathogen. It may be that the local response acts as a sink of energy resources to mount a defense against pathogens, whereas in systemic organs the resources for defense are lower. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth Simulation and Discrimination of Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum Using Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ye; Gu, Xinzhe; Wang, Zhenjie; Huang, Yangmin; Wei, Yingying; Zhang, Miaomiao; Tu, Kang; Pan, Leiqing

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a rapid and nondestructive method to model the growth and discrimination of spoilage fungi, like Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum, based on hyperspectral imaging system (HIS). A hyperspectral imaging system was used to measure the spectral response of fungi inoculated on potato dextrose agar plates and stored at 28°C and 85% RH. The fungi were analyzed every 12 h over two days during growth, and optimal simulation models were built based on HIS parameters. The results showed that the coefficients of determination (R2) of simulation models for testing datasets were 0.7223 to 0.9914, and the sum square error (SSE) and root mean square error (RMSE) were in a range of 2.03-53.40×10(-4) and 0.011-0.756, respectively. The correlation coefficients between the HIS parameters and colony forming units of fungi were high from 0.887 to 0.957. In addition, fungi species was discriminated by partial least squares discrimination analysis (PLSDA), with the classification accuracy of 97.5% for the test dataset at 36 h. The application of this method in real food has been addressed through the analysis of Botrytis cinerea, Rhizopus stolonifer and Colletotrichum acutatum inoculated in peaches, demonstrating that the HIS technique was effective for simulation of fungal infection in real food. This paper supplied a new technique and useful information for further study into modeling the growth of fungi and detecting fruit spoilage caused by fungi based on HIS.

  6. Defense responses regulated by jasmonate and delayed senescence caused by ethylene receptor mutation contribute to tolerance of petunia to Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    The death of cells can be a programmed event that occurs when plants are attacked by pathogens. Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), a model necrotrophic pathogen, triggers the host cell death response because it produces toxins. A hypersensitive reaction (HR) occurs at the site of contact. In Arabidopsis...

  7. Physcomitrella patens activates reinforcement of the cell wall, programmed cell death and accumulation of evolutionary conserved defense signals...upon Botrytis cinerea infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is an evolutionarily basal model system suitable to analyze plant defense responses activated after pathogen assault. Upon infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), several defense mechanisms are induced in P. patens, including the fortification of t...

  8. Effects and possible mechanism of tea tree oil against Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum in vitro and in vivo test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yonghua; Shao, Xingfeng; Xu, Jiayu; Wei, Yingying; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal activities and possible mechanisms of tea tree oil (TTO) against Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum in vitro and in vivo. The results show that TTO exhibits dose-dependent antifungal activity against both pathogens, but P. expansum is less sensitive than B. cinerea to TTO not only in the in vitro test but also in artificially inoculated cherry fruits. TTO vapor treatment reduced the decay caused by these pathogens in inoculated cherry fruits, but the effect on P. expansum was less than that on B. cinerea. While the total lipid and ergosterol contents of the cell membrane are greater in P. expansum than in B. cinerea, TTO treatment lowers the total lipid content in the membranes of both species by well over 50%, and ergosterol content is reduced to a greater extent in B. cinerea than in P. expansum. In both pathogens, TTO alters mycelial morphology and cellular ultrastructure. Oxygen consumption measurements show that TTO inhibits respiratory metabolism via the tricarboxylic acid cycle pathway in both pathogens, though more severely in B. cinerea than in P. expansum. The relatively decreased sensitivity of P. expansum to TTO may be due to the fact that TTO causes less disruption of the cell membrane in this organism, and higher inhibition the respiratory metabolism to the extent observed in B. cinerea.

  9. ABA Suppresses Botrytis cinerea Elicited NO Production in Tomato to Influence H2O2 Generation and Increase Host Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Anushen; Akinyemi, Aderemi; Mandon, Julian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Hall, Michael A.; Harren, Frans J. M.; Mur, Luis A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) production has emerged a susceptibility factor in plant-pathogen interactions. This work examined the interaction of ABA with nitric oxide (NO) in tomato following challenge with the ABA-synthesizing pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Trace gas detection using a quantum cascade laser detected NO production within minutes of challenge with B. cinerea whilst photoacoustic laser detection detected ethylene production – an established mediator of defense against this pathogen – occurring after 6 h. Application of the NO generation inhibitor N-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) suppressed both NO and ethylene production and resistance against B. cinerea. The tomato mutant sitiens fails to accumulate ABA, shows increased resistance to B. cinerea and we noted exhibited elevated NO and ethylene production. Exogenous application of L-NAME or ABA reduced NO production in sitiens and reduced resistance to B. cinerea. Increased resistance to B. cinerea in sitiens have previously been linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation but this was reduced in both L-NAME and ABA-treated sitiens. Taken together, our data suggests that ABA can decreases resistance to B. cinerea via reduction of NO production which also suppresses both ROS and ethylene production. PMID:27252724

  10. ABA suppresses Botrytis cinerea elicited NO production in tomato to influence H2O2 generation and increase host susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anushen eSivakumaran

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA production has emerged a susceptibility factor in plant-pathogen interactions. This work examined the interaction of ABA with NO in tomato following challenge with the ABA-synthesising pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Trace gas detection using a quantum cascade laser detected NO production within minutes of challenge with B. cinerea whilst photoacoustic laser detection detected ethylene production – an established mediator of defence against this pathogen - occurring after 6 h. Application of the NO generation inhibitor N-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME suppressed both NO and ethylene production and resistance against B. cinerea. The tomato mutant sitiens fails to accumulate ABA (abscisic acid, shows increased resistance to B. cinerea and we noted exhibited elevated NO and ethylene production. Exogenous application of L-NAME or ABA reduced NO production in sitiens and reduced resistance to B. cinerea. Increased resistance to B. cinerea in sitiens have previously been linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation but this was reduced in both L-NAME and ABA treated sitiens. Taken together, our data suggests that ABA can decreases resistance to B. cinerea via reduction of NO production which also suppresses both ROS and ethylene production.

  11. ABA Suppresses Botrytis cinerea Elicited NO Production in Tomato to Influence H2O2 Generation and Increase Host Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Anushen; Akinyemi, Aderemi; Mandon, Julian; Cristescu, Simona M; Hall, Michael A; Harren, Frans J M; Mur, Luis A J

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) production has emerged a susceptibility factor in plant-pathogen interactions. This work examined the interaction of ABA with nitric oxide (NO) in tomato following challenge with the ABA-synthesizing pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Trace gas detection using a quantum cascade laser detected NO production within minutes of challenge with B. cinerea whilst photoacoustic laser detection detected ethylene production - an established mediator of defense against this pathogen - occurring after 6 h. Application of the NO generation inhibitor N-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) suppressed both NO and ethylene production and resistance against B. cinerea. The tomato mutant sitiens fails to accumulate ABA, shows increased resistance to B. cinerea and we noted exhibited elevated NO and ethylene production. Exogenous application of L-NAME or ABA reduced NO production in sitiens and reduced resistance to B. cinerea. Increased resistance to B. cinerea in sitiens have previously been linked to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation but this was reduced in both L-NAME and ABA-treated sitiens. Taken together, our data suggests that ABA can decreases resistance to B. cinerea via reduction of NO production which also suppresses both ROS and ethylene production.

  12. The p450 monooxygenase BcABA1 is essential for abscisic acid biosynthesis in Botrytis cinerea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siewers, V.; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Tudzynski, P.

    2004-01-01

    The phytopathogenic ascomycete Botrytis cinerea is known to produce abscisic acid (ABA), which is thought to be involved in host-pathogen interaction. Biochemical analyses had previously shown that, in contrast to higher plants, the fungal ABA biosynthesis probably does not proceed via carotenoids...... but involves direct cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate and subsequent oxidation steps. We present here evidence that this "direct" pathway is indeed the only one used by an ABA-overproducing strain of B. cinerea. Targeted inactivation of the gene bccpr1 encoding a cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase reduced...

  13. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event.

  14. Modifications of fungal membrane proteins profile under pathogenicity induction: A proteomic analysis of Botrytis cinerea membranome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñeiro, Eva; Chiva, Cristina; Cantoral, Jesús M; Sabidó, Eduard; Fernández-Acero, Francisco Javier

    2016-09-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a model fungus for the study of phytopathogenicity that exhibits a wide arsenal of tools to infect plant tissues. Most of these factors are related to signal transduction cascades, in which membrane proteins play a key role as a bridge between environment and intracellular molecular processes. This work describes the first description of the membranome of Botrytis under different pathogenicity conditions induced by different plant-based elicitors: glucose and tomato cell wall (TCW). A discovery proteomics analysis of membrane proteins was carried out by mass spectrometry. A total of 2794 proteins were successfully identified, 46% of them were classified as membrane proteins based on the presence of transmembrane regions and lipidation. Further analyses showed significant differences in the membranome composition depending on the available carbon source: 804 proteins were exclusively identified when the fungus was cultured with glucose as a sole carbon source, and 251 proteins were exclusively identified with TCW. Besides, among the 1737 common proteins, a subset of 898 proteins presented clear differences in their abundance. GO enrichment and clustering interaction analysis revealed changes in the composition of membranome with increase of signalling function in glucose conditions and carbohydrate degradation process in TCW conditions. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003099 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD003099). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Dynamics in the Strawberry Rhizosphere Microbiome in Response to Biochar and Botrytis cinerea Leaf Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tender, Caroline; Haegeman, Annelies; Vandecasteele, Bart; Clement, Lieven; Cremelie, Pieter; Dawyndt, Peter; Maes, Martine; Debode, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Adding biochar, the solid coproduct of biofuel production, to peat can enhance strawberry growth, and disease resistance against the airborne fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Additionally, biochar can induce shifts in the strawberry rhizosphere microbiome. However, the moment that this biochar-mediated shift occurs in the rhizosphere is not known. Further, the effect of an above-ground infection on the strawberry rhizosphere microbiome is unknown. In the present study we established two experiments in which strawberry transplants (cv. Elsanta) were planted either in peat or in peat amended with 3% biochar. First, we established a time course experiment to measure the effect of biochar on the rhizosphere bacterial and fungal communities over time. In a second experiment, we inoculated the strawberry leaves with B. cinerea, and studied the impact of the infection on the rhizosphere bacterial community. The fungal rhizosphere community was stabilized after 1 week, except for the upcoming Auriculariales, whereas the bacterial community shifted till 6 weeks. An effect of the addition of biochar to the peat on the rhizosphere microbiome was solely measured for the bacterial community from week 6 of plant growth onwards. When scoring the plant development, biochar addition was associated with enhanced root formation, fruit production, and postharvest resistance of the fruits against B. cinerea. We hypothesize that the bacterial rhizosphere microbiome, but also biochar-mediated changes in chemical substrate composition could be involved in these events. Infection of the strawberry leaves with B. cinerea induced shifts in the bacterial rhizosphere community, with an increased bacterial richness. This disease-induced effect was not observed in the rhizospheres of the B. cinerea-infected plants grown in the biochar-amended peat. The results show that an above-ground infection has its effect on the strawberry rhizosphere microbiome, changing the bacterial interactions in the

  16. Antifungal Screening of Bioprotective Isolates against Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium pallidoroseum and Fusarium moniliforme

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    Antoinette de Senna

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium pallidoroseum, and Fusarium moniliforme are the causative agents of several plant diseases and can cause significant crop loss both before and after harvest. Fungicides are employed to control these phytopathogens, but fungicide use has led to an increase in resistance and may negatively affect the environment and human health. Hence, more environmentally sustainable solutions such as biological control methods are needed. The purpose of this study was to screen 22 bacterial isolates for inhibitory activity against fungal phytopathogens. To evaluate antifungal activity, the bacterial isolates were individually spot-inoculated onto Tryptic Soy Agar or de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe agar, and then a plug of fungal-colonized agar was placed onto the center of the isolate-inoculated plate. Plates were incubated at 24 °C for 10 days and fungal growth was evaluated. Nine of the 22 isolates screened inhibited all three fungi; inhibition by these isolates ranged from 51–62%, 60–68%, and 40–61% for B. cinerea, F. pallidoroseum, and F. moniliforme, respectively. Isolates were also screened for biosurfactant activity using the drop-collapse test. Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus thuringiensis and three Bacillus amyloliquefaciens isolates demonstrated strong biosurfactant activity and suppression of all three fungi, and therefore are recommended for further study.

  17. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea gene transiently expressed in planta, encodes a mitochondrial protein

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    David eBenito-Pescador

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of ROS, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor.

  18. Positive regulatory role of sound vibration treatment in Arabidopsis thaliana against Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bosung; Ghosh, Ritesh; Gururani, Mayank Anand; Shanmugam, Gnanendra; Jeon, Junhyun; Kim, Jonggeun; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Han, Kyung-Hwan; Bae, Dong-Won; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-05-30

    Sound vibration (SV), a mechanical stimulus, can trigger various molecular and physiological changes in plants like gene expression, hormonal modulation, induced antioxidant activity and calcium spiking. It also alters the seed germination and growth of plants. In this study, we investigated the effects of SV on the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana against Botrytis cinerea infection. The microarray analysis was performed on infected Arabidopsis plants pre-exposed to SV of 1000 Hertz with 100 decibels. Broadly, the transcriptomic analysis revealed up-regulation of several defense and SA-responsive and/or signaling genes. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of selected genes also validated the induction of SA-mediated response in the infected Arabidopsis plants pre-exposed to SV. Corroboratively, hormonal analysis identified the increased concentration of salicylic acid (SA) in the SV-treated plants after pathogen inoculation. In contrast, jasmonic acid (JA) level in the SV-treated plants remained stable but lower than control plants during the infection. Based on these findings, we propose that SV treatment invigorates the plant defense system by regulating the SA-mediated priming effect, consequently promoting the SV-induced resistance in Arabidopsis against B. cinerea.

  19. Antifungal effectiveness of fungicide and peroxyacetic acid mixture on the growth of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Fatima; Ben Oujji, Najwa; Chebli, Bouchra; Ayoub, Mohamed; Hafidi, Athman; Salghi, Rachid; Jodeh, Shehdeh

    2017-04-01

    In the attempt to reduce the negative impacts of chemical pesticides on environment and consumer's health, a new plant treatment practice minimizing the amount of pesticides needed during pests and diseases treatments has been developed. Our approach is based on combining the biocide effects of fungicide with the peroxyacetic acid (PAA) one. In this paper, we focused on the in vitro study of the antifungal activity of this combination against Botrytis cinerea, the most redoubtable threat of tomatoes plants in Morocco. First, different concentrations of a peroxyacetic acid product (PERACLEAN®5) and two commercially available fungicides SWITCH and SIGNUM were tested separately for their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth and spores germination of B. cinerea. 100% inhibition of fungal growth was achieved using 16.77 and 14.47 μg/ml of SIGNUM and SWITCH respectively and 1.5% of PERACLEAN®5. When combined with 0.5% of the peroxyacetic acid mixture (PERACLEAN®5), the pesticides 100% effective concentrations decreased to 0.5 μg/ml for both pesticides. Hence, this approach allowed us to suppress the pathogen while minimizing the amounts of applied fungicides by more than 95%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of combined treatment for control of Botrytis cinerea in phytosanitary irradiation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Koo; Yoon, Minchul; Park, Hae-Jun; Youll Lee, Kwang; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2014-06-01

    Phytosanitary treatments are required to disinfest quarantine pests and pathogens in agricultural commodities. Gray mold in fruit is caused by Botrytis cinerea, which is one of the major postharvest pathogen of apple and pear. Irradiation treatment is a viable alternative for phytosanitary purposes and a useful nonchemical method for controlling pests and postharvest pathogens. An irradiation dose of over 0.4 kGy is used for the control of insects and fungal disease in fresh fruit, but a loss of firmness occurs. Combined treatments are needed to reduce the irradiation dose in phytosanitary irradiation processing. This study focuses on the application of combined treatments to reduce the loss of fruit quality when fresh fruit is irradiated for phytosanitary purposes. Comparing the antifungal activity against B. cinerea, while gamma irradiation showed no antifungal activity at a dose of 1.0 kGy, combined treatments (nano Ag particle, nano-sized silica silver) at a dose of 1.0 kGy showed the strongest antifungal activity. This study demonstrates the synergistic impacts of combined treatments in phytosanitary irradiation processing. Taken together, the combined treatments may affect reduction of fruit injury that occurred with irradiation only, meaning that the use of combined treatments with gamma irradiation is significantly effective for the preservation of fruit quality.

  1. Molecular mechanism of BjCHI1-mediated plant defense against Botrytis cinerea infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Zhao, Kaijun

    2017-01-02

    Plant chitinases are a group of proteins associated with defense against pathogen attack. BjCHI1 is the first characterized chitinase containing two chitin binding domains (CBDs). Investigations have shown that BjCHI1 inhibits growth of fungal phytopathogens and agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent studies revealed that expression of BjCHI1 mRNA is largely induced upon infection of Botrytis cinerea via a R2R3-MYB transcription factor BjMYB1 interacting with a W box-like element (Wbl-4) in the BjCHI1 promoter. The enhanced expression pattern of BjMYB1 was similar to that of BjCHI1 and associated with resistant phenotype against B. cinerea. These findings suggest that BjCHI1 is involved in host defense against fungal attack through interaction with BjMYB1. Here, we review the recent studies on BjCHI1 and propose a model of BjCHI1-mediated plant defense against fungal attack.

  2. Synthesis of New Hydrated Geranylphenols and in Vitro Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Mauricio; Espinoza, Luis; Chávez, María I; Díaz, Katy; Olea, Andrés F; Taborga, Lautaro

    2016-06-03

    Geranylated hydroquinones and other geranylated compounds isolated from Aplydium species have shown interesting biological activities. This fact has prompted a number of studies where geranylated phenol derivatives have been synthesized in order to assay their bioactivities. In this work, we report the synthesis of a series of new hydrated geranylphenols using two different synthetic approaches and their inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea. Five new hydrated geranylphenols were obtained by direct coupling reaction between geraniol and phenol in dioxane/water and using BF₃·Et₂O as the catalyst or by the reaction of a geranylated phenol with BF₃·Et₂O. Two new geranylated quinones were also obtained. The synthesis and structural elucidation of all new compounds is presented. All hydrated geranylphenols efficiently inhibit the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. Their activity is higher than that observed for non-hydrated compounds. These results indicate that structural modification on the geranyl chain brings about an enhancement of the inhibition effect of geranylated phenol derivatives.

  3. Purification and Phytotoxic Analysis of Botrytis cinerea Virulence Factors: New Avenues for Crop Protection

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    Maria R. Davis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus infecting over 230 plant species worldwide. This highly adaptable pathogen can afflict agricultural products from seed to storage, causing significant economic losses and instability in the food supply. Small protein virulence factors secreted by B. cinerea during infection play an important role in initiation and spread of disease. BcSnod1 was found to be abundantly expressed upon exposure to media containing strawberry extract. From sequence similarity, BcSnod2 was also identified and both were recognized as members of the Ceratoplatanin family of small phytotoxic proteins. Recombinant BcSnod1 was shown to have a phytotoxic effect and play an important role in pathogenicity while the role of BcSnod2 remains less clear. Both bacterial and yeast production systems are reported, though the bacterial protein is less toxic and mostly unfolded relative to that made in yeast. Compared to BcSnod1, recombinant bacterial BcSnod2 shows similar, but delayed phytotoxicity on tomato leaves. Further studies of these critical virulence factors and their inhibition promise to provide new avenues for crop protection.

  4. Effect of Polymer Micelles on Antifungal Activity of Geranylorcinol Compounds against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborga, Lautaro; Díaz, Katy; Olea, Andrés F; Reyes-Bravo, Paula; Flores, Mario E; Peña-Cortés, Hugo; Espinoza, Luis

    2015-08-12

    Herein, we explore the potential use of two micelle-forming block copolymers, i.e., Pluronic F-127 and poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(caprolactone), for application of fungicide agents. The polymer effect on the in vitro fungicide activity of a series of geranyl orcinol derivatives against Botrytis cinerea has been assessed. The results show that, for all test compounds, the incorporation into micelles, formed by Pluronic F-127, produces a great enhancement of the inhibitory effect on the growth of B. cinerea. For some compounds, at the lowest tested concentration (50 ppm), the percentage of inhibition increases significantly (from 0-10 to 80-90%) when the application is made using a polymer solution instead of an ethanol/water mixture. The synthesis and structural determination of a series of eight geranylphenols/diacetates, which were used as fungicide agents, are also discussed. These results suggest that polymer micelles are promising systems for application of crop-protecting agents.

  5. Botrytis cinerea in raspberry in Serbia I: Morphological and molecular characterization

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    Brankica Tanović

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological and molecular characterisation of 130 isolates of Botrytis cinerea, derived from raspberry fruit originating from six commercial fields in a raspberry growing region of Serbia (locations: Požega, Prilike, Arilje, Ivanjica, Šabac and Valjevo was performed. The results showed that all isolates formed white, uniform, aerial mycelia with entire margin on PDA medium. First morphological differences among the isolates appeared after six days of incubation. Three-week old isolates were grouped into eight distinct morphological types – four mycelial and four sclerotial. Mostly, they were of sclerotial type (81.5% and the most frequently found was an S3 type, which formed large irregularly placed sclerotia. This type was dominant in five of six investigated locations and represented 45-65% of the isolates. The least frequent was the mycelial type M3 (0.7% of the isolates characterized by mycelial masses. The presence of Boty and/or Flipper transposons was detected in isolates originating from all investigated locations. It was discovered that the B. cinerea population in raspberry in Serbia, besides the well-described genetically isolated sympatric species transposa (43.1% and vacuma (10.8%, contains also another two, boty (44.6% and flipper (1.5% species with only one transposon (either Boty or Flipper in the genome. In addition, it was revealed that all isolates from raspberry collected in Serbia, transposa, vacuma, boty or flipper, are sensitive or weakly resistant to fenhexamid and therefore belong to the B. cinerea genetical Group II.

  6. The nitrogen availability interferes with mycorrhiza-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

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    Paloma Sanchez-Bel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants are generally quite efficient in coping with environmental challenges. It has been shown that the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can confer resistance against root and foliar pathogens, although the molecular mechanisms underlying such mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR are poorly understood. Tomato plants colonized with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis display enhanced resistance against the necrotrophic foliar pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaves from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM plants develop smaller necrotic lesions, mirrored also by a reduced levels of fungal biomass. A plethora of metabolic changes takes place in AMF colonized plants upon infection. Certain changes located in the oxylipin pathway indicate that several intermediaries are over-accumulated in the AM upon infection. AM plants react by accumulating higher levels of the vitamins folic acid and riboflavin, indolic derivatives and phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid. Transcriptional analysis support the key role played by the LOX pathway in the shoots associated with MIR against B. cinerea.Interestingly, plants that have suffered a short period of nitrogen starvation appear to react by reprogramming their metabolic and genetic responses by prioritizing abiotic stress tolerance. Consequently, plants subjected to a transient nitrogen depletion become more susceptible to B. cinerea. Under these experimental conditions, MIR is severely affected although still functional. Many metabolic and transcriptional responses which are accumulated or activated by MIR such NRT2 transcript induction and OPDA and most Trp and indolic derivatives accumulation during MIR were repressed or reduced when tomato plants were depleted of N for 48 h prior infection. These results highlight the beneficial roles of AMF in crop protection by promoting induced resistance not only under optimal nutritional conditions but also buffering the susceptibility

  7. Response of chickpea cultivars to foliar, seed and soil inoculations with Botrytis cinerea

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    Mujeebur Rahman KHAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four cultivars of chickpea were evaluated for their susceptibility to the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea using foliar, seed and soil inoculation at 2, 4 and 8 g fungus per plant, per kg seed or per kg soil. At 8 g the inoculum caused necrotic lesions to all 24 cultivars with foliar inoculation, to 23 cultivars except cv. CH-2007-22 with seed inoculation and to 17 cultivars with soil inoculation, and reduced yield by 7–43% (foliar inoculation, 3–34% (seed inoculation and 3–26% (soil inoculation. Foliar or seed inoculation with 4 g of the fungus significantly reduced the yield of all cultivars tested except CH-2007-22 with foliar inoculation, and 4 cultivars with seed inoculation. Soil inoculation at 4 g fungus kg-1 soil, significantly reduced the yield of eight cultivars. Foliar and seed inoculations at 2 g of the fungus significantly reduced the yield of 16 and 7 cultivars of chickpea respectively; but soil inoculation at this concentration, did not significantly reduce yield in any cultivar. The greatest significant decline in yield was recorded with foliar inoculation in the cv. BG-256, 43% at 8 g, 40% at 4 g and 26% at 2 g inoculum level. The cv. CH-2007-22 was tolerant to B. cinerea as it exhibited only 3–7% yield loss at 8 g inoculum. The fungal population, especially that on the phylloplane, increased exponentially from January to March and declined drastically in April. At the high inoculum level of 8 g fungus kg-1 soil, B. cinerea may initiate infection through the soil. There was a positive correlation between disease severity and yield decline, and a disease severity above 2 significantly reduced yield.   

  8. AaERF1 positively regulates the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Artemisia annua.

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    Xu Lu

    Full Text Available Plants are sessile organisms, and they can not move away under abiotic or biotic stresses. Thus plants have evolved a set of genes that response to adverse environment to modulate gene expression. In this study, we characterized and functionally studied an ERF transcription factor from Artemisia annua, AaERF1, which plays an important role in biotic stress responses. The AaERF1 promoter had been cloned and GUS staining results of AaERF1 promoter-GUS transgenic A. annua showed that AaERF1 is expressed ubiquitiously in all organs. Several putative cis-acting elements such as W-box, TGA-box and Py-rich element, which are involved in defense responsiveness, are present in the promoter. The expression of AaERF1 can be induced vigorously by methyl jasmonate as well as by ethephon and wounding, implying that AaERF1 may activate some of the defense genes via the jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathways of A. annua. The results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and yeast one-hybrid experiments showed that AaERF1 was able to bind to the GCC box cis-acting element in vitro and in yeast. Ectopic expression of AaERF1 could enhance the expression levels of the defense marker genes PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2 and BASIC CHITINASE (ChiB, and increase the resistance to Botrytis cinerea in the 35S::AaERF1 transgenic Arabidopsis. The down-regulated expression level of AaERF1 evidently reduced the resistance to B. cinerea in A. annua. The overall results showed that AaERF1 positively regulated the resistance to B. cinerea in A. annua.

  9. Effects of Botrytis cinerea and Erysiphe necator fungi on the aroma character of grape must: A comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Pinar, Angela; Rauhut, Doris; Ruehl, Ernst; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-09-15

    Botrytis cinerea and Erysiphe necator are among the most relevant fungi in viticulture. In order to deepen our knowledge about their potential impact on wine quality, their effects on the aroma character of the initial stage of wine production, i.e. the must were studied. The main aroma compounds were determined by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and ranked according to their relative intensities by means of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Clear differences between healthy and infected samples were observed. Botrytis cinerea had a positive impact on fruity and floral notes while several earthy smelling compounds were developed as result of the infection. Unlike in previous studies, however, we did not observe any clear differences in the quantities of earthy-mushroom-like smelling substances as result of the infection process with Erysiphe necator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide characterization of ISR induced in Arabidopsis thaliana by Trichoderma hamatum T382 against Botrytis cinerea infection

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    Janick eMathys

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the molecular basis of the induced systemic resistance (ISR in Arabidopsis thaliana by the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma hamatum T382 against the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea B05-10 was unraveled by microarray analysis both before (ISR-prime and after (ISR-boost additional pathogen inoculation. The observed high numbers of differentially expressed genes allowed us to classify them according to the biological pathways in which they are involved. By focusing on pathways instead of genes, a holistic picture of the mechanisms underlying ISR emerged. In general, a close resemblance is observed between ISR-prime and systemic acquired resistance (SAR, the systemic defense response that is triggered in plants upon pathogen infection leading to increased resistance towards secondary infections. Treatment with Trichoderma hamatum T382 primes the plant (ISR-prime, resulting in an accelerated activation of the defense response against Botrytis cinerea during ISR-boost and a subsequent moderation of the Botrytis cinerea induced defense response (BIDR. Microarray results were confirmed for representative genes by qRT-PCR, by analysis of transgenic plants expressing relevant promoter-GUS constructs and by phenotypic analysis of mutants affected in various defense-related pathways, thereby proving the validity of our approach.

  11. Control Effect and Possible Mechanism of the Natural Compound Phenazine-1-Carboxamide against Botrytis cinerea.

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    Ya Zhang

    Full Text Available To develop new agents against strawberry grey mould and to aid in the development of biological pesticides, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a natural compound, phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN, against Botrytis cinerea using a growth rate assay. Additionally, indoor toxicity and the in vitro control effect of PCN were further studied to determine its potential mechanisms of action on B. cinerea. PCN was inhibitory against B. cinerea with a 50% effective concentration (EC50 of 108.12 μg/mL; the toxicity of PCN was equivalent to that of carbendazim (CBM. The best in vitro control effect of PCN against grey mould in strawberry (fruit reached 75.32%, which was slightly higher than that of CBM. The field control effect of PCN against grey mould reached a maximum of 72.31% at a PCN concentration of 700 μg/mL, which was 1.02 times higher than that of CBM. Fungistatic activity was observed at low concentrations of PCN, while high concentrations of PCN resulted in fungicidal activity against B. cinerea. This natural compound strongly inhibited both spore and sclerotium germination of B. cinerea, with the best relative inhibition rates of 77.03% and 82.11%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of PCN on mycelial growth of B. cinerea was significant and reached levels of 87.32%. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the mycelia appeared loose, locally twisted, and folded, with exudation of contents; the mycelia was withered and twisted, with edge burrs, deformations, ruptures and a sheet-like structure. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the structure of the cell nucleus was unclear and the vacuoles had ruptured; additionally, various organelles exhibited disordered structures, there were substantial non-membrane transparent inclusions, the cells were plasmolysed, the cell walls were collapsed in some cases, and the hyphal tissue was essentially

  12. Control Effect and Possible Mechanism of the Natural Compound Phenazine-1-Carboxamide against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Wang, Chong; Su, Pin; Liao, Xiaolan

    2015-01-01

    To develop new agents against strawberry grey mould and to aid in the development of biological pesticides, we investigated the inhibitory effect of a natural compound, phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), against Botrytis cinerea using a growth rate assay. Additionally, indoor toxicity and the in vitro control effect of PCN were further studied to determine its potential mechanisms of action on B. cinerea. PCN was inhibitory against B. cinerea with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 108.12 μg/mL; the toxicity of PCN was equivalent to that of carbendazim (CBM). The best in vitro control effect of PCN against grey mould in strawberry (fruit) reached 75.32%, which was slightly higher than that of CBM. The field control effect of PCN against grey mould reached a maximum of 72.31% at a PCN concentration of 700 μg/mL, which was 1.02 times higher than that of CBM. Fungistatic activity was observed at low concentrations of PCN, while high concentrations of PCN resulted in fungicidal activity against B. cinerea. This natural compound strongly inhibited both spore and sclerotium germination of B. cinerea, with the best relative inhibition rates of 77.03% and 82.11%, respectively. The inhibitory effect of PCN on mycelial growth of B. cinerea was significant and reached levels of 87.32%. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the mycelia appeared loose, locally twisted, and folded, with exudation of contents; the mycelia was withered and twisted, with edge burrs, deformations, ruptures and a sheet-like structure. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that after 48 h of PCN treatment, the structure of the cell nucleus was unclear and the vacuoles had ruptured; additionally, various organelles exhibited disordered structures, there were substantial non-membrane transparent inclusions, the cells were plasmolysed, the cell walls were collapsed in some cases, and the hyphal tissue was essentially necrotic. A PCN

  13. Trichothecenes and aspinolides produced by Trichoderma arundinaceum regulate expression of Botrytis cinerea genes involved in virulence and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; McCormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Barua, Javier; Lindo, Laura; Casquero, Pedro A; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea (B05.10) produce the sesquiterpenoids harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively. TaΔTri5, an HA non-producer mutant, produces high levels of the polyketide compounds aspinolides (Asp) B and C. We analyzed the role of HA and Asp in the B. cinerea-T. arundinaceum interaction, including changes in BOT production as well as transcriptomic changes of BcBOT genes involved in BOT biosynthesis, and also of genes associated with virulence and ergosterol biosynthesis. We found that exogenously added HA up-regulated the expression of the BcBOT and all the virulence genes analyzed when B. cinerea was grown alone. However, a decrease in the amount of BOT and a down-regulation of BcBOT gene expression was observed in the interaction zone of B05.10-Ta37 dual cultures, compared to TaΔTri5. Thus, the confrontation with T. arundinaceum results in an up-regulation of most of the B. cinerea genes involved in virulence yet the presence of T. arundinaceum secondary metabolites, HA and AspC, act separately and together to down-regulate the B. cinerea genes analyzed. The present work emphasizes the existence of a chemical cross-regulation between B. cinerea and T. arundinaceum and contributes to understanding how a biocontrol fungus and its prey interact with each other. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Isolation and characteristics of protocatechuic acid from Paenibacillus elgii HOA73 against Botrytis cinerea on strawberry fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Xuan Hoa; Naing, Kyaw Wai; Lee, Young Seong; Moon, Jae Hak; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Kil Yong

    2015-05-01

    This study was undertaken to describe purification, identification, and characteristics of protocatechuic acid (PCA) isolated for the first time from Paenibacillus elgii HOA73 against Botrytis cinerea (the cause of gray mold disease on strawberry fruit). PCA was purified by different chromatographic techniques and identified as PCA (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) by nuclear magnetic resonance and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. PCA displayed potent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani. However, the antifungal activities were not sufficient to inhibit mycelial growth of Phytophthora capsici and Fusarium oxysporum. The minimum inhibitory concentration of PCA to inhibit any visible mycelial growth of both B. cinerea and R. solani was 64 µg ml(-1) . Most B. cinerea conidia displayed altered shape and absence of germination, or were degraded after treatment with 50 and 100 µg ml(-1) PCA, respectively. Moreover, gray mold formation on strawberry fruit was almost or completely inhibited by these PCA concentrations 7 days following infection with B. cinerea conidia, respectively. PCA may be a promising alternative to chemical fungicides as a potential biofungicide to prevent growth of B. cinerea in strawberry fruit disease management. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development and evaluation of a novel and rapid detection assay for Botrytis cinerea based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

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    Ya-Bing Duan

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a devastating plant pathogen that causes grey mould disease. In this study, we developed a visual detection method of B. cinerea based on the Bcos5 sequence using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP with hydroxynaphthol blue dye (HNB. The LAMP reaction was optimal at 63 °C for 45 min. When HNB was added prior to amplification, samples with B. cinerea DNA developed a characteristic sky blue color after the reaction but those without DNA or with DNA of other plant pathogenic fungi did not. Results of HNB staining method were reconfirmed when LAMP products were subjected to gel electrophoresis. The detection limit of this LAMP assay for B. cinerea was 10(-3 ng µL(-1 of genomic DNA per reaction, which was 10-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR (10(-2 ng µL(-1. Detection of the LAMP assay for inoculum of B. cinerea was possible in the inoculated tomato and strawberry petals. In the 191 diseased samples, 180 (94.2% were confirmed as positive by LAMP, 172 (90.1% positive by the tissue separation, while 147 (77.0% positive by PCR. Because the LAMP assay performed well in aspects of sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, reliability, and visibility, it is suitable for rapid detection of B. cinerea in infected plant materials prior to storage and during transportation, such as cut flowers, fruits and vegetables.

  16. Gene Overexpression and RNA Silencing Tools for the Genetic Manipulation of the S-(+)-Abscisic Acid Producing Ascomycete Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong-Tao; Zhang, Zhi; Luo, Di; Zhou, Jin-Yan; Zhong, Juan; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Shu, Dan; Tan, Hong

    2015-05-06

    The phytopathogenic ascomycete Botrytis cinerea produces several secondary metabolites that have biotechnical significance and has been particularly used for S-(+)-abscisic acid production at the industrial scale. To manipulate the expression levels of specific secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes of B. cinerea with Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation system, two expression vectors (pCBh1 and pCBg1 with different selection markers) and one RNA silencing vector, pCBSilent1, were developed with the In-Fusion assembly method. Both expression vectors were highly effective in constitutively expressing eGFP, and pCBSilent1 effectively silenced the eGFP gene in B. cinerea. Bcaba4, a gene suggested to participate in ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea, was then targeted for gene overexpression and RNA silencing with these reverse genetic tools. The overexpression of bcaba4 dramatically induced ABA formation in the B. cinerea wild type strain Bc-6, and the gene silencing of bcaba4 significantly reduced ABA-production in an ABA-producing B. cinerea strain.

  17. Development and evaluation of a novel and rapid detection assay for Botrytis cinerea based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ya-Bing; Ge, Chang-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Ke; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhou, Ming-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a devastating plant pathogen that causes grey mould disease. In this study, we developed a visual detection method of B. cinerea based on the Bcos5 sequence using loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with hydroxynaphthol blue dye (HNB). The LAMP reaction was optimal at 63 °C for 45 min. When HNB was added prior to amplification, samples with B. cinerea DNA developed a characteristic sky blue color after the reaction but those without DNA or with DNA of other plant pathogenic fungi did not. Results of HNB staining method were reconfirmed when LAMP products were subjected to gel electrophoresis. The detection limit of this LAMP assay for B. cinerea was 10(-3) ng µL(-1) of genomic DNA per reaction, which was 10-fold more sensitive than conventional PCR (10(-2) ng µL(-1)). Detection of the LAMP assay for inoculum of B. cinerea was possible in the inoculated tomato and strawberry petals. In the 191 diseased samples, 180 (94.2%) were confirmed as positive by LAMP, 172 (90.1%) positive by the tissue separation, while 147 (77.0%) positive by PCR. Because the LAMP assay performed well in aspects of sensitivity, specificity, repeatability, reliability, and visibility, it is suitable for rapid detection of B. cinerea in infected plant materials prior to storage and during transportation, such as cut flowers, fruits and vegetables.

  18. Effect of drimenol and synthetic derivatives on growth and germination of Botrytis cinerea: Evaluation of possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Kelly, Christian; Rubio, Julia; Thomas, Mario; Sedán, Claudia; Martinez, Rolando; Olea, Andrés F; Carrasco, Héctor; Taborga, Lautaro; Silva-Moreno, Evelyn

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antifungal activity of Drimenol (1) and its synthetic derivatives, nordrimenone (2), drimenyl acetate (3), and drimenyl-epoxy-acetate (4), and to establish a possible mechanism of action for drimenol. For that, the effect of each compound on mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea was assessed. Our results showed that compounds 1, 2, 3 and 4 are able to affect Botrytis cinerea growth with EC50 values of 80, 92, 80 and 314ppm, respectively. These values suggest that the activity of these compounds is mainly determined by presence of the double bond between carbons 7 and 8 of the drimane ring. In addition, germination of B. cinerea in presence of 40 and 80ppm of drimenol is reduced almost to a half of the control value. Finally, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism by which drimenol is affecting B. cinerea, the determination of membrane integrity, reactive oxygen species production and gene expression studies of specific genes were performed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chemical Characterization of Different Sumac and Pomegranate Extracts Effective against Botrytis cinerea Rots

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    Flora V. Romeo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. peel and sumac (Rhus coriaria L. fruit and leaf extracts were chemically characterized and their ability to inhibit table grape (cv. Italia rots caused by Botrytis cinerea was evaluated on artificially inoculated berries. Different extraction methods were applied and extracts were characterized through Ultra Fast High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Photodiode array detector and Electrospray ionization Mass spectrometer (UPLC-PDA-ESI/MSn for their phenol and anthocyanin contents. The concentrated pomegranate peel extract (PGE-C was the richest in phenols (66.97 g gallic acid equivalents/kg while the concentrated sumac extract from fruits (SUF-C showed the highest anthocyanin amount (171.96 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside equivalents/kg. Both phenolic and anthocyanin profile of pomegranate and sumac extracts were quite different: pomegranate extract was rich in cyanidin 3-glucoside, pelargonidin 3-glucoside and ellagic acid derivatives, while sumac extract was characterized by 7-methyl-cyanidin 3-galactoside and gallic acid derivatives. The concentrated extracts from both pomegranate peel and sumac leaves significantly reduced the development of Botrytis rots. In particular, the extract from pomegranate peel completely inhibited the pathogen at different intervals of time (0, 12, and 24 h between treatment and pathogen inoculation on fruits maintained at 22–24 °C and high relative humidity (RH. This extract may represent a valuable alternative to control postharvest fungal rots in view of its high efficacy because of the low cost of pomegranate peel, which is a waste product of processing factories.

  20. Combate del moho gris (Botrytis cinerea de la fresa mediante Gliocladium roseum

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    Néstor Chaves

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available En la zona de Poasito de Alajuela, se evaluó la acción del antagonista Gliocladium roseum, en forma individual y en conjunto con los fungicidas empleados en la finca, para el combate de Botrytis cinerea en fresa; comparándose los resultados contra los obtenidos con el manejo comercial. Se empleó un diseño de bloques completos al azar con 4 repeticiones y se hicieron aplicaciones semanales del antagonista (a una concentración ³ 107 conidios ml-1 durante un período aproximado de 4 meses (julio-octubre del 2000. Se evaluó la incidencia de moho gris en condiciones de campo y poscosecha, así como el efecto de los fungicidas aplicados sobre la germinación de los conidios del antagonista, mediante una prueba in vitro. Se obtuvo un combate más efectivo de la enfermedad en condiciones de campo al emplear el biocontrolador sólo o en conjunto con los fungicidas, con respecto al manejo comercial que se hace de la misma. En poscosecha, el desempeño del antagonista fue estadísticamente igual al del combate químico. Estos resultados muestran que los fungicidas aplicados no afectan considerablemente al antagonista, lo que se corroboró con la prueba in vitro. Al emplear G. roseum para el combate de B. cinerea no sólo se logra combatir efectivamente a este, sino también el resto de los patógenos (Colletotrichum, Phytophthora, Rhizoctonia, Rhizopus,Alternaria, Fusarium, Verticillium y Penicillium, ya que el porcentaje de frutas sanas es mayor al integrar la acción del antagonista al manejo de enfermedades de la finca. Sin embargo, estas diferencias no son estadísticamente significativas. Por lo anterior se concluye que G. roseum constituye una posible alternativa de manejo integrado del moho gris en fresa.

  1. Isolation, identification, and biocontrol of antagonistic bacterium against Botrytis cinerea after tomato harvest

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    Jun-Feng Shi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Tomato is one of the most important vegetables in the world. Decay after harvest is a major issue in the development of tomato industry. Currently, the most effective method for controlling decay after harvest is storage of tomato at low temperature combined with usage of chemical bactericide; however, long-term usage of chemical bactericide not only causes pathogen resistance but also is harmful for human health and environment. Biocontrol method for the management of disease after tomato harvest has great practical significance. In this study, antagonistic bacterium B-6-1 strain was isolated from the surface of tomato and identified as Enterobacter cowanii based on morphological characteristics and physiological and biochemical features combined with sequence analysis of 16SrDNA and ropB gene and construction of dendrogram. Effects of different concentrations of antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii suspension on antifungal activity after tomato harvest were analyzed by mycelium growth rate method. Results revealed that antifungal activity was also enhanced with increasing concentrations of antagonistic bacterium; inhibitory rates of 1 × 105 colony-forming units (cfu/mL antagonistic bacterial solution on Fusarium verticillioides, Alternaria tenuissima, and Botrytis cinerea were 46.31%, 67.48%, and 75.67%, respectively. By using in vivo inoculation method, it was further confirmed that antagonistic bacterium could effectively inhibit the occurrence of B. cinerae after tomato harvest, biocontrol effect of 1 × 109 cfu/mL zymotic fluid reached up to 95.24%, and antagonistic bacterium E. cowanii has biocontrol potential against B. cinerea after harvest of fruits and vegetables.

  2. Assessing the Effects of Light on Differentiation and Virulence of the Plant Pathogen Botrytis cinerea: Characterization of the White Collar Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, Montserrat A.; Tudzynski, Paul; Larrondo, Luis F.

    2013-01-01

    Organisms are exposed to a tough environment, where acute daily challenges, like light, can strongly affect several aspects of an individual's physiology, including pathogenesis. While several fungal models have been widely employed to understand the physiological and molecular events associated with light perception, various other agricultural-relevant fungi still remain, in terms of their responsiveness to light, in the dark. The fungus Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive pathogen able to cause disease on a wide range of plant species. Natural B. cinerea isolates exhibit a high degree of diversity in their predominant mode of reproduction. Thus, the majority of naturally occurring strains are known to reproduce asexually via conidia and sclerotia, and sexually via apothecia. Studies from the 1970′s reported on specific developmental responses to treatments with near-UV, blue, red and far-red light. To unravel the signaling machinery triggering development – and possibly also connected with virulence – we initiated the functional characterization of the transcription factor/photoreceptor BcWCL1 and its partner BcWCL2, that form the White Collar Complex (WCC) in B. cinerea. Using mutants either abolished in or exhibiting enhanced WCC signaling (overexpression of both bcwcl1 and bcwcl2), we demonstrate that the WCC is an integral part of the mentioned machinery by mediating transcriptional responses to white light and the inhibition of conidiation in response to this stimulus. Furthermore, the WCC is required for coping with excessive light, oxidative stress and also to achieve full virulence. Although several transcriptional responses are abolished in the absence of bcwcl1, the expression of some genes is still light induced and a distinct conidiation pattern in response to daily light oscillations is enhanced, revealing a complex underlying photobiology. Though overlaps with well-studied fungal systems exist, the light-associated machinery of B. cinerea

  3. Bombus terrestris as pollinator-and-vector to suppress Botrytis cinerea in greenhouse strawberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommaerts, Veerle; Put, Kurt; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-09-01

    Bombus terrestris L. bumblebees are widely used as commercial pollinators, but they might also be of help in the battle against economically important crop diseases. This alternative control strategy is referred to as pollinator-and-vector technology. The present study was designed to investigate the capacity of B. terrestris to fulfil this role in greenhouse strawberry flowers, which were manually inoculated with a major plant pathogen, the grey mould Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. A model microbiological control agent (MCA) product Prestop-Mix was loaded in a newly developed two-way bumblebee dispenser, and, in addition, the use of the diluent Maizena-Plus (corn starch) was tested. Importantly, loading of the MCA caused no adverse effects on bumblebee workers, with no loss of survival or impairment of flight activity of the workers during the 4 week flowering period. Secondly, vectoring of Prestop-Mix by bumblebees resulted in a higher crop production, as 71% of the flowers developed into healthy red strawberries at picking (preharvest yield) as compared with 54% in the controls. In addition, these strawberries were better protected, as 79% of the picked berries remained free of B. cinerea after a 2 day incubation (post-harvest yield), while this percentage was only 43% in the control. Overall, the total yield (preharvest × post-harvest) was 2-2.5 times higher than the total yield in the controls (24%) in plants exposed to bumblebees vectoring Prestop-Mix. Thirdly, the addition of the diluent Maizena-Plus to Prestop-Mix at 1:1 (w/w) resulted in a similar yield to that of Prestop-Mix used alone, and in no negative effects on the bumblebees, flowers and berries. This greenhouse study provides strong evidence that B. terrestris bumblebees can vector a MCA to reduce B. cinerea incidence in greenhouse strawberries, resulting in higher yields. Similar yields obtained in the treatments with Prestop-Mix and Prestop-Mix + Maizena-Plus suggest an equally efficient

  4. Synthesis, Fungicidal Activity and Mode of Action of 4-Phenyl-6-trifluoromethyl-2-aminopyrimidines against Botrytis cinerea

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    Chunhui Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Anilinopyrimidines are the main chemical agents for management of Botrytis cinerea. However, the drug resistance in fungi against this kind of compounds is very serious. To explore new potential fungicides against B. cinerea, a series of 4-phenyl-6-trifluoromethyl-2-amino-pyrimidine compounds (compounds III-1 to III-22 were synthesized, and their structures were confirmed by 1H-NMR, IR and MS. Most of these compounds possessed excellent fungicidal activity. The compounds III-3 and III-13 showed higher fungicidal activity than the positive control pyrimethanil on fructose gelatin agar (FGA, and compound III-3 on potato dextrose agar (PDA indicated high activity compared to the positive control cyprodinil. In vivo greenhouse results indicated that the activity of compounds III-3, III-8, and III-11 was significantly higher than that of the fungicide pyrimethanil. Scanning electron micrography (SEM and transmission electron micrography (TEM were applied to illustrate the mechanism of title compounds against B. cinerea. The title compounds, especially those containing a fluorine atom at the ortho-position on the benzene ring, could maintain the antifungal activity against B. cinerea, but their mechanism of action is different from that of cyprodinil. The present study lays a good foundation for us to find more efficient reagents against B. cinerea.

