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Sample records for botanical composition

  1. Botanical composition of feed of camels and nutritive value of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botanical composition of feed of camels and nutritive value of consumed plants in a arid rangeland of Niger. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... to assess the chemical composition and nutritional values of plants consumed by camels to see what is their input of energy and crude protein to the animals.

  2. Grazing effects on forage production and botanical composition in a Quercus ithaburensis subs. macrolepis silvopastoral system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantera, A.; Papanastasis, V. P.

    2009-04-01

    Grazing is considered as a major factor affecting forage production as well as botanical composition of many silvopastoral systems. In order to study these effects, three pairs of grazed and protected plots were established in a Quercus ithaburensis subsp. macrolepis silvopastoral system. The experiment was carried out in western Greece, 15 km west of the city of Agrinion. Data were collected for two continuous years and included the determination of palatable and unpalatable to animals plant species as well as the botanical composition. The results suggest that heavy grazing decreased biomass production approximately threefold. Grazing also affected number of acorns, botanical composition as well as vegetation cover whereas had no effect on natural regeneration in the study period.

  3. Chemical composition, characterization, and differentiation of honey botanical and geographical origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Qing X

    2011-01-01

    Botanical and biographical origins of honey are an important issue in food quality and safety. This chapter focuses on use of chemical components to determine botanical and geographical origins of honey. The botanical and geographical origins of the nectar are related with the chemical composition of honey. Honey can originate from single and multiplant species. In general, the prices of honey from single plant species are much higher than those of common polyfloral honey because of consumer preferences. Single and multiple chemicals and components can well indicate the botanical and geographical origins of the honey. Marker chemicals and components include flavonoids, pollen, aroma compounds, oligosaccharides, trace elements, amino acids, and proteins. If multiple chemicals are used as markers, patterns of the chemicals are often used to detect the botanical and geographical origins of honey. Modern statistical software in combination with advanced analytical instrumentation provides high potential for the differentiation of the botanical and geographical origins of the honey. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brazilian Red Propolis—Chemical Composition and Botanical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Daugsch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis contains resinous substances collected by honey bees from various plant sources and has been used as a traditional folk medicine since ca 300 BC. Nowadays, the use of evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is increasing rapidly and so is the use of propolis in order to treat or support the treatment of various diseases. Much attention has been focused on propolis from Populus sp. (Salicaceae and Baccharis dracunculifolia (Asteracea, but scientific information about the numerous other types of propolis is still sparse. We gathered six samples of red propolis in five states of Northeastern Brazil. The beehives were located near woody perennial shrubs along the sea and river shores. The bees were observed to collect red resinous exudates on Dalbergia ecastophyllum (L Taub. (Leguminosae to make propolis. The flavonoids of propolis and red resinous exudates were investigated using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance thin-layer chromatography. We conclude that the botanical origin of the reddish propolis is D. ecastophyllum. In areas where this source (D. ecastophyllum was scarce or missing, bees were collecting resinous material from other plants. Propolis, which contained the chemical constituents from the main botanical origin, showed higher antimicrobial activity.

  5. Gastrointestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njåstad, K. M.; Adler, S. A.; Hansen-Møller, J.

    2014-01-01

    fed silages with different botanical composition. Four lactating rumen cannulated Norwegian Red cattle were assigned to a 4. ×. 4 Latin square with 1 cow per treatment period of 3 wk. The 4 treatment silages were prepared from grasslands with different botanical compositions: organically managed short......Dietary phytoestrogens are metabolized or converted in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants, only limited knowledge exists on the extent and location of this conversion in vivo. The objective of this study was to quantify the gastro-intestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows...... timothy ley (CON-TI). The herbages were cut, wilted, and preserved with additive in round bales, fed as a mix of the first and third cut at 90% of ad libitum intake, and contributed to 70% of the total dry matter intake. Milk, feed, omasal digesta, urine, and feces were collected at the end of each period...

  6. Poplar-type Propolis: Chemical Composition, Botanical Origin and Biological Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristivojević, Petar; Trifković, Jelena; Andrić, Filip; Milojković-Opsenica, Dusanka

    2015-11-01

    Propolis is one of the most used natural products known for centuries for its beneficial effects. Due to significant differences in chemical composition of samples originating from different geographic and climatic zones it is crucial to characterize reliably each type of propolis. This article comprises the latest findings concerning the poplar type propolis, i.e. it gives a cross section of chemical composition, botanical origin and biological activity of poplar type propolis in order to encourage further investigations that would indicate its beneficial effects.

  7. Species Diversity and Botanical Composition of Permanent Grassland as a Response to Different Grazing Management Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Štýbnarová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different levels of grazing utilization (two, three and four grazing cycles per year and mineral fertilization (nil-fertilization; N100P30K60 on the botanical composition of permanent grasslands were studied in the locality of Rapotín (Czech Republic, 332 m a.s.l. from 2003–2010. The vegetation of the experimental pasture was classified as Cynosurion. It was found that moderate treatment (three grazing cycles per year without mineral fertilization showed the highest value of diversity index (DI = 6.08, and maximum dominance of legumes (Dmax = 9.1%, particularly Trifolium repens. The highest dominance of grasses (Dmax = 77.7%, mainly Dactylis glomerata and Elytrigia repens, was achieved with the fertilized treatment utilized in two grazing cycles per year. Based on RDA results, tested management treatments explained 26% of species composition variability, where effect of number of grazing cycles per year was five-times higher than effect of fertilization. We recommend grassland utilization in three grazing cycles per year as the most suitable way from the objective of both species diversity and botanical composition of pastures in similar site conditions. Pasture fertilization should be more controlled by careful consideration of individual pasture goals, actual nutrient status of the soil and possible environmental risks.

  8. New propolis type from north-east Brazil: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and botanical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joselena M; Fernandes-Silva, Caroline C; Salatino, Antonio; Negri, Giuseppina; Message, Dejair

    2017-08-01

    Propolis is a bee product with wide diversity of biological activity. It has a complex composition, which is dependent on its botanical source. The present study aimed to determine the chemical profile, antioxidant activity and botanical origin of two samples of a propolis type from two locations of the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN, north-east Brazil). The standard chemical characteristics of the RN propolis are similar or superior to the internationally marketed Brazilian green propolis. RN propolis from two locations have high antioxidant activity, corresponding to 10% (municipality of Afonso Bezerra) and 13% (municipality of Alto do Rodrigues) of quercetin activity by the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method and to 15% (both locations) by the β-carotene discoloration method. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD)-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analyses revealed that most constituents of the RN propolis are flavonoids, mainly flavonols and chalcones. HPLC-DAD analysis of ethanol extracts revealed a great similarity between the chemical profile of RN propolis and shoot apices of 'jurema-preta' (Mimosa tenuiflora, Leguminosae, Mimosoideae). 'Jurema-preta' shoot apices are likely resin sources of RN propolis. The chemical characteristics and antioxidant property of RN propolis provide promising prospects for the introduction of this type of propolis into the apicultural market. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Analysis of pollen load based on color, physicochemical composition and botanical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modro, Anna F H; Silva, Izabel C; Luz, Cynthia F P; Message, Dejair

    2009-06-01

    Pollen load samples from 10 hives of Apis mellifera (L.) were analyzed based on their physicochemical composition and botanical source, considering color as a parameter for quality control. In seven samples it was possible to establish the occurrence of more than 80% of a single pollen type, characterizing them as unifloral but with protein content variation. One of the samples was exclusively composed of saprophytic fungi (Cladosporium sp.). Comparing the mean results of the fungi loads with those of the nutritional components of pollen load, the former presented higher protein, mineral matter and dry matter and lower organic matter, ethereal extract and total carbohydrate values. The monochromatic samples met the physicochemical specifications regulating pollen load quality. The results showed that homogeneous coloration of the pollen load was not found to be a good indication of unifloral pollen, confirming the importance of physicochemical analysis and melissopalynological analysis for characterization of the quality of commercial pollen load.

  10. Terpenoid compositions and botanical origins of Late Cretaceous and Miocene amber from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Gongle; Dutta, Suryendu; Paul, Swagata; Wang, Bo; Jacques, Frédéric M B

    2014-01-01

    The terpenoid compositions of the Late Cretaceous Xixia amber from Central China and the middle Miocene Zhangpu amber from Southeast China were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to elucidate their botanical origins. The Xixia amber is characterized by sesquiterpenoids, abietane and phyllocladane type diterpenoids, but lacks phenolic abietanes and labdane derivatives. The molecular compositions indicate that the Xixia amber is most likely contributed by the conifer family Araucariaceae, which is today distributed primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but widely occurred in the Northern Hemisphere during the Mesozoic according to paleobotanical evidence. The middle Miocene Zhangpu amber is characterized by amyrin and amyrone-based triterpenoids and cadalene-based sesquiterpenoids. It is considered derived from the tropical angiosperm family Dipterocarpaceae based on these compounds and the co-occurring fossil winged fruits of the family in Zhangpu. This provides new evidence for the occurrence of a dipterocarp forest in the middle Miocene of Southeast China. It is the first detailed biomarker study for amber from East Asia.

  11. Relationships between botanical and chemical composition of forages: a multivariate approach to grasslands in the Western Italian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetto Enri, Simone; Renna, Manuela; Probo, Massimiliano; Lussiana, Carola; Battaglini, Luca M; Lonati, Michele; Lombardi, Giampiero

    2017-03-01

    Plant composition of species-rich mountain grasslands can affect the sensorial and chemical attributes of dairy and meat products, with implications for human health. A multivariate approach was used to analyse the complex relationships between vegetation characteristics (botanical composition and plant community variables) and chemical composition (proximate constituents and fatty acid profile) in mesophilic and dry vegetation ecological groups, comprising six different semi-natural grassland types in the Western Italian Alps. Mesophilic and dry grasslands were comparable in terms of phenology, biodiversity indices and proportion of botanical families. The content of total fatty acids and that of the most abundant fatty acids (alpha-linolenic, linoleic and palmitic acids) were mainly associated to nutrient-rich plant species, belonging to the mesophilic grassland ecological group. Mesophilic grasslands showed also higher values of crude protein, lower values of fibre content and they were related to higher pastoral values of vegetation compared to dry grasslands. The proximate composition and fatty acid profile appeared mainly single species dependent rather than botanical family dependent. These findings highlight that forage from mesophilic grasslands can provide higher nutritive value for ruminants and may be associated to ruminant-derived food products with a healthier fatty acid profile. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Effect of pasture botanical composition on milk composition in organic production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S.; Dahl, A.V.; Vae, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    no effect on milk fat, protein or vitamin concentration and only minor effects on fatty acid composition. Milk from GR had higher concentrations of the phytoestrogens equol, genistein and biochanin A than the milk from GCH. Concentrations of equol in milk from GR were higher than concentrations reported...

  13. Botanical composition, yield and nutritional quality of grassland in response to stages of harvesting and fertilizer application in the highland of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tessema, Z.K.; Ashagre, A.; Solomon, M.

    2010-01-01

    Livestock production contributes to the livelihoods of the Ethiopian people; however, the productivity of the livestock subsector in the highlands is low due to malnutrition. Therefore, this study assessed the botanical composition, dry matter (DM) yield, chemical composition and in vitro dry matter

  14. Chemical Composition and Botanical Origin of Red Propolis, a New Type of Brazilian Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Red propolis is a new type of Brazilian propolis. This material, as well as the secretions of 20 plant species that are often mentioned as its probable botanical source, have been investigated by RP-HPTLC. Phytochemical evidence based on UV-VIS spectra, RP-HPLC and GC-MS, showed Dalbergia ecastophyllum (L. Taub. to be the main source of red propolis in Alagoas state. The propolis and plant resin showed high relative percentages of the isoflavonoids 3-Hydroxy-8,9-dimethoxypterocarpan and medicarpin. To our knowledge this is the first report of the secretion of a leguminous species being the source of propolis.

  15. Chemical Composition and Botanical Origin of Red Propolis, a New Type of Brazilian Propolis

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Bruno B.; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Cury, Jaime A.; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Souza, Vinícius C.; Esteves, Alessandro; Alencar, Severino M.

    2008-01-01

    Red propolis is a new type of Brazilian propolis. This material, as well as the secretions of 20 plant species that are often mentioned as its probable botanical source, have been investigated by RP-HPTLC. Phytochemical evidence based on UV-VIS spectra, RP-HPLC and GC-MS, showed Dalbergia ecastophyllum (L.) Taub. to be the main source of red propolis in Alagoas state. The propolis and plant resin showed high relative percentages of the isoflavonoids 3-Hydroxy-8,9-dimethoxypterocarpan and medi...

  16. Terpenoid composition and botanical affinity of Cretaceous resins from India and Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mallick, Monalisa [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (India); Kumar, Kishor [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Uttarakhand (India); Mann, Ulrich [Forschungzentrum Juelich (Germany). Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere; Greenwood, Paul F. [John De Laeter Mass Spectrometry and WA Biogeochemistry Centres (M090), University of Western Australia, Crawley (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    Fossil resins from the Cretaceous sediments of Meghalaya, India and Kachin, Myanmar (Burma) were analysed using Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thermochemolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to help elucidate their botanical source. The major pyrolysis products and methyl-esterified thermochemolysis products of both the resins were abietane and labdane type diterpenoids with minor amount of sesquiterpenoids. The thermochemolysis products also included methyl-16,17-dinor callitrisate, methyl-16,17-dinor dehydroabietate and methyl-8-pimaren-18-oate - the latter two from just the Myanmarese resin. The exclusive presence of both labdane and abietane diterpenoids and the lack of phenolic terpenoids may suggest that the studied Cretaceous resins were derived from Pinaceae (pine family) conifers. (author)

  17. Contribution of botanical origin and sugar composition of honeys on the crystallization phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuredo, Olga; Dobre, Irina; Fernández-González, María; Seijo, M Carmen

    2014-04-15

    The present work provides information regarding the statistical relationships among the palynological characteristics, sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, melezitose and maltose), moisture content and sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W) of 136 different honey types (including bramble, chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia, lime, rape, sunflower and honeydew). Results of the statistical analyses (multiple comparison Bonferroni test, Spearman rank correlations and principal components) revealed the valuable significance of the botanical origin on the sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W). Brassica napus and Helianthus annuus pollen were the variables situated near F+G and G/W ratio, while Castanea sativa, Rubus and Eucalyptus pollen were located further away, as shown in the principal component analysis. The F/G ratio of sunflower, rape and lime honeys were lower than those found for the chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia and honeydew honeys (>1.4). A lower value F/G ratio and lower water content were related with a faster crystallization in the honey. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. ELEMENTAL COMPOSITION OF ROSEMARY SHOOTS (ROSMARINUS OFFICINALIS L., INTRODUCED IN THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF PYATIGORSK MEDICAL-PHARMACEUTICAL INSTITUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Nikitina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays studying plant objects in the framework of environmental monitoring to improve the quality of herbal remedies is a very important area of research.The aim of the work is to determine the elemental composition and assessment of environmental cleanliness of rosemary shoots (Rosmarinus offi cinalis L., introduced in Botanical garden of Pyatigorsk medical-pharmaceutical Institute (PMPI, Pyatigorsk (Russia.Materials and methods. An experimental study was performed at the Central research laboratories spectral analysis (“Kavkazgeolsyemka” on diffraction spectrograph DFS-8-1 by evaporation from a crater of the carbon electrode. Photometric measurement of spectrograms was performed using the Atlas of spectral lines and spectra of standards with an accuracy of not more than 2% in terms of ash.Results and discussion. For the fi rst time there were 25 elements identifi ed in rosemary shoots introduced in the North Caucasus. The prevailing macro elements were K, Ca, Mg, Na, P and the trace elements were Al, Si and Fe. The toxic elements As, Cd, Hg, Bi, Sb were not detected in the rosemary shoots. Rosemary does not accumulate heavy metals or they are present in trace amounts.Conclusion. The absence of heavy metals or their low content in rosemary shoots can be explained prosperous environmental conditions of Pyatigorsk Botanical garden. The use of rosemary shoots as a source of natural compounds of primary and secondary synthesis and minerals, are involved in the regulation of life processes. This underlines the therapeutic importance of the raw materials and the possibility of creating drugs of combined action on the basis of rosemary for the treatment and prevention of pathologies associated with disorders of mineral metabolism.

  19. Chemical Composition and Amounts of Mineral Elements in Honeybee-Collected Pollen in Relation to Botanical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha El-Kazafy Abdou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted at the apiary of the Agricultural and Veterinary Training and Research Station, King Faisal University, Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. The purpose was to study the relationship between the botanical origin and chemical composition of bee-collected pollen. The amount of mineral elements present in bee-collected pollen was also studied. The composition of pollen loads showed the maximum contents of dry matter, ash, glucose, fructose, magnesium (Mg, phosphorus (P, and manganese (Mn for the date palm; the maximum contents of protein, calcium (Ca, and zinc (Zn for alfalfa; the maximum contents of fiber, and copper (Cu for the sunflower; the maximum contents of the lipids and iron (Fe for summer squash; and the maximum contents of sodium (Na, and potassium (K for rape. Calcium was found to be correlated in a significantly (p<0.01 positive way with K, Na, Mg, P, Mn, and Zn. Copper, though, was correlated in a significantly (p<0.01 negative way with Ca, Mg, P, Mn, and Zn. The high levels of protein, ash, glucose, and fructose, and low lipid content found in bee-pollen from the date palm and from alfalfa, mean that pollen from the date palm and from alfalfa make an excellent food supplement. It was concluded, that the chemical composition of beecollected pollen can be correlated with the plant species from which pollen was collected.

  20. The effect of seasons on Brazilian red propolis and its botanical source: chemical composition and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Marsola, Alexandre; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Alencar, Severino M; Rosalen, Pedro L

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of seasons on the chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Brazilian red propolis (BRP) and its plant source. BRP was collected from Maceio, Alagoas state, north-east of Brazil, during one year. Chemical composition was determined by physicochemical analyses and HPLC while antimicrobial activity was assessed against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Staphylococcus aureus and Actinomyces naeslundii by determining the minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC, respectively). The comparative chemical profiles varied quantitatively according to the collection period. Formononetin was the most abundant compound in both propolis and resin, while isoliquiritigenin, (3S)-neovestitol, (3S)-vestitol are suggested to be responsible for antimicrobial activity of Brazilian red propolis. MIC varied from 15.6 to 125 μg/mL, whereas MBC varied from 31.2 to 500 μg/mL. Therefore, season in which propolis and its botanical source are collected indeed influences their chemical compositions, resulting in variations in their antibacterial activity.

  1. Preclinical Toxicological Evaluation of IDM01: The Botanical Composition of 4-Hydroxyisoleucine- and Trigonelline-based Standardized Fenugreek Seed Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Pallavi O; Mohan, Vishwaraman; Thakurdesai, Prasad Arvind

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate acute oral toxicity (AOT), subchronic (90-day repeated dose) toxicity, mutagenicity, and genotoxicity potential of IDM01, the botanical composition of 4-hydroxyisoleucine- and trigonelline-based standardized fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum-graecum L) seed extract in laboratory rats. The AOT and subchronic (90-day repeated dose) toxicity were evaluated using Sprague-Dawley rats as per the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines No. 423 and No. 408, respectively. During the subchronic study, the effects on body weight, food and water consumption, organ weights with hematology, clinical biochemistry, and histology were studied. The mutagenicity and genotoxicity of IDM01 were evaluated by reverse mutation assay (Ames test, OECD guideline No. 471) and chromosome aberration test (OECD guideline No. 473), respectively. The IDM01 did not show mortality or treatment-related adverse signs during acute (limit dose of 2000 mg/kg) and subchronic (90-day repeated dose of 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg with 28 days of recovery period) administration. The IDM01 showed oral median lethal dose (LD50) >2000 mg/kg during AOT study. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of IDM01 was 500 mg/kg. IDM01 did not show mutagenicity up to a concentration of 5000 μg/plate during Ames test and did not induce structural chromosomal aberrations up to 50 mg/culture. IDM01 was found safe during preclinical acute and subchronic (90-day repeated dose) toxicity in rats without mutagenicity or genotoxicity. Acute oral toxicity, subchronic (90-day) oral toxicity, mutagenicity and genotoxicity of IDM01 (4-hydroxyisoleucine- and trigonelline-based standardized fenugreek seed extract) was evaluated.The median lethal dose, LD50, of IDM01 was more than 2000 mg/kg of body weight in rats.No observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of IDM01 was 500 mg/kg of body weight in rats.IDM01 was found safe during acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats without

  2. Boron fertilisation of organically managed grass-clover swards on coarse-textured soils: effects on botanical and element composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Linse

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three trials were performed on two organic farms with dairy and suckler cows and using home-produced forage and feed crops, predominantly grass-clover ley, in order to determine whether boron (B is a limiting factor for legumes on coarse-textured soils in an area predisposed to low B soil concentrations. The effects of B fertilisation (applied as sprayed liquid on biomass yield, botanical composition and plant macro- and micronutrient concentrations relative to soil concentrations and livestock requirements were investigated. Boron fertilisation (i did not affect any yield, (ii increased the white clover percentage significantly in forage on one farm and (iii increased B concentrations in plants and soil on both farms, and (iv did not affect concentrations of other nutrients in forage on either farm. Thus, B was not an obvious limiting factor on these farms. Effects of management practices on interactions and ratios between B, calcium (Ca, potassium (K, magnesium (Mg and sodium (Na and their implications are discussed.

  3. Effect of silage botanical composition on ruminal biohydrogenation and transfer of fatty acids to milk in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Thuen, E

    2013-01-01

    Ruminal biohydrogenation and transfer of fatty acids (FA) to milk were determined for 4 silages with different botanical compositions using 4 multiparous Norwegian Red dairy cows [(mean ± SD) 118 ± 40.9 d in milk, 22.5 ± 2.72 kg of milk/d, 631 ± 3.3 kg of body weight, 3.3 ± 0.40 points on body...... condition score at the start of the experiment] fitted with rumen cannulas. Treatments consisted of 4 experimental silages: a mix of the first and third cut of organically managed short-term grassland with timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; 2 yr old; ORG-SG); organically...... at 0.90 of ad libitum intake. A barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) concentrate constituted 300 g/kg of dry matter of the total feed offered. A Latin square design (4 × 4) with 3-wk periods and the last week in each period used for sampling was implemented. Omasal flows of FA were measured using Yb acetate, Cr...

  4. Species Composition and Structure of the Communities of Plant-Parasitic and Free-Living Soil Nematodes in the Greenhouses of Botanical Gardens of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubin A.I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Species Composition and Structure of the Communities of Plant-Parasitic and Free-Living Soil Nematodes in the Greenhouses of Botanical Gardens of Ukraine. Gubin, A. I., Sigareva, D. D. — In greenhouses of botanical gardens of Ukraine 81 species of nematodes were found. The richest by the number of species was Tylenchida order that was presented by 25 species (31 % of species composition. The dominant group of nematodes was plant-parasitic (most frequent was Rotylenchus robustus (de Man, 1876 Filipjev, 1936 and Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid et White, 1919 Chitwood, 1949. The group of saprobiotic nematodes, which was presented by 52 species (64 %, appeared to be the richest by the number of species. It is shown, that formation of nematode communities in greenhouses of botanical gardens was caused by the interaction of many related factors, crucial of which is the composition of plant collections. The structure of communities is quite constant and almost independent of the quantity of nematodes species. Plant-parasitic species dominate by the number and frequency of detection, and represent a kind of a core of nematode communities.

  5. Pasture improvement in the Mediterranean mountains of the Northeast of Portugal. Yield and botanical composition

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Jaime; Fernandes, Adelaide; Pires, João; Moreira, Nuno

    2004-01-01

    Amélioration pastorale dans les montagnes méditerranéennes du Nord-est du Portugal: Production et composition botanique". Pour étudier I'amélioration de prairies dans les montagnes méditerranéennes sans irrigation du Nord-est du Portugal trois techniques ont été comparées : végétation spontanée, végétation spontanée plus fertilisation et prairie semée plus fertilisation. Cette expérience a été déclinée dans six localités différentes et sous plusieurs conditions environnementales. ...

  6. Recent Progress of Propolis for Its Biological and Chemical Compositions and Its Botanical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Cristina Toreti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is the generic name given to the product obtained from resinous substances, which is gummy and balsamic and which is collected by bees from flowers, buds, and exudates of plants. It is a popular folk medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. These biological properties are related to its chemical composition and more specifically to the phenolic compounds that vary in their structure and concentration depending on the region of production, availability of sources to collect plant resins, genetic variability of the queen bee, the technique used for production, and the season in which propolis is produced. Many scientific articles are published every year in different international journal, and several groups of researchers have focused their attention on the chemical compounds and biological activity of propolis. This paper presents a review on the publications on propolis and patents of applications and biological constituents of propolis.

  7. Chemical composition, botanical evaluation and screening of radical scavenging activity of collected pollen by the stingless bees Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu-amarela).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tania M S; Camara, Celso A; Lins, Antonio C S; Agra, Maria de Fátima; Silva, Eva M S; Reis, Igor T; Freitas, Breno M

    2009-06-01

    Stingless bees in Brazil are indigenous and found all over the country. Bee pollen is used for its nutritional value in the human diet. It is made up of natural flower pollen mixed with nectar and bee secretions. In order to evaluate the chemical composition, free radical scavenging activity, and botanical origin, sample of pollen loads from stingless bee, Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu amarela) was studied. The EtOAc extract of pollen of Melipona rufiventris yielded the following compounds: p-hydroxycinnamic acid, dihydroquercetin, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin3-O-(6'-O-E-p-coumaroyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin, and quercetin. This is the first report of the isolation of isorhamnetin3-O-(6'O-E-p-coumaroyl)beta-D-glucopyranoside from pollen. The free radicalscavenging activities of different solvent extracts of pollen were determined using DPPH assay. This activity decreases in the order: EtOAc>EtOH>Hexane extract. It appears that the EtOAc extract of the pollen is a good scavenger of active oxygen species. The botanical evaluation of pollen loads showed the composition by two pollen types, with the dominant type (97.3%) being Scopariadulcis (L.) (Scrophulariaceae) and the minor one Senna obtusifolia (L.) Irwin & Barneby (Fabaceae). This suggests a specific foraging behavior in Melipona rufiventris bees, even in an environment with such a rich botanical diversity as the Northeastern Brazil.

  8. UP601, a standardized botanical composition composed of Morus alba, Yerba mate and Magnolia officinalis for weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Brownell, Lidia; Lee, Young-Chul; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Jia, Qi

    2017-02-16

    with UP601. UP601, a standardized botanical composition from Morus alba, Yerba mate and Magnolia officinalis could potentially be used for achieving healthy weight loss and maintenance.

  9. Effect of diet composition and feeding pattern on the prececal digestibility of starches from diverse botanical origins measured with the mobile nylon bag technique in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fombelle, A; Veiga, L; Drogoul, C; Julliand, V

    2004-12-01

    This trial was conducted to determine the extent of prececal starch digestibility depending on the botanical origin of starch and on diet characteristics (i.e., composition and feeding pattern). The prececal disappearance of six substrates (oats, barley, corn, horse bean, potato, and wheat) was measured in four cannulated horses fed (as-fed basis) 11.8 g/kg BW of a high-fiber (HF) or high-starch (HS) pelleted feed and 10.0 g/kg BW of meadow hay using the mobile bag technique (MBT). The daily feeding pattern was either three meals (two meals of pellets and one meal of hay) or five meals (three meals of pellets and two meals of hay). The experimental procedure was a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement tested in a Latin square design. After 2 wk of adaptation to the diet, collections were made on 5 d. Thirty nylon bags, composed of five bags of each substrate, were intubated to each horse during the ingestion of the morning meal. Bags were collected in the cecum, using a magnet, at 9 h postintubation. In spite of strong interindividual differences, approximately 80% of the intubated bags were collected. On average, the mean retention time of the bags was 6.2 h (+/-0.17). Regardless of the feeding pattern, the transit of the bags was faster when the fiber content of the diet was higher (P = 0.003). Likewise, regardless of the meal composition, transit was also faster when the ration was split into five daily meals (P = 0.001). The DM disappearance, corrected with particulate losses (DMD(c)), differed depending on the substrate tested (33.5, 57.1, 63.8, 67.7, 78.6, and 86.2% for potato, horse bean, oats, barley, corn, and wheat, respectively; P = 0.001). The DMD(c) of corn, barley, and potato was higher when HS was fed (P = 0.020); regardless of the substrate, DMD(c) was higher with five daily meals (P = 0.001). The starch disappearance (StarchD(c)) was different depending on the substrate (P = 0.001; 36.1, 71.2, 86.6, 89.2, 99.0, and 99.7% for potato, horse bean, barley, corn

  10. Chemical composition, botanical evaluation and screening of radical scavenging activity of collected pollen by the stingless bees Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu-amarela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M.S. Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Stingless bees in Brazil are indigenous and found all over the country. Bee pollen is used for its nutritional value in the human diet. It is made up of natural flower pollen mixed with nectar and bee secretions. In order to evaluate the chemical composition, free radical scavenging activity, and botanical origin, sample of pollen loads from stingless bee, Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu amarela was studied. The EtOAc extract of pollen of Melipona rufiventris yielded the following compounds: p-hydroxycinnamic acid, dihydroquercetin, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin3-O-(6"-O-E-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin, and quercetin. This is the first report of the isolation of isorhamnetin3-O-(6"O-E-p-coumaroylβ-D-glucopyranoside from pollen. The free radicalscavenging activities of different solvent extracts of pollen were determined using DPPH assay. This activity decreases in the order: EtOAc>EtOH>Hexane extract. It appears that the EtOAc extract of the pollen is a good scavenger of active oxygen species. The botanical evaluation of pollen loads showed the composition by two pollen types, with the dominant type (97.3% being Scopariadulcis (L. (Scrophulariaceae and the minor one Senna obtusifolia (L. Irwin & Barneby (Fabaceae. This suggests a specific foraging behavior in Melipona rufiventris bees, even in an environment with such a rich botanical diversity as the Northeastern Brazil.As abelhas sem ferrão são espécies indígenas encontradas em todo o Brasil. Seu pólen é utilizado devido ao seu valor nutricional na dieta humana. É produzido a partir de pólen floral misturado com néctar e líquidos secretados pelas abelhas. Visando avaliar a composição química, a atividade sequestradora de radicais livres e a origem botânica foi estudado o pólencoletado pela abelha sem ferrão Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu-amarela. Do extrato acetato de etila foram isolados os compostos: ácido phidroxicinâmico, dihidroquercetina, isoramnetina, 3O(6

  11. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of UP1304, a botanical composite containing standardized extracts of Curcuma longa and Morus alba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Brownell, Lidia; Jia, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Though the initial etiologies of arthritis are multifactorial, clinically, patients share the prime complaints of the disease, pain. Here the authors assessed the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of UP1304, a composite that contains a standardized blend of extracts from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and the root bark of Morus alba, on rats with carrageenan-induced paw edema. A plant library was screened for bradykinin receptor antagonists. In vivo, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the standardized composite, UP1304, were evaluated in rats with carrageenan-induced paw edema using oral dose ranges of 100-400 mg/kg. Ibuprofen, at a dose of 200 mg/kg, was used as a reference compound. In vitro, cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) inhibition assays were performed to evaluate the degree of inflammation. Statistically significant improvements in pain resistance and paw edema suppression were observed in animals treated with UP1304, when compared to vehicle-treated rats. Results from the highest dose of UP1304 (400 mg/kg) were similar to those achieved by ibuprofen treatment at 200 mg/kg. In vitro, UP1304 showed dose-dependent inhibition of the enzymatic activities of COX and LOX. A half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 9.6 μg/mL for bradykinin B1 inhibition was calculated for the organic extract of C. longa. Curcumin showed Ki values of 2.73 and 58 μg/mL for bradykinin receptors B1 and B2, respectively. Data presented here suggest that UP1304, analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin, acted as a bradykinin receptor B1 and B2 antagonist, and inhibited COX and LOX enzyme activities. This compound should be considered for the management of symptoms associated with arthritis.

  12. A natural history of botanical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Barbara; Ribnicky, David M; Poulev, Alexander; Logendra, Sithes; Cefalu, William T; Raskin, Ilya

    2008-07-01

    Plants have been used as a source of medicine throughout history and continue to serve as the basis for many pharmaceuticals used today. Although the modern pharmaceutical industry was born from botanical medicine, synthetic approaches to drug discovery have become standard. However, this modern approach has led to a decline in new drug development in recent years and a growing market for botanical therapeutics that are currently available as dietary supplements, drugs, or botanical drugs. Most botanical therapeutics are derived from medicinal plants that have been cultivated for increased yields of bioactive components. The phytochemical composition of many plants has changed over time, with domestication of agricultural crops resulting in the enhanced content of some bioactive compounds and diminished content of others. Plants continue to serve as a valuable source of therapeutic compounds because of their vast biosynthetic capacity. A primary advantage of botanicals is their complex composition consisting of collections of related compounds having multiple activities that interact for a greater total activity.

  13. Botanicals in Dermatology: Essential Oils, Botanical Allergens, and Current Regulatory Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Sarah; Reeder, Margo

    Largely because of their perceived safety, the use of essential oils and other botanically derived products has become increasingly popular. Recent evidence raises concern about the safety of these products, frequently found in cosmetics and sought as an alternative to standard medical treatments. Essential oils are challenging to standardize because of the variable growing conditions, genetics, and harvesting of botanicals. There exists a potential for adverse reactions, in particular allergic contact dermatitis. Furthermore, these products are often sold without prior Food and Drug Administration approval of efficacy and safety. This review focuses on the composition of essential oils, their common associated botanical allergens, and current regulation practices of botanical drug products in the United States and Europe.

  14. Old tropical botanical collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2017-01-01

    The early history of botanical collections is reviewed, with particular emphasis on old collections from the tropics. The information available about older and newer botanical collections from the tropics was much improved after World War Two, including better lists of validly published names, more...... detailed description of literature and better information about collections and collectors. These improvements were initially made available as publications on paper, whereas now the information has become available on the Internet, at least in part. The changed procedures for handling botanical...... collections in connection with taxonomic research is sketched, from sending specimens on loan between institutions via publishing herbaria on microfiches to providing scanned images on the Internet. Examples from different institutions and organizations of how to make digitized images of specimens and other...

  15. Miscellaneous botanical Notes X

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1960-01-01

    Through the kind assistance of Prof. Dr D. K. Zerov large photographs were obtained of type specimens of two dozen Verbenaceae which have been described by Turczaninow and are preserved in his Herbarium of the Botanical Institute of the Academy of Science of the Ukrainian S.S.R. at Kiew. These have

  16. Botanical Scavenger Hunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Livingston, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Why not combine the use of technology with the excitement of a scavenger hunt that moves middle-level students out into the "wilds" of their school campus to classify plants? In the lesson plan described here, students embark on a botanical scavenger hunt and then document their findings using a digital camera. This project was designed to allow…

  17. Charles Darwin's Botanical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Darwin's botanical studies provide a way to expose students to his work that followed the publication of "On the Origin of Species." We can use stories from his plant investigations to illustrate key concepts in the life sciences and model how questions are asked and answered in science.

  18. Hepatotoxicity of botanicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickel, F; Egerer, G; Seitz, H K

    2000-06-01

    Hepatic impairment resulting from the use of conventional drugs is widely acknowledged, but there is less awareness of the potential hepatotoxicity of herbal preparations and other botanicals, many of which are believed to be harmless and are commonly used for self-medication without supervision. The aim of this paper is to examine the evidence for hepatotoxicity of botanicals and draw conclusions regarding their pathology, safety and applications. Current literature on the hepatotoxicity of herbal drugs and other botanicals is reviewed. The aetiology, clinical picture and treatment of mushroom (Amanita) poisoning are described. Hepatotoxic effects have been reported for some Chinese herbal medicines (such as Jin Bu Huan, Ma-Huang and Sho-saiko-to), pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants, germander (Teucrium chamaedrys), chaparral (Larrea tridentata), Atractylis gummifera, Callilepsis laureola, and others. The frequency with which botanicals cause hepatic damage is unclear. There is a lack of controlled treatment trials and the few studies published to date do not clarify the incidence of adverse effects. Many plant products do not seem to lead to toxic effects in everyone taking them, and they commonly lack a strict dose-dependency. For some products, such as Sho-saiko-to, the picture is confused further by demonstrations of hepatoprotective properties for some components. Mushroom poisoning is mostly due to the accidental consumption of Amanita species. Treatment with silymarin, thioctic acid, penicillin and liver transplantation have been shown to be effective but require early diagnosis. Severe liver injury, including acute and chronic abnormalities and even cirrhotic transformation and liver failure, has been described after the ingestion of a wide range of herbal products and other botanical ingredients, such as mushrooms. It is concluded that in certain situations herbal products may be just as harmful as conventional drugs.

  19. Botanical Exploration Of Sinai

    OpenAIRE

    Batanouny, K. H. [كمال الدين حسن البتانوني

    1985-01-01

    The history of the botanical exploration of Sinai has been reviewed. It has been divided into the following periods: I. Expeditions in the eighteenth century. II. Exploration from 1800 till the publication of "Florula Sinaica". III. Exploration from 1835 till the publication of "Flora Orientalis". IV. A decade of intensive exploration (1861-1871). V. An era of extensive floristic studies (1871-1929) with the publication of the Flora of Egypt. VI. A period of updating. VII...

  20. Fatty acid composition, fat soluble vitamin concentrations and oxidative stability in bovine milk produced on two pastures with different botanical composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Dahl, A V; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2013-01-01

    pratensis Huds.), timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover and LP contained smooth meadow grass (Poa pratensis L.), white clover and a variety of unsown species. Sixteen cows were blocked according to milk yield, days in milk and sire, and randomly within block allocated to the 2 dietary treatments...... with a daily pasture allowance of 15–20 kg dry matter per cow, supplemented with 3.0 kg barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) concentrate. Milk was sampled during the last week of 3 experimental periods and analysed for FA composition by gas chromatography, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins by high performance...... to oxidation. Two groups of 8 multiparous Norwegian Red dairy cows [mean (standard deviation); 599 (45.1) kg body weight, 73 (15.0) d in milk, 29.9 (2.90) kg milk/d at experiment start] grazed either a short-term pasture (SP) or a long-term pasture (LP). Both pastures were organically managed, meaning...

  1. About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PhD Education High School & College Programs Our Research Advantage About Our Research Researcher Interviews Core Facilities Research ... Herbs Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products: FAQs About Herbs App Email Us About Mind-Body Therapies Our Research & ...

  2. Using n-alkanes and their carbon isotope enrichments (d13C) to estimate the botanical composition of pasture mixes from the Mid Rift Valley grasslands of Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derseh, M.B.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the accuracy of n-alkanes and their carbon isotope enrichment to estimate the diet composition of herbivores in the Mid Rift Valley rangelands of Ethiopia. Five common grass species which are abundantly available in the area were selected, from which several

  3. Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a dietary ingredient, the possibility of contamination (by pesticides, heavy metals such as lead, bacteria, etc.), and the improper packaging and labeling of a product. What methods are used to evaluate the health benefits and safety of a botanical dietary supplement? Like ...

  4. The effects of a commercially available botanical supplement on strength, body composition, power output, and hormonal profiles in resistance-trained males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreider Richard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum is a leguminous, annual plant originating in India and North Africa. In recent years Fenugreek has been touted as an ergogenic aid. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Fenugreek supplementation on strength and body composition. Methods 49 Resistance trained men were matched according to body weight and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner capsules containing 500 mg of a placebo (N = 23, 20 ± 1.9 years, 178 ± 6.3 cm, 85 ± 12.7 kg, 17 ± 5.6 %BF or Fenugreek (N = 26, 21 ± 2.8 years, 178 ± 6 cm, 90 ± 18.2 kg, 19.3 ± 8.4 %BF. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week periodized resistance-training program split into two upper and two lower extremity workouts per week for a total of 8-weeks. At 0, 4, and 8-weeks, subjects underwent hydrodensiometery body composition, 1-RM strength, muscle endurance, and anaerobic capacity testing. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60-days. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05 between groups were noted for training volume. Significant group × time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in body fat (FEN: -2.3 ± 1.4%BF; PL: -0.39 ± 1.6 %BF, p 0.05. Conclusion It is concluded that 500 mg of this proprietary Fenugreek extraction had a significant impact on both upper- and lower-body strength and body composition in comparison to placebo in a double blind controlled trial. These changes were obtained with no clinical side effects.

  5. Botanical-drug interactions: a scientific perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Toccafondo Vieira, Manuela; Huang, Shiew-Mei

    2012-09-01

    There is a continued predisposition of concurrent use of drugs and botanical products. A general lack of knowledge of the interaction potential together with an under-reporting of botanical use poses a challenge for the health care providers and a safety concern for patients. Botanical-drug interactions increase the patient risk, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index (e.g., warfarin, cyclosporine, and digoxin). Examples of case reports and clinical studies evaluating botanical-drug interactions of commonly used botanicals in the US are presented. The potential pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic bases of such interactions are discussed, as well as the challenges associated with the interpretation of the available data and prediction of botanical-drug interactions. Recent FDA experiences with botanical products and interactions including labeling implications as a risk management strategy are highlighted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Grdiša; Kristina Gršić

    2013-01-01

    Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems....

  7. Sub-Saharan Botanical Collections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demissew, Sebsebe; Beentje, Henk; Cheek, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many historical specimens from sub-Saharan Africa are only found in European herbaria, but a higher number of newer specimens than widely assumed are kept in African herbaria, with a concentration in eastern and southern parts of the continent. Many of these herbaria were initiated in connection ...... in collaboration between African and European herbaria, and the increasing digitization of herbaria and the general development of relevant services on the Internet, which provides new possibilities for botanical studies in Africa....

  8. Contact dermatitis to botanical extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiken, David A; Cohen, David E

    2002-09-01

    A review of the literature of reported cases of contact dermatitis to a variety of natural herbal extracts is Presented. Natural extracts are commonly used ingredients in many cosmetic preparations and homeopathic remedies. Although the term natural botanical extracts inherently purports to have beneficial and benign properties, these extracts can cause adverse reactions in individuals. As such, dermatologists should be cognizant of these agents as possible sources of allergenicity in patients presenting with contact dermatitis. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and Preclinical Cognitive Function Improvement after Oral Treatment of a Botanical Composition Composed of Extracts from Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Yimam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia and cognitive impairment have become the major concerns worldwide due to a significantly aging population, increasing life span and lack of effective pharmacotherapy. In light of limited pharmaceutical drug choices and the socioeconomic implications of these conditions, the search for safe and effective alternatives from natural sources has gained many attractions within the medical food and dietary supplement industry. Two polyphenol extracts derived from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu containing free-B-ring flavonoids and flavans, respectively, were combined into a proprietary blend called UP326. A similar bioflavonoid composition, UP446, has been reported with modulation of pathways related to systemic inflammation. To test the effect of UP326 on memory and learning, a radial arm water maze (RAWM and contextual fear conditioning (CF were utilized in aged F344 rats fed with UP326 at doses of 3, 7, and 34 mg/kg for 11 weeks. The 7 and 34 mg/kg dosage groups had significantly fewer errors than aged vehicle control animals and their performance was equivalent to young animal controls. In a separate human clinical trial, test subjects orally given 300 mg of UP326 BID for 30 days showed marked improvement in speed and accuracy of processing complex information in computer tasks and reduced their standard deviation of performance compared to baseline and the placebo group. This data suggest that UP326 may help maintain memory, sustain speed of processing, and reduce the number or memory errors as we age.

  10. Forage Quality Determined by Botanic Species’ Contribution on Permanent Pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neculai Dragomir

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the forage obtained from permanent pastures is determined, in its turn, by the floristic structure consisted of species belonging to various botanic families. Each botanic species presents a specific chemical content and a certain contribution to the balancing of forage’s nutritional value. The chemical analyses performed, at species level, revealed the importance of the “diverse” species, which, with their content in mineral elements, may influence animals’ capacity of production and reproduction. Some of the species, considered to be weeds within the permanent pastures’ floristic composition, presented high crude protein content values: Achillea millefolium with 24.22%, Taraxacum officinale 24.06%, Urtica dioica with 32.46%, Plantago major with 17.04%, etc.

  11. Botanicals as "new" drugs: US development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Freddie Ann

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are ingredients that can be marketed as foods, drugs, cosmetics, and medical devices in the United States. When a botanical is intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, mitigate, or cure a disease, it is considered to be a "drug". This article reviews the US regulatory requirements for botanicals as "new" drugs. An overview of the regulatory principles used to determine product category and the basic elements of an Investigational New Drug application and New Drug Application with the US Food and Drug Administration are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Conifers in the landscape expositions of the Botanical garden of the Orenburg state University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukhlevskaya Yuliya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article describes the introduced conifers that are used in the creation of landscape structures on the territory of the Botanic garden at OSU. Gardens and parks, Orenburg poor decorative forms and varieties of cypress. Increase the range of plants is due to the presence in the city Botanic gardens of OSU. In the garden pays great attention to the creation of landscape compositions with plants of this class.

  13. Identification of the plant origin of the botanical biomarkers of Mediterranean type propolis

    OpenAIRE

    Popova, Milena; Trusheva, Boryana; Cutajar, Simone; Antonova, Daniela; Mifsud, David; Farrugia, Claude; Bankova, Vassya;

    2012-01-01

    Propolis is a honeybee product which bees produce by collecting resins from various botanical sources. The chemical composition of propolis is directly dependant on the availability of resinous plant materials in different geographic regions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the resinous plant sources used by bees to produce Mediterranean type propolis. Although this propolis type has already been the subject of numerous studies, its major botanical source had not yet been identified. In...

  14. Identifying Botanical Mechanisms of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, May Fern

    2010-01-01

    The biological mechanism of action for any botanical extract is a necessary part of discovery to determine pharmacological use and safety. Interestingly, many activities that are governed by endogenous compounds are not fully understood making the characterization of mechanisms elusive. For example, phytoestrogens are being consumed for menopausal symptoms while the biological action of estradiol are still being investigated. Therefore, long term efficacy and safety issues are a challenge in the field. As new activities are associated with new biological pathways, an important component of therapeutic discovery will need to be the re-evaluation of negative or less active natural products to determine their relative use as medicines. PMID:20837111

  15. A multi-criteria decision analysis model to assess the safety of botanicals utilizing data on history of use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, T; Walsh-Mason, B; Russell, P; Horst, A Van Der; O'Hagan, S; Lahorkar, P

    2011-08-01

    Botanicals (herbal materials and extracts) are widely used in traditional medicines throughout the world. Many have an extensive history of safe use over several hundreds of years. There is now a growing consumer interest in food and cosmetic products, which contain botanicals. There are many publications describing the safety assessment approaches for botanicals, based on the history of safe use. However, they do not define what constitutes a history of safe use, a decision that is ultimately a subjective one. The multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), is a model that has been developed, which assesses the safety of botanical ingredients using a history of use approach. The model evaluates the similarity of the botanical ingredient of interest to its historic counterpart - the comparator, the evidence supporting the history of use, and any evidence of concern. The assessment made is whether a botanical ingredient is as safe as its comparator botanical, which has a history of use. In order to establish compositional similarity between the botanical ingredient and its comparator, an analytical 'similarity scoring' approach has been developed. Applicability of the model is discussed with an example, Brahmi ( Bacopa monnieri).This evolution of the risk assessment of botanicals gives an objective, transparent, and transferable safety assessment approach.