  5. Impedance of the Grape Berry Cuticle as a Novel Phenotypic Trait to Estimate Resistance to Botrytis Cinerea

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    Katja Herzog

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Warm and moist weather conditions during berry ripening provoke Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea causing notable bunch rot on susceptible grapevines with the effect of reduced yield and wine quality. Resistance donors of genetic loci to increase B. cinerea resistance are widely unknown. Promising traits of resistance are represented by physical features like the thickness and permeability of the grape berry cuticle. Sensor-based phenotyping methods or genetic markers are rare for such traits. In the present study, the simple-to-handle I-sensor was developed. The sensor enables the fast and reliable measurement of electrical impedance of the grape berry cuticles and its epicuticular waxes (CW. Statistical experiments revealed highly significant correlations between relative impedance of CW and the resistance of grapevines to B. cinerea. Thus, the relative impedance Zrel of CW was identified as the most important phenotypic factor with regard to the prediction of grapevine resistance to B. cinerea. An ordinal logistic regression analysis revealed a R2McFadden of 0.37 and confirmed the application of Zrel of CW for the prediction of bunch infection and in this way as novel phenotyping trait. Applying the I-sensor, a preliminary QTL region was identified indicating that the novel phenotypic trait is as well a valuable tool for genetic analyses.

  6. Jasmonate signalling drives time-of-day differences in susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Robert A; Stoker, Claire; Stone, Wendy; Adams, Nicolette; Smith, Rob; Grant, Murray; Carré, Isabelle; Roden, Laura C; Denby, Katherine J

    2015-12-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping mechanism, allows plants to anticipate regular changes in the environment, such as light and dark, and biotic challenges such as pathogens and herbivores. Here, we demonstrate that the plant circadian clock influences susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Arabidopsis plants show differential susceptibility to B. cinerea depending on the time of day of inoculation. Decreased susceptibility after inoculation at dawn compared with night persists under constant light conditions and is disrupted in dysfunctional clock mutants, demonstrating the role of the plant clock in driving time-of-day susceptibility to B. cinerea. The decreased susceptibility to B. cinerea following inoculation at subjective dawn was associated with faster transcriptional reprogramming of the defence response with gating of infection-responsive genes apparent. Direct target genes of core clock regulators were enriched among the transcription factors that responded more rapidly to infection at subjective dawn than subjective night, suggesting an influence of the clock on the defence-signalling network. In addition, jasmonate signalling plays a crucial role in the rhythmic susceptibility of Arabidopsis to B. cinerea with the enhanced susceptibility to this pathogen at subjective night lost in a jaz6 mutant. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Synthesis, Fungicidal Activity and Mode of Action of 4-Phenyl-6-trifluoromethyl-2-aminopyrimidines against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunhui; Cui, Zining; Yan, Xiaojing; Qi, Zhiqiu; Ji, Mingshan; Li, Xinghai

    2016-06-24

    Anilinopyrimidines are the main chemical agents for management of Botrytis cinerea. However, the drug resistance in fungi against this kind of compounds is very serious. To explore new potential fungicides against B. cinerea, a series of 4-phenyl-6-trifluoromethyl-2-amino-pyrimidine compounds (compounds III-1 to III-22) were synthesized, and their structures were confirmed by ¹H-NMR, IR and MS. Most of these compounds possessed excellent fungicidal activity. The compounds III-3 and III-13 showed higher fungicidal activity than the positive control pyrimethanil on fructose gelatin agar (FGA), and compound III-3 on potato dextrose agar (PDA) indicated high activity compared to the positive control cyprodinil. In vivo greenhouse results indicated that the activity of compounds III-3, III-8, and III-11 was significantly higher than that of the fungicide pyrimethanil. Scanning electron micrography (SEM) and transmission electron micrography (TEM) were applied to illustrate the mechanism of title compounds against B. cinerea. The title compounds, especially those containing a fluorine atom at the ortho-position on the benzene ring, could maintain the antifungal activity against B. cinerea, but their mechanism of action is different from that of cyprodinil. The present study lays a good foundation for us to find more efficient reagents against B. cinerea.

  8. Interaction with Penicillium expansum enhances Botrytis cinerea growth in grape juice medium and prevents patulin accumulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, H; Paterson, R R M; Venâncio, A; Lima, N

    2013-05-01

    Interactions between fungi occur when they grow on the same host plant. This is the case of Botrytis cinerea and Penicillium expansum on grape. P. expansum is also responsible for production of the mycotoxin patulin. In this study, the influence of the interaction between both fungi on fungal growth parameters was studied as well as the effect on the accumulation of patulin by P. expansum. For that purpose, spores of B. cinerea and P. expansum were inoculated together (mixed inoculum), and the parameters growth rate, time for growth and patulin accumulation were assessed. The presence of P. expansum conidia shortened the time for growth of mixed inoculum colonies which, at the end of incubation, were B. cinerea-like. Although some P. expansum growth was observed in mixed inoculum colonies, very low levels of patulin were observed. In assays carried out in patulin-spiked medium, B. cinerea was capable to metabolize the mycotoxin. The capabilities of B. cinerea to shorten time for growth and prevent patulin accumulation are competing abilities that facilitate grape colonization. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; García, Juan M; Pozo, María J

    2015-01-01

    Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation. In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  10. Consideraciones sobre Botrytis cinerea pers., agente causal de la pudrición de las flores

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    Garcés de Granada Emira

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available El "moho gris" de las flores, ocasionado por el hongo
    Botrytis cinerea Pers., es una enfermedad de la cual
    se desconocen muchos aspectos fundamentales. Sin embargo y a pesar de esta carencia de conocimientos, frecuentemente se aplican fungicidas que, muchas veces, no resultan efectivos para el control adecuado de la enfermedad e, incluso, se exagera en uso, lo cual significa un aumento de costos y un efecto en el ambiente. Esta enfermedad es muy común en muchas flores de exportación, como rosa, clavel, crisantemo, estatice y gypsophila. Staby y Naegele (1985 opinan que las plantas pueden ser atacadas en el campo, en el transporte o en el almacenamiento. La penetración del patógeno se realiza directamente a través de heridas causadas por insectos o por medios mecánicos. En condiciones muy favorables, el hongo puede penetrar
    directamente en sus hospedantes a través de la cutícula, mediante la producción de enzimas que degradan los componentes de ésta.

  11. Resistance of Botrytis cinerea to fungicides controlling gray mold on strawberry in Brazil

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    Ueder Pedro Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Botrytis cinerea to the fungicides currently used for its control in Brazil. Isolates of the fungus were collected from different strawberry-producing fields in the states of Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais, and São Paulo, Brazil. First, a total of 183 isolates were identified at the species level using specific primers for the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH gene. The isolates were grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA containing the fungicides procymidone, iprodione, and thiophanate-methyl in different concentrations: 0.0 (control, 0.1; 1.0; 10.0; 100.0 and 1,000.0 μg∙mL−1. The percentage of mycelial growth inhibition was used to determine the effective concentration of the fungicide that was able to inhibit colony growth by 50% (EC50. Approximately 25.7% of the isolates were resistant to iprodione, 53.0% were resistant to procymidone, and 93.0% were resistant to thiophanate-methyl. Moreover, crossresistance and multiple resistance were verified, with 19.7% of the isolates showing resistance to 3 fungicides simultaneously. This finding explains the ineffectiveness of fungicides application to control gray mold in strawberry fields in Brazil and highlights the need for new strategies to manage this disease in the culture.

  12. Resistance to Increasing Chemical Classes of Fungicides by Virtue of "Selection by Association" in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Jun; Cox, Kerik D; Schnabel, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has shown that Botrytis cinerea isolates with resistance to multiple chemical classes of fungicides exist in eastern strawberry fields. In this study, the fungicide resistance profiles of 2,130 isolates from flowers of commercial strawberry fields located in multiple states was determined over four consecutive strawberry production seasons. Producers were asked to alternate single-site fungicides that were considered low risk in their specific location based on resistance monitoring results in their fields. This recommendation led to an increase of chemical class diversity used in the spray programs. Results indicated that simultaneous resistance in individual isolates to two, three, four, five, six, and seven classes of fungicides increased over time. The increase in chemical class resistances within isolates was likely due to a process we termed "selection by association", where fungicide resistance traits were often linked to the trait being selected rather than the selectable trait itself. Data analysis also indicated that the odds were highest for isolates resistant to one chemical class (1CCR) to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl; for 2CCR isolates to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl and pyraclostrobin; and for 3CCR isolates to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl, pyraclostrobin, and either cyprodinil or fenhexamid. We hypothesize that the more chemical classes are used in a spray program, the faster isolates will be selected with increasing numbers of chemical class resistances by virtue of selection by association if such isolates preexist in the population.

  13. Lipidperoxidative and proteolytic processes in fungi under the influence of xenobiotica. [Botrytis cinerea; Phytophora infestans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.M.; Edlich, W.; Lyr, H.

    1986-01-01

    As a model system for the investigation of peroxidative effects in the phytopathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea in submers culture was used. The influence was investigated of hydrogenperoxide with biochemical and cytological methods. The hyphae showed significant changes of the ultrastructure: swelling and vacuolization of mitochondria, loss of ribosomes, vesiculation of endoplasmic reticulum, degradation and lysis of the cell ribosomes, and deposition of lipid droplets on the membranes and in the cytoplasm, dependent on the concentration of the peroxide. Same effects with higher injuries of the membrane system are found in Phytophthorea infestans. A parallel investigation on fibroblasts showed similar effects: pathological changes of mitochondria, but also pycnosis in the nucleus. Comparative ultrastructure investigations were performed in cultures of Phytophthora infestans with tetrachlorcarbon and chloroneb, a specific fungicide substance with a new mode of action. Scavengers like ..cap alpha..-tocopherol and piperonyl butoxide inhibit the toxic effect of the investigated substances in various degrees. Results are discussed in regard to the effect of a lipid peroxidative and proteolytic attack in pesticides of unknown mechanism of action.

  14. Induced systemic resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Micromonospora strains isolated from root nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar eMartínez-Hidalgo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Micromonospora is a Gram positive bacterium that can be isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules from healthy leguminous plants, where they could be beneficial to the plant. Their plant growth promoting activity in legume and non-legume plants has been previously demonstrated. The present study explores the ability of Micromonospora strains to control fungal pathogens and to stimulate plant immunity. Micromonospora strains isolated from surface sterilized nodules of alfalfa showed in vitro antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi. Moreover, root inoculation of tomato plants with these Micromonospora strains effectively reduced leaf infection by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, despite spatial separation between both microorganisms. This induced systemic resistance, confirmed in different tomato cultivars, is long lasting. Gene expression analyses evidenced that Micromonospora stimulates the plant capacity to activate defense mechanisms upon pathogen attack. The defensive response of tomato plants inoculated with Micromonospora spp. differs from that of non-inoculated plants, showing a stronger induction of jasmonate-regulated defenses when the plant is challenged with a pathogen. The hypothesis of jasmonates playing a key role in this defense priming effect was confirmed using defense-impaired tomato mutants, since the JA-deficient line def1 was unable to display a long term induced resistance upon Micromonospora spp. inoculation.In conclusion, nodule isolated Micromonospora strains should be considered excellent candidates as biocontrol agents as they combine both direct antifungal activity against plant pathogens and the ability to prime plant immunity.

  15. Rapid isolation of mycoviral double-stranded RNA from Botrytis cinerea and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Sepúlveda Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most of the infected fungi, the mycoviruses are latent or cryptic, the infected fungus does not show disease symptoms, and it is phenotypically identical to a non-infected strain of the same species. Because of these properties, the initial stage in the search for fungi infected with mycoviruses is the detection of their viral genome, which in most of the described cases corresponds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA. So to analyze a large number of fungal isolates it is necessary to have a simple and rapid method to detect dsRNA. Results A rapid method to isolate dsRNA from a virus-infected filamentous fungus, Botrytis cinerea, and from a killer strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using commercial minicolumns packed with CF11 cellulose was developed. In addition to being a rapid method, it allows to use small quantities of yeasts or mycelium as starting material, being obtained sufficient dsRNA quantity that can later be analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, treated with enzymes for its partial characterization, amplified by RT-PCR and cloned in appropriate vectors for further sequencing. Conclusions The method yields high quality dsRNA, free from DNA and ssRNA. The use of nucleases to degrade the DNA or the ssRNA is not required, and it can be used to isolate dsRNA from any type of fungi or any biological sample that contains dsRNA.

  16. Jasmonic acid involves in grape fruit ripening and resistant against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haifeng; Zhang, Cheng; Pervaiz, Tariq; Zhao, Pengcheng; Liu, Zhongjie; Wang, Baoju; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Lin; Fang, Jinggui; Qian, Jianpu

    2016-01-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex process that is regulated by a signal network. Whereas the regulatory mechanism of abscisic acid has been studied extensively in non-climacteric fruit, little is know about other signaling pathways involved in this process. In this study, we performed that plant hormone jasmonic acid plays an important role in grape fruit coloring and softening by increasing the transcription levels of several ripening-related genes, such as the color-related genes PAL1, DFR, CHI, F3H, GST, CHS, and UFGT; softening-related genes PG, PL, PE, Cell, EG1, and XTH1; and aroma-related genes Ecar, QR, and EGS. Lastly, the fruit anthocyanin, phenol, aroma, and cell wall materials were changed. Jasmonic acid positively regulated its biosynthesis pathway genes LOS, AOS, and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase (OPR) and signal pathway genes COI1 and JMT. RNA interference of grape jasmonic acid pathway gene VvAOS in strawberry fruit appeared fruit un-coloring phenotypes; exogenous jasmonic acid rescued this phenotypes. On the contrary, overexpression of grape jasmonic acid receptor VvCOI1 in the strawberry fruit accelerated the fruit-ripening process and induced some plant defense-related gene expression level. Furthermore, jasmonic acid treatment or strong jasmonic acid signal pathway in strawberry fruit make the fruit resistance against Botrytis cinerea.

  17. Novel hypovirulence-associated RNA mycovirus in the plant-pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea: molecular and biological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Sang, Wen; Wu, Ming-De; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Long; Zhou, Ying-Jun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-04-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a pathogenic fungus causing gray mold on numerous economically important crops and ornamental plants. This study was conducted to characterize the biological and molecular features of a novel RNA mycovirus, Botrytis cinerea RNA virus 1 (BcRV1), in the hypovirulent strain BerBc-1 of B. cinerea. The genome of BcRV1 is 8,952 bp long with two putative overlapped open reading frames (ORFs), ORF1 and ORF2, coding for a hypothetical polypeptide (P1) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. A -1 frameshifting region (designated the KNOT element) containing a shifty heptamer, a heptanucleotide spacer, and an H-type pseudoknot was predicted in the junction region of ORF1 and ORF2. The -1 frameshifting role of the KNOT element was experimentally confirmed through determination of the production of the fusion protein red fluorescent protein (RFP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) by the plasmid containing the construct dsRed-KNOT-eGFP in Escherichia coli. BcRV1 belongs to a taxonomically unassigned double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycovirus group. It is closely related to grapevine-associated totivirus 2 and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum nonsegmented virus L. BcRV1 in strain BerBc-1 was found capable of being transmitted vertically through macroconidia and horizontally to other B. cinerea strains through hyphal contact. The presence of BcRV1 was found to be positively correlated with hypovirulence in B. cinerea, with the attenuation effects of BcRV1 on mycelial growth and pathogenicity being greatly affected by the accumulation level of BcRV1. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Botrydial and botcinins produced by Botrytis cinerea regulate the expression of Trichoderma arundinaceum genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis.

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    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; Mccormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Moraga, Javier; Gomes, Eriston V; Proctor, Robert H; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea produce the sesquiterpenes harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively, and also the polyketides aspinolides and botcinins (Botcs), respectively. We analysed the role of BOT and Botcs in the Ta37-B. cinerea interaction, including the transcriptomic changes in the genes involved in HA (tri) and ergosterol biosynthesis, as well as changes in the level of HA and squalene-ergosterol. We found that, when confronted with B. cinerea, the tri biosynthetic genes were up-regulated in all dual cultures analysed, but at higher levels when Ta37 was confronted with the BOT non-producer mutant bcbot2Δ. The production of HA was also higher in the interaction area with this mutant. In Ta37-bcbot2Δ confrontation experiments, the expression of the hmgR gene, encoding the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is the first enzyme of the terpene biosynthetic pathway, was also up-regulated, resulting in an increase in squalene production compared with the confrontation with B. cinerea B05.10. Botcs had an up-regulatory effect on the tri biosynthetic genes, with BotcA having a stronger effect than BotcB. The results indicate that the interaction between Ta37 and B. cinerea exerts a stimulatory effect on the expression of the tri biosynthetic genes, which, in the interaction zone, can be attenuated by BOT produced by B. cinerea B05.10. The present work provides evidence for a metabolic dialogue between T. arundinaceum and B. cinerea that is mediated by sesquiterpenes and polyketides, and that affects the outcome of the interaction of these fungi with each other and their environment. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Tomato SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 contribute to disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yafen; Huang, Lei; Ouyang, Zhigang; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2014-06-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli via receptors/sensors into intracellular responses and play key roles in plant immunity against pathogen attack. However, the function of tomato MAPK kinases, SlMKKs, in resistance against Botrytis cinerea remains unclear yet. A total of five SlMKK genes with one new member, SlMKK5, were identified in tomato. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that expression of SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 was strongly induced by B. cinerea and by jasmonic acid and ethylene precursor 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based knockdown of individual SlMKKs and disease assays identified that SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 but not other three SlMKKs (SlMKK1, SlMKK3 and SlMKK5) are involved in resistance against B. cinerea. Silencing of SlMKK2 or SlMKK4 resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea, increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and attenuated expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea in tomato plants. Furthermore, transient expression of constitutively active phosphomimicking forms SlMKK2DD and SlMKK4DD in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana plants led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and elevated expression of defense genes. VIGS-based knockdown of SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 expression in tomato and gain-of-function transient expression of constitutively active phosphomimicking forms SlMKK2DD and SlMKK2DD in N. benthamiana demonstrate that both SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 function as positive regulators of defense response against B. cinerea.

  20. The natural fenhexamid-resistant grey mould populations from strawberry in Zhejiang Province are dominated by Botrytis cinerea group S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dafang; Wu, Sisi; Liu, Na; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2016-08-01

    Recently, a novel clade Botrytis cinerea group S was found to be common in B. cinerea populations from Germany and New Zealand. Fenhexamid, an effective antibotrytis fungicide, has not been registered in China, but our preliminary study detected fenhexamid-resistant (HydR) isolates from strawberry in Zhejiang Province. Genetic identification of 639 B. cinerea isolates from strawberry found that 331 (62.9%) belonged to B. cinerea group S. The frequency of HydR isolates ranged from 0 to 37.5% among the nine locations. Of the 74 HydR isolates, 71 were B. cinerea group S and moderately resistant to fenhexamid (HydR). Seven new mutations S9G, P57A, P269L, V365A, E368D, E375K and A378T in the target gene erg27 were reported for the first time. Sixty-two (83.8%) HydR isolates simultaneously carried P57A and A378T mutations, and further transformation assays showed that integration of one copy of erg27(P57A) (,) (A378T) into a wild-type strain led to partial resistance. Detached fruit studies showed that fenhexamid at the recommended field rate could control the disease incited by moderately resistant isolates but not by highly resistant isolates. B. cinerea group S isolates are widespread in all strawberry-growing locations in Zhejiang Province. The natural HydR populations from strawberry are dominated by B. cinerea group S. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Alteration of oxidative phosphorylation as a possible mechanism of the antifungal action of p-coumaric acid against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Mendoza, L; Cotoras, M

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the mechanism of action of p-coumaric acid against isolate B05·10 of Botrytis cinerea. For this purpose, the effect of this compound on cell membrane, cell wall and oxidative phosphorylation was determined. Induction of oxidative stress triggered by this compound was also studied. p-coumaric acid showed antifungal effect on the mycelial growth. Additionally, the compound was able to retard the germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia. The mechanism of action of this compound was analysed using fluorescent probes. p-Coumaric acid did not affect the integrity of cell wall and plasmatic membrane and neither produced oxidative stress. Finally, it was shown that the compound produced an increase in oxygen consumption. p-coumaric acid performs as a mitochondrial uncoupler in B. cinerea. Its role as an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation could be explained to its acidic, nonpolar and planar characteristics. These structural and chemical characteristics would favour ability of p-coumaric acid to pass through cellular membranes. Plant secondary metabolites can be used as an alternative way to control phytopathogenic fungi. The knowledge of the action mechanism of these compounds can contribute to design modified molecules with higher antifungal activity. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Metabolomic Analysis and Mode of Action of Metabolites of Tea Tree Oil Involved in the Suppression of Botrytis cinerea

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    Jiayu Xu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tea tree oil (TTO, a volatile essential oil, has been widely used as an antimicrobial agent. However, the mechanism underlying TTO antifungal activity is not fully understood. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomics survey was undertaken to identify changes in metabolite production in Botrytis cinerea cells treated with TTO. Significant differences in 91 metabolites were observed, including 8 upregulated and 83 downregulated metabolites in TTO-treated cells. The results indicate that TTO inhibits primary metabolic pathways through the suppression of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism. Further experiments show that TTO treatment decreases the activities of key enzymes in the TCA cycle and increases the level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Membrane damage is also induced by TTO treatment. We hypothesize that the effect of TTO on B. cinerea is achieved mainly by disruption of the TCA cycle and fatty acid metabolism, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

  3. [Effect of monensin on the growth and secretion of exopolysaccharides in Botrytis cinerea Pers. and Sclerotium rolfsii Sacc].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulali, Y; Talouizte, A; Fonvieille, J L; Dargent, R

    1996-09-01

    The addition of various concentrations of monensin (1,5, and 10 micrograms/mL) to the culture medium inhibits the fungal growth and perturbs exopolysaccharides secretion, provoking a decrease of production in Botrytis cinerea and an increase in Sclerotium rolfsii. The ionophore induces also modifications in both polymer composition and structure. New monomers were observed in the two species and a decreased branching rate for Sclerotium rolfsii. These modifications show that monensin affects the enzymes responsible for normal wall synthesis and therefore vesicular traffic.

  4. An Interspecies Comparative Analysis of the Predicted Secretomes of the Necrotrophic Plant Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

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    Steph Heard

    Full Text Available Phytopathogenic fungi form intimate associations with host plant species and cause disease. To be successful, fungal pathogens communicate with a susceptible host through the secretion of proteinaceous effectors, hydrolytic enzymes and metabolites. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are economically important necrotrophic fungal pathogens that cause disease on numerous crop species. Here, a powerful bioinformatics pipeline was used to predict the refined S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea secretomes, identifying 432 and 499 proteins respectively. Analyses focusing on S. sclerotiorum revealed that 16% of the secretome encoding genes resided in small, sequence heterogeneous, gene clusters that were distributed over 13 of the 16 predicted chromosomes. Functional analyses highlighted the importance of plant cell hydrolysis, oxidation-reduction processes and the redox state to the S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea secretomes and potentially host infection. Only 8% of the predicted proteins were distinct between the two secretomes. In contrast to S. sclerotiorum, the B. cinerea secretome lacked CFEM- or LysM-containing proteins. The 115 fungal and oomycete genome comparison identified 30 proteins specific to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea, plus 11 proteins specific to S. sclerotiorum and 32 proteins specific to B. cinerea. Expressed sequence tag (EST and proteomic analyses showed that 246 S. sclerotiorum secretome encoding genes had EST support, including 101 which were only expressed in vitro and 49 which were only expressed in planta, whilst 42 predicted proteins were experimentally proven to be secreted. These detailed in silico analyses of two important necrotrophic pathogens will permit informed choices to be made when candidate effector proteins are selected for function analyses in planta.

  5. Identification of miRNAs Responsive to Botrytis cinerea in Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. by High-Throughput Sequencing

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    Daqiu Zhao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall., one of the world’s most important ornamental plants, is highly susceptible to Botrytis cinerea, and improving resistance to this pathogenic fungus is a problem yet to be solved. MicroRNAs (miRNAs play an essential role in resistance to B. cinerea, but until now, no studies have been reported concerning miRNAs induction in P. lactiflora. Here, we constructed and sequenced two small RNA (sRNA libraries from two B. cinerea-infected P. lactiflora cultivars (“Zifengyu” and “Dafugui” with significantly different levels of resistance to B. cinerea, using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. From the raw reads generated, 4,592,881 and 5,809,796 sRNAs were obtained, and 280 and 306 miRNAs were identified from “Zifengyu” and “Dafugui”, respectively. A total of 237 conserved and 7 novel sequences of miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cultivars, and we predicted and annotated their potential target genes. Subsequently, 7 differentially expressed candidate miRNAs were screened according to their target genes annotated in KEGG pathways, and the expression patterns of miRNAs and corresponding target genes were elucidated. We found that miR5254, miR165a-3p, miR3897-3p and miR6450a might be involved in the P. lactiflora response to B. cinerea infection. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for resistance to B. cinerea in P. lactiflora.

  6. Osmotic stress-induced polyamine oxidation mediates defence responses and reduces stress-enhanced grapevine susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatmi, Saloua; Trotel-Aziz, Patricia; Villaume, Sandra; Couderchet, Michel; Clément, Christophe; Aziz, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic factors inducing osmotic stress can influence the plant immune response and resistance to pathogen infections. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)- and sucrose-induced osmotic stress on polyamine (PA) homeostasis and the basal immune response in grapevine plantlets before and after Botrytis cinerea infection was determined. Pharmacological approaches were also addressed to assess the contribution of osmotic stress-induced PA oxidation to the regulation of defence responses and the susceptibility of grapevine to B. cinerea. Following osmotic stress or pathogen infection, PA homeostasis was linked to enhanced activity of diamine oxidases (CuAO) and PA oxidases (PAO) and the production of 1,3-diaminopropane. These responses paralleled the accumulation of the main stilbenic phytoalexins, resveratrol and ε-viniferin and upregulation of gene transcripts including STS (a stilbene synthase), PR-2 (a β-1,3-glucanase), PR3-4c (acidic chitinase IV), and PR-5 (a thaumatin-like protein), as well as NCED2 involved in abscisic acid biosynthesis. It was also demonstrated that leaves pre-exposed to osmotic stress and later inoculated with B. cinerea showed enhanced PA accumulation and attenuation of CuAO and PAO activities. This was consistent with the impaired production of phytoalexins and transcript levels of defence- and stress-related genes following infection, and the enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. Pharmacological experiments revealed that, under osmotic stress conditions, CuAO and PAO were involved in PA homeostasis and in the regulation of defence responses. Specific inhibition of CuAO and PAO in osmotically stressed leaves strongly attenuated the induction of defence responses triggered by B. cinerea infection and enhanced susceptibility to the pathogen. Taken together, this study reveals a contribution of PA catabolism to the resistance state through modulation of immune response in grapevine following osmotic stress and/or after B

  7. An Interspecies Comparative Analysis of the Predicted Secretomes of the Necrotrophic Plant Pathogens Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Steph; Brown, Neil A; Hammond-Kosack, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi form intimate associations with host plant species and cause disease. To be successful, fungal pathogens communicate with a susceptible host through the secretion of proteinaceous effectors, hydrolytic enzymes and metabolites. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are economically important necrotrophic fungal pathogens that cause disease on numerous crop species. Here, a powerful bioinformatics pipeline was used to predict the refined S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea secretomes, identifying 432 and 499 proteins respectively. Analyses focusing on S. sclerotiorum revealed that 16% of the secretome encoding genes resided in small, sequence heterogeneous, gene clusters that were distributed over 13 of the 16 predicted chromosomes. Functional analyses highlighted the importance of plant cell hydrolysis, oxidation-reduction processes and the redox state to the S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea secretomes and potentially host infection. Only 8% of the predicted proteins were distinct between the two secretomes. In contrast to S. sclerotiorum, the B. cinerea secretome lacked CFEM- or LysM-containing proteins. The 115 fungal and oomycete genome comparison identified 30 proteins specific to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea, plus 11 proteins specific to S. sclerotiorum and 32 proteins specific to B. cinerea. Expressed sequence tag (EST) and proteomic analyses showed that 246 S. sclerotiorum secretome encoding genes had EST support, including 101 which were only expressed in vitro and 49 which were only expressed in planta, whilst 42 predicted proteins were experimentally proven to be secreted. These detailed in silico analyses of two important necrotrophic pathogens will permit informed choices to be made when candidate effector proteins are selected for function analyses in planta.

  8. Independent Emergence of Resistance to Seven Chemical Classes of Fungicides in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ortuño, Dolores; Grabke, Anja; Li, Xingpeng; Schnabel, Guido

    2015-04-01

    Gray mold, caused by the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, is one of the most destructive diseases of small fruit crops and control is largely dependent on the application of fungicides. As part of a region-wide resistance-monitoring program that investigated 1,890 B. cinerea isolates from 189 fields in 10 states of the United States, we identified seven isolates (0.4%) from five locations in four different states with unprecedented resistance to all seven Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) codes with single-site modes of action including FRAC 1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 12, and 17 registered in the United States for gray mold control. Resistance to thiophanate-methyl, iprodione, boscalid, pyraclostrobin, and fenhexamid was based on target gene mutations that conferred E198A and F200Y in β-tubulin, I365N/S in Bos1, H272R/Y in SdhB, G143A in Cytb, and T63I and F412S in Erg27. Isolates were grouped into MDR1 and MDR1h phenotypes based on sensitivity to fludioxonil and variations in transcription factor mrr1. MDR1h isolates had a previously described 3-bp deletion at position 497 in mrr1. Expression of ABC transporter atrB was increased in MDR1 isolates but highest in MDR1h isolates. None of the isolates with seven single resistances (SR) had identical nucleotide variations in target genes, indicating that they emerged independently. Multifungicide resistance phenotypes did not exhibit significant fitness penalties for the parameters used in this study, but MDR1h isolates produced more sclerotia at low temperatures and exhibited increased sensitivity to salt stress. In this study we show that current resistance management strategies have not been able to prevent the geographically independent development of resistance to all seven site-specific fungicides currently registered for gray mold control in the United States and document the presence of MDR1h in North America.

  9. Potential Applications and Antifungal Activities of Engineered Nanomaterials against Gray Mold Disease Agent Botrytis cinerea on Rose Petals

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    Yi Hao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs have great potential for use in the fields of biomedicine, building materials, and environmental protection because of their antibacterial properties. However, there are few reports regarding the antifungal activities of NPs on plants. In this study, we evaluated the antifungal roles of NPs against Botrytis cinerea, which is a notorious worldwide fungal pathogen. Three common carbon nanomaterials, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and reduced graphene oxide, and three commercial metal oxidant NPs, copper oxide (CuO NPs, ferric oxide (Fe2O3 NPs, and titanium oxides (TiO2 NPs, were independently added to water-agar plates at 50 and 200-mg/L concentrations. Detached rose petals were inoculated with spores of B. cinerea and co-cultured with each of the six nanomaterials. The sizes of the lesions on infected rose petals were measured at 72 h after inoculation, and the growth of fungi on the rose petals was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The six NPs inhibited the growth of B. cinerea, but different concentrations had different effects: 50 mg/L of fullerene and CuO NPs showed the strongest antifungal properties among the treatments, while 200 mg/L of CuO and Fe2O3 showed no significant antifungal activities. Thus, NPs may have antifungal activities that prevent B. cinerea infections in plants, and they could be used as antifungal agents during the growth and post-harvesting of roses and other flowers.

  10. The Effect of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid on Mycelial Growth of Botrytis cinerea Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV Strain

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    Ane S. Simionato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important postharvest plant pathogens that affect strawberries, grapes and tomatoes is Botrytis cinerea, known as gray mold. The fungus remains in latent form until spore germination conditions are good, making infection control difficult, causing great losses in the whole production chain. This study aimed to purify and identify phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA produced by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain and to determine its antifungal activity against B. cinerea. The compounds produced were extracted with dichloromethane and passed through a chromatographic process. The purity level of PCA was determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography semi-preparative. The structure of PCA was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Antifungal activity was determined by the dry paper disk and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC methods and identified by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The results showed that PCA inhibited mycelial growth, where MIC was 25 μg mL-1. Microscopic analysis revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide (EPS formation, showing distorted and damaged hyphae of B. cinerea. The results suggested that PCA has a high potential in the control of B. cinerea and inhibition of EPS (important virulence factor. This natural compound is a potential alternative to postharvest control of gray mold disease.

  11. Unraveling the in vitro secretome of the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea to understand the interaction with its hosts

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    Raquel eGonzález-Fernández

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic fungus with high adaptability to different environments and hosts. It secretes a large number of extracellular proteins, which favor plant tissue penetration and colonization, thus contributing to virulence. Secretomics is a proteomics sub-discipline which study the secreted proteins and their secretion mechanisms, so-called secretome. By using proteomics as experimental approach, many secreted proteins by B. cinerea have been identified from in vitro experiments, and belonging to different functional categories: i cell wall-degrading enzymes such as pectinesterases, and endo-polygalacturonases; ii proteases involved in host protein degradation such as an aspartic protease; iii proteins related to the oxidative burst such as glyoxal oxidase; iv proteins which may induce the plant hypersensitive response such as a cerato-platanin domain-containing protein; and v proteins related to production and secretion of toxins such as malate dehydrogenase. In this mini-review, we made an overview of the proteomics contribution to the study and knowledge of the B. cinerea extracellular secreted proteins based on our current work carried out from in vitro experiments, and recent published papers both in vitro and in planta studies on this fungi. We hypothesize on the putative functions of these secreted proteins, and their connection to the biology of the B. cinerea interaction with its hosts.

  12. Characterisation of Growth Variability and Mycelial Compatibility of Botrytis Cinerea Isolates Originated from Apple and Strawberry in Lithuania

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    Rasiukevičiūtė Neringa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr. is a widespread necrotrophic pathogen causing grey mould on many economically important horticultural crops. The variability in various B. cinerea populations is known to be very high. Despite the economic importance, the variability of B. cinerea has not been investigated previously on fruit crops in Lithuania. The aim of the study was to characterise the variability of B. cinerea strains isolated from strawberry and apple in different growth conditions on various agar media and to assess mycelial compatibility among the isolates. Larger colony diameter after four days of incubation was observed for isolates from strawberry on potato dextrose and beer universal agars in 24 h dark or light regime, followed by pectin agar in 24 h light. Similarly, the maximum radial growth of the isolates from apple was on potato dextrose agar (dark, followed by beer universal agar (dark and light, after four days of incubation at 20 °C. In the mycelial compatibility tests, barrage formation was evident in mycelial contacts between several isolates, indicating their vegetative incompatibility. The tests revealed that 76% were compatible and 24% were incompatible among investigated strains.

  13. Botrytis cinerea Manipulates the Antagonistic Effects between Immune Pathways to Promote Disease Development in Tomato[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Oirdi, Mohamed; El Rahman, Taha Abd; Rigano, Luciano; El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Rodriguez, María Cecilia; Daayf, Fouad; Vojnov, Adrian; Bouarab, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense and respond to pathogen attacks. Resistance against necrotrophic pathogens generally requires the activation of the jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway, whereas the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway is mainly activated against biotrophic pathogens. SA can antagonize JA signaling and vice versa. Here, we report that the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea exploits this antagonism as a strategy to cause disease development. We show that B. cinerea produces an exopolysaccharide, which acts as an elicitor of the SA pathway. In turn, the SA pathway antagonizes the JA signaling pathway, thereby allowing the fungus to develop its disease in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). SA-promoted disease development occurs through Nonexpressed Pathogen Related1. We also show that the JA signaling pathway required for tomato resistance against B. cinerea is mediated by the systemin elicitor. These data highlight a new strategy used by B. cinerea to overcome the plant’s defense system and to spread within the host. PMID:21665999

  14. Emerging trends in molecular interactions between plants and the broad host range fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

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    Malick eMbengue

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fungal plant pathogens are major threats to food security worldwide. Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are closely related Ascomycete plant pathogens causing mold diseases on hundreds of plant species. There is no genetic source of complete plant resistance to these broad host range pathogens known to date. Instead, natural plant populations show a continuum of resistance levels controlled by multiple genes, a phenotype designated as quantitative disease resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the interaction between plants and S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea but significant advances were made on this topic in the last years. This minireview highlights a selection of nine themes that emerged in recent research reports on the molecular bases of plant-S. sclerotiorum and plant-B. cinerea interactions. On the fungal side, this includes progress on understanding the role of oxalic acid, on the study of fungal small secreted proteins. Next, we discuss the exchanges of small RNA between organisms and the control of cell death in plant and fungi during pathogenic interactions. Finally on the plant side, we highlight defense priming by mechanical signals, the characterization of plant Receptor-like proteins and the hormone abscisic acid in the response to B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum , the role of plant general transcription machinery and plant small bioactive peptides. These represent nine trends we selected as remarkable in our understanding of fungal molecules causing disease and plant mechanisms associated with disease resistance to two devastating broad host range fungi.

  15. Fitness and Competitive Ability of Botrytis cinerea Isolates with Resistance to Multiple Chemical Classes of Fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S N; Luo, C X; Hu, M J; Schnabel, G

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to multiple chemical classes of fungicides in Botrytis cinerea isolates from eastern United States strawberry fields is common and strategies to control them are needed. In this study, we compared fitness and competitive ability of eight sensitive isolates (S), eight isolates resistant to five or six chemical classes of fungicides but not to phenylpyrroles (5CCR), and eight isolates resistant to six or seven chemical classes including phenylpyrroles (6CCR/MDR1h). The latter included the MDR1h phenotype due to overexpression of atrB based on Δ497V/L in mrr1. The 6CCR/MDR1h isolates grew more slowly at 4°C on potato dextrose agar, and both 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were hypersensitive to osmotic stress compared with S isolates. In contrast, no differences were found in oxidative sensitivity, aggressiveness, and spore production in vivo, and sclerotia production and viability in vitro. In competition experiments, the 5CCR and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were both outcompeted by S isolates and 6CCR/MDR1h isolates were outcompeted by 5CCR isolates in the absence of fungicide pressure. Under selective pressure of a fludioxonil/pyraclostrobin rotation, the 6CCR/MDR1h isolates dominated after coinoculation with 5CCR and S isolates. The competitive disadvantage of 5CCR and especially 6CCR/MDR1h isolates suggest that, in the absence of fungicide selection pressure, S isolates may reduce inoculum potential of multifungicide-resistant isolates under field conditions.

  16. Effect of Botrytis cinerea infection and elicitation on ß-1,3-glucanase and chitinase activity in bean leaves and cell cultures

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    Elżbieta Kuźniak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The activity of ß-1,3-glucanase and chitinase in bean plants treated with B. cinerea products or/and infected and in cell cultures after application of fungal products has been studied. Botrytis cinerea infection and culture filtrates, ethanol precipitates, glucan and conidial extract treatment markedly enhanced the activity of both hydrolases. Cell cultures treated with B.cinerea products reacted similarly to intact plants. In plants pretreated with 2-day culture filtrate and conidial extract and then infected, ß-1,3-glucanase and chitinase were induced stronger than after infection without pretreatment.

  17. Characterization of endophytic Bacillus strains from tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum) displaying antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea Pers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefi, Asma; Ben Slimene, Imen; Karkouch, Ines; Rihouey, Christophe; Azaeiz, Sana; Bejaoui, Marwa; Belaid, Rania; Cosette, Pascal; Jouenne, Thierry; Limam, Ferid

    2015-12-01

    Eighty endophytic bacteria were isolated from healthy tissues of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum). Four strains, named BL1, BT5, BR8 and BF11 were selected for their antagonism against Botrytis cinerea, a phytopathogenic fungus responsible of gray mold in several important crops, with growth inhibitory activity ranging from 27 to 53%. Morphological, biochemical, and molecular parameters as 16S rDNA sequencing demonstrated that the selected bacterial strains were related to Bacillus species which are known to produce and secrete a lot of lipopeptides with strong inhibitory effect against pathogen mycelial growth. Electrospray mass spectrometry analysis showed that these strains produced heterogeneous mixture of antibiotics belonging to fengycin and surfactin for BL1 and BT5, to iturin and surfactin for BR8, to bacillomycin D, fengycin and surfactin for BF11. Furthermore, these bacteria exhibited biocontrol potential by reducing the disease severity when tested on detached leaflets. Based on their antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea, these strains could be used for biological control of plant diseases.

  18. Negative regulation of ABA signaling by WRKY33 is critical for Arabidopsis immunity towards Botrytis cinerea 2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shouan; Kracher, Barbara; Ziegler, Jörg; Birkenbihl, Rainer P; Somssich, Imre E

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis mutant wrky33 is highly susceptible to Botrytis cinerea. We identified >1680 Botrytis-induced WRKY33 binding sites associated with 1576 Arabidopsis genes. Transcriptional profiling defined 318 functional direct target genes at 14 hr post inoculation. Comparative analyses revealed that WRKY33 possesses dual functionality acting either as a repressor or as an activator in a promoter-context dependent manner. We confirmed known WRKY33 targets involved in hormone signaling and phytoalexin biosynthesis, but also uncovered a novel negative role of abscisic acid (ABA) in resistance towards B. cinerea 2100. The ABA biosynthesis genes NCED3 and NCED5 were identified as direct targets required for WRKY33-mediated resistance. Loss-of-WRKY33 function resulted in elevated ABA levels and genetic studies confirmed that WRKY33 acts upstream of NCED3/NCED5 to negatively regulate ABA biosynthesis. This study provides the first detailed view of the genome-wide contribution of a specific plant transcription factor in modulating the transcriptional network associated with plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07295.001 PMID:26076231

  19. A Mechanistic Model of Botrytis cinerea on Grapevines That Includes Weather, Vine Growth Stage, and the Main Infection Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, Elisa; Caffi, Tito; Ciliberti, Nicola; Rossi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for Botrytis cinerea on grapevine was developed. The model, which accounts for conidia production on various inoculum sources and for multiple infection pathways, considers two infection periods. During the first period (“inflorescences clearly visible” to “berries groat-sized”), the model calculates: i) infection severity on inflorescences and young clusters caused by conidia (SEV1). During the second period (“majority of berries touching” to “berries ripe for harvest”), the model calculates: ii) infection severity of ripening berries by conidia (SEV2); and iii) severity of berry-to-berry infection caused by mycelium (SEV3). The model was validated in 21 epidemics (vineyard × year combinations) between 2009 and 2014 in Italy and France. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to: i) evaluate the ability of the model to predict mild, intermediate, and severe epidemics; and ii) assess how SEV1, SEV2, and SEV3 contribute to epidemics. The model correctly classified the severity of 17 of 21 epidemics. Results from DFA were also used to calculate the daily probabilities that an ongoing epidemic would be mild, intermediate, or severe. SEV1 was the most influential variable in discriminating between mild and intermediate epidemics, whereas SEV2 and SEV3 were relevant for discriminating between intermediate and severe epidemics. The model represents an improvement of previous B. cinerea models in viticulture and could be useful for making decisions about Botrytis bunch rot control. PMID:26457808

  20. Antagonism in vitro of bacterial isolates from comercial and wild strawberry vs. Botrytis cinerea and Rhizopus stolonifer

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    Rosa Isela Plascencia Tenorio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Strawberry is a non-climacteric fruit, with a short postharvest life. The loss of fruit quality may be due, among other factors to damage caused by pathogens. Among the most common fungi are causing gray mold (Botrytis cinerea and white rot (Rhizopus stolonifer two phytopathogenic impact on their growth rate which allows you to colonize the surface of these caused major economic losses. An alternative to control damage in fruit postharvest pathogens usingmicrobial antagonists may be present in the plant or fruit, but at low densities. In this study bacteria were isolated from leaf tissue and wild strawberry fruit (Duchesnea indicates Andr. Fock and comercial strawberry. Those isolates that were selected had the highest percentages of inhibition of mycelial growth of both pathogens in vitro. We isolated a total of 32 strains of which 15 came from wild strawberry and 24 commercial strawberry. Only nine strains were obtained with biocontrol potential for one or both pathogens. The highest percentages of mycelial growth inhibition ranged from 67.1% and 81.7% for Botrytis cinerea and 45.5% to 73.2% for Rhizopus stolonifer. These were obtained from four isolates two of them from wild strawberry and the others from commercial strawberry, all with ability to control both pathogens.