  16. Composição florística de pastagem natural afetada por fontes de fósforo, calagem e introdução de espécies forrageiras de estação fria Botanical composition of natural pasture as afected by phosphorus sources, lime and introduction of winter forage species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duilio Guerra Bandinelli

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Uma das características das pastagens naturais do Rio Grande do Sul é a baixa produtividade de forragem no período do outono-inverno. Uma das alternativas para melhorar os sistemas de produção baseados nessas pastagens é a introdução de espécies forrageiras de crescimento inverno-primaveril e a fertilização e correção da acidez do solo. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito de fontes de fósforo, calcário e introdução de espécies forrageiras de inverno na dinâmica das espécies de uma pastagem natural. Os tratamentos testados foram: T1 - superfosfato simples + calcário + introdução de espécies; T2 - superfosfato triplo + calcário + introdução de espécies; T3 - superfosfato triplo + introdução de espécies; T4 - hiperfosfato de Gafsa + introdução de espécies; T5 - introdução de espécies sem fósforo ou calagem; T6 - testemunha com pastagem natural. Para a avaliação da composição florística da pastagem foram realizados levantamentos botânicos periódicos, durante vinte e dois meses, utilizando-se o método BOTANAL. Os resultados mostraram que os tratamentos testados não provocaram mudanças na composição botânica das espécies nativas no período de tempo avaliado.Natural pastures of Rio Grande do Sul State, South of Brazil, have low forage productivity in the autumn-winter. An alternative to improve systems based on these pastures is introduction of winter forage species, fertilization and liming of soil. The present work had the objective of evaluating the effect of phosphorus sources, lime and introduction of winter forage species in the pasture botanical composition dynamics. The treatments used were: T1 - simple superphosphate + lime + winter forage species introduction; T2 - triple superphosphate + lime + winter forage species introduction; T3 - triple superphosphate + winter forage species introduction; T4 - Gafsa rock phosphate + winter forage species introduction; T5 - winter

  17. Composição botânica e estrutural e valor nutricional de pastagens de azevém consorciadas Botanic and structural composition and nutritional value on intercropped ryegrass pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Reimann Skonieski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho objetivou-se avaliar a influência de espécies em consórcio com azevém sobre a composição botânica e estrutural e o valor nutritivo dos pastos em um sistema de transição agroecológica. Foi avaliada a cultura do azevém (Lolium multiflorum Lam. consorciada com aveia-preta (Avena strigosa Schreb., trevo-branco (Trifolium repens L. e amendoim-forrageiro (Arachis pintoi Krapov. & Gregory. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com três tratamentos e três repetições. O primeiro pastejo foi realizado 21 dias após a emergência das plantas nas pastagens de azevém + aveia-preta e azevém + amendoim-forrageiro e 28 dias após a emergência na pastagem de azevém + trevo-branco. O segundo pastejo na pastagem de azevém + aveia-preta ocorreu 30 dias após o primeiro pastejo, enquanto nas demais pastagens ocorreu 37 dias depois. As taxas de acúmulo de matéria seca (MS do início do período de exclusão até o pico de produção de MS foram de 77,7; 75,0 e 71,3 kg/ha/dia de MS para as pastagens consorciadas com trevo-branco, amendoim-forrageiro e aveia-preta, respectivamente. A razão folha/colmo até o segundo pastejo foi elevada em todas as pastagens. A redução dos teores de PB conforme os dias de exclusão no pasto de azevém + aveia-preta é menor que nos pastos de azevém consorciado com trevo-branco ou amendoim-forrageiro.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of species intercropped with ryegrass on the botanical and structural composition and the nutritional values of pastures in an agroecological transition system. It was evaluated ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. intercropped with black oats (Avena strigosa Schreb., white clover (Trifolium repens L. and forage peanut (Arachis pintoi Krapov. & Gregory. It was used a complete random design with three treatments and three repetitions. The first grazing was done 21 days after emergence of the plants on the pastures with ryegrass

  18. Resolving whether botanic gardens are on the road to conservation or a pathway for plant invasions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Philip E

    2015-06-01

    A global conservation goal is to understand the pathways through which invasive species are introduced into new regions. Botanic gardens are a pathway for the introduction of invasive non-native plants, but a quantitative assessment of the risks they pose has not been performed. I analyzed data on the living collections of over 3000 botanic gardens worldwide to quantify the temporal trend in the representation of non-native species; the relative composition of threatened, ornamental, or invasive non-native plant species; and the frequency with which botanic gardens implement procedures to address invasive species. While almost all of the world's worst invasive non-native plants occurred in one or more living collections (99%), less than one-quarter of red-listed threatened species were cultivated (23%). Even when cultivated, individual threatened species occurred in few living collections (7.3), while non-native species were on average grown in 6 times as many botanic gardens (44.3). As a result, a botanic garden could, on average, cultivate four times as many invasive non-native species (20) as red-listed threatened species (5). Although the risk posed by a single living collection is small, the probability of invasion increases with the number of botanic gardens within a region. Thus, while both the size of living collections and the proportion of non-native species cultivated have declined during the 20th century, this reduction in risk is offset by the 10-fold increase in the number of botanic gardens established worldwide. Unfortunately, botanic gardens rarely implement regional codes of conduct to prevent plant invasions, few have an invasive species policy, and there is limited monitoring of garden escapes. This lack of preparedness is of particular concern given the rapid increase in living collections worldwide since 1950, particularly in South America and Asia, and highlights past patterns of introduction will be a poor guide to determining future

  19. Botanical phenolics and brain health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Albert Y.; Wang, Qun; Simonyi, Agnes; Sun, Grace Y.

    2009-01-01

    The high demand for molecular oxygen, the enrichment of polyunsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids and the relatively low abundance of antioxidant defense enzymes are factors rendering cells in the central nervous system (CNS) particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the brain has been implicated as a common underlying factor for the etiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and stroke. While ROS are generated by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions in the mitochondria and cytoplasm under normal conditions, excessive production under pathological conditions is associated with activation of Ca2+-dependent enzymes including proteases, phospholipases, nucleases, and alterations of signaling pathways which subsequently lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, release of inflammatory factors and apoptosis. In recent years, there is considerable interest to investigate anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of phenolic compounds from different botanical sources. In this review, we describe oxidative mechanisms associated with AD, PD, and stroke, and evaluate neuroprotective effects of phenolic compounds, such as resveratrol from grape and red wine, curcumin from turmeric, apocynin from Picrorhiza kurroa, and epi-gallocatechin from green tea. The main goal is to provide a better understanding of the mode of action of these compounds and assess their use as therapeutics to ameliorate age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19191039

  20. Identification of the plant origin of the botanical biomarkers of Mediterranean type propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Milena; Trusheva, Boryana; Cutajar, Simone; Antonova, Daniela; Mifsud, David; Farrugia, Claude; Bankova, Vassya

    2012-05-01

    Propolis is a honeybee product which bees produce by collecting resins from various botanical sources. The chemical composition of propolis is directly dependant on the availability of resinous plant materials in different geographic regions. This study was undertaken to evaluate the resinous plant sources used by bees to produce Mediterranean type propolis. Although this propolis type has already been the subject of numerous studies, its major botanical source had not yet been identified. In this study, using GC-MS analysis, we identify the resin of the common cypress, Cupressus_sempervirens, as the major plant source of the characteristic diterpene fingerprint profile of Mediterranean propolis.

  1. Modern systematics, a further botanical note

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holttum, R.E.

    1948-01-01

    As noted in Dr L.G.M. Baas Becking’s Postscript to Mr van Bemmel’s article in Chronica Naturae Vol. 104, part 4, the new systematics has not been entirely neglected by botanists. I would like to put a further botanical vieuwpoint on this subject. Firstly, I suggest that there is no sharp distinction

  2. Botanic gardens, herbaria and research: The UK experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evolution of botanic gardens in the United Kingdom is outlined, with special regard to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. The modern role of such gardens is discussed and particular attention is given to Kew‟s Breathing Planet Programme. Key words/phrases: Botanic gardens, Breathing Planet Programme, Kew, United ...

  3. Nutraceuticals and botanicals: overview and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    The discovery, development and marketing of food supplements, nutraceuticals and related products are currently the fastest growing segments of the food industry. Functional foods can be considered part or borderline to these products and may be defined as foods or food ingredients that have additional health or physiological benefits over and above the normal nutritional value they provide. This trend is driven by several factors, mainly due to the current consumer perceptions: the first and dominant being 'Natural is good', and other secondary, such as the increasing cost of many pharmaceuticals and their negative secondary effects, the insistent marketing campaign, the increasing perception of the need of a healthy diet and its importance in the health and homeostasis organism conditions. However, the central point is that nutraceuticals, botanicals and other herbal remedies, including the entry of new functional foods, are important because of their acceptance as the novel and modern forms to benefit of natural substances. Due to the rapid expansion in this area, the development of several aspects is considered as it could influence the future of the market of these products negatively: an imbalance existing between the increasing number of claims and products on the one hand, the development of policies to regulate their application and safety on the other, rapid and valuable controls to check the composition, including the plant extracts or adulteration to improve efficacy, like the presence of synthetic drugs. It is interesting to see that, from the negative factors reported by the market analysts, a change in consumers preferences is absent. The functional properties of many plant extracts, in particular, are being investigated for potential use as novel nutraceuticals and functional foods. Although the availability of scientific data is rapidly improving, the central aspect concerns the validation of these products. The first step of this crucial aspect is

  4. The use of botanical products and vitamins in sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monico, Gabriela; Leo, Micheal; Ma, Brian; Johal, Ritika S; Ma, Thomas; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-11-18

    The use of botanical products and vitamins in skin care creams and sunscreens is prevalent. Herein we conduct an evaluation of sunscreens to quantitatively assess how often sunscreens incorporate botanically derived products and vitamins. The most commonly used botanicals products and vitamins are identified and stratified based on the sunscreen sun protection factor (SPF). The overall prevalence for the use of botanical agents and vitamins was 62% and 79%, respectively. Aloe vera and licorice root extracts were the most common botanical agents used in sunscreens. Retinyl palmitate was the most common vitamin derivative utilized in sunscreens. The prices of sunscreens significantly increased when more than one botanical product was added. Botanical products and vitamins are widely utilized in sunscreens and more research is needed to assess how their inclusion may enhance or alter the function of sunscreens.

  5. Scientific Opinion on a Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) approach for the safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten

    The Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) approach, initially developed for the assessment of microorganisms referred to EFSA and added to the food chain is equally applicable to the assessment of botanicals or botanical preparations. Using the principles to establish the suitability of a botanic...... in the development of a comprehensive, systematic and transparent methodology. The Scientific Committee recommends its use as an extension of the 2009 EFSA guidance for the safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations intended to be used in food supplements....

  6. Semeadura direta de forrageiras de estação fria em campo natural submetido à aplicação de herbicidas: II. Composição botânica No-till seeding of cold season forage on native pasture under herbicides application: II. Botanical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez Gomar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A semeadura direta de espécies forrageiras de estação fria permite reduzir a marcada estacionalidade da sua produção em campos naturais. Durante quatro anos, conduziu-se um experimento de aplicação de herbicidas sobre campo nativo, em um solo Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo, de textura arenosa do norte do Uruguai visando introduzir forrageiras de estação fria e estudar o impacto dos herbicidas na composição botânica de espécies estivais. Foram testadas doses de herbicidas (glifosate 1L ha-1, glifosate 4L ha-1, paraquat 3L ha-1 e testemunha, como tratamento principal, aplicadas no ano 1994, em um delineamento blocos ao acaso. A repetição ou não das mesmas doses no ano 1995 constituiu a subparcela e a aplicação ou não das mesmas doses no ano de 1996 constituiu a sub-subparcela. No levantamento de espécies da vegetação existentes no outono de 1998, observou-se que o maior distúrbio sobre a composição botânica do campo nativo foi provocado com a aplicação continuada da dose de 4L ha-1 de glifosate, onde foram identificadas seis espécies. No levantamento de espécies existentes no tratamento testemunha, no outono, foram identificadas onze espécies, sendo que as espécies Andropogon lateralis, Paspalum notatum, Conyza bonariensis, Eryngium horridum, Desmodium incanum, Cyperus sp. e Digitaria sp. constituiram 90% da composição botânica. Com a aplicação de herbicida, ocorreu uma substituição de espécies perenes por anuais.No-till seeding of winter species may reduce seasonal fluctuations of forage production of natural grasslands. An experiment of herbicide application on native grasses was conducted for four years, on a fine-loamy, mixed Mollic Hapludalf in northern of Uruguay to introduce winter forage and study the impact of herbicide on botanical composition of grass field. The experimental design was split-splitplot with three randomized blocks, with types and dosis of herbicides (gliphosate 1L ha-1, gliphosate 4L

  7. Época de sobressemeadura de gramíneas anuais de inverno e de verão no capim-Tifton 85: produção e composição botânica Tifton 85 overseeded with cool season forages: yield and botanical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Luciane Moreira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se o experimento na UNESP-Jaboticabal no período de inverno-primavera-verão de 2001-2002, com objetivo de determinar a massa seca total da forragem, composição botânica, relação lâmina foliar/colmo+bainha e variação na produção das misturas no capim-Tifton 85 exclusivo e sobressemeado com espécies de inverno e verão. Os tratamentos foram: milheto (Pennisetum americanum (L. Leeke+aveia preta (Avena strigosa Schreb; híbrido de sorgo Sudão (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench x S Sorghum sudanense (Piper Stapf (AG2501+aveia preta, sobressemeados nas áreas de Tifton-85 (Cynodon nlemfuensis Vanderyst x Cynodon dactylon (L. Pers em 19-06 (época 1 ou 02-07-2002 (época 2 e Tifton 85 (Testemunha. O delineamento experimental o de foi blocos ao acaso. O AG2501 apresentou pequena participação na composição botânica e não se observou a presença do milheto no experimento. A massa total de forragem nas avaliações 1 e 2,-época 1 de semeadura, foi 63% maior quando comparada com a época 2 de semeadura. Nas demais avaliações, foram observadas produções semelhantes. Na época 2, observou-se maior participação de forrageiras de aveia em relação a avaliação 1. A relação lâmina foliar/colmo+bainha decresceu com as sucessivas avaliações em decorrência da composição botânica presente no momento da avaliação.The experiment was conducted at UNESP-Jaboticabal during the 2001-2002 winter-spring-summer periods to evaluate the herbage mass, botanical composition, dry matter production of mix pastures, and leaf:sheat-stem ration of Tifton 85 or overseeding with annual winter or summer species. The treatments were: pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum (L. Leeke plus bristeal oat (Avena strigosa Schreb; sorghum sudan grass (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench x Sorghum sudanense (Piper Stapf (SS AG2501 C plus bristeal oat, overseeded on Tifton 85 area on 06/19/02/04 , or 07/02/02, and Tifton 85, conducted in a randomized block design. The

  8. Ethno-botanical studies from Northern Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Saadia; Afzal, Naeema; Awan, Mohammad Rashid; Khan, Taher Salim; Khanum, Aneel Gilani Rizwana; Tariq, Sumbal

    2009-01-01

    In this research paper efforts have been made to document the ethno-botanical knowledge of important plant species found in Northern Pakistan. It includes Thandiani, Galiat, Kaghan, Swat, Buner, Dir, Chitral and Northern Areas of Pakistan. The area has many climatic and vegetation zones or biomes. Locals residing in mountainous areas belonging to various ethnic groups are traditionally utilizing plants over many generations; these ethnic groups have their distinct life style, belief, traditions and cultural heritage. Plant collection and data regarding traditional uses in various areas of Northern Pakistan has been done periodically in different flowering /fruiting seasons. Locals of old age belonging to various ethnic groups were personally interviewed for establishing uses of plants. Photography is done for easy identification and habitat recognition. Collected plant specimens and seeds were preserved. Plant species were dried, mounted, identified and authenticated. 135 genera belonging from 66 families of angiosperms and gymnosperms were studied and described.76 species were known to have traditional and ethno botanical uses. Plants have been utilized for many generations. Ethnic groups have distinct life style and have different economic uses for these plants. Due to unsustainable exploitation of natural habitats scarcity of drug plants has occurred. As consequence some species are depleting and may become extinct in near future, e.g. Morchella esculenta, Colchicum lueteum and Viola serpens are just a few of these. Although some sporadic information is available about the flora of this region but very little documented record of the ethno-botanically important plants has been established. It is expected that this research paper will be beneficial for students, researchers, farmers, foresters and general public. On the basis of data obtained it is concluded that ethno-botanical Flora of Northern Pakistan is quite rich and is diverse, due to the difference in

  9. The botanical collections and their pests

    OpenAIRE

    Katinas, Liliana; Iharlegui, Laura

    1995-01-01

    Collections are the permanent records of our natural heritage and contain the materials that support the research of many scientific disciplines, including those working to preserve biodiversity and monitor global change. This is the basic reason why it is a permanent obligation to protect the collections from the attack of pests. The different types of pests that infest botanical collections and their control are discussed in this paper, with special emphasis in the Herbarium of Museo de La ...

  10. The problem analysis of regional flors in botanical gardens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharchenko Victoria E.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Now the climate changes become more pronounced. This affects to biodiversity and distribution of plants. Therefore, we need to study of the biodiversity and trends distribution of plants in specific environments. In this connection is necessary to clarify real composition of species in the of regional floras potential of their variability of and disseminating. A pressing problem remains the creation of a unified database of the flora of Russia, which takes into account the data of regional studies. Research program allows executing posed problems if it would coordinate with other botanical gardens. This program will allow revealing structural and functional adaptation of species to various environmental conditions. This will help create a basis for design ways to regulation the development of plants and biotops.

  11. A comprehensive approach to identifying and authenticating botanical products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, T J; Khan, I A

    2010-02-01

    Whether they are being taken as dietary supplements by the general public or being evaluated in a clinical study, the authenticity of botanical products is a matter of paramount concern. Botanical specimens and the dietary supplements derived from them can vary in quality and in chemical constituent profiles because of a number of factors. Subtle variations in botanical specimens are known to have profound effects on the quality, efficacy, and safety of botanical dietary supplements and can potentially alter the results of clinical studies that rely on these materials. A complete array of authentication and evaluation tools can be utilized to provide a well-rounded scientific approach to the authentication of botanical products. It is vital that the authenticity of botanical supplements be established using appropriate analysis tools regardless of whether the end products are being considered for evaluation in clinical studies or are being developed for the consumer market.

  12. Integrating Biodiversity Data into Botanic Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Today's species names are entry points into a web of publicly available knowledge and are integral parts of legislation concerning biological conservation and consumer safety. Species information usually is fragmented, can be misleading due to the existence of different names and might even be biased because of an identical name that is used for a different species. Safely navigating through the name space is one of the most challenging tasks when associating names with data and when decisions are made which name to include in legislation. Integrating publicly available dynamic data to characterise plant genetic resources of botanic gardens and other facilities will significantly increase the efficiency of recovering relevant information for research projects, identifying potentially invasive taxa, constructing priority lists and developing DNA-based specimen authentication. To demonstrate information availability and discuss integration into botanic collections, scientific names derived from botanic gardens were evaluated using the Encyclopedia of Life, The Catalogue of Life and The Plant List. 98.5% of the names could be verified by the combined use of these providers. Comparing taxonomic status information 13 % of the cases were in disagreement. About 7 % of the verified names were found to be included in the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, including one extinct taxon and three taxa with the status "extinct in the wild". As second most important factor for biodiversity loss, potential invasiveness was determined. Approximately 4 % of the verified names were detected using the Global Invasive Species Information Network, including 208 invasive taxa. According to Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe around 20 % of the verified names are European alien taxa including 15 of the worst European invasive taxa. Considering alternative names in the data recovery process, success increased up to 18 %.

  13. Mendelian controversies: a botanical and historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, D J; Rytting, B

    2001-05-01

    Gregor Mendel was a 19(th) century priest and botanist who developed the fundamental laws of inheritance. The year 2000 marked a century since the rediscovery of those laws and the beginning of genetics. Although Mendel is now recognized as the founder of genetics, significant controversy ensued about his work throughout the 20(th) century. In this paper, we review five of the most contentious issues by looking at the historical record through the lens of current botanical science: (1) Are Mendel's data too good to be true? (2) Is Mendel's description of his experiments fictitious? (3) Did Mendel articulate the laws of inheritance attributed to him? (4) Did Mendel detect but not mention linkage? (5) Did Mendel support or oppose Darwin?A synthesis of botanical and historical evidence supports our conclusions: Mendel did not fabricate his data, his description of his experiments is literal, he articulated the laws of inheritance attributed to him insofar as was possible given the information he had, he did not detect linkage, and he neither strongly supported nor opposed Darwin.

  14. Uso de N-alcanos na estimativa da composição botânica em amostras com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria brizantha e Arachis pintoi Use of N-alkanes for estimations of botanical composition in samples with different proportions of Brachiaria brizantha and Arachis pintoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Côrtes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido para se determinar a composição de n-alcanos (C24 a C36 em diferentes proporções de dietas hipotéticas de Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu e Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo (0; 15; 30; 45; 60 e 100% de Arachis pintoi e identificar a combinação de alcanos que permite calcular a composição botânica de dietas com o menor valor residual (real menos o estimado. As forragens foram amostradas no verão e os n-alcanos extraídos pelo método de saponificação direta, sendo identificados e quantificados por meio de análise de cromatografia gasosa. O alcano C34 foi utilizado como padrão interno. As proporções de A. pintoi nas dietas foram estimadas pela minimização do z (soma dos quadrados dos desvios entre a proporção real dos alcanos analisados e as proporções pré-estabelecidas (tratamentos, utilizando-se a equação de Duncan et al. (1999. Observou-se que houve predomínio das cadeias carbônicas ímpares e que a concentração total de n-alcanos decresceu à medida que se aumentou a proporção de A. pintoi nos tratamentos. Estimativas acuradas da composição botânica de misturas de A. pintoi com B. brizantha foram obtidas utilizando-se os alcanos C29, C31, C33 e C35. O alcano C35 foi fundamental para a qualidade das estimativas. Os resultados indicaram o grande potencial da técnica para estudos com animais em pastejo.This trial was carried out to determine the composition of n-alkanes (C24 to C36 in hypothetical diets comprising of pure Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu and Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo and mixtures of these two spececies with 15%, 30%, 45%, or 60% of Arachis pintoi; it also intended to identify the combination of alkanes that allows to calculate the botanical composition of diets with the smallest residual value (real less estimated values. The forages were sampled in the summer. The n-alkanes were extracted for the direct saponification

  15. Efficacy of Nigeria-Derived Diatomaceous Earth, Botanicals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insecto®, a commercialised DE, was tested as a standard check. The rates tested were 60 g kg-1 of wheat (for botanicals) and 1 g kg-1 of wheat (for other dusts). The botanicals singly and in combination with Bularafa DE and sand induced 100% mortality and total progeny suppression of both species in 7 days. Insecto and ...

  16. Effects of Cultivar, Botanical and Gibberellic Acid Treatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The yam tubers were soaked in the chloroform extracts of the botanicals/GA3 solution for 3 hours, air dried and stored in the barn for both physical and biochemical observations. The botanicals and GA3 treatments significantly (p . 0.05) increased the moisture and dry mass contents of the stored tubers but had no effects on ...

  17. Botanic gardens for the future: Integrating research, conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Botanic gardens increasingly play a role in providing a scientific basis towards sustainable use and conservation of plant diversity. Due to a rising public awareness on biodiversity, they become important windows to the public. Gullele Botanic Garden is predestined to make an impact as a model institution for the Horn of ...

  18. Comparison of outcome expectancies for synthetic cannabinoids and botanical marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, Kirstin J; Rosenberg, Harold

    2016-07-01

    Although initially developed for medical purposes, synthetic cannabinoids have also been consumed for recreational purposes. To evaluate whether agreement with positive and negative outcome expectancies differed for synthetic cannabinoids versus botanical marijuana, and assess reported reasons for using synthetic cannabinoids. Using a web-based recruitment and data collection procedure, 186 adults who had used both synthetic cannabinoids and botanical marijuana and 181 adults who had used botanical marijuana but not synthetic cannabinoids, completed measures of outcome expectancies and other relevant questionnaires. A significant interaction revealed that participants who had used both synthetic cannabinoids and botanical marijuana indicated lower agreement with positive expectancies for synthetic cannabinoids, and higher agreement with positive expectancies for botanical marijuana, than did those participants who used only botanical marijuana. There was no interaction between type of drug and use history on agreement with negative expectancies, and participants agreed more strongly with negative outcome expectancies for synthetic cannabinoids than for botanical marijuana whether they had used one or both types of these drugs. The most frequently provided reasons for using synthetic cannabinoids included availability, perceived legality, cost, curiosity, and social interaction. Given growing public acceptance of recreational and medical marijuana, coupled with negative perceptions and increasing regulation of synthetic cannabinoid compounds, botanical marijuana is likely to remain more available and more popular than synthetic cannabinoids.

  19. Larvicidal activities of Biostop Moustiques ® , a botanical insecticide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Larvicidal activities of Biostop Moustiques ® , a botanical insecticide on field collected malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae sensu lato in Togo. ... In general, this study showed that the botanical insecticide tested has almost the same larvicidal effect no matter the strains of Anopheles gambiae used. Keywords: Biostop ...

  20. Mr Napite's botanical knowledge: bridging farmers' and scientists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr Napite's botanical knowledge: bridging farmers' and scientists' insights during participatory research. ... Although he received extensive formal training, his botanical knowledge draws largely on personal and traditional concepts. Clear morphological characteristics, other than the reproductive related organs, are the key ...

  1. Botanical Composition of Alpaca (Lama pacos Linn. Diet in a Central Mediterranean Range of Chile Composición Botánica de la Dieta de Alpaca (Lama pacos Linn. en un Pastizal del Secano Mediterráneo de la Zona Central de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Castellaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The re-introduction of domestic South American camelids (alpacas and llamas in the central zone of Chile makes it necessary to study their behaviour and adaptability. Since it is fundamental to characterize the camelid’s diet, the present work had as an objective the determination of the plant species selected by the alpacas (Lama pacos Linn. in different phenological stages (vegetative, reproductive and dry season. The study was carried out over three years in a paddock of 2.5 ha of sparse shrubland dominated by Acacia caven (Mol. Mol. and annual species in the herbaceous stratum, which were continually grazed by five male alpacas. The botanical composition and the forage dry matter available for grazing in the pasture was evaluated. Botanical composition of diets was estimated with the microhistological technique, using dung samples collected directly from the rectum. During the vegetative season, the most consumed plant species were annual and perennial grasses. In the reproductive season, the most important components of the diet were woody plant species, annual grasses and forbs. In the dry season, the diet was composed of a high percentage of woody plant species.La reintroducción de camélidos sudamericanos domésticos (alpaca y llamas en la zona central de Chile, hace necesario estudiar su comportamiento y adaptabilidad. En este contexto, la caracterización de la dieta es fundamental. Por ello, el presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo determinar las especies vegetales seleccionadas por las alpacas en diferentes etapas fenológicas del pastizal (vegetativo, reproductivo y seco. El estudio se realizó durante tres temporadas en un potrero de 2,5 ha ocupado por un matorral claro dominado por Acacia caven (Mol. Mol. y especies anuales en el estrato herbáceo, las cuales fueron pastoreadas continuamente por cinco alpacas macho. En la pradera se evaluó la composición botánica y la disponibilidad de la materia seca bajo pastoreo. La

  2. Grazing management strategies for massaigrass-forage peanut pastures: 1. dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition Estratégias de manejo do pastejo para pastos consorciados de capim-massai e amendoim forrageiro: 1. dinâmica da condição do pasto e da composição botânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Soares de Andrade

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out from October 2002 to December 2003 to evaluate the dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition of a mixed massaigrass (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai and forage peanut (Arachis pintoi Ac 01 pasture, intermittently stocked at three daily herbage allowance levels (9.0, 14.5 and 18.4% live weight. Sward condition was characterized in each grazing cycle in terms of the pre and post-grazing sward height, forage mass and percentage of bare ground. Botanical composition (grass, legume and weeds was evaluated before each grazing period. Sward height and forage mass increased linearly with increasing herbage allowance (HA levels, and higher values were observed during the rainy season. Percentage of bare ground increased primarily at the lowest HA level. Percentage of forage peanut increased throughout the experimental period, primarily in the barest and shortest swards, under the lowest HA level. In the last quarter of 2003 the legume constituted 23.5, 10.6 and 6.4% of the pasture forage mass, respectively, from the lowest to the highest HA level. These results suggest that forage peanut can be successfully associated with massaigrass, as long as the pre-grazing sward height is maintained shorter than 65-70 cm, which will prevent excessive shading to the legume.Este estudo foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a dinâmica e a composição botânica de uma pastagem consorciada de capim-massai (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai e amendoim forrageiro (Arachis pintoi Ac 01, manejada sob lotação rotacionada em três níveis de oferta diária de forragem (9,0; 14,5 e 18,4% do peso vivo. A condição da pastagem foi caracterizada em cada ciclo de pastejo, em termos de altura, massa de forragem e porcentagem de solo descoberto (pré e pós-pastejo. A composição botânica da pastagem (gramínea, leguminosa e invasoras foi monitorada antes de cada período de ocupação. Houve aumento linear da altura

  3. UP3005, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba, Improves Pain Sensitivity and Cartilage Degradations in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Rat OA Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Yimam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial disease primarily noted by cartilage degradation in association with inflammation that causes significant morbidity, joint pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Present-day management of OA is inadequate due to the lack of principal therapies proven to be effective in hindering disease progression where symptomatic therapy focused approach masks the actual etiology leading to irreversible damage. Here, we describe the effect of UP3005, a composition containing a proprietary blend of two standardized extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba, in maintaining joint structural integrity and alleviating OA associated symptoms in monosodium-iodoacetate- (MIA- induced rat OA disease model. Pain sensitivity, micro-CT, histopathology, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs level analysis were conducted. Diclofenac at 10 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. UP3005 resulted in almost a complete inhibition in proteoglycans degradation, reductions of 16.6% (week 4, 40.5% (week 5, and 22.0% (week 6 in pain sensitivity, statistically significant improvements in articular cartilage matrix integrity, minimal visual subchondral bone damage, and statistically significant increase in bone mineral density when compared to the vehicle control with MIA. Therefore, UP3005 could potentially be considered as an alternative therapy from natural sources for the treatment of OA and/or its associated symptoms.

  4. William Keit and the Durban Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. McCracken

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available William Keit was born in Saxony in 1841 and in early life travelled across Europe working in many famous nurseries and gardens. In 1872 on the recommendation of the director of Kew Gardens, Keit emigrated to Natal to become curator of the Durban Botanic Garden. So dilapidated was this garden that Keit was faced with the task of virtually re-establishing it.Though he was largely successful in this endeavour, as he was in fortifying the link between Natal and Kew, Keit could not solve the problems of a severe drought,a labour shortage and a scarcity of funds. In 1881 he resigned his position leaving a solid foundation on which the renowned botanist, John Medley Wood was to build. Keit in later Ufe ran a successful nursery in Durban and for 30 years was curator of the Parks and Gardens Department,in which capacity he did more than anyone else to beautify Durban.

  5. Interactive wood combustion for botanical tree models

    KAUST Repository

    Pirk, Sören

    2017-11-22

    We present a novel method for the combustion of botanical tree models. Tree models are represented as connected particles for the branching structure and a polygonal surface mesh for the combustion. Each particle stores biological and physical attributes that drive the kinetic behavior of a plant and the exothermic reaction of the combustion. Coupled with realistic physics for rods, the particles enable dynamic branch motions. We model material properties, such as moisture and charring behavior, and associate them with individual particles. The combustion is efficiently processed in the surface domain of the tree model on a polygonal mesh. A user can dynamically interact with the model by initiating fires and by inducing stress on branches. The flames realistically propagate through the tree model by consuming the available resources. Our method runs at interactive rates and supports multiple tree instances in parallel. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through numerous examples and evaluate its plausibility against the combustion of real wood samples.

  6. Phytochemical Assays of Commercial Botanical Dietary Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krochmal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of botanical dietary supplements (BDS has been accompanied by concerns regarding the quality of commercial products. Health care providers, in particular, have an interest in knowing about product quality, in view of the issues related to herb-drug interactions and potential side effects. This study assessed whether commercial formulations of saw palmetto, kava kava, echinacea, ginseng and St. John's wort had consistent labeling and whether quantities of marker compounds agreed with the amounts stated on the label. We purchased six bottles each of two lots of supplements from nine manufacturers and analyzed the contents using established commercial methodologies at an independent laboratory. Product labels were found to vary in the information provided, such as serving recommendations and information about the herb itself (species, part of the plant, marker compound, etc. With regard to marker compound content, little variability was observed between different lots of the same brand, while the content did vary widely between brands (e.g. total phenolic compounds in Echinacea ranged from 3.9–15.3 mg per serving; total ginsenosides in ginseng ranged from 5.3–18.2 mg per serving. Further, the amounts recommended for daily use also differed between brands, increasing the potential range of a consumer's daily dose. Echinacea and ginseng were the most variable, while St. John's wort and saw palmetto were the least variable. This study highlights some of the key issues in the botanical supplement market, including the importance of standardized manufacturing practices and reliable labeling information. In addition, health care providers should keep themselves informed regarding product quality in order to be able to appropriately advise patients utilizing both conventional and herbal medicines.

  7. The National Institutes of Health Investment in Research on Botanicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Paul M.; Meyers, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) were both established by Congress in the 1990’s. ODS aims to strengthen knowledge and understanding of dietary supplements (DS). NCCAM promotes exploration of complementary and alternative medicine in the context of rigorous science. Together, they developed the Botanical Research Centers Program to promote interdisciplinary study of botanicals, particularly those found in DS, by supporting research activities ranging from plant and characterization to preclinical and early-phase clinical studies. These Centers are part of the coordinated efforts of ODS and NCCAM to enhance botanical research. PMID:21075178

  8. Botanical drugs: challenges and opportunities: contribution to Linnaeus Memorial Symposium 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yixuan; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2008-02-27

    Plants have been a source of therapeutic agents for more than 5000 years. Approximately 25% of the modern medications are developed from plants. Botanical drugs, simply defined as clinically validated pharmaceuticals of plant origin, typically contain a multi-component composition derived from herbal practices. An obvious advantage of botanical drugs is their history of use and hence, that the therapeutic window has already been understood through experience. Following vigorous scientific validation and appropriate regulatory procedures, some of the ancient remedies may prove to be useful in mitigating certain ailments (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, metabolic syndrome, etc.) where contemporary therapies often lack desired effectiveness. Such a complementary approach has received tremendous attention among medical professionals, governmental agencies and the general public across the world. A few recently approved botanical prescriptions in the USA and Europe, albeit for topical application, have opened a window of opportunity in terms of regulatory passages in the West. One of the major challenges we face is the standardization of biological materials from natural sources. New technologies to modernize traditional herbs into mainstream pharmaceutical products are being evaluated with the ultimate goal of maximizing the opportunities and overcoming the challenges.

  9. Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oral acute toxicity study of selected botanical pesticide plants used by subsistence farmers around the Lake Victoria Basin. M Kamatenesi-Mugisha, JP Buyungo, P Ogwal, A Kasibante, AL Deng, JO Ogendo, MJ Mihale ...

  10. Botanical studies in the Arctic National Wildlife Range: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a botanical study in the Arctic National Wildlife Range during 1970. Cooperative studies on flora and fauna were done on selected sites. Sites include...

  11. Effects of Cultivar, Botanical and Gibberellic Acid Treatment on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    biotechsocietynigeria.org. Effects of Cultivar, Botanical and Gibberellic Acid Treatment on. Physico-Chemical Changes of Yam (Dioscorea rotundata Poir). Tuber in Storage. Eze, S.C.. Department of Crop Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

  12. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  13. Plant Provocations: Botanical Indigeneity and (Decolonial Imaginations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendran Kumarakulasingam

    Full Text Available Abstract Abstract: This paper examines the possibilities and limitations of an emergent global discourse of indigeneity to offer an oppositional praxis in the face of the depredations of settler colonialism in post-apartheid South Africa. Self-conscious articulations of indigeneity, we argue, reveal the fraught relationship between increasingly hegemonic and narrow understandings of the indigenous and the carceral logic of apartheid. We examine this by focusing on the meanings and attachments forged through indigenous plants in two realms: the world of indigenous gardening practised by white suburban dwellers and that of subsistence farming undertaken by rural black women. This juxtaposition reveals that in contrast to the pervasive resurrection of colonial time that defines metropolitan indigenous gardening, the social relations of a subsistence cultivator challenge the confines of colonial temporality, revealing a creative mode of dissent structured around dreams, ancestral knowledge, and the commons. Our exploration of struggles around botanical indigeneity suggests that anticolonial modes of indigeneity do not necessarily inhere in recognisable forms and that studies of the indigenous need to proceed beyond those that bear familial resemblance to emergent global understandings.

  14. Development of botanicals to combat antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja D. Gupta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of antibiotics in the previous century lead to reduction in mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases but their inappropriate and irrational use has resulted in emergence of resistant microbial populations. Alteration of target sites, active efflux of drugs and enzymatic degradations are the strategies employed by the pathogenic bacteria to develop intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. This has led to an increased interest in medicinal plants since 25–50% of current pharmaceuticals are plant derived. Crude extracts of medicinal plants could serve as an alternate source of resistance modifying agents owing to the wide variety of secondary metabolites. These metabolites (alkaloids, tannins, polyphenols etc. could act as potentials for antimicrobials and resistance modifiers. Plant extracts have the ability to bind to protein domains leading to modification or inhibition protein–protein interactions. This enables the herbals to also present themselves as effective modulators of host related cellular processes viz immune response, mitosis, apoptosis and signal transduction. Thus they may exert their activity not only by killing the microorganism but by affecting key events in the pathogenic process, thereby, the bacteria, fungi and viruses may have a reduced ability to develop resistance to botanicals. The article is meant to stimulate research wherein the cidal activity of the extract is not the only parameter considered but other mechanism of action by which plants can combat drug resistant microbes are investigated. The present article emphasizes on mechanisms involved in countering multi drug resistance.

  15. Seasonal dry matter production, botanical composition and forage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seasonal growth and low forage quality of kikuyu restrict milk production. The aim of this study was to determine the yield and nutritional value of irrigated kikuyu over-sown with perennial, Italian or Westerwolds ryegrass grazed by dairy cows. The three pasture systems reached optimum growth during different months ...

  16. Botanical composition, yield and nutritional quality of grassland in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Harvesting at 90 d and application of 100 and 150 kg ha-1 N fertiliser had a higher (P < 0.05) total DM yield of the grassland. Crude protein, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre, cellulose, hemicellulose, phosphorus and IVDMD were significantly (P < 0.05) affected by the stage of harvesting. However, N fertiliser had ...

  17. Indonesian propolis: chemical composition, biological activity and botanical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusheva, Boryana; Popova, Milena; Koendhori, Eko Budi; Tsvetkova, Iva; Naydenski, Christo; Bankova, Vassya

    2011-03-01

    From a biologically active extract of Indonesian propolis from East Java, 11 compounds were isolated and identified: four alk(en)ylresorcinols (obtained as an inseparable mixture) (1-4) were isolated for the first time from propolis, along with four prenylflavanones (6-9) and three cycloartane-type triterpenes (5, 10 and 11). The structures of the components were elucidated based on their spectral properties. All prenylflavanones demonstrated significant radical scavenging activity against diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radicals, and compound 6 showed significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. For the first time Macaranga tanarius L. and Mangifera indica L. are shown as plant sources of Indonesian propolis.

  18. Botanical Gardens and Collecting of Plants in the Light of the Metamorphosis of Botanical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Unetič

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the late 18th and early 19th century, the collecting of exotic plants became a fashion that took hold of European courts, and was followed by many noblemen, intellectuals, gardeners and others. It was not only popular to grow new plants in gardens, collecting them in herbaria or illustrating and enumerating them in catalogues, but was also important to develop botanical knowledge to enable the owners of the plants to use and present them. In Carniola we can observe this interest in botany in the cases of Baron Joseph Erberg, Barons Žiga and Karl Zois, Jesuit Gabriel Gruber as well as many others. Baron Erberg's activity is recorded in archives which include lively correspondence concerning plant collecting, the exchange and purchase of plants and other botanical matters. So we can see that among plant lovers in Carniola foreign plants such as pelargonium, agave and hydrangea were popular and that they had a special role in gardens devoted especially to exotic plants. The collecting of exotic plants is not just a phenomenon of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries but can be traced back to early civilisations such the Assyrians and ancient Chinese and was also notable in a the 16th and 17th centuries with their cabinets of curiosities. But studying the botanical collection of exotic and new (or newly defined plants gardens of the late 18th and early 19th centuries shows us that although we can recognize some of the old “habits” in the process of collecting (collecting of rare, fascinating plants or collecting plants to demonstrate imperial power the social changes in the 18th century left their trace also in this aspect of human activity. Thus we can understand plant collecting of this time as a decline and metamorphosis of the former natural cabinets of curiosities. In botanical gardens of the late 18th and early 19th century we see the development of science of botany, the rise of the amateur botanist, a different perception of nature

  19. Análise micro-histológica da composição botânica de misturas preestabelecidas, submetidas ao processo de digestão in vitro Microhistological analysis of the botanical composition of pre-established mixtures, submitted to the in vitro digestion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela de Oliveira Bauer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A composição botânica de misturas preestabelecidas de seis espécies forrageiras foi estimada após diferentes tempos de digestão in vitro e comparadas com a composição real. Três misturas de seis espécies, com participações conhecidas, foram constituídas nos períodos chuvoso e seco e examinadas pela técnica micro-histológica. O período de amostragem interferiu na estimativa de apenas uma das misturas. Apesar das diferenças estatísticas entre a composição real das misturas e suas estimativas, nos períodos, seus índices de similaridade foram superiores a 85%. O tempo de digestão influenciou nas estima­tivas das misturas, dependendo da porcentagem de participação das espécies. As estimativas foram idênticas para as três misturas após 48 e 72 horas de digestão. A digestão das amostras pode melhorar ou piorar as estimativas, dependendo da porcentagem de participação e da resistência das espécies. O processo digestivo não deve ser considerado como único fator de variação quando se utiliza esta técnica, que pode ser considerada robusta, uma vez que os índices de similaridade entre os períodos, o tempo de digestão e a composição real foram superiores a 75%.The botanical composition of pre-established mixtures of six forages species was estimated after in vitro digestion times and compared with the real composition. Three mixtures of six species of known participations were made up in the rainy and dry seasons and estimated through the microhistological technique. The sampling season interfered with the estimates of only one of the mixtures. In spite of the statistical differences between the real composition of the mixtures and their estimates, the similarity indices for the periods were superior to 85%. The digestion time influenced mixtures estimates, according to the percentage of the species participation. The three mixtures estimates were identical after 48 and 72 hours of digestion. The digestion of

  20. Emerging importance of geographical indications and designations of origin - authenticating geo-authentic botanicals and implications for phytotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinckmann, J A

    2013-11-01

    Pharmacopoeial monographs providing specifications for composition, identity, purity, quality, and strength of a botanical are developed based on analysis of presumably authenticated botanical reference materials. The specimens should represent the quality traditionally specified for the intended use, which may require different standards for medicinal versus food use. Development of quality standards monographs may occur through collaboration between a sponsor company or industry association and a pharmacopoeial expert committee. The sponsor may base proposed standards and methods on their own preferred botanical supply which may, or may not, be geo-authentic and/or correspond to qualities defined in traditional medicine formularies and pharmacopoeias. Geo-authentic botanicals are those with specific germplasm, cultivated or collected in their traditional production regions, of a specified biological age at maturity, with specific production techniques and processing methods. Consequences of developing new monographs that specify characteristics of an 'introduced' cultivated species or of a material obtained from one unique origin could lead to exclusion of geo-authentic herbs and may have therapeutic implications for clinical practice. In this review, specifications of selected medicinal plants with either a geo-authentic or geographical indication designation are discussed and compared against official pharmacopoeial standards for same genus and species regardless of origin. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Safety of botanical ingredients in personal care products/cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignac, Eric; Nohynek, Gerhard J; Re, Thomas; Clouzeau, Jacques; Toutain, Hervé

    2011-02-01

    The key issue of the safety assessment of botanical ingredients in personal care products (PCP) is the phytochemical characterisation of the plant source, data on contamination, adulteration and hazardous residues. The comparative approach used in the safety assessment of GM-plants may be applied to novel botanical PCP ingredients. Comparator(s) are the parent plant or varieties of the same species. Chemical grouping includes definition of chemical groups suitable for a read-across approach; it allows the estimation of toxicological endpoints on the basis of data from related substances (congeneric groups) with physical/chemical properties producing similar toxicities. The Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) and Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) are tools for the assessment of trace substances or minor ingredients. The evaluation of skin penetration of substances present in human food is unnecessary, whereas mixtures may be assessed on the basis of physical/chemical properties of individual substances. Adverse dermal effects of botanicals include irritation, sensitisation, phototoxicity and immediate-type allergy. The experience from dietary supplements or herbal medicines showed that being natural is not equivalent to being safe. Pragmatic approaches for quality and safety standards of botanical ingredients are needed; consumer safety should be the first objective of conventional and botanical PCP ingredients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in PBMCs by Immunostimulatory Botanicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzler, Karen L.; Waters, Robert; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Rochon, Yvan; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2010-01-01

    Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics), this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata) and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica), the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:20838436

  3. Regulation of inflammatory gene expression in PBMCs by immunostimulatory botanicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Denzler

    Full Text Available Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics, this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica, the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses.

  4. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  5. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  6. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Yoon

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized. However, many scientists have reported isolation and characterization of a variety of antifungal plant derivatives. Here, we present a survey of a wide range of reported plant-derived antifungal metabolites.

  7. THE MOCHE BOTANICAL FROG (La rana botánica mochica)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donna McClelland

    2011-01-01

    .... Fine line painted vessels and ones with low relief decoration show the Botanical Frog performing as part of a ritual involving other animals and cultivated crops, suggesting that the Botanical Frog...

  8. The Regulatory Framework Across International Jurisdictions for Risks Associated with Consumption of Botanical Food Supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Low, Teng Yong; Wong, Kwok Onn; Yap, Adelene L.L.; Haan, De Laura H.J.; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.

    2017-01-01

    Dietary supplements, including those containing botanical ingredients and botanical-derived compounds, have been marketed to consumers globally for many decades. However, the legislative framework for such products remains inconsistent across jurisdictions internationally. This study aims to

  9. Factors determining the use of botanical insect pest control methods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A farm survey was conducted in three representative administrative districts of the Lake Victoria Basin (LVB), Kenya to document farmers' indigenous knowledge and the factors that influence the use of botanicals instead of synthetic insecticides in insect pest management. A total of 65 farm households were randomly ...

  10. Inhibition of Fungal Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis by Diverse Botanically ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research April 2015; 14 (4): 605-609. ISSN: 1596-5996 (print); 1596-9827 ... Results: Neither the tea-derived polyphenol mixture nor individual polyphenol compound, except quercetin, inhibited A. flavus ... compound that also inhibits fungal proliferation. Botanically-derived polyphenols ...

  11. Evaluation of Botanical Herbicides against Common Weed Species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of botanical herbicides against common weed species of coffee. [2] herbicides were varied among plant extracts as well as with application frequency. Essential oils extracted from E. citrodora and C. winterianus caused significantly the highest percentage growth retardation of weeds as compared to untreated ...

  12. Relating Social Inclusion and Environmental Issues in Botanic Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergou, Asimina; Willison, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Botanic gardens have been evolving, responding to the changing needs of society, from their outset as medicinal gardens of monasteries and university gardens to more recently as organizations that contribute to the conservation of plant genetic resources. Considering that social and environmental issues are deeply intertwined and cannot be tackled…

  13. Botanical and molecular evidences of landraces from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Botanical descriptors, total seed proteins, isozymes and RAPD markers were applied to identify landraces from indigenous lentil germplasm exclusively collected from the province of Baluchistan,. Pakistan. The Germplasm revealed the prevalence of landraces, especially on the basis of isozymes.

  14. Evaluation of botanicals for onion thrips, Thrips tabaci Lindeman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    2005; Shiberu et al., 2013), are found to be the best option for smallholder vegetable production. Use of botanical insecticides is ideal for organic farming and is safe for both the environment and human health ..... Agricultural Institute NSW Department of Primary Industries, Onions Australia, 22: 27-. 28. Kahsay, Y., Abay, F ...

  15. Factors affecting the adoption of botanical extracts as pesticides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of synthetic pesticides in pest control raises concern for human health and environment safety. However, a long history of use of botanical extracts and herbs in African cultures is available for protecting crops and stored products, as well as for medicinal and veterinary purposes. In recent decades, the use of ...

  16. The changing role of botanic gardens and the experience from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although not covered in as much depth in the literature as botanic gardens, other types of gardens, i.e., the home, urban, or community gardens, as special gardens, and “Liberty and Victory gardens,” as emergency situation gardens, are discussed. Home gardens are not new in Ethiopia, but victory gardens, instituted in ...

  17. Efficacy of botanical powders and cooking oils against Angoumois ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cumulative mortality of 39.00% was registered from Azadirachta indica bark powder (with LT50 of 30.40 days) and Cympopogon citratus leaf (with LT50 of 171 days) against Sitotroga cerealella 20 days after insect exposure to the botanicals. Maximum moths mortality, 94.4%, was recorded from standard control (Malathion) ...

  18. Insecticidal Actions of Some Botanicals to Storage Bruchid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of some botanicals on the control of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) against the bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus during storage was investigated. Three plant materials used were powdered ginger, garlic and bitter leaf, while five varieties of cowpea used included Aloka, IAR48 (Big Brown), IT3629 (Big ...

  19. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    .2%), Camellia sinensis/green tea ( 8.7%) and Ginkgo biloba/gingko (8.5%). Considering the length of time examined and the number of plants included in the review, it is remarkable that: (i) the adverse effects due to botanical ingredients were relatively infrequent, if assessed for causality; and (ii...

  20. A survey of ethnoveterinary botanical remedies in Ogun State and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty four villages were visited during a cross sectional survey of ethno veterinary botanical remedies used for the management of animal diseases in four local government areas randomly selected cutting across the four geopolitical zones in Ogun State. A total of 323 households were purposively selected and ...

  1. Bioactivity-Guided Identification of Botanical Inhibitors of Ketohexokinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MyPhuong T Le

    Full Text Available In developed countries with westernized diets, the excessive consumption of added sugar in beverages and highly refined and processed foods is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. As a major constituent of added sugars, fructose has been shown to cause a variety of adverse metabolic effects, such as impaired insulin sensitivity, hypertriglyceridemia, and oxidative stress. Recent studies have shown that ketohexokinase isoform C is the key enzyme responsible in fructose metabolism that drive's fructose's adverse effects. The objective of this study was to identify botanical ingredients with potential for inhibitory activity against ketohexokinase-C and fructose-induced metabolic effects by using a series of in vitro model systems.Extracts from 406 botanicals and 1200 purified phytochemicals were screened (initial concentration of 50 μg/mL and 50 μM, respectively for their inhibitory activity using a cell free, recombinant human ketohexokinase-C assay. Dose response evaluations were conducted on botanical extracts and phytochemicals that inhibited ketohexokinase-C by > 30% and > 40%, respectively. Two different extract lots of the top botanical candidates were further evaluated in lysates of HepG2 cells overexpressing ketohexokinase-C for inhibition of fructose-induced ATP depletion. In addition, extracts were evaluated in intact Hep G2 cells for inhibition of fructose-induced elevation of triglyceride and uric acid production.Among the botanical extracts, phloretin (Malus domestica extracts were the most potent (IC50: 8.9-9.2 μg/mL followed by extracts of Angelica archangelica (IC50: 22.6 μg/mL-57.3 μg/mL. Among the purified phytochemicals, methoxy-isobavachalcone (Psoralea corylifolia, IC50 = 0.2 μM exhibited the highest potency against ketohexokinase isoform C activity followed by osthole (Angelica archangelica, IC50 = 0.7 μM, cratoxyarborenone E (Cratoxylum prunifolium, IC50 = 1.0 μM, and

  2. Antioxidant Activity of a Geopropolis from Northeast Brazil: Chemical Characterization and Likely Botanical Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Joselena M; Fernandes-Silva, Caroline C; Salatino, Antonio; Message, Dejair; Negri, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Geopropolis is a product containing wax, plant resin, and soil particles. It is elaborated by stingless bees of tribe Meliponini. Methanol extracts of sample of geopropolis produced by Scaptotrigona postica ("mandaguari") in the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN, northeast Brazil) were analyzed for the determination of standard parameters (total phenols, total flavonoids, and radical scavenging activity) and chemical characterization by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS analysis. The sample analyzed has high contents of total phenols and flavonoids, as well as high antioxidant activity. The constituents characterized were mainly flavonols, such as quercetin methyl ethers, and methoxychalcones. Such chemical profile is similar to the composition of a green propolis from the same area of RN, which is produced by Africanized Apis mellifera , using shoot apices of Mimosa tenuiflora , popularly known as "jurema-preta." This finding provides evidence that "mandaguari" geopropolis and honeybee propolis have the same botanical origin in RN. The sharing of a plant resin source by phylogenetically distant bees (Apinae and Meliponinae) suggests that bee genetic factors play little role in the choice of plants for resin collection and that the availability of potential botanical sources plays a decisive role.