  1. Multidrug resistance in Botrytis cinerea associated with decreased accumulation of the azole fungicide oxpoconazole and increased transcription of the ABC transporter gene BcatrD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Sugiura, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Azole-resistant mutants of Botrytis cinerea have a multidrug resistance phenotype since they exhibit cross-resistance to unrelated chemicals. These mutants also display resistance to the new azole fungicide oxpoconazole. Resistance to oxpoconazole is associated with decreased accumulation of the

  2. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant

  3. Characters of aerated compost tea from immature compost that limit colonization of bean leaflets by Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, A K; Evans, K J; Metcalf, D A

    2010-11-01

    The aim was to produce and characterize an aerated compost tea (ACT) that suppressed growth of the plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Three different open-windrow composts were sampled weekly from the early secondary mesophilic stage until maturity. Each 10kg of compost sample was extracted in 30 l of aerated water for 24, 48 or 72h. Relative to water, all batches of ACT applied to detached bean leaflets reduced lesion development following single-point inoculations of B. cinerea. There was a significant linear, inverse relationship between the internal windrow temperature of compost (≤51°C) used to prepare ACT and the extent of lesion development. Bacterial diversity in ACTs from one windrow was highest using compost sampled at 48°C. The compost weight-to-water volume ratios of 1:3, 1:10 or 1:30, using compost sampled from a fourth windrow at 50°C, also produced ACTs that reduced the growth of B. cinerea on bean leaflets. The '1 : 3' ACT, and to a lesser degree the same ACT filtered to remove micro-organisms, inhibited the germination of B. cinerea conidia. ACT produced using the methods reported here suppressed the growth of B. cinerea on bean leaflets, with an abundant and diverse microbial community likely to contribute to pathogen suppression. This is the first report of the use of immature compost to produce a pathogen-suppressive ACT, suggesting that compost stage is an important production variable. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation and its convergent treatment for control of postharvest Botrytis cinerea of cut roses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Eun-Hee; Shin, Eun-Jung; Park, Hae-Jun; Jeong, Rae-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Postharvest diseases cause considerable losses to harvested crops. Among them, gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is a major problem of exporting to cut rose flowers into Korea. Irradiation treatment is an alternative to phytosanitary purposes and a useful nonchemical approach to the control of postharvest diseases. Gamma irradiation was evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity against B. cinerea on cut rose varieties, 'Shooting Star' and 'Babe'. The irradiating dose required to reduce the population by 90%, D10, was 0.99 kGy. Gamma irradiation showed complete inhibition of spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea, especially 4.0 kGy in vitro. Antifungal activity of gamma irradiation on rose B. cinerea is a dose-dependent manner. A significant phytotoxicity such as bent neck in cut rose quality was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.4 kGy (pflower rate, 'Babe' shows more sensitivity than 'Shooting Star'. In vivo assays demonstrated that established doses in in vitro, over 4 kGy, could completely inactive fungal pathogens, but such high doses can cause severe flowers damage. Thus, to eliminate negative impact on their quality, gamma irradiation was evaluated at lower doses in combination with an eco-friendly chemical, sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) to examine the inhibition of B. cinerea. Intriguingly, only the combined treatment with 0.2 kGy of gamma irradiation and 70 ppm of NaDCC exhibited significant synergistic antifungal activity against blue mold decay in both varieties. Together, these results suggest that a synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and NaDCC can be efficiently used to control the postharvest diseases in cut rose flowers, and will provide a promising technology for horticulture products for exportation.

  5. Arabidopsis AtERF15 positively regulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea

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    Huijuan eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Upon pathogen infection, activation of immune response requires effective transcriptional reprogramming that regulates inducible expression of a large set of defense genes. A number of ethylene-responsive factor transcription factors have been shown to play critical roles in regulating immune responses in plants. In the present study, we explored the functions of Arabidopsis AtERF15 in immune responses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, a (hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen, and Botrytis cinerea, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen. Expression of AtERF15 was induced by infection of Pst DC3000 and B. cinerea and by treatments with salicylic acid (SA and methyl jasmonate. Biochemical assays demonstrated that AtERF15 is a nucleus-localized transcription activator. The AtERF15-overexpressing (AtERF15-OE plants displayed enhanced resistance while the AtERF15-RNAi plants exhibited decreased resistance against Pst DC3000 and B. cinerea. Meanwhile, Pst DC3000- or B. cinerea-induced expression of defense genes was upregulated in AtERF15-OE plants but downregulated in AtERF15-RNAi plants, as compared to the expression in wild type plants. In response to infection with B. cinerea, the AtERF15-OE plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS while the AtERF15-RNAi plants accumulated more ROS. The flg22- and chitin-induced oxidative burst was abolished and expression levels of the pattern-triggered immunity-responsive genes AtFRK1 and AtWRKY53 were suppressed in AtER15-RNAi plants upon treatment with flg22 or chitin. Furthermore, SA-induced defense response was also partially impaired in the AtERF15-RNAi plants. These data demonstrate that AtERF15 is a positive regulator of multiple layers of the immune responses in Arabidopsis.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals genes commonly induced by Botrytis cinerea infection, cold, drought and oxidative stresses in Arabidopsis.

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    Arjun Sham

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress, and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses. Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs. We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets

  7. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Genes Commonly Induced by Botrytis cinerea Infection, Cold, Drought and Oxidative Stresses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ameri, Salma; Al-Mahmoud, Bassam; Awwad, Falah; Al-Rawashdeh, Ahmed; Iratni, Rabah; AbuQamar, Synan

    2014-01-01

    Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress), and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses). Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs) and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs). We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets for genetic

  8. Effect of cuticular waxes compounds from table grapes on growth, germination and gene expression in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Moreno, Evelyn; Brito-Echeverría, Jocelyn; López, Miguel; Ríos, Juan; Balic, Iván; Campos-Vargas, Reinaldo; Polanco, Rubén

    2016-05-01

    Botrytis cinerea attacks a broad range of host causing significant economic losses in the worldwide fruit export industry. Hitherto, many studies have focused on the penetration mechanisms used by this phytopathogen, but little is known about the early stages of infection, especially those such as adhesion and germination. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of cuticular waxes compounds from table grapes on growth, germination and gene expression of B. cinerea. To accomplish this, growth was analyzed using as substrate n-alkanes extracted from waxes of fresh fruit (table grapes, blueberries and apricots). Subsequently, the main compounds of table grape waxes, oleanolic acid (OA) and n-fatty alcohols, were mixed to generate a matrix on which conidia of B. cinerea were added to assess their effect on germination and expression of bctub, bchtr and bchex genes. B. cinerea B05.10, isolated from grapes, increased its growth on a matrix composed by table grapes n-alkanes in comparison to a matrix made with n-alkanes from apricot or blueberries. Moreover, at 2.5 h, B05.10 germination increased 17 and 33 % in presence of n-alkanes from table grape, in comparison to conditions without alkanes or with blueberries alkanes, respectively. Finally, expression of bchtr and bchex showed a significant increase during the first hour after contact with n-fatty alcohols and OA. In conclusion, B. cinerea displays selectivity towards certain compounds found in host waxes, mainly n-fatty alcohols, which could be a good candidate to control this phytopathogen in early stages of infection.

  9. Silencing of the tomato phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C2 (SlPLC2) reduces plant susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonorazky, Gabriela; Guzzo, María Carla; Abd-El-Haliem, Ahmed M; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Laxalt, Ana María

    2016-12-01

    The tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (Sl)] phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) gene family is composed of six members, named SlPLC1 to SlPLC6, differentially regulated on pathogen attack. We have previously shown that the fungal elicitor xylanase induces a raise of SlPLC2 and SlPLC5 transcripts and that SlPLC2, but not SlPLC5, is required for xylanase-induced expression of defense-related genes. In this work we studied the role of SlPLC2 in the interaction between tomato and the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Inoculation of tomato leaves with B. cinerea increases SlPLC2 transcript levels. We knocked-down the expression of SlPLC2 by virus-induced gene silencing and plant defense responses were analyzed upon B. cinerea inoculation. SlPLC2 silenced plants developed smaller necrotic lesions concomitantly with less proliferation of the fungus. Silencing of SlPLC2 resulted as well in a reduced production of reactive oxygen species. Upon B. cinerea inoculation, transcript levels of the salicylic acid (SA)-defense pathway marker gene SlPR1a were diminished in SlPLC2 silenced plants compared to non-silenced infected plants, while transcripts of the jasmonic acid (JA)-defense gene markers Proteinase Inhibitor I and II (SlPI-I and SlPI-II) were increased. This implies that SlPLC2 participates in plant susceptibility to B. cinerea. © 2016 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Features of air masses associated with the deposition of Pseudomonas syringae and Botrytis cinerea by rain and snowfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Caroline L; Bardin, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-11-01

    Clarifying the role of precipitation in microbial dissemination is essential for elucidating the processes involved in disease emergence and spread. The ecology of Pseudomonas syringae and its presence throughout the water cycle makes it an excellent model to address this issue. In this study, 90 samples of freshly fallen rain and snow collected from 2005-2011 in France were analyzed for microbiological composition. The conditions favorable for dissemination of P. syringae by this precipitation were investigated by (i) estimating the physical properties and backward trajectories of the air masses associated with each precipitation event and by (ii) characterizing precipitation chemistry, and genetic and phenotypic structures of populations. A parallel study with the fungus Botrytis cinerea was also performed for comparison. Results showed that (i) the relationship of P. syringae to precipitation as a dissemination vector is not the same for snowfall and rainfall, whereas it is the same for B. cinerea and (ii) the occurrence of P. syringae in precipitation can be linked to electrical conductivity and pH of water, the trajectory of the air mass associated with the precipitation and certain physical conditions of the air mass (i.e. temperature, solar radiation exposure, distance traveled), whereas these predictions are different for B. cinerea. These results are pertinent to understanding microbial survival, emission sources and atmospheric processes and how they influence microbial dissemination.

  11. Transcriptome analysis reveals regulatory networks underlying differential susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in response to nitrogen availability in Solanum lycopersicum.

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    Andrea eVega

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is one of the main limiting nutrients for plant growth and crop yield. It is well documented that changes in nitrate availability, the main N source found in agricultural soils, influences a myriad of developmental programs and processes including the plant defense response. Indeed, many agronomical reports indicate that the plant N nutritional status influences their ability to respond effectively when challenged by different pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in N-modulation of plant susceptibility to pathogens are poorly characterized. In this work, we show that Solanum lycopersicum defense response to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is affected by plant N availability, with higher susceptibility in nitrate-limiting conditions. Global gene expression responses of tomato against B. cinerea under contrasting nitrate conditions reveals that plant primary metabolism is affected by the fungal infection regardless of N regimes. This result suggests that differential susceptibility to pathogen attack under contrasting N conditions is not only explained by a metabolic alteration. We used a systems biology approach to identify the transcriptional regulatory network implicated in plant response to the fungus infection under contrasting nitrate conditions. Interestingly, hub genes in this network are known key transcription factors involved in ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. This result positions these hormones as key integrators of nitrate and defense against B. cinerea in tomato plants. Our results provide insights into potential crosstalk mechanisms between necrotrophic defense response and N status in plants.

  12. The Botrytis cinerea xylanase Xyn11A contributes to virulence with its necrotizing activity, not with its catalytic activity

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    González Celedonio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Botrytis cinerea xylanase Xyn11A has been previously shown to be required for full virulence of this organism despite its poor contribution to the secreted xylanase activity and the low xylan content of B. cinerea hosts. Intriguingly, xylanases from other fungi have been shown to have the property, independent of the xylan degrading activity, to induce necrosis when applied to plant tissues, so we decided to test the hypothesis that secreted Xyn11A contributes to virulence by promoting the necrosis of the plant tissue surrounding the infection, therefore facilitating the growth of this necrotroph. Results We show here that Xyn11A has necrotizing activity on plants and that this capacity is conserved in site-directed mutants of the protein lacking the catalytic activity. Besides, Xyn11A contributes to the infection process with the necrotizing and not with the xylan hydrolyzing activity, as the catalytically-impaired Xyn11A variants were able to complement the lower virulence of the xyn11A mutant. The necrotizing activity was mapped to a 30-amino acids peptide in the protein surface, and this region was also shown to mediate binding to tobacco spheroplasts by itself. Conclusions The main contribution of the xylanase Xyn11A to the infection process of B. cinerea is to induce necrosis of the infected plant tissue. A conserved 30-amino acids region on the enzyme surface, away from the xylanase active site, is responsible for this effect and mediates binding to plant cells.

  13. Arabidopsis Defense against Botrytis cinerea: Chronology and Regulation Deciphered by High-Resolution Temporal Transcriptomic Analysis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windram, Oliver; Madhou, Priyadharshini; McHattie, Stuart; Hill, Claire; Hickman, Richard; Cooke, Emma; Jenkins, Dafyd J.; Penfold, Christopher A.; Baxter, Laura; Breeze, Emily; Kiddle, Steven J.; Rhodes, Johanna; Atwell, Susanna; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Kim, Youn-sung; Stegle, Oliver; Borgwardt, Karsten; Zhang, Cunjin; Tabrett, Alex; Legaie, Roxane; Moore, Jonathan; Finkenstadt, Bärbel; Wild, David L.; Mead, Andrew; Rand, David; Beynon, Jim; Ott, Sascha; Buchanan-Wollaston, Vicky; Denby, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming forms a major part of a plant’s response to pathogen infection. Many individual components and pathways operating during plant defense have been identified, but our knowledge of how these different components interact is still rudimentary. We generated a high-resolution time series of gene expression profiles from a single Arabidopsis thaliana leaf during infection by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Approximately one-third of the Arabidopsis genome is differentially expressed during the first 48 h after infection, with the majority of changes in gene expression occurring before significant lesion development. We used computational tools to obtain a detailed chronology of the defense response against B. cinerea, highlighting the times at which signaling and metabolic processes change, and identify transcription factor families operating at different times after infection. Motif enrichment and network inference predicted regulatory interactions, and testing of one such prediction identified a role for TGA3 in defense against necrotrophic pathogens. These data provide an unprecedented level of detail about transcriptional changes during a defense response and are suited to systems biology analyses to generate predictive models of the gene regulatory networks mediating the Arabidopsis response to B. cinerea. PMID:23023172

  14. Arabidopsis WRKY33 Is a Key Transcriptional Regulator of Hormonal and Metabolic Responses toward Botrytis cinerea Infection1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkenbihl, Rainer P.; Diezel, Celia; Somssich, Imre E.

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcription factor WRKY33 is essential for defense toward the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Here, we aimed at identifying early transcriptional responses mediated by WRKY33. Global expression profiling on susceptible wrky33 and resistant wild-type plants uncovered massive differential transcriptional reprogramming upon B. cinerea infection. Subsequent detailed kinetic analyses revealed that loss of WRKY33 function results in inappropriate activation of the salicylic acid (SA)-related host response and elevated SA levels post infection and in the down-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA)-associated responses at later stages. This down-regulation appears to involve direct activation of several jasmonate ZIM-domain genes, encoding repressors of the JA-response pathway, by loss of WRKY33 function and by additional SA-dependent WRKY factors. Moreover, genes involved in redox homeostasis, SA signaling, ethylene-JA-mediated cross-communication, and camalexin biosynthesis were identified as direct targets of WRKY33. Genetic studies indicate that although SA-mediated repression of the JA pathway may contribute to the susceptibility of wrky33 plants to B. cinerea, it is insufficient for WRKY33-mediated resistance. Thus, WRKY33 apparently directly targets other still unidentified components that are also critical for establishing full resistance toward this necrotroph. PMID:22392279

  15. Entomopathogenic Fungi as Dual Control Agents against Both the PestMyzus persicaeand PhytopathogenBotrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hwi-Geon; Kim, Dong-Jun; Gwak, Won-Seok; Shin, Tae-Young; Woo, Soo-Dong

    2017-09-01

    The green peach aphid ( Myzus persicae ), a plant pest, and gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea , affect vegetables and fruit crops all over the world. To control this aphid and mold, farmers typically rely on the use of chemical insecticides or fungicides. However, intensive use of these chemicals over many years has led to the development of resistance. To overcome this problem, there is a need to develop alternative control methods to suppress populations of this plant pest and pathogen. Recently, potential roles have been demonstrated for entomopathogenic fungi in endophytism, phytopathogen antagonism, plant growth promotion, and rhizosphere colonization. Here, the antifungal activities of selected fungi with high virulence against green peach aphids were tested to explore their potential for the dual control of B. cinerea and M. persicae . Antifungal activities against B. cinerea were evaluated by dual culture assays using both aerial conidia and cultural filtrates of entomopathogenic fungi. Two fungal isolates, Beauveria bassiana SD15 and Metarhizium anisopliae SD3, were identified as having both virulence against aphids and antifungal activity. The virulence of these isolates against aphids was further tested using cultural filtrates, blastospores, and aerial conidia. The most virulence was observed in the simultaneous treatment with blastospores and cultural filtrate. These results suggest that the two fungal isolates selected in this study could be used effectively for the dual control of green peach aphids and gray mold for crop protection.

  16. Involvement of BcElp4 in vegetative development, various environmental stress response and virulence of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenyong; Lv, Chiyuan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Jin; Chen, Changjun

    2017-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Elongator complex consisting of the six Elp1-Elp6 proteins has been proposed to participate in three distinct cellular processes: transcriptional elongation, polarized exocytosis and formation of modified wobble uridines in tRNA. In this study, we investigated the function of BcElp4 in Botrytis cinerea, which is homologous to S. cerevisiae Elp4. A bcelp4 deletion mutant was significantly impaired in vegetative growth, sclerotia formation and melanin biosynthesis. This mutant exhibited decreased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses as well as cell way-damaging agent. Pathogenicity assays revealed that BcElp4 is involved in the virulence of B. cinerea. In addition, the deletion of bcelp4 led to increased aerial mycelia development. All these defects were restored by genetic complementation of the bcelp4 deletion mutant with the wild-type bcelp4 gene. The results of this study indicated that BcElp4 is involved in regulation of vegetative development, various environmental stress response and virulence in B. cinerea. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Some biochemical reactions of strawberry plants to infection with Botrytis cinerea and salicylic acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Małolepsza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of strawberry plants to infection with B. cinerea and treatment with salicylic acid has been studied. Infection of leaves with B. cinerea resulted in early increases in active oxygen species generation, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activities and phenolic compounds content. Some increases of the above reactions were noticed in plants treated with salicylic acid but not in the plants treated with SA and then later infected with B. cinerea.

  18. Botrytis pseudocinerea Is a Significant Pathogen of Several Crop Plants but Susceptible to Displacement by Fungicide-Resistant B. cinerea Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesken, Cecilia; Weber, Roland W S; Rupp, Sabrina; Leroch, Michaela; Hahn, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important pathogens worldwide, causing gray mold on a large variety of crops. Botrytis pseudocinerea has been found previously to occur together with B. cinerea in low abundance in vineyards and strawberry fields. Here, we report B. pseudocinerea to be common and sometimes dominant over B. cinerea on several fruit and vegetable crops in Germany. On apples with calyx end rot and on oilseed rape, it was the major gray mold species. Abundance of B. pseudocinerea was often negatively correlated with fungicide treatments. On cultivated strawberries, it was frequently found in spring but was largely displaced by B. cinerea following fungicide applications. Whereas B. cinerea strains with multiple-fungicide resistance were common in these fields, B. pseudocinerea almost never developed resistance to any fungicide even though resistance mutations occurred at similar frequencies in both species under laboratory conditions. The absence of resistance to quinone outside inhibitors in B. pseudocinerea was correlated with an intron in cytB preventing the major G143A resistance mutation. Our work indicates that B. pseudocinerea has a wide host range similar to that of B. cinerea and that it can become an important gray mold pathogen on cultivated plants. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. In-vitro effects of garlic extracts on pathogenic fungi Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum and Neofabraea alba

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    Chanel K. Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The antifungal activity of garlic extracts applied directly and through volatile release was tested against the growth of postharvest pathogens Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum and Neofabraea alba. Mycelial growth of B. cinerea and P. expansum was inhibited by aqueous and ethanol dilutions on garlic extract amended media (direct method in a dose-response manner. The aqueous dilution was more effective than the ethanol dilution. Both dilutions inhibited mycelial growth of N. alba to a similar extent but no trend in data was noted across the concentration range. Calculated EC50 values indicated that 13.36% and 8.09% aqueous dilutions could be used to inhibit growth of B. cinerea and P. expansum, respectively; however, values generated for N. alba either bordered on or exceeded the concentration range. The volatile vapour application of garlic was able to inhibit mycelial growth and spore germination of all pathogens at concentrations as low as 20%. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis showed that 85.95% of compounds present in the garlic sample belonged to a sulphur or sulphur-derived group. Allicin, the active component of garlic, was not found; however, breakdown products of allicin were present in high amounts. Overall, the antifungal activity of garlic extracts for the control of B. cinerea and P. expansum was confirmed. Further investigations into the antifungal effect of garlic extracts on N. alba is required, although garlic volatiles seem to be effective. This report is the first of antifungal activity of garlic extracts against N. alba – the causal agent of bull’s eye rot, one of the major diseases of apples.

  20. Effects of Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae infection on the antioxidant profile of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum C3/CAM intermediate plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libik-Konieczny, Marta; Surówka, Ewa; Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Nosek, Michał; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2011-07-01

    Mesembryathemum crystallinum plants performing C(3) or CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism) appear to be highly resistant to Botrytis cinerea as well as to Pseudomonas syringae. Fungal hyphae growth was restricted to 48h post-inoculation (hpi) in both metabolic types and morphology of hyphae differed between those growing in C(3) and CAM plants. Growth of bacteria was inhibited significantly 24 hpi in both C(3) and CAM plants. B. cinerea and P. syringae infection led to an increase in the concentration of H(2)O(2) in C(3) plants 3 hpi, while a decrease in H(2)O(2) content was observed in CAM performing plants. The concentration of H(2)O(2) returned to the control level 24 and 48 hpi. Changes in H(2)O(2) content corresponded with the activity of guaiacol peroxidase (POD), mostly 3 hpi. We noted that its activity decreased significantly in C(3) plants and increased in CAM plants in response to inoculation with both pathogens. On the contrary, changes in the activity of CAT did not correlate with H(2)O(2) level. It increased significantly after interaction of C(3) plants with B. cinerea or P. syringae, but in CAM performing plants, the activity of this enzyme was unchanged. Inoculation with B. cinerea or P. syringae led to an increase in the total SOD activity in C(3) plants while CAM plants did not exhibit changes in the total SOD activity after interaction with both pathogens. In conclusion, the pathogen-induced changes in H(2)O(2) content and in SOD, POD and CAT activities in M. crystallinum leaves, were related to the photosynthetic metabolism type of the stressed plants rather than to the lifestyle of the invading pathogen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. A Single-Nucleotide Deletion in the Transcription Factor Gene bcsmr1 Causes Sclerotial-Melanogenesis Deficiency in Botrytis cinerea

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    Yingjun Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is an important plant pathogenic fungus with a wide range of host. It usually produces black-colored sclerotia (BS due to deposition of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene melanin in sclerotial melanogenesis. Our previous study (Zhou et al., 2018 reported six B. cinerea isolates producing orange-colored sclerotia (OS with deficiency in sclerotial melanogenesis. Comparison of ecological fitness (conidia, mycelia, sclerotia, natural distribution, and melanogenesis of selected BS and OS isolates suggests that sclerotia play an important role in the disease cycle caused by B. cinerea. However, the molecular mechanism for formation of the OS B. cinerea remains unknown. This study was done to unravel the molecular mechanism for the sclerotial melanogenesis deficiency in the OS isolates. We found that all the five sclerotial melanogenesis genes (bcpks12, bcygh1, bcbrn1/2, bcscd1 were down-regulated in OS isolates, compared to the genes in the BS isolates. However, the sclerotial melanogenesis-regulatory gene bcsmr1 had similar expression in both types of sclerotia, suggesting the sclerotial melanogenesis deficiency is due to loss-of-function of bcsmr1, rather than lack of expression of bcsmr1. Therefore, we cloned bcsmr1 from OS (bcsmr1OS and BS (bcsmr1BS isolates, and found a single-nucleotide deletion in bcsmr1OS. The single-nucleotide deletion caused formation of a premature stop codon in the open reading frame of bcsmr1OS, resulting in production of a 465-aa truncated protein. The transcription activity of the truncated protein was greatly reduced, compared to that of the 935-aa full-length protein encoded by bcsmr1BS in the BS isolates. The function of bcsmr1OS was partially complemented by bcsmr1BS. This study not only elucidated the molecular mechanism for formation of orange-colored sclerotia by the spontaneous mutant XN-1 of B. cinerea, but also confirmed the regulatory function of bcsmr1 in sclerotial melanogenesis of B. cinerea.

  2. Arabidopsis Elongator subunit 2 positively contributes to resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenggang; Ding, Yezhang; Yao, Jin; Zhang, Yanping; Sun, Yijun; Colee, James; Mou, Zhonglin

    2015-09-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Elongator complex functions in diverse biological processes including salicylic acid-mediated immune response. However, how Elongator functions in jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-mediated defense is unknown. Here, we show that Elongator is required for full induction of the JA/ET defense pathway marker gene PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) and for resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. A loss-of-function mutation in the Arabidopsis Elongator subunit 2 (ELP2) alters B. cinerea-induced transcriptome reprogramming. Interestingly, in elp2, expression of WRKY33, OCTADECANOID-RESPONSIVE ARABIDOPSIS AP2/ERF59 (ORA59), and PDF1.2 is inhibited, whereas transcription of MYC2 and its target genes is enhanced. However, overexpression of WRKY33 or ORA59 and mutation of MYC2 fail to restore PDF1.2 expression and B. cinerea resistance in elp2, suggesting that ELP2 is required for induction of not only WRKY33 and ORA59 but also PDF1.2. Moreover, elp2 is as susceptible as coronatine-insensitive1 (coi1) and ethylene-insensitive2 (ein2) to B. cinerea, indicating that ELP2 is an important player in B. cinerea resistance. Further analysis of the lesion sizes on the double mutants elp2 coi1 and elp2 ein2 and the corresponding single mutants revealed that the function of ELP2 overlaps with COI1 and is additive to EIN2 for B. cinerea resistance. Finally, basal histone acetylation levels in the coding regions of WRKY33, ORA59, and PDF1.2 are reduced in elp2 and a functional ELP2-GFP fusion protein binds to the chromatin of these genes, suggesting that constitutive ELP2-mediated histone acetylation may be required for full activation of the WRKY33/ORA59/PDF1.2 transcriptional cascade. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Contribución al control de Botrytis cinerea pers. en statice (Limonium sinuatum mill variedad Midnigth blue

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    Díaz Norma C.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This work was outlined under the need of controlling the looses of statice (Limonium sinuatum caused by patogend fungi, with emphasis to Botrytis cinerea. In soil samples, monitoring and affected plants, were obtained the fungi Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp, Alternaria sp and Cladospotium sp, causative of symptoms in stems, roots, leaves and flowers. Upon evaluating "in vitro" the antagonistic capacity of T. hamatum with the fungi, was observed growth inhibition ofthe patogens. The eficiency tests of the (fungicides
    Iprodione (Rovral and Captan (Orthocide, on the patogens and the antagonist, determined the lethal dose of these (1 gmllt evaluated in the chemical and integrated treatments. In field was accomplished the assembly of the treatments (biological, chemical and integrated, to find the most effective in the control of the patogens. The efficiency
    was evaluated taking into account the production of export branches (550-560 gr.; national branches (twisted stems (decoloratedj; and branches lost by disease; the
    integrated treatment was the best, with a production of 1.8 branches/plant, followed of the Chemical trealment, with 1.62 branches/plant. The branches lost by disease were of 0.14 branches/plant in the integrated treatment and 0.26 branches/plant in the Chemical treatments-Biological and Chemical-Cultural. Treatment with smaller productivity
    was the Chemical-Cultural with 1.42 branches/plant.Este trabajo se planteó bajo la necesidad de controlar las pérdidas de Statice (Limonium sinuatum causados por hongos patógenos, con énfasis a Botrytis cinerea. En las muestras de suelo, monitoreo y plantas afectadas, se obtuvieron los hongos Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium sp, Alternaría sp y Cladosporium sp, causantes de síntomas
    en tallos, raíces, hojas y flores. Al evaluar "in vitro" la capacidad antagónica de T. hamatum con los hongos, se
    observó inhibición de crecimiento de los patógenos. Las pruebas de

  4. Control of Botrytis cinerea in Eucalyptus globulus Mini-Cuttings Using Clonostachys and Trichoderma Strains Control de Botrytis cinerea en miniestacas de Eucalyptus globulus Utilizando Cepas de Clonostachys y Trichoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomé Zaldúa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr. causes the disease known as gray mold in more than 200 hosts. It is one of the most important pathogens in Chilean forest nurseries and Eucalyptus globulus Labill. is one of the most susceptible species, especially in vegetative reproduction systems. Clonostachys and Trichoderma strains were selected as potential biocontrol agents of gray mold in previous research by the authors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of antagonistic fungi to control B. cinerea in E. globulus mini-cuttings. Five fungi strains were tested and applied weekly, two Clonostachys and three Trichoderma (5 x 10(6 conidia mL-1. In addition, comparison treatments were also used: absolute control (water and fungicide application. The experiment was carried out under operational conditions to produce E. globulus mini-cuttings. The Clonostachys UDC-A10 and UDC-A11 strains reduce mini-cutting mortality caused by B. cinerea in 54 and 71%, respectively, and with effects similar to those achieved by fungicides. Clonostachys UDC-A11 reduces the disease progression rate with the same statistical results as fungicides. A negative effect of applying fungicides on rooting of the surviving mini-cuttings was also confirmed. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of Clonostachys as a control agent against gray mold disease in E. globulus mini-cuttings.Botrytis cinerea Pers. ex Fr. ocasiona la enfermedad conocida como moho gris en más de 200 hospederos. En Chile es uno de los patógenos más importantes en viveros forestales, siendo Eucalyptus globulus Labill. una de las especies más susceptibles, especialmente en los sistemas de reproducción vegetativa. En investigaciones previas, realizadas por los autores, se seleccionaron cepas de Clonostachys y Trichoderma como potenciales agentes de biocontrol del moho gris. El objetivo fue evaluar la eficacia de hongos antagonistas en el control de B. cinerea en mini-estacas de E

  5. The glutaredoxin ATGRXS13 is required to facilitate Botrytis cinerea infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    La Camera, Sylvain; L’Haridon, Floriane; Astier, Jérémy; Zander, Mark; Abou‐Mansour, Eliane; Page, Gonzague; Thurow, Corinna; Wendehenne, David; Gatz, Christiane; Métraux, Jean‐Pierre; Lamotte, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    .... Despite basal resistance, virulent strains of B. cinerea can cause disease on Arabidopsis thaliana and virulent pathogens can interfere with the metabolism of the host in a way to facilitate infection of the plant...

  6. Effects of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides used against Botrytis cinerea, on carbohydrate physiology in Vitis vinifera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Gaëlle; Magné, Christian; Clément, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    In Vitis vinifera L, photosynthesis and photosynthate partitioning are affected in the presence of fludioxonil and pyrimethanil, two fungicides commonly used in vineyards against Botrytis cinerea Pers. However, the effects were found to be different according to the model studied: plantlets (cv Chardonnay) grown in vitro, fruiting cuttings (cv Chardonnay) and plants grown in vineyards (cvs Chardonnay, Pinot noir and Pinot Meunier). In the plantlets grown in vitro, both fungicides decreased gas exchanges, photosynthetic pigment and starch concentrations in the leaves, whereas soluble carbohydrates transiently accumulated, suggesting that plantlets mobilised starch in response to photosynthesis inhibition caused by fungicides. In the fruiting cuttings, the fungicides did not affect photosynthesis, although fludioxonil caused starch decrease in parallel with sucrose accumulation, suggesting that the fungicide effects were of lower intensity than in vitro. Conversely, in vineyard, the two fungicides stimulated photosynthesis and increased pigment concentrations in the three vine cultivars tested. In the meantime, glucose, fructose and starch levels of the leaves declined after fungicide exposure, whereas sucrose accumulated, indicating that sucrose synthesis increased in the leaves following the fungicide treatment. Among the three varieties, Chardonnay was the most sensitive to the fungicides as revealed by the intensity of the responses and the longer period for recovery. In vineyard, the results suggested that the two fungicides, in addition to inhibiting B cinerea development, had a beneficial effect on vine physiology through the stimulation of leaf carbon nutrition, which may further enable the plant to rapidly make use of its defence reactions.

  7. Testing of Eight Medicinal Plant Extracts in Combination with Kresoxim-Methyl for Integrated Control of Botrytis cinerea in Apples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burtram C. Fielding

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a fungus that causes gray mold on many fruit crops. Despite the availability of a large number of botryticides, the chemical control of gray mold has been hindered by the emergence of resistant strains. In this paper, tests were done to determine the botryticidal efficacy of selected plant extracts alone or combined with kresoxim-methyl. In total, eight South African medicinal plants viz Artemisia afra, Elyptropappus rhinocerotis, Galenia africana, Hypoxis hemerocallidea, Siphonochilus aetheopicus, Sutherlandia frutescens, Tulbaghia violacea and Tulbaghia alliacea were screened. Allium sativum, a plant species known to have antifungal activity, was included in the in vivo studies. For the in vitro studies, synergistic interactions between the plant extracts and the kresoxim-methyl fungicide were tested with radial growth assays. Data indicated synergistic inhibitory effects between the fungicide and the plant extracts. Next, different doses of plant extracts combined with kresoxim-methyl were used for decay inhibition studies on Granny Smith apples. Synergistic and additive effects were observed for many of the combinations. Even though this study was done using only one strain of B. cinerea, results showed that the tested indigenous South African plant species possess natural compounds that potentiate the activity of kresoxim-methyl.

  8. Tomato transcriptome and mutant analyses suggest a role for plant stress hormones in the interaction between fruit and Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBlanco-Ulate

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fruit-pathogen interactions are a valuable biological system to study the role of plant development in the transition from resistance to susceptibility. In general, unripe fruit are resistant to pathogen infection but become increasingly more susceptible as they ripen. During ripening, fruit undergo significant physiological and biochemical changes that are coordinated by complex regulatory and hormonal signaling networks. The interplay between multiple plant stress hormones in the interaction between plant vegetative tissues and microbial pathogens has been documented extensively, but the relevance of these hormones during infections of fruit is unclear. In this work, we analyzed a transcriptome study of tomato fruit infected with Botrytis cinerea in order to profile the expression of genes for the biosynthesis, modification and signal transduction of ethylene (ET, salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA, and abscisic acid (ABA, hormones that may be not only involved in ripening, but also in fruit interactions with pathogens. The changes in relative expression of key genes during infection and assays of susceptibility of fruit with impaired synthesis or perception of these hormones were used to formulate hypotheses regarding the involvement of these regulators in the outcome of the tomato fruit-B. cinerea interaction.

  9. Phosphoproteome profiles of the phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea during exponential growth in axenic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanture, Marlène; Dumur, Jérôme; Bataillé-Simoneau, Nelly; Campion, Claire; Valot, Benoît; Zivy, Michel; Simoneau, Philippe; Fillinger, Sabine

    2014-07-01

    This study describes the gel-free phosphoproteomic analysis of the phytopathogenic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea grown in vitro under nonlimiting conditions. Using a combination of strong cation exchange and IMAC prior to LC-MS, we identified over 1350 phosphopeptides per fungus representing over 800 phosphoproteins. The preferred phosphorylation sites were found on serine (>80%) and threonine (>15%), whereas phosphorylated tyrosine residues were found at less than 1% in A. brassicicola and at a slightly higher ratio in B. cinerea (1.5%). Biological processes represented principally among the phoshoproteins were those involved in response and transduction of stimuli as well as in regulation of cellular and metabolic processes. Most known elements of signal transduction were found in the datasets of both fungi. This study also revealed unexpected phosphorylation sites in histidine kinases, a category overrepresented in filamentous ascomycetes compared to yeast. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange database with identifier PXD000817 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000817). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Light governs asexual differentiation in the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea via the putative transcription factor BcLTF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Kim C; Simon, Adeline; Viaud, Muriel; Schumacher, Julia

    2016-11-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a plant pathogenic fungus known for its utilization of light as environmental cue to regulate asexual differentiation: conidia are formed in the light, while sclerotia are formed in the dark. As no orthologues of known regulators of conidiation (e.g., Aspergillus nidulans BrlA, Neurospora crassa FL) exist in the Leotiomycetes, we initiated a de novo approach to identify the functional counterpart in B. cinerea. The search revealed the light-responsive C2H2 transcription factor BcLTF2 whose expression - usually restricted to light conditions - is necessary and sufficient to induce conidiation and simultaneously to suppress sclerotial development. Light-induced expression of bcltf2 is mediated via a so far unknown pathway, and is attenuated in a (blue) light-dependent fashion by the White Collar complex, BcLTF1 and the VELVET complex. Mutation of either component leads to increased bcltf2 expression and causes light-independent conidiation (always conidia phenotype). Hence, the tight regulation of bcltf2 governs the balance between vegetative growth that allows for the colonization of the substrate and subsequent reproduction via conidia in the light. The orthologue ssltf2 in the closely related species Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is not significantly expressed suggesting that its deregulation may cause the lack of the conidiation program in this fungus. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Synergistic effect of the combined treatment with gamma irradiation and sodium dichloroisocyanurate to control gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) on paprika

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Minchul; Jung, Koo; Lee, Kwang-Youll; Jeong, Je-Yong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Hae-Jun

    2014-05-01

    Gray mold (Botrytis cinerea) is one of the most major fungal pathogens in paprika. Generally, gamma irradiation over 1 kGy is effective for the control of fungal pathogens; however, a significant change in fruit quality (physical properties) on paprika was shown from gamma irradiation at over 0.6 kGy (pcinerea isolated from naturally-infected postharvest paprika, fungal symptoms were observed in the stem and exocarp of paprika after conidial inoculation. From the sensitivity of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, B. cinerea conidia were fully inactivated by 4 kGy of gamma irradiation (D10 value 0.99 kGy), and were fully inactivated by 50 ppm NaDCC treatment. The fungal symptoms were not detected by the dose-dependent gamma irradiation (>4 kGy) and NaDCC (>50 ppm). As a result of the combined treatment of gamma irradiation and NaDCC, the D10 value was significantly reduced by 1.06, 0.88, 0.77, and 0.58 kGy (p<0.05). Moreover, fungal symptoms were more significantly reduced in combined treatment groups (gamma irradiation and NaDCC) than single treatment groups (gamma irradiation or NaDCC). These results suggest that combined treatment with irradiation and NaDCC treatment can be applied to preserve quality of postharvest paprika or other fruits.

  12. Suppression of the homeobox gene HDTF1 enhances resistance to Verticillium dahliae and Botrytis cinerea in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Xu, Li; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2016-05-01

    Development of pathogen-resistant crops, such as fungus-resistant cotton, has significantly reduced chemical application and improved crop yield and quality. However, the mechanism of resistance to cotton pathogens such as Verticillium dahliae is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterized a cotton gene (HDTF1) that was isolated following transcriptome profiling during the resistance response of cotton to V. dahliae. HDTF1 putatively encodes a homeodomain transcription factor, and its expression was found to be down-regulated in cotton upon inoculation with V. dahliae and Botrytis cinerea. To characterise the involvement of HDTF1 in the response to these pathogens, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate HDTF1-silenced cotton. VIGS reduction in HDTF1 expression significantly enhanced cotton plant resistance to both pathogens. HDTF1 silencing resulted in activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling and JA accumulation. However, the silenced plants were not altered in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) or the expression of marker genes associated with SA signaling. These results suggest that HDTF1 is a negative regulator of the JA pathway, and resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea can be engineered by activation of JA signaling. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Multiple resistance of Botrytis cinerea from kiwifruit to SDHIs, QoIs and fungicides of other chemical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardas, George A; Veloukas, Thomas; Koutita, Olga; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2010-09-01

    Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr. is a high-risk pathogen for fungicide resistance development that has caused resistance problems on many crops throughout the world. This study investigated the fungicide sensitivity profile of isolates from kiwifruits originating from three Greek locations with different fungicide use histories. Sensitivity was measured by in vitro fungitoxicity tests on artificial nutrient media. Seventy-six single-spore isolates were tested for sensitivity to the SDHI fungicide boscalid, the QoI pyraclostrobin, the anilinopyrimidine cyprodinil, the hydroxyanilide fenhexamid, the phenylpyrrole fludioxonil, the dicarboxamide iprodione and the benzimidazole carbendazim. All isolates from Thessaloniki showed resistance to both boscalid and pyraclostrobin, while in the other two locations the fungal population was sensitive to these two fungicides. Sensitive isolates showed EC(50) values to boscalid and pyraclostrobin ranging from 0.9 to 5.2 and from 0.04 to 0.14 mg L(-1) respectively, while the resistant isolates showed EC(50) values higher than 50 mg L(-1) for boscalid and from 16 to > 50 mg L(-1) for pyraclostrobin. All QoI-resistant isolates carried the G143A mutation in cytb. Sensitivity determinations to the remaining fungicides revealed in total eight resistance phenotypes. No isolates were resistant to the fungicides fenhexamid and fludioxonil. This is the first report of B. cinerea field isolates with resistance to both boscalid and pyraclostrobin, and it strongly suggests that there may be a major problem in controlling this important pathogen on kiwifruit. (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Overexpression of Three Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Genes in Brassica napus Identifies Enhanced Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Huai, Dongxin; Yang, Qingyong; Cheng, Yan; Ma, Ming; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are notorious plant pathogenic fungi with an extensive host range including Brassica crops. Glucosinolates (GSLs) are an important group of secondary metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important in plant protection. Enhancing the defense effect of GSL and their associated degradation products is an attractive strategy to strengthen the resistance of plants by transgenic approaches. We generated the lines of Brassica napus with three biosynthesis genes involved in GSL metabolic pathway (BnMAM1, BnCYP83A1 and BnUGT74B1), respectively. We then measured the foliar GSLs of each transgenic lines and inoculated them with S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. Compared with the wild type control, over-expressing BnUGT74B1 in B. napus increased the aliphatic and indolic GSL levels by 1.7 and 1.5 folds in leaves respectively; while over-expressing BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1 resulted in an approximate 1.5-fold higher only in the aliphatic GSL level in leaves. The results of plant inoculation demonstrated that BnUGT74B1-overexpressing lines showed less severe disease symptoms and tissue damage compared with the wild type control, but BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1-overexpressing lines showed no significant difference in comparison to the controls. These results suggest that the resistance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea in B. napus could be enhanced through tailoring the GSL profiles by transgenic approaches or molecular breeding, which provides useful information to assist plant breeders to design improved breeding strategies.

  15. Overexpression of Three Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Genes in Brassica napus Identifies Enhanced Resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea are notorious plant pathogenic fungi with an extensive host range including Brassica crops. Glucosinolates (GSLs are an important group of secondary metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order, whose degradation products are proving to be increasingly important in plant protection. Enhancing the defense effect of GSL and their associated degradation products is an attractive strategy to strengthen the resistance of plants by transgenic approaches. We generated the lines of Brassica napus with three biosynthesis genes involved in GSL metabolic pathway (BnMAM1, BnCYP83A1 and BnUGT74B1, respectively. We then measured the foliar GSLs of each transgenic lines and inoculated them with S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea. Compared with the wild type control, over-expressing BnUGT74B1 in B. napus increased the aliphatic and indolic GSL levels by 1.7 and 1.5 folds in leaves respectively; while over-expressing BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1 resulted in an approximate 1.5-fold higher only in the aliphatic GSL level in leaves. The results of plant inoculation demonstrated that BnUGT74B1-overexpressing lines showed less severe disease symptoms and tissue damage compared with the wild type control, but BnMAM1 or BnCYP83A1-overexpressing lines showed no significant difference in comparison to the controls. These results suggest that the resistance to S. sclerotiorum and B. cinerea in B. napus could be enhanced through tailoring the GSL profiles by transgenic approaches or molecular breeding, which provides useful information to assist plant breeders to design improved breeding strategies.

  16. Gray mold populations in german strawberry fields are resistant to multiple fungicides and dominated by a novel clade closely related to Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroch, Michaela; Plesken, Cecilia; Weber, Roland W S; Kauff, Frank; Scalliet, Gabriel; Hahn, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to fruit and vegetable production. Strawberry fields usually receive several fungicide treatments against Botrytis per season. Gray mold isolates from several German strawberry-growing regions were analyzed to determine their sensitivity against botryticides. Fungicide resistance was commonly observed, with many isolates possessing resistance to multiple (up to six) fungicides. A stronger variant of the previously described multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype MDR1, called MDR1h, was found to be widely distributed, conferring increased partial resistance to two important botryticides, cyprodinil and fludioxonil. A 3-bp deletion mutation in a transcription factor-encoding gene, mrr1, was found to be correlated with MDR1h. All MDR1h isolates and the majority of isolates with resistance to multiple fungicides were found to be genetically distinct. Multiple-gene sequencing confirmed that they belong to a novel clade, called Botrytis group S, which is closely related to B. cinerea and the host-specific species B. fabae. Isolates of Botrytis group S genotypes were found to be widespread in all German strawberry-growing regions but almost absent from vineyards. Our data indicate a clear subdivision of gray mold populations, which are differentially distributed according to their host preference and adaptation to chemical treatments.

  17. Tomato SlRbohB, a member of the NADPH oxidase family, is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and tolerance to drought stress

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    Xiaohui eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues, Rbohs are the enzymes that catalyze the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in plants. In the present study, eight SlRboh genes were identified in tomato and their possible involvement in resistance to Botrytis cinerea and drought tolerance was examined. Expression of SlRbohs was induced by B. cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato but displayed distinct patterns. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS-based silencing of SlRbohB resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea but silencing of each of other SlRbohs did not affect the resistance. The SlRbohB-silenced plants accumulated more ROS and attenuated expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea than the nonsilenced plants. Silencing of SlRbohB also suppressed flg22-induced ROS burst and the expression of SlLrr22, a marker gene related to PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. Transient expression of SlRbohB in Nicotiana benthamiana led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Furthermore, silencing of SlRbohB resulted in decreased drought tolerance, accelerated water loss in leaves and altered expression of drought-responsive genes. Our data demonstrate that SlRbohB positively regulates the resistance to B. cinerea, flg22-induced PTI and drought tolerance in tomato.

  18. Molecular characterization of pyraclostrobin resistance and structural diversity of the cytochrome b gene in Botrytis cinerea from apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y N; Kim, Y K; Xiao, C L

    2012-03-01

    Botrytis cinerea isolates obtained from apple orchards were screened for resistance to the quinone outside inhibitor (QoI) pyraclostrobin. Of the 220 isolates tested, 43 (19.5%) were resistant to pyraclostrobin. Analysis of partial sequences of the cytochrome b gene (cyt b) in five pyraclostrobin-resistant (PR) and five pyraclostrobin-sensitive (PS) isolates showed that PR isolates harbored the point mutation leading to the substitution of glycine by alanine at codon position 143 in cyt b (G143A). Two pairs of allele-specific primers were designed based on this point mutation, and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction analysis with these primers showed that all 73 PR isolates (including 30 collected from decayed apple fruit) harbored the G143A mutation but PS isolates did not. Six pairs of primers were designed to analyze the presence of various introns in cyt b. There were six types (I to VI) of cyt b present in 247 isolates of B. cinerea collected from various apple-production areas in Washington State. Of the 247 isolates, 23 had type I cyt b containing all four introns (Bcbi-67/68, Bcbi-131/132, Bcbi-143/144, and Bcbi-164), 176 had type II cyt b containing three introns (Bcbi-67/68, Bcbi-131/132, and Bcbi-164), six had type III cyt b containing two introns (Bcbi-67/68 and Bcbi-131/132), one had type IV cyt b containing two introns (Bcbi-131/132 and Bcbi-164), one had type V cyt b containing only the Bcbi-131/132 intron, and 40 had type VI cyt b containing no introns. This is the first report of types III to VI cyt b present in B. cinerea. All 73 PR isolates did not carry the Bcbi-143/144 intron in cyt b. Of the 247 isolates tested, >90% did not carry the Bcbi-143/144 intron in cyt b, suggesting that B. cinerea populations from apple pose a high inherent risk for the development of resistance to QoIs because the presence of this intron in cyt b prevents the occurrence of G143A-mediated resistance. Analysis of genetic background based on three microsatellite

  19. Fungistatic activity of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium Lam. bark extracts against fungal plant pathogens and investigation on mechanism of action in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Gennaro; Carrieri, Raffaele; Tarantino, Paola; Alfieri, Mariaevelina; Leone, Antonella; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Lahoz, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived compounds are emerging as an alternative choice to synthetic fungicides. Chloroform-methanol extract, obtained from the bark of Zanthoxylum rhoifolium, a member of Rutaceae, showed a fungistatic effect on Botrytis cinerea, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Alternaria alternata, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Clonostachys rosea, when added to the growth medium at different concentrations. A fraction obtained by gel separation and containing the alkaloid O-Methylcapaurine showed significant fungistatic effect against B. cinerea and S. sclerotiorum, two of the most destructive phytopathogenic fungi. The underlying mechanism of such an inhibition was further investigated in B. cinerea, a fungus highly prone to develop fungicide resistance, by analysing the expression levels of a set of genes (BcatrB, P450, CYP51 and TOR). O-Methylcapaurine inhibited the expression of all the analysed genes. In particular, the expression of BcatrB gene, encoding a membrane drug transporter involved in the resistance to a wide range of xenobiotic compounds, was strongly inhibited (91%).

  20. Selection of bacterial antagonists for the biological control of Botrytis cinerea in apple (Malus domestica) and in comparison with application of thiabendazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peighami-Ashnaei, S; Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Behboudi, K

    2009-01-01

    In this study fifteen strains of identified Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis were investigated for biological control activity against Botrytis cinerea. P. fluorescens P-35 and B. subtilis B-16 showed the most inhibitory zone in dual culture assay against B. cinerea, In vitro. After ten days, P. fluorescens P-5 and B. subtilis B-3 showed the considerable results against B. cinerea on apple fruits and could reduce the grey mould from 100% to less than 35%. After twenty days, P. fluorescens P-5 and 8. subtilis B-16 decreased the disease from 100% to less than 65%. Also, application of thiabendazol at 1500 mg/litre was more effective and could reduce the disease from 100% to 30% and 60%, after 10 and 20 days respectively. Results indicated that there is no significant difference among the treatments (thiabendazol and bacterial strains). So, bacterial strains could not only control the disease but also be a reliable replacement instead of Thiabendazol.

  1. Oxidation of Wine Polyphenols by Secretomes of Wild Botrytis cinerea Strains from White and Red Grape Varieties and Determination of Their Specific Laccase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdars, Sabrina; Hitschler, Julia; Schieber, Andreas; Weber, Fabian

    2017-12-06

    Processing of Botrytis cinerea-infected grapes leads to enhanced enzymatic browning reactions mainly caused by the enzyme laccase which is able to oxidize a wide range of phenolic compounds. The extent of color deterioration depends on the activity of the enzymes secreted by the fungus. The present study revealed significant differences in the oxidative properties of secretomes of several B. cinerea strains isolated from five grape varieties. The presumed laccase-containing secretomes varied in their catalytic activity toward six phenolic compounds present in grapes. All strains led to identical product profiles for five of six substrates, but two strains showed deviating product profiles during gallic acid oxidation. Fast oxidation of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside was observed. Product formation rates and relative product concentrations were determined. The results reflect the wide range of enzyme activity and the corresponding different impact on color deterioration by B. cinerea.

  2. Oviposition preference and larval performance of Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on Botrytis cinerea (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae) infected berries of Vitis vinifera (Vitales: Vitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Z M; Raman, Anantanarayanan; Wheatley, Warwick M; Cook, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we tested the behavior of gravid Epiphyas postvittana in selecting the most-appropriate site for oviposition thus benefitting offspring performance. Our hypothesis was built on Jaenike's preference-performance hypothesis (also referred to as the "mother-knows-the-best" hypothesis). To test this, we used the interacting Epiphyas postvittana, its host Vitis vinifera, and the pathogenic microbe Botrytis cinerea system. Populations of E. postvittana and B. cinerea often exist concurrently on V. vinifera in Australasia and their interaction and mutual influence are currently being explored, although the suggestion presently is that the relationship between E. postvittana and B. cinerea is mutualistic. We tested the effect of volatiles from B. cinerea-infected berries and uninfected (control) berries of V. vinifera on the oviposition behavior of E. postvittana. We also characterized the effects of B. cinerea infection on the berries of V. vinifera on the growth and development of E. postvittana. Contrary to the preference-performance hypothesis, oviposition choices made by gravid E. postvittana did not result in the best offspring survival, development, and performance. The preference for oviposition by E. postvittana was strongly influenced by the olfactory and tactile cues. She laid fewer eggs on B. cinerea-infected berries compared to uninfected berries of V. vinifera. The larvae of E. postvittana showed no preference to uninfected berries of V. vinifera. The larvae fed on B. cinerea-infected berries of V. vinifera showing greater survival rate, shorter time to pupation, greater pupal mass, and on becoming adults they laid more numbers of eggs than the larvae that were enabled to feed on uninfected berries. The larvae of E. postvittana transport the conidia of B. cinerea and transmit grey-mould disease to uninfected berries of V. vinifera. © 2014 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  3. Resistance evaluation of Chinese wild Vitis genotypes against Botrytis cinerea and different responses of resistant and susceptible hosts to the infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ran; Hou, Xiaoqing; Wang, Xianhang; Qu, Jingwu; Singer, Stacy D.; Wang, Yuejin; Wang, Xiping

    2015-01-01

    The necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is a major threat to grapevine cultivation worldwide. A screen of 41 Vitis genotypes for leaf resistance to B. cinerea suggested species independent variation and revealed 18 resistant Chinese wild Vitis genotypes, while most investigated V. vinifera, or its hybrids, were susceptible. A particularly resistant Chinese wild Vitis, “Pingli-5” (V. sp. [Qinling grape]) and a very susceptible V. vinifera cultivar, “Red Globe” were selected for further study. Microscopic analysis demonstrated that B. cinerea growth was limited during early infection on “Pingli-5” before 24 h post-inoculation (hpi) but not on Red Globe. It was found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidative system were associated with fungal growth. O2- accumulated similarly in B. cinerea 4 hpi on both Vitis genotypes. Lower levels of O2- (not H2O2) were detected 4 hpi and ROS (H2O2 and O2-) accumulation from 8 hpi onwards was also lower in “Pingli-5” leaves than in “Red Globe” leaves. B. cinerea triggered sustained ROS production in “Red Globe” but not in “Pingli-5” with subsequent infection progresses. Red Globe displayed little change in antioxidative activities in response to B. cinerea infection, instead, antioxidative activities were highly and timely elevated in resistant “Pingli-5” which correlated with its minimal ROS increases and its high resistance. These findings not only enhance our understanding of the resistance of Chinese wild Vitis species to B. cinerea, but also lay the foundation for breeding B. cinerea resistant grapes in the future. PMID:26579134

  4. A functional bikaverin biosynthesis gene cluster in rare strains of Botrytis cinerea is positively controlled by VELVET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Schumacher

    Full Text Available The gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the red polyketidic pigment bikaverin has only been characterized in Fusarium ssp. so far. Recently, a highly homologous but incomplete and nonfunctional bikaverin cluster has been found in the genome of the unrelated phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. In this study, we provided evidence that rare B. cinerea strains such as 1750 have a complete and functional cluster comprising the six genes orthologous to Fusarium fujikuroi ffbik1-ffbik6 and do produce bikaverin. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the whole cluster was acquired from Fusarium through a horizontal gene transfer (HGT. In the bikaverin-nonproducing strain B05.10, the genes encoding bikaverin biosynthesis enzymes are nonfunctional due to deleterious mutations (bcbik2-3 or missing (bcbik1 but interestingly, the genes encoding the regulatory proteins BcBIK4 and BcBIK5 do not harbor deleterious mutations which suggests that they may still be functional. Heterologous complementation of the F. fujikuroi Δffbik4 mutant confirmed that bcbik4 of strain B05.10 is indeed fully functional. Deletion of bcvel1 in the pink strain 1750 resulted in loss of bikaverin and overproduction of melanin indicating that the VELVET protein BcVEL1 regulates the biosynthesis of the two pigments in an opposite manner. Although strain 1750 itself expresses a truncated BcVEL1 protein (100 instead of 575 aa that is nonfunctional with regard to sclerotia formation, virulence and oxalic acid formation, it is sufficient to regulate pigment biosynthesis (bikaverin and melanin and fenhexamid HydR2 type of resistance. Finally, a genetic cross between strain 1750 and a bikaverin-nonproducing strain sensitive to fenhexamid revealed that the functional bikaverin cluster is genetically linked to the HydR2 locus.

  5. The SWEET family of sugar transporters in grapevine: VvSWEET4 is involved in the interaction with Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Julie; Piron, Marie-Christine; Meyer, Sophie; Merdinoglu, Didier; Bertsch, Christophe; Mestre, Pere

    2014-12-01

    During plant development, sugar export is determinant in multiple processes such as nectar production, pollen development and long-distance sucrose transport. The plant SWEET family of sugar transporters is a recently identified protein family of sugar uniporters. In rice, SWEET transporters are the target of extracellular bacteria, which have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to modify their expression and acquire sugars to sustain their growth. Here we report the characterization of the SWEET family of sugar transporters in Vitis vinifera. We identified 17 SWEET genes in the V. vinifera 40024 genome and show that they are differentially expressed in vegetative and reproductive organs. Inoculation with the biotrophic pathogens Erysiphe necator and Plasmopara viticola did not result in significant induction of VvSWEET gene expression. However, infection with the necrotroph Botrytis cinerea triggered a strong up-regulation of VvSWEET4 expression. Further characterization of VvSWEET4 revealed that it is a glucose transporter localized in the plasma membrane that is up-regulated by inducers of reactive oxygen species and virulence factors from necrotizing pathogens. Finally, Arabidopsis knockout mutants in the orthologous AtSWEET4 were found to be less susceptible to B. cinerea. We propose that stimulation of expression of a developmentally regulated glucose uniporter by reactive oxygen species production and extensive cell death after necrotrophic fungal infection could facilitate sugar acquisition from plant cells by the pathogen. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Involvement of BcStr2 in methionine biosynthesis, vegetative differentiation, multiple stress tolerance and virulence in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wenyong; Yang, Yalan; Zhang, Yu; Lv, Chiyuan; Ren, Weichao; Chen, Changjun

    2016-04-01

    The Str2 gene encodes a cystathionine γ-synthase that is a key enzyme in methionine (Met) biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Met plays a critical role in protein synthesis and diverse cellular processes in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In this study, we characterized the Str2 orthologue gene BcStr2 in Botrytis cinerea. The BcStr2 mutant was unable to grow on minimal medium (MM). In addition, conidia of the mutant were unable to germinate in water-agar medium within 15 h of incubation. Supplementation with 1 mm Met or 0.5 mg/mL homocysteine, but not 1 mm cysteine or 0.5 mg/mL glutathione, rescued the defect in mycelial growth of the BcStr2 deletion mutant. These results indicate that the enzyme encoded by BcStr2 is involved in the conversion of cysteine into homocysteine. The mutant exhibited decreased conidiation and impaired sclerotium development. In addition, the BcStr2 mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to osmotic and oxidative stresses, cell wall-damaging agents and thermal stress. The mutant demonstrated dramatically decreased virulence on host plant tissues. All of the defects were restored by genetic complementation of the mutant with wild-type BcStr2. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that BcStr2 plays a critical role in the regulation of various cellular processes in B. cinerea. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fungicide-driven evolution and molecular basis of multidrug resistance in field populations of the grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kretschmer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The grey mould fungus Botrytis cinerea causes losses of commercially important fruits, vegetables and ornamentals worldwide. Fungicide treatments are effective for disease control, but bear the risk of resistance development. The major resistance mechanism in fungi is target protein modification resulting in reduced drug binding. Multiple drug resistance (MDR caused by increased efflux activity is common in human pathogenic microbes, but rarely described for plant pathogens. Annual monitoring for fungicide resistance in field isolates from fungicide-treated vineyards in France and Germany revealed a rapidly increasing appearance of B. cinerea field populations with three distinct MDR phenotypes. All MDR strains showed increased fungicide efflux activity and overexpression of efflux transporter genes. Similar to clinical MDR isolates of Candida yeasts that are due to transcription factor mutations, all MDR1 strains were shown to harbor activating mutations in a transcription factor (Mrr1 that controls the gene encoding ABC transporter AtrB. MDR2 strains had undergone a unique rearrangement in the promoter region of the major facilitator superfamily transporter gene mfsM2, induced by insertion of a retrotransposon-derived sequence. MDR2 strains carrying the same rearranged mfsM2 allele have probably migrated from French to German wine-growing regions. The roles of atrB, mrr1 and mfsM2 were proven by the phenotypes of knock-out and overexpression mutants. As confirmed by sexual crosses, combinations of mrr1 and mfsM2 mutations lead to MDR3 strains with higher broad-spectrum resistance. An MDR3 strain was shown in field experiments to be selected against sensitive strains by fungicide treatments. Our data document for the first time the rising prevalence, spread and molecular basis of MDR populations in a major plant pathogen in agricultural environments. These populations will increase the risk of grey mould rot and hamper the effectiveness of

  8. Natural Variation in the VELVET Gene bcvel1 Affects Virulence and Light-Dependent Differentiation in Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Simon, Adeline; Traeger, Stefanie; Moraga, Javier; Collado, Isidro González; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is an aggressive plant pathogen causing gray mold disease on various plant species. In this study, we identified the genetic origin for significantly differing phenotypes of the two sequenced B. cinerea isolates, B05.10 and T4, with regard to light-dependent differentiation, oxalic acid (OA) formation and virulence. By conducting a map-based cloning approach we identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in an open reading frame encoding a VELVET gene (bcvel1). The SNP in isolate T4 results in a truncated protein that is predominantly found in the cytosol in contrast to the full-length protein of isolate B05.10 that accumulates in the nuclei. Deletion of the full-length gene in B05.10 resulted in the T4 phenotype, namely light-independent conidiation, loss of sclerotial development and oxalic acid production, and reduced virulence on several host plants. These findings indicate that the identified SNP represents a loss-of-function mutation of bcvel1. In accordance, the expression of the B05.10 copy in T4 rescued the wild-type/B05.10 phenotype. BcVEL1 is crucial for full virulence as deletion mutants are significantly hampered in killing and decomposing plant tissues. However, the production of the two best known secondary metabolites, the phytotoxins botcinic acid and botrydial, are not affected by the deletion of bcvel1 indicating that other factors are responsible for reduced virulence. Genome-wide expression analyses of B05.10- and Δbcvel1-infected plant material revealed a number of genes differentially expressed in the mutant: while several protease- encoding genes are under-expressed in Δbcvel1 compared to the wild type, the group of over-expressed genes is enriched for genes encoding sugar, amino acid and ammonium transporters and glycoside hydrolases reflecting the response of Δbcvel1 mutants to nutrient starvation conditions. PMID:23118899

  9. A Functional Bikaverin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster in Rare Strains of Botrytis cinerea Is Positively Controlled by VELVET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Gautier, Angélique; Morgant, Guillaume; Studt, Lena; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Le Pêcheur, Pascal; Azeddine, Saad; Fillinger, Sabine; Leroux, Pierre; Tudzynski, Bettina; Viaud, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    The gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the red polyketidic pigment bikaverin has only been characterized in Fusarium ssp. so far. Recently, a highly homologous but incomplete and nonfunctional bikaverin cluster has been found in the genome of the unrelated phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. In this study, we provided evidence that rare B. cinerea strains such as 1750 have a complete and functional cluster comprising the six genes orthologous to Fusarium fujikuroi ffbik1-ffbik6 and do produce bikaverin. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the whole cluster was acquired from Fusarium through a horizontal gene transfer (HGT). In the bikaverin-nonproducing strain B05.10, the genes encoding bikaverin biosynthesis enzymes are nonfunctional due to deleterious mutations (bcbik2-3) or missing (bcbik1) but interestingly, the genes encoding the regulatory proteins BcBIK4 and BcBIK5 do not harbor deleterious mutations which suggests that they may still be functional. Heterologous complementation of the F. fujikuroi Δffbik4 mutant confirmed that bcbik4 of strain B05.10 is indeed fully functional. Deletion of bcvel1 in the pink strain 1750 resulted in loss of bikaverin and overproduction of melanin indicating that the VELVET protein BcVEL1 regulates the biosynthesis of the two pigments in an opposite manner. Although strain 1750 itself expresses a truncated BcVEL1 protein (100 instead of 575 aa) that is nonfunctional with regard to sclerotia formation, virulence and oxalic acid formation, it is sufficient to regulate pigment biosynthesis (bikaverin and melanin) and fenhexamid HydR2 type of resistance. Finally, a genetic cross between strain 1750 and a bikaverin-nonproducing strain sensitive to fenhexamid revealed that the functional bikaverin cluster is genetically linked to the HydR2 locus. PMID:23308280

  10. Developmental and Metabolic Plasticity of White-Skinned Grape Berries in Response to Botrytis cinerea during Noble Rot1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Thomas S.; Vicente, Ariel R.; Doyle, Carolyn L.; Ye, Zirou; Allen, Greg; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2015-01-01

    Noble rot results from exceptional infections of ripe grape (Vitis vinifera) berries by Botrytis cinerea. Unlike bunch rot, noble rot promotes favorable changes in grape berries and the accumulation of secondary metabolites that enhance wine grape composition. Noble rot-infected berries of cv Sémillon, a white-skinned variety, were collected over 3 years from a commercial vineyard at the same time that fruit were harvested for botrytized wine production. Using an integrated transcriptomics and metabolomics approach, we demonstrate that noble rot alters the metabolism of cv Sémillon berries by inducing biotic and abiotic stress responses as well as ripening processes. During noble rot, B. cinerea induced the expression of key regulators of ripening-associated pathways, some of which are distinctive to the normal ripening of red-skinned cultivars. Enhancement of phenylpropanoid metabolism, characterized by a restricted flux in white-skinned berries, was a common outcome of noble rot and red-skinned berry ripening. Transcript and metabolite analyses together with enzymatic assays determined that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a consistent hallmark of noble rot in cv Sémillon berries. The biosynthesis of terpenes and fatty acid aroma precursors also increased during noble rot. We finally characterized the impact of noble rot in botrytized wines. Altogether, the results of this work demonstrated that noble rot causes a major reprogramming of berry development and metabolism. This desirable interaction between a fruit and a fungus stimulates pathways otherwise inactive in white-skinned berries, leading to a greater accumulation of compounds involved in the unique flavor and aroma of botrytized wines. PMID:26450706

  11. Chemically Induced Cryptic Sesquiterpenoids and Expression of Sesquiterpene Cyclases in Botrytis cinerea Revealed New Sporogenic (+)-4-Epieremophil-9-en-11-ols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Cristina; Moraga, Javier; Barua, Javier; González-Rodríguez, Victoria E; Aleu, Josefina; Durán-Patrón, Rosa; Macías-Sánchez, Antonio J; Hanson, James R; Viaud, Muriel; Hernández-Galán, Rosario; Garrido, Carlos; Collado, Isidro G

    2016-05-20

    The sequencing of the genomes of the B05.10 and T4 strains of the fungus Botrytis cinerea revealed an abundance of novel biosynthetic gene clusters, the majority of which were unexpected on the basis of the previous analyses of the fermentation of these and closely related species. By systematic alteration of easy accessible cultivation parameters, using chemical induction with copper sulfate, we have found a cryptic sesquiterpenoid family with new structures related to eremophil-9-ene, which had the basic structure of the sesquiterpene (+)-5-epiaristolochene ((+)-4-epieremophil-9-ene). An expression study of the sesquiterpene cyclase genes present in the Botrytis cinerea genome, under culture conditions, is reported. In general, a 3 day delay and a higher BcSTC genes expression were observed when copper (5 ppm) was fed to the fermentation broth. In addition, to the observed effect on the BcBOT2 (BcSTC1) gene, involved in the biosynthesis of the botrydial toxin, a higher expression level for BcSTC3 and BcSTC4 was observed with respect to the control in the strain B05.10. Interestingly, under copper conditions, the BcSTC4 gene was the most expressed gene in the Botrytis cinerea UCA992 strain. In vitro evaluation of the biological role of these metabolites indicates that they contributed to the conidial development in B. cinerea and appear to be involved in self-regulation of the production of asexual spores. Furthermore, they promoted the formation of complex appressoria or infection cushions.

  12. Biological control of botrytis cinerea growth on apples stored in modified atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dock, Lise Lotte; Nielsen, Per Væggemose; Floros, John D.

    1998-01-01

    The combined effect of modified-atmosphere packaging and theapplication of a bacterial antagonist (Erwinia sp.) on Botrytiscinerea growth on apples (cv. 'Golden Delicious') was investigated.Inoculated apples were stored in polyethylene bags at 5 degrees C. Theinitial gas composition in each bag......,while increased CO2 levels delayed its growth by about 4 days.Application of the antagonist resulted in a significant interactionbetween O2 and CO2. At low O2 levels, CO2 had no effect on moldgrowth, but at high O2, CO2 enhanced mold growth. O2 and theantagonist worked synergistically to reduce mold growth...... by about 6days at low levels of CO2. However, at high CO2 levels, O2 had noeffect. The strongest antagonistic effect was observed under ambientconditions. Overall, results showed that high CO2 atmospheres can slowthe growth of B. cinerea and that Erwinia sp. was an effectiveantagonist against B. cinerea...

  13. Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl Ether, a Marine Algae Derived Bromophenol, Inhibits the Growth of Botrytis cinerea and Interacts with DNA Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl ether (BDDE is a bromophenol isolated from marine algae. Previous reports have shown that BDDE possesses cytotoxic and antibacterial activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that BDDE displays broad-spectrum antifungal activities, especially on Botrytis cinerea. BDDE inhibits the growth of B. cinerea cultured on a solid medium of potato dextrose agar (PDA as well as on the potato dextrose broth (PDB medium. Moreover, BDDE decreases the incidence of fruit decay and severity of strawberries infected with B. cinerea. Further studies have revealed that BDDE decreases the germination rate and inhibits the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The inhibition mechanisms are related to the disruption of the cell membrane integrity in B. cinerea spores and newly formed germ tubes. This study also suggests that BDDE possibly interacts with DNA via intercalation and minor groove binding. The studies provide evidence that BDDE has potential application in the control of gray mold after fruit harvest and the compound could serve as a candidate or lead template for rational drug design and for the development of antifungal agents.

  14. Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl) ether, a marine algae derived bromophenol, inhibits the growth of Botrytis cinerea and interacts with DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Wang, Genzhu; Xiao, Lin; Xu, Xuanli; Liu, Xiaohui; Xu, Pingxiang; Lin, Xiukun

    2014-06-27

    Bis(2,3-dibromo-4,5-dihydroxybenzyl) ether (BDDE) is a bromophenol isolated from marine algae. Previous reports have shown that BDDE possesses cytotoxic and antibacterial activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that BDDE displays broad-spectrum antifungal activities, especially on Botrytis cinerea. BDDE inhibits the growth of B. cinerea cultured on a solid medium of potato dextrose agar (PDA) as well as on the potato dextrose broth (PDB) medium. Moreover, BDDE decreases the incidence of fruit decay and severity of strawberries infected with B. cinerea. Further studies have revealed that BDDE decreases the germination rate and inhibits the mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The inhibition mechanisms are related to the disruption of the cell membrane integrity in B. cinerea spores and newly formed germ tubes. This study also suggests that BDDE possibly interacts with DNA via intercalation and minor groove binding. The studies provide evidence that BDDE has potential application in the control of gray mold after fruit harvest and the compound could serve as a candidate or lead template for rational drug design and for the development of antifungal agents.

  15. Tomato WRKY transcriptional factor SlDRW1 is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and tolerance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Hong, Yong-Bo; Zhang, Ya-Fen; Li, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Hui-Juan; Li, Da-Yong; Song, Feng-Ming

    2014-10-01

    WRKY proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses; however, only a few of tomato WRKYs have been studied for their biological functions. In the present study, we identified a Botrytis cinerea-responsive WRKY gene SlDRW1 (Solanum lycopersicumdefense-related WRKY1) from tomato. SlDRW1 is a nucleus localized protein with transactivation activity in yeast. Expression of SlDRW1 was significantly induced by B. cinerea, leading to 10-13 folds of increase than that in the mock-inoculated plants but not by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Silencing of SlDRW1 resulted in increased severity of disease caused by B. cinerea, but did not affect the phenotype of disease caused by Pst DC3000. In addition, silencing of SlDRW1 also resulted in decreased tolerance against oxidative stress but did not affect drought stress tolerance. Furthermore, silencing of SlDRW1 attenuated defense response such as expression of defense-related genes after infection by B. cinerea. Our results demonstrate that SlDRW1 is a positive regulator of defense response in tomato against B. cinerea and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterisation of heteroplasmic status at codon 143 of the Botrytis cinerea cytochrome b gene in a semi-quantitative AS-PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Maki; Aoki, Yoshinao; Saito, Seiya; Suzuki, Shunji

    2015-03-01

    An in-depth understanding of quinone outside inhibitor (QoI)-fungicide-resistant Botrytis cinerea isolates in a vineyard is expected to contribute to the development of an optimum disease management programme for the control of grape grey mould. The resistance and structure of the cytochrome b gene in B. cinerea collected from a Japanese vineyard were characterised. The semi-quantitative allele-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assay developed in the present study was able to distinguish heteroplasmic status from homoplasmic status at codon 143 of the cytochrome b gene in QoI-fungicide-resistant B. cinerea from vineyards in Japan. With this assay it was demonstrated that the repeated introduction of QoI fungicide selection pressure increased the ratio of G143A-mutated cytochrome b genes in B. cinerea isolates. It is proposed that the semi-quantitative AS-PCR assay is a reliable tool for the detection of QoI fungicide resistance and the evaluation of homoplasmic/heteroplasmic status at codon 143 of the cytochrome b gene in B. cinerea isolates. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. A wild-type Botrytis cinerea strain co-infected by double-stranded RNA mycoviruses presents hypovirulence-associated traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, Christiaan A; Castillo, Antonio; Castro, Miguel; Cottet, Luis; Morales, Angélica

    2013-07-02

    Botrytis cinerea CCg378 is a wild-type strain infected with two types of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) mycoviruses and which presents hypovirulence-associated traits. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the mycoviruses and investigate their relationship with the low virulence degree of the fungal host. B. cinerea CCg378 contains five dsRNA molecules that are associated with two different types of isometric viral particles of 32 and 23 nm in diameter, formed by structural polypeptides of 70-kDa and 48-kDa, respectively. The transfection of spheroplasts of a virus-free strain, B. cinerea CKg54, with viral particles purified from the CCg378 strain revealed that the 2.2-kbp dsRNAs have no dependency on the smaller molecules for its stable maintenance in the fungal cytoplasm, because a fungal clone that only contains the 2.2-kbp dsRNAs associated with the 32-nm particles was obtained, which we named B. cinerea CKg54vi378. One of the 2.2 kbpdsRNA segments (2219 bp) was sequenced and corresponds to the gene encoding the capsid protein of B. cinerea CCg378 virus 1 (Bc378V1), a putative new member of the Partitiviridae family. Furthermore, physiological parameters related to the degree of virulence of the fungus, such as the sporulation rate and laccase activity, were lower in B. cinerea CCg378 and B. cinerea CKg54vi378 than in B. cinerea CKg54. Additionally, bioassays performed on grapevine leaves showed that the CCg378 and CKg54vi378 strains presented a lower degree of invasiveness on the plant tissue than the CKg54 strain. The results show that B. cinerea CCg378 is coinfected by two mycoviruses and that the 2.2-kbp dsRNAs correspond to the 32-nm mycovirus genome, which would be a new member of the Partitiviridae family as it has the typical pattern of partitiviruses. On the other hand, the results suggest that the hypovirulence of B. cinerea CCg378 could be conferred by both mycoviruses, since the fungal clone B. cinerea CKg54vi378 presents an

  18. Fast detection of peroxidase (POD) activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Chu; Bao, Yidan; Yu, Jiajia; He, Yong

    2014-01-24

    Tomatoes are cultivated around the world and gray mold is one of its most prominent and destructive diseases. An early disease detection method can decrease losses caused by plant diseases and prevent the spread of diseases. The activity of peroxidase (POD) is very important indicator of disease stress for plants. The objective of this study is to examine the possibility of fast detection of POD activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging data. Five pre-treatment methods were investigated. Genetic algorithm-partial least squares (GA-PLS) was applied to select optimal wavelengths. A new fast learning neural algorithm named extreme learning machine (ELM) was employed as multivariate analytical tool in this study. 21 optimal wavelengths were selected by GA-PLS and used as inputs of three calibration models. The optimal prediction result was achieved by ELM model with selected wavelengths, and the r and RMSEP in validation were 0.8647 and 465.9880 respectively. The results indicated that hyperspectral imaging could be considered as a valuable tool for POD activity prediction. The selected wavelengths could be potential resources for instrument development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Population structure and temporal maintenance of the multihost fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea: causes and implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Anne-Sophie; Gladieux, Pierre; Decognet, Véronique; Fermaud, Marc; Confais, Johann; Roudet, Jean; Bardin, Marc; Bout, Alexandre; Nicot, Philippe C; Poncet, Christine; Fournier, Elisabeth

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the causes of population subdivision is of fundamental importance, as studying barriers to gene flow between populations may reveal key aspects of the process of adaptive divergence and, for pathogens, may help forecasting disease emergence and implementing sound management strategies. Here, we investigated population subdivision in the multihost fungus Botrytis cinerea based on comprehensive multiyear sampling on different hosts in three French regions. Analyses revealed a weak association between population structure and geography, but a clear differentiation according to the host plant of origin. This was consistent with adaptation to hosts, but the distribution of inferred genetic clusters and the frequency of admixed individuals indicated a lack of strict host specificity. Differentiation between individuals collected in the greenhouse (on Solanum) and outdoor (on Vitis and Rubus) was stronger than that observed between individuals from the two outdoor hosts, probably reflecting an additional isolating effect associated with the cropping system. Three genetic clusters coexisted on Vitis but did not persist over time. Linkage disequilibrium analysis indicated that outdoor populations were regularly recombining, whereas clonality was predominant in the greenhouse. Our findings open up new perspectives for disease control by managing plant debris in outdoor conditions and reinforcing prophylactic measures indoor. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fast detection of peroxidase (POD) activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wenwen; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Chu; Bao, Yidan; Yu, Jiajia; He, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Tomatoes are cultivated around the world and gray mold is one of its most prominent and destructive diseases. An early disease detection method can decrease losses caused by plant diseases and prevent the spread of diseases. The activity of peroxidase (POD) is very important indicator of disease stress for plants. The objective of this study is to examine the possibility of fast detection of POD activity in tomato leaves which infected with Botrytis cinerea using hyperspectral imaging data. Five pre-treatment methods were investigated. Genetic algorithm-partial least squares (GA-PLS) was applied to select optimal wavelengths. A new fast learning neural algorithm named extreme learning machine (ELM) was employed as multivariate analytical tool in this study. 21 optimal wavelengths were selected by GA-PLS and used as inputs of three calibration models. The optimal prediction result was achieved by ELM model with selected wavelengths, and the r and RMSEP in validation were 0.8647 and 465.9880 respectively. The results indicated that hyperspectral imaging could be considered as a valuable tool for POD activity prediction. The selected wavelengths could be potential resources for instrument development.

  1. INTENSITY OF ATTACK OF BOTRYTIS CINEREA PERS. EX FR. ON THE CV. GRAŠEVINA AND TRAMINAC GRAPES AND THE EFFICIENCY OF BOTRYTICIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brankica Svitlica

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is an important pathogen of grapevines all over the world. In order to determine the intensity of B. cinerea attack on mature grapes and efficiency of botryticides (cv. Traminac - iprodion, pyrimethanil, fludioxinil + cyprodinil; cv. Graševina - fenhexamid, fludioxinil+cyprodinil, tebuconazol+diclofluanid a two-year experiment (2001-2002 was set up on locations Mladice (Traminac and Škomić (Graševina. By evaluation of the intensity of B. cinerea infection on the Graševina and Traminac grapes the strongest infection determined on the control, and the weakest on the variant with botryticides Switch. Comparison of infection intensity on the Traminac grapes with the Graševina grapes led to no differences concerning the sensitivity of varieties. The disease intensity primarily depended on climate conditions. Both experimental years were charactized by the quantity of precipitation in the vine-yards which were in favour of the high humidity allowing high disease intensity.

  2. Role of dioxygenase α-DOX2 and SA in basal response and in hexanoic acid-induced resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Carlos; de la O Leyva, María; Finiti, Ivan; López-Cruz, Jaime; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea requires complex interplay between hormonal signalling. In this study, we explored the involvement of new oxylipins in the tomato basal and induced response to this necrotroph through the functional analysis of the tomato α-dioxygenase2 (α-DOX2)-deficient mutant divaricata. We also investigated the role of SA in the defence response against this necrotrophic fungus using SA-deficient tomato nahG plants. The plants lacking dioxigenase α-DOX2, which catalyses oxylipins production from fatty acids, were more susceptible to Botrytis, and hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) was impaired; hence α-DOX2 is required for both tomato defence and the enhanced protection conferred by natural inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) against B. cinerea. The divaricata plants accumulated less pathogen-induced callose and presented lower levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) upon infection if compared to the wild type. Glutathion-S-transferase (GST) gene expression decreased and ROS production significantly increased in Botrytis-infected divaricata plants. These results indicate that absence of α-DOX2 influences the hormonal changes, oxidative burst and callose deposition that occur upon Botrytis infection in tomato. The study of SA-deficient nahG tomato plants showed that the plants with low SA levels displayed increased resistance to Botrytis, but were unable to display Hx-IR. This supports the involvement of SA in Hx-IR. NaghG plants displayed reduced callose and ROS accumulation upon infection and an increased GST expression. This reflects a positive relationship between SA and these defensive mechanisms in tomato. Finally, Hx boosted the pathogen-induced callose in nahG plants, suggesting that this priming mechanism is SA-independent. Our results support the involvement of the oxylipins pathway and SA in tomato response to Botrytis, probably through complex crosstalk of

  3. Control in vitro de Botrytis (Botrytis cinerea), Mildiu (Bremia lactucae) Y Esclerotinia (Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) en lechuga (Lactuca sativa), usando extractos de Cola de Caballo (Equisetum arvense), Ortiga (Urtica dioica L.), Ruda (Ruta graveolens) y Tomillo (Thymus vulgaris).

    OpenAIRE

    Tayupanta Rodríguez, Verónica Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    Se realizó el control biológico de Botrytis cinerea, Bremia lactucae y Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, con 4 extractos de plantas: Ruta graveolens, Thymus vulgaris, Urtica dioica, Equisetum arvense y Trichoderma harzianum como tratamiento adicional. Se realizaron ensayos en laboratorio dentro de cajas Petri, donde se inoculó el hongo obtenido previamente en cultivo puro, junto con los extractos de cada planta para evaluar el halo de inhibición y se realizó el conteo del número de UFC (Unidades f...

  4. Efeito de Botrytis cinerea na composição do vinho Gewürztraminer Effect of Botrytis cinerea on the composition of Gewürztraminer wine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Meneguzzo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar o efeito da podridão cinzenta da uva, causada por Botrytis cinerea na composição do vinho Gewürztraminer (Vitis vinifera L., foram analisados vinhos obtidos a partir de uvas com 0; 2,5; 5; 10; 15; e 20% em peso de podridão cinzenta. O experimento consistiu de seis tratamentos e quatro repetições. As variáveis avaliadas foram densidade, álcool, acidez total e volátil, extrato seco, extrato seco reduzido, açúcares redutores, relação álcool em peso/extrato seco reduzido, cinzas, alcalinidade das cinzas, índice de cor (I 420, polifenóis totais (I 280, N total, glicerol, ácido glicônico, minerais (P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Li, compostos voláteis (etanal, acetato de etila, metanol, 1-propanol, 2-metil-1-propanol, 2-metil-1-butanol e 3-metil-1-butanol. A análise de regressão polinomial que avaliou o efeito da podridão cinzenta da uva na composição físico-química do vinho Gewürztraminer, mostrou que houve efeito linear significativo e positivo em relação à densidade, acidez total e volátil, extrato seco, extrato seco reduzido, açúcares redutores, cinzas, alcalinidade das cinzas, índice de cor (I 420, polifenóis totais (I 280, ácido glicônico, P, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Rb, etanal e acetato de etila; efeito linear significativo e negativo nas variáveis álcool, relação álcool em peso/extrato seco reduzido, 2metil-1-butanol e 3-metil-1-butanol; efeito quadrático sobre N total, glicerol e metanol; e efeito cúbico sobre Mg, Zn, Li e 1-propanol. Não houve efeito significativo nas variáveis Na, Cu e 2-metil-1-propanol.The aim of this work was to determine the effect of grape gray bunch rot, caused by Botrytis cinerea, on the composition of Gewürztraminer (Vitis vinifera L. wine. The treatments consisted of increasing percentages (in weight of grape gray bunch rot, i.e., 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20%. The experiment underwent six treatments and four replications. The variables evaluated

  5. Solidago canadensis L essential oil vapor effectively inhibits Botrytis cinerea growth and preserves postharvest quality of strawberry as a food model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L essential oil (SCLEO against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase (PAL, polyphenol oxidase (POD, or chitinase (CHI, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries.

  6. The Endo-Arabinanase BcAra1 Is a Novel Host-Specific Virulence Factor of the Necrotic Fungal Phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Zhang, Lisha

    2014-01-01

    The plant cell wall is one of the first physical interfaces encountered by plant pathogens and consists of polysaccharides, of which arabinan is an important constituent. During infection, the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea secretes a cocktail of plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes...... protein was shown to hydrolyze linear arabinan with high efficiency whereas little or no activity was observed against the other oligo- and polysaccharides tested. The Bcara1 knockout mutants displayed reduced arabinanase activity in vitro and severe retardation in secondary lesion formation during...

  7. Effect of concentration, exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity on the toxicity of sulfur dioxide to the spores of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.; Uota, M.

    1961-12-01

    When spores of Botrytis cinerea are exposed to SO/sub 2/ gas, the subsequent reduction in spore germination is quantitatively proportional to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the exposure time. The toxicity of SO/sub 2/ increases with increasing relative humidity. In an atmosphere of 96% RH, SO/sub 2/ is more than 20 times as effective as at 75% RH. The toxicity also increases about 1.5 times for each 10/sup 0/C rise in temperature between 0/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Screen-printed immunosensor modified with carbon nanotubes in a continuous-flow system for the Botrytis cinerea determination in apple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Baldo, Martín A; Messina, Germán A; Sanz, Maria I; Raba, Julio

    2009-08-15

    Botrytis cinerea is a plant-pathogenic fungus that produces the disease known as grey mould in a wide variety of agriculturally important hosts in many countries. This paper describes the development of an immunosensor coupled to carbon-based screen-printed electrodes (SPCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which show a rapid and sensitive determination of B. cinerea in apple tissues (Red-delicious) using a competitive immunoassay method. Both the infected plant tissue sample and the B. cinerea-specific monoclonal antibody are allowed to react immunologically with the B. cinerea purified antigens immobilized on a rotating disk. Then, the bound antibodies are quantified by a horseradish peroxidise (HRP) enzyme labeled second antibodies specific to mouse IgG, using 4-tertbutylcatechol (4-TBC) as enzymatic mediators. The HRP, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, catalyses the oxidation of 4-TBC to 4-tertbutyl o-benzoquinone. The electrochemical reduction back to 4-TBC is detected on SPCE-CNT at -0.15 V. The response current is inversely proportional to the amount of the B. cinerea antigens present in the fruit sample. The time consumed per assay was 30 min and the calculated detection limits for electrochemical method and the ELISA procedure are 0.02 and 10 microg mL(-1), respectively. Moreover the intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were below 7%. This electrochemical immunosensor promises to be usefully suited to the detection and quantification of B. cinerea in apparently healthy plant prior to the development of the symptoms.

  9. Development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay applied to the Botrytis cinerea quantification in tissues of postharvest fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raba Julio

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botrytis cinerea is a phytopathogenic fungus responsible for the disease known as gray mold, which causes substantial losses of fruits at postharvest. This fungus is present often as latent infection and an apparently healthy fruit can deteriorate suddenly due to the development of this infection. For this reason, rapid and sensitive methods are necessary for its detection and quantification. This article describes the development of an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for quantification of B. cinerea in apple (Red Delicious, table grape (pink Moscatel, and pear (William's tissues. Results The method was based in the competition for the binding site of monoclonal antibodies between B. cinerea antigens present in fruit tissues and B. cinerea purified antigens immobilized by a crosslinking agent onto the surface of the microtiter plates. The method was validated considering parameters such as selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy and sensibility. The calculated detection limit was 0.97 μg mL-1 B. cinerea antigens. The immobilized antigen was perfectly stable for at least 4 months assuring the reproducibility of the assay. The fungus was detected and quantified in any of the fruits tested when the rot was not visible yet. Results were compared with a DNA quantification method and these studies showed good correlation. Conclusions The developed method allowed detects the presence of B. cinerea in asymptomatic fruits and provides the advantages of low cost, easy operation, and short analysis time determination for its possible application in the phytosanitary programs of the fruit industry worldwide.

  10. Reduced susceptibility of tomato stem to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea is associated with a specific adjustment of fructose content in the host sugar pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, François; Nicot, Philippe C; Ripoll, Julie; Abro, Manzoor A; Raimbault, Astrid K; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Bertin, Nadia

    2017-03-01

    Plant soluble sugars, as main components of primary metabolism, are thought to be implicated in defence against pathogenic fungi. However, the function of sucrose and hexoses remains unclear. This study aimed to identify robust patterns in the dynamics of soluble sugars in sink tissues of tomato plants during the course of infection by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea . Distinct roles for glucose and fructose in defence against B. cinerea were hypothesized. We examined sugar contents and defence hormonal markers in tomato stem tissues before and after infection by B. cinerea , in a range of abiotic environments created by various nitrogen and water supplies. Limited nitrogen or water supplies increased tomato stem susceptibility to B. cinerea . Glucose and fructose contents of tissues surrounding infection sites evolved differently after inoculation. The fructose content never decreased after inoculation with B. cinerea , while that of glucose showed either positive or negative variation, depending on the abiotic environment. An increase in the relative fructose content (defined as the proportion of fructose in the soluble sugar pool) was observed in the absence of glucose accumulation and was associated with lower susceptibility. A lower expression of the salicylic acid marker PR1a , and a lower repression of a jasmonate marker COI1 were associated with reduced susceptibility. Accordingly, COI1 expression was positively correlated with the relative fructose contents 7 d after infection. Small variations of fructose content among the sugar pool are unlikely to affect intrinsic pathogen growth. Our results highlight distinct use of host glucose and fructose after infection by B. cinerea and suggest strongly that adjustment of the relative fructose content is required for enhanced plant defence.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of pectate-induced gene expression in Botrytis cinerea: identification and functional analysis of putative d-galacturonate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lisha; Hua, Chenlei; Stassen, Joost H M; Chatterjee, Sayantani; Cornelissen, Maxim; van Kan, Jan A L

    2014-11-01

    The fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea produces a spectrum of cell wall degrading enzymes for the decomposition of host cell wall polysaccharides and the consumption of the monosaccharides that are released. Especially pectin is an abundant cell wall component, and the decomposition of pectin by B. cinerea has been extensively studied. An effective concerted action of the appropriate pectin depolymerising enzymes, monosaccharide transporters and catabolic enzymes is important for complete d-galacturonic acid utilization by B. cinerea. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing to compare genome-wide transcriptional profiles between B. cinerea cultures grown in media containing pectate or glucose as sole carbon source. Transcript levels of 32 genes that are induced by pectate were further examined in cultures grown on six different monosaccharides, by means of quantitative RT-PCR, leading to the identification of 8 genes that are exclusively induced by d-galacturonic acid. Among these, the hexose transporter encoding genes Bchxt15 and Bchxt19 were functionally characterised. The subcellular location was studied of BcHXT15-GFP and BcHXT19-GFP fusion proteins expressed under control of their native promoter, in a B. cinerea wild-type strain. Both genes are expressed during growth on d-galacturonic acid and the fusion proteins are localized in plasma membranes and intracellular vesicles. Target gene knockout analysis revealed that BcHXT15 contributes to d-galacturonic acid uptake at pH 5∼5.6. The virulence of all B. cinerea hexose transporter mutants tested was unaltered on tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability and fitness of pyraclostrobin- and boscalid-resistant phenotypes in field isolates of Botrytis cinerea from apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y K; Xiao, C L

    2011-11-01

    Phenotype stability, fitness, and competitive ability of pyraclostrobin- and boscalid-resistant isolates of Botrytis cinerea from apple were investigated. Stability of resistance was determined after consecutive transfers on potato dextrose agar (PDA) or being cycled on apple fruit. In vitro fitness components mycelial growth, osmotic sensitivity, conidial germination, and sporulation were evaluated on agar media. Pathogenicity, virulence and sporulation on apple fruit were evaluated at both 20 and 0°C. Competition between fungicide-resistant and -sensitive isolates on apple fruit also was evaluated. Resistance to the two fungicides was retained at levels similar to that of the initial generation after 20 and 10 transfers on PDA and five and three disease cycles on apple fruit at 20 and 0°C, respectively. Great variability in individual fitness components tested was observed among isolates within the same phenotype groups either sensitive or resistant to the fungicides but, when compared as phenotype groups, there were no significant differences in the mean values of these fitness components between resistant and sensitive phenotypes except that the phenotype resistant only to boscalid produced fewer conidia in vitro than sensitive isolates. Resistant isolates were as pathogenic and virulent on apple fruit as sensitive isolates. There was no significant correlation between the values of individual fitness components tested and the level of resistance to pyraclostrobin or boscalid, except that virulence at 20°C positively correlated with the level of resistance to the two fungicides. The final frequency of pyraclostrobin-resistant individuals in the populations was significantly decreased compared with the initial generation and no boscalid-resistant individuals were detected after four disease cycles on apple fruit inoculated with a pair mixture of a dual-sensitive isolate and one isolate each of the three phenotypes resistant to pyraclostrobin, boscalid, or

  13. Identification of metabolic pathways expressed by Pichia anomala Kh6 in the presence of the pathogen Botrytis cinerea on apple: new possible targets for biocontrol improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kwasiborski

    Full Text Available Yeast Pichia anomala strain Kh6 Kurtzman (Saccharomycetales: Endomycetaceae exhibits biological control properties that provide an alternative to the chemical fungicides currently used by fruit or vegetable producers against main post-harvest pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae. Using an in situ model that takes into account interactions between organisms and a proteomic approach, we aimed to identify P. anomala metabolic pathways influenced by the presence of B. cinerea. A total of 105 and 60 P. anomala proteins were differentially represented in the exponential and stationary growth phases, respectively. In the exponential phase and in the presence of B. cinerea, the pentose phosphate pathway seems to be enhanced and would provide P. anomala with the needed nucleic acids and energy for the wound colonisation. In the stationary phase, P. anomala would use alcoholic fermentation both in the absence and presence of the pathogen. These results would suggest that the competitive colonisation of apple wounds could be implicated in the mode of action of P. anomala against B. cinerea.