  3. Sensory and chemical profiles of Finnish honeys of different botanical origins and consumer preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortesniemi, Maaria; Rosenvald, Sirli; Laaksonen, Oskar; Vanag, Anita; Ollikka, Tarja; Vene, Kristel; Yang, Baoru

    2018-04-25

    The sensory-chemical profiles of Finnish honeys (labeled as buckwheat, cloudberry-bog, lingonberry, sweet clover, willowherb and multifloral honeys) were investigated using a multi-analytical approach. The sensory test (untrained panel, n = 62) was based on scaling and check-all-that-apply (CATA) methods accompanied with questions on preference and usage of honey. The results were correlated with corresponding profiles of odor-active compounds, determined using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O). Botanical origins and chemical compositions including sugars were evaluated using NMR spectroscopy. A total of 73 odor-active compounds were listed based on GC-O. Sweet and mild honeys with familiar sensory properties were preferred by the panelists (PCA, R2X(1) = 0.7) while buckwheat and cloudberry-bog honeys with strong odor, flavor and color were regarded as unfamiliar and unpleasant. The data will give the honey industry novel information on honey properties in relation to the botanical origin, and consumer preference. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phytotherapeutics: The Emerging Role of Intestinal and Hepatocellular Transporters in Drug Interactions with Botanical Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulam Murtaza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In herbalism, botanical supplements are commonly believed to be safe remedies, however, botanical supplements and dietary ingredients interact with transport and metabolic processes, affecting drug disposition. Although a large number of studies have described that botanical supplements interfere with drug metabolism, the mode of their interaction with drug transport processes is not well described. Such interactions may result in serious undesired effects and changed drug efficacy, therefore, some studies on interaction between botanical supplement ingredients and drug transporters such as P-gp and OATPs are described here, suggesting that the interaction between botanical supplements and the drug transporters is clinically significant.

  5. Review of the use of botanicals for epilepsy in complementary medical systems--Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fenglai; Yan, Bo; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Dong

    2015-11-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, botanical remedies have been used for centuries to treat seizures. This review aimed to summarize the botanicals that have been used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat epilepsy. We searched Chinese online databases to determine the botanicals used for epilepsy in traditional Chinese medicine and identified articles using a preset search syntax and inclusion criteria of each botanical in the PubMed database to explore their potential mechanisms. Twenty-three botanicals were identified to treat epilepsy in traditional Chinese medicine. The pharmacological mechanisms of each botanical related to antiepileptic activity, which were mainly examined in animal models, were reviewed. We discuss the use and current trends of botanical treatments in China and highlight the limitations of botanical epilepsy treatments. A substantial number of these types of botanicals would be good candidates for the development of novel AEDs. More rigorous clinical trials of botanicals in traditional Chinese medicine for epilepsy treatment are encouraged in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian W. Millsop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other substances of plant origin and may be used in the form of dried or fresh plants, extracted plant material, or specific plant-derived chemicals. They possess multiple properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties and are, therefore, believed to be possible chemopreventive agents or substances that may suppress or reverse the process of carcinogenesis. Here, we provide a review of botanical agents studied for the treatment and prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  7. Botanical drugs in Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Yogini; Liang, Zhitao; Zhao, Zhongzhen

    2016-12-24

    China and India have a long history in the therapeutic application of botanical drugs in traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Ayurveda are considered as two of the most ancient systems of medicine, with history of more than two millennia. Medicinal plants are the principal medicinal materials used in both these systems. This review discusses about the histories of Ayurveda and TCM, the common medicinal plants species, the drug processing strategies used, and the current statuses of these traditional systems of medicine (TSM). Through the views presented in this article, we aim to provide a new perspective to herbal drug researchers for expanding and improving the utilization of botanical drugs and their therapeutic applications. A bibliographic investigation of Chinese and Indian pharmacopoeias, monographs and official websites was performed. Furthermore, information was obtained from scientific databases on ethnobotany and ethno medicines. The review of Ayurveda and TCM ethno medicine indicates that both these systems have many medicinal materials in common. The studies carried out by the authors for comparison of plants from same genus from both these TSM's have been discussed to further bring focus to the utilization of "qualitatively" similar species which can be utilized and substituted for endangered or economically valued species. The overview of ancient literature and scientific findings for drugs in both these systems suggests that, the botanical drugs used in common and their processing methods can be explored further for extensive utilization in traditional medicine. This review describes the histories, common medicinal plant species, their processing methods and therapeutic applications in Ayurveda and TCM. The insights provided through this article may be used by herbal drug researchers and pharmacologists for further exploration of botanical drugs from these two traditional systems of medicine. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  8. Fibonacci or quasi-symmetric phyllotaxis. Part II: botanical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Douady

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the study of phyllotaxis was greatly helped by the simple description of botanical patterns by only two integer numbers, namely the number of helices (parastichies in each direction tiling the plant stem. The use of parastichy numbers reduced the complexity of the study and created a proliferation of generalizations, among others the simple geometric model of lattices. Unfortunately, these simple descriptive method runs into difficulties when dealing with patterns presenting transitions or irregularities. Here, we propose several ways of addressing the imperfections of botanical reality. Using ontogenetic analysis, which follows the step-by-step genesis of the pattern, and crystallographic analysis, which reveal irregularity in its details, we show how to derive more information from a real botanical sample, in particular, about its irregularities and transitions. We present several examples, from the first explicit visualization of a normal Fibonacci parastichy number increase, to more exotic ones, including the quasi-symmetric patterns detected in simulations. We compare these observations qualitatively with the result of the disk-packing model, presenting evidence for the relevance of the model.

  9. The use of botanicals during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Dog, Tieraona

    2009-01-01

    Women are the largest consumers of healthcare, and this extends to their utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Researchers have attempted to uncover the reasons why women turn to CAM in general and to botanical medicine in particular. Desire to have personal control over their health has been cited as the strongest motive for women to use herbal medicine. Second was dissatisfaction with conventional treatment and its disregard for a holistic approach, as well as concerns about the side effects of medications.' These concerns may explain, in part, the fact that many women use herbal remedies during pregnancy. A survey of 578 pregnant women in the eastern United States reported that 45% of respondents had used herbal medicines, and a survey of 588 women in Australia revealed that 36% had used at least 1 herbal product during pregnancy. Women probably feel comfortable using herbal remedies because of their perceived safety, easy access, and the widespread availability of information about them (ie, Internet, magazines, books). While it is true that many botanicals are mild in both treatment effects and side effects, the data regarding safety during pregnancy are very limited. Given the small sample sizes in clinical trials studying botanicals in pregnant women, only large differences in measures of pregnancy outcomes would likely be detected. For example, if an herb were thought to increase the rate of spontaneous abortion from 6% to 7%, a sample size of more than 19000 women would be needed. It is highly unlikely that there will be any studies of a botanical (or drug) with this large a sample size. So when addressing the safety of an herb during pregnancy, we must look at the totality of the evidence, which includes traditional and contemporary use, animal studies, pharmacological studies, and clinical trial data, when available. Survey data tell us that women often do not share their use of herbal remedies with their healthcare providers due

  10. The worldwide trend of using botanical drugs and strategies for developing global drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungseop

    2017-03-01

    Natural product drugs, or botanical drugs, are drugs composed of natural substances which have constituents with healthenhancing or medicinal activities. In Korea, government-led projects brought attention to botanical drugs invigorating domestic botanical drug industry. Foreign markets, as well, are growing bigger as the significance of botanical drugs stood out. To follow along with the tendency, Korea puts a lot of effort on developing botanical drugs suitable for global market. However, standards for approving drug sales vary by countries. And also, thorough standardization, certification, clinical studies and data of these will be required as well as data confirming safety and effectiveness. Meanwhile, as an international exchange in botanical drug market continues, the importance of plant resources was emphasized. Thus countries' ownership of domestic natural resources became vital. Not only establishing a systematic method to secure domestic plant resources, but also cooperation with other countries on sharing natural resources is essential to procure natural resources effectively. Korea started to show visible results with botanical drugs, and asthma/COPD treatment made out of speedwell is one example. Sufficient investment and government's active support for basic infrastructure for global botanical drugs will bring Korea to much higher level of botanical drug development. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(3): 111-116].

  11. Traditional botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Marcela Meneghetti; Ramos, Marcelo Alves; de Albuquerque, Ulysses Paulino; Coelho-de-Souza, Gabriela; Ritter, Mara Rejane

    2013-07-30

    This study characterized the botanical knowledge of artisanal fishers of the Lami community, Porto Alegre, southern Brazil based on answers to the following question: Is the local botanical knowledge of the artisanal fishers of the rural-urban district of Lami still active, even since the district's insertion into the metropolitan region of Porto Alegre? This region, which contains a mosaic of urban and rural areas, hosts the Lami Biological Reserve (LBR) and a community of 13 artisanal fisher families. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 fishers, complemented by participatory observation techniques and free-lists; in these interviews, the species of plants used by the community and their indicated uses were identified. A total of 111 species belonging to 50 families were identified. No significant differences between the diversities of native and exotic species were found. Seven use categories were reported: medicinal (49%), human food (23.2%), fishing (12.3%), condiments (8%), firewood (5%), mystical purposes (1.45%), and animal food (0.72%). The medicinal species with the highest level of agreement regarding their main uses (AMUs) were Aloe arborescens Mill., Plectranthus barbatus Andrews, Dodonaea viscosa Jacq., Plectranthus ornatus Codd, Eugenia uniflora L., and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. For illness and diseases, most plants were used for problems with the digestive system (20 species), followed by the respiratory system (16 species). This community possesses a wide botanical knowledge, especially of medicinal plants, comparable to observations made in other studies with fishing communities in coastal areas of the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Ethnobotanical studies in rural-urban areas contribute to preserving local knowledge and provide information that aids in conserving the remaining ecosystems in the region.

  12. A botanical and pharmacological description of petasites species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tys Jerzy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to evaluate the botanical and pharmacological description of Petasites species. Petasides (butterbur as a perennial shrub which was found in Europe and also in a parts of Asia and North America, has been widely used medicinally for centuries. At present, the main phytopharmacology uses for Petasides extracts are for prophylactic treatment of migraines, as well as an antispasmodic agent for bronchial asthma and pertussis. Furthermore, it has been used effectively in preventing gastric ulcers, and in urinary tract spasms and treating patients with irritable bladder. But still, there is a need for more studies on the potential applications of butterbur extract in medicine.

  13. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all...

  14. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  15. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  16. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  17. The Botanical Drug Substance Crofelemer as a Model System for Comparative Characterization of Complex Mixture Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleindl, Peter A; Xiong, Jian; Hewarathna, Asha; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Nariya, Maulik K; Fisher, Adam C; Deeds, Eric J; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Schöneich, Christian; Volkin, David B; Forrest, M Laird

    2017-11-01

    Crofelemer is a botanical polymeric proanthocyanidin that inhibits chloride channel activity and is used clinically for treating HIV-associated secretory diarrhea. Crofelemer lots may exhibit significant physicochemical variation due to the natural source of the raw material. A variety of physical, chemical, and biological assays were used to identify potential critical quality attributes (CQAs) of crofelemer, which may be useful in characterizing differently sourced and processed drug products. Crofelemer drug substance was extracted from tablets of one commercial drug product lot, fractionated, and subjected to accelerated thermal degradation studies to produce derivative lots with variations in chemical and physical composition potentially representative of manufacturing and raw material variation. Liquid chromatography, UV absorbance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed substantial changes in the composition of derivative lots. A chloride channel inhibition cell-based bioassay suggested that substantial changes in crofelemer composition did not necessarily result in major changes to bioactivity. In 2 companion papers, machine learning and data mining approaches were applied to the analytical and biological data sets presented herein, along with chemical stability data sets derived from forced degradation studies, to develop an integrated mathematical model that can identify CQAs which are most relevant in distinguishing between different populations of crofelemer. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  18. Botanical features for identification of Gymnosporia arenicola dried leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Gustavo; Serrano, Rita; Gomes, Elsa Teixeira; Silva, Olga

    2015-11-01

    Gymnosporia arenicola Jordaan (Celastraceae) is a shrub or small tree, which naturally occurs in coastal sand dunes of Southern Mozambique and South Africa. Its dried leaf is often used in traditional medicine for the treatment of infectious and inflammatory diseases. Hereby, we present results of studies carried out according to the pharmacopoeia standards for the identification of herbal drugs, in the whole, fragmented, and powdered plant material. These results were complemented with scanning electron microscopy and histochemical techniques. The leaf microscopic analysis revealed a typical dorsiventral mesophyll with a corresponding spongy parenchyma-palisade parenchyma ratio of 0.60, anomocytic and paracytic stomata, papillate cells with a diameter of 4.00 ± 0.40 µm, multicellular uniseriate nonglandular trichomes with a length of 27.00 ± 4.10 µm and cristalliferous idioblasts containing calcium oxalate cluster crystals with a diameter of 23.04 ± 5.84 µm. The present findings demonstrate that the G. arenicola leaf has both nonglandular trichomes and hypoderm, features not previously described in the corresponding botanical section (Gymnosporia sect. Buxifoliae Jordaan). The establishment of these new botanical markers for the identification of G. arenicola leaf is essential for quality, safety and efficacy reasons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Neural networks applied to discriminate botanical origin of honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Ofélia; Iglesias, Carla; Peres, Fátima; Martínez, Javier; García, Ángela; Taboada, Javier

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work is develop a tool based on neural networks to predict the botanical origin of honeys using physical and chemical parameters. The managed database consists of 49 honey samples of 2 different classes: monofloral (almond, holm oak, sweet chestnut, eucalyptus, orange, rosemary, lavender, strawberry trees, thyme, heather, sunflower) and multifloral. The moisture content, electrical conductivity, water activity, ashes content, pH, free acidity, colorimetric coordinates in CIELAB space (L(∗), a(∗), b(∗)) and total phenols content of the honey samples were evaluated. Those properties were considered as input variables of the predictive model. The neural network is optimised through several tests with different numbers of neurons in the hidden layer and also with different input variables. The reduced error rates (5%) allow us to conclude that the botanical origin of honey can be reliably and quickly known from the colorimetric information and the electrical conductivity of honey. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. External calibration strategy for trace element quantification in botanical samples by LA-ICP-MS using filter paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Matheus A.G.; Voss, Mônica; Corazza, Gabriela; Flores, Erico M.M.; Dressler, Valderi L., E-mail: vdressler@gmail.com

    2016-01-28

    The use of reference solutions dispersed on filter paper discs is proposed for the first time as an external calibration strategy for matrix matching and determination of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in plants by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The procedure is based on the use of filter paper discs as support for aqueous reference solutions, which are further evaporated, resulting in solid standards with concentrations up to 250 μg g{sup −1} of each element. The use of filter paper for calibration is proposed as matrix matched standards due to the similarities of this material with botanical samples, regarding to carbon concentration and its distribution through both matrices. These characteristics allowed the use of {sup 13}C as internal standard (IS) during the analysis by LA-ICP-MS. In this way, parameters as analyte signal normalization with {sup 13}C, carrier gas flow rate, laser energy, spot size, and calibration range were monitored. The calibration procedure using solution deposition on filter paper discs resulted in precision improvement when {sup 13}C was used as IS. The method precision was calculated by the analysis of a certified reference material (CRM) of botanical matrix, considering the RSD obtained for 5 line scans and was lower than 20%. Accuracy of LA-ICP-MS determinations were evaluated by analysis of four CRM pellets of botanical composition, as well as by comparison with results obtained by ICP-MS using solution nebulization after microwave assisted digestion. Plant samples of unknown elemental composition were analyzed by the proposed LA method and good agreement were obtained with results of solution analysis. Limits of detection (LOD) established for LA-ICP-MS were obtained by the ablation of 10 lines on the filter paper disc containing 40 μL of 5% HNO{sub 3} (v v{sup −1}) as calibration blank. Values ranged from 0.05 to 0.81  μg g{sup −1}. Overall, the use of filter

  1. Survey on the Quality of the Top-Selling European and American Botanical Dietary Supplements Containing Boswellic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meins, Jürgen; Artaria, Christian; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2016-04-01

    In consideration of the increasing popularity of frankincense and the widely published quality problems associated with botanical dietary supplements, a survey was conducted for the first time on the quality of frankincense containing botanical dietary supplements. Six US products representing 78 % of the units sold and 70 % of the market value, and 11 European products representing 30 % of the units sold and 40 % of the market value were tested for their boswellic acid composition profile, label compliance, and claimed health benefits. Special focus was also set on the statements made with regard to the frankincense applied.Only five products out of seventeen disclosed all relevant information for the Boswellia extract, mentioning the species, the part of plant used, and the boswellic acid content. Whereas all products but one claimed to use Boswellia serrata, three products did not mention the resin as the part applied and 10 products did not declare the boswellic acid content. Apart from the different boswellic acid composition determined with a sensitive LC/MS method, 41 % of the products did not comply with the label declaration. Hence, one product from Italy did not contain any of the six characteristic boswellic acids (KBA, AKBA, αBA, βBA, AαBA, AβBA) at all and another US product contained only traces, suggesting the absence of frankincense or the use of Boswellia frereana instead of B. serrata. In another product, the ratios of the individual boswellic acids were different from B. serrata gum resin, indicating the use of another species such as Boswellia sacra or Boswellia carterii. Furthermore, two products revealed different boswellic acid contents from those declared on the label. Further, two products did not declare the use of manipulated Boswellia gum resin extract being enriched in acetyl-11-keto-boswellic acid content reaching up to 66 %. In addition, consumers could be misled by outdated literature or references to in vitro studies

  2. Side-effects of cowpea treatment with botanical insecticides on two parasitoids of Callosobruchus maculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeke, S.J.; Sinzogan, A.A.C.; Almeida, de R.P.; Boer, de P.W.M.; Jeong, G.S.; Kossou, D.K.; Loon, van J.J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Studies on the protective effect of botanical products against pest insects have infrequently been extended to side-effects on natural enemies. Indirect effects of botanicals on the storability of seeds could occur through their possible negative impact on biological control agents. Four plant

  3. Topical Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahnik, Benjamin; Sharma, Divya; Alban, Joseph; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-08-01

    Patients with psoriasis often enquire about the use of numerous botanical therapeutics. It is important for dermatologists to be aware of the current evidence regarding these agents. We conducted a systematic literature search using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases for controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials that assessed the use of topical botanical therapeutics for psoriasis. The search included the following keywords: 'psoriasis' and 'plant' or 'herbal' or 'botanical'. We also reviewed citations within articles to identify additional relevant sources. We then further refined the results by route of administration and the topical botanical agents are reviewed herein. A total of 27 controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials addressing the use of topical botanical agents for psoriasis were assessed in this review. We found that the most highly studied and most efficacious topical botanical therapeutics were Mahonia aquifolium, indigo naturalis, aloe vera, and, to a lesser degree, capsaicin. The most commonly reported adverse effects were local skin irritation, erythema, pruritus, burning, and pain. However, the overall evidence for these therapeutics remains limited in quantity and quality. The literature addresses a large number of studies in regard to botanicals for the treatment of psoriasis. While most agents appear to be safe, further research is necessary before topical botanical agents can be consistently recommended to patients.

  4. Leadership's Use of Educational Technologies in U.S. Botanic Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ginger Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Botanic gardens are rich informational environments that exhibit ideas in limited increments due to constraints of time and physical layout. This study addressed a gap in research about experiences and issues of botanic gardens leaders related to implementing educational technologies. Educational theorists Dewey, Kolb, and Bandura provided the…

  5. Level of use and safety of botanical products for itching vulvar dermatoses. Are patch tests useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Virgili, Annarosa; Toni, Giulia; Minghetti, Sara; Tiengo, Silvia; Borghi, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    Topical remedies based on botanical ingredients are popular. To assess: (i) the usage of botanical substances in subjects affected with itching and chronic vulvar complaints; (ii) the incidence of side-effects associated with their use and the frequency of contact allergy; (iii) the diagnostic usefulness of patch testing. Sixty-six patients were provided with a questionnaire to assess the prevalence and type of topical botanical preparations used and the occurrence of adverse reactions. Patients were patch tested with (i) the Italian baseline series, (ii) a topical medicament series, and (iii) a botanical series. Forty-two patients (63.6%) reported the use of natural topical products on the vulva. Seven (16.7%) noted adverse reactions; 27 showed positive reactions with the baseline series; 14 (21.2%) had at least one relevant reaction, mainly to allergens in topical products and cosmetics; and 2 (3%) showed positive reactions to the botanical series. Of the 7 patients complaining of adverse effects of botanical products, 3 (42.8%) showed relevant sensitization. The use of natural topical products is widespread among women affected with itching vulvar diseases. Contact dermatitis is a possible adverse effect. Botanical series are of questionable usefulness, owing to the wide variety of botanical ingredients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Probability of identification (POI): a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure which returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) mate...

  7. Climate Change Education: Quantitatively Assessing the Impact of a Botanical Garden as an Informal Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Although informal learning environments have been studied extensively, ours is one of the first studies to quantitatively assess the impact of learning in botanical gardens on students' cognitive achievement. We observed a group of 10th graders participating in a one-day educational intervention on climate change implemented in a botanical garden.…

  8. Topical botanically derived products: use, skin reactions, and usefulness of patch tests. A multicentre Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, Monica; Borghi, Alessandro; Gallo, Rosella; Schena, Donatella; Pigatto, Paolo; Lauriola, Maria Michela; Guarneri, Fabrizio; Stingeni, Luca; Vincenzi, Colombina; Foti, Caterina; Virgili, Annarosa

    2014-02-01

    The evidence on the safety of topical preparations containing botanical extracts is limited. To assess (i) the use of botanically derived compounds in a large population, (ii) the incidence of cutaneous side-effects, and (iii) the diagnostic usefulness of patch testing. A questionnaire was used in 2661 patients to assess both the prevalence and type of topical botanical preparations used, and the occurrence of adverse skin reactions. Patients declaring adverse reactions were patch tested with (i) the Italian (SIDAPA) baseline series, (ii) an additional botanical series, and (iii) the patients' own products. Of the patients, 1274 (48%) reported the use of topical botanical products; 139 patients (11%) commented on adverse cutaneous reactions; 75 (54%) showed positive reactions with the Italian baseline series. Among the 122 patients tested with the botanical series, 19 (16%) showed positive reactions, in many cases with concomitant relevant positivity to at least one allergen of the Italian series connected with cosmetics. The commonest botanically derived allergens were propolis, Compositae extracts, and Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree) oil. Contact allergy is a possible adverse effect of natural products. Baseline series supplemented with the commonest botanical allergens may be adequate for detecting most of the cases of contact allergy to natural topical products. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. COMPOSITE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An effective medium theory of ferroelectric ceramic-polymer composite materials which treats both components symmetrically has been investigated to demonstrate the role played by the microgeometry of inclusions on dielectric, mechanical and piezoelectric properties of 0-3 composites. The limits of the various theoretical ...

  10. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Barrientos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anticancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 µgmL-1. Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them.

  11. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Leticia; Herrera, Christian L.; Montenegro, Gloria; Ortega, Ximena; Veloz, Jorge; Alvear, Marysol; Cuevas, Alejandro; Saavedra, Nicolás; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from the central and southern regions of Chile. The botanical profile was determined by palynological analysis. Total phenolic contents were determined using colorimetric assays. Reverse phase HPLC and HPLC-MS were used to determine the chemical composition. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined on S. mutans and S. sobrinus. All propolis samples were dominated by structures from native plant species. The characterization by HPLC/MS, evidenced the presence of quercetin, myricetin, kaempferol, rutine, pinocembrin, coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester, that have already been described in these propolis with conventional HPLC. Although all propolis samples inhibited the mutans streptococci growth, it was observed a wide spectrum of action (MIC 0.90 to 8.22 μg mL−1). Given that results it becomes increasingly evident the need of standardization procedures, where we combine both the determination of botanical and the chemical characterization of the extracts. Research conducted to date, describes a promising effectiveness of propolis in the prevention of caries and other diseases of the oral cavity, making it necessary to develop studies to identify and understand the therapeutic targets or mechanisms of molecular action of the various compounds present on them. PMID:24294257

  12. Use of physiologically based kinetic modelling facilitated read-across in risk assessment of botanical food-borne alkenylbenzenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Malahmeh, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Botanicals and botanical preparations have become widely available on the market in the form of food supplements and other food preparations. In Europe the safety of botanicals and derived food products placed on the market has to comply with the general requirements set out in 

  13. The botanical explorer's legacy: a promising bioprospecting tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstädter, Axel

    2017-05-01

    Records about the traditional uses of medicinal plants can be considered useful in bioprospecting (i.e., the search for new active agents or lead structures in nature). Several sources like Egyptian papyri, early modern herbals and pharmacopoeias have been studied in this respect. It is proposed to use recordings of botanically interested explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries as well. Some of them give detailed information about traditionally used medicinal plants and analysis shows that a considerable number of these have never been scientifically investigated. Existing studies, however, are confirming the traditional uses described to a great extent. Thus, the explorer's writings should not be neglected while looking for starting points for plant screening; success seems more likely than with screening at random. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A new proposal concerning the botanical origin of Baltic amber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Alexander P.; Tappert, Ralf; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Boudreau, Marc; McKellar, Ryan C.; Basinger, James F.; Garrett, Amber

    2009-01-01

    Baltic amber constitutes the largest known deposit of fossil plant resin and the richest repository of fossil insects of any age. Despite a remarkable legacy of archaeological, geochemical and palaeobiological investigation, the botanical origin of this exceptional resource remains controversial. Here, we use taxonomically explicit applications of solid-state Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy, coupled with multivariate clustering and palaeobotanical observations, to propose that conifers of the family Sciadopityaceae, closely allied to the sole extant representative, Sciadopitys verticillata, were involved in the genesis of Baltic amber. The fidelity of FTIR-based chemotaxonomic inferences is upheld by modern–fossil comparisons of resins from additional conifer families and genera (Cupressaceae: Metasequoia; Pinaceae: Pinus and Pseudolarix). Our conclusions challenge hypotheses advocating members of either of the families Araucariaceae or Pinaceae as the primary amber-producing trees and correlate favourably with the progressive demise of subtropical forest biomes from northern Europe as palaeotemperatures cooled following the Eocene climate optimum. PMID:19570786

  15. John Locke's seed lists: a case study in botanical exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Stephen A; Anstey, Peter R

    2009-12-01

    This paper gives a detailed analysis of four seed lists in the journals of John Locke. These lists provide a window into a fascinating open network of botanical exchange in the early 1680s which included two of the leading botanists of the day, Pierre Magnol of Montpellier and Jacob Bobart the Younger of Oxford. The provenance and significance of the lists are assessed in relation to the relevant extant herbaria and plant catalogues from the period. The lists and associated correspondence provide the main evidence for Locke's own important, though modest contribution to early modern botany, a contribution which he would have regarded as a small part of the broader project of constructing a natural history of plants. They also provide a detailed case study of the sort of open and informal network of knowledge exchange in the early modern period that is widely recognised by historians of science, but all too rarely illustrated.

  16. Botanical, Phytochemical, and Anticancer Properties of the Eucalyptus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Quan V; Chalmers, Anita C; Jyoti Bhuyan, Deep; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  17. Integrated standardization concept for Angelica botanicals using quantitative NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödecke, Tanja; Yao, Ping; Napolitano, José G.; Nikolić, Dejan; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Lankin, David C.; Pauli, Guido F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite numerous in vitro/vivo and phytochemical studies, the active constituents of Angelica sinensis (AS) have not been conclusively identified for the standardization to bioactive markers. Phytochemical analyses of AS extracts and fractions that demonstrate activity in a panel of in vitro bioassays, have repeatedly pointed to ligustilide as being (associated with) the active principle(s). Due to the chemical instability of ligustilide and related issues in GC/LC analyses, new methods capable of quantifying ligustilide in mixtures that do not rely on an identical reference standard are in high demand. This study demonstrates how NMR can satisfy the requirement for simultaneous, multi-target quantification and qualitative identification. First, the AS activity was concentrated into a single fraction by RP-solid-phase extraction, as confirmed by an (anti-)estrogenicity and cytotoxicity assay. Next, a quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR) method was established and validated using standard compounds and comparing processing methods. Subsequent 1D/2D NMR and qHNMR analysis led to the identification and quantification of ligustilide and other minor components in the active fraction, and to the development of quality criteria for authentic AS preparations. The absolute and relative quantities of ligustilide, six minor alkyl phthalides, and groups of phenylpropanoids, polyynes, and poly-unsaturated fatty acids were measured by a combination of qHNMR and 2D COSY. The qNMR approach enables multi-target quality control of the bioactive fraction, and enables the integrated biological and chemical standardization of AS botanicals. This methodology can potentially be transferred to other botanicals with active principles that act synergistically, or that contain closely related and/or constituents, which have not been conclusively identified as the active principles. PMID:21907766

  18. Composição da flora arbórea e arborescente no Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Composition of the tree flora in the Botanical Garden of Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Treviso Cenci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo o levantamento florístico e fitossociológico de uma área de 178.000 m², situada nas coordenadas 29º10'38"S e 51º27'16"W, na localidade de Linha Palmeiro, Distrito de São Pedro, no Município de Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brasil, onde se encontra o Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves, o qual se situa numa zona de transição de três formações vegetais distintas: Floresta Ombrófila Mista, Floresta Estacional Decidual e resquícios de Mata Atlântica. O local é uma área de conservação in situ no Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves. O método de amostragem utilizado foi o de parcelas distribuídas ao acaso. Avaliaram-se 10 parcelas medindo 50 x 50 m cada. Dentro de cada parcela, foram amostrados indivíduos com circunferência à altura do peito (CAP superior ou igual a 30 cm. Foram amostrados 1.947 indivíduos vivos dentro de 35 famílias botânicas, além de 109 indivíduos mortos ainda em pé. As famílias mais expressivas em número de indivíduos e em espécies foram Sapindaceae, Anacardiaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae e Lauraceae. As espécies com maiores valores de importância foram Matayba elaeagnoides Radlk., Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze, Lithraea brasiliensis Marchand, Ligustrum licidum W. T. Aiton e Sebastiania serrata (Klotzsch Müll. Arg. O índice de diversidade de Shannon foi de 3,18 nats/indivíduos, enquanto a equabilidade de Pielou (J', 0,71, valores esses considerados altos se comparados a de outros levantamentos. O número de espécies identificadas evidenciou nível alto de diversidade florística, que se caracterizou pela associação de diferentes contingentes florestais, com predomínio daquelas de ampla distribuição na área.The objective of this study was to survey the flora in an area of 178,000 square meters at 29&º10'38''S and 51&º27'16''W, in Linha Palmeiro, in São Pedro, a district of Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil where the Botanical Garden of Bento

  19. Botanicals in Ribes nigrum bud-preparations: an analytical fingerprinting to evaluate the bioactive contribution to total phytocomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donno, D; Beccaro, G L; Mellano, M G; Cerutti, A K; Marconi, V; Bounous, G

    2013-10-01

    CONTEXT. Ribes nigrum L. (Grossulariaceae) is among the most commonly used herbal medicines and it is popularized for its alleged tonic effect and curative and restorative properties. The current practice of identifying herbal extracts is by measuring the concentration of the main botanicals. Their concentrations are used to characterize the herbal preparations and fingerprinting is recommended by the main Pharmacopeias as a potential and reliable strategy for the quality control of complex mixtures. The aim of this research was to perform an analytical study of R. nigrum bud-preparations, in order to identify and quantify the main bioactive compounds, obtaining a specific chemical fingerprint to evaluate the single class contribution to herbal preparation phytocomplex. The same analyses were performed using a high-performance liquid chromatograph-diode array detector both on University lab preparations and on commercial preparations from different Italian locations. Different chromatographic methods were used to analyse the macerated samples, two for polyphenols and one for terpenic compounds. RESULTS. Ribes nigrum was identified as a rich source of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds. The observed analytical firgerprint demonstrated that these bud-preparations represent a rich source of terpenic and polyphenolic compounds, especially catechins and phenolic acids. Analytical fingerprinting could be an important tool to study the assessment of chemical composition and bioactivities of plant-derived products, helping to find new sources of natural health-promoting compounds: this study allowed the development of an effective tool for quality control through botanical fingerprinting of bud preparations.

  20. Process Philosophy and the Text-Image Interface: A Study of Three Western Australian Botanical Illustrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Charles Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical illustration combines scientific knowledge and artistic technique. However, whereas illustrated botanical images record static visual qualities, such as form and color, written botanical narratives supply crucial sensory, ecological, historical, and cultural contexts that complement visual representation. Understanding the text-image interface—where images and words intersect—contributes to humanities-based analyses of botanical illustration and illustrators. More specifically, a process philosophy perspective reveals the extent to which botanical representations engage the temporality, cyclicality, and contextuality of the living plants being illustrated. This article takes up these themes through a comparative theoretical study of three female Western Australian botanical illustrators, Georgiana Leake (1812–1869, Emily Pelloe (1877–1941, and Philippa Nikulinsky (born 1942, whose lives together span the 183 year history of the Swan River Colony and the state of Western Australia. I apply a processist framework to examine the text-image interface of their works. All three illustrators use some form of textuality: marginalia, annotations, written accompaniments, introductory statements, and other narrative materials. In examining their written commentaries and traces, I identify the emergence of a process mode of botanical illustration that represents plants as ecological, historical, cultural, and temporal organisms.

  1. Oral (Systemic) Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahnik, Benjamin; Sharma, Divya; Alban, Joseph; Sivamani, Raja

    2017-06-01

    Patients with psoriasis often use botanical therapies as part of their treatment. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the current evidence regarding these agents as they treat patients. A systematic literature search was conducted using the PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE database for randomized clinical trials assessing the use of botanical therapeutics for psoriasis. The search included the following keywords: "psoriasis" and "plant" or "herbal" or "botanical." Citations within articles were also reviewed to identify relevant sources. The results were then further refined by route of administration, and the oral (systemic) botanical agents are reviewed herein. A total of 12 controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials addressing the use of oral, systemic botanical agents for psoriasis were assessed in this review. While overall evidence is limited in quantity and quality, HESA-A, curcumin, neem extract, and, to a lesser degree, Traditional Chinese Medicine seem to be the most efficacious agents. The literature addresses a large amount of studies in regards to botanicals for the treatment of psoriasis. While most agents appear to be safe, further research is necessary for evidence-based recommendation of oral botanical agents to psoriasis patients.

  2. Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communication: Journalism Education Today, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Considers how photography is more than just pointing a camera in the right direction. Explains that good pictures use elements of composition such as the Rule of Thirds, leading lines, framing and repetition of shapes. Presents 16 photographs from college and secondary school publications, and describes the techniques that makes them effective.…

  3. Cosmetic Functional Ingredients from Botanical Sources for Anti-Pollution Skincare Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Juliano

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution is a rising problem in many metropolitan areas around the world. Airborne contaminants are predominantly derived from anthropogenic activities, and include carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, ozone and particulate matter (PM; a mixture of solid and liquid particles of variable size and composition, able to absorb and delivery a large number of pollutants. The exposure to these air pollutants is associated to detrimental effects on human skin, such as premature aging, pigment spot formation, skin rashes and eczema, and can worsen some skin conditions, such as atopic dermatitis. A cosmetic approach to this problem involves the topical application of skincare products containing functional ingredients able to counteract pollution-induced skin damage. Considering that the demand for natural actives is growing in all segments of global cosmetic market, the aim of this review is to describe some commercial cosmetic ingredients obtained from botanical sources able to reduce the impact of air pollutants on human skin with different mechanisms, providing a scientific rationale for their use.

  4. Adulteration screening of botanical materials by a sensitive and model-free approach using infrared spectroscopic imaging and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-bo; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Su-qin

    2016-11-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is often used as a simple, fast, and green method for the adulteration screening of botanical materials for foods and herbs. However, the overlapping of absorption signals of various substances significantly decrease the sensitivity and specificity of IR spectroscopy in the detection of adulterated samples. In this research, a model-free approach is proposed for the sensitive and non-targeted screening of botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials. First, the spectra of the entities in the test sample are collected by near-infrared spectroscopic imaging and clustered by unsupervised pattern recognition methods. The sample may be adulterated if there are two or more clusters of the entities. Next, the entities of different clusters are characterized by mid-infrared spectroscopy to interpret the chemical compositions to determine the clustering is caused whether by adulteration or other reasons. Second derivative spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy are often needed to resolve the overlapped bands mathematically or experimentally to find the characteristic signals to identify the authentic and adulterant entities. The feasibility of this approach was proved by the simulated adulterated sample of saffron. In conclusion, botanical materials adulterated by adding other plant materials can be detected by a simple, fast, sensitive, and green screening approach using IR spectroscopic imaging, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy, and necessary chemometrics techniques.

  5. Analysis of small carbohydrates in several bioactive botanicals by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, Serban; Scott, Wayne; Zhu, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    Bioactive botanicals contain natural compounds with specific biological activity, such as antibacterial, antioxidant, immune stimulating, and taste improving. A full characterization of the chemical composition of these botanicals is frequently necessary. A study of small carbohydrates from the plant materials of 18 bioactive botanicals is further described. The study presents the identification of the carbohydrate using a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis that allows detection of molecules as large as maltotetraose, after changing them into trimethylsilyl derivatives. A number of carbohydrates in the plant (fructose, glucose, mannose, sucrose, maltose, xylose, sorbitol, and myo-, chiro-, and scyllo-inositols) were quantitated using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric technique. Both techniques involved new method developments. The gas chromatography with mass spectrometric analysis involved derivatization and separation on a Rxi(®)-5Sil MS column with H2 as a carrier gas. The liquid chromatographic separation was obtained using a hydrophilic interaction type column, YMC-PAC Polyamine II. The tandem mass spectrometer used an electrospray ionization source in multiple reaction monitoring positive ion mode with the detection of the adducts of the carbohydrates with Cs(+) ions. The validated quantitative procedure showed excellent precision and accuracy allowing the analysis in a wide range of concentrations of the analytes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Workshops with expedition trips organized by the Central Botanical Gardens of NAS of Belarus - an effective instrument of international cooperation between botanical gardens

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    Spiridovich Elena Vladimirovna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available NASB Central Botanical Garden (CBG in 2013-2016 made by the lead agency, the organizer of four international scientific workshops with with expedition trips "Strategies and methods of botanical gardens for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity of the natural flora" (Minsk, protected nature areas (PNAs of the Republic of Belarus, which was attended by representatives of leading botanical gardens of the US, Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Poland and Lithuania. During the scientific seminars discussions and expeditions at 2013-2015 the overall goal of joint work - addressing the conservation of biodiversity of flora and strengthening the role of scientific support for optimal implementation of the Global Strategy Plant Conservation (GSPC were defined, as well as specific joint projects are elaborated.

  7. Application of nanotechnology for the encapsulation of botanical insecticides for sustainable agriculture: prospects and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Jhones Luiz; Campos, Estefânia Vangelie Ramos; Bakshi, Mansi; Abhilash, P C; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    This review article discusses the use of nanotechnology in combination with botanical insecticides in order to develop systems for pest control in agriculture. The main types of botanical insecticides are described, together with different carrier systems and their potential uses. The botanical insecticides include those based on active principles isolated from plant extracts, as well as essential oils derived from certain plants. The advantages offered by the systems are highlighted, together with the main technological challenges that must be resolved prior to future implementation of the systems for agricultural pest control. The use of botanical insecticides associated with nanotechnology offers considerable potential for increasing agricultural productivity, while at the same time reducing impacts on the environment and human health.

  8. Photoprotective effect of botanicals and vitamins: A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuong, William; Kuo, Sandy; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-01-01

    Overexposure to solar radiation is a major contributor to skin cancer development and premature skin aging. Botanical extracts and vitamins may represent novel photoprotective agents. We sought to systemically review clinical evidence for the use of botanically derived agents and vitamins as photoprotective agents. We systematically searched Embase and PubMed databases. Two independent reviewers reviewed abstracts for inclusion. Additional relevant studies were identified by a manual review of reference lists. Data from eligible studies were extracted independently and discrepancies were resolved by consensus. A total of 51 studies met inclusion criteria. Limited available evidence indicates that several botanical agents and vitamins in topical or oral forms may have promising photoprotective effects. However, generalizability of results is limited by small sample sizes. Botanical extracts and vitamins may add to the armamentarium of sun-protective agents. Additional high-quality trials are needed to strengthen support for their use.

  9. [Comparative study on botanical morphologic character of different cultivated types medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Bin

    2008-12-01

    Botanical character of different cultivated types medicinal Chrysanthemum morifolium were observed and compared, which can offer reference for its genetic diversity research and breeding. Based on the random blocks field experiments design, the main character of leaf and capitulum of medicinal C. morifolium were observed, it was studied on that the botanical character of different cultivated types medicinal C. mortfolium in China were comparatively study with statistical means. There are some different of botanical character among different cultivated types medicinal C. morifolium in China, which can be divided into 7 colonies according as its diversity of the botanical and morphological character. The sawtooth number of lamina, leafstalk length and leaf division number are the important laminae morphologic character of different types medicinal C. morifolium, which are relative independent characters.

  10. Organizational structure, acquisition practice and collection development in a botanical research library in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Janka, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    In this survey the organizational structure, the acquisition practice and collection development at the LuEsther T. Mertz Library of the New York Botanical are analyzed and discussed. The Mertz Library specializes in botany and horticulture and it collects materials published in all core botanical subjects as comprehensively as possible. The library serves both as an institutional research library and a public library. It is sought by a broad constituency, locally and abroad, for plant inform...

  11. Botanical Characteristics of Polish Honeys from Natura 2000 Habitats

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    Wróblewska Anna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen samples of honeys which were harvested over several beekeeping seasons from apiaries located in the area of the “Kózki” Nature Reserve (central-eastern Poland were the subject of the present study. The “Kózki” Nature Reserve is included in the European Ecological Network Natura 2000 program. A microscopic analysis of the pollen sediment in the honeys showed the presence of 61 pollen types from 32 botanical families in the investigated material. There were represented by nectariferous (72.1% and nonnectariferous plants (27.9% and both entomophilous and anemophilous ones. The total number of pollen taxa in individual samples ranged from 13 to 37. The main sources of nectar from trees and shrubs were: Frangula alnus, Prunus, Robinia pseudacacia, Rubus, Salix, Tilia. The main sources of nectar from herbaceous plants were: Anthriscus, Brassicaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Centaurea cyanus, Taraxacum, and Trifolium repens. Four unifloral honeys (three fruit tree honeys and one lime honey and fourteen multifloral honeys, with a significant percentage of pollen from several nectariferous plant taxa, were distinguished in the studied material.

  12. Active ingredients from natural botanicals in the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W-L; Zhu, L; Jiang, J-G

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is considered as a chronic disease that can induce a series of comorbidities and complications. Chinese medicine has long clinical experiences in the treatment of obesity. This review summarizes the natural products from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that are reported to have anti-obesity effects in the past two decades. Botanic TCM comprises 90% of total Chinese crude drugs, and generally contains various active ingredients, in which the effective anti-obesity ingredients identified can be divided into saponins, polysaccharides, alkaloids, polyphenols and others. Astragaloside IV, glycyrrhizin, macrostemonoside A, berberine, betaine, capsaicin, matrine, methyl piperate, piperine, rutaecarpine, asimilobine, epigallocatechingallate, magnolol, resveratrol, soybean-isoflavone, α-linolenic acid, emodin, geniposide, phillyrin, salidroside and ursolic acid are specified in this review, and their sources, models, efficacy are described. It is concluded that the mechanisms of these components for the treatment of obesity include: (i) suppression of appetite, increase of satiety, reduction of energy intake; (ii) reduction in the digestion and absorption of exogenous lipid; (iii) attenuation of the synthesis of endogenous lipid; (iv) promotion of the oxidation and expenditure of lipid and (v) improvement of lipid metabolism disorder. Authors believe that the effective compounds from TCM will provide an alternative and hopeful way for the treatment of obesity. © 2014 World Obesity.

  13. Botanical name changes – nuisance or a quest for precision?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce G. Cook

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the need for the seemingly regular changes to plant names applied to many tropical forage species, it is necessary to be aware of the rules that govern botanical nomenclature.  The binomial naming system, first proposed in 1753, is governed by rules defined in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (ICN.  These rules have been strengthened as necessary over the years in the interest of providing practitioners with plant names that are unique for each species, and presented in an hierarchical format that shows the evolutionary relationships between plants.  This paper includes a table of name changes accepted by the USDA Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN for species used in tropical forage research and development over the last half century.  The need to use legitimate plant names is emphasized and suggestions are made on how practitioners might best deal with the changes.Keywords: Taxonomy, nomenclature, tropical forages.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(334-40

  14. Botanical pharmacognosy of stem of Gmelina asiatica Linn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R; Prasant, K; Babu, U V

    2012-04-01

    Gmelina asiatica Linn (G. parvifolia Roxb.) is a large shrub or a small tree. Roots and aerial parts are used in Ayurvedic medicine and also have ethno-medical uses. Root is reported as adulterant to G. arborea roxb roots. Pharmacognostical characters of root were reported. Owing to the shortage of genuine drug and ever-increasing demands in market, it becomes necessary to search an alternative with equal efficacy without compromising the therapeutic value. Nowadays, it becomes a common practice of using stem. In case of roots phytochemical and pharmacological analysis of stem was reported. However, there is no report on the pharmacognostical characters of stem and to differentiate it from roots. The present report describes the botanical pharmacognostical characters of stem and a note to differentiate it from root. Hollow pith, faint annual rings in cut ends, alternatively arranged macrosclereids and bundle cap fibers, and presence of abundant starch grains and calcium oxalates in pith and in ray cells are the diagnostic microscopic characters of stem. Stem pieces can be differentiated from roots by absence of tylosis.

  15. Use of Traditional Botanical Medicines During Pregnancy in Rural Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Jason; Asanti, Daniel; Nsabimana, Damien; Anastos, Kathryn; Mutimura, Eugene; Merkatz, Irwin; Sirotin, Nicole; Nathan, Lisa M

    To evaluate the perceptions of healthcare and traditional medicine providers regarding the type, indications, side effects, and prevalence of traditional medicine use amongst pregnant women in a rural Rwandan population. Six focus groups with physicians, nurses, and community health workers and four individual in-depth interviews with traditional medicine providers were held. Qualitative data was gathered using a structured questionnaire querying perceptions of the type, indications, side effects, and prevalence of use of traditional medicines in pregnancy. The healthcare provider groups perceived a high prevalence of traditional botanical medicine use by pregnant women (50-80%). All three groups reported similar indications for use of the medicines and the socioeconomic status of the pregnant women who use them. The traditional medicine providers and the healthcare providers both perceived that the most commonly used medicine is a mixture of many plants, called Inkuri. The most serious side effect reported was abnormally bright green meconium with a poor neonatal respiratory drive. Thirty-five traditional medicines were identified that are used during pregnancy. Perceptions of high prevalence of use of traditional medicines during pregnancy with possible negative perinatal outcomes exist in areas of rural Rwanda.

  16. New Botanical Anxiolytics for Use in Companion Animals and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Ahmed, Fida; Cayer, Christian; Mullally, Martha; Carballo, Ana Francis; Rojas, Marco Otarola; Garcia, Mario; Baker, John; Masic, Aleksandar; Sanchez, Pablo E; Poveda, Luis; Merali, Zul; Durst, Tony; Arnason, John T

    2017-11-01

    As part of our ongoing research into botanical therapies for anxiety disorders, the neotropical vine Souroubea sympetala was chosen for study as a phytochemical discovery strategy focusing on rare Central American plant families. When orally administered to male Sprague-Dawley rats, the crude plant extract, its ethyl acetate fraction, supercritical carbon dioxide fraction, or its isolated triterpenes reduced anxiety and/or fear-related behavior in standardized behavioral models. Pharmacological studies showed that the extracts acted at the benzodiazepine GABAA receptor and reduced corticosterone levels. A preparation containing Souroubea fortified with a second triterpene containing plant, Platanus occidentalis, was shown to be safe in a 28-day feeding trial with beagles at 5 times the intended dose. Subsequent trials with beagles in a thunderstorm model of noise aversion showed that the material reduced anxiety behaviors and cortisol levels in dogs. The formulation has been released for the companion animal market in Canada and the USA under the Trademark "Zentrol." Ongoing research is exploring the use of the material in treatment of anxiety and post-traumatic stress in humans.

  17. Botanicals and anti-inflammatories: natural ingredients for rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emer, Jason; Waldorf, Heidi; Berson, Diane

    2011-09-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by cutaneous hypersensitivity. There are many therapeutic options available for the treatment of rosacea, but none are curative. Since the pathogenesis of rosacea remains elusive, it is not surprising that no single treatment is paramount and that many patients find therapies unsatisfactory or even exacerbating. Treatments are prescribed to work in concert with each other in order to ameliorate the common clinical manifestations, which include: papules and pustules, telangiectasias, erythema, gland hypertrophy, and ocular disease. The most validated topical therapies include metronidazole, azelaic acid, and sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur. Many other topical therapies, such as calcineurin inhibitors, benzoyl peroxide, clindamycin, retinoids, topical corticosteroids, and permethrin have demonstrated varying degrees of success. Due to the inconsistent results of the aforementioned therapies patients are increasingly turning to alternative products containing natural ingredients or botanicals to ease inflammation and remit disease. Additional research is needed to elucidate the benefits of these ingredients in the management of rosacea, but some important considerations regarding the natural ingredients with clinical data will be discussed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficacy of dietary supplementation with botanicals on carbohydrate metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, William T; Ye, Jianping; Wang, Zhong Q

    2008-06-01

    Botanical products are widely used in nutritional supplementation for promotion of health or prevention of diseases. With the high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism are common in the general population and obtaining glycemic control is important in reducing the complications of diabetes. If shown to be effective, botanical products have a unique position in potentially aiding the general public in regard to obesity and diabetes. They can be obtained "over-the-counter" and may have less side effects compared to many synthetic drugs. Although most of the popular botanicals have a long history in folk medicine, there is paucity of data regarding their efficacy and safety, particularly as it relates to human studies. In this review, we discuss the data that was available in the literature for nine botanicals that are frequently promoted to help manage blood glucose. They are Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia), Fenugreek (trigonella foenum graecum), Gymnema Sylvestre, Ivy Gourd (Coccinia indica), Nopal or Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia streptacantha), Ginseng, Aloe Vera, Russian Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), and Garlic (Allium sativum). The discussion is emphasized on the clinical aspect of these botanicals. Due to the lack of sufficient evidence from clinical studies for any of the botanicals reviewed, it is premature to actively recommend use of any particular herb to treat either glucose or other risk factors. Thus, well defined randomized clinical trials are warranted in this area.

  19. Inflorescence development in petunia: through the maze of botanical terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Rob; Kusters, Elske; Koes, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    Flowering plants have developed many ways to arrange their flowers. A flower-bearing branch or system of branches is called an inflorescence. The number of flowers that an inflorescence contains ranges from a single flower to endless flower-clusters. Over the past centuries, botanists have classified inflorescences based on their morphology, which has led to an unfortunate maze of complex botanical terminology. With the rise of molecular developmental biology, research has become increasingly focused on how inflorescences develop, rather than on their morphology. It is the decisions taken by groups of stem cells at the growing tips of shoots, called meristems, on when and where to produce a flower or a shoot that specify the course of inflorescence development. Modelling is a helpful aid to follow the consequences of these decisions for inflorescence development. The so-called transient model can produce the broad inflorescence types: cyme, raceme, and panicle, into which most inflorescences found in nature can be classified. The analysis of several inflorescence branching mutants has led to a solid understanding of cymose inflorescence development in petunia (Petunia hybrida). The cyme of petunia is a distinct body plan compared with the well-studied racemes of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, which provides an excellent opportunity to study evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo) related questions. However, thus far, limited use has been made of this opportunity, which may, at least in part, be due to researchers getting lost in the terminology. Some general issues are discussed here, while focusing on inflorescence development in petunia.

  20. Rhodiola rosea L. as a putative botanical antidepressant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Panossian, Alexander G

    2016-06-15

    Rhodiola rosea (R. rosea) is a botanical adaptogen with putative anti-stress and antidepressant properties. Evidence-based data supporting the effectiveness of R. rosea for depression in adults is limited, and therefore a comprehensive review of available animal and human studies suggesting a putative antidepressant action is warranted. A review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain studies of possible antidepressant mechanisms of action and studies of the safety and effectiveness of R. rosea extracts in animals and adult humans. A search of MEDLINE and the Russian state library database was conducted (up to October 2015) on R. rosea. R. rosea extracts and its purified constituent, salidroside, has been shown to produce a variety of mediator interactions with several molecular networks of neuroendocrine-immune and neurotransmitter receptor systems likely to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. A wide variety of preclinical in vivo and ex vivo studies with laboratory animals suggests the presence of several biochemical and pharmacological antidepressant-like actions. Clinical assessment of R. rosea L. rhizome extracts in humans with various depressive syndromes is based upon results from two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 146 subjects with major depressive disorder and seven open-label studies totaling 714 individuals with stress-induced mild depression (diagnosed as asthenic syndrome or psychoneurosis). Overall, results of these studies suggests a possible antidepressant action for R. rosea extract in adult humans. In contrast to most conventional antidepressants, R. rosea extract appears to be well-tolerated in short-term studies with a favorable safety profile. R. rosea demonstrates multi-target effects on various levels of the regulation of cell response to stress, affecting various components of the neuroendocrine, neurotransmitter receptor and molecular networks associated with possible beneficial effects on mood

  1. Exploring the usefulness of botanicals as an adjunctive treatment for lymphedema: a systematic search and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poage, Ellen G; Rodrick, Julia R; Wanchai, Ausanee; Stewart, Bob R; Cormier, Janice N; Armer, Jane M

    2015-03-01

    To provide a critical analysis of the current published research regarding the use, risks, and benefits of botanicals in the treatment of lymphedema and to provide health professionals with current knowledge of safe, appropriate use of botanicals for treatment of lymphedema. TYPE: This systematic search and review addresses the use of botanicals in the treatment of lymphedema in order to develop a best evidence synthesis of the research. Articles were identified from 11 major medical indices published from 2004-2012 using search terms for lymphedema and management. Eighty-five articles met the inclusion criteria of evidence-based lymphedema therapies for the category "complementary and alternative methods for lymphedema therapy." Two clinical lymphedema experts reviewed the studies according to level of evidence guidelines established by the Oncology Nursing Society, Putting Evidence into Practice, and subdivided the methods into subcategories that included Botanical, Pharmaceutical, Physical Agent Modalities, and Modalities of Contemporary Value. The pharmaceutical articles were excluded (5) because they fell outside the inclusion criteria. Twenty-two articles were used in a separate review of physical agent modalities and modalities of contemporary value for lymphedema. Botanicals generated substantial research (11) and warranted its own independent review. The levels of evidence are weak, because research conclusions were limited by size, dose, and study design. A limited number of randomized controlled trials have been performed, and reliability is not always evident, particularly in the context of large systematic reviews where evidence was bundled. Evidence supporting the use of botanicals for the treatment of lymphedema is insufficient. Some evidence suggests benefits for the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency. Development of specific and sensitive measurement methods may change how botanicals are studied and establish a body of evidence for their use

  2. Botanicals as eco friendly biorational alternatives of synthetic pesticides against Callosobruchus spp. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)—a review

    OpenAIRE

    Kedia, Akash; Prakash, Bhanu; Mishra, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Priyanka; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the potential of botanicals in the management of Callosobruchus spp., the primary insect pest causing deterioration to a variety of stored legume grains. Different botanical formulations have been reported time to time showing pronounced insecticidal activity, repellence to pest, oviposition deterrency, adult emergence inhibition, ovicidal, larvicidal, pupaecidal activity and feeding deterrency based on their contact toxicity and fumigation effects. Some of the botanicals...

  3. Chemometric analysis for identification of botanical raw materials for pharmaceutical use: a case study using Panax notoginseng.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiang Zhu

    Full Text Available The overall control of the quality of botanical drugs starts from the botanical raw material, continues through preparation of the botanical drug substance and culminates with the botanical drug product. Chromatographic and spectroscopic fingerprinting has been widely used as a tool for the quality control of herbal/botanical medicines. However, discussions are still on-going on whether a single technique provides adequate information to control the quality of botanical drugs. In this study, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC, capillary electrophoresis (CE and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR were used to generate fingerprints of different plant parts of Panax notoginseng. The power of these chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate the identity of botanical raw materials were further compared and investigated in light of the capability to distinguishing different parts of Panax notoginseng. Principal component analysis (PCA and clustering results showed that samples were classified better when UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprints were employed, which suggested that UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprinting are superior to CE- and NIR-based fingerprinting. The UPLC- and HPLC- based fingerprinting with PCA were able to correctly distinguish between samples sourced from rhizomes and main root. Using chemometrics and its ability to distinguish between different plant parts could be a powerful tool to help assure the identity and quality of the botanical raw materials and to support the safety and efficacy of the botanical drug products.

  4. Identification, quantification and carbon stable isotopes determinations of organic acids in monofloral honeys. A powerful tool for botanical and authenticity control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Gaëlle; Maitre, Dany; Casabianca, Hervé

    2012-09-15

    The analytical composition and botanical origin of honey are basic data used to determine the quality of this foodstuff. Although proteins are used to characterise the analytical composition of honey, they can be eliminated during its ultrafiltration and, in the case of honeys not saturated with their own pollen, the use of proteins does not work well. As acidity is a well-known characteristic of honey and organic acids are present at around 0.5% in honey, we therefore investigated an alternative method to the protein-based White method, using organic acids as new internal standards instead of proteins. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of 14 organic acids were carried out by ion chromatography with an electrochemical detector. The (13)C/(12)C isotopic ratios of the honeys, and of the organic acids extracted from them with an anion exchange resin, were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Gluconic acid is the predominant organic acid in honey, at between 1.8 and 12.7 g/kg. For fir honey the major acid is galacturonic acid at around 4.6 g/kg. The isotopic ratios of honeys and of their acids are strongly linked. Correlations between the δ(13)C values of the honey and the acids were significant, and better than those obtained using proteins. This study has provided a method to differentiate honeys from seven botanical origins, based on organic acid analysis. By combining various organic acid contents and isotopic ratio values through statistical processing by Principal Component Analysis it is possible to differentiate honey samples as a function of their botanical origin. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Research and Development for Botanical Products in Medicinals and Food Supplements Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Miroddi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botanical products sold in the health area are generally intended as drugs, medicinal products, food supplements or substances for therapeutic use. Use of botanicals for improving or to care human health has evolved independently in different countries worldwide. Regulatory issues regarding botanical products designed for the food supplements or medicinal market and their influence on research and development are discussed. European Union (EU and United States (US policies regulating these products are focused with comments on the legislations delivered during the last ten years and differences existing in rules between these countries are emphasized. Research and development on botanical products nowdays strongly influenced by the product destination in the market. Addressed and differentiated research for either food supplements or medicinal markets is necessary to purchase data really useful for assessment of safe and effective use for both the categories. The main objective is to catalyze interest of academic and companies' researchers on crucial aspects to be taken into account in the research for the development of botanical products.

  6. Ethnopharmacognostic survey on botanical compendia for potential cosmeceutic species from Atlantic Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maique W. Biavatti

    Full Text Available The Atlantic Forest is one of the most endangered ecosystems on earth, and is acknowledged as an area with truly exceptional levels of biodiversity under enormous levels of stress. Cosmeceutics cover a border area between pharmaceuticals for skin diseases and cosmetics. Natural products for external application, to improve the appearance of the skin or for skin treatment, have always been observed and used by native cultures. The present work deals with the ethnopharmacognostic analysis of two botanical compendia (BC, named: Dicionário das Plantas Úteis do Brasil - e das exóticas cultivadas, compiled by Pio Correa (PC Flora Ilustrada Catarinense (FIC. From these BC, reported species with cosmeceutical uses or with related physico-chemical or organoleptic characteristics were selected, updated, searched for scientific background and highlighted if endangered. PC and FIC specified that 245 plant species, belonging to 98 plant families, are used in Brazil for cosmeceutical, cosmetic or skin remedies. The families most widely represented were Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Myrtaceae, Annonaceae, Clusiaceae, Anacardiaceae, Apiaceae, Bignoniaceae and Solanaceae The most frequently cited plant parts were bark, followed by leaves and aerial parts. The most frequently cited properties were astringency and tonic effect followed by uses in skin disorders and wound healing, emollient characteristic, anti-inflammatory uses and healing of skin ulcers, antiseptic effects, parasiticide and skin lightening properties and aphrodisiacs. According to the Pubmed survey, most of the selected species (65% have not been previously investigated for potential cosmeceutical applications, nor have their chemical composition been investigated.

  7. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 10(6) grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38 ± 0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5 ± 550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey EC. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1 ± 4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5 ± 4.7 mm. Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations.

  8. Annual soil CO_{2} production in Moscow Botanical Garden (Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovenko, Maria; Goncharova, Olga; Matyshak, Georgy

    2017-04-01

    Soil respiration is an essential component of the carbon cycle, determining 25-40 % of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Urban soils are subject to significant anthropogenic influences. Anthropogenic impact affects both the plants and the soil microbiota. So, soil CO2 efflux and soil profile CO2 concentration probably differ in urban and natural soils. Influence of abiotic factors on soil carbon dioxide production is explored insufficiently. The research of their impact on soil carbon dioxide production is necessary to predict soil response to anthropogenic climate change. The aim of this study was estimation of annual soil CO2 production and the impact of climatic factors on it. The research took place in Moscow State University Botanical Garden Arboretum (southern taiga). Investigations were carried out at two sites: the areas planted with Picea obovata and Carpinus betulus. The study was conducted with 1-2 weeks intervals between November 2014 and December 2015. Emission measurement were carried out by closed chamber technique, profile concentration were measured by soil air sampling tubes method. Annual carbon dioxide soil surface efflux of soil planted with Picea obovata was 1370 gCO2/(m2 * year), soil planted with Carpinus betulus - 1590 gCO2/(m2 * year). Soil CO2 concentration increased with depth in average of 3300 to 12000 ppm (at 80 cm depth). Maximum concentration values are confined to the end of vegetation period (high biological activity) and to beginning of spring (spring ice cover of soil prevents CO2 emission). Soil CO2 efflux depends on soil temperature at 10 cm depth (R = 0.89; p <0.05), in a less degree it correlate with soil surface temperature and with soil temperature at 20 cm depth (r=0.88; p<0.05). Soil moisture has a little effect on CO2 efflux in the annual cycle (r=-0.16; p<0.05). However in vegetation period efflux of carbon dioxide largely depends on soil moisture, due to the fact, that soil moisture is limiting factor for soil

  9. IAG ring test feed composition 2015

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Rhee, van de N.E.; Pinckaers, V.G.Z.; Vliege, J.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    A ring test was organized for the microscopic determination of botanic composition in animal feed in the framework of the annual ring tests of the IAG - International Association for Feeding stuff Analysis, Section Feeding stuff Microscopy. The organizer of the ring test was RIKILT Wageningen UR,

  10. SAMITAL®: a new botanical drug for the treatment of mucositis induced by oncological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morazzoni, Paolo; Petrangolini, Giovanna; Bombardelli, Ezio; Ronchi, Massimo; Cabri, Walter; Riva, Antonella

    2013-11-01

    SAMITAL(®) (Indena SpA, Milan, Italy) is a new multicomponent and multiacting botanical formulation rationally designed for the relief of oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in oncological patients. Each of the individual botanical constituents of SAMITAL-standardized extracts of Vaccinium myrtillus, Macleaya cordata and Echinacea angustifolia have a long history of clinical use that corroborates their safety and activity in SAMITAL. A number of pilot trials in oncological patients demonstrated that SAMITAL has good clinical efficacy and tolerability as evidenced by its significant effects in terms of reduction of mucositis, pain and a general improvement in patient quality of life. Importantly, the use of this botanical formulation had the added benefit that patients were able to complete their chemotherapy/radiotherapy regimen. Phase II trials with SAMITAL as part of an overall clinical development program are currently ongoing in Italy and are planned in the USA.

  11. Relationship between botanical origin and antioxidants vitamins of bee-collected pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla C. L. S. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study quantified vitamin C, E and β-carotene in samples of fresh bee-collected pollen and correlating them with the botanical origin. Vitamin content varied between 13.5 and 42.5 µg/g for vitamin E; 56.3 and 198.9 µg/g for β-carotene and 273.9 and 560.3 µg/g for vitamin C. It was concluded that the botanical origin and collecting season influenced the vitamin contents. There is a relationship between the vitamins and its botanical origin: Raphanus sp and Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with β-carotene; Raphanus sp, Eucalyptus sp, Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with vitamin E and Anadenanthera sp, Arecaceae type and Philodendron sp with vitamin C.

  12. Amylopectin small chain glucans form structure fingerprint that determines botanical origin of starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sarita; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2017-02-20

    Starch granule size, shape and structure of amylopectin are species specific and influence starch properties and end-use of starch. Amylopectin glucan chain structure was used to predict the starch botanical sources. Mathematical probability for accumulation of small glucan chains DP 6-10 reveal exponential fit curve with maximum R2 in smallest granule size starches (Chlamydomonas, quinoa, buckwheat). Cereal and cassava showed R2 of 0.81-0.96 while in pulses and tubers it was less than 0.7. The amylopectin small glucan chains form a unique 'finger print region' that identified starch botanical source. Differential amylopectin chain length distribution (APCLD) graphs between DP 6-80 of all species from Chlamydomonas starch distinguished five structural groups that clustered the 31 analyzed starches into four major patterns. APCLD analyses of amylopectin combined with characteristic pattern of small linear DP (6-9) glucan chains predicted the starch botanical source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Veld composition in relation to grazing capacity. | Barnes | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Present methods of evaluating veld composition in relation to grazing capacity can be criticised on grounds of subjectivity, especially with regard to the assignment of relative values to the constituent species. Data relating to botanical composition and estimated grazing capacity, derived from long-term animal production ...

  14. The structure and differentiation of the synanthropic flora of the botanical gardens in Poland

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    Halina Galera

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Floristic studies were carried out in eight botanical gardens in Poland in the years 1992-1999. It was demonstrated that the spontaneous synanthropic flora of the gardens consisted of 1092 taxa in the rank of a genus or lower, among which alien species constituted 55% of the flora studied. Ergasiophygophytes, of which the introduction is closely associated with the activities of the botanical gardens, dominated in the latter group of species. It appeared that the flora of the studied botanical gardens was rather similar. However, the structure of the flora of different spatial units (six types of microhabitats distinguished in the particular gardens varied, which was associated with the various management practices. The flora of microhabitats identified in the gardens differed with respect to the number of taxa and spectra of geographical-historical groups of species and life forms. Ruderal sites, arable lands and roadsides supported the highest number of taxa (the flora of the above spatial units was represented by 646, 645 and 597 taxa, respectively. Moreover, they were characterized by a high proportion of annual plants in the flora (43, 38 and 34%, respectively and by a relatively small representation of apophytes (39% in all the three types of microhabitats. The flora of wet areas and parks was, however, poor in species (154 and 403 species, respectively, but relatively rich in apophytes (72 and 55% of the flora, respectively and with a low contribution of therophytes (19 and 20%, respectively. The present data were compared with the findings of other authors who investigated the synanthropic flora of cities in which the botanical gardens were located. The comparative analysis of the flora of Poznań and Łódź showed a great richness of species (in relation to size of the area studied and a high incidence of aliens (especially those, which had not become established permanently in the botanical gardens. However comparative studies of the

  15. The important of living botanical collections for plant biology and the “next generation” of evo-devo research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Dosmann; Andrew Groover

    2012-01-01

    Living botanical collections include germplasm repositories, long-term experimental plantings, and botanical gardens. We present here a series of vignettes to illustrate the central role that living collections have played in plant biology research, including evo-devo research. Looking towards the future, living collections will become increasingly important in support...

  16. Species traits and plant performance: functional trade-offs in a large set of species in a botanical garden

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Z.; Klimešová, Jitka; Hrouda, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 6 (2012), s. 1522-1533 ISSN 0022-0477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0963; GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vegetative multiplication * generative reproduction * botanical garden Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.431, year: 2012

  17. Target and non-target toxicity of botanical insecticide derived from Couroupita guianensis L. flower against generalist herbivore, Spodoptera litura Fab. and an earthworm, Eisenia foetida Savigny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel chemistries in botanical insecticides may provide alternatives to, or development of synthetic insecticides suitable for controlling the Lepidopteran pests, like Spodoptera litura (F.). Many botanical chemistries are biodegradable, and have lower mammalian toxicity. Eight natural chemical comp...

  18. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sam

    2014-03-01

    This article will explore the intersection between `literature' and `science' in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of the Lichfield Botanical Society (headed by Erasmus Darwin) became implicated in debates around the education of women in Linnaean botany. The Society's translations from Linnaeus inspired a new genre of women's educational writing, the botanical poem with scientific notes, which emerged at this time. It focuses in particular on a poem by Anna Seward and argues that significant problems regarding the representation of the Linnaean sexual system of botany are found in such works and that women in the culture of botany struggled to give voice to a subject which was judged improper for female education. The story of this unique poem and the surrounding controversies can teach us much about how gender impacted upon women's scientific writing in eighteenth century Britain, and how it shaped the language and terminology of botany in works for female education. In particular, it demonstrates how the sexuality of plants uncovered by Linnaeus is a paradigmatic illustration of how societal forces can simultaneously both constrict and stimulate women's involvement in science. Despite the vast changes to women's access in scientific knowledge of the present day, this `fair sexing' of botany illustrates the struggle that women have undergone to give voice to their botanical knowledge.

  19. A Garden of Stories: An English Lesson in a Botanical Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Five middle school teachers are among the few people wandering around the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, squinting at labels describing the plants that will bloom soon. The author and her colleagues are on a reconnaissance mission, trying to plan an interdisciplinary field trip for the seventh grade. They represent different departments--science, math,…

  20. On flowering and botanical seed production in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Almekinders, C.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of true potato seed (TPS) as a propagule for potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) production is a viable alternative to the use of seed tubers. For this technology to be successful, efficient production of high- quality botanical seed is crucial. The objectives

  1. Effect of some botanical extracts on post-harvest losses of yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two storage experiments in an improved yam barn were carried out simultaneously at two locations in southern Nigeria to determine the influence of cultivar, botanical storage treatments and storage environments on the shelf life of yam (Dioscorea rotundata). The experiments were conducted from January to July.

  2. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  3. A survey on the presence of undesirable botanical substances in feed in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Vancutsem, J.; Jorgensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 May 2002 on undesirable substances in animal feed lists a range of substances from botanical origin (weed seeds) and additionally some chemical compounds directly originating from specific weeds. In order to examine the actual

  4. Botanical drugs, synergy, and network pharmacology: forth and back to intelligent mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsch, Jürg

    2011-07-01

    For centuries the science of pharmacognosy has dominated rational drug development until it was gradually substituted by target-based drug discovery in the last fifty years. Pharmacognosy stems from the different systems of traditional herbal medicine and its "reverse pharmacology" approach has led to the discovery of numerous pharmacologically active molecules and drug leads for humankind. But do botanical drugs also provide effective mixtures? Nature has evolved distinct strategies to modulate biological processes, either by selectively targeting biological macromolecules or by creating molecular promiscuity or polypharmacology (one molecule binds to different targets). Widely claimed to be superior over monosubstances, mixtures of bioactive compounds in botanical drugs allegedly exert synergistic therapeutic effects. Despite evolutionary clues to molecular synergism in nature, sound experimental data are still widely lacking to support this assumption. In this short review, the emerging concept of network pharmacology is highlighted, and the importance of studying ligand-target networks for botanical drugs is emphasized. Furthermore, problems associated with studying mixtures of molecules with distinctly different pharmacodynamic properties are addressed. It is concluded that a better understanding of the polypharmacology and potential network pharmacology of botanical drugs is fundamental in the ongoing rationalization of phytotherapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Recent additions to the collection funds of Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University. Perennial ornamental plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platonova Elena

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most important task for the botanical gardens is the introduction of new species, forms and cultivars of useful plants. This study summarizes the results of the first stages of the introduction of 255 species of perennial herbaceous plants new to Karelia in Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University. The seeds of hardy plants (USDA zones 3-4 were received from 97 botanical gardens in the world. Species belong to 27 families. Geographic area of investigated plants covers different regions of Asia-Temperate, Europe and North America. Several species are rare and endangered of habitat within areas of natural distribution. Some species are rarely used in horticultural crops in Russia and are suggest for gardens and parks. Investigated plants will be placed to the following thematic departments of Botanical Garden: "Shadow Garden" - 41 species, "Sunny Garden" - 80 species (22 species of them may be used for the geographic exposure "American prairie", exposure of Arcto-Alpine flora - 86 species, exposure of spicy plants - 16 species etc. The most of species will be perspective to the landscape gardening in Karelia.

  6. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

  7. Grammatical objections to the International Rules of Botanical Nomenclature, adopted at Cambridge in 1930

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danser, B.H.

    1935-01-01

    It is generally known that botanical nomenclature, though sprung from mediaeval scientific Latin, and agreeing, in its orthography for the greater part, in its grammar as much as possible, with classical Latin, shows countless forms which not only from a classical-grammatical, but also from a

  8. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This article will explore the intersection between "literature" and "science" in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of…

  9. Consumer and farmer safety evaluation of application of botanical pesticides in black pepper crop protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Moreno, J.; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Wiratno,; Falke, H.E.; Rietjens, I.; Murk, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a consumer and farmer safety evaluation on the use of four botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop protection. The pesticides evaluated include preparations from clove, tuba root, sweet flag and pyrethrum. Their safety evaluation was based on their active ingredients being

  10. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Poojari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  11. The potential of using botanical insecticides for the control of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and R. communis compared to controls. Oviposition on corms treated with water hyacinth extracts was not statistically different from oviposition on controls. The data indicates that botanicals possess limited insecticidal properties but the potential of M. azedarach, Tagetes spp and R. communis to control the weevil through ...

  12. Missouri botanical garden’s support of ex-situ conservation with living collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gunn; Meg Engelhardt; Derek. Lyle

    2017-01-01

    The Missouri Botanical Garden’s living collections are critical for supporting its multi-disciplinary strategy of integrated plant conservation. The Garden is increasing ex-situ collections of plants in need of conservation to build species diversity into its displays for visitor education. Current areas of focus include native Missouri species and International Union...

  13. Fourier-transform imaging of cotton and botanical and field trash mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botanical and field cotton trash comingled with cotton lint can greatly reduce the marketability and quality of cotton. Trash can be found comingled with cotton lint during harvesting, ginning, and processing, thus this study is of interest. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (A...

  14. Estimating sample size for a small-quadrat method of botanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in eight plant communities in the Nylsvley Nature Reserve. Illustrates with a table. Keywords: Botanical surveys; Grass density; Grasslands; Mixed Bushveld; Nylsvley Nature Reserve; Quadrat size species density; Small-quadrat method; Species density; Species richness; botany; sample size; method; survey; south africa

  15. THE MOCHE BOTANICAL FROG (La rana botánica mochica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna McClelland †

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants and animals with features which identify them as supernaturals characterize the art of the Precolumbian Moche culture of northern Peru. Among these animals is a frog with feline attributes and a consistent association with manioc tubers, stalks, and plants, the Botanical Frog. The Botanical Frog appears to have been patterned on Leptodactylus pentadactylus. It is shown copulating with felines. Fine line painted vessels and ones with low relief decoration show the Botanical Frog performing as part of a ritual involving other animals and cultivated crops, suggesting that the Botanical Frog was associated with agriculture. ESPAÑOL: El arte de la cultura mochica de la costa norte del Perú presenta plantas y animales mostrando rasgos sobrenaturales. Uno de los animales es una rana con elementos felinos y asociada con tubérculos, ramas y plantas de yuca. La Rana Botánica probablemente tiene su origen en Leptodactylus pentadactylus, una rana carnívora de la selva amazónica. La Rana Botánica copula con felinos y, en vasijas pintadas con líneas finas o con escenarios representados en bajorrelieve, toma parte en ceremonias involucrando a otros animales y cosechas domésticas. Parece ser que la Rana Botánica era un ser sobrenatural asociado con la agricultura.

  16. Comparative DNA profiling, botanical identification and biological evaluation of Gazania longiscapa DC and Gazania rigens L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa M. El Kady

    2015-12-01

    The genetic and botanical differences between the two Gazania species are reported for the first time in this study. The results contribute toward validation of the traditional use of Gazania showing that both species are safe for oral administration and they exhibit significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in a dose dependent manner.

  17. Cienfuegos Botanical Garden and the Municipal Agricultural System, a territorial approach to local management extensionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Domínguez Soto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work identifies the goods and services available in the Botanical Garden of Cienfuegos, from the plant genetic resources that tax the agricultural sector and that allow to establish synergies with the Agrarian System of the Municipality Cienfuegos with the purpose of producing food.

  18. Evaluation of some bioagents and botanicals in in vitro control of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collectotrichum destructivum has not been effectively controlled. This led to trials on the use of bioagents and botanicals to control the pathogen. The bio-agents such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, Bacillus subtilis, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma pseudokoningii were inoculated as dixenic culture with the ...

  19. Ethno-Botanical Survey Of Medicinal Plants In The Plant Genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ethno-botanical uses and mode of administration of twenty-nine medicinal plants found in the arboretum of the Plant Genetic Resource Centre located at Bunso in the Eastern region of Ghana against some disease conditions are hereby documented. Key words: Ethnobotany, medicinal plants, arboretum, Ghana. Nig.

  20. Rwandan female genital modification: elongation of the Labia minora and the use of local botanical species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.; Price, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The elongation of the labia minora is classified as a Type IV female genital mutilation by the World Health Organization. However, the term mutilation carries with it powerful negative connotations. In Rwanda, the elongation of the labia minora and the use of botanicals to do so is meant to increase

  1. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: where are we lacking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojari, R J; Patil, A G; Gota, V S

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  2. Reflectance of botanical, production and geographical origin on the unique compositional traits of purple grape juices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granato, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Grape juices represent one of the most consumed fruit juices because of its sensory properties, availability, reasonable price, and more recently because of their functional properties demonstrated by a vast number of in vitro, in vivo, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Although grape juices

  3. Effect of owersowing on yields and botanical composition of pasture sward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Müller

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several metods of permanent pasture renovation. Different technologies were investigated on a pasture sward. Three seeders (Einböck seeder with the tine harrow, no-till Sulky disc seeder and SPP 8 strip seeder and two fertilization regimes (with no fertilization and with mineral fertilization N90P30K60 kg.ha−1 were used to determine optimum methods of establishment and the use of oversowed pasture swards. In the first year, renovated plots had a higher DM production than control plots. The pasture oversowing had no effect on herbage production in the second production year. The fertilization had no effect in the first production year with a higher clover content in the sward. The share of clovers was higher in plots oversown with the Einböck and Sulky seeders but only in the second and third cuts of the first production year and in the third cut of the second production year. The highest content of clovers was observed in the second and third cuts. There was a positive correlation between the clover content in DM yield and herbage DM production. The oversowing did not show any effect on the grass content in the pasture sward.

  4. Phyto-oestrogens and their metabolites in milk produced on two pastures with different botanical compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S. A.; Purup, S.; Hansen-Møller, J.

    2014-01-01

    clover (mean 28%), shepherd[U+05F3]s-purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik.) (mean 6%), pineappleweed (Matricaria matricarioides Porter ex Britton) (mean 5%) and scentless mayweed (Tripleurospermum perforatum (Mérat) Laínz) (mean 4%), and LP contained mainly white clover (Trifolium repens L.) (mean...... 21%), smooth meadowgrass (Poa pratensis L.) (mean 19%), timothy (mean 17%), meadow fescue (mean 15%), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) (mean 6%), tufted hairgrass (Deschampsia cespitosa (L.) P. Beauv.) (mean 5%), northern dock (Rumex longifolius DC.) (mean 4%), common couch (Elytrigia repens (L...

  5. Does the name really matter? The importance of botanical nomenclature and plant taxonomy in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Bradley C; Balick, Michael J

    2014-03-28

    Medical research on plant-derived compounds requires a breadth of expertise from field to laboratory and clinical skills. Too often basic botanical skills are evidently lacking, especially with respect to plant taxonomy and botanical nomenclature. Binomial and familial names, synonyms and author citations are often misconstrued. The correct botanical name, linked to a vouchered specimen, is the sine qua non of phytomedical research. Without the unique identifier of a proper binomial, research cannot accurately be linked to the existing literature. Perhaps more significant, is the ambiguity of species determinations that ensues of from poor taxonomic practices. This uncertainty, not surprisingly, obstructs reproducibility of results-the cornerstone of science. Based on our combined six decades of experience with medicinal plants, we discuss the problems of inaccurate taxonomy and botanical nomenclature in biomedical research. This problems appear all too frequently in manuscripts and grant applications that we review and they extend to the published literature. We also review the literature on the importance of taxonomy in other disciplines that relate to medicinal plant research. In most cases, questions regarding orthography, synonymy, author citations, and current family designations of most plant binomials can be resolved using widely-available online databases and other electronic resources. Some complex problems require consultation with a professional plant taxonomist, which also is important for accurate identification of voucher specimens. Researchers should provide the currently accepted binomial and complete author citation, provide relevant synonyms, and employ the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III family name. Taxonomy is a vital adjunct not only to plant-medicine research but to virtually every field of science. Medicinal plant researchers can increase the precision and utility of their investigations by following sound practices with respect to botanical

  6. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry, a process analytical technology tool for real-time process monitoring in botanical drug manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zeng, Shanshan; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-03-01

    A promising process analytical technology (PAT) tool has been introduced for batch processes monitoring. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS), a means of rapid fingerprint analysis, was applied to a percolation process with multi-constituent substances for an anti-cancer botanical preparation. Fifteen batches were carried out, including ten normal operations and five abnormal batches with artificial variations. The obtained multivariate data were analyzed by a multi-way partial least squares (MPLS) model. Control trajectories were derived from eight normal batches, and the qualification was tested by R(2) and Q(2). Accuracy and diagnosis capability of the batch model were then validated by the remaining batches. Assisted with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) determination, process faults were explained by corresponding variable contributions. Furthermore, a batch level model was developed to compare and assess the model performance. The present study has demonstrated that DART-MS is very promising in process monitoring in botanical manufacturing. Compared with general PAT tools, DART-MS offers a particular account on effective compositions and can be potentially used to improve batch quality and process consistency of samples in complex matrices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Botanical collecting activity in the area of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea during the "motor period"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2011-01-01

    The account summarizes the botanical field work in Eritrea and Ethiopia since the 1930s, in the period when motor cars have been used for transport of equipment and collections, as opposed to the "heroic" period, when pack animals were used. The use of cars for botanical collecting in Eritrea...... and Ethiopia has been seriously hampered by the difficult and mountainous terrain, and cars therefore came into use in connection with botanical collecting relatively late in comparison with the situation in many other African countries. The big expeditions during the Italian occupation of Ethiopia and Eritrea...

  8. A hybridized membrane-botanical biofilter for improving air quality in occupied spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, David; Darlington, Alan; van Ras, Niels; Kraakman, Bart; Dixon, Mike

    Botanical biofilters have been shown to be effective in improving indoor air quality through the removal of complex mixtures of gaseous contaminants typically found in human-occupied environments. Traditional, botanical biofilters have been comprised of plants rooted into a thin and highly porous synthetic medium that is hung on vertical surfaces. Water flows from the top of the biofilter and air is drawn horizontally through the rooting medium. These botanical biofilters have been successfully marketed in office and institutional settings. They operate efficiently, with adequate contaminant removal and little maintenance for many years. Depending on climate and outdoor air quality, botanical biofiltration can substantially reduce costs associated with ventilation of stale indoor air. However, there are several limitations that continue to inhibit widespread acceptance: 1. Current designs are architecturally limiting and inefficient at capturing ambient light 2. These biofilters can add significant amounts of humidity to an indoor space. This water loss also leads to a rapid accumulation of dissolved salts; reducing biofilter health and performance 3. There is the perception of potentially actively introducing harmful bioaerosols into the air stream 4. Design and practical limitations inhibit the entrance of this technology into the lucrative residential marketplace This paper describes the hybridization of membrane and botanical biofiltration technologies by incorporating a membrane array into the rootzone of a conventional interior planting. This technology has the potential for addressing all of the above limitations, expanding the range of indoor settings where botanical biofiltration can be applied. This technology was developed as the CSA-funded Canadian component an ESA-MAP project entitled: "Biological airfilter for air quality control of life support systems in manned space craft and other closed environments", A0-99-LSS-019. While the project addressed a

  9. Report on botanical nomenclature—Vienna 2005. XVII International Botanical Congress, Vienna: Nomenclature Section, 12–16 July 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Flann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available PrefaceThis is the official Report on the deliberations and decisions of the ten sessions of the Nomenclature Section of the XVII International Botanical Congress held in Vienna, Austria, from 12–16 July 2005. The meetings of the Section took place on these five consecutive days prior to the Congress proper. The Section meetings were hosted by the Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Austria. Technical facilities included full electronic recording of all discussion spoken into the microphones. Text of all proposals to amend the Code was displayed on one screen allowing suggested amendments to be updated as appropriate. The team at the University of Vienna (Christopher Dixon, Jeong-Mi Park, Ovidiu Paun, Carolin A. Redernig and Dieter Reich ensured that the proceedings ran smoothly and enjoyably for all.A report of the decisions of the Section was published soon after the Congress (McNeill & al. in Taxon 54: 1057–1064. 2005. It includes a tabulation of the preliminary mail vote on the published proposals, specifying how the Section acted on each and detailing amendments and new proposals approved upon motions from the floor. It also includes the report of the Nominating Committee as well as the Congress resolution ratifying the Section’s decisions, neither reproduced here. The main result of the Section’s deliberations is the Vienna Code, which was published as Regnum Vegetabile 146, on 20 Sep 2006 (McNeill & al. in Regnum Veg. 146. 2006. It was also published online, on the same date (see http://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/main.php.The present report of the proceedings of the Vienna Nomenclature Section conveys, we believe, a true and lively picture of the event. It is primarily based on the MP3 electronic recordings, with, where necessary, supplementation by the comment slips submitted by most speakers and by reference to parallel tape-recording, particularly where there were gaps in the MP3 record. With these sources combined, and

  10. Characterization of Botanical and Geographical Origin of Corsican “Spring” Honeys by Melissopalynological and Volatile Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen spectrum, physicochemical parameters and volatile fraction of Corsican “spring” honeys were investigated with the aim of developing a multidisciplinary method for the qualification of honeys in which nectar resources are under-represented in the pollen spectrum. Forty-one Corsican “spring” honeys were certified by melissopalynological analysis using directory and biogeographical origin of 50 representative taxa. Two groups of honeys were distinguished according to the botanical origin of samples: “clementine” honeys characterized by the association of cultivated species from oriental plain and other “spring” honeys dominated by wild herbaceous taxa from the ruderal and/or maquis area. The main compounds of the “spring” honey volatile fraction were phenylacetaldehyde, benzaldehyde and methyl-benzene. The volatile composition of “clementine” honeys was also characterized by three lilac aldehyde isomers. Statistical analysis of melissopalynological, physicochemical and volatile data showed that the presence of Citrus pollen in “clementine” honeys was positively correlated with the amount of linalool derivatives and methyl anthranilate. Otherwise, the other “spring” honeys were characterized by complex nectariferous species associations and the content of phenylacetaldehyde and methyl syringate.

  11. Analysis of four pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in several bioactive botanicals with gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, Serban C; Scott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid acids including betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids were reported to have health beneficial properties such as antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the capability to inhibit "in vitro" the development of various cancer cell types. For this reason betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids are used as neutraceuticals. For the analysis of the pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in complex plant materials, an improved scheme was developed, involving a qualitative screening using silylation and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis, followed by quantitation using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure. The use of the two methods provides more reliable information regarding the plant materials with unknown composition. Besides betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids that were analyzed, by this procedure a fourth pentacyclic triterpenoid acid was identified and quantitated that was not previously reported to be present in plants. This acid has been identified as 3β-3-hydroxy-lupa-18,20(29)-dien-28-oic acid. The newly identified acid has a structure as a derivative of lupane, although lupane with a double bond in the 18-position was not previously reported as present in plants. The new liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure developed for this study offers a very low limit of quantitation, excellent precision, and robustness. Rosemary was found to contain the largest levels of pentacyclic triterpenoid acids among all the analyzed botanicals. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Comparison of Metabolomics Approaches for Evaluating the Variability of Complex Botanical Preparations: Green Tea (Camellia sinensis) as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Joshua J; Graf, Tyler N; Paine, Mary F; McCune, Jeannine S; Kvalheim, Olav M; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Cech, Nadja B

    2017-05-26

    A challenge that must be addressed when conducting studies with complex natural products is how to evaluate their complexity and variability. Traditional methods of quantifying a single or a small range of metabolites may not capture the full chemical complexity of multiple samples. Different metabolomics approaches were evaluated to discern how they facilitated comparison of the chemical composition of commercial green tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze] products, with the goal of capturing the variability of commercially used products and selecting representative products for in vitro or clinical evaluation. Three metabolomic-related methods-untargeted ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), targeted UPLC-MS, and untargeted, quantitative (1)HNMR-were employed to characterize 34 commercially available green tea samples. Of these methods, untargeted UPLC-MS was most effective at discriminating between green tea, green tea supplement, and non-green-tea products. A method using reproduced correlation coefficients calculated from principal component analysis models was developed to quantitatively compare differences among samples. The obtained results demonstrated the utility of metabolomics employing UPLC-MS data for evaluating similarities and differences between complex botanical products.

  13. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadda eLAALLAM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components.Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins and its physicochemical characteristics.Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four pathogenic bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM.Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38±0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5±550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey electrical conductivity. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1±4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive with 3.9±5.4 mm. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5±4.7 mm.Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations.Keywords: Honey characterization; antibacterial effects

  14. Botanical and genetic characteristics of Farsetia aegyptia Turra growing in Egypt

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    Walaa M. Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Farsetia aegyptia Turra is a perennial woody desert shrub native to Egypt. It is used by native Bedouins as an anti-diabetic and antispasmodic. Study of the botanical features was carried out for the root, young and old stems, leaf, fruit and seed of the plant. F. aegyptia Turra was characterized by the presence of myrosin cells and non-glandular branched unicellular two-armed hairs in the stem, leaves and fruit, while the root showed sclereids with a wide or narrow lumen and lignified pitted walls. Furthermore, the DNA of the plant was extracted from leaf samples and analysed using ten random decamer primers. A total of 58 random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were identified. Both the botanical study and the DNA fingerprint helped in the identification of the plant.

  15. Botanical origin of mei-gui hua (petal of a Rosa species).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochir, Sarangowa; Ishii, Kouta; Park, ByoungJae; Matsuta, Tomohiko; Nishizawa, Makoto; Kanazawa, Tsutomu; Funaki, Minoru; Yamagishi, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Mei-gui hua has been used as a crude drug in traditional medicine and as herbal tea in China. The scientific name of Mei-gui is Rosa rugosa thunb. However, the morphological characteristics and botanical ecology of Mei-gui were different from those of R. rugosa. Since the botanical origins of Mei-gui cultivated in China have not yet been clarified, we compared Mei-gui and R. rugosa in terms of their morphological characteristics, phylogenetic analysis, and phytochemical studies. Our research suggested that Mei-gui cultivated around Tarim Basin in Xinjiang Province showed homology to Rosa gallica, while those cultivated in the northeastern parts of China are considered to be hybrids of R. rugosa.

  16. Botanical Drugs as an Emerging Strategy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M. Elena; Risco, Severiano; Ocete, M. Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common categories of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that comprises the patients' life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their aetiology is not completely understood, nonfully efficient drugs have been developed and those that show effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. Therefore, many patients try with some botanical drugs, which are safe and efficient after many years of use. However, it is necessary to properly evaluate these therapies to consider a new strategy for human IBD. In this report we have reviewed the main botanical drugs that have been assessed in clinical trials in human IBD and the mechanisms and the active compounds proposed for their beneficial effects. PMID:26576073

  17. Xanthones from the botanical dietary supplement mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) with aromatase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balunas, Marcy J; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-07-01

    Twelve xanthone constituents of the botanical dietary supplement mangosteen (the pericarp of Garcinia mangostana) were screened using a noncellular, enzyme-based microsomal aromatase inhibition assay. Of these compounds, garcinone D (3), garcinone E (5), alpha-mangostin (8), and gamma-mangostin (9) exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity. In a follow-up cell-based assay using SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells that express high levels of aromatase, the most potent of these four xanthones was gamma-mangostin (9). Because xanthones may be consumed in substantial amounts from commercially available mangosteen products, the consequences of frequent intake of mangosteen botanical dietary supplements require further investigation to determine their possible role in breast cancer chemoprevention.

  18. Rapid identification of the botanical and entomological sources of honey using DNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Sean W J; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-01-01

    Honey is generated by various bee species from diverse plants, and because the value of different types of honey varies more than 100-fold, it is a target for fraud. This paper describes a protocol that employs DNA metabarcoding of three gene regions (ITS2, rbcLa, and COI) to provide an inexpensive tool to simultaneously deliver information on the botanical and entomological origins of honey. This method was used to examine seven varieties of honey: light, medium, dark, blended, pasteurized, creamed, and meliponine. Plant and insect sources were identified in five samples, but only the botanical or insect source could be identified in the other two. Two samples were found to be misrepresented. Although this method was generally successful in determining both plant and insect sources, honeys rich in polyphenolic compounds or subject to crystallization were recalcitrant to analysis, so further research is required to combat honey adulteration and mislabeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Abies semenovii B. Fedtsch. at the Peter the Great Botanical Garden

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    Tkachenko Kirill

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abies semenovii B. Fedtsch. (Pinaceae is an extremely rare flora species of the Central Asia (Kirghizia; it has been cultivated at the Peter the Great Botanical Garden of the Komarov Botanical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS since 1949, where it was first introduced into general cultivation. Since 2000, upon reaching the age of 43 years, the seed reproduction of the plants is being marked. An X-ray test proved seeds, collected in 2014, to be filled and full. In spring 2015, first time in the 67 years of cultivating this specie in St. Petersburg area, first young crops were received. Abies semenovii – a cold hard and decorative tree – has to be introduced into the gardening of St. Petersburg and shall be promoted into the Karelia and further to the northern regions of the European part of the Russian Federation.

  20. New forms of maples (ACER L., Aceraceae cultivated at Peter the Great Botanic Garden (ST. Petersburg, Russia

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    Firsov Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contains description of two new maple forms - Acer miyabei Maxim. f. suberosum Byalt et Firsov forma nova (Aceraceae and Acer saccharinum L. f. variifolium Byalt et Firsov forma nova – cultivated at Peter the Great Botanic Garden of the Komarov Botanical Institute RAS in St. Petersburg, Russia. The article contains a brief history of the introduction of A. miyabei Maxim. and A. saccharinum L., information about the origin of the planting material in the park of the botanical garden of RAS, basic differences between the new forms and similar taxa (incl. Latin diagnoses, as well as data about standard samples and their storage. The article has color photos of the alive plants located in the botanical garden of RAS. Both maple forms are very decorative and appear to be very useful for a large-scale implementation in the urban landscape planting.

  1. Botanicals as eco friendly biorational alternatives of synthetic pesticides against Callosobruchus spp. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Akash; Prakash, Bhanu; Mishra, Prashant Kumar; Singh, Priyanka; Dubey, Nawal Kishore

    2015-03-01

    The article presents the potential of botanicals in the management of Callosobruchus spp., the primary insect pest causing deterioration to a variety of stored legume grains. Different botanical formulations have been reported time to time showing pronounced insecticidal activity, repellence to pest, oviposition deterrency, adult emergence inhibition, ovicidal, larvicidal, pupaecidal activity and feeding deterrency based on their contact toxicity and fumigation effects. Some of the botanicals have also been practically proved efficacious to protect the stored food commodities from the bruchids during storage conditions. Such botanical formulations have shown their promise in integrated management of the pest as semiochemicals by showing behaviour altering efficacy against the bruchids, thereby, reducing the induced pest resistance problem which is frequently reported with synthetic pesticides. Hence, they may be recommended in food security programmes as eco-friendly and biorational alternatives of synthetic pesticides providing integrated management of the losses of stored food commodities due to infestation of bruchids.

  2. Morphological peculiarities of Dracocephalum moldavica L. with respect to its introduction in the Botanical Garden of ZhNAEU

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    Lyudmyla A. Kotyuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper determines the morphological peculiarities of vegetative and generative organs of two forms of Dracocephalum moldavicaL. under its introductions in the Botanical Gardens of ZhNAEU.

  3. The Ven. Charles Theophilus Hahn, a hitherto unknown Edwardian botanical illustrator in Natal, 1908—1916

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    J. P. Rourke

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A brief biographical sketch is given of the Rev. C.T. Hahn, an English-born, Oxford-educated Anglican missionary in Zululand who painted some 235 watercolours of Natal flora between 1908 and 1913. Hahn (who later changed his name to Headley was one of the most productive of the early botanical illustrators in Natal but as a collection of his paintings has only recently been discovered, his work has until hitherto remained unknown.

  4. ANTI-HELMINTHIC POTENTIAL OF SO LVENT EXTRACTS OF INDIGENOUS BOTANICALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Jain; Shubham; Abhishek Mathur; Abhishek Mathur; Shabista Ansari; Deepali Aswal

    2015-01-01

    Ethno botanical studies reveal that the indigenous knowledge of a community is a key player in the identification of medicinal plants and such plants have beenoften tested by generations of indigenous people. In the present investigation, the hydro-alcoholic extracts of leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem)and Swertia chirayta(Chirayta) were assessed for anti-helminthic potential against helminths (earthworms were used as model) at 10, 50 and 100 mg/ml. No anti-helminthic potential was observed...

  5. DNA Barcoding for the Identification of Botanicals in Herbal Medicine and Dietary Supplements: Strengths and Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Iffat; Gafner, Stefan; Techen, Natascha; Murch, Susan J; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2016-09-01

    In the past decades, the use of traditional medicine has increased globally, leading to a booming herbal medicine and dietary supplement industry. The increased popularity of herbal products has led to a rise in demand for botanical raw materials. Accurate identification of medicinal herbs is a legal requirement in most countries and prerequisite for delivering a quality product that meets consumer expectations. Traditional identification methods include botanical taxonomy, macroscopic and microscopic examination, and chemical methods. Advances in the identification of biological species using DNA-based techniques have led to the development of a DNA marker-based platform for authentication of plant materials. DNA barcoding, in particular, has been proposed as a means to identify herbal ingredients and to detect adulteration. However, general barcoding techniques using universal primers have been shown to provide mixed results with regard to data accuracy. Further technological advances such as mini-barcodes, digital polymerase chain reaction, and next generation sequencing provide additional tools for the authentication of herbs, and may be successful in identifying processed ingredients used in finished herbal products. This review gives an overview on the strengths and limitations of DNA barcoding techniques for botanical ingredient identification. Based on the available information, we do not recommend the use of universal primers for DNA barcoding of processed plant material as a sole means of species identification, but suggest an approach combining DNA-based methods using genus- or species-specific primers, chemical analysis, and microscopic and macroscopic methods for the successful authentication of botanical ingredients used in the herbal dietary supplement industry. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Elements of Success in Chicago Botanic Garden’s Science Career Continuum

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    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Science Career Continuum at the Chicago Botanic Garden is a model program for successfully encouraging youth from diverse backgrounds into STEM careers. This program has shown that when students are given an opportunity to participate in real scientific research under the mentorship of a caring professional over multiple years, they are more likely to go to college and pursue STEM careers than their peers. 