  14. BcCFEM1, a CFEM Domain-Containing Protein with Putative GPI-Anchored Site, Is Involved in Pathogenicity, Conidial Production, and Stress Tolerance in Botrytis cinerea

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    Wenjun Zhu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally isolated and characterized a CFEM protein with putative GPI-anchored site BcCFEM1 in Botrytis cinerea. BcCFEM1 contains a CFEM (common in several fungal extracellular membrane proteins domain with the characteristic eight cysteine residues at N terminus, and a predicted GPI modification site at C terminus. BcCFEM1 was significantly up-regulated during early stage of infection on bean leaves and induced chlorosis in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using Agrobacterium infiltration method. Targeted deletion of BcCFEM1 in B. cinerea affected virulence, conidial production and stress tolerance, but not growth rate, conidial germination, colony morphology, and sclerotial formation. However, over expression of BcCFEM1 did not make any observable phenotype change. Therefore, our data suggested that BcCFEM1 contributes to virulence, conidial production, and stress tolerance. These findings further enhance our understanding on the sophisticated pathogenicity of B. cinerea beyond necrotrophic stage, highlighting the importance of CFEM protein to B. cinerea and other broad-host-range necrotrophic pathogens.

  15. A new transformant selection system for the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea based on the expression of fenhexamid-insensitive ERG27 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Kim Christopher; Burbank, Joachim; Schumacher, Julia

    2017-03-01

    The gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea features a wide host range and causes severe economic losses, making it an important object for molecular research. Thus far, genetic modification of the fungus mainly is relied on two selection systems (nourseothricin and hygromycin), while other selection systems hold significant disadvantages. To broaden the spectrum of available molecular tools, a new selection system based on the cheap and widely used fungicide fenhexamid (hydroxyanilide group) was established. Fenhexamid specifically targets the 3-ketoreductase ERG27 from the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. We generated a set of expression vectors suitable for deletion or expression of genes of interest (GOIs) in B. cinerea based on fenhexamid-insensitive ERG27 variants. Expression of BcERG27F412I and Fusarium fujikuroi ERG27 in the sensitive B. cinerea strain B05.10 causes resistance towards fenhexamid (fenR) and allows for the selection of transformants and their genetic purification. A modified split-marker approach facilitates the site-specific integration and expression of GOIs at the bcerg27 locus. No undesired secondary phenotypes regarding virulence, stress responses, the formation of reproductive structures or conidial germination were observed in strains expressing fenhexamid-insensitive ERG27 variants. Thus, the fenR system represents a third reliable selection system for genetic modifications of fenhexamid-sensitive B. cinerea strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Action mechanism for 3β-hydroxykaurenoic acid and 4,4-dimethylanthracene-1,9,10(4H)-trione on Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Leonora; Ribera, Alejandra; Saavedra, Alejandra; Silva, Evelyn; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro; Cotoras, Milena

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of the diterpenoid 3β-hydroxykaurenoic acid and the anthraquinone 4,4-dimethylanthracene-1,9,10(4H)-trione on the phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea was studied. The effect of both compounds on the respiratory process and on the membrane integrity of B. cinerea was evaluated. The results showed that 3β-hydroxykaurenoic acid inhibited the growth of this fungus by disrupting the plasmatic membrane. This compound also partially affected oxygen consumption of B. cinerea germinating conidia. Conversely, 4,4-dimethylanthracene-1,9,10(4H)-trione did not produce membrane disruption of B. cinerea. The effect of this compound on mycelial growth was notably increased by the presence of an inhibitor of the cyanide-resistant respiration pathway. It also was shown that the anthraquinone inhibited oxygen consumption by about 80%; therefore this compound would act as a potent inhibitor of the cytochrome pathway of the respiratory chain to exert its antifungal effect. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  17. Molecular analysis of the early interaction between the grapevine flower and Botrytis cinerea reveals that prompt activation of specific host pathways leads to fungus quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haile, Zeraye Mehari; Pilati, Stefania; Sonego, Paolo; Malacarne, Giulia; Vrhovsek, Urska; Engelen, Kristof; Tudzynski, Paul; Zottini, Michela; Baraldi, Elena; Moser, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    Grape quality and yield can be impaired by bunch rot, caused by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Infection often occurs at flowering, and the pathogen stays quiescent until fruit maturity. Here, we report a molecular analysis of the early interaction between B. cinerea and Vitis vinifera flowers, using a controlled infection system, confocal microscopy and integrated transcriptomic and metabolic analysis of the host and the pathogen. Flowers from fruiting cuttings of the cultivar Pinot Noir were infected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled B. cinerea and studied at 24 and 96 hours post-inoculation (h.p.i.). We observed that penetration of the epidermis by B. cinerea coincided with increased expression of genes encoding cell-wall-degrading enzymes, phytotoxins and proteases. Grapevine responded with a rapid defence reaction involving 1193 genes associated with the accumulation of antimicrobial proteins, polyphenols, reactive oxygen species and cell wall reinforcement. At 96 h.p.i., the reaction appears largely diminished both in the host and in the pathogen. Our data indicate that the defence responses of the grapevine flower collectively are able to restrict invasive fungal growth into the underlying tissues, thereby forcing the fungus to enter quiescence until the conditions become more favourable to resume pathogenic development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Inhibitory effect and possible mechanism of a Pseudomonas strain QBA5 against gray mold on tomato leaves and fruits caused by Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pan; Qin, Jiaxing; Li, Delong; Zhou, Shanyue

    2018-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea causes gray mold disease on various hosts, which results in serious economic losses. Over the past several decades, many kinds of fungicides have been used to successfully control the disease. Meanwhile, the uses of fungicides lead to environmental pollution as well as a potential threat to the human health by the chemical residues in tomato fruit. Also, the gray mold disease is difficult to control with fungicides. Therefore, exploring alternative measures such as biological controls could be the best choice to control the disease and alleviate damages caused by fungicides. In this study, we isolated and identified a novel Pseudomonas strain termed as QBA5 from healthy tomato plant based on the morphological, biochemical characteristics and molecular detection. The antifungal activity assays revealed that, in the presence of QBA5, conidia germination, germ tube elongation and mycelial growth of B. cinerea were significantly inhibited. Most importantly, QBA5 exerted a significant preventive effectiveness against gray mold on tomato fruits and plants. The possible mechanism of QBA5 involved in the inhibition of B. cinerea was investigated. It revealed that the conidia plasma membrane of B. cinerea was severely damaged by QBA5. Further, four different antifungal compounds in the supernatant of QBA5 were separated by preparative high performance liquid chromatography (PHPLC). Overall, the data indicate that there is a considerable potential for QBA5 to reduce the damage caused by gray mold disease on tomato.

  19. Loss of bcbrn1 and bcpks13 in Botrytis cinerea Not Only Blocks Melanization But Also Increases Vegetative Growth and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenghua; He, Yifan; Zhu, Pinkuan; Chen, Lu; Wang, Yiwen; Ni, Bing; Xu, Ling

    2015-10-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a necrotrophic pathogen that causes gray mold disease in a broad range of plants. Dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin is a major component of the extracellular matrix of B. cinerea, but knowledge of the exact role of melanin biosynthesis in this pathogen is unclear. In this study, we characterize two genes in B. cinerea, bcpks13 and bcbrn1, encoding polyketide synthase and tetrahydroxynaphthalene (THN) reductases, respectively, and both have predicted roles in DHN melanin biosynthesis. The ∆bcpks13 and ∆bcbrn1 mutants show white and orange pigmentation, respectively, and the mutants are also deficient in conidiation in vitro but show enhanced growth rates and virulence on hosts. Moreover, the mutants display elevated acidification of the complete medium (CM), probably due to oxalic acid secretion and secretion of cell wall-degrading enzymes, and preferably utilize plant cell-wall components as carbon sources for mycelium growth in vitro. In contrast, overexpression of bcbrn1 (OE::bcbrn1 strain) results in attenuated hydrolytic enzyme secretion, acidification ability, and virulence. Taken together, these results indicate that bcpks13 and bcbrn1 participate in diverse cellular and developmental processes, such as melanization and conidiation in B. cinerea in vitro, but they negatively regulate the virulence of this pathogen.

  20. Efecto fungistático de extractos y aceites esenciales de Lippia origanoides HBK y Thymus vulgaris L. como alternativas de manejo de Botrytis cinerea en fresa

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    Luis Alejandro Taborda Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El moho gris de la fresa causado por Botrytis cinerea es una enfermedad que produce importantes pérdidas poscosecha. En el estudio se evaluó el efecto fungistático de extractos y aceites esenciales de Lippia origanoides HBK y Thymus vulgaris L. en concentraciones de 128, 256 y 500 mg/lt sobre B. cinerea in vitro e in vivo. In vitro se determinó el porcentaje de inhibición del crecimiento micelial del hongo. En estas condiciones se observó que el aceite esencial (AE de L. origanoides presentó el porcentaje de control más alto (66.2% sobre B. cinerea. In vivo, se observó que en bananos inoculados con B. cinerea después de 120 los AE controlaron eficientemente la incidencia de daño causado por el patógeno estudiado y no se encontraron diferencias significativas con el control químico utilizando el fungicida Benomil

  1. Jasmonic Acid Oxidase 2 Hydroxylates Jasmonic Acid and Represses Basal Defense and Resistance Responses against Botrytis cinerea Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Ekaterina; Marquis, Valentin; Poirier, Laure; Aubert, Yann; Zumsteg, Julie; Ménard, Rozenn; Miesch, Laurence; Heitz, Thierry

    2017-09-12

    Jasmonates (JAs) orchestrate immune responses upon wound/herbivore injury or infection by necrotrophic pathogens. Elucidation of catabolic routes has revealed new complexity in jasmonate metabolism. Two integrated pathways attenuate signaling by turning over the active hormone jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) through ω-oxidation or deconjugation, and define an indirect route forming the derivative 12OH-JA. Here, we provide evidence for a second 12OH-JA formation pathway by direct jasmonic acid (JA) oxidation. Three jasmonic acid oxidases (JAOs) of the 2-oxoglutarate dioxygenase family catalyze specific oxidation of JA to 12OH-JA, and their genes are induced by wounding or infection by the fungus Botrytis cinerea. JAO2 exhibits the highest basal expression, and its deficiency in jao2 mutants strongly enhanced antifungal resistance. The resistance phenotype resulted from constitutive expression of antimicrobial markers rather than from their higher induction in infected jao2 plants and could be reversed by ectopic expression of any of the three JAOs in jao2. Elevated defense in jao2 was dependent on the activity of JASMONATE RESPONSE 1 (JAR1) and CORONATINE-INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) but was not correlated with enhanced JA-Ile accumulation. Instead, jao2 mutant lines displayed altered accumulation of several JA species in healthy and challenged plants, suggesting elevated metabolic flux through JA-Ile. Collectively, these data identify the missing enzymes hydroxylating JA and uncover an important metabolic diversion mechanism for repressing basal JA defense responses. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The transcription factor BcLTF1 regulates virulence and light responses in the necrotrophic plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

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    Julia Schumacher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold diseases in a range of dicotyledonous plant species. The fungus can reproduce asexually by forming macroconidia for dispersal and sclerotia for survival; the latter also participate in sexual reproduction by bearing the apothecia after fertilization by microconidia. Light induces the differentiation of conidia and apothecia, while sclerotia are exclusively formed in the absence of light. The relevance of light for virulence of the fungus is not obvious, but infections are observed under natural illumination as well as in constant darkness. By a random mutagenesis approach, we identified a novel virulence-related gene encoding a GATA transcription factor (BcLTF1 for light-responsive TF1 with characterized homologues in Aspergillus nidulans (NsdD and Neurospora crassa (SUB-1. By deletion and over-expression of bcltf1, we confirmed the predicted role of the transcription factor in virulence, and discovered furthermore its functions in regulation of light-dependent differentiation, the equilibrium between production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and secondary metabolism. Microarray analyses revealed 293 light-responsive genes, and that the expression levels of the majority of these genes (66% are modulated by BcLTF1. In addition, the deletion of bcltf1 affects the expression of 1,539 genes irrespective of the light conditions, including the overexpression of known and so far uncharacterized secondary metabolism-related genes. Increased expression of genes encoding alternative respiration enzymes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX, suggest a mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of bcltf1. The hypersensitivity of Δbctlf1 mutants to exogenously applied oxidative stress--even in the absence of light--and the restoration of virulence and growth rates in continuous light by antioxidants, indicate that BcLTF1 is required to cope with oxidative stress that is caused either by

  3. The Transcription Factor BcLTF1 Regulates Virulence and Light Responses in the Necrotrophic Plant Pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia; Simon, Adeline; Cohrs, Kim Christopher; Viaud, Muriel; Tudzynski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold diseases in a range of dicotyledonous plant species. The fungus can reproduce asexually by forming macroconidia for dispersal and sclerotia for survival; the latter also participate in sexual reproduction by bearing the apothecia after fertilization by microconidia. Light induces the differentiation of conidia and apothecia, while sclerotia are exclusively formed in the absence of light. The relevance of light for virulence of the fungus is not obvious, but infections are observed under natural illumination as well as in constant darkness. By a random mutagenesis approach, we identified a novel virulence-related gene encoding a GATA transcription factor (BcLTF1 for light-responsive TF1) with characterized homologues in Aspergillus nidulans (NsdD) and Neurospora crassa (SUB-1). By deletion and over-expression of bcltf1, we confirmed the predicted role of the transcription factor in virulence, and discovered furthermore its functions in regulation of light-dependent differentiation, the equilibrium between production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and secondary metabolism. Microarray analyses revealed 293 light-responsive genes, and that the expression levels of the majority of these genes (66%) are modulated by BcLTF1. In addition, the deletion of bcltf1 affects the expression of 1,539 genes irrespective of the light conditions, including the overexpression of known and so far uncharacterized secondary metabolism-related genes. Increased expression of genes encoding alternative respiration enzymes, such as the alternative oxidase (AOX), suggest a mitochondrial dysfunction in the absence of bcltf1. The hypersensitivity of Δbctlf1 mutants to exogenously applied oxidative stress - even in the absence of light - and the restoration of virulence and growth rates in continuous light by antioxidants, indicate that BcLTF1 is required to cope with oxidative stress that is caused either by exposure to light

  4. Identification and functional analysis of Botrytis cinerea genes induced during infection of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.

    2001-01-01

    Keyword(s): Botryotinia fuckeliana , grey mould, pathogenesis, tomato, differential gene expression, glutathione S-transferase, aspartic protease, ubiquitin

    In

  5. Anti-Apoptotic Machinery Protects the Necrotrophic Fungus Botrytis cinerea from Host-Induced Apoptotic-Like Cell Death during Plant Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlezinger, Neta; Minz, Anna; Gur, Yonatan; Hatam, Ido; Dagdas, Yasin F.; Talbot, Nicholas J.; Sharon, Amir

    2011-01-01

    Necrotrophic fungi are unable to occupy living plant cells. How such pathogens survive first contact with living host tissue and initiate infection is therefore unclear. Here, we show that the necrotrophic grey mold fungus Botrytis cinerea undergoes massive apoptotic-like programmed cell death (PCD) following germination on the host plant. Manipulation of an anti-apoptotic gene BcBIR1 modified fungal response to PCD-inducing conditions. As a consequence, strains with reduced sensitivity to PCD were hyper virulent, while strains in which PCD was over-stimulated showed reduced pathogenicity. Similarly, reduced levels of PCD in the fungus were recorded following infection of Arabidopsis mutants that show enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. When considered together, these results suggest that Botrytis PCD machinery is targeted by plant defense molecules, and that the fungal anti-apoptotic machinery is essential for overcoming this host-induced PCD and hence, for establishment of infection. As such, fungal PCD machinery represents a novel target for fungicides and antifungal drugs. PMID:21876671

  6. Anti-apoptotic machinery protects the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea from host-induced apoptotic-like cell death during plant infection.

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    Neta Shlezinger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Necrotrophic fungi are unable to occupy living plant cells. How such pathogens survive first contact with living host tissue and initiate infection is therefore unclear. Here, we show that the necrotrophic grey mold fungus Botrytis cinerea undergoes massive apoptotic-like programmed cell death (PCD following germination on the host plant. Manipulation of an anti-apoptotic gene BcBIR1 modified fungal response to PCD-inducing conditions. As a consequence, strains with reduced sensitivity to PCD were hyper virulent, while strains in which PCD was over-stimulated showed reduced pathogenicity. Similarly, reduced levels of PCD in the fungus were recorded following infection of Arabidopsis mutants that show enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. When considered together, these results suggest that Botrytis PCD machinery is targeted by plant defense molecules, and that the fungal anti-apoptotic machinery is essential for overcoming this host-induced PCD and hence, for establishment of infection. As such, fungal PCD machinery represents a novel target for fungicides and antifungal drugs.

  7. Tomato Sl3-MMP, a member of the Matrix metalloproteinase family, is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Qiuming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Shixia; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Song, Fengming

    2015-06-14

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases. MMPs have been characterized in detail in mammals and shown to play key roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Although MMPs in some plant species have been identified, the function of MMPs in biotic stress responses remains elusive. A total of five MMP genes were identified in tomato genome. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of Sl-MMP genes was induced with distinct patterns by infection of Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and by treatment with defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene precursor 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based knockdown of individual Sl-MMPs and disease assays indicated that silencing of Sl3-MMP resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, whereas silencing of other four Sl-MMPs did not affect the disease resistance against these two pathogens. The Sl3-MMP-silenced tomato plants responded with increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and alerted expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea. Transient expression of Sl3-MMP in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana led to an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and upregulated expression of defense-related genes. Biochemical assays revealed that the recombinant mature Sl3-MMP protein had proteolytic activities in vitro with distinct preferences for specificity of cleavage sites. The Sl3-MMP protein was targeted onto the plasma membrane of plant cells when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. VIGS-based knockdown of Sl3-MMP expression in tomato and gain-of-function transient expression of Sl3-MMP in N. benthamiana demonstrate that Sl3-MMP functions as a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Isolates of Botrytis cinerea Sensitive and Resistant to Benzimidazole and Dicarboximide Fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yourman, L F; Jeffers, S N; Dean, R A

    2000-08-01

    ABSTRACT A total of 56 isolates of B. cinerea collected from ornamental crops from commercial greenhouses were examined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprint analyses. Isolates were examined as two independent sets of 35 and 36 isolates, with 15 isolates common to both sets. The isolates had four phenotypes: 17 were sensitive to two commonly used fungicides, thiophanate-methyl (a benzimidazole) and vinclozolin (a dicarboximide) (S(T)S(V)); 18 were resistant to both fungicides (R(T)R(V)); 16 were resistant to thiophanate-methyl but sensitive to vinclozolin (R(T)S(V)); and 5 were sensitive to thiophanate-methyl but resistant to vinclozolin (S(T)R(V)). Relationships among the isolates were determined by cluster analyses of mean character differences using the unweighted pair group method using arithmetic average and cladograms were constructed. Isolates were clustered primarily by fungicide-sensitivity phenotype. In one set of greenhouse isolates, 6 of 10 S(T)S(V) isolates clustered together with a bootstrap confidence value of 91%. In the other fingerprint set of greenhouse isolates, 9 of 11 S(T)S(V) isolates clustered together and had a bootstrap confidence value of 98%. Isolates resistant to thiophanate-methyl, vinclozolin, or both fungicides usually were not clustered with other isolates or were clustered with isolates of the same phenotype. To further elucidate these relationships, variant isolates resistant to one or both fungicides were produced on fungicide-amended agar medium from 14 S(T)S(V) greenhouse isolates. These 14 S(T)S(V) parent isolates, 57 resistant variant isolates, and 11 resistant greenhouse isolates were analyzed as three independent RAPD fingerprint sets. Variants selected from eight S(T)S(V) parent isolates were resistant to both thiophanate-methyl and vinclozolin even though parent isolates were exposed to only one of the fungicides. Isolates resistant only to vinclozolin (S(T)R(V)) had fingerprint patterns similar to and

  9. Assessment of the Role of Local Strawberry Rhizosphere—Associated Streptomycetes on the Bacterially—Induced Growth and Botrytis cinerea Infection Resistance of the Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. İpek Kurtböke

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The future need for sustainable agriculture will be met in part by wider use of biological control of plant pathogens over conventional fungicides hazardous to the environment and to public health. Control strategies involving both (i direct use of microorganisms antagonistic to the phytopathogen, and (ii use of bioactive compounds (secondary metabolites/antibiotic compounds from microorganisms on the phytopathogen were both adapted in order to investigate the ability of streptomycetes isolated from the rhizosphere of strawberry plants to promote the growth of the fruit and suppress Botrytis cinerea causing strawberry rot on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. In vitro studies showed that 25/39 streptomycetes isolated from strawberry field soils inhibited B. cinerea growth by antifungal activity, ranging from antibiosis to volatile compound production. However, when non-volatile antifungal compounds were extracted and applied aerially to the actively growing strawberry fruits infected with B. cinerea, a significant disease reduction was not recorded. On the other hand, plant and fruit growth was promoted by the presence of actively growing streptomycetes in container media. Findings might indicate that live streptomycete inoculum can be used as growth promoting agent in container media for this economically important crop.

  10. DHN melanin biosynthesis in the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is based on two developmentally regulated key enzyme (PKS)-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Botrytis cinerea is the causal agent of gray mold disease in various plant species and produces grayish macroconidia and/or black sclerotia at the end of the infection cycle. It has been suggested that the pigmentation is due to the accumulation of 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin. To unravel its basis and regulation, the putative melanogenic and regulatory genes were identified and functionally characterized. Unlike other DHN melanin-producing fungi, B. cinerea and other Leotiomycetes contain two key enzyme (PKS)-encoding enzymes. Bcpks12 and bcpks13 are developmentally regulated and are required for melanogenesis in sclerotia and conidia respectively. BcYGH1 converts the BcPKS13 product and contributes thereby to conidial melanogenesis. In contrast, enzymes acting downstream in conversion of the PKS products (BcBRN2, BcSCD1 and BcBRN1) are required for both, sclerotial and conidial melanogenesis, suggesting that DHN melanogenesis in B. cinerea follows a non-linear pathway that is rather unusual for secondary metabolic pathways. Regulation of the melanogenic genes involves three pathway-specific transcription factors (TFs) that are clustered with bcpks12 or bcpks13 and other developmental regulators such as light-responsive TFs. Melanogenic genes are dispensable in vegetative mycelia for proper growth and virulence. However, DHN melanin is considered to contribute to the longevity of the reproduction structures. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Botrytis cinerea can import and utilize nucleosides in salvage and catabolism and BcENT functions as high affinity nucleoside transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daumann, Manuel; Golfier, Philippe; Knüppel, Nathalie; Hahn, Matthias; Möhlmann, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide de novo synthesis is an essential pathway in nearly all organisms. Transport processes as well as salvage and catabolism of nucleotides and pathway intermediates are required to balance nucleotide pools. We have analysed the genome of the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea for genes involved in nucleotide metabolism and found a complete set of genes necessary for purine and pyrimidine uptake and salvage based on homology of the gene products to corresponding proteins from Aspergillus nidulans. Candidate genes required for a complete purine catabolic sequence were identified in addition. These analyses were complemented by growth tests showing functional transport and salvage activity for pyrimidines. Growth of B. cinerea mycelium in nitrogen free medium could be restored by addition of purines, indicating the presence of a functional purine catabolism, whereas pyrimidines did not support growth. Bcin07g05490 (BcENT) was identified as sole member of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) family. The protein synthesized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed high affinity transport of adenosine (KM = 6.81 μM) and uridine (KM=9.04 μM). Furthermore, a BcENT knockout mutant was generated and tested in a range of growth and infection assays. These results provide detailed insight in the use of externally supplied nucleobases and nucleosides by B. cinerea. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disruption of Bcchs4, Bcchs6 or Bcchs7 chitin synthase genes in Botrytis cinerea and the essential role of class VI chitin synthase (Bcchs6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcx, Serena; Kunz, Caroline; Choquer, Mathias; Assie, Sébastien; Blondet, Eddy; Simond-Côte, Elisabeth; Gajek, Karina; Chapeland-Leclerc, Florence; Expert, Dominique; Soulie, Marie-Christine

    2013-03-01

    Chitin synthases play critical roles in hyphal development and fungal pathogenicity. Previous studies on Botrytis cinerea, a model organism for necrotrophic pathogens, have shown that disruption of Bcchs1 and more particularly Bcchs3a genes have a drastic impact on virulence (Soulié et al., 2003, 2006). In this work, we investigate the role of other CHS including BcCHS4, BcCHS6 and BcCHS7 during the life cycle of B. cinerea. Single deletions of corresponding genes were carried out. Phenotypic analysis indicates that: (i) BcCHS4 enzyme is not essential for development and pathogenicity of the fungus; (ii) BcCHS7 is required for pathogenicity in a host dependant manner. For Bcchs6 gene disruption, we obtained only heterokaryotic strains. Indeed, sexual or asexual purification assays were unsuccessful. We concluded that class VI chitin synthase could be essential for B. cinerea and therefore BcCHS6 represents a valuable antifungal target. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CYP94-mediated jasmonoyl-isoleucine hormone oxidation shapes jasmonate profiles and attenuates defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Yann; Widemann, Emilie; Miesch, Laurence; Pinot, Franck; Heitz, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea depends on jasmonate metabolism and signalling in Arabidopsis. We have presented here extensive jasmonate profiling in this pathosystem and investigated the impact of the recently reported jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) catabolic pathway mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP94) enzymes. Using a series of mutant and overexpressing (OE) plant lines, we showed that CYP94B3 and CYP94C1 are integral components of the fungus-induced jasmonate metabolic pathway and control the abundance of oxidized conjugated but also some unconjugated derivatives, such as sulfated 12-HSO4-JA. Despite causing JA-Ile overaccumulation due to impaired oxidation, CYP94 deficiency had negligible impacts on resistance, associated with enhanced JAZ repressor transcript levels. In contrast, plants overexpressing (OE) CYP94B3 or CYP94C1 were enriched in 12-OH-JA-Ile or 12-COOH-JA-Ile respectively. This shift towards oxidized JA-Ile derivatives was concomitant with strongly impaired defence gene induction and reduced disease resistance. CYP94B3-OE, but unexpectedly not CYP94C1-OE, plants displayed reduced JA-Ile levels compared with the wild type, suggesting that increased susceptibility in CYP94C1-OE plants may result from changes in the hormone oxidation ratio rather than absolute changes in JA-Ile levels. Consistently, while feeding JA-Ile to seedlings triggered strong induction of JA pathway genes, induction was largely reduced or abolished after feeding with the CYP94 products 12-OH-JA-Ile and 12-COOH-JA-Ile, respectively. This trend paralleled in vitro pull-down assays where 12-COOH-JA-Ile was unable to promote COI1–JAZ9 co-receptor assembly. Our results highlight the dual function of CYP94B3/C1 in antimicrobial defence: by controlling hormone oxidation status for signal attenuation, these enzymes also define JA-Ile as a metabolic hub directing jasmonate profile complexity. PMID:25903915

  14. Fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands and effectiveness of non-chemical treatments against gray mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Acosta, A; Rodríguez, C

    2014-09-01

    Tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands, Spain, were surveyed to estimate frequencies of resistance to benzimidazoles, dicarboximides, anilinopyrimidines and N-phenylcarbamates in Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and diethofencarb was found in 74.2, 86.4, 28.8 and 31.8% of isolates, respectively. Benzimidazole- and anilinopyrimide-resistant isolates were highly resistant, showing EC50 values above 500 µg/ml carbendazim and a mean EC50 value of 28.42 µg/ml pyrimethanil, respectively. By contrast, a low level of resistance was observed among dicarboximide-resistant isolates (mean EC50 value of 1.81 µg/ml iprodione). Phenotypes with double resistance to carbendazim and iprodione, and triple resistance to carbendazim, iprodione and pyrimethanil were the most common, occurring in 36.4 and 28.8% of isolates. The surveyed greenhouses had never been treated with fenhexamid and Signum™ (pre-packed mixture of boscalid and pyraclostrobin), and baseline sensitivities of B. cinerea isolates to these fungicides were determined. The EC50 values were within the range of 0.009-0.795 µg/ml fenhexamid and of 0.014-0.48 µg/ml Signum. In addition, available formulations based on elicitors of plant defense response and biocontrol agents were evaluated against B. cinerea in tomato plants under semi-controlled greenhouse conditions, the yeast Candida sake CPA-1 being able to reduce gray mold significantly when it was applied on petiole wounds and the plants were inoculated 24 h later. Likewise, C. sake was effective against B. cinerea in harvested tomato fruits, yeast-treated tomatoes showed a 70.66 and 30.31% reduction in the diameters of decay lesions compared with controls after 10 days of storage at 20 and 9 °C, respectively.

  15. The response regulator BcSkn7 is required for vegetative differentiation and adaptation to oxidative and osmotic stresses in Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qianqian; Yin, Dafang; Yin, Yanni; Cao, Yi; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The high-osmolarity glycerol pathway plays an important role in the responses of fungi to various environmental stresses. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Skn7 is a response regulator in the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway, which regulates the oxidative stress response, cell cycle and cell wall biosynthesis. In this study, we characterized an Skn7 orthologue BcSkn7 in Botrytis cinerea. BcSKN7 can partly restore the growth defects of S. cerevisiae SKN7 mutant and vice versa. The BcSKN7 mutant (ΔBcSkn7-1) revealed increased sensitivity to ionic osmotic and oxidative stresses and to ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors. In addition, ΔBcSkn7-1 was also impaired dramatically in conidiation and sclerotial formation. Western blot analysis showed that BcSkn7 positively regulated the phosphorylation of BcSak1 (the orthologue of S. cerevisiae Hog1) under osmotic stress, indicating that BcSkn7 is associated with the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway in B. cinerea. In contrast with BcSak1, BcSkn7 is not involved in the regulation of B. cinerea virulence. All of the phenotypic defects of ΔBcSkn7-1 are restored by genetic complementation of the mutant with the wild-type BcSKN7. The results of this study indicate that BcSkn7 plays an important role in the regulation of vegetative differentiation and in the response to various stresses in B. cinerea. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  16. Induction of Direct or Priming Resistance against Botrytis cinerea in Strawberries by β-Aminobutyric Acid and Their Effects on Sucrose Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaituo; Liao, Yunxia; Xiong, Qi; Kan, Jianquan; Cao, Shifeng; Zheng, Yonghua

    2016-07-27

    The specific forms of disease resistance induced by β-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and their impacts on sucrose metabolism of postharvest strawberries were determined in the present research. Treatment with 10-500 mmol L(-1) BABA inhibited the Botrytis cinerea infection, possibly directly by suppressing the fungus growth and indirectly by triggering disease resistance. Moreover, BABA-induced resistance against B. cinerea infection in strawberries was associated with either one of two mechanisms, depending upon the concentration used: BABA at concentrations higher than 100 mmol L(-1) directly induced the defense response, including a H2O2 burst, modulation of the expression of PR genes, including FaPR1, FaChi3, Faβglu, and FaPAL, and increased activities of chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, and PAL, whereas BABA at 10 mmol L(-1) activated a priming response because the BABA-treated fruits exhibited an increased capacity to express molecular defense only when the fruits were inoculated with B. cinerea. Activation of the priming defense appeared almost as effective against B. cinerea as inducing direct defense. However, the primed strawberries maintained higher activities of SS synthesis and SPS and SPP enzymes) and lower level of SS cleavage during the incubation; these activities contributed to higher sucrose, fructose, and glucose contents, sweetness index, and sensory scores compared to fruits exhibiting the direct defense. Thus, it is plausible that the priming defense, which can be activated by BABA at relatively low concentrations, represents an optimal strategy for combining the advantages of enhanced disease protection and soluble sugar accumulation.

  17. The Two Cryptochrome/Photolyase Family Proteins Fulfill Distinct Roles in DNA Photorepair and Regulation of Conidiation in the Gray Mold Fungus Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Kim C; Schumacher, Julia

    2017-09-01

    The plant-pathogenic leotiomycete Botrytis cinerea is known for the strict regulation of its asexual differentiation programs by environmental light conditions. Sclerotia are formed in constant darkness; black/near-UV (NUV) light induces conidiation; and blue light represses both differentiation programs. Sensing of black/NUV light is attributed to proteins of the cryptochrome/photolyase family (CPF). To elucidate the molecular basis of the photoinduction of conidiation, we functionally characterized the two CPF proteins encoded in the genome of B. cinerea as putative positive-acting components. B. cinerea CRY1 (BcCRY1), a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyase, acts as the major enzyme of light-driven DNA repair (photoreactivation) and has no obvious role in signaling. In contrast, BcCRY2, belonging to the cry-DASH proteins, is dispensable for photorepair but performs regulatory functions by repressing conidiation in white and especially black/NUV light. The transcription of bccry1 and bccry2 is induced by light in a White Collar complex (WCC)-dependent manner, but neither light nor the WCC is essential for the repression of conidiation through BcCRY2 when bccry2 is constitutively expressed. Further, BcCRY2 affects the transcript levels of both WCC-induced and WCC-repressed genes, suggesting a signaling function downstream of the WCC. Since both CPF proteins are dispensable for photoinduction by black/NUV light, the origin of this effect remains elusive and may be connected to a yet unknown UV-light-responsive system.IMPORTANCEBotrytis cinerea is an economically important plant pathogen that causes gray mold diseases in a wide variety of plant species, including high-value crops and ornamental flowers. The spread of disease in the field relies on the formation of conidia, a process that is regulated by different light qualities. While this feature has been known for a long time, we are just starting to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms

  18. Bioatividade de óleos essenciais no controle de Botrytis cinerea isolado de morangueiro Essential oils bioactivity in strawberry grey mould control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Lorenzetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar o uso de óleos essenciais sobre isolados de Botrytis cinerea, causador do mofo cinzento em morangueiro. Foram testados óleos essenciais de capim-limão, palmarosa, citronela, cravo, canela, menta, lavanda, tangerina, eucalipto, melaleuca, alecrim e laranja, todos estes analisados em cromatógrafo a gás acoplado a detector de massas, para identificação dos principais componentes dos óleos. Foram avaliados o crescimento micelial, produção e germinação de conídios de B. cinerea, com a incorporação do óleo no meio de cultura. Realizou-se ainda uma avaliação de voláteis e a eficiência de óleos em isolado resistente a fungicida. Para cada teste, diferentes óleos apresentaram eficiência, contudo capim limão, palmarosa, canela e menta demonstraram os melhores efeitos em todos os testes realizados. Todos os tratamentos a base de óleos demonstraram efeito semelhante a um fungicida recomendado para a cultura, a base de tiofanato metílico. Dois tratamentos mostraram-se efetivos no caso de isolado resistente (óleo de capim limão e de canela. Óleos essenciais mostram-se como opção promissora para o desenvolvimento de possíveis produtos fitossanitários para o manejo de doenças em plantas.This study aimed evaluates essential oils in Botrytis cinerea isolates growth, which causes gray mould on strawberry. Were tested essential oils of lemon grass, palmrose, citronella, clove, cinnamon, mint, lavender, tangerine, eucalyptus, tea tree, rosemary and orange. The oils were analyzed in gas chromatograph attached to mass detector for identifying the mainly oils components. Were evaluated mycelial growth, conidia production and conidia germination of B. cinerea, with oil incorporation in culture medium. Were conducted an evaluation of oils volatile components and the efficiency of oils in fungicide-resistant isolate. For each test, different oils showed efficiency, however lemongrass, palmarosa, cinnamon and mint

  19. High resolution imaging of temporal and spatial changes of subcellular ascorbate, glutathione and H₂O₂ distribution during Botrytis cinerea infection in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe K Simon

    Full Text Available In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS. H₂O₂ accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi correlated with an accumulation of H₂O₂ in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H₂O₂ in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size, chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves.

  20. High Resolution Imaging of Temporal and Spatial Changes of Subcellular Ascorbate, Glutathione and H2O2 Distribution during Botrytis cinerea Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Uwe K.; Polanschütz, Lisa M.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi) in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS) and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS). H2O2 accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi) correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H2O2 in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size), chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves. PMID:23755284

  1. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN Confers Grapevine Resistance against Botrytis cinerea via a Direct Antimicrobial Effect Combined with a Better Resource Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto-Vilanova, Lidiane; Jacquard, Cédric; Courteaux, Barbara; Wortham, Laurence; Michel, Jean; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaïd A; Sanchez, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Plant innate immunity serves as a surveillance system by providing the first line of powerful weapons to fight against pathogen attacks. Beneficial microorganisms and Microbial-Associated Molecular Patterns might act as signals to trigger this immunity. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN, a highly efficient plant beneficial endophytic bacterium, promotes growth in a wide variety of plants including grapevine. Further, the bacterium induces plant resistance against abiotic and biotic stresses. However, no study has deciphered triggered-mechanisms during the tripartite interaction between grapevine, B. phytofirmans PsJN and Botrytis cinerea. Herein, we showed that in contrast with classical rhizobacteria, which are restricted in the root system and act through ISR, B. phytofirmans PsJN is able to migrate until aerial part and forms at leaves surface a biofilm around B. cinerea mycelium to restrict the pathogen. Nevertheless, considering the endophytic level of PsJN in leaves, the plant protection efficacy of B. phytofirmans PsJN could not be explained solely by its direct antifungal effect. Deeper investigations showed a callose deposition, H2O2 production and primed expression of PR1, PR2, PR5, and JAZ only in bacterized-plantlets after pathogen challenge. The presence of PsJN modulated changes in leaf carbohydrate metabolism including gene expression, sugar levels, and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging after Botrytis challenge. Our findings indicated that protection induced by B. phytofirmans PsJN was multifaceted and relied on a direct antifungal effect, priming of defense mechanisms as well as the mobilization of carbon sources in grapevine leaf tissues.

  2. Biocontrol ability and action mechanism of food-isolated yeast strains against Botrytis cinerea causing post-harvest bunch rot of table grape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parafati, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Restuccia, Cristina; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2015-05-01

    Strains belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Aureobasidium pullulans, isolated from different food sources, were tested in vitro as biocontrol agents (BCAs) against the post-harvest pathogenic mold Botrytis cinerea. All yeast strains demonstrated antifungal activity at different levels depending on species and medium. Killer strains of W. anomalus and S. cerevisiae showed the highest biocontrol in vitro activity, as demonstrated by largest inhibition halos. The competition for iron and the ability to form biofilm and to colonize fruit wounds were hypothesized as the main action mechanisms for M. pulcherrima. The production of hydrolytic enzymes and the ability to colonize the wounds were the most important mechanisms for biocontrol activity in A. pullulans and W. anomalus, which also showed high ability to form biofilm. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect on pathogen growth was observed for the species W. anomalus, S. cerevisiae and M. pulcherrima. Our study clearly indicates that multiple modes of action may explain as M. pulcherrima provide excellent control of postharvest botrytis bunch rot of grape. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Two Salts Compounds on Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Spore Germination of Six Isolates of Botrytis cinerea in the Western North of Algeria

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    Boualem Boumaaza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of Botrytis cinerea were isolated from leaves and stems of different tomato varieties taken from four areas in the northwest of Algeria where tomato is mostly grown in greenhouses and high tunnels. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of two salts, NaCl and CaCl2, on three stages of Botrytis cinerea’s life cycle. All isolates tested were stimulated in 50 to 150 ppm; NaCl was the most effective treatment to increase mycelial growth at two tested concentrations. However, at 300 ppm concentration, CaCl2 completely inhibited the growth of mycelium; they reach 34.78% for the isolate TR46 and 26.72% for isolate F27. The sodium and calcium salts stimulated conidia production in liquid culture. We noticed that the effect of calcium chloride on sporulation was average while sodium chloride. In the medium containing 50 ppm, calcium chloride and sodium chloride increased the germination capacity of most isolates compared with the control. Other calcium salts, at 100 or 300 ppm, decreased the germination percentage of the conidia. With the exception of sodium salts, the inhibitions of germination reduce at 150 or 300 compared with the control. Conidial germination was slightly inhibited by sodium chloride only when the concentration was over 300 ppm.

  4. Arabidopsis WRKY33 Is a Key Transcriptional Regulator of Hormonal and Metabolic Responses toward Botrytis cinerea Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rainer P. Birkenbihl; Celia Diezel; Imre E. Somssich

    2012-01-01

    ... uncovered massive differential transcriptional reprogramming upon B. cinerea infection. Subsequent detailed kinetic analyses revealed that loss of WRKY33 function results in inappropriate activation of the salicylic acid (SA...

  5. Co-culturing of Fungal Strains Against Botrytis cinerea as a Model for the Induction of Chemical Diversity and Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Rachel; González-Menéndez, Víctor; Rodríguez, Lorena; Martín, Jesús; Tormo, José R.; Genilloud, Olga

    2017-01-01

    New fungal SMs (SMs) have been successfully described to be produced by means of in vitro-simulated microbial community interactions. Co-culturing of fungi has proved to be an efficient way to induce cell–cell interactions that can promote the activation of cryptic pathways, frequently silent when the strains are grown in laboratory conditions. Filamentous fungi represent one of the most diverse microbial groups known to produce bioactive natural products. Triggering the production of novel antifungal compounds in fungi could respond to the current needs to fight health compromising pathogens and provide new therapeutic solutions. In this study, we have selected the fungus Botrytis cinerea as a model to establish microbial interactions with a large set of fungal strains related to ecosystems where they can coexist with this phytopathogen, and to generate a collection of extracts, obtained from their antagonic microbial interactions and potentially containing new bioactive compounds. The antifungal specificity of the extracts containing compounds induced after B. cinerea interaction was determined against two human fungal pathogens (Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus) and three phytopathogens (Colletotrichum acutatum, Fusarium proliferatum, and Magnaporthe grisea). In addition, their cytotoxicity was also evaluated against the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2). We have identified by LC-MS the production of a wide variety of known compounds induced from these fungal interactions, as well as novel molecules that support the potential of this approach to generate new chemical diversity and possible new therapeutic agents. PMID:28469610

  6. Effect of hydro-ethanolic extracts of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and common horsetail (Equisetum arvense L. on incidence and severity of Botrytis cinerea on strawberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pazmiño-Miranda Pilar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of application of three dosages (5, 10 and 15 mL/L and two frequencies (each 6 and 8 days of ethanoic extracts obtained from cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum Blume and common horsetail (Equisetum arvense L. on incidence and severity of grey mould (Botrytis cinerea on strawberry crop (Fragaria ananassa cv. Albion was evaluated. Experiment was carried out in a randomized block design with factorial arrangement 2 x 3 x 2 + 1, with three replications. Lower incidence and severity percentage in flower and fruit (10.24 and 24.43%, respectively were observed after application of cinnamon extract at 15 mL/L at 6 days interval. Similarly, lower fruit severity (11.86% was observed with the same treatment. In general, reduction in B. cinerea incidence and severity was lower when common horsetail extract was used, compared to cinnamon extracts. According to our results, using of cinnamon hydro-ethanoic extracts could be considered as sustainable alternative for grey mold management in strawberry crops.

  7. iTRAQ Proteomic Analysis Reveals That Metabolic Pathways Involving Energy Metabolism Are Affected by Tea Tree Oil in Botrytis cinerea

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    Jiayu Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tea tree oil (TTO is a volatile essential oil obtained from the leaves of the Australian tree Melaleuca alternifolia by vapor distillation. Previously, we demonstrated that TTO has a strong inhibitory effect on Botrytis cinerea. This study investigates the underlying antifungal mechanisms at the molecular level. A proteomics approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ was adopted to investigate the effects of TTO on B. cinerea. A total of 718 differentially expression proteins (DEPs were identified in TTO-treated samples, 17 were markedly up-regulated and 701 were significantly down-regulated. Among the 718 DEPs, 562 were annotated and classified into 30 functional groups by GO (gene ontology analysis. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analysis linked 562 DEPs to 133 different biochemical pathways, involving glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle, and purine metabolism. Additional experiments indicated that TTO destroys cell membranes and decreases the activities of three enzymes related to the TCA cycle. Our results suggest that TTO treatment inhibits glycolysis, disrupts the TCA cycle, and induces mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby disrupting energy metabolism. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms underlying the antifungal activity of essential oils.

  8. Antifungal activity of food additives in vitro and as ingredients of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-lipid edible coatings against Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata on cherry tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Cristiane; Pérez-Gago, María B; Monteiro, Alcilene R; Palou, Lluís

    2013-09-16

    The antifungal activity of food additives or 'generally recognized as safe' (GRAS) compounds was tested in vitro against Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata. Radial mycelial growth of each pathogen was measured in PDA Petri dishes amended with food preservatives at 0.2, 1.0, or 2.0% (v/v) after 3, 5, and 7 days of incubation at 25 °C. Selected additives and concentrations were tested as antifungal ingredients of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-lipid edible coatings. The curative activity of stable coatings was tested in in vivo experiments. Cherry tomatoes were artificially inoculated with the pathogens, coated by immersion about 24 h later, and incubated at 20 °C and 90% RH. Disease incidence and severity (lesion diameter) were determined after 6, 10, and 15 days of incubation and the 'area under the disease progress stairs' (AUDPS) was calculated. In general, HPMC-lipid antifungal coatings controlled black spot caused by A. alternata more effectively than gray mold caused by B. cinerea. Overall, the best results for reduction of gray mold on cherry tomato fruit were obtained with coatings containing 2.0% of potassium carbonate, ammonium phosphate, potassium bicarbonate, or ammonium carbonate, while 2.0% sodium methylparaben, sodium ethylparaben, and sodium propylparaben were the best ingredients for coatings against black rot. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Induction of Noble Rot (Botrytis cinerea Infection during Postharvest Withering Changes the Metabolome of Grapevine Berries (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Garganega

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    Stefano Negri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural or induced development of noble rot caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea during the late stages of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. berry ripening is used in some traditional viticulture areas to produce high-quality wines such as Sauternes and Tokaji. In this research, we wanted to verify if by changing the environmental conditions during post-harvest withering we could induce the noble rot development on harvested berries in order to positively change the wine produced from withered Garganega berries. Therefore, we exposed the berries to postharvest withering under normal or artificially humid conditions, the latter to induce noble rot. The presence of noble rot symptoms was associated with the development of B. cinerea in the berries maintained under humid conditions. The composition of infected and non-infected berries was investigated by untargeted metabolomics using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. We also explored the effects of the two withering methods on the abundance of volatile organic compounds in wine by yeast-inoculated micro-fermentation followed by targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. These experiments revealed significant metabolic differences between berries withered under normal and humid conditions, indicating that noble rot affects berry metabolism and composition. As well as well-known botrytization markers, we detected two novel lipids that have not been observed before in berries infected with noble rot. Unraveling the specific metabolic profile of berries infected with noble rot may help to determine the compounds responsible for the organoleptic quality traits of botrytized Garganega wines.