  7. Impact of dietary organic acids and botanicals on intestinal integrity and inflammation in weaned pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Grilli, Ester; Tugnoli, Benedetta; Passey, Jade L; Stahl, Chad H; Piva, Andrea; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    Background Organic acids, such as citric and sorbic acid, and pure plant-derived constituents, like monoterpens and aldehydes, have a long history of use in pig feeding as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. However, their effects on the intestinal barrier function and inflammation have never been investigated. Therefore, aim of this study was to assess the impact of a microencapsulated mixture of citric acid and sorbic acid (OA) and pure botanicals, namely thymol and vanillin, (PB) ...

  8. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn S. Adams

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa repens were collected, taxonomically identified and extracts prepared. Effects of the extracts on cell viability were quantitated in prostate cell lines using a luminescent ATP cell viability assay. Combinations of two botanical extracts of the four most active extracts were tested in the 22Rv1 cell line and their interactions assessed using isobolographic analysis. Each extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of prostate cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner except repens. The most active extracts, baicalensis, D. morifolium, G. uralensis and R. rubescens were tested as two-extract combinations. baicalensis and D. morifolium when combined were additive with a trend toward synergy, whereas D. morifolium and R. rubescens together were additive. The remaining two-extract combinations showed antagonism. The four extracts together were significantly more effective than the two-by-two combinations and the individual extracts alone. Combining the four herbal extracts significantly enhanced their activity in the cell lines tested compared with extracts alone. The less predictable nature of the two-way combinations suggests a need for careful characterization of the effects of each individual herb based on their intended use.

  9. USE OF BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE MEXICAN BEAN WEEVIL

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    KAREN FERREIRA DA SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the insecticidal activity of eight botanical species in the behavior and biological development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae under laboratory conditions. The botanical species were applied on bean grains (Phaseolus vulgaris Linnaeus directly as powder or indirectly within TNT bags. Three laboratory assays were performed. First, a repellent activity test was performed by exposing twenty couples of Z. subfasciatus adults in a choice-test arena. Second, a mortality test was performed for seven days after infestation. Finally, the oviposition and emergency rates of adults (% and the development from egg to adult (in days were evaluated in seven couples (males and females for seven days inside of a vial containing 0.3g of the powder from each botanical species and 10 g of bean grains (3% w.w-1. The study was conducted in a completely randomized design, and the treatments were arranged as a factorial design (2 x 9 with two factors (factor 1= powder and TNT bag application forms and factor 2= eight botanical species and control with eight replications. The powder application form was more efficient in controlling Z. subfasciatus. Azadirachta indica (powder application, Ruta graveolens (powder application, and Piper aduncum (TNT bag reduced the infestation of adults. The species A. inidica, Piper tuberculatum, Trichilia catigua, Pfaffia glomerata, R. graveolens, and Mentha pulegium inhibited the oviposition of the insects regardless of the formulation applied. R. graveolens (powder application caused 100% of mortality. The powder application of R. graveolens and M. pulegium reduced egg viability and insect emergence; therefore, they are very promising alternatives to control Z. subfasciatus in stored grains.

  10. A survey on the presence of undesirable botanical substances in feed in the European Union

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    van Raamsdonk LWD.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 May 2002 on undesirable substances in animal feed lists a range of substances from botanical origin (weed seeds and additionally some chemical compounds directly originating from specific weeds. In order to examine the actual status of enforcement and of the present occurrence of these botanical substances, a survey was carried out. A questionnaire was sent to 103 laboratories, including official control labs from all member states of the European Union. The results, indicating the frequency of occurrence as far as reported, are compared to the publications of the EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF. A total of 44 questionnaires was returned (42.7% from 22 member states. Ten member states predominantly from north-western Europe appeared to have an active monitoring of botanical undesirable substances. The questionnaire results did not indicate that the other member states enforce this part of Directive 2002/32/EC. Reports on the frequency of occurrence include: a few to 25-50% of the samples contain traces of ergot (8 member states, a few to 24% contain at least some traces of thorn apple (6 member states, zero to 17% contain some castor oil plant seeds (3 member states, zero to a few samples contain Crotalaria seeds (3 member states, and zero to 6% contain traces of Sareptian mustard (4 member states. One member state conducted extra surveillance since several cases of animal intoxications have been reported. In some cases a coincidence with undesirable botanical substances was found.

  11. 210 year anniversary of the Botanical Garden of the University of Tartu

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    Politsinski Zanna

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available June 28, 2013 Botanic Garden of the University of Tartu has celebrated its 210th anniversary. To mark the occasion four significant events were presented: the first electric car trip, opening of the sculpture in honor of the gardeners of Estonia, the opening of "Moss garden" and a concert at the summer stage in the rock, which was held on June 29.

  12. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Lynn S.; Seeram, Navindra P.; Hardy, Mary L.; Carpenter, Catherine; Heber, David

    2006-01-01

    Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa repens were collected, taxonomically identified and extracts prepared. Effects of the extracts on cell viability were quantitated in prostate cell lines using a luminescent ATP cell viability assay. Combinations of two botanical extracts of the four most active extracts were tested in the 22Rv1 cell line and their interactions assessed using isobolographic analysis. Each extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of prostate cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner except S. repens. The most active extracts, S. baicalensis, D. morifolium, G. uralensis and R. rubescens were tested as two-extract combinations. S. baicalensis and D. morifolium when combined were additive with a trend toward synergy, whereas D. morifolium and R. rubescens together were additive. The remaining two-extract combinations showed antagonism. The four extracts together were significantly more effective than the two-by-two combinations and the individual extracts alone. Combining the four herbal extracts significantly enhanced their activity in the cell lines tested compared with extracts alone. The less predictable nature of the two-way combinations suggests a need for careful characterization of the effects of each individual herb based on their intended use. PMID:16550232

  13. Wild Musa Species Collection of Purwodadi Botanic Garden: Inventory and Its Morpho - taxonomic Review

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    Lia Hapsari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia, being part of the center of origin of bananas (Musaceae, has a large number diversity of bananas both wild seeded species and edible seedless cultivated varieties. Inventory of wild Musa species in Purwodadi Botanic Garden has been conducted through compiling data records from PBG’s Registration section, field inspection and observation to living collections in the garden, herbarium specimens and literature studies. The results show that total 17 wild Musa accessions has been recorded planted in Purwodadi Botanic Garden since 1990 until 2012; comprises of 8 Musa acuminata sub species, 2 Musa balbisiana forms, 1 Musa ornata, 1 Musa troglodytarum, 1 Musa borneensis and 4 unidentified species Musa spp.; but only 8 living accessions remained in 2012. Morphotaxonomic review of those 8 wild Musa accessions remained will be discussed in this paper including their geographical distributions. According to its differentiated morphological characteristics observations, it is known that there are three accessions were resembled cultivars and one unidentified species have been determined its species level, so that their registration identity needs to be revised. It is important next to prioritize ex-situ conservation of wild Musa species not yet collected in Purwodadi Botanic Garden especially from Eastern Indonesia.

  14. A bibliometric study of scientific literature in Scopus on botanicals for treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Perna, Simone; Peroni, Gabriella; Guido, Davide

    2016-06-01

    In androgenetic alopecia, a number of botanicals are available that can effectively slow or reduce hair loss and inflammation or stimulate partial hair regrowth. The aim of this study was to provide a descriptive overview of the impact and production of literature on botanicals used for androgenetic alopecia and to perform a citation analysis of the related research articles. We searched for "alopecia" OR "androgenetic alopecia" OR "hair loss" AND "Camelia sinensis" OR (and other 15 botanicals) in ARTICLE (Title/Abstract/Keyword) in Scopus database. A total of 29 references, that is, research articles, were retrieved by SCOPUS search, and 93.1% had been published since 2000. The majority (48.3%) describe applications of hair grow stimulants, followed by inhibitors of 5-alpha-reductase applications (27.6%), and studies concerning inhibitors of inflammation (24.1%). The citation analysis revealed a growing interest for this topic and the papers on hair grow stimulants are most cited. Citation trend of inhibition of 5-alpha-reductase articles is growing in the last years. This study has highlighted three important aspects: (1) growing interest for this topic; (2) evidences mainly in hair grow stimulants and recently in the inhibition of 5-alpha-reductase, as demonstrated by article and citation counts across years; (3) in addition, all major studies have been focused on green tea epigallocatechin-3-gallate, Serenoa repens, Citrullus colocynthis and Cuscuta reflexa. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. What Does It Mean to be Central? A Botanical Geography of Paris 1830-1848.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoquet, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on the geography of the botanical community in Paris, under the July Monarchy (1830-1848). At that time, the Muséum d'Histoire naturelle (MHN) was at its institutional acme and, under the impulse of François Guizot, its budget was increasing dramatically. However, closer attention to manuscript sources (correspondence, travel diaries) reveals that the botanists of the time favoured other private institutions, located both on the Right and Left Banks of the Seine. The MHN was prestigious for its collections and professors but it was relatively remote from the centre of Paris, and its plant samples were sometimes difficult to access. Several other first-class private herbaria granted liberal access to botanists: those of Jacques Gay, Phillip Barker Webb, and Benjamin Delessert. Thanks to their wealth, these plant amateurs had ownership of historical herbaria consisting of species types alongside rich botanical libraries. Botanists visiting Paris from foreign countries or other provinces of France also spent some time studying less general plant collections, like those of Count Jaubert, or specialized collections, like Montagne's or Léveillé's on cryptogams. Other botanists also enjoyed renown at the time, although they published little, if anything (like Maire). Living in crammed apartments, literally in the middle of their plant samples, these botanists were key nodes in botanical networks, although they had no relation with the prestigious MHN.

  16. Probability of Identification: A Statistical Model for the Validation of Qualitative Botanical Identification Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBudde, Robert A.; Harnly, James M.

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure that returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) material, or whether it contains excessive non-target (undesirable) material. The report describes the development and validation of studies for a BIM based on the proportion of replicates identified, or probability of identification (POI), as the basic observed statistic. The statistical procedures proposed for data analysis follow closely those of the probability of detection, and harmonize the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. Use of POI statistics also harmonizes statistical concepts for botanical, microbiological, toxin, and other analyte identification methods that produce binary results. The POI statistical model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods, reporting of descriptive statistics, and application of performance requirements. Single collaborator and multicollaborative study examples are given. PMID:22468371

  17. The Larch Genus (Larix Mill., Pinaceae at Peter the Great Botanical Garden

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    Firsov G.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There are 148 trees of larches (Larix Mill. cultivating at Peter the Great Botanic Garden of the Komarov Botanical Institute RAS (Saint-Petersburg, Russia which belong to 16 species (22 taxa. They are long-lived trees, up to 200 years old, of large sizes. The larches represent the base of tree-stand of Arboretum and form the alleys at the oldest historical regular part of Botanic Garden. The largest trees reach 31,6 m high (L. dahurica and 113 cm in trunk diameter (L. decidua and L. dahurica. The pride of collection being rare Far Eastern species – L. olgensis and related to it L. lubarskii and L. maritima. There are species promising both for repeated and primary introduction, the best prospects being in the flora of China and of adjacent countries of Eastern Asia. The continuous monitoring on winter hardiness as well as on steadiness to pests and diseases is necessary, which is especially true in conditions of the global warming of the climate. The investigation of reproductive abilities, quality of seeds and of seed generation is of importance. This is necessary to involve the best species and forms into city planting and forest economy.

  18. Forensic botany: species identification of botanical trace evidence using a multigene barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Corradini, Beatrice; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidence during criminal investigations. However, it is still an underutilized field of investigation with its most common application limited to identifying specific as well as suspected illegal plants. The ubiquitous presence of plant species can be useful in forensics, but the absence of an accurate identification system remains the major obstacle to the present inability to routinely and correctly identify trace botanical evidence. Many plant materials cannot be identified and differentiated to the species level by traditional morphological characteristics when botanical specimens are degraded and lack physical features. By taking advantage of a universal barcode system, DNA sequencing, and other biomolecular techniques used routinely in forensic investigations, two chloroplast DNA regions were evaluated for their use as "barcoding" markers for plant identification in the field of forensics. We therefore investigated the forensic use of two non-coding plastid regions, psbA-trnH and trnL-trnF, to create a multimarker system for species identification that could be useful throughout the plant kingdom. The sequences from 63 plants belonging to our local flora were submitted and registered on the GenBank database. Sequence comparison to set up the level of identification (species, genus, or family) through Blast algorithms allowed us to assess the suitability of this method. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our botanic universal multimarker assay in forensic investigations.

  19. Extraction of DNA from honey and its amplification by PCR for botanical identification

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    Sona Arun Jain

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiochemical and biological properties of honey are directly associated to its floral origin. Some current commonly used methods for identification of botanical origin of honey involve palynological analysis, chromatographic methods, or direct observation of the bee behavior. However, these methods can be less sensitive and time consuming. DNA-based methods have become popular due to their simplicity, quickness, and reliability. The main objective of this research is to introduce a protocol for the extraction of DNA from honey and demonstrate that the molecular analysis of the extracted DNA can be used for its botanical identification. The original CTAB-based protocol for the extraction of DNA from plants was modified and used in the DNA extraction from honey. DNA extraction was carried out from different honey samples with similar results in each replication. The extracted DNA was amplified by PCR using plant specific primers, confirming that the DNA extracted using the modified protocol is of plant origin and has good quality for analysis of PCR products and that it can be used for botanical identification of honey.

  20. [Comparison of botanical characteristics of cultivated Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. 'Hangju' of different origins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Qiao-Sheng; Mao, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Zai-Biao; Zhu, Li-Juan; Chen, Yun

    2012-12-01

    To compare botanical characteristics of cultivated Chrysanthemum morifolium cv. 'Hangju' of different origins in order to provide the basis for introduction and cultivation of Ch. morifolium cv. 'Hangju'. The characteristics of plants, leaves and capitulum of Ch. morifolium cv. 'Hangju' were measured, and the obtained data were analyzed and compared. The range of plant height was 60.87-99.47 cm, number of branches 2.76-5.20, leave length 4.90-8.40 cm, leave width 3.25-5.38 cm, aspect ratio of leave 1.35-1.83, number of leave split 1.92-3.08. Numbers of capitulum were 21.92-53.12, diameter of capitulum 3.41-5.48 cm, lays of ray florets 3.28-7.16, number of ray florets 55.32-114.60, ray florets length 1.58-2.37 cm, ray florets width 0.50-0.69 cm, aspect ratio of ray florets 2.90-3.99, diameter of tubular flower 1.10-1.58 cm. The botanical characteristics of cultivated Ch. morifolium cv. 'Hangju' were distinguished from different origins. With the cultivation environment change, the botanical characteristics of the cultivars are changed.

  1. Plants from Abroad: Botanical Terminology in 18th-century British Encyclopaedias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Lonati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the 18th century British encyclopaedias included in their lemmata an increasing number of botanical lexis, that is the terminology pertaining to “that branch of natural history which treats of the uses, characters, classes, orders, genera, and species of plants. […] and what useful and ornamental purposes may be expected from the cultivation of it [i.e. botany]” (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1768-1771, s.v. Botany. More often than not, these terms represented migrating plants coming from exotic places, new geographical areas, whether eastwards or westwards. The general aim of this survey is to investigate the representation of the botanical science in 18th-century universal and specialized encyclopaedias, starting from prefaces and going on with the micro-texts of the single entries s.v. Botany. The starting point is thus theoretical botany. A further point in the analysis focuses on applied botany and discusses those plants such as Camellia Sinensis, Coffea Arabica, Theobroma Cacao, Saccharum Officinarum and Cinchona Officinalis which were mostly exploited for commercial and/or medical reasons. The individual entries include the most tiny details on the single headwords-topics and also display an acceptable plurality of beliefs, viewpoints and perspectives, focussing on botanical descriptions, historical information, socio-cultural issues, legal, political and commercial considerations.

  2. Flowering Period of 22 Species of Wild Begonias in Bali Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTUTININGSIH-M. SIREGAR

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Bali Botanic Garden has becoming one of the botanic gardens in the world that has quite complete Begonias collection. Up to now (Sept2007 its Begonias collection consists of 215 species, comprise of 70 species of wild Begonias (originated in Indonesia and 145 species ofexotic Begonias. Some aspects of research has been done and one of them is the reproductive biology. This research is aimed to gatherinformation about Begonia’s life cycle and also to know about the natural obstacle that cause the wild Begonias failure in forming theirseeds. Final result of this research is the important informations that are useful for breeding and seed’s banking. Flowering observationwere done everyday towards the 22 species of wild Begonias that are planted in Bali Botanic Garden during 2006. Data collection weredone qualitatively by counting the amount of flowers that appeared. Results showed that flowering period of 22 species wild Begonias canbe grouped as : Flowering troughout the year group; Seasonal Floweing group; Rare Flowering group; Not Flowering or has not floweringBegonias group; Not all Begonias that floweing are capable to form fruits and seeds

  3. Perception Environmental Awareness and Green Areas: The Case Botanical Garden City Park in Sinop / MT, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinovia Cecilia Rauber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the environmental perception of a group of residents of two neighborhoods surrounding the Botanical Garden City Park in Sinop-MT, revealing their relationship with the area as well as their involvement in proposing alternatives for the conservation of the Park. With this aim a study on the Botanical Garden Municipal Park was carried out, using the following procedures: documentary research in public agencies; site visits for description of the area and semi-structured interviews with a group of residents of two neighborhoods in the vicinity, Celeste Garden and the Botanical Garden. The presence of fauna, flora and springs that form Ribeirão Nilza within the park indicates the need for its conservation, and the residents consider the area important for the local micro weather, tourism, biodiversity conservation and also to develop researches, contributing significantly to the population's quality of life. Taking into account the above considerations, it is important to consider a new scenario, which aims to mobilize social participation, propitiating the people the feeling of belonging to what they conceive as the environment, giving rise to a participatory management by means of Environmental Education.

  4. Floristic Composition and Vegetation Structure of The KNUST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity, relative importance, canopy height and cover of plant species in the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Botanic Garden were evaluated in five 1-ha plots using a stratified random sampling technique in order to build an understanding of its floristic composition and structure in two ...

  5. The implementation of research recommendations at the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martie Mearns

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study Biodiversity is not a static phenomenon and many variables have an effect on accelerated biodiversity loss. While most of the variables affecting biodiversity loss are caused by humankind, many species are affected by more than one variable simultaneously. Six fundamental causes for biodiversity loss have been identifi ed, namely unsustainable population growth and associated increased pressure on natural resources; a reduced spectrum of agricultural, forestry and fishery products; failure of economic systems to attach appropriate economic value to the environment and resources; inequality in ownership, flow and management of the benefits and utilisation of resources; insufficient knowledge in the application and use of resources; and legislation and institutional systems that promote unsustainable abuse of the environment (Middleton 2003:250. The worldwide loss of biodiversity makes the management of protected areas more important than ever. Protected areas are under increasing pressure to become economically viable and independent of state grants. Tourism creates the mechanism and opportunities for protected areas to increase their economic viability while advancing the appreciation of nature. The management of these protected areas therefore includes the management of visitors. South Africa is the third most bio diverse country in the world. Amongst a variety of nature conservation endeavours nine national botanical gardens are managed by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI. One of the nine national gardens is the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden situated in Roodekrans towards the west of Johannesburg. A study was launched to determine preferences of visitors to the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden by making use of semi-structured interviews. The purpose of the study was threefold. Firstly the study was launched to determine whether visitors to the garden had an increased awareness

  6. Motivations for Botanical Use by Socioeconomically Diverse, Urban Adults: Does Evidence Support Motivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Grace F; Shupe, Emily Stave; Kuczmarski, Marie Fanelli; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K

    2017-10-01

    The study objectives were to characterize botanical dietary supplement (BDS) use and to compare the motivations for botanical supplement (BS) use to the efficacy of the botanical in a socioeconomically and racially diverse urban adult population. Subjects were from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span (HANDLS) study, a 20-year prospective health disparities study with African American and white adults from Baltimore, Maryland. All study participants completed two dietary recalls and a dietary supplement (DS) questionnaire in Wave 3 (n = 2140). Diet quality was evaluated by the Healthy Eating Index-2010 and the Mean Adequacy Ratio for 17 micronutrients. A comparison of reported motivations to efficacy reported in the literature of single BS was conducted. Approximately 50% (1062/2140) of participants took DS. Of these, 8% (n = 178) reported taking either BS or BDS. It was found that BDS users had better diet quality than DS users as well as nonusers of DS. The top three motivations for BDS users were to improve overall health, to maintain health, and to supplement the diet. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of most BS. Review of the efficacy of the 15 BS reported by ≥5% of the study population revealed beneficial health roles for only fiber, gingko biloba extract EGb 761, and hawthorn berry. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to report a better quality diet with BDS use for a racially diverse urban population. Yet, improvement in diet is needed because overall quality did not achieve current recommendations. To improve overall health, it may be beneficial for this population to focus on dietary modifications to reduce the risks associated with chronic diseases. In general, the reported motivations for BS use were not supported by clinical evidence.

  7. A novel insight into the cost-benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Saganová, Michaela

    2015-06-01

    The cost-benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory provides a conceptual framework for interpreting a wide range of comparative and experimental studies on carnivorous plants. This model assumes that the modified leaves called traps represent a significant cost for the plant, and this cost is outweighed by the benefits from increased nutrient uptake from prey, in terms of enhancing the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf mass or area (AN) in the microsites inhabited by carnivorous plants. This review summarizes results from the classical interpretation of the cost-benefit model for evolution of botanical carnivory and highlights the costs and benefits of active trapping mechanisms, including water pumping, electrical signalling and accumulation of jasmonates. Novel alternative sequestration strategies (utilization of leaf litter and faeces) in carnivorous plants are also discussed in the context of the cost-benefit model. Traps of carnivorous plants have lower AN than leaves, and the leaves have higher AN after feeding. Prey digestion, water pumping and electrical signalling represent a significant carbon cost (as an increased rate of respiration, RD) for carnivorous plants. On the other hand, jasmonate accumulation during the digestive period and reprogramming of gene expression from growth and photosynthesis to prey digestion optimizes enzyme production in comparison with constitutive secretion. This inducibility may have evolved as a cost-saving strategy beneficial for carnivorous plants. The similarities between plant defence mechanisms and botanical carnivory are highlighted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Herbal medicinal products versus botanical-food supplements in the European market: state of art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    Botanical products marketed in Europe are diverse, classified as herbal medicinal products, dietary supplements, cosmetics, foods and beverages depending on the relevant applicable legislation. Many factors are taken into account in the classification of a botanical product (e.g. intended use, labeling, preparations and dosages) according to how it is placed on the market. Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) can only be sold in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist, and are marketed after full or simplified registration procedures according to their classification, i.e. as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) available without special restrictions and prescription only medicine (POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The dietary supplement segment is also sold in the market in dose form (such as capsules, tablets, ampoules of liquids, drops etc) and represents 15-20% of the botanical market at the European level with high variability among each country (i.e. in Italy it reaches up to 80%). In many cases the distinction between medicinal products and food supplements has generated borderline botanical-sourced products, which generally produce confusion and mislead the consumers. As a consequence, there is an urgent need of consumer education and in addition to collect comprehensive data and make this database systematically available to herbalists, nutritionists and medical specialists for a proper classification and harmonization of the use of botanical ingredients, and, as consequence, a correct use of these products.

  9. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF SYNTHETIC AND BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES AGAINST SUCKING INSECT PEST AND THEIR NATURAL ENEMIES ON COTTON CROP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Baker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Synthetic and botanical insecticides are relatively safer for environment and beneficial insects. The study was conducted in Rahim Yar Khan during the cotton cropping season 2014 to evaluate the comparative efficacy of two Synthetic insecticides i.e. Nitenpyram (Jasper 10% SL and Pyriproxyfen (Bruce 10.8% EC and two botanical extracts of Calotropic procera and Azadirachta indica, against sucking insect pest complex of cotton and their natural enemies. Upon reaching economic thresholds, the recommended field doses of all the insecticides were applied on cotton cultivar MNH-886. Data against sucking pests and their natural enemies was recorded 24 hours prior to insecticidal application and then 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after insecticidal application. Results revealed that Nitenpyram was much toxic against sucking pests followed by Pyriproxyfen as compared to two botanical extracts. On the other hand, the synthetic insecticides did not prove safer for natural enemies as compared to botanical extracts. It was concluded that as an Integrated Pest Management (IPM strategy, botanical extracts can be used at low infestation levels so that ecosystem service of biological control may be sustained.

  10. Plants from abroad : botanical terminology in 18th-century British encyclopaedias

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Lonati

    2013-01-01

    During the 18th century British encyclopaedias included in their lemmata an increasing number of botanical lexis, that is the terminology pertaining to “that branch of natural history which treats of the uses, characters, classes, orders, genera, and species of plants. […] and what useful and ornamental purposes may be expected from the cultivation of it [i.e. botany]” (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1768-1771, s.v. Botany). More often than not, these terms represented migrating plants coming from...

  11. An ex vivo approach to botanical-drug interactions: a proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinwen; Zhu, Hao-Jie; Munoz, Juliana; Gurley, Bill J; Markowitz, John S

    2015-04-02

    Botanical medicines are frequently used in combination with therapeutic drugs, imposing a risk for harmful botanical-drug interactions (BDIs). Among the existing BDI evaluation methods, clinical studies are the most desirable, but due to their expense and protracted time-line for completion, conventional in vitro methodologies remain the most frequently used BDI assessment tools. However, many predictions generated from in vitro studies are inconsistent with clinical findings. Accordingly, the present study aimed to develop a novel ex vivo approach for BDI assessment and expand the safety evaluation methodology in applied ethnopharmacological research. This approach differs from conventional in vitro methods in that rather than botanical extracts or individual phytochemicals being prepared in artificial buffers, human plasma/serum collected from a limited number of subjects administered botanical supplements was utilized to assess BDIs. To validate the methodology, human plasma/serum samples collected from healthy subjects administered either milk thistle or goldenseal extracts were utilized in incubation studies to determine their potential inhibitory effects on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively. Silybin A and B, two principal milk thistle phytochemicals, and hydrastine and berberine, the purported active constituents in goldenseal, were evaluated in both phosphate buffer and human plasma based in vitro incubation systems. Ex vivo study results were consistent with formal clinical study findings for the effect of milk thistle on the disposition of tolbutamide, a CYP2C9 substrate, and for goldenseal׳s influence on the pharmacokinetics of midazolam, a widely accepted CYP3A4/5 substrate. Compared to conventional in vitro BDI methodologies of assessment, the introduction of human plasma into the in vitro study model changed the observed inhibitory effect of silybin A, silybin B and hydrastine and berberine on CYP2C9 and CYP3A4/5, respectively, results which more

  12. Evaluation of Botanical Reference Materials for the Determination of Vanadium in Biological Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Kaj; Damsgaard, Else

    1982-01-01

    Three botanical reference materials prepared by the National Bureau of Standards have been studied by neutron activation analysis to evaluate their suitability with respect to the determination of vanadium in biological samples. Various decomposition methods were applied in connection with chemic....... A reference value of 1.15 mg/kg of this material is recommended, based on results from 3 different methods. All three materials are preferable to SRM 1571 Orchard Leaves, while Bowen's Kale remains the material of choice because of its lower concentration....

  13. INVESTIGATION OF BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE COMPONENTS IN PROPOLIS SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT BOTANICAL ORIGIN

    OpenAIRE

    SİLİCİ, Sibel

    2008-01-01

    Propolis örneklerinin kimyasal kompozisyonunun botanik orijine bağlı olarak değiştiği görülmüştür. Propolis samples from different botanical origin (populus, castanea and eucalyptus type) were hand-collected. Propolis samples were investigated by GC-MS. Total ash, ethanolic extract yield and wax content were determined and total phenolic content was measured by the Folin Ciacalteu procedure. Predominant components of propolis samples are phenolic compounds, organic and fatty acids and their e...

  14. RARE DENDROTAXONS CULTIVATED IN THE UNIVERSITY BOTANIC GARDEN MACEA (ARAD COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARDELEAN AUREL

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Macea University Botanical Garden, which covers a surface of 21.5 hectares, represents a scientific collection of 2.200 woody taxons. We presents 11 rarities of the Romanian cultivated dendroflora, these are: Callicarpa cathayana Chang, Chimonanthus nitens Oliver, Davidia involucrata Baill., Euonymus carnosus Hemsl., Forestiera neomexicana A. Gray., Paliurus hemsleyanus Rehder, Pistacia chinensis Bunge, Platycarya strobilacea Sieb. et Zucc., Quercus shumardii Buckl., Sinojackia rehderiana Hu, Sorbus caloneura Rehder.The dendrotaxons adaptation and acclimatization confers a permanent preoccupation to the garden specialists.

  15. Botanical identification of native species most important of dairy basins Molinopampa, Pomacochas and Leymebamba, Amazonas, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Oliva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was conducted botanical identification of native grass species that predominate in the three major livestock department of Amazonas basins (Peru: Molinopampa, Pomacochas and Leymebamba. To select eleven species were surveyed 293 farmers distributed stratified manner in the three basins. The methodology consisted of an examination and recognition of morphological characters of qualitative and quantitative in each of the specimens with the help of laboratory equipment, and then formulates a database order. After identifying each specimen proceeds to develop a database of structural and phenological characteristics. Also, comparisons are made with collections of specimens in herbaria national and foreign herbaria.

  16. Quantification of total iodine in intact granular starches of different botanical origin exposed to iodine vapor at various water activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Bruce; Ye, Mei; Holbein, Bruce E; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2011-11-08

    Iodine has been used as an effective tool for studying both the structure and composition of dispersed starch and starch granules. In addition to being employed to assess relative amylose contents for starch samples, it has been used to look at the molecular mobility of the glucose polymers within intact starch granules based on exposure to iodine vapor equilibrated at different water activities. Starches of different botanical origin including corn, high amylose corn, waxy corn, potato, waxy potato, tapioca, wheat, rice, waxy rice, chick pea and mung bean were equilibrated to 0.33, 0.75, 0.97 water activities, exposed to iodine vapor and then absorbance spectra and LAB color were determined. In addition, a new iodine quantification method sensitive to <0.1% iodine (w/w) was employed to measure bound iodine within intact granular starch. Amylose content, particle size distribution of granules, and the density of the starch were also determined to explore whether high levels of long linear glucose chains and the surface area-to-volume ratio were important factors relating to the granular iodine binding. Results showed, in all cases, starches complexed more iodine as water content increased and waxy starches bound less iodine than their normal starch counterparts. However, much more bound iodine could be measured chemically with waxy starches than was expected based on colorimetric determination. Surface area appeared to be a factor as smaller rice and waxy rice starch granules complexed more iodine, while the larger potato and waxy potato granules complexed less than would be expected based on measured amylose contents. Corn, high amylose corn, and wheat, known to have starch granules with extensive surface pores, bound higher levels of iodine suggesting pores and channels may be an important factor giving iodine vapor greater access to bind within the granules. Exposing iodine vapor to moisture-equilibrated native starches is an effective tool to explore starch

  17. The inventory of botanical curiosities in Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix's Nouvelle France (1744).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelinski, Michel

    2013-03-01

    The article explores the botanical contributions of Pierre-François-Xavier de Charlevoix's book Histoire et description générale de la Nouvelle France vis-à-vis the contributions of previous researchers, his use of iconographic and discursive representations and its relevance to the project of French colonization. It investigates why he refused Linnaeus' taxonomic model and what he intended with his catalogue of botanical curiosities. The unfolding of his philosophical and religious trajectory allows to understand his stance regarding the classification of nature, the meanings of ethnological information, his forms of intellectual appropriation, and his use of discourse and botanical iconography as political and emotional propaganda to encourage colonial settlement.

  18. Does Botanical Diversity in Sewage Treatment Reed-Bed Sites Enhance Invertebrate Biodiversity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Feest

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 This study examines the effect of increasing botanical diversity, through reed-bed planting and maintenance regimes, on sewage treatment reed-bed invertebrate biodiversity and the possible enrichment of overall catchment biodiversity. (2 Reed-bed invertebrates were identified as a good indicator group of overall site biodiversity quality and were sampled at a range of sewage treatment reed-bed sites in the same geographical area between May and August 2006 (plus one natural reed-bed control site. Standardised water trapping and pitfall trapping techniques were employed throughout this sampling period. (3 Statistical analysis of the sampling results revealed that the number of plant species recorded was inversely related to terrestrial invertebrate species richness, species conservation value index and biomass within the study sites. For example, the natural reed-bed sampled had the highest botanical diversity but the lowest terrestrial invertebrate species richness. (4 This study has demonstrated that sewage treatment reed-beds support a diverse range of invertebrate species, some of them being of national conservation value. This suggests that sewage treatment reed-beds may be at least as biodiverse as naturally occurring reed-beds and will add to the overall biodiversity and ecohydrology of a catchment whilst saving energy.

  19. Ethnopharmacological information from the botanical correspondence of Berthold Seemann (1825 - 1871)--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstädter, A

    2015-09-01

    Historical research may be able to contribute to the exploration of traditional knowledge about medicinal plants and promising attempts have been made investigating Byzantine texts, Early Modern herbals, and writings of Christian missionaries. In this pilot study it should be explored if publications, travel reports, diaries or correspondence of the botanical explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries may serve a source of ethnopharmacological information as well and may be able to guide modern phytopharmacological research. Writings of Berthold Seemann (1825-1871), a German investigator exploring the botany of Middle America, the Fiji islands and other regions, are investigated as a first example. It could be shown that Seemann's heritage mainly kept at Kew Garden Archives, does contain ethnopharmacological information which in part has already been confirmed by recent study results indicating some reliability of his observations. However, there are also reports about traditional medicinal plants scarcely investigated so far, including Schultesia stenophylla Mart. (syn. S. guainensis (Aubl.) Malme), Trixis inula Crantz, Waltheria glomerata Presl., Gonophlebium attenuatum (Humb. & Bonpl. Es Wil\\d) C. Presl., or Pseudoelephantopus spicatus (Juss ex Aubl.) C.F. Baker. It is suggested to further explore their potential as medicinal plants. In general, as Seemann's example has shown, publications and correspondence of botanical explorers of the past seem to be a valuable and hitherto almost neglected source of information to be considered in further historical and ethnopharmacological research.

  20. The current status of cyanobacterial nomenclature under the "prokaryotic" and the "botanical" code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Ventura, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Cyanobacterial taxonomy developed in the botanical world because Cyanobacteria/Cyanophyta have traditionally been identified as algae. However, they possess a prokaryotic cell structure, and phylogenetically they belong to the Bacteria. This caused nomenclature problems as the provisions of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN; the "Botanical Code") differ from those of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP; the "Prokaryotic Code"). While the ICN recognises names validly published under the ICNP, Article 45(1) of the ICN has not yet been reciprocated in the ICNP. Different solutions have been proposed to solve the current problems. In 2012 a Special Committee on the harmonisation of the nomenclature of Cyanobacteria was appointed, but its activity has been minimal. Two opposing proposals to regulate cyanobacterial nomenclature were recently submitted, one calling for deletion of the cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is regulated by the ICNP, the second to consistently apply the rules of the ICNP to all cyanobacteria. Following a general overview of the current status of cyanobacterial nomenclature under the two codes we present five case studies of genera for which nomenclatural aspects have been discussed in recent years: Microcystis, Planktothrix, Halothece, Gloeobacter and Nostoc.

  1. Effect of botanicals on inflammation and skin aging: analyzing the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Amanda; Oyetakin-White, Patricia; Baron, Elma D

    2014-01-01

    The skin and its immune system manifest a decline in physiologic function as it undergoes aging. External insults such as ultraviolet light exposure cause inflammation, which may enhance skin aging even further leading to cancer and signs of photoaging. There is a potential role for botanicals as an adjunct modality in the prevention of skin aging. Numerous over-the-counter anti-aging products are commercially available, many of which boast unverified claims to reduce stress, inflammation and correct signs of aging. In this article we reviewed the scientific literature for data on frequently published "anti-inflammaging" additives such as vitamins A, C and E and green tea. We also analyzed the evidence available on five promising ingredients commonly found in anti-aging products, namely, argan oil, rosemary, pomegranate, Coenzyme Q10, and Coffeeberry. Though there may be an increasing amount of scientific data on a few of these novel botanicals, in general, there remains a lack of clinical data to support the anti-aging claims made.

  2. Pharmacological, ethnopharmacological, and botanical evaluation of subtropical medicinal plants of Lower Kheng region in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangchuk, Phurpa; Yeshi, Karma; Jamphel, Kinga

    2017-12-01

    The Bhutanese Sowa Rigpa medicine (BSM) uses medicinal plants as the bulk ingredients. Our study was to botanically identify subtropical medicinal plants from the Lower Kheng region in Bhutan, transcribe ethnopharmacological uses, and highlight reported pharmacological activities of each plant. We freely listed the medicinal plants used in the BSM literature, current formulations, and the medicinal plants inventory documents. This was followed by a survey and the identification of medicinal plants in the Lower Kheng region. The botanical identification of each medicinal plant was confirmed using The Plant List, eFloras, and TROPICOS. Data mining for reported pharmacological activities was performed using Google Scholar, Scopus, PubMed, and SciFinder Scholar. We identified 61 subtropical plants as the medicinal plants used in BSM. Of these, 17 plants were cultivated as edible plant species, 30 species grow abundantly, 24 species grow in moderate numbers, and only seven species were scarce to find. All these species grow within the altitude range of 100-1800 m above sea level. A total of 19 species were trees, and 13 of them were shrubs. Seeds ranked first in the parts usage category. Goshing Gewog (Block) hosted maximum number of medicinal plants. About 52 species have been pharmacologically studied and only nine species remain unstudied. Lower Kheng region is rich in subtropical medicinal plants and 30 species present immediate economic potential that could benefit BSM, Lower Kheng communities and other Sowa Rigpa practicing organizations.

  3. Effects of Ayurvedic Rasayana botanicals on CYP3A4 isoenzyme system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Swapnil P; Kamble, Bhagyashree B

    2015-05-01

    Consuming botanical dietary supplements or herbal drugs along with prescription drugs may lead to potential pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) herb-drug interactions (HDI). The present study focuses on the importance of and novel approach for assessing HDI in integrative medicine with case examples of two frequently-used Ayurvedic Rasayana botanicals. The aqueous extracts of Asparagus racemosus (ARE) and Gymnema sylvester (GSE) were prepared as per Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India. Chemoprofiling of these extracts was done using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, ARE was characterized for the presence of shatavarins IV and I using HPLC & mass spectroscopy respectively. Effects of ARE and GSE were investigated on rat liver microsome using testosterone probe drug assay. The changes in formation of metabolite (6-β hydroxy testosterone) were monitored on incubation of testosterone alone, testosterone with ketoconazole, ARE and GSE using HPLC. Half inhibitory concentration (IC50) was used to predict plausible HDI. ARE and GSE showed no inhibition with IC50 values >1 000 μg/mL while the standard inhibitor ketoconazole completely abolished CYP3A4-dependent activity at 0.531 μg/mL and IC50 was found to be 0.036 μg/mL. ARE and GSE prepared as per Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India were found to be safe for CYP3A4-mediated inhibitory HDI in rats. Our in vitro study suggests the need of further in vivo investigation for HDI in order to provide clinical relevance.

  4. From Flower to Honey Bouquet: Possible Markers for the Botanical Origin of Robinia Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Aronne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flowers are complex structures devoted to pollinator attraction, through visual as well as chemical signals. As bees collect nectar on flowers to produce honey, some aspects of floral chemistry are transferred to honey, making chemical markers an important technique to identify the botanical and geographical origins of honey. We applied a new approach that considers the simultaneous analysis of different floral parts (petals, stamens + pistils, calyxes + nectarines, and nectar and the corresponding unifloral honey. We collected fresh flowers of Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust, selected five samples of Robinia honey from different geographical origins, applied SPME-GC/MS for volatile analyses, and defined the chemical contribution added by different floral parts to the honey final bouquet. Our results show that honey blends products from nectar as well as other flower parts. Comparing honey and flower profiles, we detected compounds coming directly from flower parts but not present in the nectar, such as hotrienol and β-pinene. These may turn out to be of special interest when selecting floral markers for the botanical origin of honey.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of plants from the Mountain Botanical Garden in Zakopane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Zubek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal status of 77 plant species collected from the Mountain Botanical Garden of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Zakopane (southern Poland was surveyed. These plants include rare, endemic and threatened species in the Tatra Mts. (the Western Carpathians and are maintained in the botanical garden in order to develop effective methods of protection and cultivation. Plants belonging to Brassicaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dryopteridaceae, Juncaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae and Woodsiaceae families were nonmycorrhizal. 41 species formed AM symbiosis. Spores of nine AMF spccies (Glomeromycota, including Archaeospora trappei, Glomus aggregatum, G. claroideum, G. constrictum, G. deserticola, G. geosponrum, G. microcarpum, G. mosseae and G.rubiforme were isolated for the first time from this region of Poland. In addition, the occurrence of the fine endophyte, G. tenue was detected in roots of 18 species from the study area, although formation of arbuscules by this fungus was observed rarely. AM fungi were sporadically accompanied by dark septate endophytes (DSE. 70% of nonmycorrhizal plant sepcies were devoid of DSE.

  6. Botanical smuts and hermaphrodites: Lydia Becker, Darwin's botany, and education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianquitto, Tina

    2013-06-01

    In 1868, Lydia Becker (1827-1890), the renowned Manchester suffragist, announced in a talk before the British Association for the Advancement of Science that the mind had no sex. A year later, she presented original botanical research at the BAAS, contending that a parasitic fungus forced normally single-sex female flowers of Lychnis diurna to develop stamens and become hermaphroditic. This essay uncovers the complex relationship between Lydia Becker's botanical research and her stance on women's rights by investigating how her interest in evolutionary theory, as well as her correspondence with Charles Darwin, critically informed her reform agendas by providing her with a new vocabulary for advocating for equality. One of the facts that Becker took away from her work on Lychnis was that even supposedly fixed, dichotomous categories such as biological sex became unfocused under the evolutionary lens. The details of evolutionary theory, from specific arguments on structural adaptations to more encompassing theories on heredity (i.e., pangenesis), informed Becker's understanding of human physiology. At the same time, Becker's belief in the fundamental equality of the sexes enabled her to perceive the distinction between inherent, biological differences and culturally contingent ones. She applied biological principles to social constructs as she asked: Do analogous evolutionary forces act on humans?

  7. The botanical integrity of wheat products influences the gastric distention and satiety in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almér Lars-Olof

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of the botanical integrity of cereal kernels and the addition of acetic acid (as vinegar in the product or meal has been shown to lower the postprandial blood glucose and insulin response and to increase satiety. However, the mechanism behind the benefits of acetic acid on blood glucose and satiety is not clear. We hypothesized that the gastric emptying rate could be involved. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of maintained botanical integrity of cereals and the presence of acetic acid (vinegar on gastric emptying rate (GER, postprandial blood glucose and satiety. Methods Fifteen healthy subjects were included in a blinded crossover trial, and thirteen of the subjects completed the study. Equicarbohydrate amounts of the following wheat-based meals were studied: white wheat bread, whole-kernel wheat bread or wholemeal wheat bread served with white wine vinegar. The results were compared with a reference meal consisting of white wheat bread without vinegar. The GER was measured with standardized real-time ultrasonography using normal fasting blood glucose Results The whole-kernel wheat bread with vinegar resulted in significantly higher ( Conclusion The present study shows higher satiety after a whole-kernel wheat bread meal with vinegar. This may be explained by increased antral distension after ingestion of intact cereal kernels but, in this study, not by a lower gastric emptying rate or higher postprandial blood glucose response. Trial registration NTR1116

  8. Point-wise and whole-field laser speckle intensity fluctuation measurements applied to botanical specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Junlan; Wu, Xiaoping; Williams, Fred W.; Schmidt, Richard J.

    1997-12-01

    Based on multi-scattering speckle theory, the speckle fields generated by plant specimens irradiated by laser light have been studied using a pointwise method. In addition, a whole-field method has been developed with which entire botanical specimens may be studied. Results are reported from measurements made on tomato and apple fruits, orange peel, leaves of tobacco seedlings, leaves of shihu seedlings (a Chinese medicinal herb), soy-bean sprouts, and leaves from an unidentified trailing houseplant. Although differences where observed in the temporal fluctuations of speckles that could be ascribed to differences in age and vitality, the growing tip of the bean sprout and the shihu seedling both generated virtually stationary speckles such as were observed from boiled orange peel and from localised heat-damaged regions on apple fruit. Our results suggest that both the identity of the botanical specimen and the site at which measurements are taken are likely to critically affect the observation or otherwise of temporal fluctuations of laser speckles.

  9. Establishing a long-term permanent plot in remnant forest of Cibodas Botanic Garden, West Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAENAL MUTAQIEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutaqien Z, Zuhri M (2011 Establishing a long-term permanent plot in remnant forest of Cibodas Botanic Garden, West Java. Biodiversitas 12: 218-224. Cibodas Botanic Garden (CBG has unique characters; almost 10% of which is forested area adjacent to the natural forest of Mt. Gede Pangrango National Park. The area is a transition between natural forest and artificial habitat which mostly consists of exotic plant species. The permanent plot in CBG was established in 2007-2009. Two hundred and eighty four units of 10x10 square meters sub-plot were established in four locations, i.e. Wornojiwo, Kompos, Jalan Akar, and Lumut forest. Vegetation analyses were conducted for trees, saplings, shrubs, and herb species. The inventory found 137 species plants consisting of 74 tree species dominated by Villebrunea rubescens (Bl. Bl. and Ostodes paniculata Bl., 30 shrub species dominated by Strobilanthes hamiltoniana (Steud., 24 herb species dominated by Cyrtandra picta Bl., 6 fern species mainly consisted of Diplazium pallidum Moore, and 3 climber species dominated by Calamus reinwardtii Mart. In comparison with the natural forest of Mt. Gede Pangrango National Park, the CBG permanent plot showed a good representative of the vegetation of lower montane forest. A regular monitoring during the successive years is needed to maintain diversity, monitor forest dynamics and anticipate the spread of invasive plant from CBG.

  10. Toxins in botanical dietary supplements: blue cohosh components disrupt cellular respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B; Khan, Ikhlas A; Nagle, Dale G; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-24

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA "black box" warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3), exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage.

  11. Toxins in Botanical Dietary Supplements: Blue Cohosh Components Disrupt Cellular Respiration and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sandipan; Mahdi, Fakhri; Ali, Zulfiqar; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Nagle, Dale G.; Zhou, Yu-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Certain botanical dietary supplements have been associated with idiosyncratic organ-specific toxicity. Similar toxicological events, caused by drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, have forced the withdrawal or U.S. FDA “Black Box” warnings of major pharmaceuticals. To assess the potential mitochondrial liability of botanical dietary supplements, extracts from 352 authenticated plant samples used in traditional Chinese, Ayurvedic, and Western herbal medicine were evaluated for the ability to disrupt cellular respiration. Blue cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides) methanol extract exhibited mitochondriotoxic activity. Used by some U.S. midwives to help induce labor, blue cohosh has been associated with perinatal stroke, acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, multiple organ injury, and neonatal shock. The potential link between mitochondrial disruption and idiosyncratic herbal intoxication prompted further examination. The C. thalictroides methanol extract and three saponins, cauloside A (1), saponin PE (2), and cauloside C (3) exhibited concentration- and time-dependent mitochondriotoxic activities. Upon treatment, cell respiration rate rapidly increased and then dramatically decreased within minutes. Mechanistic studies revealed that C. thalictroides constituents impair mitochondrial function by disrupting membrane integrity. These studies provide a potential etiological link between this mitochondria-sensitive form of cytotoxicity and idiosyncratic organ damage. PMID:24328138

  12. THE INFLUENCE OF THE BOTANIC ORIGIN OF HONEY PLANTS ON THE QUALITY OF HONEY

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    Z. Tucak

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous parameters affect the quality of honey from different beehive types (Albert – Žindaršić AŽ, Langstroth – Roott LR i Dadant – Blatt DB, i.e. the material of beehives are made of, the origin of queen bees (natural and selected, etc. Our research focuses on the influence of the botanic origin of honey plants (Tilia sp. L. (lime, Amorpha fructirosa L. (desert false indigo, Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower, Brassica napus subsp. olifera DC. (oil beet and Robina pseudoacacia L. (acacia on the quality of honey. The physical and chemical analyses of honey (N=133 (water %, water insoluble compounds %, acidity level, mmol of acid per kg, electrical conductivity, mS/cm, reducing sugar %, sucrose %, HMF, mg/kg, and diastasic number were conducted by Harmonised methods of the European Honey. The pollen analysis was conducted by Harmonised methods of melissopalynology. The pollen analysis indicates that the botanic origin has had a statistically significant influence (P<0.001 on the quality of all investigated characteristics of honey, except on the share of the non–dissolving substances (P=0.088. The research was conducted in the Vukovar-Srijem County, the Republic of Croatia. All bees used in this research belong to the Carniolan honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica, the European bee species.

  13. Acrylic bone cement and starch: Botanical variety impact on curing parameters and degradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrun-Fillâtre, Céline; Monchau, Francine; Hivart, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Acrylic bone cements are a conventional solution to heal bone defects. Starch is often added to the cement to improve its degradability and resorbability. The most used botanical variety is corn starch; few studies or applications deal with other varieties. This study focuses on classical formulations based on 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate but incorporating different starches: waxy maize, corn, amylo maize, wheat, pea or potato, with or without enzyme (α-amylase). A thermocouple is used to determine the curing parameters: setting time and maximal temperature. The water uptake depends on the cement immersion time in a biological fluid and it is studied through sample mass variation analysis. The weight loss is determined after immersion (function of the time) and drying. Starch botanical variety and enzyme presence do not impact curing parameters and water uptake but strongly influence degradability. Water uptake involves advantageous swelling in situ filling the defect. This study shows that starch accessibility by the enzyme explains this impact. Grain spatial configuration, specific surface area and starch distribution in cement give a complementary explanation of the well-known influence of the ratio amylopectin/amylose. Acrylic cements incorporating starch can be classified according to their degradability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations: a systematic review with critical evaluation of causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Lüde, Saskia; De Souza Nascimento, Elizabeth; Dos Santos, Ariana; Colombo, Francesca; Frigerio, Gianfranco; Nørby, Karin; Plumb, Jenny; Finglas, Paul; Restani, Patrizia

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this review was to collect available data on the following: (i) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements or botanical preparations; (ii) the misidentification of poisonous plants; and (iii) interactions between plant food supplements/botanicals and conventional drugs or nutrients. PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase were searched from database inception to June 2014, using the terms 'adverse effect/s', 'poisoning/s', 'plant food supplement/s', 'misidentification/s' and 'interaction/s' in combination with the relevant plant name. All papers were critically evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines for causality assessment. Data were obtained for 66 plants that are common ingredients of plant food supplements; of the 492 papers selected, 402 (81.7%) dealt with adverse effects directly associated with the botanical and 89 (18.1%) concerned interactions with conventional drugs. Only one case was associated with misidentification. Adverse effects were reported for 39 of the 66 botanical substances searched. Of the total references, 86.6% were associated with 14 plants, including Glycine max/soybean (19.3%), Glycyrrhiza glabra/liquorice (12.2%), Camellia sinensis/green tea ( 8.7%) and Ginkgo biloba/gingko (8.5%). Considering the length of time examined and the number of plants included in the review, it is remarkable that: (i) the adverse effects due to botanical ingredients were relatively infrequent, if assessed for causality; and (ii) the number of severe clinical reactions was very limited, but some fatal cases have been described. Data presented in this review were assessed for quality in order to make the results maximally useful for clinicians in identifying or excluding deleterious effects of botanicals. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rondanelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation.

  16. Using Discovery Maps as a Free-Choice Learning Process Can Enhance the Effectiveness of Environmental Education in a Botanical Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Chen, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Botanical gardens (BGs) are important agencies that enhance human knowledge and attitude towards flora conservation. By following free-choice learning model, we developed a "Discovery map" and distributed the map to visitors at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden in Yunnan, China. Visitors, who did and did not receive discovery…

  17. Compendium of botanicals reported to contain naturally occuring substances of possible concern for human health when used in food and food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten

    one lists botanicals for which, although some data were available, the Scientific Committee could not identify substances of concern, or other reasons for the inclusion in the compendium. This new “Compendium of botanicals reported to contain naturally occuring substances of possible concern for human...

  18. Species richness of the genera Trachelomonas and Strombomonas (pigmented Euglenophyceae in a subtropical urban lake in the Porto Alegre Botanical Garden, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Maria Alves-da-Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic composition and richness of the genera Trachelomonas and Strombomonas (pigmented Euglenophyceae in a subtropical urban lake (30º03'05"S; 51º10'34"W within the Botanical Garden, in the city of Porto Alegre, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in order to contribute to the floristic knowledge of Euglenophyta in artificial urban lakes. From July 2007 to June 2008, we collected samples monthly from two sampling stations, using a 25-µm mesh plankton net. The samples were preserved in 4% formaldehyde. We evaluated the following environmental variables related to the water in the lake: ammonia content, silica content, organic matter content, dissolved oxygen concentration, temperature, pH, depth, transparency, electrical conductivity and rainfall. To study the species composition in relation to environmental factors, we used cluster analysis, principal components analysis, canonical correspondence analysis and indicator species analysis. At the specific and infraspecific level, 22 taxa were identified, Trachelomonas elliptica (Playf. Defl. and T. gracillima Bal. & Dast. representing new records for the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The cluster analysis indicated seasonal variation, species richness being highest in the spring of 2007. Seven indicator species were characterized as acid-tolerant.

  19. Botanical insecticides in controlling Kelly's citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on organic grapefruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V A

    2011-12-01

    Kelly's citrus thrips, Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was first recorded in Cyprus in 1996 and became an economic citrus pest. In Cyprus, Kelly's citrus thrips larvae cause feeding damage mainly on immature lemon and grapefruit fruits. Use of botanical insecticides is considered an alternative tool compared with synthetic chemicals, in offering solutions for healthy and sustainable citrus production. During 2008-2010, the efficacy of the botanical insecticides azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W and Oikos 10 EC), garlic extract (Alsa), and pyrethrins (Vioryl 5%SC) was evaluated in field trials against Kelly's citrus thrips larval stage I and II aiming at controlling the pest's population and damage to organic grapefruit fruits. In each of the trial years treatments with pyrethrins and azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W) were the most effective against Kelly's citrus thrips compared with the untreated control (for 2008: P < 0.018; for 2009: P < 0.000; for 2010: P < 0.008). In 2008, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatments with pyrethrins and Neemex was 9.6 (19.2%) and 9.7 (19.5%) respectively, compared with 12.2 (24.3%) in the untreated control. In 2009, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatment with pyrethrins was 3.7 (7.3%) and 3.9 (7.8%) in treatment with Neemex compared with 8.6 (17.3%) in the untreated control, while in 2010 the mean damaged fruits in these treatments was recorded at 18.7 (37.5%) and 19.6 (39.2), respectively, compared with 29.6 fruits (59.2%) in the control. Oikos 10 EC showed significant effect only in 2009 and 2010. In these years, the mean number of damaged fruits was recorded at 5.5 and 21.2 compared with 8.6 and 29.6 fruits in the untreated control, respectively. Garlic extract showed the lowest effect from all the botanicals used compared with the untreated control.

  20. Botanical trash mixtures analyzed with near-infrared and attenuated total reflectance fourier transform spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botanical cotton trash mixed with lint reduces cotton’s marketability and appearance. During cotton harvesting, ginning, and processing, trash size reduction occurs, thus complicating its removal and identification. This trash causes problems by increasing ends down in yarn formation and thus proce...

  1. The 'Botanical Gardens of the Dispossessed' revisited: richness and significance of Old World crops grown by Suriname Maroons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andel, van Tinde; Velden, van der Amber; Reijers, Minke

    2016-01-01

    Old World crops entered the Americas as provision on slave ships and were planted by enslaved Africans in their home gardens, known as the ‘Botanical Gardens of the Dispossessed’. Escaped slaves who settled in Maroon communities in Suriname’s forested interior practiced shifting cultivation for

  2. A brief understanding of process optimisation in microwave-assisted extraction of botanical materials: options and opportunities with chemometric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anup Kumar; Mandal, Vivekananda; Mandal, Subhash C

    2014-01-01

    Extraction forms the very basic step in research on natural products for drug discovery. A poorly optimised and planned extraction methodology can jeopardise the entire mission. To provide a vivid picture of different chemometric tools and planning for process optimisation and method development in extraction of botanical material, with emphasis on microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of botanical material. A review of studies involving the application of chemometric tools in combination with MAE of botanical materials was undertaken in order to discover what the significant extraction factors were. Optimising a response by fine-tuning those factors, experimental design or statistical design of experiment (DoE), which is a core area of study in chemometrics, was then used for statistical analysis and interpretations. In this review a brief explanation of the different aspects and methodologies related to MAE of botanical materials that were subjected to experimental design, along with some general chemometric tools and the steps involved in the practice of MAE, are presented. A detailed study on various factors and responses involved in the optimisation is also presented. This article will assist in obtaining a better insight into the chemometric strategies of process optimisation and method development, which will in turn improve the decision-making process in selecting influential extraction parameters. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Morphometric features of the genus Paeonia L. in the introduction conditions of the Botanical Garden-Institute, Ufa Research Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonina A. Reut

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the Botanical Garden-Institute, Ufa Research Center conducted the study of morphometric features of four alien species PaeoniaL. Revealed that the most of labile symptoms observed in labile P. anomalaand P. lactiflora, the lowest – in P. hybridaand P. tenuifolia.

  4. Sublethal effects of some synthetic and botanical insecticides on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

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    Esmaeily Saeideh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortality caused by insecticides, some biological traits of insects may also be affected by sublethal insecticide doses. In this study, we used the age-stage, two-sex life table method to evaluate the sublethal effects of the four synthetic insecticides: abamectin, imidacloprid, diazinon, and pymetrozin as well as the botanical insecticide taken from Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae extract, on eggs of the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem.: Aleyrodidae. The lowest and highest survival rates and oviposition periods were observed in whiteflies treated by diazinon and imidacloprid, respectively. We found significant differences in the net reproductive rate (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r, the finite rate of increase (?, and the gross reproductive rate (GRR among different insecticides. Altogether, our results showed that pymetrozin and C. procera induced the most sublethal effects, thus they may be suitable candidates for use in integrated pest management programs of B. tabaci.

  5. Multifunctional Carbon Aerogels Derived by Sol–Gel Process of Natural Polysaccharides of Different Botanical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bakierska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, we describe the results of our recent studies on carbon aerogels derived from natural starches. A facile method for the fabrication of carbon aerogels is presented. Moreover, the complete analysis of the carbonization process of different starch aerogels (potato, maize, and rice was performed using thermogravimetric studies combined with a detailed analysis of evolved decomposition products. The prepared carbon aerogels were studied in terms of their morphology and electrical properties to relate the origin of starch precursor with final properties of carbon materials. The obtained results confirmed the differences in carbon aerogels’ morphology, especially in materials’ specific surface areas, depending on the botanical origin of precursors. The electrical conductivity measurements suggest that carbon aerogels with the best electrical properties can be obtained from potato starch.

  6. Combinatorial epigenetic mechanisms and efficacy of early breast cancer inhibition by nutritive botanicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Buckhaults, Phillip; Cui, Xiangqin; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aberrant epigenetic events are important contributors to the pathogenesis of different types of cancers and dietary botanicals with epigenetic properties can influence early cancer development leading to cancer prevention effects. We sought to investigate potential combinatorial effects of bioactive dietary components including green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and broccoli sprouts (BSp) on neutralizing epigenetic aberrations during breast tumorigenesis. Materials & methods: The combinatorial effects were evaluated in a breast cancer transformation cellular system and breast cancer mouse xenografts. Results & conclusion: Combined treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate in GTPs and sulforaphane in BSp resulted in a synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cellular growth. Further studies revealed this combination led to genome-wide epigenetic alterations. Combinatorial diets significantly inhibited tumor growth in breast cancer mouse xenografts. Collectively, these studies indicate that combined GTPs and BSp are highly effective in inhibiting early breast cancer development by, at least in part, regulating epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:27478970

  7. Identification of botanical origin of Chinese unifloral honeys by free amino acid profiles and chemometric methods

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    Zheng Sun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid contents of five floral sources Chinese honeys (jujube, rape, chaste, acacia, and lungan were measured using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The results showed that proline was the main amino acid in most of the analyzed samples. Phenylalanine presents at the highest content in chaste honey samples, and the total amino acid contents of chaste honeys were also significantly higher than those of other honey samples. Based on the amino acid contents, honey samples were classified using chemometric methods (cluster analysis (CA, principal component analysis (PCA, and discriminant analysis (DA. According to the CA results, chaste honeys could be separated from other honeys, while the remaining samples were correctly grouped together when the chaste honey data were excluded. By using DA, the overall correct classification rate reached 100%. The results revealed that amino acid contents could potentially be used as indicators to identify the botanical origin of unifloral honeys.

  8. The determination of botanical origin of honeys based on enantiomer distribution of chiral volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Špánik, Ivan; Pažitná, Alexandra; Šiška, Peter; Szolcsányi, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The enantiomer ratios of chiral volatile organic compounds in rapeseed, chestnut, orange, acacia, sunflower and linden honeys were determined by multi-dimensional gas chromatography using solid phase microextraction (SPME) as a sample pre-treatment procedure. Linalool oxides, linalool and hotrienol were present at the highest concentration levels, while significantly lower amounts of α-terpineol, 4-terpineol and all isomers of lilac aldehydes were found in all studied samples. On the other hand, enantiomer distribution of some chiral organic compounds in honey depends on their botanical origin. The significant differences in enantiomer ratio of linalool were observed for rapeseed honey that allows us to distinguish this type of honey from the other ones. The enantiomer ratios of lilac aldehydes were useful for distinguishing of orange and acacia honey from other studied monofloral honeys. Similarly, different enantiomer ratio of 4-terpineol was found for sunflower honeys. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A short life cycle of introduced Carex vulpina L. in the Donetsk Botanical Garden

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    Pavlova Marina Alexandrovna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the study of a short life cycle in introduced ornamental Carex vulpina L. in the Donetsk Botanical Garden, we have revealed and described five main stages of ontogeny (plantlet, juvenile, immature, virginal, young generative and determined their time limits. It was found out that pregenerative period in this species lasts only for one growing season. This fact may be preconditioned by optimal for sapling development conditions (edaphic ones and agricultural methods. This study allowed us to formulate the following specific traits of a short life cycle in C. vulpina: a prolonged seed germination period, a long lasting relationship between a plant and its seed, an accelerated pregenerative period of ontogeny. Based on these data we suggest seed reproduction of this introduced species to be the best way to get a number of high grade planting material yet in the second year after sowing, which has implications for landscaping in our region.

  10. [Dissection of differences and similarities of botanical drugs in European Union, US and Canada].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi; Zhao, Libin; Ye, Zhengliang; Guo, Zhixin; Sun, He

    2011-10-01

    Because of the unique nature and treatment concept of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs), TCMs have been respected again since 70s of last century. The regulatory agencies of some developed countries (the FDA, EMA and Health Canada etc) have published new guidance/guidelines/directives in recent years, such as the botanical drug product guidance of the FDA, the evidence for quality of finished natural health products guidance of the Health Canada and the guideline on quality of herbal medicinal products/ traditional herbal medicinal products of the EMA etc. All of the regulatory agencies are willing to scientifically evaluate the herbal medicines and accept it as therapeutic product. This paper analyzed the history of herbal medicine regulation and the similarities and differences of the regulatory requirements of the European Union, the United States and Canada, proposed possible future direction of the international development of Chinese medicine from the perspective of global regulatory affairs.

  11. Conifers in decorative arboretum of Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University

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    Eglacheva Arina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation that taking place during of spontaneous cultivars introduction have not taken into consideration for last 10 years. The plants introduction in the Botanic Garden PSU have a planned character in a northwest middle taiga. Decorative arboretum was laid in 2000 (Potapova, Prokhorov, 2010. By 2014, the conifers collection includes 159 specimens of 98 cultivars belonging to 28 species, 10 genera and 3 families (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Taxaceae. Taxa are presented as species with narrow native habitat (Microbiota decussata, Thujopsis dolabrata, Chamaecyparis pisifera, Picea omorika, and with a wide (Juniperus communis. Plants were planted gradually. Annual plant monitoring include measuring of height, width of the crown, trunk diameter, needles color, seed-bearing, damage. Based on the study was identified plants groups in growth rate, seed-bearing. The number of generative samples are increased from 17 to 53% during 2007-2014. Seed-bearing is not a constant parameter and depends on a complex of abiotic factors.

  12. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidomorpha of the Botanic Garden of the Jagiellonian University, Kraków*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starowicz Marzena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of faunistic investigations of aphids (Aphidomorpha in the Botanic Garden of the Jagiellonian University, Kraków, in the Kraków – Wieluń Upland. During two seasons of research (2011, 2012 two aphid species from the family Adelgidae and 50 species from the family Aphididae, associated with 66 host plants were recorded. The following species – Eriosoma anncharlotteae Danielsson, 1979, Capitophorus elaeagni (Del Guercio, 1894, Rhopalosiphoninus (Neorhopalosiphoninus staphyleae staphyleae (Koch, 1854, Eulachnus brevipilosus Börner, 1940 and E. cembrae Börner, 1950 – are new for the Kraków – Wieluń Upland. Seven of the species recorded are regarded as alien to Poland.

  13. Effects of botanical antifeedants on Melolontha melolontha grub feeding on Scots pine roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzecz Iwona

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of using botanic antifeedants to reduce the damage caused by Melolontha spp. grubs. To achieve the objective, the experiments were established in semi-field conditions to estimate the antifeedant activity of rutin, quercetin (flavonoids from buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum and an extract from black alder Alnus glutinosa leaves against Melolontha melolontha grubs. The grubs were placed individually in the pots with a soil in which 2 year old Pinus sylvestris trees were planted. The pots were put in garden pavilions placed in the open area. Then the soil in the pots were watered with the emulsions of rutin, quercetin, an extract from A. glutinosa leaves, and with pure water-comparative variant. After 4 months, the weight and mortality of grubs were compared, as well as the weight of tree roots in all pots.

  14. Discovery of Some Piperine-Based Phenylsulfonylhydrazone Derivatives as Potent Botanically Narcotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Yu, Xiang; Lian, Xihong; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    By structural modification of piperine, some piperine-based phenylsulfonylhydrazone derivatives exhibited an unprecedented and potent narcotic activity against the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker). The ND50 values of compounds 6c and 6e against the third-instar larvae of M. separata, which were more potent than those of wilfortrine and wilforgine, were 0.0074 μmol (after 3.5 h), and 0.0075 μmol (after 7 h) per larvae, respectively. By transmission electron microscope, it demonstrated that mitochondria were vacuolated and swollen in the ganglion cell of M. separata after treatment with 6c. More importantly, 6c selectively displayed the inhibition activity on acetylcholine esterase (AchE) of M. separata. This work paved the way for further studying the insecticidal mechanism of 6c as a new and promising botanical narcotic agent. PMID:26268805

  15. Combinatorial epigenetic mechanisms and efficacy of early breast cancer inhibition by nutritive botanicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Buckhaults, Phillip; Cui, Xiangqin; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-08-01

    Aberrant epigenetic events are important contributors to the pathogenesis of different types of cancers and dietary botanicals with epigenetic properties can influence early cancer development leading to cancer prevention effects. We sought to investigate potential combinatorial effects of bioactive dietary components including green tea polyphenols (GTPs) and broccoli sprouts (BSp) on neutralizing epigenetic aberrations during breast tumorigenesis. The combinatorial effects were evaluated in a breast cancer transformation cellular system and breast cancer mouse xenografts. Combined treatment with epigallocatechin-3-gallate in GTPs and sulforaphane in BSp resulted in a synergistic inhibition of breast cancer cellular growth. Further studies revealed this combination led to genome-wide epigenetic alterations. Combinatorial diets significantly inhibited tumor growth in breast cancer mouse xenografts. Collectively, these studies indicate that combined GTPs and BSp are highly effective in inhibiting early breast cancer development by, at least in part, regulating epigenetic mechanisms.

  16. Checklist of invasive alien species in CSIR-NBRI Botanic Garden, Lucknow, India

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    Shilpi Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The invasive alien species of CSIR-NBRI Botanic Garden are enumerated and their impact on the surrounding ecosystem are discussed. This study deals with the information on habit, nativity and family of plant species occurring in the area of study. A total of 103 invasive alien species under 86 genera and 36 families were recorded. Among these, the eudicotyledons represent 85 species, 69 genera and 32 families; monocotyledons represent 18 species, 17 genera and 4 families. In terms of nativity, species from Tropical America are the most dominant group with 34 species. In addition, based on life forms, herbs are dominant (88 species, followed by shrubs (8 species, climbers (4 species and trees (3 species.

  17. Juglans regia L. (Juglandaceae at Peter the Great Botanical Garden in Saint Petersburg

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    Firsov Gennadiy Afanasyevich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Juglans regia L. was the first exotic species of this genus to be cultivated at Peter the Great Botanical Garden of the V.L. Komarov Botanical Institute of RAS in Saint Petersburg – it was mentioned at M.M. Terekhovsky’s Catalogue in 1796. Firstly it was cultivated indoors. It was tested by E.L. Regel as early as in 1871 but unsuccessfully. It has been cultivated trustworthy outdoors since 1914. It was seriously frost damaging during the 20th century in cold winters with temperature below -25 oC, such as in 1955/56, 1968/69, 1978/79, аnd 1984/85. The winter of 1986/87 with absolute minimum temperature -34,7oC was very unfavourable, and many trees died after it. At present, the winter hardiness has increased with the warming of the climate. There are no frost damages at all or they are small and insignificant. The largest trees now reach 19 m high and 31 cm of trunk diameter in the age of 67 years old. The majority of trees produce fruits. Twenty trees of modern collection represent the five generations. The visible increasing of adaptation abilities is observed starting with the fifth generation. The trees of the fifth generation are good looking single-trunked trees without frost damages. Since 2014 they have been producing fruits, and subsequently this is possible to obtain plants of the sixth generation. Apparently the specimens of the fifth and the next generations are of special value to test at areas outside of the city to promote the distribution of the walnut in cultivation.

  18. The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System: general concept and aspects of botanical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, V; Hollander-Czytko, H; Voeste, D

    1997-09-01

    The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (CEBAS) consists of four subcomponents which form a closed (artificial) aquatic ecosystem initially designed to study the long-term influence of space conditions on several successive generations of aquatic organisms. Teleost fishes and water snails in the zoological component produce CO2 ammonium ions and waste compounds which can be utilized after ammonium is oxidised in a microbial component by the botanical component consisting of a rootless, aquatic higher plant species which eliminates ions, i.e. nitrate, and produces oxygen for animal respiration. An electronic component serves as a data-acquisition and regulation device for temperature and oxygen-dependent illumination of the plant chamber. A comprehensive interdisciplinary research programme, focused around the CEBAS, is especially well developed in the field of zoology. It covers a ground laboratory and preparations for two scheduled space flight projects, as well as aspects of combined animal-plant food production modules for human nutrition in bioregenerative space life-support systems and for terrestrial production sites. In the botanical research programme, morphological investigations on Ceratophyllum demersum L. performed with light and electron microscopy have demonstrated a gas lacuna system which, in addition to starch grains in the plastids, might regulate the buoyancy of the plant and/or serve as a 'gas skeleton'. Also, a remarkable symmetry in the arrangement of tissues was observed in stems and older leaves. The photosynthetic capacities of Ceratophyllum in the CEBAS-MINI MODULE proved to be more than sufficient for life support, and experiments on nitrate uptake into the plants showed their capacity to utilize ions from the water.

  19. Pharmacological, ethnopharmacological, and botanical evaluation of subtropical medicinal plants of Lower Kheng region in Bhutan

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    Phurpa Wangchuk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Bhutanese Sowa Rigpa medicine (BSM uses medicinal plants as the bulk ingredients. Our study was to botanically identify subtropical medicinal plants from the Lower Kheng region in Bhutan, transcribe ethnopharmacological uses, and highlight reported pharmacological activities of each plant. Methods: We freely listed the medicinal plants used in the BSM literature, current formulations, and the medicinal plants inventory documents. This was followed by a survey and the identification of medicinal plants in the Lower Kheng region. The botanical identification of each medicinal plant was confirmed using The Plant List, eFloras, and TROPICOS. Data mining for reported pharmacological activities was performed using Google Scholar, Scopus, PubMed, and SciFinder Scholar. Results: We identified 61 subtropical plants as the medicinal plants used in BSM. Of these, 17 plants were cultivated as edible plant species, 30 species grow abundantly, 24 species grow in moderate numbers, and only seven species were scarce to find. All these species grow within the altitude range of 100–1800 m above sea level. A total of 19 species were trees, and 13 of them were shrubs. Seeds ranked first in the parts usage category. Goshing Gewog (Block hosted maximum number of medicinal plants. About 52 species have been pharmacologically studied and only nine species remain unstudied. Conclusion: Lower Kheng region is rich in subtropical medicinal plants and 30 species present immediate economic potential that could benefit BSM, Lower Kheng communities and other Sowa Rigpa practicing organizations. Keywords: Bhutanese Sowa Rigpa medicine, ethnobotany, Lower Kheng, medicinal plants, pharmacological activities

  20. Phytochemicals and botanical extracts regulate NF-κB and Nrf2/ARE reporter activities in DI TNC1 astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajit, Deepa; Simonyi, Agnes; Li, Runting; Chen, Zihong; Hannink, Mark; Fritsche, Kevin L; Mossine, Valeri V; Smith, Robert E; Dobbs, Thomas K; Luo, Rensheng; Folk, William R; Gu, Zezong; Lubahn, Dennis B; Weisman, Gary A; Sun, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    The increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory responses associated with neurodegenerative diseases has drawn considerable attention towards understanding the transcriptional signaling pathways involving NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells) and Nrf2 (Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-like 2). Our recent studies with immortalized murine microglial cells (BV-2) demonstrated effects of botanical polyphenols to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and enhance Nrf2-mediated antioxidant responses (Sun et al., 2015). In this study, an immortalized rat astrocyte (DI TNC1) cell line expressing a luciferase reporter driven by the NF-κB or the Nrf2/Antioxidant Response Element (ARE) promoter was used to assess regulation of these two pathways by phytochemicals such as quercetin, rutin, cyanidin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, as well as botanical extracts from Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Sutherlandia frutescens (Sutherlandia) and Euterpe oleracea (Açaí). Quercetin effectively inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB reporter activity and stimulated Nrf2/ARE reporter activity in DI TNC1 astrocytes. Cyanidin and the glycosides showed similar effects but only at much higher concentrations. All three botanical extracts effectively inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB reporter activity. These extracts were capable of enhancing ARE activity by themselves and further enhanced ARE activity in the presence of LPS. Quercetin and botanical extracts induced Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expression. Interestingly, Ashwagandha extract was more active in inducing Nrf2 and HO-1 expression in DI TNC1 astrocytes as compared to Sutherlandia and Açaí extracts. In summary, this study demonstrated NF-kB and Nrf2/ARE promoter activities in DI TNC1 astrocytes, and further showed differences in ability for specific botanical polyphenols and extracts to down-regulate LPS-induced NF-kB and up-regulate the NRF2/ARE activities in these cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  1. Botanical identity of plant sources of Daśamūla drugs through an analysis of published literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, S; Ved, Devendra Kumar; Lalitha, S; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2012-07-01

    Daśamūla (DM) is a top-traded group of medicinal plants used by the Ayurvedic industry. Through literature survey and analysis, this article has enlisted the botanical sources of DM, as correlated by several scholars. Such a list is not available from any single, earlier publication. It brings to light the confusion that exists in terms of botanical sources correlated to Ayurvedic entities. There is quite a bit of difference in the botanical correlation, parts, and substitutes reported in the different scholarly works, particularly for Pṛṣṇiparṇī, and Agnimantha. For e.g., is Uraria picta the original intended Pṛṣṇiparṇī, as the Ayurvedic Formulary of India (AFI) stipulates or is it U. lagopoidiodes or Desmodium gangeticum as other scholars report? While AFI provides two botanical correlations to Agnimantha in its two editions, namely Premna integrifolia and Clerodendrum phlomidis, other scholars correlate it to other Premna and Clerodendrum species. Why has AFI provided stem bark and whole plant as substitutes for roots of DM? Are substitutes recommended by AFI only for ecological or practical convenience or is there an Ayurvedic or pharmacological explanation for the same? There are many species used in the name of Daśamūla,, in this article all the species are listed out to find the differences in the usage of the drugs. Ayurveda texts and lexicons along with the texts which have done correlation work were considered to arrive at a list of various species used as Dasmula. Since neither the methodology nor the logic behind the correlation have been discussed in these scholarly works, including the AFI, the same is not available for analysis or scrutiny. Such a list as provided in this article can form an essential base for a much needed systematic approach at etymological analysis, botanical correlation, and further scientific work to establish legitimacy of substitutes prescribed.

  2. The preventive Control of White Root Rot Disease in Small Holder Rubber Plantation Using Botanical, Biological and Chemical Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Prasetyo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The preventive control of white root rot disease in small holder plantation using botanical, biological, and chemical agents. A field and laboratory experiment were conducted from June 2008 to December 2009 in Panumangan, Tulang Bawang - Lampung. The  field experiment was intended to evaluate the effect of  botanical plants (Alpinia galanga, Sansiviera auranthii, and Marantha arundinacea, biological agents (organic matter and Trichoderma spp., and chemical agents (lime and natural sulphur on the incidence of white root rot disease and population of some soil microbes. The laboratory experiment was conducted  to observe the mechanism of botanical agents  in controlling white root rot disease. In the field experiment, the treatments were applied  in the experimental plot with cassava plant infection as the indicator. The variables  examined were the incidence of  white root rot and population of soil microbes. In the laboratory experiment, culture of R. microporus was grown in PDA containing root exudate of the antagonistic plant (botanical agent. The variable examined was colony diameter of R. microporus growing in the PDA plates. The results of the  field experiment  showed that planting of the botanical agents, and application of Trichoderma spp., as well as natural sulphur, decreased the incidence of white root rot disease. The effectiveness of M. arundinacea and Trichoderma spp. was comparable to natural  sulphur. The laboratory experiment showed only root exudate of  A. galanga and  S. auranthii that were significantly inhibit the growth of R. microporus.

  3. Stocking rate and fuels reduction effects on beef cattle diet composition and quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe Clark; Tim DelCurto; Martin Vavra; Brian L. Dick

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of forest fuels reduction on diet quality, botanical composition, relative preference, and foraging efficiency of beef cattle grazing at different stocking rates. A split plot factorial design was used, with whole plots (3 ha) being fuel reduced or no treatment (control), and split plots (1 ha) within whole plots...

  4. The molecular composition of ambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalt, J.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Hatcher, P.G.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1988-01-01

    Bulk (elemental composition, IR, CP/MAS 13C NMR) and molecular (GC-MS) analyses have been performed on a series of ambers and resins derived from different locations (Dominican Republic, Philippines, Canada, Israel, New Zealand, Chile) having diverse botanical affinities (Araucariaceae, Hymenaea) and variable age (from Holocene to Early Cretaceous). No major differences have been observed from the elemental composition and the spectroscopic data; however, the molecular analyses of the solvent extractable fraction show that a specific mixture of components is present in each sample. These are mainly diterpenoid products that in general are also found abundantly in the higher plants from which the ambers and resins originate. Nevertheless, a direct relationship between major terpenoid constituents in fossil resins and precursor plant materials can only be established for the younger samples. Irrespective of the geographical or botanical origin of the ambers and resins, several common age-dependent molecular transformation trends can be recognized: (1) progressive loss of olefinic bonds (especially those located in exocyclic positions), (2) decrease of functionalized products, and (3) increasing proportion of aromatized components. However, even in the samples of older age (Cretaceous) the degree of aromatization is very low when compared with that of other higher-plant related materials such as fossilized woods or low rank coals. This indicates that maturation must involve essentially olefin polymerization processes instead of extensive aromatization. ?? 1988.

  5. Liquid chromatography-particle beam electron ionization mass spectrometry method for analysis of botanical extracts: evaluation of ephedrine alkaloids in standard reference materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Joaudimir; Krishna, M V Balarama; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The preliminary validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography particle beam mass spectrometry method (HPLC-PB/MS) with electron impact ionization source for analysis of botanical extracts is presented. The LC-PB/MS system was evaluated for the analysis of ephedrine alkaloids using ephedra-containing National Institute of Standards and Technology dietary supplement standard reference materials (SRMs) 3241 Ephedra Sinica Stapf Native Extract and 3242 Ephedra Sinica Stapf Commercial Extract. The ephedrine alkaloids were separated by reversed-phase chromatography using a phenyl column at room temperature. A linear gradient method with a mobile phase composition varying from 5:95 [MeOH:0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water] to 20:80 (MeOH:0.1% TFA in water) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, with an analysis time of less than 20 min, was used. The source block temperature was evaluated to determine the optimal operating conditions by monitoring the intensities and fragmentation patterns of the ephedrine alkaloids. Ephedrine and N-methylephedrine were taken as a representative of the test alkaloids. The LODs on the sub-nanogram level were achieved, with ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, and methylephedrine in the SRMs quantified by a standard addition method with recoveries of > or = 86% and RSDs of < or = 14% (n = 3).

  6. Botanical ethnoveterinary therapies in three districts of the Lesser Himalayas of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnoveterinary knowledge is highly significant for persistence of traditional community-based approaches to veterinary care. This is of particular importance in the context of developing and emerging countries, where animal health (that of livestock, especially) is crucial to local economies and food security. The current survey documents the traditional veterinary uses of medicinal plants in the Lesser Himalayas-Pakistan. Methods Data were collected through interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and by administering questionnaires. A total of 105 informants aged between 20–75 years old who were familiar with livestock health issues (i.e. farmers, shepherds, housewives and herbalists) participated in the study. Results A total of 89 botanical taxa, belonging to 46 families, were reported to have ethnoveterinary applications. The most quoted families were Poaceae (6 taxa), Fabaceae (6), Asteraceae (5), and Polygonaceae (5). Adhatoda vasica was the most cited species (43%), followed by Trachyspermum ammi (37%), and Zanthoxylum armatum var. armatum (36%). About 126 medications were recorded against more than 50 veterinary conditions grouped into seven categories. The highest cultural index values were recorded for Trachyspermum ammi, Curcuma longa, Melia azedarach, Zanthoxylum armatum var. armatum and Adhatoda vasica. The highest informant consensus factor was found for pathologies related to respiratory and reproductive disorders. Comparison with the local plant-based remedies used in human folk medicine revealed that many of remedies were used in similar ways in local human phytotherapy. Comparison with other field surveys conducted in surrounding areas demonstrated that approximately one-half of the recorded plants uses are novel to the ethnoveterinary literature of the Himalayas. Conclusion The current survey shows a remarkable resilience of ethnoveterinary botanical knowledge in the study area. Most of the species reported for

  7. Tick repellents and acaricides of botanical origin: a green roadmap to control tick-borne diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Pavela, Roman; Canale, Angelo; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Arthropods are dangerous vectors of agents of deadly diseases, which may hit as epidemics or pandemics in the increasing world population of humans and animals. Among them, ticks transmit more pathogen species than any other group of blood-feeding arthropods worldwide. Thus, the effective and eco-friendly control of tick vectors in a constantly changing environment is a crucial challenge. A number of novel routes have been attempted to prevent and control tick-borne diseases, including the development of (i) vaccines against viruses vectored by ticks; (ii) pheromone-based control tools, with special reference to the "lure and kill" techniques; (iii) biological control programmes relying on ticks' natural enemies and pathogens; and (iv) the integrated pest management practices aimed at reducing tick interactions with livestock. However, the extensive employment of acaricides and tick repellents still remains the two most effective and ready-to-use strategies. Unfortunately, the first one is limited by the rapid development of resistance in ticks, as well as by serious environmental concerns. On the other hand, the exploitation of plants as sources of effective tick repellents is often promising. Here, we reviewed current knowledge concerning the effectiveness of plant extracts as acaricides or repellents against tick vectors of public health importance, with special reference to Ixodes ricinus, Ixodes persulcatus, Amblyomma cajennense, Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Haemaphysalis longicornis, Hyalomma anatolicum, Hyalomma marginatum rufipes, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus pulchellus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus turanicus. Eighty-three plant species from 35 botanical families were selected. The most frequent botanical families exploited as sources of acaricides and repellents against ticks were Asteraceae (15 % of the selected studies), Fabaceae (9 %), Lamiaceae (10 %), Meliaceae (5 %), Solanaceae (6

  8. An Overview of Okra Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasababu, Nadendla

    2015-05-01

    Increasing attention towards “sustainable environment” invited the development of new materials to satisfy the needs of the public with less/no damage on surroundings. In this regard a specific attempt is made by the author to do review and understand the performance of the variable vegetable fibres of okra which is botanically called ‘Abelmoschus Esculentus’ and their composites under various conditions of load. Further the results exist in the literature are also reviewed for the purpose of comparison.

  9. Multi-Element Composition of Honey as a Suitable Tool for Its Authenticity Analysis

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    Oroian Mircea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition of 36 honey samples of 4 different botanical origins (acacia, sun flower, tilia and honeydew from the North East region of Romania. An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS method was used to determine 27 elements in honey (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn. We would like to achieve the following goal: to demonstrate that the qualitative and quantitative multi-element composition determination of honey can be used as a suitable tool to classify honey according to its botanical origin. The principal component analysis allowed the reduction of the 27 variables to 2 principal components which explained 74% of the total variance. The dominant elements which were strongly associated with the principal component were K, Mg and Ca. Discriminant models obtained for each kind of botanical honey confirmed that the differentiation of honeys according to their botanical origin was mainly based on multi-element composition. A correct classification of all samples was achieved with the exception of 11.1% of honeydew honeys.

  10. Classification of vegetable oils according to their botanical origin using n-alkane profiles established by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troya, F; Lerma-García, M J; Herrero-Martínez, J M; Simó-Alfonso, E F

    2015-01-15

    n-Alkane profiles established by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used to classify vegetable oils according to their botanical origin. The n-alkanes present in corn, grapeseed, hazelnut, olive, peanut and sunflower oils were isolated by means of alkaline hydrolysis followed by silica gel column chromatography of the unsaponifiable fractions. The n-alkane fraction was constituted mainly of n-alkanes in the range C8-C35, although only those most abundant (15 n-alkanes, from 21 to 35 carbon No.) were used as original variables to construct linear discriminant analysis (LDA) models. Ratios of the peak areas selected by pairs were used as predictors. All the oils were correctly classified according to their botanical origin, with assignment probabilities higher than 95%, using an LDA model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Barrientos; Herrera, Christian L.; Gloria Montenegro; Ximena Ortega; Jorge Veloz; Marysol Alvear; Alejandro Cuevas; Nicolás Saavedra; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from t...

  12. Begonia “Tuti Siregar” (Begonia listada Smith &Wasshausen x Begonia acetosa Vellozo): a new cultivar from Bali Botanic Garden, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    HARTUTININGSIH-M. SIREGAR; MADE ARDAKA; MUSTAID SIREGAR

    2010-01-01

    Siregar HM, Ardaka IM, Siregar M (2010) Begonia “Tuti Siregar” (Begonia listada Smith &Wasshausen x Begonia acetosa Vellozo): a new cultivar from Bali Botanic Garden, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 11: 15-18. A new Begonia cultivar was generated by crossing Begonia listada Smith & Wasshausen with Begonia acetosa Vellozo at Bali Botanic Garden began in 2005. The female flowers of B. listada were pollinated with pollen grains from B. acetosa. Begonia listada is characterized by the following characte...

  13. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

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    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  14. Determination of the botanical origin of honey by front-face synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Lea; Zeković, Ivana; Dramićanin, Tatjana; Dramićanin, Miroslav D; Bro, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    Front-face synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is used to classify honey samples according to their botanical origin. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of three monofloral (linden, sunflower, and acacia), polyfloral (meadow mix), and fake (fake acacia and linden) honey types (109 samples) were collected in an excitation range of 240-500 nm for synchronous wavelength intervals of 30-300 nm. Chemometric analysis of the gathered data included principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis. Mean cross-validated classification errors of 0.2 and 4.8% were found for a model that accounts only for monofloral samples and for a model that includes both the monofloral and polyfloral groups, respectively. The results demonstrate that single synchronous fluorescence spectra of different honeys differ significantly because of their distinct physical and chemical characteristics and provide sufficient data for the clear differentiation among honey groups. The spectra of fake honey samples showed pronounced differences from those of genuine honey, and these samples are easily recognized on the basis of their synchronous fluorescence spectra. The study demonstrated that this method is a valuable and promising technique for honey authentication.

  15. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with marine and botanical oils: influence on serum lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendzki, Barbara C; Leung, Katherine; Van Buskirk, Susan; Reed, George; Zurier, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    The gap in mortality between patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the general population (1.5-3.0 fold risk) is increasing. This disparity is attributable mainly to cardiovascular disease (CVD), as the CVD risk is comparable to patients with diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study is to determine whether borage seed oil rich in gamma-linolenic acid, fish oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or the combination of both oils are useful treatments for dyslipidemia in patients with RA. We randomized patients into a double blind, 18 month trial. Mixed effects models were used to compare trends over time in serum lipids. No significant differences were observed between the three groups: All three treatment groups exhibited similar meaningful improvement in the lipid profile at 9 and 18 months. When all groups were combined, these treatments significantly reduced total and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, increased HDL-cholesterol, and improved the atherogenic index. All improvements observed at 9 months persisted at 18 months (P botanical oils may be useful treatment for rheumatoid arthritis patients who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease compared to the general population.

  16. A general model for allometric covariation in botanical form and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Charles A; Enquist, Brian J; Savage, Van M

    2007-08-07

    The West, Brown, and Enquist (WBE) theory for the origin of allometric scaling laws is centered on the idea that the geometry of the vascular network governs how a suite of organismal traits covary with each other and, ultimately, how they scale with organism size. This core assumption has been combined with other secondary assumptions based on physiological constraints, such as minimizing the scaling of transport and biomechanical costs while maximally filling a volume. Together, these assumptions give predictions for specific "quarter-power" scaling exponents in biology. Here we provide a strong test of the core assumption of WBE by examining how well it holds when the secondary assumptions have been relaxed. Our relaxed version of WBE predicts that allometric exponents are highly constrained and covary according to specific quantitative functions. To test this core prediction, we assembled several botanical data sets with measures of the allometry of morphological traits. A wide variety of plant taxa appear to obey the predictions of the model. Our results (i) underscore the importance of network geometry in governing the variability and central tendency of biological exponents, (ii) support the hypothesis that selection has primarily acted to minimize the scaling of hydrodynamic resistance, and (iii) suggest that additional selection pressures for alternative branching geometries govern much of the observed covariation in biological scaling exponents. Understanding how selection shapes hierarchical branching networks provides a general framework for understanding the origin and covariation of many allometric traits within a complex integrated phenotype.

  17. Scientific basis of botanical medicine as alternative remedies for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cindy L H; Or, Terry C T; Ho, Marco H K; Lau, Allan S Y

    2013-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that causes permanent disability and mortality to approximately 1 to 100 people in the world. Patients with RA not only suffer from pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in their joints, but also have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and lymphoma. Typically prescribed medications, including pain-relieving drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, can help to relieve pain, reduce inflammation and slow the course of disease progression in RA patients. However, the general effectiveness of the drugs has been far from satisfactory. Other therapeutic modalities like TNF-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists targeting precise pathways within the immune system are expensive and may be associated with serious side effects. Recently, botanical medicines have become popular as alternative remedies as they are believed to be efficacious, safe and have over a thousand years experience in treating patients. In this review, we will summarize recent evidence for pharmacological effects of herbs including Black cohosh, Angelica sinensis, Licorice, Tripterygium wilfordii, Centella asiatica, and Urtica dioica. Scientific research has demonstrated that these herbs have strong anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. A wide range of phytochemicals including phenolic acids, phenylpropanoid ester, triterpene glycosides, phthalide, flavonoids, triterpenoid saponin, diterpene and triterpene have been isolated and demonstrated to be responsible for the biological effects of the herbs. Understanding the mechanisms of action of the herbs may provide new treatment opportunities for RA patients.

  18. Integration of botanicals and microbials for management of crop and human pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh Kumar, A; Murugan, K; Madhiyazhagan, P

    2013-01-01

    Insect pests inflict damage to humans, farm animals, and crops. Human and animal pests put more than 100 million people and 80 million cattle at risk worldwide. Plant pests are the main reason for destroying one fifth of the world's total crop production annually. Anopheles stephensi is the major vector of human malaria in Middle East and South Asian regions. Spodoptera litura is a polyphagous pest of vegetables and field crops. Because of its broad host range, this insect is also known as cluster caterpillar, common cutworm, cotton leafworm, tobacco cutworm, tobacco caterpillar, and tropical armyworm. The toxic effects of methanolic extract of Senna alata and microbial insecticide, Bacillus sphericus, were tested against the polyphagous crop pest, S. litura (Fab.), and the malarial vector, A. stephensi. Results from the present study states that B. sphericus is more toxic than S. alata to both the crop pest and mosquito. The malarial vector, A. stephensi, was found to be susceptible than the crop pest, S. litura. Both the botanical and microbial insecticide showed excellent larvicidal, pupicidal, longevity, fecundity, and growth regulatory activities. Median lethal concentrations of B. sphericus and methanolic extract of S. alata observed to kill the third instar of S. litura were 0.52 and 193.09 ppm and A. stephensi were 0.40 and 174.64 ppm, respectively.

  19. Flowering and Fruiting Times on Four Species of Annona (Annonaceae in Purwodadi Botanic Garden

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    Dewi Ayu Lestari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Annona is a genus belongs to Annonaceae family, consisting of numerous species that produce edible fruit. Four species namely A. glabra, A. montana, A. muricata and A. squamosa collections of Purwodadi Botanic Garden were recorded for its flowering and fruiting times, since November 2010 to April 2013. The data were scored and complemented with climate data (temperature, rainfall intensity, humidity then analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. The result showed that humidity was the most affected climate factors on the flowering and fruiting times of those species. Specifically, rainfall intensity (0-550 mm affected to Annona muricata, temperature (25,56-28,33°C and humidity (66,83-85,02% to Annona squamosa, and humidity to A. glabra (71,62-85,02% and A. montana (71,62 to 82,94 % as well. Flowering time of A. glabra occurs three times a year in wet and dry, and fruiting occurs twice a year in the same month. Annona muricata is flowering throughout the year and fruiting twice a year in wet. A. montana and A. squamosa recorded one a year during the wet month.

  20. Toxicology of a Peruvian botanical remedy to support healthy liver function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Hugh A; Sloley, B Duff; Cabanillas, José; Chiu, Andrea; Aung, Steven K H; Green, Francis H Y

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine the safety of a botanical treatment for supporting healthy liver function developed in Peru. The formulation, A4+, contains extracts of Curcuma longa L. rhizome (A4R), Cordia lutea Lam. flower (A4F) and Annona muricata L. leaf (A4L). The tests were used to support an application for a non-traditional Natural Health Product Licence from the Natural Health Product Directorate of Health Canada and future clinical trials. Besides reviewing the scientific and clinical information from Peru on the ingredients and conducting an initial Ames test for mutagenicity, we analysed A4+ for its chemical profile and tested genotoxicity (micronucleus test) and general toxicity (28-day repeated dose). A4+ and extracts from the three plants provided distinctive chemical fingerprints. A4L contained acetogenins, requiring a second chromatographic method to produce a specific fingerprint. The Ames test proved positive at the highest concentration (5,000 μg/mL) but A4+ showed no evidence of genotoxicity in the more specific mouse micronucleus test. The 28-day repeated dose (general toxicity) study in rats showed no toxicity at 2,000 mg/kg. We conclude that under the conditions of these studies, A4+ shows no evidence of toxicity at the levels indicated. A no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 2,000 mg/kg was assigned.

  1. Botanical and biological pesticides elicit a similar Induced Systemic Response in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretali, Luca; Bernardo, Letizia; Butterfield, Timothy S; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Natural pesticides have attracted substantial interest due to the increase in organic agriculture and enhanced attention to environmental pollution. Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) are applied for both disease control and growth enhancement; PGPBs are known to elicit Induced Systemic Response (ISR) in plants. However, less is known about the effect of botanical pesticides, such as the azadirachtin-containing neem extracts, on plant metabolism. This study aimed to investigate the effects of foliar application of the above-mentioned natural pesticides on the metabolic profiling of tomato. Leaf application of Bacillus subtilis fostered Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) in treated plants via the Jasmonic acid pathway, and enhanced production of secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, phytoalexins and auxins. Changes in sterols and terpenes, as well as an increase in glucosinolates were also observed. Interestingly, azadirachtin-treated tomatoes also showed an increase in ISR and our results revealed that most of the enriched metabolites are shared with a B. subtilis treatment, suggesting conserved biochemical responses. These (un)expected findings indicate that plants are not insensitive to application of natural pesticide and while Azadirachtin is applied as a direct pesticide, it also stimulates a defense response in tomatoes very similar to B. subtilis induced ISR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The botanical origin of kratom (Mitragyna speciosa; Rubiaceae) available as abused drugs in the Japanese markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawamura, Maiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Goda, Yukihiro

    2009-07-01

    Kratom is the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa (Rubiaceae). Recently, kratom has been sold in street shops or on the Internet in Japan for the purpose of abuse due to its opium-like effects. In this study, we investigated the botanical origin of the commercial kratom products using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis of rDNA in preparation for future regulation of this product. In addition, a previously reported method to authenticate the plant, utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was applied to the same products in order to estimate the method's accuracy and utility. The ITS sequence analysis of the commercial kratoms revealed that most of them were derived from M. speciosa or closely related plants, while the others were made from the same tribe plant as M. speciosa. The reported PCR-RFLP method could clearly distinguish kratoms from the other psychoactive plants available in the Japanese markets and also from related plants. The authentication method is considered to be useful for the practical regulation of the plant due to its wide range of application, high accuracy and simplicity.

  3. Determination of Botanical Origin of Propolis from Monte Region of Argentina by Histological and Chemical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasa, Ana; Mercadoc, María I; Zampini, Iris C; Ponessa, Graciela I; Isla, María I

    2016-05-01

    Propolis production by honey bees is the result of a selective harvest of exudates from plants in the neighborhood of the hive. This product is used in Argentina as a food supplement and alternative medicine. The aim of this study was to determine the botanical origin of propolis from the arid regions of Monte of Argentina using rapid histochemical techniques and by comparison of TLC and HPLC-DAD chromatographic profiles with extract profiles obtained from Zuccagnia punctata, Larrea divaricata and Larrea cuneifolia, plant species that grow in the study area as a natural community named "jarillal". Microscopical analysis revealed the presence of several Z. punctata structures, such as multicellular trichomes, leaflets, stems and young leaves. Remarkable was the richness of the propolis in two bioactive chalcones, also present in Z. punctata resin; these compounds can be regarded as possible markers for propolis identification and justify its use as a dietary supplement, functional food and medicinal product. This study indicates that the source of resin used by honey bees to produce propolis in the Monte region of Argentina is only Z. punctata, a native shrub widespread in this phytogeographical region, while other more abundant species (L. divaricata and L. cuneifolia) in the region were not found, indicating that this propolis could be defined as a mono-resin, type-Zuccagnia.