  10. bcpmr1 encodes a P-type Ca(2+)/Mn(2+)-ATPase mediating cell-wall integrity and virulence in the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Verónica; Lagües, Yanssuy; Carvajal, Mauro; Pérez-García, Luis A; Mora-Montes, Hector M; Canessa, Paulo; Larrondo, Luis F; Castillo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The cell wall of fungi is generally composed of an inner skeletal layer consisting of various polysaccharides surrounded by a layer of glycoproteins. These usually contain both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, coupled to the proteins by stepwise addition of mannose residues by mannosyltransferases in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In yeast, an essential luminal cofactor for these mannosyltransferases is Mn(2+) provided by the Ca(2+)/Mn(2+)-ATPase known as Pmr1. In this study, we have identified and characterized the Botrytis cinerea pmr1 gene, the closest homolog of yeast PMR1. We hypothesized that bcpmr1 also encodes a Ca(2+)/Mn(2+)-ATPase that plays an important role in the protein glycosylation pathway. Phenotypic analysis showed that bcpmr1 null mutants displayed a significant reduction in conidial production, radial growth and diameter of sclerotia. Significant alterations in hyphal cell wall composition were observed including a 83% decrease of mannan levels and an increase in the amount of chitin and glucan. These changes were accompanied by a hypersensitivity to cell wall-perturbing agents such as Calcofluor white, Congo red and zymolyase. Importantly, the Δbcpmr1 mutant showed reduced virulence in tomato (leafs and fruits) and apple (fruits) and reduced biofilm formation. Together, our results highlight the importance of bcpmr1 for protein glycosylation, cell wall structure and virulence of B. cinerea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of crop development on the emission of volatiles in leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum and its inhibitory activity to Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng-Ying; Chen, Kao-Shan; He, Pei-Qing; Liu, Sheng-Hao; Jiang, Wan-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Volatiles emitted from the leaves of Lycopersicon esculentum at the two-, ten-leaf and anthesis periods were collected by a gas absorbing method and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC)-mass spectrometry. In total, 33 compounds of volatiles emitted from three developmental stage plants were separated and identified, and quantitatively analyzed by the internal standard addition method. All of the samples of volatile were found to be rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. beta-phellandrene and caryophyllene predominated in the volatiles of the leaves of plants at the two- and ten-leaf stages. Furthermore, (E)-2-hexenal were the dominant components in the volatiles emitted from anthesis plants. The results of volatiles analyzed show that the compositions varied depending on the developmental stages. The volatiles emitted from crushed tomato leaves of plants at the anthesis stage had the most strongly inhibitory activity against the spore germination and hyphal growth of Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum, followed by ten- and two-leaf plants. However, the activity of volatiles, emitted from the leaves of plants at the two-leaf stage, in inhibiting F. oxysporum was greater than B. cinerea.

  12. Involvement of salicylic acid, glutathione and protein S-thiolation in plant cell death-mediated defence response of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Kaźmierczak, Andrzej; Wielanek, Marzena; Głowacki, Rafał; Kornas, Andrzej

    2013-02-01

    The response of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum plants performing C3 photosynthesis and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to the non-host necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea was analyzed at the local and systemic levels. The induction of programmed cell death, lignin and callose deposition, changes in salicylic acid, glutathione and cysteinylglycine pools as well as the content of thiolated proteins were studied. The infected C3 and CAM plants exhibited hypersensitive-like defence response, however fluorescence staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide revealed programmed cell death events in C3 plants only. The local immune response was not related to callose and lignin deposition. In the infected plants, salicylic acid, glutathione and cysteinylglycine, the first product of glutathione catabolism, as well as protein S-thiolation, predominantly S-glutathionylation, contributed to local defence at sites of inoculation. They (except protein thiolation) were also active in the establishment of systemic acclimation response monitored in the non-treated upper leaves. The extent to which they were involved in the local and systemic responses induced by B. cinerea differed in C3 and CAM plants. The accumulation of free salicylic acid, both in treated and upper leaves of the infected plants, was much more pronounced in CAM plants. The results have been discussed with respect to redox regulations in defence against necrotrophic pathogens and to stress acclimation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)-Botrytis cinerea (Helotiales: Sclerotiniaceae)-Vitis vinifera (Vitales: Vitaceae) Interaction: The Role of B. cinerea on the Development of E. postvittana in Synthetic Nutritional Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, S Z M; Raman, A

    2015-08-01

    Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (light-brown apple moth) is a polyphagous herbivore of economic significance, which also feeds on Vitis vinifera L. The E. postvittana-V. vinifera interacting system also involves the participation of the fungus Botrytis cinerea Persoon ex Fries. We have been exploring the relationship among E. postvittana-V. vinifera-B. cinerea over the past two years. In this article, we report the preference and performance of the larvae of E. postvittana raised solely on a synthetic diet incorporated with the mycelial material of B. cinerea (Diet B). To characterize the effect of fungus on the development of E. postvittana, another synthetic diet was prepared that included the lyophilized leaf material of V. vinifera (Diet C). When raised on Diets B and C, a decrease in the duration of larval development and an increase in the survival and fecundity rate of E. postvittana occurred. Diet B influenced the pupal mass, but a significant increase occurred when the larvae were fed on Diet C. The larval emergence rate was the greatest in E. postvittana raised on Diet B, followed by those on Diet C. The F(2) generation of the larvae reared on Diet B showed similar effects as F(1) on the life-history performance of the larvae. Diet B enhanced the life-history performance of E. postvittana, although the larvae of E. postvittana showed little preference to Diet B. The greater fertility rate of E. postvittana reared on Diet B suggests the importance of sterols as shown in Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and in a few Myrmicinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), which serve as precursors to different ecdysteroids that regulate many critical processes through embryonic development. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Targeting the AtCWIN1 Gene to Explore the Role of Invertases in Sucrose Transport in Roots and during Botrytis cinerea Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veillet, Florian; Gaillard, Cécile; Coutos-Thévenot, Pierre; La Camera, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall invertases (CWIN) cleave sucrose into glucose and fructose in the apoplast. CWINs are key regulators of carbon partitioning and source/sink relationships during growth, development and under biotic stresses. In this report, we monitored the expression/activity of Arabidopsis cell wall invertases in organs behaving as source, sink, or subjected to a source/sink transition after infection with the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. We showed that organs with different source/sink status displayed differential CWIN activities, depending on carbohydrate needs or availabilities in the surrounding environment, through a transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. Loss-of-function mutation of the Arabidopsis cell wall invertase 1 gene, AtCWIN1, showed that the corresponding protein was the main contributor to the apoplastic sucrose cleaving activity in both leaves and roots. The CWIN-deficient mutant cwin1-1 exhibited a reduced capacity to actively take up external sucrose in roots, indicating that this process is mainly dependent on the sucrolytic activity of AtCWIN1. Using T-DNA and CRISPR/Cas9 mutants impaired in hexose transport, we demonstrated that external sucrose is actively absorbed in the form of hexoses by a sugar/H(+) symport system involving the coordinated activity of AtCWIN1 with several Sugar Transporter Proteins (STP) of the plasma membrane, i.e., STP1 and STP13. Part of external sucrose was imported without apoplastic cleavage into cwin1-1 seedling roots, highlighting an alternative AtCWIN1-independent pathway for the assimilation of external sucrose. Accordingly, we showed that several genes encoding sucrose transporters of the plasma membrane were expressed. We also detected transcript accumulation of vacuolar invertase (VIN)-encoding genes and high VIN activities. Upon infection, AtCWIN1 was responsible for all the Botrytis-induced apoplastic invertase activity. We detected a transcriptional activation of several AtSUC and At

  15. Induced Systemic Resistance against Botrytis cinerea by Bacillus cereus AR156 through a JA/ET- and NPR1-Dependent Signaling Pathway and Activates PAMP-Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Pingping; Li, Xia; Wang, Shune; Guo, Jianhua; Zhao, Hongwei; Niu, Dongdong

    2017-01-01

    Induced resistance response is a potent and cost effective plant defense against pathogen attack. The effectiveness and underlying mechanisms of the suppressive ability by Bacillus cereus AR156 to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000) in Arabidopsis has been investigated previously; however, the strength of induced systemic resistance (ISR) activity against Botrytis cinerea remains unknown. Here, we show that root-drench application of AR156 significantly reduces disease inciden...

  16. A polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from grapevine reduces the symptoms of the endopolygalacturonase BcPG2 from Botrytis cinerea in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves without any evidence for in vitro interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joubert, D.A.; Kars, I.; Wagemakers, L.; Bergmann, C.; Kemp, G.; Vivier, M.A.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Six endopolygalacturonases from Botrytis cinerea (BcPG1 to BcPG6) as well as mutated forms of BcPG1 and BcPG2 were expressed transiently in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana using agroinfiltration. Expression of BcPG1, BcPG2, BcPG4, BcPG5, and mutant BcPG1-D203A caused symptoms, whereas BcPG3, BcPG6,

  17. Combinations of pulsed white light and UV-C or mild heat treatment to inactivate conidia of Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquenie, D; Geeraerd, A H; Lammertyn, J; Soontjens, C; Van Impe, J F; Michiels, C W; Nicolaï, B M

    2003-08-15

    The use of pulses of intense white light to inactivate conidia of the fungi Botrytis cinerea and Monilia fructigena, responsible for important economical losses during postharvest storage and transport of strawberries and sweet cherries, was investigated in this study. In the first stage, a light treatment applying pulses of 30 micros at a frequency of 15 Hz was investigated, resulting in a treatment duration varying from 1 to 250 s. The conidia of both fungi showed similar behaviour to pulsed light, with a maximal inactivation of 3 and 4 log units for B. cinerea and M. fructigena, respectively. The inactivation of the conidia increased with increasing treatment intensity, but no complete inactivation was achieved. The sigmoidal inactivation pattern obtained by the pulsed light treatment was described using a modification of the model of Geeraerd et al. [Int. J. Food Microbiol. 59 (2000) 185]. Hereto, the shoulder length was incorporated explicitly and relative values for the microbial populations were used. In the second stage, combinations of light pulses and ultraviolet-C or heat were applied. The UV light used in the experiments is the short-wave band or UV-C, running from 180 to 280 nm with a peak at 254 nm (UV-B runs from 280 to 320 nm and UV-A from 320 to 380 nm). The UV-C doses were 0.025, 0.05 and 0.10 J/cm(2), and the temperatures for the thermal treatment ranged from 35 to 45 degrees C during 3-15 min. When combining UV-C and light pulses, there was an increase in inactivation for both B. cinerea and M. fructigena, and synergism was observed. There was no effect of the order of the treatments. For the heat-light pulses combination, there was a difference between both fungi. The order of the treatments was highly significant for B. cinerea, but not for M. fructigena. Combining heat and light treatments improved the inactivation, and synergism between both methods was again observed. Complete inactivation of M. fructigena conidia was obtained after, e

  18. Are bacterial volatile compounds poisonous odors to a fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, alarm signals to Arabidopsis seedlings for eliciting induced resistance, or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong-Min eRyu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological control (biocontrol agents act on plants via numerous mechanisms, and can be used to protect plants from pathogens. Biocontrol agents can act directly as pathogen antagonists or competitors or indirectly to promote plant induced systemic resistance (ISR. Whether a biocontrol agent acts directly or indirectly depends on the specific strain and the pathosystem type. We reported previously that bacterial volatile organic compounds (VOCs are determinants for eliciting plant ISR. Emerging data suggest that bacterial VOCs also can directly inhibit fungal and plant growth. The aim of the current study was to differentiate direct and indirect mechanisms of bacterial VOC effects against Botrytis cinerea infection of Arabidopsis. Volatile emissions from Bacillus subtilis GB03 successfully protected Arabidopsis seedlings against B. cinerea. First, we investigated the direct effects of bacterial VOCs on symptom development and different phenological stages of B. cinerea including spore germination, mycelial attachment to the leaf surface, mycelial growth, and sporulation in vitro and in planta. Volatile emissions inhibited hyphal growth in a dose-dependent manner in vitro, and interfered with fungal attachment on the hydrophobic leaf surface. Second, the optimized bacterial concentration that did not directly inhibit fungal growth successfully protected Arabidopsis from fungal infection, which indicates that bacterial VOC-elicited plant ISR has a more important role in biocontrol than direct inhibition of fungal growth on Arabidopsis. We performed qRT-PCR to investigate the priming of the defense-related genes PR1, PDF1.2, and ChiB at 0, 12, 24, and 36 hours post-infection and 14 days after the start of plant exposure to bacterial VOCs. The results indicate that bacterial VOCs potentiate expression of PR1 and PDF1.2 but not ChiB, which stimulates SA- and JA-dependent signaling pathways in plant ISR and protects plants against pathogen

  19. Targeting the AtCWIN1 gene to explore the role of invertases in sucrose transport in roots and during Botrytis cinerea infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Veillet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall invertases (CWIN cleave sucrose into glucose and fructose in the apoplast. CWINs are key regulators of carbon partitioning and source/sink relationships during growth, development and under biotic stresses. In this report, we monitored the expression/activity of Arabidopsis cell wall invertases in organs behaving as source, sink or subjected to a source/sink transition after infection with the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. We showed that organs with different source/sink status displayed differential CWIN activities, depending on carbohydrate needs or availabilities in the surrounding environment, through a transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. Loss-of-function mutation of the Arabidopsis cell wall invertase 1 gene, AtCWIN1, showed that the corresponding protein was the main contributor to the apoplastic sucrose cleaving activity in both leaves and roots. The CWIN-deficient mutant cwin1-1 exhibited a reduced capacity to actively take up external sucrose in roots, indicating that this process is mainly dependent on the sucrolytic activity of AtCWIN1. Using T-DNA and CRISPR/Cas9 mutants impaired in hexose transport, we demonstrated that external sucrose is actively absorbed in the form of hexoses by a sugar/H+ symport system involving the coordinated activity of AtCWIN1 with several Sugar Transporter Proteins (STP of the plasma membrane, i.e. STP1 and STP13. Part of external sucrose was imported without apoplastic cleavage into cwin1-1 seedling roots, highlighting an alternative AtCWIN1-independent pathway for the assimilation of external sucrose. Accordingly, we showed that several genes encoding sucrose transporters of the plasma membrane were expressed. We also detected transcript accumulation of vacuolar invertase (VIN-encoding genes and high VIN activities. Upon infection, AtCWIN1 was responsible for all the Botrytis-induced apoplastic invertase activity. We detected a transcriptional activation of several At

  20. Absence of Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase BCSOD1 reduces Botrytis cinerea virulence in Arabidopsis and tomato plants, revealing interplay among reactive oxygen species, callose and signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Jaime; Óscar, Crespo-Salvador; Emma, Fernández-Crespo; Pilar, García-Agustín; Carmen, González-Bosch

    2017-01-01

    Plants activate responses against pathogens, including the oxidative burst. Necrotrophic pathogens can produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that benefit the colonization process. Previously, we have demonstrated that tomato plants challenged with Botrytis cinerea accumulate ROS and callose, together with the induction of genes involved in defence, signalling and oxidative metabolism. Here, we studied the infection phenotype of the Δbcsod1 strain in both tomato and Arabidopsis plants. This mutant lacks bcsod1, which encodes Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). This enzyme catalyses the conversion of superoxide ion ( O2-) into hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ). ROS play a protective role and act as signals in plants. Δbcsod1 displayed reduced virulence compared with wild-type B05.10 in both species. Plants infected with Δbcsod1 accumulated less H2 O2 and more O2- than those infected with B05.10, which is associated with an increase in the defensive polymer callose. This supports a major role of fungal SOD in H2 O2 production during the plant-pathogen interaction. The early induction of the callose synthase gene PMR4 suggested that changes in ROS altered plant defensive responses at the transcriptional level. The metabolites and genes involved in signalling and in response to oxidative stress were differentially expressed on Δbcsod1 infection, supporting the notion that plants perceive changes in ROS balance and activate defence responses. A higher O2- /H2 O2 ratio seems to be beneficial for plant protection against this necrotroph. Our results highlight the relevance of callose and the oxylipin 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) in the response to changes in the oxidative environment, and clarify the mechanisms that underlie the responses to Botrytis in Arabidopsis and tomato plants. © 2016 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Enhanced Botrytis cinerea Resistance of Arabidopsis Plants Grown in Compost May Be Explained by Increased Expression of Defense-Related Genes, as Revealed by Microarray Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segarra, Guillem; Santpere, Gabriel; Elena, Georgina; Trillas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Composts are the products obtained after the aerobic degradation of different types of organic matter waste and can be used as substrates or substrate/soil amendments for plant cultivation. There is a small but increasing number of reports that suggest that foliar diseases may be reduced when using compost, rather than standard substrates, as growing medium. The purpose of this study was to examine the gene expression alteration produced by the compost to gain knowledge of the mechanisms involved in compost-induced systemic resistance. A compost from olive marc and olive tree leaves was able to induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis, unlike the standard substrate, perlite. Microarray analyses revealed that 178 genes were differently expressed, with a fold change cut-off of 1, of which 155 were up-regulated and 23 were down-regulated in compost-grown, as against perlite-grown plants. A functional enrichment study of up-regulated genes revealed that 38 Gene Ontology terms were significantly enriched. Response to stress, biotic stimulus, other organism, bacterium, fungus, chemical and abiotic stimulus, SA and ABA stimulus, oxidative stress, water, temperature and cold were significantly enriched, as were immune and defense responses, systemic acquired resistance, secondary metabolic process and oxireductase activity. Interestingly, PR1 expression, which was equally enhanced by growing the plants in compost and by B. cinerea inoculation, was further boosted in compost-grown pathogen-inoculated plants. Compost triggered a plant response that shares similarities with both systemic acquired resistance and ABA-dependent/independent abiotic stress responses. PMID:23405252

  2. Osmotic dehydration of apple slices using a sucrose/CaCl2 combination to control spoilage caused by Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum acutatum, and Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, C O; Sams, C E; Conway, W S; Mount, J R; Draughon, F A

    2001-09-01

    The efficacy of sucrose combined with CaCl2 during osmotic dehydration (OD) was tested for the control of Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum acutatum, and Penicillium expansum growth on lightly processed apple slices. The objective of this work was to determine whether the addition of CaCl2 in the osmotic solutions would limit the proliferation of fungal decay organisms. Slices were submitted to OD for 1 h at 25 degrees C in solutions containing 5 to 65% sucrose. Calcium chloride was added to a similar set of sucrose solutions at 0 to 8%. Control slices were made of untreated slices, and slices were processed in water. The mass ratio of the slices did not vary when fruit pieces were processed in solutions containing 5 to 65% sucrose. These slices showed a high susceptibility to spoilage compared to the control slices not submitted to OD: a significant twofold and 60% increase in decay area caused by B. cinerea and P. expansum, respectively, was observed when slices were processed in 50% sucrose/0% CaCl2; C. acutatum showed a significant 50% increase in decay area when slices were processed in 20% sucrose/0% CaCl2. Calcium uptake was significantly increased when slices were processed in CaCl2 solutions, and the highest Ca content was observed when processed in 8% CaCl2, reaching 40 times that of the control slices processed in water. Calcium-treated slices were less susceptible to spoilage by all three pathogens, and the most effective combination in reducing apple slice spoilage was 20 to 30% sucrose combined with 2% CaCl2.

  3. Digital Gene Expression Analysis to Screen Disease Resistance-Relevant Genes from Leaves of Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. Infected by Botrytis cinerea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saijie Gong

    Full Text Available Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall. is a well-known traditional flower in China and is widely used for landscaping and garden greening due to its high ornamental value. However, disease spots usually appear after the flowering of the plant and may result in the withering of the plant in severe cases. This study examined the disease incidence in an herbaceous peony field in the Yangzhou region, Jiangsu Province. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, the disease in this area was identified as a gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Based on previously obtained transcriptome data, eight libraries generated from two herbaceous peony cultivars 'Zifengyu' and 'Dafugui' with different susceptibilities to the disease were then analyzed using digital gene expression profiling (DGE. Thousands of differentially expressed genes (DEGs were screened by comparing the eight samples, and these genes were annotated using the Gene ontology (GO and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG database. The pathways related to plant-pathogen interaction, secondary metabolism synthesis and antioxidant system were concentrated, and 51, 76, and 13 disease resistance-relevant candidate genes were identified, respectively. The expression patterns of these candidate genes differed between the two cultivars: their expression of the disease-resistant cultivar 'Zifengyu' sharply increased during the early stages of infection, while it was relatively subdued in the disease-sensitive cultivar 'Dafugui'. A selection of ten candidate genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR to validate the DGE data. These results revealed the transcriptional changes that took place during the interaction of herbaceous peony with B. cinerea, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of host resistance to gray mold.

  4. The Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent signaling pathway in the gray mold Botrytis cinerea: the role of calcipressin in modulating calcineurin activity.

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    Karin Harren

    Full Text Available In the gray mold fungus Botrytis cinerea the Gα subunit Bcg1 of a heterotrimeric G protein is an upstream activator of the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In this study we focused on the functional characterization of the catalytic subunit of calcineurin (BcCnA and its putative regulator calcipressin (BcRcn1. We deleted the genes encoding both proteins to examine their role concerning growth, differentiation and virulence. The ΔbccnA mutant shows a severe growth defect, does not produce conidia and is avirulent, while the loss of BcRcn1 caused retardation of hyphal growth and delayed infection of host plants, but had no impact on conidiation and sclerotia formation. Expression of several calcineurin-dependent genes and bccnA itself is positively affected by BcRcn1. Complementation of the Δbcrcn1 mutant with a GFP-BcRcn1 fusion construct revealed that BcRcn1 is localized in the cytoplasm and accumulates around the nuclei. Furthermore, we showed that BcCnA physically interacts with BcRcn1 and the regulatory subunit of calcineurin, BcCnB. We investigated the impact of several protein domains characteristic for modulation and activation of BcCnA via BcRcn1, such as the phosphorylation sites and the calcineurin-docking site, by physical interaction studies between BcCnA and wild-type and mutated copies of BcRcn1. Based on the observed phenotypes we conclude that BcRcn1 acts as a positive modulator of BcCnA and the Ca(2+/calcineurin-mediated signal transduction in B. cinerea, and that both proteins regulate fungal development and virulence.

  5. The Protein Disulfide Isomerase of Botrytis cinerea: An ER Protein Involved in Protein Folding and Redox Homeostasis Influences NADPH Oxidase Signaling Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Marschall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis cinerea is a filamentous plant pathogen, which infects hundreds of plant species; within its lifestyle, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and a balanced redox homeostasis are essential parameters. The pathogen is capable of coping with the plant’s oxidative burst and even produces its own ROS to enhance the plant’s oxidative burst. Highly conserved NADPH oxidase (Nox complexes produce the reactive molecules. The membrane-associated complexes regulate a large variety of vegetative and pathogenic processes. Besides their commonly accepted function at the plasma membrane, recent studies reveal that Nox complexes are also active at the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum. In this study, we identified the essential ER protein BcPdi1 as new interaction partner of the NoxA complex in B. cinerea. Mutants that lack this ER chaperone display overlapping phenotypes to mutants of the NoxA signaling pathway. The protein appears to be involved in all major developmental processes, such as the formation of sclerotia, conidial anastomosis tubes and infection cushions (IC’s and is needed for full virulence. Moreover, expression analyses and reporter gene studies indicate that BcPdi1 affects the redox homeostasis and unfolded protein response (UPR-related genes. Besides the close association between BcPdi1 and BcNoxA, interaction studies provide evidence that the ER protein might likewise be involved in Ca2+ regulated processes. Finally, we were able to show that the potential key functions of the protein BcPdi1 might be affected by its phosphorylation state.

  6. Enhanced Botrytis cinerea resistance of Arabidopsis plants grown in compost may be explained by increased expression of defense-related genes, as revealed by microarray analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillem Segarra

    Full Text Available Composts are the products obtained after the aerobic degradation of different types of organic matter waste and can be used as substrates or substrate/soil amendments for plant cultivation. There is a small but increasing number of reports that suggest that foliar diseases may be reduced when using compost, rather than standard substrates, as growing medium. The purpose of this study was to examine the gene expression alteration produced by the compost to gain knowledge of the mechanisms involved in compost-induced systemic resistance. A compost from olive marc and olive tree leaves was able to induce resistance against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis, unlike the standard substrate, perlite. Microarray analyses revealed that 178 genes were differently expressed, with a fold change cut-off of 1, of which 155 were up-regulated and 23 were down-regulated in compost-grown, as against perlite-grown plants. A functional enrichment study of up-regulated genes revealed that 38 Gene Ontology terms were significantly enriched. Response to stress, biotic stimulus, other organism, bacterium, fungus, chemical and abiotic stimulus, SA and ABA stimulus, oxidative stress, water, temperature and cold were significantly enriched, as were immune and defense responses, systemic acquired resistance, secondary metabolic process and oxireductase activity. Interestingly, PR1 expression, which was equally enhanced by growing the plants in compost and by B. cinerea inoculation, was further boosted in compost-grown pathogen-inoculated plants. Compost triggered a plant response that shares similarities with both systemic acquired resistance and ABA-dependent/independent abiotic stress responses.

  7. EFFECT OF BOTRYCIDES AND ATTACK INTENSITY OF BOTRYTIS CINEREA Pers. ex Fr. ON GRAŠEVINA AND TRAMINAC cv. IN KUTJEVO VINEYARD

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    Brankica Svitlica

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available During 2001/2002 experiments made in the vineyards of Kutjevo, the examinations were conducted on the intensity of infection with Botrytis cinerea Pers., the efficiency of the applied botryticides, the achieved grape production and the impact of meteorological factors on the development and intensity of the disease. Among the examined sorts of Graševina and Traminac, the intensity of infection with Botrytis in both years and on all localities was the highest on the control fields, which therefore indicate justified and appropriate use of fungicides. The examined efficiency of fungicides applied throughout all four phenophases of the vine development indicates the differences in their efficiency according to sorts and localities as well as the length of examination. With the sort Traminac the best efficiency was achieved with the Switch 62,5 WG, somewhat weaker efficiency with the Mythos SC, and in the last place is the Kidan SC. As for the sort Graševina, the best efficiency was achieved with the Teldor SC, insignificantly weaker efficiency with the Switch 62,5 WG, and last place is the combination of Folicur EW 50 + Euparen 50 WP. The production of grape achieved in the years of examination on certain localities did not show the expected results, since the unfavourable climatic conditions (too much humidity in both years caused the extraordinary attack of the grey mould of grapes. The lowest production was achieved on the control fields with Traminac as well as with Graševina, whereas a better production was achieved with the sorts treated with fungicides, according to their efficiency. There is a significant impact of climatic factors (precipitation and temperatures on the intensity of infection, the efficiency of fungicides and achieved production of grape. Both years of the examination in the months of grape ripening abounded in great amounts of rain. In 2001 the six-month average (V-X month of the total quantity of rain was 504,4 mm, and

  8. Comparison of defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Patykowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Defence reactions: O2 - generation, superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase activities after B. cinerea infection in tomato plants propagated in vitro and grown in vivo have been compared. Infection resulted in rapid O2 - generation. Superoxide dismutase activity increase was slower than O2 - response. In plants propagated in vitro catalase and guaiacol peroxidase activities after infection were induced less strongly than in plants grown in vivo. K2HPO4 pretreatment of plants grown in vitro enhanced significantly the activities of catalase and guaiacol peroxidase after infection. Slight restriction of B. cinerea infection development in in vitro propagated plants pretreated with K2HP04 was observed.

  9. ERF5 and ERF6 play redundant roles as positive regulators of JA/Et-mediated defense against Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis.

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    Caroline S Moffat

    Full Text Available The ethylene response factor (ERF family in Arabidopsis thaliana comprises 122 members in 12 groups, yet the biological functions of the majority remain unknown. Of the group IX ERFs, the IXc subgroup has been studied the most, and includes ERF1, ERF14 and ORA59, which play roles in plant innate immunity. Here we investigate the biological functions of two members of the less studied IXb subgroup: ERF5 and ERF6. In order to identify potential targets of these transcription factors, microarray analyses were performed on plants constitutively expressing either ERF5 or ERF6. Expression of defense genes, JA/Et-responsive genes and genes containing the GCC box promoter motif were significantly upregulated in both ERF5 and ERF6 transgenic plants, suggesting that ERF5 and ERF6 may act as positive regulators of JA-mediated defense and potentially overlap in their function. Since defense against necrotrophic pathogens is generally mediated through JA/Et-signalling, resistance against the fungal necrotroph Botrytis cinerea was examined. Constitutive expression of ERF5 or ERF6 resulted in significantly increased resistance. Although no significant difference in susceptibility to B. cinerea was observed in either erf5 or erf6 mutants, the erf5 erf6 double mutant showed a significant increase in susceptibility, which was likely due to compromised JA-mediated gene expression, since JA-induced gene expression was reduced in the double mutant. Taken together these data suggest that ERF5 and ERF6 play positive but redundant roles in defense against B. cinerea. Since mutual antagonism between JA/Et and salicylic acid (SA signalling is well known, the UV-C inducibility of an SA-inducible gene, PR-1, was examined. Reduced inducibilty in both ERF5 and ERF6 constitutive overexepressors was consistent with suppression of SA-mediated signalling, as was an increased susceptibility to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae. These data suggest that ERF5 and ERF6 may also play a

  10. The Botrytis cinerea PAK kinase BcCla4 mediates morphogenesis, growth and cell cycle regulating processes downstream of BcRac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minz-Dub, Anna; Sharon, Amir

    2017-05-01

    Rac proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes. Effector proteins that interact with active Rac convey the GTPase-generated signal to downstream developmental cascades and processes. Here we report on the analysis of the main effector and signal cascade downstream of BcRac, the Rac homolog of the grey mold fungus Botrytis cinerea. Several lines of evidence highlighted the p21-activated kinase Cla4 as an important effector of Rac in fungi. Analysis of Δbccla4 strains revealed that the BcCla4 protein was sufficient to mediate all of the examined BcRac-driven processes, including hyphal growth and morphogenesis, conidia production and pathogenicity. In addition, the Δbccla4 strains had altered nuclei content, a phenomenon that was previously observed in Δbcrac isolates, thus connecting the BcRac/BcCla4 module with cell cycle control. Further analyses revealed that BcRac/BcCla4 control mitotic entry through changes in phosphorylation status of the cyclin dependent kinase BcCdk1. The complete cascade includes the kinase BcWee1, which is downstream of BcCla4 and upstream of BcCdk1. These results provide a mechanistic insight on the connection of cell cycle, morphogenesis and pathogenicity in fungi, and position BcCla4 as the most essential effector and central regulator of all of these processes downstream of BcRac. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Identification of Botrytis cinerea genes up-regulated during infection and controlled by the Galpha subunit BCG1 using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Gronover, Christian; Schorn, Corinna; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2004-05-01

    The Galpha subunit BCG1 plays an important role during the infection of host plants by Botrytis cinerea. Delta bcg1 mutants are able to conidiate, penetrate host leaves, and produce small primary lesions. However, in contrast to the wild type, the mutants completely stop invasion of plant tissue at this stage; secondary lesions have never been observed. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify fungal genes whose expression on the host plant is specifically affected in bcg1 mutants. Among the 22 differentially expressed genes, we found those which were predicted to encode proteases, enzymes involved in secondary metabolism, and others encoding cell wall-degrading enzymes. All these genes are highly expressed during infection in the wild type but not in the mutant. However, the genes are expressed in both the wild type and the mutant under certain conditions in vitro. Most of the BCG1-controlled genes are still expressed in adenylate cyclase (bac) mutants in planta, suggesting that BCG1 is involved in at least one additional signaling cascade in addition to the cAMP-depending pathway. In a second SSH approach, 1,500 clones were screened for those that are specifically induced by the wild type during the infection of bean leaves. Of the 22 BCG1-controlled genes, 11 also were found in the in planta SSH library. Therefore, SSH technology can be successfully applied to identify target genes of signaling pathways and differentially expressed genes in planta.

  12. Avaliação de quitosana, aplicada em pós-colheita, na proteção de uva 'Itália' contra Botrytis cinerea Evaluation of chitosan on postharvest protection of ‘Itália’ grapes against Botrytis cinerea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Clarete Camili

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Perdas significativas ocorrem durante o armazenamento e a comercialização de uvas de mesa devido, principalmente, à ocorrência do mofo cinzento (Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr. e, para o controle de patógenos emprega-se, geralmente, o dióxido de enxofre (SO2. Diante da restrição crescente ao uso de produtos químicos em pós-colheita, tem ocorrido considerável interesse em métodos alternativos de controle. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo avaliar os efeitos da quitosana, na proteção pós-colheita de uva 'Itália' contra B. cinerea. In vivo, avaliou-se o efeito direto e indireto da quitosana pelo tratamento dos cachos de uva, antes e após a inoculação com o patógeno. Utilizou-se quitosana nas concentrações de 0,00; 0,25; 0,50; 1,00; 1,50 e 2,00 % (v/v. Para inoculação, em 10 bagas de cada cacho de uva foram feitos ferimentos de ±2 mm de profundidade, procedendo-se em seguida, a aspersão da suspensão de conídios (±10(5 conídios.mL-1 de B. cinerea. Após os tratamentos, os cachos foram mantidos a 25±1 °C / 80-90 % UR e avaliados diariamente quanto à incidência e severidade da podridão. Avaliações in vitro do efeito do produto sobre o patógeno também foram realizadas analisando-se o crescimento micelial e a germinação dos conídios de B. cinerea. A solução de quitosana, nas concentrações de 1,5 e 2,0 % (v/v, quando empregada após a inoculação com B cinerea, reduziu significativamente o índice de doença no entanto, quando os cachos foram tratados antes da inoculação, não houve efeito significativo do tratamento sobre o desenvolvimento da doença. Nos ensaios in vitro, a solução de quitosana, nas maiores concentrações, suprimiu o crescimento micelial do patógeno e retardou a germinação dos conídios.Significant losses of table grapes are seem during storage and marketing due mainly to the occurrence of gray mold (Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr., whick has been frequently controlled by using

  13. Osmotic dehydration of apple slices with CaCl2 and sucrose limits decay caused by Penicillium expansum, Colletotrichum acutatum, and Botrytis cinerea and does not promote Listeria monocytogenes or total aerobic population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardonnet, Catherine O; Sams, Carl E; Conway, William S; Draughon, Frances A; Mount, John R

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of Penicillium expansum Link, Colletotrichum acutatum, and Botrytis cinerea Pers.:Fr. with Listeria monocytogenes on osmotically dehydrated apple slices was evaluated. In mineral analyses of the slices, the calcium content of the peel and flesh tissues increased by 4- and 11-fold, respectively, when processed in 2% CaCl2. These slices also exhibited less decay by P. expansum, C. acutatum, and B. cinerea. Inoculation of slices with P. expansum resulted in a decrease in the pH of the flesh tissue at the infection site, while the pHs of slices infected with C. acutatum and B. cinerea increased and remained stable, respectively. Total mold population increased in wounds inoculated with P. expansum or C. acutatum. The presence of L. monocytogenes in the wounds did not significantly affect mold growth. The association of P. expansum and L. monocytogenes on apple slices resulted in a decrease in the bacterial population, whereas L. monocytogenes survived when slices were inoculated with C. acutatum. When associated with B. cinerea, there was a fourfold decrease in the L. monocytogenes population when slices were treated with 2% CaCl2. The total aerobic population was not significantly affected by the type of microorganism added to the wounds or by the osmotic treatment. These data show that osmotic dehydration with 2% CaCl2 combined with 20% sucrose limits decay of apple slices and does not promote bacterial or total aerobic population growth.

  14. The botrydial biosynthetic gene cluster of Botrytis cinerea displays a bipartite genomic structure and is positively regulated by the putative Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factor BcBot6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porquier, Antoine; Morgant, Guillaume; Moraga, Javier; Dalmais, Bérengère; Luyten, Isabelle; Simon, Adeline; Pradier, Jean-Marc; Amselem, Joëlle; Collado, Isidro González; Viaud, Muriel

    2016-11-01

    Botrydial (BOT) is a non-host specific phytotoxin produced by the polyphagous phytopathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea. The genomic region of the BOT biosynthetic gene cluster was investigated and revealed two additional genes named Bcbot6 and Bcbot7. Analysis revealed that the G+C/A+T-equilibrated regions that contain the Bcbot genes alternate with A+T-rich regions made of relics of transposable elements that have undergone repeat-induced point mutations (RIP). Furthermore, BcBot6, a Zn(II)2Cys6 putative transcription factor was identified as a nuclear protein and the major positive regulator of BOT biosynthesis. In addition, the phenotype of the ΔBcbot6 mutant indicated that BcBot6 and therefore BOT are dispensable for the development, pathogenicity and response to abiotic stresses in the B. cinerea strain B05.10. Finally, our data revealed that B. pseudocinerea, that is also polyphagous and lives in sympatry with B. cinerea, lacks the ability to produce BOT. Identification of BcBot6 as the major regulator of BOT synthesis is the first step towards a comprehensive understanding of the complete regulation network of BOT synthesis and of its ecological role in the B. cinerea life cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Expression of the grape VqSTS21 gene in Arabidopsis confers resistance to osmotic stress and biotrophic pathogens but not Botrytis cinerea

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    Li Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stilbene synthase (STS is a key gene in the biosynthesis of various stilbenoids, including resveratrol and its derivative glucosides (such as piceid, that has been shown to contribute to disease resistance in plants. However, the mechanism behind such a role has yet to be elucidated. Furthermore, the function of STS genes in osmotic stress tolerance remains unclear. As such, we sought to elucidate the role of STS genes in the defense against biotic and abiotic stress in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression profiling of 31 VqSTS genes from Vitis quinquangularis revealed that VqSTS21 was up-regulated in response to powdery mildew (PM infection. To provide a deeper understanding of the function of this gene, we cloned the full-length coding sequence of VqSTS21 and overexpressed it in Arabidopsis thaliana via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The resulting VqSTS21 Arabidopsis lines produced trans-piceid rather than resveratrol as their main stilbenoid product and exhibited improved disease resistance to PM and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, but displayed increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis lines were found to confer tolerance to salt and drought stress from seed germination through plant maturity. Intriguingly, qPCR assays of defense-related genes involved in salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and abscisic acid-induced signaling pathways in these transgenic lines suggested that VqSTS21 plays a role in various phytohormone-related pathways, providing insight into the mechanism behind VqSTS21-mediated resistance to biotic and abiotic stress.

  16. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module from Solanum lycopersicum expansin 1 (Sl-EXP1) modifies tomato fruit firmness and Botrytis cinerea susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, M A; Sin, I N; Villarreal, N M; Marina, M; Powell, A L T; Martínez, G A; Civello, P M

    2017-04-01

    Firmness, one of the major determinants of postharvest quality and shelf life of fruits is determined by the mechanical resistance imposed by the plant cell wall. Expansins (EXP) are involved in the non-hydrolytic metabolic disassembly of plant cell walls, particularly in processes where relaxation of the wall is necessary, such as fruit development and ripening. As many carbohydrate-associated proteins, expansins have a putative catalytic domain and a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). Several strategies have been pursued to control the loss of fruit firmness during storage. Most of the approaches have been to suppress the expression of key enzymes involved in the cell wall metabolism, but this is the first time that a CBM was overexpressed in a fruit aimed to control cell wall degradation and fruit softening. We report the constitutive overexpression of the CBM of Solanum lycopersicum expansin 1 (CBM-SlExp1) in the cell wall of tomato plants, and its effects on plant and fruit phenotype. Overexpression of CBM-SlExp1 increased the mechanical resistance of leaves, whereas it did not modify plant growth and general phenotype. However, transgenic plants showed delayed softening and firmer fruits. In addition, fruits were less susceptible to Botrytis cinerea infection, and the "in vitro" growth of the fungus on media containing AIR from the pericarp of transgenic fruits was lower than controls. The possibility of overexpressing a CBM of a fruit-specific expansin to control cell wall degradation and fruit softening is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Chasing stress signals - Exposure to extracellular stimuli differentially affects the redox state of cell compartments in the wild type and signaling mutants of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Robert; Schumacher, Julia; Siegmund, Ulrike; Tudzynski, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important molecules influencing intracellular developmental processes as well as plant pathogen interactions. They are produced at the infection site and affect the intracellular redox homeostasis. However, knowledge of ROS signaling pathways, their connection to other signaling cascades, and tools for the visualization of intra- and extracellular ROS levels and their impact on the redox state are scarce. By using the genetically encoded biosensor roGFP2 we studied for the first time the differences between the redox states of the cytosol, the intermembrane space of mitochondria and the ER in the filamentous fungus Botrytis cinerea. We showed that the ratio of oxidized to reduced glutathione inside of the cellular compartments differ and that the addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), calcium chloride (CaCl2) and the fluorescent dye calcofluor white (CFW) have a direct impact on the cellular redox states. Dependent on the type of stress agents applied, the redox states were affected in the different cellular compartments in a temporally shifted manner. By integrating the biosensor in deletion mutants of bcnoxA, bcnoxB, bctrx1 and bcltf1 we further elucidated the putative roles of the different proteins in distinct stress-response pathways. We showed that the redox states of ΔbcnoxA and ΔbcnoxB display a wild-type pattern upon exposure to H2O2, but appear to be strongly affected by CaCl2 and CFW. Moreover, we demonstrated the involvement of the light-responsive transcription factor BcLtf1 in the maintenance of the redox state in the intermembrane space of the mitochondria. Finally, we report that CaCl2 as well as cell wall stress-inducing agents stimulate ROS production and that ΔbcnoxB produces significantly less ROS than the wild type and ΔbcnoxA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic alteration of UDP-rhamnose metabolism in Botrytis cinerea leads to the accumulation of UDP-KDG that adversely affects development and pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Salas, Omar; Bowler, Kyle; Oren-Young, Liat; Bar-Peled, Maor; Sharon, Amir

    2017-02-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a model plant-pathogenic fungus that causes grey mould and rot diseases in a wide range of agriculturally important crops. A previous study has identified two enzymes and corresponding genes (bcdh, bcer) that are involved in the biochemical transformation of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose, the major fungal wall nucleotide sugar precursor, to UDP-rhamnose. We report here that deletion of bcdh, the first biosynthetic gene in the metabolic pathway, or of bcer, the second gene in the pathway, abolishes the production of rhamnose-containing glycans in these mutant strains. Deletion of bcdh or double deletion of both bcdh and bcer has no apparent effect on fungal development or pathogenicity. Interestingly, deletion of the bcer gene alone adversely affects fungal development, giving rise to altered hyphal growth and morphology, as well as reduced sporulation, sclerotia production and virulence. Treatments with wall stressors suggest the alteration of cell wall integrity. Analysis of nucleotide sugars reveals the accumulation of the UDP-rhamnose pathway intermediate UDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-glucose (UDP-KDG) in hyphae of the Δbcer strain. UDP-KDG could not be detected in hyphae of the wild-type strain, indicating fast conversion to UDP-rhamnose by the BcEr enzyme. The correlation between high UDP-KDG and modified cell wall and developmental defects raises the possibility that high levels of UDP-KDG result in deleterious effects on cell wall composition, and hence on virulence. This is the first report demonstrating that the accumulation of a minor nucleotide sugar intermediate has such a profound and adverse effect on a fungus. The ability to identify molecules that inhibit Er (also known as NRS/ER) enzymes or mimic UDP-KDG may lead to the development of new antifungal drugs. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Eficiência de Trichoderma harzianum e Gliocladium viride na redução da incidência de Botrytis cinerea em tomateiro cultivado sob ambiente protegido Efficiency of Trichoderma harzianum and Gliocladium viride in decreasing the incidence of Botrytis cinerea in tomato cultivated in protected environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Brito Lisboa

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A produção de tomates no Estado do RS ocupa um importante papel sócio-econômico, que pode ser constatado pelo crescimento do cultivo dessa hortaliça em ambiente protegido. Essa técnica permite a produção de tomates em período de entressafra; no entanto, ocorrem também condições favoráveis para o desenvolvimento de doenças fúngicas como o mofo cinzento provocado por Botrytis cinerea. O surgimento de raças de patógenos resistentes a fungicidas químicos vem fazendo com que o controle biológico torne-se uma alternativa necessária. Neste trabalho foi realizada seleção in vitro de 24 isolados do fungo Trichoderma harzianum e 12 de Gliocladium viride que inibiram o desenvolvimento do patógeno B. cinerea. Foram selecionados dois isolados (TRIC-30 e GLIO-10 para serem testados em experimentos em condições de campo com tomates cultivados sob ambiente protegido, nos quais a pulverização foliar semanal com uma suspensão com 2x10(7 conídios mL-1 reduziu significativamente a incidência do mofo cinzento, enquanto a aplicação dos antagonistas nas sementes, no substrato e na cova, no momento do plantio, não reduziu a incidência do patógeno.The production of tomato in the State of Rio Grande do Sul performs an important economical and social role that can be evidenced by the increase in cultivation of this vegetable in protected environment. This practice allows the production of tomato during the off-season periods. However, it can also promote favorable conditions to the development of gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea, and the arising of pathogen races resistant to fungicides is turning biological control into a necessary alternative. In the present work, an in vitro selection among 24 isolates of the fungus Trichoderma harzianum and 12 of Gliocladium viride that inhibited the development of the pathogen B. cinerea was carried out. Two isolates (TRIC-30 e GLIO-10 were selected to be tested in an experiment in field

  20. Avaliação da atividade fungitóxica de óleos essenciais de folhas de Eucalyptus sobre Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea e Bipolaris sorokiniana Fungitoxic activity evaluation of essential leaf oils of Eucalyptus on Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea and Bipolaris sorokiniana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Soares P. Salgado

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A maioria das plantas são resistentes aos diferentes patógenos, e essa resistência pode estar relacionada à existência de compostos fungistáticos naturalmente produzidos. Com o presente trabalho, avaliou-se a atividade fungitóxica de óleos essenciais de eucaliptos. Os óleos foram obtidos de folhas dos eucaliptos mediante arraste a vapor de água, utilizando o aparelho de Clevenger modificado. Nos ensaios biológicos, foram empregados os fitopatógenos Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea e Bipolaris sorokiniana. O crescimento dos microorganismos na presença de diferentes concentrações de óleo (5, 50 e 500 mg/Kg, usando os meios de cultura BDA (Batata-Dextrose-Ágar e PCA (Batata-Cenoura-Ágar, foi avaliado. Nas concentrações de 500 mg/Kg dos óleos, foram observadas inibições significativas no crescimento micelial das espécies fúngicas, após período de 7 dias. No entanto, o óleo essencial de Eucalyptus urophylla foi o que apresentou maior ação fungitóxica, que foi atribuída à presença do composto denominado globulol, ausente no E.camaldulensis e no E. citriodora.Most plants are resistant to different pathogens and this resistance may be related to the existence of naturally produced fungistatic components. The present work evaluated the fungitoxic activity of essential oils from three eucalyptus species. The essential oils were obtained from eucalyptus leaves by steam distillation using a modified Clevenger apparatus. The phytopatogens Fusarium oxysporum, Botrytis cinerea and Bipolaris sorokiniana were employed in the biological tests. The growth of fungi in the presence of different concentrations of oil (5, 50, and 500 mg/kg, using BDA (Potato-Dextrose-agar and PCA (Potato-Carrot-agar culture media were evaluated. Significant inhibition of the micelial growth of the fungal species was observed at the concentration of 500 mg/kg of oil after a period of seven days. The essential oil of Eucalyptus urophylla showed the

  1. Hoe veroorzaakt Botrytis rot?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, I.

    2010-01-01

    Als een spore is geland op het plantoppervlak, scheidt Botrytis cinerea enzymen en metabolieten uit waaronder pectine-afbrekende enzymen zoals de zes endopolygalacturonases (BcPGs). Elk van deze BcPGs breken pectine uit de plantencelwanden en middenlamel op hun eigen wijze af. Pectine zit verweven

  2. Synthesis and in Vitro Antifungal Activity against Botrytis cinerea of Geranylated Phenols and Their Phenyl Acetate Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María I. Chávez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory effects on the mycelial growth of plant pathogen Botritys cinerea have been evaluated for a series of geranylphenols substituted with one, two and three methoxy groups in the aromatic ring. The results show that the antifungal activity depends on the structure of the geranylphenols, increasing from 40% to 90% by increasing the number of methoxy groups. On the other hand, the acetylation of the –OH group induces a change of activity that depends on the number of methoxy groups. The biological activity of digeranyl derivatives is lower than that exhibited by the respective monogeranyl compound. All tested geranylphenols have been synthesized by direct coupling of geraniol and the respective phenol. The effect of solvent on yields and product distribution is discussed. For monomethoxyphenols the reaction gives better yields when acetonitrile is used as a solvent and AgNO3 is used as a secondary catalyst. However, for di- and trimethoxyphenols the reaction proceeds only in dioxane.