  4. Geophysical and botanical monitoring of simulated graves in a tropical rainforest, Colombia, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Carlos Martin; Pringle, Jamie K.; Saumett, Miguel; Evans, Gethin T.

    2016-12-01

    In most Latin American countries there are significant numbers of missing people and forced disappearances, currently 80,000 only in Colombia. Successful detection of shallow buried human remains by forensic search teams is currently difficult in varying terrain and climates. Within this research we built four simulated clandestine burial styles in tropical rainforests, as this is a common scenario and depositional environment encountered in Latin America, to gain knowledge of optimum forensic geophysics detection techniques. The results of geophysically monitoring these burials using ground penetrating radar, magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity are presented from one to forty three weeks post-burial. Radar survey results with both the 250 MHz and 500 MHz frequency antennae showed good detection of modern simulated burials on 2D profiles and horizontal time slices but poor detection on the other simulated graves. Magnetic susceptibility, bulk ground conductivity and electrical resistivity results were generally poor at detecting the simulated targets. Observations of botanical variations on the test site show rapid regrowth of Malvaceae and Petiveria alliacea vegetation over all burials that are common in these forests, which can make detection more difficult.

  5. Adsorption of hexavalent chromium on cationic cross-linked starches of different botanic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimaviciute, Rima; Bendoraitiene, Joana; Rutkaite, Ramune; Zemaitaitis, Algirdas

    2010-09-15

    The influence of origin of native starch used to obtain cationic cross-linked starch (CCS) on the adsorption of Cr(VI) onto CCS has been investigated. CCS granule size is influenced by the botanic source of native starch. The equilibrium adsorption of Cr(VI) onto CCS was described by the Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin models. The more equal the adsorption energy of the quaternary ammonium groups in CCS granule as indicated by low value of change of Temkin adsorption energy DeltaE(T) the greater amount of Cr(VI) was adsorbed onto CCS. The value of DeltaE(T) decreased and sorption capacity of CCS increased with the decrease of CCS granule size and with the increase of number of amorphous regions in CCS granules. The affinity of dichromate anions increases and adsorption proceeds more spontaneously when Cr(VI) is adsorbed onto more amorphous CCS. Adsorption process of Cr(VI) onto such CCS is more exothermic and order of system undergoes major changes during adsorption. After the adsorption on CCS Cr(VI) could be regenerated by incineration at temperature of 800 degrees C. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Contribution of the Heart of Borneo (HoB initiative towards botanical exploration in Sabah, Malaysia

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    Suzana Sabran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Heart of   Borneo (HoB declaration is a conservation agreement initiated by WWF and signed by three countries, i.e., Brunei       Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia in Bali, Indonesia on 12th February 2007 to protect more than 23 million hectares of forested region on Borneo Island. These forested areas could be well protected when conservation management plan is in place. One of the crucial activities to facilitate the planning and formulation of conservation plan is to conduct  scientific expeditions that include botanical exploration. The primary objective of the expedition is to identify the key conservation targets within the forest reserves. For the past five years, several expeditions have been conducted by the Sabah Forestry Department under the auspices of the HoB project to explore various forest reserves with conservation issues within the Heart of Borneo area. This paper will present the findings which include plant richness, endemism and plant conservation status in each forest reserves that has been explored. 

  7. Botanical and genetic characters of Erythrina × neillii cultivated in Egypt

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    Salma K. Gabr

    Full Text Available Abstract Erythrina × neillii Mabberley & Lorence, Fabaceae, is a sterile hybrid between E. herbacea L. and E. humeana Spreng. Nothing was traced about its genetic, macro and micromorphology. Therefore, it was deemed of interest to study its botanical characters, in addition to the DNA fingerprint to help in the identification of the plant. The anatomical characters of the old stem and its bark are characterized by the presence of cork cells, bast fibers and sclereids. Pericycle is sclerenchymatous forming crystal sheath. The epidermises of the leaf and young stem are characterized by the presence of anomocytic and paracytic stomata, non-glandular, unicellular and multicellular two armed hairs, and glandular club shaped hair. Calcium oxalate is present in the form of crystal sheath and prisms. Secretory cavities are distributed in the phloem and cortex. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was used as one of the molecular methods to differentiate between the samples of Erythrina. The DNA of Erythrina was extracted and analyzed using seven-mer random primers. Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA were recognized. This characterization allows certification of the authenticity of Erythrina × neillii, in order to provide quality control for the plant.

  8. Botanical, Pharmacological, Phytochemical, and Toxicological Aspects of the Antidiabetic Plant Bidens pilosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bidens pilosa L. is an easy-to-grow, widespread, and palatable perennial on earth. Hence, it has traditionally been used as foods and medicines without noticeable adverse effects. Despite significant advancement in chemical and biological studies of B. pilosa over the past few years, comprehensive and critical reviews on its anti-diabetic properties are missing. The present review is to summarize up-to-date information on the pharmacology, phytochemistry, and toxicology of B. pilosa, in regard to type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes from the literature. In addition to botanical studies and records of the traditional use of B. pilosa in diabetes, scientific studies investigating antidiabetic action of this species and its active phytochemicals are presented and discussed. The structure and biosynthesis of B. pilosa and its polyynes in relation to their anti-diabetic action and mechanism are emphasized. Although some progress has been made, rigorous efforts are further required to unlock the molecular basis and structure-activity relationship of the polyynes isolated from B. pilosa before their clinical applications. The present review provides preliminary information and gives guidance for further anti-diabetic research and development of this plant.

  9. Bidens pilosa L. (Asteraceae: Botanical Properties, Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene P. Bartolome

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 230 to 240 known Bidens species. Among them, Bidens pilosa is a representative perennial herb, globally distributed across temperate and tropical regions. B. pilosa has been traditionally used in foods and medicines without obvious adverse effects. Despite significant progress in phytochemical and biological analyses of B. pilosa over the past few years, comprehensive and critical reviews of this plant are anachronistic or relatively limited in scope. The present review aims to summarize up-to-date information on the phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of B. pilosa from the literature. In addition to botanical studies and records of the traditional use of B. pilosa in over 40 diseases, scientific studies investigating the potential medicinal uses of this species and its constituent phytochemicals for a variety of disorders are presented and discussed. The structure, bioactivity, and likely mechanisms of action of B. pilosa and its phytochemicals are emphasized. Although some progress has been made, further rigorous efforts are required to investigate the individual compounds isolated from B. pilosa to understand and validate its traditional uses and develop clinical applications. The present review provides preliminary information and gives guidance for further basic and clinical research into this plant.

  10. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae

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    Emily H. Kuhns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices.

  11. User Satisfaction Assessment To Edu-Eco Tourism Services Of Cibodas Botanical Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, I. W.; Winarni

    2017-10-01

    Cibodas Botanical Garden (CBG) is a government institution which has principal duties and functions as area of conservation ex situ of wet highland plants, research, education and tourism, it very closely related to aspect of the services to user. Good services will support the sustainability and existence of CBG as a world class edu-eco tourism destination. The purpose of this study was to measure the quality of services which delivered and improvement which necessary at the future. Assessments were made based on 14 criteria of services aspect for user which need research-education services and regular tourism services activities. The study was conducted by distributing questionnaires to users of these services. Questionnaires distribution was conducted in early August 2015 and August 2016, the respondents were 124 and 207. The results were showed the user satisfaction at good level, there were 77.685 in 2015 and 72.08 in 2016. Although still at a good level, there were a decline in satisfaction levels based on the value. In the future, the managerial needs to continuously to improve it, in order to get a good or very good valuation.

  12. The potentiality of botanicals and their products as an alternative to chemical insecticides to sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae): a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh, Diwakar Singh; Kumari, Seema; Kumar, Vijay; Das, Pradeep

    2014-03-01

    Use of chemical pesticides is the current method for controlling sandflies. However, resistance is being developed in sandflies against the insecticide of choice that is DDT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane). Botanicals have potential to act as an alternative to chemical insecticides as the crude extracts and active molecules of some plants show insecticidal effect to sandflies. This will lead to safe, easy and environment friendly method for control of sandflies. Therefore, information regarding botanicals acting as alternative to chemical insecticide against sandflies assumes importance in the context of development of resistance to insecticides as well as to prevent environment from contamination. This review deals with some plants and their products having repellent and insecticidal effect to sandflies in India and abroad. Different methods of extraction and their bioassay on sandflies have been emphasized in the text. Various extracts of some plants like Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), Solanum jasminoides (Solanaceae), Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae), Capparis spinosa (Capparidaceae), Acalypha fruticosa (Euphorbiaceae) and Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae) had shown repellent/insecticidal effect on sandflies. This review will be useful in conducting the research work to find out botanicals of Indian context having insecticidal effect on sandflies.

  13. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species.

  14. A Different Way to Stay in Touch with 'Urban Nature': The Perceived Restorative Qualities of Botanical Gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrus, Giuseppe; Scopelliti, Massimiliano; Panno, Angelo; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Colangelo, Giuseppe; Pirchio, Sabine; Ferrini, Francesco; Salbitano, Fabio; Agrimi, Mariagrazia; Portoghesi, Luigi; Semenzato, Paolo; Sanesi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Botanical gardens represent interesting arenas for research in environmental psychology and environment-behavior relations. They can be considered a very particular type of restorative environment and also have a relevant social function for the promotion of a more sustainable lifestyle in current societies. In this paper, we present a study assessing the relationship between the perceived restorativeness, the psychological and physical benefits experienced, and the subjective well-being reported by visitors of botanical gardens in four different cities in Italy (N = 127). As expected, a bootstrapping mediation model supported the idea that perceived restorativeness of botanical gardens significantly predicts visitors' subjective well-being, both directly and indirectly through perceived physical and psychological benefits of the visit. A moderation model also revealed that the relationship between restorativeness and well-being varies across respondents with different socio-demographic characteristics, being stronger for singles as compared to couples with and without children, respectively. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Antioxidant markers based TLC-DPPH differentiation on four commercialized botanical sources of Shankhpushpi (A Medhya Rasayana): A preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethiya, Neeraj K; Raja, M K Mohan Maruga; Mishra, Shri Hari

    2013-01-01

    Shankhpushpi is a cognition boosting traditional ayurvedic brain supplement. Convolvulus pluricaulis (Convolvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides (Convolvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea (Papilionaceae), and Canscora decussata (Gentianaceae) are botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi. This investigation is to focus the identification of the compound based on biological marker differentiation of four botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi for their antioxidant evaluation on thin layer chromatography (TLC) by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. A rapid TLC-DPPH method was developed to identify and differentiate four botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi in terms of presence of β-carotene, rutin, scopoletin, chlorogenic acid, and mangiferin. C. pluricaulis shows presence of scopoletin; E. alsinoides shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and chlorogenic acid; C. ternatea shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and rutin; and C. decussata shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and mangiferin. The order, they followed, based on their antioxidant potential is β-carotene < mangiferin < rutin < scopoletin < chlorogenic acid. Antioxidants are attributed for their beneficial role in age-related cognition decline. The proposed method provides an edge in terms of identification and quantification of antioxidant constituents in a multi-component system. This method may also provide application for identification of correct plant sources used in the name of Shankhpushpi in marketed ayurvedic formulation, food supplement, and extracts.

  16. Antioxidant markers based TLC-DPPH differentiation on four commercialized botanical sources of Shankhpushpi (A Medhya Rasayana: A preliminary assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K Sethiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Shankhpushpi is a cognition boosting traditional ayurvedic brain supplement. Convolvulus pluricaulis (Convolvulaceae, Evolvulus alsinoides (Convolvulaceae, Clitoria ternatea (Papilionaceae, and Canscora decussata (Gentianaceae are botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi. This investigation is to focus the identification of the compound based on biological marker differentiation of four botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi for their antioxidant evaluation on thin layer chromatography (TLC by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH method. A rapid TLC-DPPH method was developed to identify and differentiate four botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi in terms of presence of β-carotene, rutin, scopoletin, chlorogenic acid, and mangiferin. C. pluricaulis shows presence of scopoletin; E. alsinoides shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and chlorogenic acid; C. ternatea shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and rutin; and C. decussata shows presence of β-carotene, scopoletin, and mangiferin. The order, they followed, based on their antioxidant potential is β-carotene < mangiferin < rutin < scopoletin < chlorogenic acid. Antioxidants are attributed for their beneficial role in age-related cognition decline. The proposed method provides an edge in terms of identification and quantification of antioxidant constituents in a multi-component system. This method may also provide application for identification of correct plant sources used in the name of Shankhpushpi in marketed ayurvedic formulation, food supplement, and extracts.

  17. A Different Way to Stay in Touch with ‘Urban Nature’: The Perceived Restorative Qualities of Botanical Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrus, Giuseppe; Scopelliti, Massimiliano; Panno, Angelo; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Colangelo, Giuseppe; Pirchio, Sabine; Ferrini, Francesco; Salbitano, Fabio; Agrimi, Mariagrazia; Portoghesi, Luigi; Semenzato, Paolo; Sanesi, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Botanical gardens represent interesting arenas for research in environmental psychology and environment-behavior relations. They can be considered a very particular type of restorative environment and also have a relevant social function for the promotion of a more sustainable lifestyle in current societies. In this paper, we present a study assessing the relationship between the perceived restorativeness, the psychological and physical benefits experienced, and the subjective well-being reported by visitors of botanical gardens in four different cities in Italy (N = 127). As expected, a bootstrapping mediation model supported the idea that perceived restorativeness of botanical gardens significantly predicts visitors’ subjective well-being, both directly and indirectly through perceived physical and psychological benefits of the visit. A moderation model also revealed that the relationship between restorativeness and well-being varies across respondents with different socio-demographic characteristics, being stronger for singles as compared to couples with and without children, respectively. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:28620335

  18. The interplay between yam (Dioscorea sp.) starch botanical source, micromeritics and functionality in paracetamol granules for reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Cliff K; Adebayo, Sarafadeen A; Wheatley, Andrew O; Asemota, Helen N

    2008-09-01

    A comparative investigation of the interplay between starch botanical source, micromeritics and their functionality in formulated paediatric paracetamol granules for reconstitution was conducted using starches extracted from five local yam (Dioscorea spp.) species. Significant differences were observed in the physicochemical properties of the different starches studied (pparacetamol dissolution correlated well with the physicochemical properties of the starches. Granules formulated with Chinese yam and Bitter yam starches showed the fastest rate of paracetamol dissolution with T(80) of 2.2 and 2.6 min, respectively, at 2.5%w/w, and 3.75 and 4.00 min, respectively, at 10% w/w binder concentrations. Those formulated with Round leaf yellow yam starch had the slowest dissolution rate with T(80) of 4.5 and 8.75 min, respectively, at 2.5% and 10% binder concentrations. The results generally indicate a significant dependence of the rate of paracetamol dissolution from granules on starch surface tension, viscosity, swelling power and water binding capacity, particle size distribution, specific surface and porosity. These, in turn, were found to be starch botanic source-dependent suggesting careful consideration of botanic source when substituting one starch product for another in granule formulation.

  19. Characterization and comparison of phenolic composition, antioxidant capacity and instrumental taste profile of juices from different botanical origins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granato, D.; Karnopp, A.R.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The European Union registered a consumption of about 10.7 billion litres of juices in 2011 and a great part of this amount is imported from other countries, which makes the monitoring of their quality essential. This work was aimed at mapping the quality of various juices from different

  20. Research highlights from the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research for Women’s Health: Black cohosh from the field to the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Norman R; Mahady, Gail B.

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy at the College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois (UIC) at Chicago was funded to establish a Botanical Dietary Supplements Research Center from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The emphasis of the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research (CBDSR) is botanical dietary supplements (BDS) for women's health. Center’s research has focused on BDS that may improve women's health and quality of life, specifically in the areas of menopause, premenstrual syndrome, and persistent urinary tract infections. Center investigators have overcome many challenges associated with botanical dietary supplements research, including acquiring and identifying plant species for investigation, isolating and identifying active constituents, elucidating the mechanisms of action of these botanicals, and conducting phase I and phase II clinical studies. Black cohosh [Actaea racemosa L. (Ranunculaceae)] has been used as a model to illustrate the steps involved in taking a botanical dietary supplement from the field, all the way to clinical trials. Bioassays are described that were necessary to elucidate the pertinent biological studies of plant extracts and their mechanisms of action. The Center has used an innovative multidisciplinary approach to this type of research, and thus has been very successful in fulfilling its specific aims. PMID:20161501

  1. Evaluation of n-alkanes and their carbon isotope enrichments (d13C) as diet composition markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derseh, M.B.; Pellikaan, W.F.; Tolera, A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Plant cuticular n-alkanes have been successfully used as markers to estimate diet composition and intake of grazing herbivores. However, additional markers may be required under grazing conditions in botanically diverse vegetation. This study was conducted to describe the n-alkane profiles and the

  2. Identification and Analysis of the Active Phytochemicals from the Anti-Cancer Botanical Extract Bezielle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Vivian; Staub, Richard E.; Baggett, Scott; Chimmani, Ramesh; Tagliaferri, Mary; Cohen, Isaac; Shtivelman, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Bezielle is a botanical extract that has selective anti-tumor activity, and has shown a promising efficacy in the early phases of clinical testing. Bezielle inhibits mitochondrial respiration and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria of tumor cells but not in non-transformed cells. The generation of high ROS in tumor cells leads to heavy DNA damage and hyper-activation of PARP, followed by the inhibition of glycolysis. Bezielle therefore belongs to a group of drugs that target tumor cell mitochondria, but its cytotoxicity involves inhibition of both cellular energy producing pathways. We found that the cytotoxic activity of the Bezielle extract in vitro co-purified with a defined fraction containing multiple flavonoids. We have isolated several of these Bezielle flavonoids, and examined their possible roles in the selective anti-tumor cytotoxicity of Bezielle. Our results support the hypothesis that a major Scutellaria flavonoid, scutellarein, possesses many if not all of the biologically relevant properties of the total extract. Like Bezielle, scutellarein induced increasing levels of ROS of mitochondrial origin, progressive DNA damage, protein oxidation, depletion of reduced glutathione and ATP, and suppression of both OXPHOS and glycolysis. Like Bezielle, scutellarein was selectively cytotoxic towards cancer cells. Carthamidin, a flavonone found in Bezielle, also induced DNA damage and oxidative cell death. Two well known plant flavonoids, apigenin and luteolin, had limited and not selective cytotoxicity that did not depend on their pro-oxidant activities. We also provide evidence that the cytotoxicity of scutellarein was increased when other Bezielle flavonoids, not necessarily highly cytotoxic or selective on their own, were present. This indicates that the activity of total Bezielle extract might depend on a combination of several different compounds present within it. PMID:22272282

  3. Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight & Arn. (Jivanti): Botanical, Agronomical, Phytochemical, Pharmacological, and Biotechnological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sudipta Kumar; Swamy, Mallappa Kumara; Sinniah, Uma Rani; Anuradha, Maniyam

    2017-06-19

    Leptadenia reticulata (Retz.) Wight & Arn. (Apocynaceae), is a traditional medicinal plant species widely used to treat various ailments such as tuberculosis, hematopoiesis, emaciation, cough, dyspnea, fever, burning sensation, night blindness, cancer, and dysentery. In Ayurveda, it is known for its revitalizing, rejuvenating, and lactogenic properties. This plant is one of the major ingredients in many commercial herbal formulations, including Speman, Envirocare, Calshakti, Antisept, and Chyawanprash. The therapeutic potential of this herb is because of the presence of diverse bioactive compounds such as α-amyrin, β-amyrin, ferulic acid, luteolin, diosmetin, rutin, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, hentricontanol, a triterpene alcohol simiarenol, apigenin, reticulin, deniculatin, and leptaculatin. However, most biological studies on L. reticulata are restricted to crude extracts, and many biologically active compounds are yet to be identified in order to base the traditional uses of L. reticulata on evidence-based data. At present, L. reticulata is a threatened endangered plant because of overexploitation, unscientific harvesting, and habitat loss. The increased demand from pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and veterinary industries has prompted its large-scale propagation. However, its commercial cultivation is hampered because of the non-availability of genuine planting material and the lack of knowledge about its agronomical practices. In this regard, micropropagation techniques will be useful to obtain true-to-type L. reticulata planting materials from an elite germplasm to meet the current demand. Adopting other biotechnological approaches such as synthetic seed technology, cryopreservation, cell culture, and genetic transformation can help conservation as well as increased metabolite production from L. reticulata. The present review summarizes scientific information on the botanical, agronomical, phytochemical, pharmacological, and biotechnological aspects of L

  4. Leptadenia reticulata (Retz. Wight & Arn. (Jivanti: Botanical, Agronomical, Phytochemical, Pharmacological, and Biotechnological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Kumar Mohanty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Leptadenia reticulata (Retz. Wight & Arn. (Apocynaceae, is a traditional medicinal plant species widely used to treat various ailments such as tuberculosis, hematopoiesis, emaciation, cough, dyspnea, fever, burning sensation, night blindness, cancer, and dysentery. In Ayurveda, it is known for its revitalizing, rejuvenating, and lactogenic properties. This plant is one of the major ingredients in many commercial herbal formulations, including Speman, Envirocare, Calshakti, Antisept, and Chyawanprash. The therapeutic potential of this herb is because of the presence of diverse bioactive compounds such as α-amyrin, β-amyrin, ferulic acid, luteolin, diosmetin, rutin, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, hentricontanol, a triterpene alcohol simiarenol, apigenin, reticulin, deniculatin, and leptaculatin. However, most biological studies on L. reticulata are restricted to crude extracts, and many biologically active compounds are yet to be identified in order to base the traditional uses of L. reticulata on evidence-based data. At present, L. reticulata is a threatened endangered plant because of overexploitation, unscientific harvesting, and habitat loss. The increased demand from pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and veterinary industries has prompted its large-scale propagation. However, its commercial cultivation is hampered because of the non-availability of genuine planting material and the lack of knowledge about its agronomical practices. In this regard, micropropagation techniques will be useful to obtain true-to-type L. reticulata planting materials from an elite germplasm to meet the current demand. Adopting other biotechnological approaches such as synthetic seed technology, cryopreservation, cell culture, and genetic transformation can help conservation as well as increased metabolite production from L. reticulata. The present review summarizes scientific information on the botanical, agronomical, phytochemical, pharmacological, and

  5. The botanical content in the South African curriculum: A barren desert or a thriving forest?

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    Amelia L. Abrie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Botanists who are interested in education have often expressed their dismay at how plant sciences are neglected in Biology curricula, despite the important roles that plants play. While botanists in several overseas countries have studied the ways in which plant sciences are represented in curricula, no research has been done on how botany is neglected in the South African curriculum. Currently, the South African curriculum is known as the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS for Grades R–12. In this study, a comparison was made among the content that is generally taught in introductory plant sciences courses, the American Society of Plant Biologists’ principles for plant biology education and the relevant CAPS documents. The time spent on plant, animal or human-focused content was established and compared at both phase and grade level. It was found that while the curriculum addresses all the major concepts in the plant sciences, very little time was being allocated to exclusively plant-focused content as compared to animal and human-focused content. This neglect was particularly prevalent in the Foundation Phase. The way in which the content is structured and presented in the curriculum may in all likelihood not be sufficient to provide a strong knowledge and skills foundation in the plant sciences, nor will it encourage the development of positive values towards plants. While consensus regarding the content of a curriculum will be difficult to achieve, awareness of potential gaps in the curriculum should be brought to the attention of the botanical and educational communities.

  6. The botanical legacy of Thomas Hardwicke’s journey to Srinagar in 1796

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    Ian M. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1796, Thomas Hardwicke travelled through northern India between what is now Fatehgarh in Uttar Pradesh and Srinagar in Uttarakhand. Hardwicke collected and described plants encountered and had many of the plants illustrated from life. He published an account of the journey in 1799 including a list of plant species. I review the names validated in the original paper, and also those published subsequently by Sir James Edward Smith and William Roxburgh based partly or wholly on the material or drawings acquired by Hardwicke on the journey to Srinagar. The large collection of Hardwicke plant drawings now held in the British Library, and a smaller set in the Botany Library of the Natural History Museum, are considered in relation to the application and typification of plant names related to Hardwicke’s botanical exploration in India. The names of seven plant species were validly published in the 1799 paper (Androsace rotundifolia Hardw., Ficus laminosa Hardw., Justicia thyrsiformis Roxb. ex Hardw., Linum trigynum Roxb. ex Hardw., Lonicera quinquelocularis Hardw., Salvia integrifolia Roxb. ex Hardw. and Volkameria bicolor Hardw., plus one new combination (Echites antidysentericus (L. Roxb. ex Hardw.. As concluded by Britten more than a century ago, Ficus laminosa is the correct name for the fig variously referred to F. saemocarpa Miq. or F. squamosa Roxb. Smith based Rhododendron arboreum Sm. and Bignonia undulata Sm. on Hardwicke plants. At least a dozen Roxburgh names, including Crataegus integrifolia Roxb., Gardenia tetrasperma Roxb. and Morus serrata Roxb., are based, at least partly, on Hardwicke’s collections. In total, 23 names are lectotypified here and one neotype is designated.

  7. Resins and gums in historical iatrosophia texts from Cyprus - a botanical and medico-pharmacological approach

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    Andreas eLardos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores historical iatrosophia texts from Cyprus from a botanical and medico-pharmacological point of view focusing on remedies containing resins and gums. The iatrosophia are a genre of Greek medical literature of Byzantine origin and can be described as medicine handbooks which serve as therapeutic repositories containing recipes or advice. To extract and analyse information on plant usage in such sources – which are largely unedited texts and so far have not been translated – we investigate i the relationship of the iatrosophia to Dioscorides' De Materia Medica as well as historic pharmaceutical books or standard texts on modern phytotherapy and ii the validity of the remedies by comparing them to modern scientific data on reported biological activities. In the six texts investigated 27 substances incorporating plant exudates are mentioned. They are obtained from over 43 taxa of higher plants and in particular are used to treat dermatological, gastrointestinal and respiratory tract conditions. The comparison to historic pharmaceutical books and phytotherapy texts reflects the gradual decline of the use of plant exudates in Western medicine. While remarkable parallels to Dioscorides’ text exist, the non-Dioscoridean influence suggests a complex pattern of knowledge exchange. Overall, this resulted in an integration of knowledge from so far poorly understood sources. The comparison with bioscientific data reveals a fragmentary picture and highlights the potential of these unexplored substances and their uses. Where relevant bioscientific data are available, we generally found a confirmation. This points to a largely rational use of the associated remedies. Taken together, the iatrosophia are a valuable resource for ethnopharmacological and natural product research. Most importantly they contribute to the understanding of the development of herbal medicines in the (Eastern Mediterranean and Europe.

  8. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  9. Preserving Traditional Botanical Knowledge: The Importance of Phytogeographic and Ethnobotanical Inventory of Peruvian Dye Plants

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    José Mostacero León

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Peru is a megadiverse country with native species of all kinds, including dye plants, which have been used for hundreds of years by the local population. Despite the fact that many of these natural dyes are of a superior quality compared to synthetic ones and do not have the harmful effects that the latter may cause to human health, due to the lack of documentation and dissemination, ethnobotanical knowledge is unfortunately being lost with the passing of generations. In order to preserve and spread such valuable knowledge, this study conducted a comprehensive taxonomic, phytogeographic, and ethnobotanical inventory of dye plants based on periodical botanical explorations in selected locations of Northern Peru during the span of two decades. A critical review of the specialized bibliography was then carried out and the findings were verified with the personal knowledge and experience of both the researchers and the local and regional people. The results of the inventory record 32 species of dye plants from Northern Peru distributed in 22 families, of which the following stand out due to the number of species: Fabaceae (5, Anacardiaceae (2, Annonaceae (2, Asteraceae (2, Berberidaceae (2, Rosaceae (2, and Solanaceae (2. Of the 32 dye species identified, four are considered endemic from Peru: Berberis buceronis J.F. Macbr., Caesalpinia paipai Ruiz & Pav., Coreopsis senaria S.F. Blake & Sherf., and Lomatia hirsuta (Lam. Diels. The study also found that species such as Bixa orellana L., Indigofera suffruticosa Mill., Sambucus peruviana, and the lichen Usnea baileyi (Stirton Zahlbr have not been commercially exploited in Peru despite the fact that they already constitute a great economic source for several countries.

  10. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden ( n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  11. INVASIVE WEEDS IN BOGOR BOTANIC GARDENS, INDONESIA AND ITS IMPLICATION ON SURROUNDING LANDSCAPES

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    Edi Santosa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation areas with the objective for collection and exchange plant materials have been speculated as weed bank for surrounding areas. Objective of this study was to identify and characterize ruderal invasive weeds in the Bogor Botanic Gardens (BBG. Observations were conducted in all vak (collection blocks in the BBG in order to identify the weeds species, determine their invasiveness, dominance and distribution. Weeds associations with host plants were observed. Current weed control program and data of dead trees collection were analyzed in relevant to weed. Distribution of weeds outside BBG was observed by transects method following river and road directions. Results showed that there were seven invasive weeds, i.e., Cecropia adenopus (Cecropiaceae, Cissus nodosa Blume (Vitaceae, Cissus sicyoides Blume (Vitaceae, Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae, Ficus elastica Roxb. (Moraceae, Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Paraserianthes falcataria (L. Nielsen (Fabaceae. These seven weeds species invaded 41 out of 215 plant families in BBG. Six species of weeds, i.e., C. adenopus, C. nodosa Blume., C. sicyoides Blume., D. bulbifera L., M. micrantha H.B.K. and P. falcataria (L. Nielsen, were introduced as BBG collections for the first time while the F. elastica Roxb was considered as native. It is most likely that the weeds dispersal agents are the wind, birds, bats, visitors, and waters. All of these weeds existed in surrounding areas outside BBG. Given the detrimental impact of invasive weeds on the plant collection in BBG, it is necessary to develop long–term comprehensive control measures both inside and neighboring areas by involving other government authorities beyond BBG.

  12. Recommendations for Development of Botanical Polyphenols as "Natural Drugs" for Promotion of Resilience Against Stress-Induced Depression and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Libby; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-09-01

    Extensive evidence has demonstrated that psychological stress has detrimental effects on psychological health, cognitive function, and ultimately well-being. While stressful events are a significant cause of psychopathology, most individuals exposed to adversity maintain normal psychological functioning. The mechanisms underlying such resilience are poorly understood, and there is an urgent need to identify and target these mechanisms to promote resilience under stressful events. Botanicals have been used throughout history to treat various medical conditions; however, the development of botanical compounds into potential preventative and therapeutic agents in studies promoting brain health is hindered by the fact that most orally consumed botanicals are extensively metabolized during absorption and/or by post-absorptive xenobiotic metabolism. Therefore, the primary objective of this review article is to provide recommendations for developing natural compounds as novel therapeutic strategies to promote resilience in susceptible subjects. The development of botanical polyphenols to ultimately attenuate mood disorders and cognitive impairment will rely on understanding (1) the absorption and bioavailability of botanical polyphenols with emphasis on flavan-3-ols, (2) the characterization of tissue-specific accumulation of biologically available polyphenols and their mechanisms of action in the brain, and eventually (3) the characterization of biologically available polyphenol metabolites in mechanisms associated with the promotion of resilience against mood disorders and cognitive impairment in response to stress. We also summarize exciting new lines of investigation about the role of botanicals such as polyphenols in the promotion of cognitive and psychological resilience. This information will provide a strategical framework for the future development of botanicals as therapeutic agents to promote resilience, ultimately preventing and/or therapeutically treating

  13. Recommendations for Development of Botanical Polyphenols as “Natural Drugs” for Promotion of Resilience Against Stress-Induced Depression and Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Libby; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence has demonstrated that psychological stress has detrimental effects on psychological health, cognitive function, and ultimately well-being. While stressful events are a significant cause of psychopathology, most individuals exposed to adversity maintain normal psychological functioning. The mechanisms underlying such resilience are poorly understood, and there is an urgent need to identify and target these mechanisms to promote resilience under stressful events. Botanicals have been used throughout history to treat various medical conditions; however, the development of botanical compounds into potential preventative and therapeutic agents in studies promoting brain health is hindered by the fact that most orally consumed botanicals are extensively metabolized during absorption and/or by post-absorptive xenobiotic metabolism. Therefore, the primary objective of this review article is to provide recommendations for developing natural compounds as novel therapeutic strategies to promote resilience in susceptible subjects. The development of botanical polyphenols to ultimately attenuate mood disorders and cognitive impairment will rely on understanding (1) the absorption and bioavailability of botanical polyphenols with emphasis on flavan-3-ols, (2) the characterization of tissue specific accumulation of biologically available polyphenols and their mechanisms of action in the brain, and eventually (3) the characterization of biologically available polyphenol metabolites in mechanisms associated with the promotion of resilience against mood disorders and cognitive impairment in response to stress. We also summarize exciting new lines of investigation about the role of botanicals such as polyphenols in the promotion of cognitive and psychological resilience. This information will provide a strategical framework for the future development of botanicals as therapeutic agents to promote resilience, ultimately preventing and/or therapeutically treating

  14. Horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.; hemiptera: cimicidae.

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    Yasmin Akhtar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal transfer of insecticide occurs when insects contact or ingest an insecticide, return to an aggregation or a nest, and transfer the insecticide to other conspecific insects through contact. This phenomenon has been reported in a number of insects including social insects, however it has not been reported in bed bugs. Since horizontal transfer can facilitate the spread of insecticide into hard to reach spaces, it could contribute greatly to the management of these public health pests. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: To demonstrate horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in C. lectularius, an exposed (donor bed bug, following a 10-minute acquisition period, was placed with unexposed (recipient bed bugs. Mortality data clearly demonstrates that diatomaceous earth (DE 51 was actively transferred from a single exposed bug to unexposed bugs in a concentration dependent manner. LC50 values varied from 24.4 mg at 48 h to 5.1 mg at 216 h when a single exposed bed bug was placed with 5 unexposed bed bugs. LT50 values also exhibited a concentration response. LT50 values varied from 1.8 days to 8.4 days when a 'donor' bug exposed to 20 and 5 mg of dust respectively was placed with 5 'recipient' bugs. Dust was also actively transferred from adult bed bugs to the nymphs. In addition we observed horizontal transfer of botanical insecticides including neem, ryania, and rotenone to varying degrees. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data clearly demonstrate horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in the common bed bug, C. lectularius. Use of a fluorescent dust provided visual confirmation that contaminated bed bugs transfer dust to untreated bed bugs in harborage. This result is important because bedbugs live in hard-to-reach places and interaction between conspecifics can be exploited for delivery and dissemination of management products directed at this public health pest.

  15. Effect of picung (Pangium edule plant extracts as a botanical pesticide on mortality of coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei

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    soekadar wiryadiputra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee pests known as coffe berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei were main pests which decreasing the productivity of Indonesian coffee. One of pests controlling was done by insecticides. Generally, plant uses for insecticide show high security level, because the breaking molecule was easy as not dangerous compound. Pangium edule contains of flavanoide, cyanide acid and saponin had potential as an botanical insecticide. The purpose of this research was to prove the potential extract of seed and leaves of picung (Pangium edule as an botanical insecticide for CBB. This research used a complete random design. There were 8 treatments with the concentration of the extract from leaves and seed of picung, one positive control treatment (Carbaril 0,02% formulation and one negative control treatment (aquades. The treatment was repeated four times and carried out observation on every day until six days. The concentrations leaf and seed extracts were 1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0%. The result of the research show that between concentration applied the were no significant different and at observation six days after application the mortality of CBB only around 35 -40% on both extracts (ewater and methanol. The result of the research also show that there were no real differentiation between leaves and seed of picung. LT-50 values were 1.25% and 0.96%, for leaves and seed extract in water for six day observation. From this observation could be concluded that picung tree (Pangium edule is not effective in the controlling CBB in the interval concentration applied and extraction method used. Key words: Botanical pesticide, picung tree, Pangium edule, mortality, Hypothenemus hampei, water extraction, methanol extraction.

  16. The results of experimental studies on the cultivation of species of southern origin in the Botanical Garden PetrSU

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    Falin Aleksey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The results have been given an experimental cultivation plants of southern areas (21 species. Species were tested in the Botanic garden of PetrSU (61 ° 50'57 "N, 34 ° 19'54" ° E. Two species belongs to USDA Hardiness Zones (HZ 3 and higher; 7 species - HZ 4 and higher; 11 species - HZ 5 and higher; 1 species - HZ 6 and higher. Some ones from HZ 5 (namely: Actinidia kolomikta (Rupr. & Maxim. Maxim.; Catalpa bignonioides Walter; Morus nigra L. are fruiting.

  17. ECONOMIC VALUE OF SOME LEGUMINOUS PLANT SPECIES OF THE COLLECTIONS FROM THE BOTANICAL GARDEN (INSTITUTE OF THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF MOLDOVA

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    Alexandru TELEUTA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the evaluation of the growth and development rates, the seed productivity, the green mass yield, the biochemical composition and the content of amino acids, phosphorous and calcium, the nutritive and energy value of the forage, as well as the biomethane productivity of local ecotypes of the leguminous species maintained in monoculture, in the collection of the Botanical Garden (Institute of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (BG ASM: Astragalus ponticus, Coronilla varia, Lotus corniculatus, Medicago falcata, Onobrychis arenaria and Trifolium repens are presented in this article. Control variants – the traditional forage crops: Medicago sativa and Onobrychis viciifolia. The local ecotypes of the studied leguminous species were characterized by different growth and development rates. Coronilla varia and Lotus corniculatus, in the 2nd-3rd years, could be harvested, for the first time, 5 days earlier than Medicago sativa, but Medicago falcata and Onobrychis viciifolia – 18 days later. The green mass yield varied from 0.83 kg/m2 to 4.08 kg/m2. The studied ecotypes reached amounts of 0.60-0.89 nutritive units/kg and metabolizable energy 8.05-9.90 MJ/kg of dry matter, the content of digestible protein, of 106.28-225.09 g/nutritive unit, met the zootechnical standards; seed production: 19.12-83.00 g/m2; the biomethane yield ranged from 692 to 3197 m3/ha. Higher yield of natural forage, dry matter and biomethane was produced by Onobrychis arenaria and Coronilla varia.

  18. Adjunctive treatment with oral AKL1, a botanical nutraceutical, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockwell, Claire; Ampikaipakan, Sundari; Sexton, Darren W; Price, David; Freeman, Daryl; Thomas, Mike; Ali, Muzammil; Wilson, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this pilot trial was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AKL1, a patented botanical formulation containing extracts of Picrorhiza kurroa, Ginkgo biloba, and Zingiber officinale, as add-on therapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cough. Patients and methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled male and female patients >18 years old with COPD and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) score of <18. The 10-week study period comprised a 2-week single-blind placebo run-in period followed by add-on treatment with AKL1 or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks. The primary study endpoint was the change from week 0 to week 8 in cough-related health status, as assessed by the LCQ. Results Of 33 patients enrolled, 20 were randomized to AKL1 and 13 to placebo. Patients included 19 (58%) men and 14 (42%) women of mean (standard deviation [SD]) age of 67 (9.4) years; 15 (45%) patients were smokers and 16 (49%) were ex-smokers. The mean (SD) change from baseline in LCQ score at 8 weeks was 2.3 (4.9) in the AKL1 group and 0.6 (3.7) in the placebo group, with mean difference in change of 1.8 (95% confidence interval: −1.5 to 5.1; P=0.28). The St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire score improved substantially in the AKL1 treatment group by a mean (SD) of −7.7 (11.7) versus worsening in the placebo group (+1.5 [9.3]), with mean difference in change of −9.2 (95% confidence interval: −19.0 to 0.6; P=0.064). There were no significant differences between treatment groups in change from baseline to week 8 in other patient-reported measures, lung function, or the 6-minute walk distance. Conclusion Further study is needed with a larger patient population and over a longer duration to better assess the effects of add-on therapy with AKL1 in COPD. PMID:25031533

  19. Resilience at the border: traditional botanical knowledge among Macedonians and Albanians living in Gollobordo, Eastern Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieroni, Andrea; Cianfaglione, Kevin; Nedelcheva, Anely; Hajdari, Avni; Mustafa, Behxhet; Quave, Cassandra L

    2014-03-31

    Ethnobotany in South-Eastern Europe is gaining the interest of several scholars and stakeholders, since it is increasingly considered a key point for the re-evaluation of local bio-cultural heritage. The region of Gollobordo, located in Eastern Albania and bordering the Republic of Macedonia, is of particular interest for conducting ethnobiological studies, since it remained relatively isolated for the larger part of the 20th Century and is traditionally inhabited by a majority of ethnic Macedonians and a minority of Albanians (nowadays both sharing the Muslim faith). An ethnobotanical survey focused on local food, medicinal, and veterinary plant uses was conducted with 58 participants using open and semi-structured interviews and via participant observation. We recorded and identified 115 taxa of vascular plants, which are locally used for food, medicinal, and veterinary purposes (representing 268 total plant reports). The Macedonian Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) was greater than the Albanian TEK, especially in the herbal and ritual domains. This phenomenon may be linked to the long socio-cultural and linguistic isolation of this group during the time when the borders between Albania and the former Yugoslavia were completely closed. Moreover, the unusual current food utilisation of cooked potatoes leaves, still in use nowadays among Macedonians, could represent the side effect of an extreme adaptation that locals underwent over the past century when the introduction of the potato crop made new strategies available for establishing stable settlements around the highest pastures. Additionally, the difference in use of Helichrysum plicatum, which is popular in the local Macedonian folk medicine but absent among Albanians, confirms the particular significance of this taxon as it relates to the yellow colour of its flowers in South Slavic folklore. Botanical studies with an ethnographic approach are crucial for understanding patterns of use of plants within

  20. Impact of dietary organic acids and botanicals on intestinal integrity and inflammation in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Ester; Tugnoli, Benedetta; Passey, Jade L; Stahl, Chad H; Piva, Andrea; Moeser, Adam J

    2015-04-16

    Organic acids, such as citric and sorbic acid, and pure plant-derived constituents, like monoterpens and aldehydes, have a long history of use in pig feeding as alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. However, their effects on the intestinal barrier function and inflammation have never been investigated. Therefore, aim of this study was to assess the impact of a microencapsulated mixture of citric acid and sorbic acid (OA) and pure botanicals, namely thymol and vanillin, (PB) on the intestinal integrity and functionality of weaned pigs and in vitro on Caco-2 cells. In the first study 20 piglets were divided in 2 groups and received either a basal diet or the basal diet supplemented with OA + PB (5 g/kg) for 2 weeks post-weaning at the end of which ileum and jejunum samples were collected for Ussing chambers analysis of trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TER), intermittent short-circuit current (I SC), and dextran flux. Scrapings of ileum mucosa were also collected for cytokine analysis (n = 6). In the second study we measured the effect of these compounds directly on TER and permeability of Caco-2 monolayers treated with either 0.2 or 1 g/l of OA + PB. Pigs fed with OA + PB tended to have reduced I SC in the ileum (P = 0.07) and the ileal gene expression of IL-12, TGF-β, and IL-6 was down regulated. In the in vitro study on Caco-2 cells, TER was increased by the supplementation of 0.2 g/l at 4, 6, and 14 days of the experiment, whereas 1 g/l increased TER at 10 and 12 days of treatment (P < 0.05). Dextran flux was not significantly affected though a decrease was observed at 7 and 14 days (P = 0.10 and P = 0.09, respectively). Overall, considering the results from both experiments, OA + PB improved the maturation of the intestinal mucosa by modulating the local and systemic inflammatory pressure ultimately resulting in a less permeable intestine, and eventually improving the growth of piglets prematurely weaned.

  1. Studies on the lipophilicity of vehicles (or co-vehicles) and botanical oils used in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, C J

    2007-05-01

    The lipophilic character of five vehicles (or co-vehicles): diethylhexylmaleate, dimethicone, light mineral oil, octyldodecanol and oleyl alcohol and eight botanical oils: Aloe vera oil, coconut oil, extra virgin olive oil, grape leaf oil, grape seed oil, hazelnut oil, jojoba oil and safflower oil was determined by partitioning esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (parabens) between them and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The results were compared to those obtained with 1-octanol. The most lipophilic effects were observed with octyldodecanol and oleyl alcohol for the vehicles (or co-vehicles), coconut oil, jojoba oil and safflower oil for botanical oils. Light mineral oil showed the least lipophilic effect. With butylparaben, it was observed that oleyl alcohol, octyldodecanol, coconut oil and jojoba oil were 0.94, 0.91, 0.74 and 0.68 times as lipophilic as 1-octanol respectively. The study indicates that octyldodecanol and oleyl alcohol could be good substitutes for 1-octanol in partition coefficient determination. The estimated permeability coefficients of the parabens suggest that octyldodecanol, oleyl alcohol, coconut oil and jojoba oil could be potential dermal permeation enhancers.

  2. Rosa x odorata “viridiflora” (green rose in Bali Botanical Garden: biological phenology and its propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSTAID SIREGAR

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Rosa x odorata “viridiflora” (green rose was one of rose collection in Bali Botanical Garden. This shrub had shiny, dark green leaves and sprays of rossete-shaped, double flowers, 4-5 cm across, green ageing to purplish green, with narrow petals that resemble sepals. Phenology flower research was begin from the growth phase and the development until the flower was fall, every phase was identified with one or more changing. Vegetative reproduction should take over for propagation purpose. Vegetative propagation was done by cutting about 15 cm long and 0.8-1.0 cm diameter. The study was carried out in the greenhouse of Bali Botanic Garden by using Completely Randomized Design with 5 treatments: rootone F powder, atonik 1 mL/L, atonik 2 mL/L, IBA 1 mg/L, NAA 1 mg/L and control. Each treatment was done 3 replication had 5 pieces of cutting. The result of research indicated that cutting more responsive to rootone F with highest cutting persentage (66,67%, highest to buds (25 days after planting and to fast flowering (147 days after planting. Green rose is one of more flowers is not interested by pollinator insect.

  3. [Botanical journey of Josef A. Knapp in Galicia as a part of exploration of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokińska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Josef Armin Knapp (1843-1899) as Austrian botanist was interested in development of botanical knowledge of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy--his maternal country. Monarchy, during the long regency of emperor Franz Josef I, was multinational, very much diversified geographically territory. This large empire had included, among others, such countries as present Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Ukraine, Romania and the southern part of present Poland--previously known as Galicia. J. A. Knapp was interested in studying these parts of empire which were considered peripheries and less-known. It seems to have met the requirements of science, economy and administration of Vienna. J. A. Knapp in his large floristic researches had included explorations of considerable part of the Monarchy and had left an interesting scientific legacy. His research papers were results of botanical explorations in selected areas of the Monarchy--area of Nitra (currently a city in Slovakia), Slavonia (presently a land in Croatia) and Galicia (the historical area in the south of Poland). This article refers to the botanical journey of J. A. Knapp in Galicia in summer 1868. The main purpose of his journey was to visit and explore selected places in Galicia--the surroundings of Jaslo and Sanok towns and some specific areas within the Bieszczady Mountains, which are part of the Carpathians Mountains. Botanical researches in the Bieszczady Mountains provided by J. A. Knapp can be considered nowadays as very important and pioneering in that area. In the second part of XIX century this area was highly populated and the observed anthropogenic pressure applied to the nature was strong. Now, the area is considered a very valuable natural territory--since 1973 it has been occupied by the Bieszczady National Park--one of Polish national parks. J. A. Knapp had spent more than two months in Galicia thanks to the great hospitality of Polish people, especially botanists: A. Rehmann, I. R. Czerwiakowski, W. Jab

  4. Discussion of a Well-Designed Clinical Trial Which Did Not Demonstrate Effectiveness: UIC Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research Study of Black Cohosh and Red Clover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lee P.; Banuvar, Suzanne; Fong, Harry H. S.; Farnsworth, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of a clinical trial for pharmaceutical agents is usually undertaken only after there is likely benefit demonstrated from the use of the putative agent. The consideration of botanical products as pharmaceutical agents must similarly go through a rigorous evaluation process. The present work reviews the recently published Phase II study evaluating the effectiveness of black cohosh and red clover in a randomized trial with conjugated equine estradiol/medroxyprogesterone acetate and placebo for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. We analyze the possible reasons why this study failed to show benefit for either botanical product in reducing menopause-related vasomotor symptoms. PMID:21034798

  5. History of the Botanic Garden of the Stefan Batory University in Vilna (Vilnius (1919–1939 (in Polish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Zemanek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The university in Vilna (Lithuanian: Vilnius, now Vilniaus universitetas, founded in 1579 by Stefan Batory (Stephen Báthory, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania, was a centre of Polish botany in 1780-1832 and 1919-1939. The Botanic Garden established by Jean-Emmanuel Gilibert (1741–1814 in 1781 (or, actually, from 1782 survived the loss of independence by Poland (1795, and a later closure of the University (1832, and it continued to function until 1842, when it was shut down by Russian authorities. After Poland had regained independence and the University was reopened as the Stefan Batory University (SBU, its Botanic Garden was established on a new location (1919, active since 1920. It survived as a Polish institution until 1939. After the Second World War, as a result of changed borders, it found itself in the Soviet Union, and from 1990 – in the Republic of Lithuania. A multidisciplinary research project has been recently launched with the aim to create a publication on the history of science at the Stefan Batory University. The botanical part of the project includes, among others, drafting the history of the Botanic Garden. Obtaining electronic copies of archival documents, e.g. annual reports written by the directors, enabled a more thorough analysis of the Garden’s history. Piotr Wiśniewski (1884–1971, a plant physiologist, nominated as Professor in the Department of General Botany on 1 June 1920, was the organiser and the first director of the Garden. He resigned from his post in October 1923, due to financial problems of the Garden. From October 1923 to April 1924, the management was run by the acting director, Edward Bekier (1883–1945, Professor in the Department of Physical Chemistry, Dean of the Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences. For 13 subsequent years, i.e. from 1 May 1924 to 30 April 1937, the directorship of the Garden was held by Józef Trzebiński (1867–1941, a mycologist and one of the pioneers of

  6. Adjunctive treatment with oral AKL1, a botanical nutraceutical, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockwell C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Claire Brockwell,1 Sundari Ampikaipakan,1,2 Darren W Sexton,1 David Price,3,4 Daryl Freeman,5 Mike Thomas,6 Muzammil Ali,4 Andrew M Wilson1,21Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; 2Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK; 3Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 4Research in Real Life, Cambridge, UK; 5Mundesley Medical Centre, Mundesley, Norwich, UK; 6Primary Care Research, Aldermoor Health Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UKPurpose: The objective of this pilot trial was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AKL1, a patented botanical formulation containing extracts of Picrorhiza kurroa, Ginkgo biloba, and Zingiber officinale, as add-on therapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic cough.Patients and methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled male and female patients >18 years old with COPD and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ score of <18. The 10-week study period comprised a 2-week single-blind placebo run-in period followed by add-on treatment with AKL1 or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks. The primary study endpoint was the change from week 0 to week 8 in cough-related health status, as assessed by the LCQ.Results: Of 33 patients enrolled, 20 were randomized to AKL1 and 13 to placebo. Patients included 19 (58% men and 14 (42% women of mean (standard deviation [SD] age of 67 (9.4 years; 15 (45% patients were smokers and 16 (49% were ex-smokers. The mean (SD change from baseline in LCQ score at 8 weeks was 2.3 (4.9 in the AKL1 group and 0.6 (3.7 in the placebo group, with mean difference in change of 1.8 (95% confidence interval: –1.5 to 5.1; P=0.28. The St George's Respiratory Questionnaire score improved substantially in the AKL1 treatment group by a mean (SD of –7.7 (11.7 versus worsening in the placebo group (+1.5 [9.3], with mean difference in change of –9.2 (95% confidence

  7. Estimation of extractable protein in botanical fractions of legume and grass species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solati, Zeinab; Jørgensen, Uffe; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2018-01-01

    a high content of protein with a favourable amino acid composition. The extractable true protein was estimated at two harvest dates in leaf and stem of the legume species white clover (Trifolium repens L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) and the grass species...