  3. Tomato SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, SlERF.C3 and SlERF.A3, Members of B3 Group of ERF Family, Are Required for Resistance to Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zhigang; Liu, Shixia; Huang, Lihong; Hong, Yongbo; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Yafen; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    The Ethylene-Responsive Factors (ERFs) comprise a large family of transcriptional factors that play critical roles in plant immunity. Gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, a typical necrotrophic fungal pathogen, is the serious disease that threatens tomato production worldwide. However, littler is known about the molecular mechanism regulating the immunity to B. cinerea in tomato. In the present study, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based functional analyses of 18 members of B3 group (also called Group IX) in tomato ERF family were performed to identify putative ERFs that are involved in disease resistance against B. cinerea. VIGS-based silencing of either SlERF.B1 or SlERF.C2 had lethal effect while silencing of SlERF.A3 (Pit4) significantly suppressed vegetative growth of tomato plants. Importantly, silencing of SlERF.A1, SlERF.A3, SlERF.B4, or SlERF.C3 resulted in increased susceptibility to B. cinerea, attenuated the B. cinerea-induced expression of jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated signaling responsive defense genes and promoted the B. cinerea-induced H2O2 accumulation. However, silencing of SlERF.A3 also decreased the resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 but silencing of SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4 or SlERF.C3 did not affect the resistance to this bacterial pathogen. Expression of SlERF.A1, SlERF.A3, SlERF.B4, or SlERF.C3 was induced by B. cinerea and by defense signaling hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an ethylene precursor). SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, SlERF.C3, and SlERF.A3 proteins were found to localize in nucleus of cells and possess transactivation activity in yeasts. These data suggest that SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, and SlERF.C3, three previously uncharacterized ERFs in B3 group, and SlERF.A3, a previously identified ERF with function in immunity to Pst DC3000, play important roles in resistance against B. cinerea in tomato. PMID:28083004

  4. Characterization of Botrytis cinerea negative-stranded RNA virus 1, a new mycovirus related to plant viruses, and a reconstruction of host pattern evolution in negative-sense ssRNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaire, Livia; Pagán, Israel; Ayllón, María A

    2016-12-01

    The molecular characterization of a novel negative single-stranded RNA virus infecting the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea is reported here. Comparison of the sequence of Botrytis cinerea negative-stranded RNA virus 1 (BcNSRV-1) showed a strong identity with RNA dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of plant pathogenic emaraviruses and tospoviruses. We have also found all the molecular signatures present in the RdRp of the genus Emaravirus and in other genera of family Bunyaviridae: the conserved TPD triplet and RY dinucleotide, the three basic residues in premotif A and the conserved motifs A, B, C, D, and E. Our results showed that BcNSRV-1 is phylogenetically close to members of the genus Emaravirus and of the family Bunyaviridae, and an ancestral state reconstruction using the conserved RdRp motifs of type members of each family of (-)ssRNA viruses indicated that BcNSRV-1 could possibly derive from an invertebrate and vertebrate-infecting virus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tomato histone H2B monoubiquitination enzymes SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 contribute to disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea through modulating the balance between SA- and JA/ET-mediated signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafen; Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Li, Xiaohui; Ouyang, Zhigang; Song, Fengming

    2015-10-21

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination pathway has been shown to play critical roles in regulating growth/development and stress response in Arabidopsis. In the present study, we explored the involvement of the tomato histone H2B monoubiquitination pathway in defense response against Botrytis cinerea by functional analysis of SlHUB1 and SlHUB2, orthologues of the Arabidopsis AtHUB1/AtHUB2. We used the TRV-based gene silencing system to knockdown the expression levels of SlHUB1 or SlHUB2 in tomato plants and compared the phenotype between the silenced and the control plants after infection with B. cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. Biochemical and interaction properties of proteins were examined using in vitro histone monoubiquitination and yeast two-hybrid assays, respectively. The transcript levels of genes were analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The tomato SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 had H2B monoubiquitination E3 ligases activity in vitro and expression of SlHUB1 and SlHUB2 was induced by infection of B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 and by treatment with salicylic acid (SA) and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). Silencing of either SlHUB1 or SlHUB2 in tomato plants showed increased susceptibility to B. cinerea, whereas silencing of SlHUB1 resulted in increased resistance against Pst DC3000. SlMED21, a Mediator complex subunit, interacted with SlHUB1 but silencing of SlMED21 did not affect the disease resistance to B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. The SlHUB1- and SlHUB2-silenced plants had thinner cell wall but increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased callose deposition and exhibited altered expression of the genes involved in phenylpropanoid pathway and in ROS generation and scavenging system. Expression of genes in the SA-mediated signaling pathway was significantly upregulated, whereas expression of genes in the jasmonic acid (JA)/ethylene (ET)-mediated signaling pathway were markedly decreased in SlHUB1- and SlHUB2

  6. Efeito de variáveis ambientais, épocas e métodos de plantio na intensidade da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea em Hibiscus sabdariffa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo objetivou avaliar o efeito da temperatura (15, 20, 25 e 30ºC, do período de molhamento foliar (0, 6, 12 e 24 h, de épocas (setembro, outubro, novembro e dezembro e métodos de plantio (semeadura direta e transplantio de mudas, na intensidade da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea do hibisco (Hibiscus sabdariffa. As variáveis ambientais foram avaliadas em condições controladas com inoculação artificial e as épocas e métodos de plantio foram avaliados em condições de infecção natural em campo. Os dados de frequência de infecção analisados, como área abaixo da curva de progresso da frequência de infecção (AACPF e comprimento de lesões relacionados às variáveis ambientais, foram submetidos à análise de variância e regressão e, em seguida, plotadas as superfícies de resposta. Os dados de incidência (AACPI relacionados às épocas e métodos de plantio foram submetidos à análise de variância, utilizando-se o programa estatístico Sisvarâ/UFLA. A interação da temperatura e da duração do período de molhamento foliar influenciou a frequência de infecção e o comprimento de lesões da seca da haste. Houve aumento na frequência de infecção e no comprimento de lesões com o incremento do período de molhamento foliar e redução da temperatura. As lesões apresentaram maior tamanho na temperatura de 15ºC e 24 horas de molhamento foliar. Na ausência de molhamento foliar houve manifestação de sintomas somente a 15ºC. A 30ºC houve dependência de maior período de molhamento foliar para a manifestação de sintomas. Houve interação significativa de métodos e épocas de plantio na incidência da doença. Constatou-se menor incidência da seca da haste em transplantio de mudas comparado à semeadura direta em todas as épocas de plantio. Verificou-se aumento da incidência proporcionado pelo atraso na época de plantio nos dois métodos. Registrou-se uma relação direta entre queda de

  7. Ectopic Expression of the Wild Grape WRKY Transcription Factor VqWRKY52 in Arabidopsis thaliana Enhances Resistance to the Biotrophic Pathogen Powdery Mildew But Not to the Necrotrophic Pathogen Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhang; Guo, Rongrong; Tu, Mingxing; Wang, Dejun; Guo, Chunlei; Wan, Ran; Li, Zhi; Wang, Xiping

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to play important roles in plant responses to biotic stresses. We previously showed that the expression of the WRKY gene, VqWRKY52, from Chinese wild Vitis quinquangularis was strongly induced 24 h post inoculation with powdery mildew. In this study, we analyzed the expression levels of VqWRKY52 following treatment with the defense related hormones salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate, revealing that VqWRKY52 was strongly induced by SA but not JA. We characterized the VqWRKY52 gene, which encodes a WRKY III gene family member, and found that ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, but increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea, compared with wild type (WT) plants. The transgenic A. thaliana lines displayed strong cell death induced by the biotrophic powdery mildew pathogen, the hemibiotrophic P. syringe pathogen and the necrotrophic pathogen B. cinerea. In addition, the relative expression levels of various defense-related genes were compared between the transgenic A. thaliana lines and WT plants following the infection by different pathogens. Collectively, the results indicated that VqWRKY52 plays essential roles in the SA dependent signal transduction pathway and that it can enhance the hypersensitive response cell death triggered by microbial pathogens.

  8. Comparação de dois métodos de aplicação de fungicidas, irrigação por gotejamento e pulverização convencional no controle do mofo cinzento (Botrytis cinerea Pers.: Fr.) em vasos com plantas de lisianthus (Eustoma grandiflorum (Raf.) Shinn.)

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, Ieoschua [UNESP; da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro [UNESP; Sousa, Antonio de Pádua [UNESP; de Herdani, Egberto Egon [UNESP

    2006-01-01

    Plan disease control techniques are used through the irrigation water, which reduces the labor and it improves application uniformity with smaller contact of the operator with toxic products, lower environmental impact and lower production cost. In order to control Botrytis cinerea the lisianthus culture, this work aimed to evaluate two fungicide application methods with different treatments. The fungicides were: thiophanate methyl (50 g i.a. L-1), thiophanate methyl + chlorothalonil (50 g i....

  9. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  10. Bladrandjes en Ca bij tomaat: Fysiologische achtergronden van cel- en weefselstevigheid in relatie tot het ontstaan van bladrandjes en infectie met Botrytis cinerea L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJdo, M.L.; Janse, J.; Hofland-Zijlstra, J.D.; Voogt, W.

    2011-01-01

    Referaat Een studie is gedaan naar het voorkomen van bladrandjes bij tomaat. Telers zien bladrandjes vaak als teken dat het maximum uit de plant wordt gehaald, maar is een gemakkelijk invalspoort voor botrytis. Het verschijnsel is een fysiologische ziekte waarbij er door een lokaal een tekort aan Ca

  11. Modeling spatial characteristics in the biological control of fungi at leaf scale: competitive substrate colonization by Botrytis cinerea and the saprophytic antagonist Ulocladium atrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, G.J.T.; Köhl, J.; Powell, J.A.; Rabbinge, R.; Werf, van der W.

    2005-01-01

    A spatially explicit model describing saprophytic colonization of dead cyclamen leaf tissue by the plant-pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinereo and the saprophytic fungal antagonist Ulocladium atrum was constructed. Both fungi explore the leaf and utilize the resources it provides. Leaf tissue is

  12. Overexpression of a Novel NAC Domain-Containing Transcription Factor Gene (AaNAC1) Enhances the Content of Artemisinin and Increases Tolerance to Drought and Botrytis cinerea in Artemisia annua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zongyou; Wang, Shu; Zhang, Fangyuan; Chen, Lingxian; Hao, Xiaolong; Pan, Qifang; Fu, Xueqing; Li, Ling; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-09-01

    The NAC (NAM, ATAF and CUC) superfamily is one of the largest plant-specific transcription factor families. NAC transcription factors always play important roles in response to various abiotic stresses. A NAC transcription factor gene AaNAC1 containing a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 864 bp was cloned from Artemisia annua. The expression of AaNAC1 could be induced by dehydration, cold, salicylic acid (SA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ), suggesting that it might be a key regulator of stress signaling pathways in A. annua. AaNAC1 was shown to be localized to the nuclei by transforming tobacco leaf epidermal cells. When AaNAC1 was overexpressed in A. annua, the content of artemisinin and dihydroartemisinic acid was increased by 79% and 150%, respectively. The expression levels of artemisinin biosynthetic pathway genes, i.e. amorpha-4,11-diene synthase (ADS), artemisinic aldehyde Δ11(13) reductase (DBR2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), were increased. Dual luciferase (dual-LUC) assays showed that AaNAC1 could activate the transcription of ADS in vivo. The transgenic A. annua exhibited increased tolerance to drought and resistance to Botrytis cinerea. When AaNAC1 was overexpressed in Arabidopsis, the transgenic Arabidopsis were markedly more tolerant to drought. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed increased resistance to B. cinerea. These results indicate that AaNAC1 can potentially be used in transgenic breeding for improving the content of artemisinin and drought tolerance in A. annua. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Evaluation of the incidence of the G143A mutation and cytb intron presence in the cytochrome bc-1 gene conferring QoI resistance in Botrytis cinerea populations from several hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Stylianos; Papayiannis, Lambros C; Leroch, Michaela; Veloukas, Thomas; Hahn, Matthias; Karaoglanidis, George S

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that resistance of Botrytis cinerea to QoI fungicides has been attributed to the G143A mutation in the cytochrome b (cytb) gene, while, in a part of the fungal population, an intron has been detected at codon 143 of the gene, preventing QoI resistance. During 2005-2009, 304 grey mould isolates were collected from strawberry, tomato, grape, kiwifruit, cucumber and apple in Greece and screened for resistance to pyraclostrobin and for the presence of the cytb intron, using a novel real-time TaqMan PCR assay developed in the present study. QoI-resistant phenotypes existed only within the population collected from strawberries. All resistant isolates possessed the G143A mutation. Differences were observed in the genotypic structure of cytb. Individuals possessing the intron were found at high incidence in apple fruit and greenhouse-grown tomato and cucumber populations, whereas in the strawberry population the intron frequency was lower. Cultivation of QoI-resistant and QoI-sensitive isolates for ten culture cycles on artificial nutrient medium in the presence or absence of fungicide selection showed that QoI resistance was stable. The results of the study suggest that a high risk for selection of QoI-resistant strains exists in crops heavily treated with QoIs, in spite of the widespread occurrence of the cytb intron in B. cinerea populations. The developed real-time TaqMan PCR constitutes a powerful tool to streamline detection of the mutation by reducing pre- and post-amplification manipulations, and can be used for rapid screening and quantification of QoI resistance. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Biocontrol ability and action mechanismof Starmerella bacillaris (synonym Candida zemplinina isolated from wine musts against grey mold disease agent Botrytis cinerea on grape and their effects on alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Josè Fernandes Lemos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gray mold is one of the most important diseases of grapevine in temperate climates. This plant pathogen affects plant growth and reduces wine quality. The use of yeasts as biocontrol agents to apply in the vineyard have been investigated in recent years as an alternative to agrochemicals. In this work, fermenting musts obtained from overripe grape berries, therefore more susceptible to infection by fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea, were considered for the selection of yeasts carrying antifungal activity. Thirty-six isolates were identified as Starmerella bacillaris, a species recently proven to be of enological interest. Among them 14 different strains were studied and antifungal activity against B. cinerea was demonstrated, for the first time, to be present in S. bacillaris species. The production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, tested in vitro, was found to be the main responsible of S. bacillaris antifungal effects. All the strains were able to reduce B. cinerea decay on wounded grape berries artificially inoculated with gray mold. The colonization level of wound was very high reaching, after five days, a concentration of 106 cells per ml of grape juice obtained after berry crushing. At this cell concentration S. bacillaris strains were used to ferment synthetic and natural musts. The sequential yeast inoculation, performed by adding S. cerevisiae 48 h after S. bacillaris, was needed to complete sugar consumption and determined a significant increase in glycerol content and a reduction of ethanol and acetic acid concentrations.The high wound colonization ability, found in this work, together with the propensity to colonize grape berry and the interesting enological traits possessed by the selected S. bacillaris strains allow the use of this yeast as biocontrol agent on vine and grape berries with possible positive effects on must fermentation, although the presence of S. cerevisiae is needed to complete the fermentation process

  15. Effect of iodine citrate of cupper (Citrubact on Botrytis cinerea Pers in Fragaria vesca L. cv. Albion at Tungurahua province, Ecuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Mauricio Rivera Casignia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In Ecuador, the principal disease in strawberry is the grey mould caused by B. cinerea. Chemical fungicides are used only for its control but sometime cause phyto-toxicity due frequent application, high doses and non-rotation of active ingredients. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of iodinecitrate of cupper (Citrubact on fruits number afected by B. cinereain Fragaria vesca L. cv. Albion in Tungurahua province. Iodinecitrate reduced the number of infected flowers with B. cinerea. Doses of 0.588 g L-1 each 14 days; 0.588 g L-1 each 7 days; 0.392 g L-1 each 14 days and 0.196 g L-1 each 7 days of active ingredient increase the number of healthy fruit in comparison with unprotected fruits. Based on results Citrubact is an efficient chemical alternative to control B. cinerea in F. vesca. This fungicide is accepted in strawberry organic production system in Ecuador and other producing countries which conferee added value.

  16. Development of a two-step high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis for screening sequence variants associated with resistance to the QoIs, benzimidazoles and dicarboximides in airborne inoculum of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidimopoulos, Michael; Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Vellios, Evangelos; Madesis, Panagiotis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Pappas, Athanassios C

    2014-11-01

    A rapid, high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis protocol was developed to detect sequence variations associated with resistance to the QoIs, benzimidazoles and dicarboximides in Botrytis cinerea airborne inoculum. HRM analysis was applied directly in fungal DNA collected from air samplers with selective medium. Three and five different genotypes were detected and classified according to their melting profiles in BenA and bos1 genes associated with resistance to benzimidazoles and dicarboximides, respectively. The sensitivity of the methodology was evident in the case of the QoIs, where genotypes varying either by a single nucleotide polymorphism or an additional 1205-bp intron were separated accurately with a single pair of primers. The developed two-step protocol was completed in 82 min and showed reduced variation in the melting curves' formation. HRM analysis rapidly detected the major mutations found in greenhouse strains providing accurate data for successfully controlling grey mould. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The potential role of PR-8 gene of apple fruit in the mode of action of yeast antagonist, Candida oleophila, in postharvest biocontrol of Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several pathogenesis-related (PR) genes of apple have been cloned and identified in response to specific pathogens. However, different PR genes in certain organs of specific host may be involved in specific interaction with different microbes. Current research is aimed at characterizing specific P...

  18. In vitro and in vivo effects of Pseudomonas spp. and Bacillus sp. on Fusarium acuminatum, Botrytis cinerea and Aspergillus niger infecting cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Zdravković

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L is an important member of the Cucurbitaceae family. Production of healthy nursery is necessary for high-quality production of this crop in greenhouses and in fields. With the idea of minimizing the use of pesticides and mineral fertilizers to preserve soil quality, we investigated the effects of plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB on growth promotion and protection of cucumber plants from phytopathogenic fungi. The effects of Pseudomonas spp. strains with different antifungal activities and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain with PGP activity were tested on cucumber plants. Antagonistic activity of Pseudomonas spp. against the growth of several phytopathogenic fungi isolated from cucumber: F. acuminatum, B. cinerea and A. niger, was observed. The influences of overnight cultures, supernatants and heat-stable antifungal factors were tested on the phytopathogenic fungi in vitro. Pseudomonas sp. K35 and K24 strains were more effective than P. chlororaphis Q16 and Pseudomonas sp. K27, showing 70-80% of fungal growth inhibition regardless of culture or fraction applied. The good antagonists that belong to pseudomonads and Bacillus sp. Q10 strain were used as mixtures for estimation of plant growth and health promoting effects on cucumber plants. Growth dynamics differed depending on the applied strain of Pseudomonas sp. The M3 treatment (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and P. chlororaphis Q16 stimulated the initial phase of growth, while M4 (a mixture of Bacillus sp. Q10 and Pseudomonas sp. K24 resulted in the maximal height at the final measurement. Significant differences in leaf and plant weight (M4, and leaf weight (M5, containing K35 strain were found after the treatments. No significant differences in chlorophyll and NBI level were observed in any of the tested combinations. The obtained results suggested that M3 was suitable for stimulation of the early phase of cucumber growth, while the mixtures M4 and M5 improved plant

  19. Epidemiology of Botrytis spotting on gerbera and rose flowers grown under glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssies, A.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments described in this thesis were performed to improve the knowledge on the epidemiology of Botrytis cinerea in glasshouses, with gerbera and rose as model systems. B. cinerea is an airborne fungus, with conidia as the most important

  20. BcSUN1, a B. cinerea SUN-family protein, is involved in virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez-Hernández, Alicia; González, Mario; González, Celedonio; Kan, van Jan A.L.; Brito, Nélida

    2017-01-01

    BcSUN1 is a glycoprotein secreted by Botrytis cinerea, an important plant pathogen that causes severe losses in agriculture worldwide. In this work, the role of BcSUN1 in different aspects of the B. cinerea biology was studied by phenotypic analysis of Bcsun1 knockout strains. We identified

  1. (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) resistance to Botrytis cinerea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-05-08

    May 8, 2012 ... in tomato inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. DC3000. Mol. Plant Microbe Interact. 20: 955-965. Van Loon LC, Geraats BPJ, Linhorst HJM (2006). Ethylene as a modulator of disease resistance in plants. Trends Plant Sci. 11: 184-. 191. Verberne MC, Verpoorte R, Bol JF, Mercado-Blanco J, ...

  2. The Botrytis cinerea endopolygalacturonase gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Have, ten A.

    2000-01-01

    C ell w all d egrading e nzyme s (CWDEs) secreted by microbial plant pathogens have been suggested to function as virulence factors. Evidence that

  3. Enhancement of defense responses by oligandrin against Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oligandrin is an elicitin-like protein with a molecular mass of ∼10 kDa secreted by Pythium oligandrum. Here, the effect of oligandrin on defense response against Botrytis cinerea in tomato leaves is reported. Tomato seedlings were pretreated with 5 ml oligandrin (10 g/ml) by root submerging and then inoculated with B.

  4. Enhancement of defense responses by oligandrin against Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... Here, the effect of oligandrin on defense response against Botrytis cinerea in tomato leaves is reported. Tomato seedlings were pretreated with .... measured with an ultraviolet spectrophotometer. The PPO activity .... Protective effect of oligandrin against tomato gray mold in greenhouse. Oligandrin. (μg/ml).

  5. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  6. Ozone and Botrytis interactions in onion-leaf dieback: open-top chamber studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wukasch, R.T.; Hofstra, G.

    1977-09-01

    Paired open-top chambers were used to study interactions between Botrytis spp. and ozone in field-grown onions. Charcoal filters removed 35 to 65% of the ambient ozone, resulting in six-fold reduction of onion leaf dieback and a 28% increase in onion yield compared with unfiltered chambers. Symptoms of leaf injury appeared soon after ozone levels exceeded 294 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ (0.15 ppm) for 4 hr. Lesions caused by Botrytis were few because no dew formed in the chambers. However, when leaves were wetted with foggers, inoculation with mycelial suspensions of B. sauamosa in late August produced significantly more lesions and leaf dieback in the unfiltered chamber. Botrytis squamosa, B. cinerea, B. allii, and several genera of secondary fungi were isolated from these lesions. Botrytis squamosa was recovered from lesions only, whereas B. cinerea and B. allii were associated more generally with onion leaf tissue regardless of lesions. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. 灰色カビ病(Botrytis cinerea)感染ストレスに対する貯蔵トマト果実の生理的反応

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    武田, 裕子; 中村, 怜之輔

    1990-01-01

    Botryis cinerea を接種したトマト果実の生理的反応を貯蔵温度との関係で調査した.1. 5°, 15°および25°Cでは, 接種果実の成熟が促進されたが, 35°Cでは無処理果実との間に差はなかった. 2. 病斑の拡大は15°Cで最も早く, 以下25°, 5°, 35°Cの順であった. 25°Cでのみ,...

  8. "Efecto de un plástico fotoselectivo y de una pantalla climática en la enfermedad causada por el hongo Botrytis cinerea Pers. y en el negreamiento de los pétalos en un cultivo de rosas (Rosahybrida"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Ramírez Aníbal

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed to compare the postharvest
    performance of the disease caused by the fungus Botrytis cinerea Pers., as well as the Petal Blackening in roses grown in greenhouses cover with plastic of different transmittance to the ultraviolet light. Furthermore, the effect of a climatic screen over the two problems was evaluated. The trial was
    done in the "Centro de Investigaciones y Asesorías Agroindustriales" located in Chía, Cundinamarca, under greenhouses with the same features as the ones used in commercial rose cultivation, with the varieties "Eterna" and "Madame Delbard" and its clones 13 and 15. The effect of the plastic over the disease made a clear difference, showing a lower development of the diseas e in the greenhouse covered with photoselective plastic, as compared with the commercially used plastic. A lower effect of this cover was
    found related to the Petal Blackening, where the results were rather similar between the two plastic types. The climatic screen did not show difference over any of the two problems, under these conditions. The effect of the varieties was not very clear related to the disease, but it in fact was in relation
    to the Petal Blackening, in which the variety "Madame
    Delbard" showed a better performance than its clones 13 and 15. No effect was shown in the interactions between the factors.
    El objetivo de la presente investigación fue comparar el comportamiento en postcosecha de la enfermedad causada por el hongo Botrytis cinerea Pers., así como el "negreamiento de los pétalos" en rosas cultivadas bajo invernaderos cubiertos con plásticos de diferente filtración de la luz ultravioleta. Adicionalmente, se evaluó el efecto de una
    pantalla climática sobre los dos problemas. El ensayo se realizó en el Centro de Investigaciones y Asesorías Agroindustriales, localizado en el municipio de Chía, Cundinamarca, en un invernadero con las mismas características de

  9. First report of Botrytis pseudocinerea causing gray mold on blueberry in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea has been shown to consist of two sibling species, referred to Group I and Group II, and the two groups can be differentiated by a PCR-RFLP on the Bc-hch gene (vegetative incompatibility locus). Group I has recently been described as a new species B. pseudocinerea. Gray mold caused b...

  10. Botrytis species on bulb crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorbeer, J.W.; Seyb, A.M.; Boer, de M.; Ende, van den J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. A number of Botrytis species are pathogens of bulb crops. Botrytis squamosa (teleomorph= Botrytotinia squamosa) causal agent of botrytis leaf blight and B. allii the causal agent of botrytis neck rot are two of the most important fungal diseases of onion. The taxonomics of several of the

  11. Botrytis fragariae, a New Species Causing Gray Mold on Strawberries, Shows High Frequencies of Specific and Efflux-Based Fungicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Sabrina; Plesken, Cecilia; Rumsey, Sibylle; Dowling, Madeline; Schnabel, Guido; Weber, Roland W. S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Botrytis cinerea causes pre- and postharvest decay of many fruit and vegetable crops. A survey of German strawberry fields revealed Botrytis strains that differed from B. cinerea in diagnostic PCR markers and growth appearance. Phylogenetic analyses showed that these strains belong to an undescribed species in Botrytis clade 2, named Botrytis fragariae sp. nov. Isolates of B. fragariae were detected in strawberry fields throughout Germany, sometimes at frequencies similar to those of B. cinerea, and in the southeastern United States. B. fragariae was isolated from overwintering strawberry tissue but not from freshly infected fruit. B. fragariae invaded strawberry tissues with an efficiency similar to or lower than that of B. cinerea but showed poor colonization of inoculated nonhost plant tissues. These data and the exclusive occurrence of this fungus on strawberry plants indicate that B. fragariae is host specific and has a tissue preference different from that of B. cinerea. Various fungicide resistance patterns were observed in B. fragariae populations. Many B. fragariae strains showed resistance to one or several chemical classes of fungicides and an efflux-based multidrug resistance (MDR1) phenotype previously described in B. cinerea. Resistance-related mutations in B. fragariae were identical or similar to those of B. cinerea for carbendazim (E198A mutation in tubA), azoxystrobin (G143A in cytB), iprodione (G367A+V368F in bos1), and MDR1 (gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factor mrr1 gene and overexpression of the drug efflux transporter gene atrB). The widespread occurrence of B. fragariae indicates that this species is adapted to fungicide-treated strawberry fields and may be of local importance as a gray mold pathogen alongside B. cinerea. IMPORTANCE Gray mold is the most important fruit rot on strawberries worldwide and requires fungicide treatments for control. For a long time, it was believed to be caused only by Botrytis cinerea

  12. Analysis of Cryptic, Systemic Botrytis Infections in Symptomless Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael W.; Emmanuel, Christy J.; Emilda, Deni; Terhem, Razak B.; Shafia, Aminath; Tsamaidi, Dimitra; Emblow, Mark; van Kan, Jan A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis species are generally considered to be aggressive, necrotrophic plant pathogens. By contrast to this general perception, however, Botrytis species could frequently be isolated from the interior of multiple tissues in apparently healthy hosts of many species. Infection frequencies reached 50% of samples or more, but were commonly less, and cryptic infections were rare or absent in some plant species. Prevalence varied substantially from year to year and from tissue to tissue, but some host species routinely had high prevalence. The same genotype was found to occur throughout a host, representing mycelial spread. Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis pseudocinerea are the species that most commonly occur as cryptic infections, but phylogenetically distant isolates of Botrytis were also detected, one of which does not correspond to previously described species. Sporulation and visible damage occurred only when infected tissues were stressed, or became mature or senescent. There was no evidence of cryptic infection having a deleterious effect on growth of the host, and prevalence was probably greater in plants grown in high light conditions. Isolates from cryptic infections were often capable of causing disease (to varying extents) when spore suspensions were inoculated onto their own host as well as on distinct host species, arguing against co-adaptation between cryptic isolates and their hosts. These data collectively suggest that several Botrytis species, including the most notorious pathogenic species, exist frequently in cryptic form to an extent that has thus far largely been neglected, and do not need to cause disease on healthy hosts in order to complete their life-cycles. PMID:27242829

  13. Characterization of Botrytis cinerea isolates from chickpea: DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-15

    Nov 15, 2010 ... polymorphic loci has been used in genetic mapping and diagnosis of several fungal species .... dNTP, 10 µM of primer, 1U Taq polymerase and 2.5 µl of 10X reaction buffer. PCR reactions were ..... Pande S, Galloway J, Gaur PM, Siddique KHM, Tripathi HS, Taylor P,. MacLeod MJ, Basandrai AK, Bakr A, ...

  14. Mise en évidence d'une variation intra spécifique chez Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectifs : Le présent travail oeuvre pour la mise en évidence de la variation intra spécifique chez Botrytis cinerea et de l'effet d'un extrait d'un compost de déchets urbains solides sur deux stades du cycle de vie de ce pathogène. Methodologie et Résultats : Des feuilles de tomate ont été inoculées par 22 souches de B.

  15. The control of Botrytis fruit rot in strawberry using combined treatments of Chitosan with Zataria multiflora or Cinnamomum zeylanicum essential oil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammadi, Ali; Hashemi, M; Hosseini, SM

    2015-01-01

    ...) or Cinnamomum zeylanicum essential oils (CEO) on the inhibition of Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of strawberry gray mold on laboratory media and fruits during storage (7 days at 4 °C followed by 3 days at 20 °C...

  16. Biological control of Botrytis gray mould on tomato cultivated in greenhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, F; Fiume, G

    2006-01-01

    Research was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the biological control of the Botrytis gray mould, caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers., one of the most important fungal diseases of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Biological control was performed by using Trichoderma harzianum Rifai, an antagonist that is a naturally occurring fungus found on some plants and in the soil worldwide. Trichoderma spp. are fungi diffused in nearly all agricultural soils and in other environments such as decaying wood. The object of this research is to find control strategies to reduce chemical treatments that cause damage to the environment and increase the pathogen resistance, applying the biological control by using T. harzianum against B. cinerea. A commercial product containing a natural isolate of T. harzianum is trichodex (Makhteshim Chemical Works, LTD). The research was performed in laboratory and in greenhouse. In laboratory, radial growth reduction of B. cinerea, in presence of T. harzianum, was calculated in relation to the growth of the pathogen control, by using a specific formula that measures the percentage of the inhibition of the radial mycelial growth. In greenhouse, starting from the tomato fruit setting, the research was carried out comparing, by a randomized complete block experiment design, replicated four times, the following treatments:1) untreated control; 2) pyrimethanil (400 g/L of a.i.), at 200 cc/hL of c.i. (pyrimidine fungicides); 3) trichodex at 100g/hL (1 kg/ha); 4) trichodex at 200 g/hL (2 kg/ha); 5) trichodex at 400 g/hL (4 kg/ha). Before fruit setting, the plots were all treated against Botrytis gray mould with iprodione 50% (100 g/hL), procymidone 50% (100 g/hL) and switch (Novartis plant protection) at 80 g/hL. In dual culture, the inhibition of B. cinerea radial mycelial growth was 76%. No inhibition halo was observed between B. cinerea and T. harzianum colonies but, after 3 days, the pathogen colony radius resulted no more than 1

  17. Inflorescences vs leaves: a distinct modulation of carbon metabolism process during Botrytis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsa-Portugal, Parul; Walker, Anne-Sophie; Jacquens, Lucile; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid Ait; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie

    2015-05-01

    Plant growth and survival depends critically on photo assimilates. Pathogen infection leads to changes in carbohydrate metabolism of plants. In this study, we monitored changes in the carbohydrate metabolism in the grapevine inflorescence and leaves using Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis pseudo cinerea. Fluctuations in gas exchange were correlated with variations in chlorophyll a fluorescence. During infection, the inflorescences showed an increase in net photosynthesis (Pn) with a stomatal limitation. In leaves, photosynthesis decreased, with a non-stomatal limitation. A decrease in the effective photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield (ΦPSII) was accompanied by an increase in photochemical quenching (qP) and non-photochemical quenching (qN). The enhancement of qP and ΦPSII could explain the observed increase in Pn. In leaves, the significant decline in ΦPSII and qP, and increase in qN suggest that energy was mostly oriented toward heat dissipation instead of CO2 fixation. The accumulation of glucose and sucrose in inflorescences and glucose and fructose in the leaves during infection indicate that the plant's carbon metabolism is differently regulated in these two organs. While a strong accumulation of starch was observed at 24 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi) with both species of Botrytis in the inflorescences, a significant decrease with B. cinerea at 24 hpi and a significant increase with B. pseudo cinerea at 48 hpi were observed in the leaves. On the basis of these results, it can be said that during pathogen attack, the metabolism of grapevine inflorescence and leaf is modified suggesting distinct mechanisms modifying gas exchange, PSII activity and sugar contents in these two organs. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  18. Effects of Botrytis and ozone on bracts and flowers of poinsettia cultivars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Feder, W.A.; Perkins, I.

    1972-09-01

    Variability, ranging from complete resistance to extensive susceptibility, was observed when flowers and bracts of 14 cultivars of poinsettia were inoculated with spores of Botrytis cinerea. Flowers and bracts were not visibly injured by exposure to ozone levels up to 45 pphm. Ozone did not have significant fungicidal effects, as measured by visual disease incidence following incubation, when inoculated flowers and bracts were exposed to ozone at 15, 25, 35, and 45 pphm ozone for 4 hr prior to incubation. 8 references, 1 table.

  19. How light affects the life of Botrytis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Julia

    2017-09-01

    Fungi, like other organisms, actively sense the environmental light conditions in order to drive adaptive responses, including protective mechanisms against the light-associated stresses, and to regulate development. Ecological niches are characterized by different light regimes, for instance light is absent underground, and light spectra from the sunlight are changed underwater or under the canopy of foliage due to the absorption of distinct wavelengths by bacterial, algal and plant pigments. Considering the fact that fungi have evolved to adapt to their habitats, the complexities of their 'visual' systems may vary significantly. Fungi that are pathogenic on plants experience a special light regime because the host always seeks the optimum light conditions for photosynthesis - and the pathogen has to cope with this environment. When the pathogen lives under the canopy and is indirectly exposed to sunlight, it is confronted with an altered light spectrum enriched for green and far-red light. Botrytis cinerea, the gray mold fungus, is an aggressive plant pathogen mainly infecting the above-ground parts of the plant. As outlined in this review, the Leotiomycete maintains a highly sophisticated light signaling machinery, integrating (near)-UV, blue, green, red and far-red light signals by use of at least eleven potential photoreceptors to trigger a variety of responses, i.e. protection (pigmentation, enzymatic systems), morphogenesis (conidiation, apothecial development), entrainment of a circadian clock, and positive and negative tropism of multicellular (conidiophores, apothecia) and unicellular structures (conidial germ tubes). In that sense, 'looking through the eyes' of this plant pathogen will expand our knowledge of fungal photobiology. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Moss Pathogenesis-Related-10 protein enhances resistance to Pythium irregulare in Physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eCastro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to pathogen infection by activating signaling pathways leading to the accumulation of proteins with diverse roles in defense. Here, we addressed the functional role of PpPR-10, a pathogenesis-related (PR-10 gene, of the moss Physcomitrella patens, in response to biotic stress. PpPR-10 belongs to a multigene family and encodes a protein twice the usual size of PR-10 proteins due to the presence of two Bet v1 domains. Moss PR-10 genes are differentially regulated during development and inoculation with the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Specifically, PpPR-10 transcript levels increase significantly by treatments with elicitors of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, spores of B. cinerea, and the defense hormone salicylic acid. To characterize the role of PpPR-10 in plant defense against pathogens, we conducted overexpression analysis in P. patens and in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that constitutive expression of PpPR-10 in moss tissues increased resistance against the oomycete Pythium irregulare. PpPR-10 overexpressing moss plants developed less symptoms and decreased mycelium growth than wild type plants. In addition, PpPR-10 overexpressing plants constitutively produced cell wall depositions in protonemal tissue. Ectopic expression of PpPR-10 in Arabidopsis resulted in increased resistance against P. irregulare as well, evidenced by smaller lesions and less cellular damage compared to wild type plants. These results indicate that PpPR-10 is functionally active in the defense against the pathogen P. irregulare, in both P. patens and Arabidopsis, two evolutionary distant plants. Thus, P. patens can serve as an interesting source of genes to improve resistance against pathogen infection in flowering plants.

  1. Diversity and environmental relations of cryptic, systemic Botrytis infections in symptomless hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Shaw

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis species are generally considered to be aggressive, necrotrophic plant pathogens. By contrast to this general perception, however, Botrytis species could frequently be isolated from the interior of multiple tissues in apparently healthy hosts of many species. Infection frequencies reached 50% of samples or more, but were commonly less, and cryptic infections were rare or absent in some plant species. Prevalence varied substantially from year to year and from tissue to tissue, but some host species routinely had high prevalence. The same genotype was found to occur throughout a host, representing mycelial spread. B. cinerea and B. pseudocinerea are the species that most commonly occur as cryptic infections, but phylogenetically distant isolates of Botrytis were also detected, one of which does not correspond to previously described species. Sporulation and visible damage occurred only when infected tissues were stressed, or became mature or senescent. There was no evidence of cryptic infection having a deleterious effect on growth of the host, and prevalence was probably greater in plants grown in high light conditions. Isolates from cryptic infections were often capable of causing disease (to varying extents when spore suspensions were inoculated onto their own host as well as on distinct host species, arguing against co-adaptation between cryptic isolates and their hosts. These data collectively suggest that several Botrytis species, including the most notorious pathogenic species, exist frequently in cryptic form to an extent that has thus far largely been neglected, and do not need to cause disease on healthy hosts in order to complete their life-cycles.

  2. Ectopic expression of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene from wild rice, OgUBC1, confers resistance against UV-B radiation and Botrytis infection in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, En Hee; Pak, Jung Hun; Kim, Mi Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang Hyun [National Crop Experiment Station, Rural Development Administration, Suwon 441-100 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jai Heon; Kim, Doh Hoon; Oh, Ju Sung [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Boung-Jun [BioControl Center, Jeonnam 516-942 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Ho Won, E-mail: hwjung@dau.ac.kr [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Soo, E-mail: chungys@dau.ac.kr [Department of Genetic Engineering, Dong-A University, Busan 604-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We isolated a novel E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme from leaves of wild rice plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 was highly expressed in leaves treated with SA and UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The recombinant OgUBC1 has an enzymatic activity of E2 in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The OgUBC1 could protect disruption of plant cells by UV-B radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OgUBC1 confers disease resistance and UV-B tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. -- Abstract: A previously unidentified gene encoding ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme was isolated from leaves of wild rice plant treated with wounding and microbe-associated molecular patterns. The OgUBC1 gene was composed of 148 amino acids and contained a typical active site and 21 ubiquitin thioester intermediate interaction residues and 4 E3 interaction residues. Both exogenous application of salicylic acid and UV-B irradiation triggered expression of OgUBC1 in leaves of wild rice. Recombinant OgUBC1 proteins bound to ubiquitins in vitro, proposing that the protein might act as E2 enzyme in planta. Heterologous expression of the OgUBC1 in Arabidopsis thaliana protected plants from cellular damage caused by an excess of UV-B radiation. A stable expression of chalcone synthase gene was detected in leaves of OgUBC1-expressing Arabidopsis, resulting in producing higher amounts of anthocyanin than those in wild-type Col-0 plants. Additionally, both pathogenesis-related gene1 and 5 were transcribed in the transgenic Arabidopsis in the absence of pathogen infection. The OgUBC1-expressing plants were resistant to the infection of Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, we suggested that the OgUBC1 is involved in ubiquitination process important for cellular response against biotic and abiotic stresses in plants.

  3. Malus hupehensis NPR1 induces pathogenesis-related protein gene expression in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-Y; Qiao, Y-S; Lv, D; Gao, Z-H; Qu, S-C; Zhang, Z

    2012-03-01

    Most commercially grown apple cultivars are susceptible to fungal diseases. Malus hupehensis has high resistance to many diseases affecting apple cultivars. Understanding innate defence mechanisms would help to develop disease-resistant apple crops. Non-expressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) plays a key role in regulating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated systemic acquired resistance (SAR). MhNPR1 cDNA, corresponding to genomic DNA and its 5' flanking sequences, was isolated from M. hupehensis. Sequence analysis showed that the regulatory mechanism for oligomer-monomer transition of the MhNPR1 protein in apple might be similar to that of GmNPR1 in soybean, but different from that of AtNPR1 in Arabidopsis. No significant differences in MhNPR1 expression were found in M. hupehensis after infection with Botryosphaeria berengeriana, showing that MhNPR1 might be regulated by pathogens at the protein level, as described for Arabidopsis and grapevine. SA treatment significantly induced MhNPR1 expression in leaves, stems and roots, while methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment induced MhNPR1 expression in roots, but not in leaves or stems. The expression of MhNPR1 was highly increased in roots, moderately in leaves, and did not change in stems after treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). SAR marker genes (MhPR1 and MhPR5) were induced by SA, MeJA and ACC in leaves, stems and roots. Overexpression of MhNPR1 significantly induced the expression of pathogenesis-related genes (NtPR1, NtPR3 and NtPR5) in transgenic tobacco plants and resistance to the fungus Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that MhNPR1 orthologues are a component of the SA defence signalling pathway and SAR is induced in M. hupehensis. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  4. PRP8 inteins in species of the genus Botrytis and other ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokor, Annika A M; Kohn, Linda M; Poulter, Russell T M; van Kan, Jan A L

    2012-03-01

    The mobile elements termed inteins have a sporadic distribution in microorganisms. It is unclear how these elements are maintained. Inteins are intervening protein sequences that autocatalytically excise themselves from a precursor. Excision is a post-translational process referred to as 'protein splicing' in which the sequences flanking the intein are ligated, reforming the mature host protein. Some inteins contain a homing endonuclease domain (HEG) that is proposed to facilitate propagation of the intein element within a gene pool. We have previously demonstrated that the HEG of the PRP8 intein is highly active during meiosis in Botrytis cinerea. Here we analysed the Prp8 gene status in 21 additional Botrytis species to obtain insight into the mode of intein inheritance within the Botrytis lineage. Of the 21 species, 15 contained a PRP8 intein whereas six did not. The analysis was extended to closely related (Sclerotiniaceae) and distantly related (Ascomycota) taxa, focussing on evolutionary diversification of the PRP8 intein, including their possible acquisition by horizontal transfer and loss by deletion. Evidence was obtained for the occurrence of genetic footprints of previous intein occupation. There is no compelling evidence of horizontal transfer among species. Three distinct states of the Prp8 allele were identified, distributed over different orders within the Ascomycota: an occupied allele; an empty allele that was never occupied; an empty allele that was presumably previously occupied, from which the intein was precisely deleted. The presence of the genetic footprint identifies 20 species (including Neurospora crassa, Magnaporthe oryzae and Fusarium oxysporum) that previously contained the intein but have lost it entirely, while only 18 species (including Podospora anserina and Fusarium graminearum) appear never to have contained a PRP8 intein. The analysis indicates that inteins may be maintained in an equilibrium state. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  5. Positive regulatory role of sound vibration treatment in Arabidopsis thaliana against Botrytis cinerea infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bosung Choi; Ritesh Ghosh; Mayank Anand Gururani; Gnanendra Shanmugam; Junhyun Jeon; Jonggeun Kim; Soo-Chul Park; Mi-Jeong Jeong; Kyung-Hwan Han; Dong-Won Bae; Hanhong Bae

    2017-01-01

    Sound vibration (SV), a mechanical stimulus, can trigger various molecular and physiological changes in plants like gene expression, hormonal modulation, induced antioxidant activity and calcium spiking...

  6. Polyamines attenuate ethylene-mediated defense responses to abrogate resistance to Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines over-expressing yeast spermidine synthase (ySpdSyn), an enzyme involved in polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, were developed. These transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of spermidine (Spd) than the wild type plants and were examined for responses to the...

  7. Biological Traits of Botrytis cinerea Pers. Isolates Differently Sensitive to Dicarboximides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brankica Tanović

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of biological characteristics of both field and laboratory isolates revealed that highly resistant isolates were morphologically different from their original wild types. The majority of them were less pathogenic and produced less sclerotia than the original ones.Significant negative correlation between osmotic sensitivity and the degree of resistance was recorded. The correlation between micelium growth rate and resistance to dicarboximides was also significant and negative. Growth medium, acidity and growth temperature had less effect on the micelium growth rate of the highly resistant isolates than on the sensitive ones.

  8. Calmodulin gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding the stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various physiological responses in plants. To determine the functional significance of calmodulin in fl...

  9. ABC and MFS transporters from Botrytis cinerea involved in sensitivity to fungicides and natural toxic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters are two major classes of proteins involved in drug resistance. ABC transporter proteins are primary transporters that use the energy generated by ATP hydrolysis to transport drugs over membranes, while MFS transport

  10. Aspartic Acid Protease from Botrytis cinerea Removes Haze-Forming Proteins during White Winemaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, Van S.C.; Warnock, N.I.; Schmidt, S.; Anderson, P.; Kan, van J.A.L.; Bacic, A.; Waters, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    White wines suffer from heat-induced protein hazes during transport and storage unless the proteins are removed prior to bottling. Bentonite fining is by far the most commonly used method, but it is inefficient and creates several other process challenges. An alternative to bentonite is the

  11. Effects of bunch rot (Botrytis cinerea) and powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator) fungal diseases on wine aroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Pinar, Angela; Rauhut, Doris; Ruehl, Ernst; Buettner, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effects of bunch rot and powdery mildew on the primary quality parameter of wine, the aroma. The influence of these fungal diseases was studied by comparative Aroma Extract Dilution Analyses (AEDA) and sensory tests. The effect of bunch rot was investigated on three grape varieties, namely White Riesling, Red Riesling and Gewürztraminer and that of powdery mildew on the hybrid Gm 8622-3; thereby, samples were selected that showed pronounced cases of infection to elaborate potential currently unknown effects. Both infections revealed aromatic differences induced by these fungi. The sensory changes were not associated with one specific compound only, but were due to quantitative variations of diverse substances. Bunch rot predominantly induced an increase in the intensities of peach-like/fruity, floral and liquor-like/toasty aroma notes. These effects were found to be related to variations in aroma substance composition as monitored via AEDA, mainly an increase in the FD factors of lactones and a general moderate increase of esters and alcohols. On the other hand, powdery mildew decreased the vanilla-like character of the wine while the remaining sensory attributes were rather unaffected. Correspondingly, FD factors of the main aroma constituents were either the same or only slightly modified by this disease. Moreover, bunch rot influenced the aroma profiles of the three varieties studied to a different degree. In hedonic evaluation, bunch rot-affected samples were rated as being more pleasant in comparison to their healthy controls in all three varieties while the powdery mildew-affected sample was rated as being less pleasant than its healthy control.

  12. Real-time RT-PCR expression analysis of chitinase and endoglucanase genes in the three-way interaction between the biocontrol strain Clonostachys rosea IK726, Botrytis cinera and strawberry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamarabadi, Mojtaba; Jensen, Birgit; Jensen, Søren Dan Funck

    2008-01-01

    Clonostachys rosea is a well-known biocontrol agent against Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold in strawberry. The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes might play a significant role for successful biocontrol by C. rosea. The expression pattern of four chitinases, and two endoglucan...... of IK726 are involved in biocontrol on leaves. This is the first example of monitoring of expression of chitinolytic genes in interactions between biocontrol agents and pathogens in plant material.......Clonostachys rosea is a well-known biocontrol agent against Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of gray mold in strawberry. The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes might play a significant role for successful biocontrol by C. rosea. The expression pattern of four chitinases, and two......, allowing in situ activity assessment of each fungus in vitro and during their interaction on strawberry leaves. Growth of B. cinerea was inhibited in all pathogen-antagonist interactions while the activity of IK726 was slightly increased. In all in vitro interactions, four of the six genes were upregulated...

  13. Efficacy of Combined Formulations of Fungicides with Different Modes of Action in Controlling Botrytis Gray Mold Disease in Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Botrytis gray mold (BGM caused by Botrytis cinerea Pers. Ex. Fr. is an extremely devastating disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and has a regional as well as an international perspective. Unfortunately, nonchemical methods for its control are weak and ineffective. In order to identify an effective control measure, six fungicides with different modes of action were evaluated on a BGM susceptible chickpea variety BARIchhola-1 at a high BGM incidence location (Madaripur in Bangladesh for three years (2008, 2009, and 2010. Among the six fungicides tested, one was protectant [Vondozeb 42SC, a.i. mancozeb (0.2%], two systemic [Bavistin 50 WP, a.i. carbendazim (0.2%, and Protaf 250EC, propiconazole (0.05%], and three combination formulations [Acrobat MZ690, dimethomorph 9% + mancozeb 60%, (0.2%; Secure 600 WG, phenomadone + mancozeb (0.2%; and Companion, mancozeb 63% + carbendazim 12% (0.2%]. The results showed superiority of combination formulations involving both protectant and systemic fungicides over the sole application of either fungicide separately. Among the combination fungicides, Companion was most effective, resulting in the lowest disease severity (3.33 score on 1–9 scale and the highest increase (38% of grain yield in chickpea. Therefore, this product could be preferred over the sole application of either solo protectant or systemic fungicides to reduce yield losses and avoid fungicide resistance.

  14. Plastic Transcriptomes Stabilize Immunity to Pathogen Diversity: The Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Networks within the Arabidopsis/Botrytis Pathosystem[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Robert; Chen, Fang; Atwell, Susana

    2017-01-01

    To respond to pathogen attack, selection and associated evolution has led to the creation of plant immune system that are a highly effective and inducible defense system. Central to this system are the plant defense hormones jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) and crosstalk between the two, which may play an important role in defense responses to specific pathogens or even genotypes. Here, we used the Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea pathosystem to test how the host’s defense system functions against genetic variation in a pathogen. We measured defense-related phenotypes and transcriptomic responses in Arabidopsis wild-type Col-0 and JA- and SA-signaling mutants, coi1-1 and npr1-1, individually challenged with 96 diverse B. cinerea isolates. Those data showed genetic variation in the pathogen influences on all components within the plant defense system at the transcriptional level. We identified four gene coexpression networks and two vectors of defense variation triggered by genetic variation in B. cinerea. This showed that the JA and SA signaling pathways functioned to constrain/canalize the range of virulence in the pathogen population, but the underlying transcriptomic response was highly plastic. These data showed that plants utilize major defense hormone pathways to buffer disease resistance, but not the metabolic or transcriptional responses to genetic variation within a pathogen. PMID:29042403

  15. Involvement of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 Protein in the Regulation of Botrytis Virulence- and Tomato Defense-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriston V. Gomes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several Trichoderma spp. are well known for their ability to: (i act as important biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic fungi; (ii function as biofertilizers; (iii increase the tolerance of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses; and (iv induce plant defense responses via the production and secretion of elicitor molecules. In this study, we analyzed the gene-regulation effects of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 protein during the interactions of mutant Δepl-1 or wild-type T. harzianum strains with: (a the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea and (b with tomato plants, on short (24 h hydroponic cultures and long periods (4-weeks old plants after Trichoderma inoculation. Our results indicate that T. harzianum Epl-1 protein affects the in vitro expression of B. cinerea virulence genes, especially those involved in the botrydial biosynthesis (BcBOT genes, during the mycoparasitism interaction. The tomato defense-related genes were also affected, indicating that Epl-1 is involved in the elicitation of the salicylic acid pathway. Moreover, Epl-1 also regulates the priming effect in host tomato plants and contributes to enhance the interaction with the host tomato plant during the early stage of root colonization.

  16. Fungi isolated from Stewartia pseudocamellia Max. seeds and their pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Kurzawińska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of studies was to determine typical composition of fungi occurring on seeds of Stewartia pseudocamellia.The studies conducted on 100 disinfected and 100 nondisinfected seeds of these plants.Isolates of Alternaria alternata, Fusarium oxysporum, Cylindrocarpon radicicola and Rhizoctonia solani were characterized by pathogenicity towards the investigated Stewartia pseudocamellia. In the laboratory experiment, 204 isolations of microorganisms were obtained that belonged to 20 species and form of fungi and bacteria. Among fungi there were both of parasite (Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium spp., Rhizoctonia solani and typical saprophytic (Cladosporium spp., Penicillium spp., Aspergillus spp., Epicoccum spp., Mucor spp.. The dominant fungus on seeds was Alternaria alternata. Among the investigated isolates only one isolate (R4 Rhizoctonia solani, was strongly pathogenic, isolates (A1 Alternaria alternata were weakly pathogenic to seedlings of Stewartia pseudocamellia.

  17. Analysis of Cryptic, Systemic Botrytis Infections in Symptomless Hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaw, Michael W.; Emmanuel, Christy J.; Emilda, Deni; Terhem, Razak B.; Shafia, Aminath; Tsamaidi, Dimitra; Emblow, Mark; Kan, Van Jan A.L.

    2016-01-01


    Botrytis species are generally considered to be aggressive, necrotrophic plant pathogens. By contrast to this general perception, however, Botrytis species could frequently be isolated from the interior of multiple tissues in apparently healthy hosts of many species. Infection frequencies

  18. Occurrence of Narcissus Smoulder Caused by Botrytis narcissicola in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Wan Gyu; Cho, Weon Dae; Kim, Hong Gi

    2007-01-01

    Leaf blight and bulb rot symptoms were observed on narcissus plants grown in Yongin, Cheongwon and Namhae areas in Korea during disease survey from 1999 to 2002. A total of 15 isolates of Botrytis sp. were obtained from the infected plant parts of narcissus. All the isolates were identified as Botrytis narcissicola based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Three isolates of B. narcissicola were tested for their pathogenicity to leaves and bulbs of narcissus by artificial inoc...

  19. Combining Ascochyta blight and Botrytis grey mould resistance in chickpea through interspecific hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livinder KAUR

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight (AB caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass. Labr. and Botrytis grey mould (BGM caused by Botrytis cinerea (Pers. ex Fr. are important diseases of the aerial plant parts of chickpea in most chickpea growing areas of the world. Although conventional approaches have contributed to reducing disease, the use of new technologies is expected to further reduce losses through these biotic stresses. Reliable screening techniques were developed: ‘field screening technique’ for adult plant screening, ‘cloth chamber technique’ and ‘growth chamber technique’ for the study of races of the pathogen and for segregating generations. Furthermore, the ‘cut twig technique’ for interspecific population for AB and BGM resistance was developed. For introgression of high levels of AB and BGM resistance in cultivated chickpea from wild relatives, accessions of seven annual wild Cicer spp. were evaluated and identified: C. judaicum accessions 185, ILWC 95 and ILWC 61, C. pinnatifidum accessions 188, 199 and ILWC 212 as potential donors. C. pinnatifidum accession188 was crossed with ICCV 96030 and 62 F9 lines resistant to AB and BGM were derived. Of the derived lines, several are being evaluated for agronomic traits and yield parameters while four lines, GL 29029, GL29206, GL29212, GL29081 possessing high degree of resistance were crossed with susceptible high yielding cultivars BG 256 to improve resistance and to undertake molecular studies. Genotyping of F2 populations with SSR markers from the chickpea genome was done to identify markers potentially linked with AB and BGM resistance genes. In preliminary studies, of 120 SSR markers used, six (Ta 2, Ta 110, Ta 139, CaSTMS 7, CaSTMS 24 and Tr 29 were identified with polymorphic bands between resistant derivative lines and the susceptible parent. The study shows that wild species of Cicer are the valuable gene pools of resistance to AB and BGM. The resistant derivative lines generated here can

  20. Involvement ofTrichoderma harzianumEpl-1 Protein in the Regulation ofBotrytisVirulence- and Tomato Defense-Related Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Eriston V; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Cardoza, Rosa E; Silva, Roberto N; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    Several Trichoderma spp. are well known for their ability to: (i) act as important biocontrol agents against phytopathogenic fungi; (ii) function as biofertilizers; (iii) increase the tolerance of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses; and (iv) induce plant defense responses via the production and secretion of elicitor molecules. In this study, we analyzed the gene-regulation effects of Trichoderma harzianum Epl-1 protein during the interactions of mutant Δ epl-1 or wild-type T. harzianum strains with: (a) the phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea and (b) with tomato plants, on short (24 h hydroponic cultures) and long periods (4-weeks old plants) after Trichoderma inoculation. Our results indicate that T. harzianum Epl-1 protein affects the in vitro expression of B. cinerea virulence genes, especially those involved in the botrydial biosynthesis ( BcBOT genes), during the mycoparasitism interaction. The tomato defense-related genes were also affected, indicating that Epl-1 is involved in the elicitation of the salicylic acid pathway. Moreover, Epl-1 also regulates the priming effect in host tomato plants and contributes to enhance the interaction with the host tomato plant during the early stage of root colonization.

  1. Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, X.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. I studied numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The large genomic changes are important for

  2. Jasmonate signalling drives time-of-day differences in susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingle, R.A.; Stoker, C.; Stone, W.; Adams, N.; Smith, R.W.; Grant, M.; Carré, I.; Roden, L.C.; Denby, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal timekeeping mechanism, allows plants to anticipate regular changes in the environment, such as light and dark, and biotic challenges such as pathogens and herbivores. Here, we demonstrate that the plant circadian clock influences susceptibility to the necrotrophic

  3. Postharvest jasmonic acid treatment of sugarbeet roots reduces rot due to Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium claviforme, and Phoma betae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although jasmonic acid (JA) and JA derivatives are known to activate plant defense mechanisms and provide protection against postharvest fungal diseases for several horticultural crops, JA’s ability to protect sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots against common causal organisms of storage rot is unkno...

  4. Regulation of Botrytis cinerea virulence genes in interaction with Trichoderma arundinaceum is mediated by the sesquiterpene harzianum A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichoderma includes a great diversity of species, some of them with the ability to control the growth of fungal phytopathogens. Many of these strains produce secondary metabolites that are able to inhibit the growth of their fungal preys. However, pathogens can also produce metabolites that in some...

  5. Novel aspinolide production by Trichoderma arundinaceum with a potential role in Botrytis cinerea antagonistic activity and plant defense priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzianum A (HA), a trichothecene produced by Trichoderma arundinaceum, has recently been described to have antagonistic activity against fungal plant pathogens and to induce plant defence genes. In the present work, we have shown that a tri5 genedisrupted mutant that lacks HA production overproduce...

  6. Quantification of the changes in potent wine odorants as induced by bunch rot (Botrytis cinerea) and powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Pinar, Angela; Rauhut, Doris; Ruehl, Ernst; Buettner, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Fungal infections are detrimental for viticulture since they may reduce harvest yield and wine quality. This study aimed to characterize the effects of bunch rot and powdery mildew on wine aroma by quantification of representative aroma compounds using Stable Isotope Dilution Analysis (SIDA). For this purpose, samples affected to a high degree by each fungus were compared with a healthy sample in each case; to this aim, the respective samples were collected and processed applying identical conditions. Thereby, the effects of bunch rot were studied in three different grape varieties: White Riesling, Red Riesling and Gewürztraminer whereas the influence of powdery mildew was studied on the hybrid Gm 8622-3. Analyses revealed that both fungal diseases caused significant changes in the concentration of most target compounds. Thereby, the greatest effects were increases in the concentration of phenylacetic acid, acetic acid and γ-decalactone for both fungi and all grape varieties. Regarding other compounds, however, inconsistent effects of bunch rot were observed for the three varieties studied.

  7. A greenhouse screening assay for Botrytis tulipae resistance in tulips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, T.P.; Mes, J.J.; Eikelboom, W.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2002-01-01

    As a leaf pathogen, Botrytis tulipae severely affects tulip bulb production. Chemical control is not desired for environmental reasons. Thus, resistant cultivars can play an important role in the control of this disease. To select genotypes resistant to B. tulipae, a reliable screening assay is

  8. Occurrence of Narcissus Smoulder Caused by Botrytis narcissicola in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Kee; Kim, Wan Gyu; Cho, Weon Dae; Kim, Hong Gi

    2007-12-01

    Leaf blight and bulb rot symptoms were observed on narcissus plants grown in Yongin, Cheongwon and Namhae areas in Korea during disease survey from 1999 to 2002. A total of 15 isolates of Botrytis sp. were obtained from the infected plant parts of narcissus. All the isolates were identified as Botrytis narcissicola based on their morphological and cultural characteristics. Three isolates of B. narcissicola were tested for their pathogenicity to leaves and bulbs of narcissus by artificial inoculation. All the isolates induced leaf blight and bulb rot symptoms on the plants of narcissus by artificial inoculation. The symptoms induced by artificial inoculation were similar to those observed in the fields. This is the first report of narcissus smoulder caused by B. narcissicola in Korea.

  9. Somatic embryogenesis from immature fruit of Juglans cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula M. Pijut

    1999-01-01

    Butternut (Juglans cinerea L.) (Fig. 1a), also known as white walnut or oilnut, is a hardwood species in the family Juglandaceae, section Trachycaryon (Manning, 1978), or more appropriately, section Cardiocaryon (Fjellstrom & Parfitt, 1994). This hardwood species is valued for its wood and edible...

  10. Cytotoxic triterpenoids from the mushroom Clavulina cinerea (Bull) J ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C. cinerea (Bull) J. Schröt (Lyophyllaceae) is among the many edible mushrooms in Kenya and is also traditionally regarded as a complementary medicine for chronically-ill people. The use of these mushrooms in the East African prompted this investigation in which the phytochemistry and potential anti-cancer activity was ...

  11. Yeast Diversity and Persistence in Botrytis-Affected Wine Fermentations

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, David A; Johannsen, Eric A.; Cocolin, Luca

    2002-01-01

    Culture-dependent and -independent methods were used to examine the yeast diversity present in botrytis-affected (“botrytized”) wine fermentations carried out at high (∼30°C) and ambient (∼20°C) temperatures. Fermentations at both temperatures possessed similar populations of Saccharomyces, Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Metschnikowia, Kluyveromyces, and Candida species. However, higher populations of non-Saccharomyces yeasts persisted in ambient-temperature fermentations, with Candida and, to a less...

  12. Evaluation of Gliocladium species for control of Botrytis corm rot of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botrytis corm rot (Botrytis gladiolorum) is one of the most important and destructive diseases of gladiolus and poses a major constraint in production of flowers and corms all over the world. An In vivo experiment was conducted to determine the efficacy, antagonistic potential and disease reduction capacity of four ...

  13. Production of UC-labeled gas in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits by Neisseria cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyce, J.M.; Mitchell, E.B. Jr.; Knapp, J.S.; Buttke, T.M.

    1985-09-01

    Six strains of Neisseria cinerea were tested in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits (Johnston Laboratories, Inc., Towson, Md.), and all yielded positive glucose growth indices and negative maltose and fructose growth indices. These results were similar to those achieved with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. However, most of the N. cinerea isolates tested yielded 3-h glucose growth indices that were lower than those obtained with gonococci. UC-labeled gas was produced significantly faster by N. gonorrhoeae than by N. cinerea. Additional studies suggested that the UC-labeled gas produced by N. cinerea was carbon dioxide. N. cinerea strains were similar to Branhamella catarrhalis strains because both species failed to produce detectable acid from glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose in cysteine-tryptic agar media. However, in contrast to N. cinerea strains, B. catarrhalis strains did not metabolize glucose in BACTEC Neisseria Differentiation kits.

  14. Mise en évidence d'une variation intra spécifique chez Botrytis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    25 avr. 2013 ... intraspecific variation. The sterilized compost extracts efficiency on B. cinerea in vitro proves that chemical compounds are involved and suggests the possibility of using these extracts and compost in vivo against tomato gray mold. Keywords: B. cinerea, intraspecific variation, compost extract, growth, ...

  15. Sexual selection in Nauphoeta cinerea: inherited mating preference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A J

    1989-09-01

    In the cockroach, Nauphoeta cinerea, female preferences with respect to sexual selection can be easily examined. Mating is nonrandom due to female preferences based on olfactory differences among males. This mate choice results in a mating advantage for socially dominant males. In this paper, results of experiments designed to explore the relationship between female choice in daughters and the preferred male character are described. Using females with male parents of known status and an olfactometer to determine preferences, it is shown that the type of male preferred depends on the status of the female's father. Because social experiences of females were experimentally controlled, these preliminary results suggest that (1) variation in female preferences may have a genetic basis and (2) because of assortative mating, mate choice may be genetically linked to the preferred male character, as predicted by mathematical models of the sexual selection process. N. cinerea appears to be an ideal species for testing predictions and assumptions of models of sexual selection.

  16. The laccase gene family in Coprinopsis cinerea (Coprinus cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegger, Patrik J; Navarro-González, Monica; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Hoffmann, Matthias; Westbrook, Elisha D; Kües, Ursula

    2004-02-01

    In this study, we isolated and sequenced eight non-allelic laccase genes from Coprinopsis cinerea ( Coprinus cinereus) homokaryon AmutBmut. These eight genes represent the largest laccase gene family identified so far in a single haploid fungal genome. We analyzed the phylogenetic relationships between these genes by intron positions, amino acid sequence conservation and similarities in promoter sequences. All deduced protein products have the laccase signature sequences L1-L4, the typical conserved cysteine and the ten histidine residues which are ligands in the two laccase copper-binding centers, T1 and T2/T3. Proteins Lcc2 and Lcc3 of Coprinopsis cinerea are most similar to the acidic, membrane-associated laccase CLAC2 from Coprinellus congregatus implicated in neutralization of acidic medium. All other laccases from the saprophyte Coprinopsis cinerea, including the well described enzyme Lcc1, form a cluster separate from these three enzymes and from various laccases of wood-rotting and plant-pathogenic basidiomycetes.

  17. Recovery and germination of Dichrostachys cinerea seeds fed to goats (Capra hircus)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tjelele, JT

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available addressed. The objective of this study was to determine the recovery rate and germination of D. cinerea seeds that pass through the digestive tract of goats. We hypothesized that 1) D. cinerea seeds will remain intact and viable after passage through...

  18. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  19. Antimalarial activity of sesquiterpene lactones from Vernonia cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chea, Aun; Hout, Sotheara; Long, Christophe; Marcourt, Laurence; Faure, Robert; Azas, Nadine; Elias, Riad

    2006-10-01

    Two new sesquiterpene lactones, vernolides C and D as well as six known ones were isolated from the dichloromethane fraction of an aqueous extract from Vernonia cinerea. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Among the known sesquiterpene lactones, three of them were described in this plant for the first time. In vitro antiplasmodial evaluation showed that the three major compounds 1, 7 and 8 were active against chloroquine resistant Plasmodium falciparum strain (W2) with IC(50) 3.9, 3.7 and 3.5 microM, respectively.

  20. Bioactive sesquiterpene lactones and other compounds isolated from Vernonia cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Ui Joung; Miklossy, Gabriella; Chai,Xingyun; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Toyama, Onoomar; Songsak, Thanapat; Turkson, James; Chang, Leng Chee

    2013-01-01

    Four new sesquiterpene lactones, 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (1), 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide-13-O-acetate (2), 8α-(4-hydroxytigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (3), and 8α-hydroxy-13-O-tigloyl-hirsutinolide (4), along with seven known derivatives (5–11), three norisoprenoids (12–14), a flavonoid (15), and a linoleic acid derivative (16), were isolated from the chloroform partition of a methanol extract from the combined leaves and stems of Vernonia cinerea. Their structures were establishe...

  1. Controlling Gladiolus botrytis bud rot with ozone gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magie, R.O.

    1960-01-01

    Treatment of gladiolus spikes with ozone gas appears to be safer and as effective in controlling Botrytis disease as fungicidal dips. The treatment is less expensive than dipping and the flowers are kept dry. Ozone is most active under dry, cool conditions and could be used to best advantage in an air-conditioned packing house. Several models of the Aire-Zone ozonator were used in these tests. Their operation and maintenance are simple and inexpensive. These and other grid-type ozonators are safely used in hospitals and homes but the open-arc type should be avoided. Methods of determining the concentration of ozone near the flowers are crude but better methods are being developed. 3 references, 4 tables.

  2. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  3. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  4. Występowanie szarej pleśni tulipanow – Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind na plantacjach produkcyjnych [Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind in tulip plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cz. Zamorski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of disease caused by Botrytis tulipae (Lib. Lind was studied in selected tulip plantations. Primary and secondary infection, as well as infections of daughter bulbs were observed. The number of affected plants differed according (to the variety, season, and rainfall.

  5. Estudio del crecimiento de "Botrytis cinerea" Pers. ex. Fr. y del desarrollo de las podreduumbres de frutos de tomate con el uso de aceites esenciales

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes López, María Almudena

    2013-01-01

    En unos tiempos en los que la eliminación o reducción del uso de fungicidas sintéticos constituye una necesidad, la búsqueda de sustancias inocuas o de muy reducida toxicidad que resulten ser una alternativa válida es un tema de investigación fundamental en este campo. Sin embargo, este tipo de investigación, realizado bajo este enfoque, se lleva realizando desde hace al menos 40 años y no existe una alternativa eficaz y económica para sustituir a los fungicidas de síntesis. Es...

  6. Progresso da seca da haste (Botrytis cinerea do hibisco (Hibiscus sabdariffa em quatro épocas e dois métodos de plantio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O progresso da seca da haste em hibisco foi estudado em quatro épocas e dois métodos de plantio. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições e os oito tratamentos foram dispostos em esquema fatorial 4 (épocas de plantio x 2 (métodos de plantio, sendo: semeadura direta em 05/02/03, 06/03/03, 05/04/03 e 15/05/03; transplantio de mudas em 24/12/02, 25/01/03, 24/02/03 e 25/03/03. Imediatamente após o surgimento dos sintomas, avaliou-se a doença a cada 10 dias até o final do ciclo, aos 205 dias, calculando-se a porcentagem de hastes infectadas por planta. Calculou-se a área abaixo da curva de progresso para a incidência (AACPI. As curvas de progresso da doença dos tratamentos foram submetidas ao ajuste dos modelos linear, exponencial, monomolecular, logístico e Gompertz. Houve interação significativa de métodos e épocas de plantio na incidência da doença. Constatou-se menor incidência da seca da haste em transplantio de mudas comparado à semeadura direta em todas as épocas de plantio. Verificou-se aumento da incidência proporcionado pelo atraso na época de plantio nos dois métodos. O modelo exponencial foi o que melhor descreveu o comportamento da doença em todos os tratamentos. As diferenças estatísticas entre os tratamentos, considerando a taxa de progresso, não refletiram a intensidade da doença no campo. Na mesma época de plantio, as quantidades inicial e máxima da doença, observadas na semeadura direta, foram superiores aos tratamentos referentes ao transplantio de mudas, coerentes com os valores da AACPI. Registrou-se uma relação direta entre queda de temperatura e aumento da incidência da seca da haste.

  7. Health monitoring of plants by their emitted volatiles: A model to predict the effect of Botrytis cinerea on the concentration of volatiles in a large-scale greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.M.C.; Hofstee, J.W.; Wildt, J.; Vanthoor, B.H.E.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Takayama, K.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Henten, van E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a model to calculate the concentrations of (Z)-3-hexenol, a-pinene, a-terpinene, ß-caryophyllene, and methyl salicylate in a greenhouse on the basis of their source and sink behaviour. The model was used to determine whether these volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can be used to

  8. Genetic analysis and molecular characterisation of laboratory and field mutants of Botryotinia fuckeliana (Botrytis cinerea) resistant to QoI fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miccolis Angelini, Rita M; Rotolo, Caterina; Masiello, Mario; Pollastro, Stefania; Ishii, Hideo; Faretra, Francesco

    2012-09-01

    QoI fungicides, inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, are considered to be at high risk of resistance development. In several phytopathogenic fungi, resistance is caused by mutations (most frequently G143A) in the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cytb) gene. The genetic and molecular basis of QoI resistance were investigated in laboratory and field mutants of Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetz. exhibiting in vitro reduced sensitivity to trifloxystrobin. B. fuckeliana mutants highly resistant to trifloxystrobin were obtained in the laboratory by spontaneous mutations in wild-type strains, or from naturally infected plants on a medium amended with 1-3 mg L(-1) trifloxystrobin and 2 mM salicylhydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of alternative oxidase. No point mutations were detected, either in the complete nucleotide sequences of the cytb gene or in those of the aox and Rieske protein genes of laboratory mutants, whereas all field mutants carried the G143A mutation in the mitochondrial cytb gene. QoI resistance was always maternally inherited in ascospore progeny of sexual crosses of field mutants with sensitive reference strains. The G143A mutation in cytb gene is confirmed to be responsible for field resistance to QoIs in B. fuckeliana. Maternal inheritance of resistance to QoIs in progeny of sexual crosses confirmed that it is caused by extranuclear genetic determinants. In laboratory mutants the heteroplasmic state of mutated mitochondria could likely hamper the G143A detection, otherwise other gene(s) underlying different mechanisms of resistance could be involved. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Zhen; Li, Yong-Yu

    2014-01-07

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is characterized by chronic relapsing intestinal inflammation. It has been a worldwide health-care problem with a continually increasing incidence. It is thought that IBD results from an aberrant and continuing immune response to the microbes in the gut, catalyzed by the genetic susceptibility of the individual. Although the etiology of IBD remains largely unknown, it involves a complex interaction between the genetic, environmental or microbial factors and the immune responses. Of the four components of IBD pathogenesis, most rapid progress has been made in the genetic study of gut inflammation. The latest internationally collaborative studies have ascertained 163 susceptibility gene loci for IBD. The genes implicated in childhood-onset and adult-onset IBD overlap, suggesting similar genetic predispositions. However, the fact that genetic factors account for only a portion of overall disease variance indicates that microbial and environmental factors may interact with genetic elements in the pathogenesis of IBD. Meanwhile, the adaptive immune response has been classically considered to play a major role in the pathogenesis of IBD, as new studies in immunology and genetics have clarified that the innate immune response maintains the same importance in inducing gut inflammation. Recent progress in understanding IBD pathogenesis sheds lights on relevant disease mechanisms, including the innate and adaptive immunity, and the interactions between genetic factors and microbial and environmental cues. In this review, we provide an update on the major advances that have occurred in above areas.

  10. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy John Watts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusion is that although there is not a clear pathway of mechanisms directed towards a simple pathogenesis and an established link to autism on the symptomatic level; there are however several important theories (neural connectivity, neural migration, excitatory-inhibitory neural activity, dendritic morphology, neuroimmune; calcium signalling and mirror neurone which appear to offer an explanation to how autism develops. It seems probable that autism's neurodevelopmental defect is ‘multi-domain’ in origin (rather than a single anomaly and is hence distributed across numerous levels of study (genetic, immunopathogenic, etc.. A more definitive understanding of the pathogenesis could facilitate the development of better treatments for this complex psychiatric disorder.

  11. Identification of a Novel Nematotoxic Protein by Challenging the Model Mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea with a Fungivorous Nematode

    OpenAIRE

    David Fernando Plaza; Stefanie Sofia Schmieder; Anna Lipzen; Erika Lindquist; Markus Künzler

    2015-01-01

    The dung of herbivores, the natural habitat of the model mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea, is a nutrient-rich but also very competitive environment for a saprophytic fungus. We showed previously that C. cinerea expresses constitutive, tissue-specific armories against antagonists such as animal predators and bacterial competitors. In order to dissect the inducible armories against such antagonists, we sequenced the poly(A)-positive transcriptome of C. cinerea vegetative mycelium upon challenge wit...

  12. Growth factors and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Soriful; Greco, Stefania; Janjusevic, Milijana; Ciavattini, Andrea; Giannubilo, Stefano Raffaele; D'Adderio, Assunta; Biagini, Alessandra; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Castellucci, Mario; Ciarmela, Pasquapina

    2016-07-01

    Growth factors are relatively small and stable, secreted or membrane-bound polypeptide ligands, which play an important role in proliferation, differentiation, angiogenesis, survival, inflammation, and tissue repair, or fibrosis. They exert multiple effects through the activation of signal transduction pathways by binding to their receptors on the surface of target cells. A number of studies have demonstrated the central role of growth factors and their signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas. Numerous differentially expressed growth factors have been identified in leiomyoma and myometrial cells. These growth factors can activate multiple signaling pathways (Smad 2/3, ERK 1/2, PI3K, and β-catenin) and regulate major cellular processes, including inflammation, proliferation, angiogenesis, and fibrosis which are linked to uterine leiomyoma development and growth. In this chapter, we discuss the role of growth factors and their signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pathogenesis of Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilayda Karakök Güngör

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic urticaria is defined by the presence of urticaria on most days of the week for longer than six weeks. Appereance of the lesions is not triggered by any reasons. Mast cell and basophil degranulation and releasing of histamine is the main cause of apperance of hives. In 1960, it was first hypothesised that chronic urticaria is an autoimmune condition. This hypothesis is supported by autoloug serum skin test positivity in some cases. It is not clear whether autoantibodies or serum or plasma factors triggered autoreactivity in cases with autolog serum skin test positivity. Compleman activity as also one of the key factors in basophil degranulation. Functional differences in basophils has also been shown by studies. Absence of characteristics of allergic late phase reaction in dermathopathologic specimen, suggests clues for better understanding the pathogenesis. In this review theories about pathogenesis of chronic urticaria will be discussed.

  14. Tennis Elbow Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Vicens

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Lateral epicondylitis, also known as tennis elbow, is a common pathology that usually affects tennis players and athletes involved in overhead throwing, especially athletes between 30 and 50 years old. It is a painful condition that starts with swelling of the tendons that attach to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus and continues as a tendinosis. This pathology is related to a repetitive contraction of the extensor carpi radialis and it could also be associated with the conditions of the tennis racquet, an improper technique while playing tennis or with the frequency of play. The aim of this review is to analyze the different causes of suffering lateral epicondylitis in tennis players and its pathogenesis. METHODS: A bibliographic research has been performed with Medline database. In order to obtain as much as relevant literature possible, the key words used were: tennis elbow AND pathogenesis. Only manuscripts that had been published in the last five years and only English- written studies were selected, as well as studies that really mentioned pathogenesis of lateral epicondylitis in adult tennis players. RESULTS: 434 results were obtained reducing to 81 manuscripts in the last five years. Following the selection criteria, four systematic reviews were obtained referring to tennis elbow in athletes and pathogenesis. These studies mentioned the possible causes of lateral epicondylitis, especially in tennis players due to their constantly exercise over the extensor muscles that have their origin in the humeral epicondyle in order to keep going with the tennis practice. CONCLUSIONS: A repetitive contraction of the extensor carpi radialis seems to cause lateral epicondylitis in tennis players. But, in fact, there are some aspects that differ: the conditions of the racquet could be a cause of this pathology, as well as an incorrect technique while playing tennis and the frequency of play.

  15. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...... Associate Professor Allan Stensballe The output of this PhD programme, besides from this dissertation, includes 5 published papers, 30 ECTS PhD courses, oral presentations of posters in national and international research environment and a short-term scholarship at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy...

  16. Pathogenesis of microbial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhundi, Sahreena; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening ocular infection caused by bacteria, fungi, and protist pathogens. Epithelial defects and injuries are key predisposing factors making the eye susceptible to corneal pathogens. Among bacterial pathogens, the most common agents responsible for keratitis include Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Serratia species. Fungal agents of corneal infections include both filamentous as well as yeast, including Fusarium, Aspergillus, Phaeohyphomycetes, Curvularia, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium and Candida species, while in protists, Acanthamoeba spp. are responsible for causing ocular disease. Clinical features include redness, pain, tearing, blur vision and inflammation but symptoms vary depending on the causative agent. The underlying molecular mechanisms associated with microbial pathogenesis include virulence factors as well as the host factors that aid in the progression of keratitis, resulting in damage to the ocular tissue. The treatment therefore should focus not only on the elimination of the culprit but also on the neutralization of virulence factors to minimize the damage, in addition to repairing the damaged tissue. A complete understanding of the pathogenesis of microbial keratitis will lead to the rational development of therapeutic interventions. This is a timely review of our current understanding of the advances made in this field in a comprehensible manner. Coupled with the recently available genome sequence information and high throughput genomics technology, and the availability of innovative approaches, this will stimulate interest in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathogenesis of Rhinovirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Joshua L; Turner, Ronald B.; Braciale, Thomas; Heymann, Peter W.; Borish, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Summary Since its discovery in 1956, rhinovirus (RV) has been recognized as the most important virus producing the common cold syndrome. Despite its ubiquity, little is known concerning the pathogenesis of RV infections, and some of the research in this area has led to contradictions regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of RV-induced illness. In this article, we discuss the pathogenesis of this virus as it relates to RV-induced illness in the upper and lower airway, an issue of considerable interest in view of the minimal cytopathology associated with RV infection. We endeavor to explain why many infected individuals exhibit minimal symptoms or remain asymptomatic, while others, especially those with asthma, may have severe, even life-threatening, complications (sequelae). Finally, we discuss the immune responses to RV in the normal and asthmatic host focusing on RV infection and epithelial barrier integrity and maintenance as well as the impact of the innate and adaptive immune responses to RV on epithelial function. PMID:22542099

  18. Pemphigus: Epidemiology and Pathogenesis

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    Yelda Karıncaoğlu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus, a group of bullous diseases affecting the oral mucosa and the skin, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmogleins (Dsg, desmosomal transmembrane glycoproteins, leading to acantholysis. Pemphigus has a worldwide distribution but the incidence in patients of Jewish origin is higher. The disease has a peak incidence of occurrence between the 4th and 6th decades. While various environmental factors have been implicated as triggering agents, HLA association is probably the most important predisposing factor. Pemphigus, is caused by antibody-mediated autoimmune reaction to desmosomal cadherins, Dsg1, and Dsg3. Recent molecular studies have shown that acantholysis can occur also in the presence of antibodies against 9a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Pemphigus is currently divided into three distinct varieties, i.e., pemphigus vulgaris (PV, pemphigus foliaceus (PF and other variants of pemphigus, depending on clinical features, the level of separation in the epidermis, and immunologic characteristics of auto-antigens. Blistering pathogenesis differ for each of the types of pemphigus. PV is characterized by IgG autoantibodies against Dsg 3, whereas the target of PF is Dsg1, although about 50% of PV patients also have Dsg1 autoantibodies. Lesion distribution is related to the location of the antigen (Dgs 3 and/or Dgs 1 in the epithelium and specific autoantibody production. This article reviews the epidemiology and pathogenesis of pemphigus.

  19. Differences in epicuticular wax layer in tulip can influence resistance to Botrytis tulipae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon-Reyes, A.; Prins, T.W.; Empel, van J.P.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis tulipae is one of the major diseases of tulip. The pathogen is a necrotroph and infection normally results in host cell death, resulting in serious damage to plant tissues and culminating in rotten plants. Several defense strategies are required to counter attack this aggressive invader.

  20. Control strategies with reduced fungicide input for Botrytis leaf blight in lily - a simulation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, de J.; Ende, van den J.E.; Rossing, W.A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Leaf blight, caused by the pathogen Botrytis elliptica (Berk.) Cooke, is the most important foliar disease in ornamental lily cultivation. The conventional control strategy of Dutch bulb growers is to apply protective fungicides at weekly intervals from crop emergence until harvest. We applied

  1. Development of a weather-based model for Botrytis leaf blight of onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luiz Marcuzzo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, onion plants were tested under controlled conditions for the development of a climate model based on the influence of temperature (10, 15, 20 and 25°C and leaf wetness duration (6, 12, 24 and 48 hours on the severity of Botrytis leaf blight of onion caused by Botrytis squamosa. The relative lesion density was influenced by temperature and leaf wetness duration (P <0.05. The disease was most severe at 20°C. Data were subjected to nonlinear regression analysis. Beta generalized function was used to adjust severity and temperature data, while a logistic function was chosen to represent the effect of leaf wetness on the severity of Botrytis leaf blight. The response surface obtained by the product of two functions was expressed as ES = 0.008192 * (((x-51.01089 * ((30-x1.19052 * (0.33859/(1+3.77989 * exp (-0.10923*y, where ES represents the estimated severity value (0.1; x, the temperature (°C; and y, the leaf wetness (in hours. This climate model should be validated under field conditions to verify its use as a computational system for the forecasting of Botrytis leaf blight in onion.

  2. Biological control of Botrytis spp. by Ulocladium atrum : an ecological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessel, G.

    1999-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi from the genus Botrytis cause economically important diseases in a wide range of crops during the production phase as well as post harvest phase. Control is based on the frequent use of fungicides. Alternative approaches for control are studied

  3. Bioactive sesquiterpene lactones and other compounds isolated from Vernonia cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ui Joung; Miklossy, Gabriella; Chai, Xingyun; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Toyama, Onoomar; Songsak, Thanapat; Turkson, James; Chang, Leng Chee

    2014-01-01

    Four new sesquiterpene lactones, 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (1), 8α-(2′Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide-13-O-acetate (2), 8α-(4-hydroxytigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (3), and 8α-hydroxy-13-O-tigloyl-hirsutinolide (4), along with seven known derivatives (5–11), three norisoprenoids (12–14), a flavonoid (15), and a linoleic acid derivative (16), were isolated from the chloroform partition of a methanol extract from the combined leaves and stems of Vernonia cinerea. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, and MS analyses. Compounds 1–16 were evaluated for their inhibitory effects against the viability of U251MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that harbour aberrantly-active STAT3, compared to normal NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts that show no evidence of activated STAT3. Among the isolates, compounds 2 and 7 inhibited the aberrant STAT3 activity in glioblastoma or breast cancer cells. Further, compounds 7 and 8 inhibited viability of all three cell lines, compounds 2, 4, and 9 predominantly inhibited the viability of the U251MG glioblastoma cell line. PMID:24370662

  4. Bioactive sesquiterpene lactones and other compounds isolated from Vernonia cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ui Joung; Miklossy, Gabriella; Chai, Xingyun; Wongwiwatthananukit, Supakit; Toyama, Onoomar; Songsak, Thanapat; Turkson, James; Chang, Leng Chee

    2014-03-01

    Four new sesquiterpene lactones, 8α-(2'Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (1), 8α-(2'Z-tigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide-13-O-acetate (2), 8α-(4-hydroxytigloyloxy)-hirsutinolide (3), and 8α-hydroxy-13-O-tigloyl-hirsutinolide (4), along with seven known derivatives (5-11), three norisoprenoids (12-14), a flavonoid (15), and a linoleic acid derivative (16), were isolated from the chloroform partition of a methanol extract from the combined leaves and stems of Vernonia cinerea. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, and MS analyses. Compounds 1-16 were evaluated for their inhibitory effects against the viability of U251MG glioblastoma and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that harbour aberrantly-active STAT3, compared to normal NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts that show no evidence of activated STAT3. Among the isolates, compounds 2 and 7 inhibited the aberrant STAT3 activity in glioblastoma or breast cancer cells. Further, compounds 7 and 8 inhibited viability of all three cell lines, compounds 2, 4, and 9 predominantly inhibited the viability of the U251MG glioblastoma cell line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of stipe elongation of the mushroom Coprinopsis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenming; Wu, Xiuxiu; Zhou, Yajun; Liu, Zhonghua; Zhang, Wen; Niu, Xin; Zhao, Yan; Pei, Siyu; Zhao, Yang; Yuan, Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Previously, we observed an acid-induced short-term wall extension in Flammulina velutipes apical stipes during a 15 min period after a change from a neutral to an acidic pH. This acid-induced stipe wall extension was eliminated by heating and reconstituted by a snail expansin-like protein, although we failed to isolate any endogenous expansin-like protein from F. velutipes because of its limited 1 mm fast elongation region. In this study, we report that Coprinopsis cinerea stipes possess a 9 mm fast elongation apical region, which is suitable as a model material for wall extension studies. The elongating apical stipe showed two phases of acid-induced wall extension, an initial quick short-term wall extension during the first 15 min and a slower, gradually decaying long-term wall extension over the subsequent 2 h. After heating or protein inactivation pretreatment, apical stipes lost the long-term wall extension, retaining a slower short-term wall extension, which was reconstituted by an expansin-like snail protein. In contrast, the non-elongating basal stipes showed only a weaker short-term wall extension. We propose that the long-term wall extension is a protein-mediated process involved in stipe elongation, whereas the short-term wall extension is a non-protein mediated process not involved in stipe elongation. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. Controversies in dengue pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B

    2012-01-01

    Research into the pathogenesis of dengue fever has exploded over the last half-century, with issues that were considered simple becoming more complex as additional data are found. This has led to the development of a number of controversies that are being studied across the globe and debated in the literature. In this paper, the following six controversies are analysed and, where possible, resolved: the 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) is not useful; DHF is not significantly associated with secondary dengue infection; DHF results from infection with a ‘virulent’ dengue virus; DHF is owing to abnormal T-cell responses; DHF results from auto-immune responses; and DHF results from direct infection of endothelial cells. PMID:22668442

  7. Pathogenesis of dermatophytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermout, Sandy; Tabart, Jérémy; Baldo, Aline; Mathy, Anne; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Despite the superficial localization of most dermatophytosis, host-fungus relationship in these infections is complex and still poorly elucidated. Though many efforts have been accomplished to characterize secreted dermatophytic proteases at the molecular level, only punctual insights have been afforded into other aspects of the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis, such as fungal adhesion, regulation of gene expression during the infection process, and immunomodulation by fungal factors. However, new genetic tools were recently developed, allowing a more rapid and high-throughput functional investigation of dermatophyte genes and the identification of new putative virulence factors. In addition, sophisticated in vitro infection models are now used and will open the way to a more comprehensive view of the interactions between these fungi and host epidermal cells, especially keratinocytes.

  8. Pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome

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    Daniele Masarone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is an enigmatic disease with a multifactorial and still unresolved pathogenesis. Postulated mechanisms include catecholamine excess, coronary artery spasm, and microvascular dysfunction, however catecholamines seem to play a central role in the pathophysiology of TTS. In facts catecholamines have relevant effects on the vasculature and myocardium. Toxic direct effects of catecholamine on myocardium are mediated by multiple pathway including functional hypoxia, metabolic changes and changes in membrane permeability leading to various electrolytic imbalances. Recently report of familial cases has suggested a genetic component. Further research is required to help clarify the proposed hypotheses and to increase our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acute stress and the pathophysiology underpinning TTS.

  9. Pathogenesis of Lassa Fever

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    David H. Walker

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae, is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host’s immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  10. Pathogenesis of Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Walker, David H

    2012-10-09

    Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus (family Arenaviridae), is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe human disease that is reported in more than 100,000 patients annually in the endemic regions of West Africa with mortality rates for hospitalized patients varying between 5-10%. Currently, there are no approved vaccines against Lassa fever for use in humans. Here, we review the published literature on the life cycle of Lassa virus with the specific focus put on Lassa fever pathogenesis in humans and relevant animal models. Advancing knowledge significantly improves our understanding of Lassa virus biology, as well as of the mechanisms that allow the virus to evade the host's immune system. However, further investigations are required in order to design improved diagnostic tools, an effective vaccine, and therapeutic agents.

  11. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

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    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  12. Morfología y biología de los estados inmaduros de Marilia cinerea y M. elongata, con redescripción del macho adulto de M. cinerea (Trichoptera: Odontoceridae Morphology and biology of the immature stages of Marilia cinerea and M. elongata, with redescriptions of adult male of M. cinerea (Trichoptera: Odontoceridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A. Rueda Martín

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available La fauna de Trichoptera de Las Yungas del noroeste de Argentina y sur de Bolivia es poco conocida en la actualidad. De las aproximadamente 30 especies Neotropicales para el género Marilia Muller, sólo se han podido asociar a sus respectivos adultos los estados preimaginales de cuatro especies, a pesar de su importancia ecológica y de ser éstos los estados más conspicuos y abundantes. En el presente trabajo se redescribe e ilustra la genitalia del macho adulto de M. cinerea Navás. Se usó el método del metamorfotipo y se realizaron las asociaciones de los estados inmaduros de M. cinerea y M. elongata Martynov, se incluyen descripciones, ilustraciones y datos sobre hábitat y biología de los mismos