  8. Effects of a botanical larvicide derived from Azadirachta indica (the neem tree) on oviposition behaviour in Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Adongo, E.A.; Vulule, J.; Githure, J.

    2011-01-01

    More focus is given to mosquito larval control due to the necessity to use several control techniques together in integrated vector management programmes. Botanical products are thought to be able to provide effective, sustainable and cheap mosquito larval control tools. However, bio-larvicides like

  9. The vegetation of the Coastal Region of Suriname. Results of the scientific expedition to Suriname 1948—49 botanical series No. 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeman, J.C.

    1952-01-01

    The data on which this study is based, were gathered during a scientific expedition which lasted from September 1948 to May 1949. The author had accepted an invitation to join Prof. J. LANJOUW who on this expedition was entrusted with the botanical part of the investigations. They worked in close

  10. Extra soil fertilization of mother plants increases botanical seed yield but not long-term germination in wild Solanum (potato) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato has about 100 wild species relatives that are multiplied in the form of botanical seed populations by genebanks, and distributed for use in research and breeding, so factors that affect long term seed germination are of interest. In 1987 the US Potato Genebank conducted routine seed multiplic...

  11. Type specimens of taxa of Artemisia L. (Asteraceae from Siberia and the Far East kept in the Herbarium of V.L. Komarov Botanical Insitute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Korobkov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Typification of 97 Artemisia (Asteraceae taxa from Siberia and the Far East kept in the Herbarium of V.L. Komarov Botanical Institute was carried out. Holotypes for 39 taxa, lectotypes for 48 taxa, 28 syntypes and 4 isotypes are given.

  12. Impact of botanical pesticides derived from Melia azedarach and Azadirachta indica on the biology of two parasitoid species of the diamondback moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charleston, D.S.; Kfir, R.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of two botanical pesticides was tested on two species of parasitoids, Cotesia plutellae and Diadromus collaris. Aqueous leaf extracts from the syringa tree, Melia azedarach and commercial formulations from the neem tree, Azadirachta indica, Neemix 4.5 were investigated in the laboratory

  13. Characterization and screening of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and N-oxides from various parts of many botanicals and dietary supplements using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The UHPLC-QToF-MS analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from various parts of 37 botanicals and 7 dietary supplements was performed. A separation by LC was achieved using a reversed-phase column and a gradient of water/acetonitrile each containing formic acid as the mobile phase. MS-MS detection was u...

  14. Soil nematode community under the non-native trees in the Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University

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    Sushchuk Anna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The particularities of soil nematode communities of the rhizosphere of non-native trees were studied in the Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University (Republic of Karelia. Taxonomic diversity, abundance, community structure and ecological indices derived from nematode fauna analysis were used as the evaluation parameters. Nematode fauna included 51 genera, 6 of them were plant parasitic. The dominant eco-trophic group in the nematode community structure of coniferous trees was bacterial feeders; fungal feeders in most cases were observed in the second numbers. The contribution of bacterial feeders was decreased and plant parasites were increased in eco-trophic structure of nematode communities of deciduous trees in compared with coniferous trees. Analysis of ecological indices showed that the state of soil nematode communities reflects complex, structured (stable soil food web in the biocenoses with deciduous trees, and degraded (basal food web – under coniferous trees.

  15. Portuguese Honeys from Different Geographical and Botanical Origins: A 4-Year Stability Study Regarding Quality Parameters and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Sonia; Pinto, Diana; Rodrigues, Francisca; Alves, Rita C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2017-08-11

    Portuguese honeys (n = 15) from different botanical and geographical origins were analysed regarding their quality parameters (diastase activity, hydroxymethylfurfural content, moisture and pH), colour (L*, a*, b*) and antioxidant profile (total phenolics content, total flavonoids content, DPPH• scavenging activity, and ferric reducing power). The samples were analysed fresh and after 4-years of storage (at 25 °C and protected from light). The hydroxymethylfurfural content and diastase activity of the fresh samples were in accordance with the recommended values described in the legislation. In general, the antioxidant activity of the samples correlated more with the bioactive compounds content than with colour. The storage affected differently each individual sample, especially regarding the antioxidant profile. Nevertheless, although in general the lightness of the samples decreased (and the redness increased), after 4 years, 11 samples still presented acceptable diastase activity and hydroxymethylfurfural values.

  16. [European Union regulatory and quality requirements for botanical drugs and their implications for Chinese herbal medicinal products development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Ping

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces regulatory pathways and characteristic quality requirements for marketing authorization of herbal medicinal products in the European Union(EU), and the legal status and applications of "European Union list of herbal substances, preparations and combinations" and "European Union herbal monographs". Also introduced are Chinese herbs that have been granted the EU list entry, those with EU herbal monographs, and registered EU traditional herbal medicinal products with Chinese herbs as active ingredients. Special attention is paid to the technical details of three authorized EU herbal medicinal products (Veregen, Sativex and Episalvan) in comparison with Andrographis paniculata extract HMPL-004 that failed the phase Ⅲ clinical trial for ulcerative colitis. The paper further emphasizes the importance of enriching active fractions of herbal extracts and taking regulatory and quality considerations into account in early stage of botanical drug development. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieh Hajirahimkhan

    Full Text Available The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec. to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of

  18. Botanical and geographical characterization of green coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora): chemometric evaluation of phenolic and methylxanthine contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Salces, Rosa M; Serra, Francesca; Reniero, Fabiano; Héberger, Károly

    2009-05-27

    Green coffee beans of the two main commercial coffee varieties, Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta), from the major growing regions of America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania were studied. The contents of chlorogenic acids, cinnamoyl amides, cinnamoyl glycosides, free phenolic acids, and methylxanthines of green coffee beans were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with UV spectrophotometry to determine their botanical and geographical origins. The analysis of caffeic acid, 3-feruloylquinic acid, 5-feruloylquinic acid, 4-feruloylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-feruloylquinic acid, 3-p-coumaroyl-4-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-4-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, 3-caffeoyl-5-dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-N-tryptophan, feruloyl-N-tryptophan, caffeoyl-N-tryptophan, and caffeine enabled the unequivocal botanical characterization of green coffee beans. Moreover, some free phenolic acids and cinnamate conjugates of green coffee beans showed great potential as means for the geographical characterization of coffee. Thus, p-coumaroyl-N-tyrosine, caffeoyl-N-phenylalanine, caffeoyl-N-tyrosine, 3-dimethoxycinnamoyl-5-feruloylquinic acid, and dimethoxycinnamic acid were found to be characteristic markers for Ugandan Robusta green coffee beans. Multivariate data analysis of the phenolic and methylxanthine profiles provided preliminary results that allowed showing their potential for the determination of the geographical origin of green coffees. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) provided classification models that correctly identified all authentic Robusta green coffee beans from Cameroon and Vietnam and 94% of those from Indonesia. Moreover, PLS-DA afforded independent models for Robusta samples from these three countries with sensitivities and specificities of classifications close to 100% and for Arabica samples from America and

  19. Unit operation optimization for the manufacturing of botanical injections using a design space approach: a case study of water precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xingchu; Chen, Huali; Chen, Teng; Qu, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    Quality by design (QbD) concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP) in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs). Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC), amount of water added (AWA), and stirring speed (SS) were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38-0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7-4.9 g/g, and SS of 280-350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability.

  20. Unit operation optimization for the manufacturing of botanical injections using a design space approach: a case study of water precipitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingchu Gong

    Full Text Available Quality by design (QbD concept is a paradigm for the improvement of botanical injection quality control. In this work, water precipitation process for the manufacturing of Xueshuantong injection, a botanical injection made from Notoginseng Radix et Rhizoma, was optimized using a design space approach as a sample. Saponin recovery and total saponin purity (TSP in supernatant were identified as the critical quality attributes (CQAs of water precipitation using a risk assessment for all the processes of Xueshuantong injection. An Ishikawa diagram and experiments of fractional factorial design were applied to determine critical process parameters (CPPs. Dry matter content of concentrated extract (DMCC, amount of water added (AWA, and stirring speed (SS were identified as CPPs. Box-Behnken designed experiments were carried out to develop models between CPPs and process CQAs. Determination coefficients were higher than 0.86 for all the models. High TSP in supernatant can be obtained when DMCC is low and SS is high. Saponin recoveries decreased as DMCC increased. Incomplete collection of supernatant was the main reason for the loss of saponins. Design space was calculated using a Monte-Carlo simulation method with acceptable probability of 0.90. Recommended normal operation region are located in DMCC of 0.38-0.41 g/g, AWA of 3.7-4.9 g/g, and SS of 280-350 rpm, with a probability more than 0.919 to attain CQA criteria. Verification experiment results showed that operating DMCC, SS, and AWA within design space can attain CQA criteria with high probability.

  1. Water-insoluble fractions of botanical foods lower blood ethanol levels in rats by physically maintaining the ethanol solution after ethanol administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Oshima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have analyzed the functions of foods and dietary constituents in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. However, few studies have reported the function of dietary fibers in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. Objective: We assessed the effects of botanical foods that contain dietary fibers on alcohol metabolism. Methods: The ability of the water-insoluble fraction (WIF of 18 kinds of botanical foods to maintain 15% (v/v ethanol solution was examined using easily handled filtration. A simple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the filtered volumes and blood ethanol concentration (BEC in F344 rats 4 h after the ingestion of 4.0 g/kg of ethanol following dosage of 2.5% (w/v WIF of the experimental botanical foods. Furthermore, the supernatant (6.3 Brix; water-soluble fraction and precipitate (WIF of tomato, with a strong ethanol-maintaining ability, were obtained and BEC and the residual gastric ethanol in rats were determined 2 h after the administration of 4.0 g/kg of ethanol and the individuals fractions. Results: The filtered volumes of dropped ethanol solutions containing all the botanical foods tested except green peas were decreased compared with the ethanol solution without WIF (control. There was a significant correlation between the filtered volumes and blood ethanol concentration (BEC. There was no significant difference in the residual gastric ethanol between controls and the supernatant group; however, it was increased significantly in the WIF group than in controls or the supernatant group. Consistent with this, BEC reached a similar level in controls and the supernatant group but significantly decreased in the WIF group compared with controls or the supernatant group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that WIFs of botanical foods, which are mostly water-insoluble dietary fibers, possess the ability to absorb ethanol-containing solutions, and this ability correlates

  2. Discrimination of botanical origins for Chinese honey according to free amino acids content by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection with chemometric approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Jin, Linghe; Chang, Qiaoying; Peng, Tao; Hu, Xueyan; Fan, Chunlin; Pang, Guofang; Lu, Meiling; Wang, Wenwen

    2017-05-01

    The contents of 18 free amino acids in 87 Chinese honey samples from four botanical origins (linden, acacia, vitex and rape) were determined by developing a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD) method with an in-loop automated pre-column derivatization. The free amino acid profiles of these samples were used to construct a statistical model to distinguish honeys from various floral origins. The average contents of all free amino acids in linden honey were lower than in the other three types of honey. Phenylalanine was particularly useful in the present study because its average content in vitex honey was far higher than in any other honey samples. There is no doubt that both phenylalanine and tyrosine can be considered as the marker free amino acid in Chinese vitex honey. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted based on 15 free amino acids and showed significant differences among the honey samples. The cumulative variance for the first two components was 80.62%, and the four principal components can explain 94.18% of the total variance. In the two first component scores, the honey samples can be separated according to their botanical origins. Cluster analysis of amino acid data also revealed that the botanical origins of honey samples correlated with their amino acid content. Back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN) and naïve Bayes methods were employed to construct the classification models. The results revealed an excellent separation among honey samples according to their botanical origin with 100% accuracy in model training for both BP-ANN and naïve Bayes. It indicated that the free amino acid profile determined by HPLC-FLD can provide sufficient information to discriminate honey samples according to their botanical origins. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Information on plant foods in eBASIS: what is in a correct botanical scientific name?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Eriksen, Folmer Damsted; Sørensen, Marten

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the plant information included in the eBASIS (BioActive Substances in Foods Information System) database on composition and biological activity of selected bioactive compounds from European plant/mushroom foods with putative beneficial and/or toxic effects. The European Food...... Information Resource (EuroFIR)-NETTOX Plant List (2007) presents scientific and vernacular names in 15 European languages for around 325 major European plant/mushroom foods and also for different parts of these foods. This list and its predecessor, the NETTOX List of Food Plants, have been used by national...... food authorities and within the European Union for consideration of plants and mushrooms that have been used to a significant degree up to 1997 and are therefore not covered by the novel food regulation (European Parliament and Council of the European Union, 1997). The species and the plant part...

  4. Typification of taxa of subfamily Silenoideae (Caryophyllaceae Juss. from Siberia and Russian Far East based on materials kept in the Herbarium of the Komarov Botanical Institute (LE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Lazkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on type material of previously not typified taxa of the subfamily Silenoideae (Caryophyllaceae Juss., kept in the Herbarium of the Komarov Botanical Institute (LE are summarized in the paper. All relevant taxa including eight species (or subsequently accepted as species: Gastrolychnis violascens Tolm., Gypsophila stricta Bunge, Heterochroa petraea Bunge, Lychnis ajanensis var. villosula Trautv. [L. villosula (Trautv. Gorschk.], L. fulgens var. wilfordi Regel [L. wilfordi (Regel Maxim.], L. tristis Bunge, Melandrium olgae Maxim., Silene melandriiformis Maxim., five varieties (Melandrium affine var. Intermedium Tolm., Silene repens var. pratensis Kom., S. repens var. alpina Kom., S. repens var. angustifolia Turcz., S. repens var. latifolia Turcz., and one form (Silene repens f. densa Kom. are lectotypified.Key words: Caryophyllaceae, Silenoideae, type specimens, typification, Komarov Botanical Institute (LE, Siberia, Far East. 

  5. Botanical Drug Puerarin Coordinates with Nerve Growth Factor in the Regulation of Neuronal Survival and Neuritogenesis via Activating ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt Signaling Pathways in the Neurite Extension Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhao, Jia; Cheng, Yuan‐Yuan; Fan, Wen; Yang, Chuan‐Bin; Ye, Shui‐Fen; Cui, Wei; Wei, Wei; Lao, Li‐Xing; Cai, Jing; Han, Yi‐Fan; Rong, Jian‐Hui

    2015-01-01

    .... This study was designed to investigate whether botanical drug C-glucosylated isoflavone puerarin coordinates with NGF to regulate neuritogenesis via activating ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt in neurite extension process...

  6. A botanical inventory of forest on karstic limestone and metamorphic substrate in the Chiquibul Forest, Belize, with focus on woody taxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baden, Maria; Särkinen, Tiina; Conde, Dalia Amor

    2016-01-01

    we present a botanical species list of mostly woody taxa based on voucher specimens, with particular focus on the Raspaculo watershed in the eastern part of the National Park. Within the Raspaculo watershed, a comparison is made between 0.1 hectare of valley floor and 0.1 hectare of hilltop...... plant species, and represent a source of information for the management and conservation of the area....

  7. BGCI’s Rrole in co-ordinating a botanic garden-centred global system for the conservation of all tree diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Smith

    2017-01-01

    It is estimated that there are at least 60,000 tree species globally and that more than 20 percent of them are threatened with extinction. This threatened tree diversity will have a critical impact for solving some of this century’s major challenges in the areas of energy, water scarcity, human health, food security, climate change and habitat degradation. Botanic...

  8. EFFECT OF BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES NEEMAZAL-T/S AND PYRETHRUM APPLIED ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH DIFFERENT ORGANIC PRODUCTS ON THRIPS TABACI POPULATION DENSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolova, Ivelina; Georgieva, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The trial was conducted with spring forage pea (Pisum sativum L.) from 2011-2013 in the experimental field of the Institute of Forage Crops, Bulgaria. The effect of three insecticides was studied: NeemAzal T/S®, Pyrethrum FS EC (botanical insecticides) and Nurelle D (synthetic insecticide) applied alone and in combination with the growth regulators Polyversum (biological growth regulator and fungicide) and Flordimex 420 (synthetic growth regulator); and an organic foliar fertili...

  9. Additions to the type collection of Cruciferae Juss. (Brassicaceae Burnett) of Siberia and Russian Far East kept in Herbarium of V. L. Komarov Botanical Institute (LE)

    OpenAIRE

    V. I. Dorofeyev

    2017-01-01

    A complete set of the type specimens of Cruciferae (Brassicaceae) of Siberia and Far East stored in the Komarov Botanical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences was investigated. Previously uncounted samples of 130 taxa from 23 genera have been identified. Lectotypification of 119 taxa is done in the paper. Most valuable contribution into the study of Siberian and the Far Eastern Cruciferae biodiversity was made by the works of N. A. Busch (genera Arabis, Draba, Erysimum, Nasturtium), E. Re...

  10. Applicability of physico-chemical parameters of honey for identification of the botanical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Stanisław; Lukasiewicz, Marcin; Berski, Wiktor

    2013-01-01

    Efforts are being made to apply physicochemical parameters analysis in the identification of varietal honeys. With many variables describing a given population, it is feasible to differentiate between basing on principal component analysis (PCA). The aim of this study was to investigate selected physicochemical quality characteristics of nectar honey, with particular emphasis paid to carbohydrate composition, and to determine its applicability in identifying the variety of floral honey. The experimental materials were samples of commercial honey available at retail in Krakow in 2005-2007 period. The following analyses were performed: water content by the refractometric method, sugars content according to Luff-Schoorl, content of sugars using HPLC, electrical conductivity, specific rotation, and acidity of honey. Application of HPLC allowed the precise qualitative identification of sugars, which was impossible to be determined by Luff-Schoorl method. The obtained results were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA). Based on the obtained results and performing the statistical analysis, it was found that the relationship between specific rotation and the total acidity can be used to distinguish buckwheat honeys from other analysed varieties. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the relationship between the specific rotation and maltose content can be used to distinguish between acacia honeys vs. buckwheat and lime honeys.

  11. Botanical inventory of the Rocky Flats AEC site. Final report, April 29, 1976--July 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, P.J.

    1979-04-01

    The present plant life of the Rocky Flats site and surrounding area was documented. This documentation is intended as a base-line description which may be used by researchers and managers. The analysis of natural vegetation, including plant species inventory, vegetation composition study, and identification of major environmental control factors at the Rocky Flats site provides a data base on which future environmental decisions concerning, for example, future construction and handling of disturbance on this site can be made. The establishment of morphological norms for potential plant indicators of mutagenic hazards serves as a start for development of a vegetation-based system for detection of possible changes in plant life induced by accidental plutonium release around the plant. This study is not directed towards assessing any past or present industrial impacts of plutonium processing. The principal products from the contract are a list of vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens, a 1:12,000 color vegetation map, five large scale (1:500) maps of special study and experimental areas, and a description of the morphological norms of two common vascular plant species.

  12. Review: DNA Barcoding and Chromatography Fingerprints for the Authentication of Botanicals in Herbal Medicinal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a tremendous increase in the global use of herbal medicinal products (HMPs) due to their claimed health benefits. This has led to increase in their demand and consequently, also, resulted in massive adulteration. This is due to the fact that most of the traditional methods cannot identify closely related species in a process product form. Therefore the urgent need for simple and rapid identification methods resulted in the discovery of a novel technique. DNA barcoding is a process that uses short DNA sequence from the standard genome for species identification. This technique is reliable and is not affected by external factors such as climates, age, or plant part. The difficulties in isolation of DNA of high quality in addition to other factors are among the challenges encountered using the DNA barcoding in the authentication of HMP. These limitations indicated that using DNA barcoding alone may ineffectively authenticate the HMP. Therefore, the combination of DNA barcoding with chromatographic fingerprint, a popular and generally accepted technique for the assessment and quality control of HMP, will offer an efficient solution to effectively evaluate the authenticity and quality consistency of HMP. Detailed and quality information about the main composition of the HMPs will help to ascertain their efficacy and safety as these are very important for quality control. PMID:28536641

  13. Flowering Plants Preferred by Bumblebees (Bombus Latr. in the Botanical Garden of Medicinal Plants in Wrocław

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikora Aneta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to fewer bumblebees in rural areas these days, it is necessary to look for alternative habitats for the active protection of these very important pollinators. The research was carried out in The Botanical Garden of Medicinal Plants, in Wrocław, Poland. In the garden, approximately 2000 plant species were cultivated, of which 185 were visited by bumblebees. Amongst them, 57 plant species were deemed very attractive and were determined to be indicators for 7 bumblebee species. Indicator species for bumblebees ranged between 6 for Bombus pratorum to up to 20 for B. pascuorum. Monarda didyma was an indicator plant to 6 recorded bumblebee species. Other indicator plant species for at least 4 bumblebees species were: Origanum vulgare, Lavandula angustifolia, Rhododendron catawbiense, Phacelia tanacetifolia, and Agastache rugosa. Three bumblebee species were found to forage the most on 11 of the flowering plant species. The biggest group of plants were those which were mostly visited by 1-2 bumblebee species. Amongst all recorded indicator plants, 32% were native species.

  14. Ecological Design of Fernery based on Bioregion Classification System in Ecopark Cibinong Science Center Botanic Gardens, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafar, S.; Gunawan, A.

    2017-10-01

    Indonesia as mega biodiversity country has a wide variety of ferns. However, the natural habitats of ferns are currently degrading, particularly in lowlands due to the increasing level of urban-sprawl and industrial zones development. Therefore, Ecology Park (Ecopark) Cibinong Science Center-Botanic Gardens as an ex-situ conservation area is expected to be the best location to conserve the lowland ferns. The purpose of this study is to design a fernery through an ecological landscape design process. The main concept is The Journey of Fern, this concept aiming on providing users experiences in fernery by associating conservational, educational, and recreational aspects. Ecological landscape design as general is applied by the principal of reduce, reuse, and recycle (3R). Bioregion classification system is applied by grouping the plants based on the characteristics of light, water, soil, air, and temperature. The design concept is inspired by the morphology of fern and its growth patterns which is transformed into organic and geometric forms. The result of this study is a design of fernery which consist of welcome area, recreation area, service area, and conservation education area as the main area that providing 66 species of ferns.

  15. Rapid on-site TLC-SERS detection of four antidiabetes drugs used as adulterants in botanical dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingxia; Cao, Yongbing; Cao, Yingying; Chai, Yifeng; Lu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    A novel facile method has been established for rapid on-site detection of antidiabetes chemicals used to adulterate botanical dietary supplements (BDS) for diabetes. Analytes and components of pharmaceutical matrices were separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) then surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) was used for qualitative identification of trace substances on the HPTLC plate. Optimization and standardization of the experimental conditions, for example the method used for preparation of silver colloids, the mobile phase, and the concentration of colloidal silver, resulted in a very robust and highly sensitive method which enabled successful detection when the amount of adulteration was as low as 0.001 % (w/w). The method was also highly selective, enabling successful identification of some chemicals in extremely complex herbal matrices. The established TLC-SERS method was used for analysis of real BDS used to treat diabetes, and the results obtained were verified by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The study showed that TLC-SERS could be used for effective separation and detection of four chemicals used to adulterate BDS, and would have good prospects for on-site qualitative screening of BDS for adulterants.

  16. Rapid High-throughput Species Identification of Botanical Material Using Direct Analysis in Real Time High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesiak, Ashton D; Musah, Rabi A

    2016-10-02

    We demonstrate that direct analysis in real time-high resolution mass spectrometry can be used to produce mass spectral profiles of botanical material, and that these chemical fingerprints can be used for plant species identification. The mass spectral data can be acquired rapidly and in a high throughput manner without the need for sample extraction, derivatization or pH adjustment steps. The use of this technique bypasses challenges presented by more conventional techniques including lengthy chromatography analysis times and resource intensive methods. The high throughput capabilities of the direct analysis in real time-high resolution mass spectrometry protocol, coupled with multivariate statistical analysis processing of the data, provide not only class characterization of plants, but also yield species and varietal information. Here, the technique is demonstrated with two psychoactive plant products, Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom) and Datura (Jimsonweed), which were subjected to direct analysis in real time-high resolution mass spectrometry followed by statistical analysis processing of the mass spectral data. The application of these tools in tandem enabled the plant materials to be rapidly identified at the level of variety and species.

  17. Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere of the Botanical Garden of the City of Rio de Janeiro: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cleyton Martins; Souza, Elaine Cesar C A; da Silva, Luane Lima; Oliveira, Rafael Lopes; Corrêa, Sergio Machado; Arbilla, Graciela

    2016-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play a central role in atmospheric chemistry. In this work, VOCs in the Botanical Garden of Rio de Janeiro were determined using the TO-15 Method. The park occupies 1,370,000 m(2) in the southern area of the city and is next to the Tijuca Forest, which is considered the largest secondary urban forest in the world. The total VOC concentrations ranged from 43.52 to 168.75 µg m(-3), depending on the sampling site and dates. In terms of concentration isoprene represented 4 %-14 % of the total VOC masses. The results suggested that the differences in biomass, distance from the street and activities within the park affected the concentrations of VOCs. The ratios of isoprene/aromatic compounds were higher than those determined in other areas of the city, confirming that the atmosphere of this green area has the contribution of other sources. Kinetic and mechanistic reactivities were also evaluated.

  18. Structural Characterization, Biological Effects, and Synthetic Studies on Xanthones from Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), a Popular Botanical Dietary Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Young-Won; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2011-01-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L., Clusiaceae) is a popular botanical dietary supplement in the United States, where it is used principally as an antioxidant. It is referred to as the “queen of fruits” in Thailand, a country of origin. The major secondary metabolites of mangosteen, the xanthones, exhibit a variety of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antiplasmodial, cytotoxic, and potential cancer chemopreventive activities. Moreover, some of the xanthones from mangosteen have been found to influence specific enzyme activities, such as aromatase, HIV-1 protease, inhibitor κB kinase, quinone reductase, sphingomyelinase, topoisomerase and several protein kinases, and they also modulate histamine H1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine2A receptor binding. Several synthetic procedures for active xanthones and their analogs have been conducted to obtain a better insight into structure-activity relationships for this compound class. This short review deals with progress made in the structural characterization of the chemical constituents of mangosteen, as well as the biological activity of pure constituents of this species and synthetic methods for the mangosteen xanthones. PMID:21562610

  19. Essential Oils of Aromatic and Medicinal Plants as Botanical Biocide for Management of Coconut Eriophyid Mite (Aceria guerreronis Keifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Patnaik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the efficiency of essential oils extracted from different aromatic and medicinal plant sources on Aceria guerreronis Keifer, one of the serious pests of coconut. The essential oils and the herbal extracts were prepared in two different formulations and were used both in laboratory and field conditions to assess the efficiency of the formulations against the coconut mite infestation. The field trial results showed that reduction in infestation intensity was found to vary between 73.44% and 44.50% at six different locations of trial farms with an average of 64.18% after four spells of treatment. The average number of live mites was higher in the third month old nuts both in the control as well as the treated nut samples. The laboratory experiments on the efficacy of botanical biocide showed that the time taken for dehydration and shriveling of body cells took only sixty seconds. The multilocational field trials revealed the overall efficiency of the biocide to significantly control the eriophyid mite in coconut crop in an ecofriendly and sustainable manner without adopting any chemical pesticide.

  20. EXOTIC PLANTS IN THE CIBODAS BOTANIC GARDENS REMNANT FOREST: INVENTORY AND CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF SEVERAL ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decky Indrawan Junaedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to potential impact of invasive alien (exotic species to the natural ecosystems, inventory of exotic species in the Cibodas Botanic Gardens (CBG remnant forest area is an urgent need for CBG. Inventory of exotic species can assist gardens manager to set priorities and plan better responses for possible or existed invasive plants in the CBG remnants forest. The objectives of this study are to do inventory of the exotic species in the CBG remnant forest and to determine whether several environmental variables play role to the existence of exotic species in the CBG remnant forests. There are 26 exotic plant species (23 genera, 14 families found and recorded from all four remnant forests in CBG. Cluster analysis of four environmental variables shows that clustering of environmental factors of exotic species correlates with the abundances of those exotic species. The relation between environmental factor clusters and the abundance of those exotics signify the role of environmental variables on the existence of exotic plant species. The information of exotic plant species in the remnants forest is the base information for gardens manager to manage exotic species in CBG remnants forest. The relation of several environmental factors with exotic species abundance could assist gardens manager to understand better the supportive and or suppressor factors of exotics in the CBG remnants forest. Further study on these species is needed to set priorities to decide which species should be treated first in order to minimize the impact of exotic plant species to native ecosystem of CBG.

  1. Volatile Compounds in Honey: A Review on Their Involvement in Aroma, Botanical Origin Determination and Potential Biomedical Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Ndip, Roland N.; Clarke, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in honey are obtained from diverse biosynthetic pathways and extracted by using various methods associated with varying degrees of selectivity and effectiveness. These compounds are grouped into chemical categories such as aldehyde, ketone, acid, alcohol, hydrocarbon, norisoprenoids, terpenes and benzene compounds and their derivatives, furan and pyran derivatives. They represent a fingerprint of a specific honey and therefore could be used to differentiate between monofloral honeys from different floral sources, thus providing valuable information concerning the honey’s botanical and geographical origin. However, only plant derived compounds and their metabolites (terpenes, norisoprenoids and benzene compounds and their derivatives) must be employed to discriminate among floral origins of honey. Notwithstanding, many authors have reported different floral markers for honey of the same floral origin, consequently sensory analysis, in conjunction with analysis of VOCs could help to clear this ambiguity. Furthermore, VOCs influence honey’s aroma described as sweet, citrus, floral, almond, rancid, etc. Clearly, the contribution of a volatile compound to honey aroma is determined by its odor activity value. Elucidation of the aroma compounds along with floral origins of a particular honey can help to standardize its quality and avoid fraudulent labeling of the product. Although only present in low concentrations, VOCS could contribute to biomedical activities of honey, especially the antioxidant effect due to their natural radical scavenging potential. PMID:22272147

  2. Transforming an Exposure trip to Botanical Expedition: Introducing Ecological Research thru Exposure Trip in an Eco-tourism Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo C. Lunar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available – Fieldtrips can be considered as one of the three avenues through which science can be taught - through formal classroom teaching, practical work and field trips. An exposure trip at Bangkong Kahoy Valley Field Study Center was arranged for a class of BS Biology and BS Education students enrolled in Ecology Course. This approach purposefully transformed the usual exposure trip from being a casual site visit into a focused and productive learning experience. This transformation from exposure trip to a botanical expedition has exceeded the initial activity goals. Rather than a day off from learning, the time spent at the study center has been a meaningful opportunity to engage students in an active ecological research project while delivering valuable science content. Employing the descriptive survey design, the learning gains of the students were assessed and students were directed to do a guided reflection writing using the ORID Model of Focused Conversation. The learning gains and reflections of the students confirmed that students can collaboratively develop focused research questions, make meaning from a variety of sources, carry out a vegetation analysis and conduct surveys on socio-economic status, plant resource utilization and ecotourism assessment of the host community. As students prepared for their trip and synthesized their learning afterward, they were able to come up with very impressive and scientifically sound research outputs.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling and Pathway Network Analysis Predicts a Novel Antitumor Function for a Botanical-Derived Drug, PG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lun Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PG2 is a botanical drug that is mostly composed of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS. Its role in hematopoiesis and relieving cancer-related fatigue has recently been clinically investigated in cancer patients. However, systematic analyses of its functions are still limited. The aim of this study was to use microarray-based expression profiling to evaluate the quality and consistency of PG2 from three different product batches and to study biological mechanisms of PG2. An integrative molecular analysis approach has been designed to examine significant PG2-induced signatures in HL-60 leukemia cells. A quantitative analysis of gene expression signatures was conducted for PG2 by hierarchical clustering of correlation coefficients. The results showed that PG2 product batches were consistent and of high quality. These batches were also functionally equivalent to each other with regard to how they modulated the immune and hematopoietic systems. Within the PG2 signature, there were five genes associated with doxorubicin: IL-8, MDM4, BCL2, PRODH2, and BIRC5. Moreover, the combination of PG2 and doxorubicin had a synergistic effect on induced cell death in HL-60 cells. Together with the bioinformatics-based approach, gene expression profiling provided a quantitative measurement for the quality and consistency of herbal medicines and revealed new roles (e.g., immune modulation for PG2 in cancer treatment.

  4. USING GIS FOR DEVELOPING INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR INVENTORY AND CARE OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS IN THE NIKITSKY BOTANICAL GARDENS (CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Plugatar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the data on creating information system (IS for stocktaking and handling the ornamental woody and herbaceous plants at the Nikitsky Botanical Gardens (NBG on the basis of a database (DB and a geographic information system (GIS for addressing the problems related to the preservation of biological diversity and sustainable development of the territory.The DB is being created on the basis of a relation model using of an analytic language and a graphic method of displaying the model “object – property – relation” using International Transfer Format (ITF for coding standard fields. For formation of web maps, the electronic layers are exported to the web-GIS on the NextGIS Web platform and configured into the thematic web maps.The information on the infological DB model has been provided. Functions to be performed by the IS and its final components have been described. The IS will make it possible to assess the current status of the NBG’s collection funds and plan the collection policy aimed at rehabilitating of plants’ gene pool and enriching the cultivated flora at the Southern Coast of Crimea. 

  5. A Review of Botanical Characteristics, Traditional Usage, Chemical Components, Pharmacological Activities, and Safety of Pereskia bleo (Kunth DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sogand Zareisedehizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pereskia bleo, a leafy cactus, is a medicinal plant native to West and South America and distributed in tropical and subtropical areas. It is traditionally used as a dietary vegetable, barrier hedge, water purifier, and insect repellant and for maintaining health, detoxification, prevention of cancer, and/or treatment of cancer, hypertension, diabetes, stomach ache, muscle pain, and inflammatory diseases such as dermatitis and rheumatism. The aim of this paper was to provide an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the botanical characteristics, traditional usage, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, and safety of P. bleo. A literature search using MEDLINE (via PubMed, Science direct, Scopus and Google scholar and China Academic Journals Full-Text Database (CNKI and available eBooks and books in the National University of Singapore libraries in English and Chinese was conducted. The following keywords were used: Pereskia bleo, Pereskia panamensis, Pereskia corrugata, Rhodocacus corrugatus, Rhodocacus bleo, Cactus panamensis, Cactus bleo, Spinach cactus, wax rose, Perescia, and Chinese rose. This review revealed the association between the traditional usage of P. bleo and reported pharmacological properties in the literature. Further investigation on the pharmacological properties and phytoconstituents of P. bleo is warranted to further exploit its potentials as a source of novel therapeutic agents or lead compounds.

  6. A comprehensive platform for quality control of botanical drugs (PhytomicsQC): a case study of Huangqin Tang (HQT) and PHY906.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Robert; Paiva, Anthony A; Guan, Jing-Qu; Marathe, Rajendra; Jiang, Zaoli; van Eyndhoven, Winfried; Bjoraker, Jeffrey; Prusoff, Zachary; Wang, Hailong; Liu, Shwu-Huey; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2010-08-20

    Establishing botanical extracts as globally-accepted polychemical medicines and a new paradigm for disease treatment, requires the development of high-level quality control metrics. Based on comprehensive chemical and biological fingerprints correlated with pharmacology, we propose a general approach called PhytomicsQC to botanical quality control. Incorporating the state-of-the-art analytical methodologies, PhytomicsQC was employed in this study and included the use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) for chemical characterization and chemical fingerprinting, differential cellular gene expression for bioresponse fingerprinting and animal pharmacology for in vivo validation. A statistical pattern comparison method, Phytomics Similarity Index (PSI), based on intensities and intensity ratios, was used to determine the similarity of the chemical and bioresponse fingerprints among different manufactured batches. Eighteen batch samples of Huangqin Tang (HQT) and its pharmaceutical grade version (PHY906) were analyzed using the PhytomicsQC platform analysis. Comparative analysis of the batch samples with a clinically tested standardized batch obtained values of PSI similarity between 0.67 and 0.99. With rigorous quality control using analytically sensitive and comprehensive chemical and biological fingerprinting, botanical formulations manufactured under standardized manufacturing protocols can produce highly consistent batches of products.

  7. Solar energy and ecosystem. ; Botanical factory which utilizes the solar energy. Taiyo energy to ecosystem. ; Taiyo energy wo riyoshita shokubutsu kojo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, T. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-11-30

    The present paper explains the present development status and future problem of botanical factory. As a lightening method in the factory, there are artificial light type, solar light type, and combined solar and artificial light type. Each of all the types has both advantages and disadvantages. Development history is explained of a combined solar and artificial light type botanical factory. An NFT (nutrient film technique) nutrient liquid cultivator was developed in order to stabilize the vegetable production. Further, the air conditioner was modified. Heat storage tank for the night power utilization use and simple duct type heat exchanger for the air conditioning use in the cultivating room underwent associated works for both the thermal insulation and prevention of water bakage, which resulted in heightening in efficiency of both floor area utilization and air conditioning. As for the botanical growth, spinach cultivated with a CO2 concentration which was about three times as high as that outdoors gave a 60% heavier harvest and hardly differed in nutritive quality from that cultivated in the farm. A continuous cultivation test in summer, 1990 resulted in about 224g/day and 250g/day in production rate per 1m[sup 2] of cultivation area for the spinach and lettuce, respectively, which makes the factory cultivation profitable by economizing both the construction and maintenance (expenses for light and fuel). Future problem is about how to put it to practical use. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Environmental Risks of Landscape Botanical Complexes and Minimization of Technogenic Influence Exerted by Objects of Oil&Gas Production in Steppe Zone of the Southern Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabukhina, M. V.; Maiski, R. A.; Salikhova, R. H.

    2017-11-01

    The modern rates of oil and gas production, developed industry, high technologies in the field of the construction and operation of wells, pipelines and other facilities of the oil and gas industry, as well as growing environmental control do not fully solve the problem of the negative impacts on natural objects, in particular, landscape botanical complexes. Taking into account the increasing oil and gas production rates, the existing objects-Orenburg NGKM and constructed ones, for example, by 2015 in the Orenburg region was organized a “new thread” oil company, LLC, the activities of which include exploration, design and preparation of the Mogutovskoye deposits, a part of the Vorontsov and a part of Gremjacheskoye deposits, as well as their exploitation, should explore and develop some effective mechanisms to minimize and eliminate the environmental risks of industrial impact. In our view the multi-component continuous monitoring of environmental risks will help to formulate an effective strategy and develop an effective preventive mechanism of technological activities, identify landscape botanical complexes which are more exposed to environmental risks as well as the regional forecast component changes in terms of a landscape botanical complex in the zone of technogenic influence exerted by the objects of the oil and gas industry.

  9. Identification of Potential Plants Producing Tannin-protein Complex for a-amylase as Botanical Pesticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asriyah Firdausi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research  on  the  development  of  botanical  pesticides  should  be developed  through  new  methods,  such  as  by  inhibiting the  activity  of  digestive enzymes  by  secondary  metabolites.  The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  identify some  of  potential  plants  as  a  source  of  tannin-protein  complexes  to  inhibitthe  activity  of  - amylase.  The  study  of  identification  of  potential  plants producing  the  active  ingredient  tannin-protein  complex  was  divided  into  three stages,  1  identification  of  potential  plants  producing  tannin,  2  isolation  of tannin-protein  complexes,  and  3  in  vitro  test  of  tannin-protein  complexes effect  of  the  -amylase activity.  Some  of  the observed  plants  were  sidaguri  leaf (Sida rhombifolia, melinjo leaf (Gnetum gnemon, gamal leaf (Gliricidia sepium,lamtoro  leaf  (Leucaena  leucocephala ,  betel  nut  (Areca  catechu ,  and  crude gambier  (Uncaria  gambir a s  a  source of  tannins  and  melinjo  seed was  used  asprotein  source.  Betel  nut  and  melinjo  seed  were  the  best  source  of  tannin-protein  complex,  tannin  content  1.77  mg  TAE/mL  with  antioxidant  activity  of  90%,the  ability  to  inhibit  the  activity  of  -amylase by  95%  with  IC 50  values  of 10 mg/mL.Key words: Tannin, protein, -amylase, botanical pesticides,Areca catechu, Gnetum gnemon.

  10. Effects of a research-infused botanical curriculum on undergraduates' content knowledge, STEM competencies, and attitudes toward plant sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jennifer Rhode; Clarke, H David; Horton, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    In response to the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education initiative, we infused authentic, plant-based research into majors' courses at a public liberal arts university. Faculty members designed a financially sustainable pedagogical approach, utilizing vertically integrated curricular modules based on undergraduate researchers' field and laboratory projects. Our goals were to 1) teach botanical concepts, from cells to ecosystems; 2) strengthen competencies in statistical analysis and scientific writing; 3) pique plant science interest; and 4) allow all undergraduates to contribute to genuine research. Our series of inquiry-centered exercises mitigated potential faculty barriers to adopting research-rich curricula, facilitating teaching/research balance by gathering publishable scholarly data during laboratory class periods. Student competencies were assessed with pre- and postcourse quizzes and rubric-graded papers, and attitudes were evaluated with pre- and postcourse surveys. Our revised curriculum increased students' knowledge and awareness of plant science topics, improved scientific writing, enhanced statistical knowledge, and boosted interest in conducting research. More than 300 classroom students have participated in our program, and data generated from these modules' assessment allowed faculty and students to present 28 contributed talks or posters and publish three papers in 4 yr. Future steps include analyzing the effects of repeated module exposure on student learning and creating a regional consortium to increase our project's pedagogical impact. © 2014 J. R. Ward et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2014 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  11. Ethno-botanical study of the African star apple (Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don in the Southern Benin (West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houessou Laurent G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to plant species biology and ecology, understanding the folk knowledge systems related to the use of plant species and how this knowledge system influences the conservation of plant species is an important issue in the implementation of sustainable strategies of biodiversity conservation programs. This study aimed at providing information on the use and local knowledge variation on Chrysophyllum albidum G. Don a multipurpose tree species widely used in southern Benin. Methods Data was collected through 210 structured interviews. Informants were randomly selected from ten villages. The fidelity level and use value of different plant parts of C. albidum were estimated. The variation in ethnobotanical knowledge was assessed by comparing the use value between ethnic, gender and age groups. In order to assess the use pattern of the different plant parts in folk medicine, a correspondence analysis was carried out on the frequency citation of plant parts. Results Four categories of use (food, medicine, firewood and timber were recorded for C. albidum. With respect to the different plant parts, the fleshy pulp of the African star apple fruit showed high consensus degree as food among the informants. Fifteen diseases were reported to be treated by the different parts of C. albidum in the region. Correspondence analysis revealed the specificity of each part in disease treatment. There was no significant difference among ethnic groups regarding the ethno-botanical use value of C. albidum. However, significant difference existed between genders and among age groups regarding the knowledge of the medical properties of this species. Conclusions C. albidum is well integrated in the traditional agroforestry system of the southern Benin. Despite its multipurpose character, this species remains underutilized in the region. Considering the current threat of habitat degradation, action is needed in order to ensure the long term

  12. Effects of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, and turmeric oleoresin on gene expression profile of ileal mucosa in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the effects of feeding 3 plant extracts on gene expression in ileal mucosa of weaned pigs. Weaned pigs (n = 32, 6.3 ± 0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens for 9 d and fed 4 different diets: a nursery basal diet as control diet, basal diet supplemented with 10 mg/kg of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin. Results reported elsewhere showed that the plant extracts reduced diarrhea and increased growth rate of weaning pigs. Total RNA (4 pigs/treatment) was extracted from ileal mucosa of pigs at d 9. Double-stranded cDNA was amplified, labeled, and further hybridized to the microarray. Microarray data were analyzed in R using packages from the Bioconductor project. Differential gene expression was tested by fitting a mixed linear model equivalent to ANOVA using the limma package. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted by DAVID Bioinformatics Resources. Three pairwise comparisons were used to compare each plant extract diet with the control diet. Quantitative real time PCR was applied to verify the mRNA expression detected by microarray. Compared with the control diet, feeding capsicum oleoresin altered (P oleoresin altered (P oleoresin and turmeric oleoresin increased [Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer (EASE) < 0.05] the expression of genes related to integrity of membranes and tight junctions, indicating enhanced gut mucosa health, but decreased (EASE < 0.05) the cell cycle pathway. Feeding each of the 3 plant extracts enhanced (EASE < 0.05) the expression of genes associated with immune responses, indicating that feeding these plant extracts may stimulate the immune responses of pigs in the normal conditions. In conclusion, plant extracts regulated the expression of genes in ileal mucosa of pigs, perhaps providing benefits by enhancing the gut mucosa health and stimulating the immune system.

  13. Monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in food supplements containing botanicals and other ingredients on the Dutch market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martena, M J; Grutters, M M P; De Groot, H N; Konings, E J M; Rietjens, I M C M

    2011-01-01

    Food supplements can contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has defined 16 priority PAH that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic and identified eight priority PAH (PAH8) or four of these (PAH4) as good indicators of the toxicity and occurrence of PAH in food. The current study aimed to determine benzo[a]pyrene and other EFSA priority PAH in different categories of food supplements containing botanicals and other ingredients. From 2003 to 2008, benzo[a]pyrene exceeded the limit of quantification (LOQ) in 553 (44%) of 1258 supplements with a lower-bound mean of 3.37 µg kg(-1). In 2008 and 2009, benzo[a]pyrene and 12 other EFSA priority PAH were determined in 333 food supplements. Benzo[a]pyrene exceeded the LOQ in 210 (63%) food supplements with a lower-bound mean of 5.26 µg kg(-1). Lower-bound mean levels for PAH4 and PAH8(-indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene) were 33.5 and 40.5 µg kg(-1), respectively. Supplements containing resveratrol, Ginkgo biloba, St. John's wort and propolis showed relatively high PAH4 levels in 2008 and 2009. Before 2008, supplements with these ingredients and also dong quai, green tea or valerian contained relatively high benzo[a]pyrene levels. On average, PAH4 intake resulting from food supplement use will be at the lower end of the range of contributions of main food groups to PAH4 exposure, although individual food supplements can contribute significantly to PAH4 exposure. Regular control of EFSA indicator PAH levels in food supplements may prove a way forward to reduce further the intake of PAH from food.

  14. [History of Polish botanical and mycological researches on sheets of land of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic in the years 1977-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Piotr; Olech, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The work includes a description of the period from the moment of setting up Polish Polar Station on King George Island (1977) to the end of International Polar Year IV in 2009. Researches on flower plants focused, among others, on plants' morphology, morphological composition of the pollen and anatomical ultra-structure of the leaves. There were also carried out biochemical and other searches for the internal mutability. Within physiological studies one concentrated on the problem of reaction to temperature stress. Biological researches focused mainly on solving taxonomic and bio-geographic problems. Finally, were published several monographs and, among others, the first in history complete description of moss' flora of the whole of Antarctic (2008). Research works over algae included also such issues as floristics, bio-geography, taxonomy and ecology (for instance, the rookery's impact on distribution of algae, or the influence of inanimate factors on dynamics of condensing the Diatoma in different water and soil-bound tanks). Up till now, within mycological investigations has been identified a variety of lichen fungi that for the most part of Antarctic are a novelty. There were scientifically described new for science genera and species of Western Antarctic. Lichenological studies were made in the field of taxonomy, geography, lichenometry, biochemistry of lichens, lichenoindication, ecophysiology and from the point of analysis of base metals' content. There were also described new for science species. Since 1991, were published the results of searches for the base metals' content and vestigial chemical elements in lichens' thallus. Ecophysiological researches concerned both micro-climatic conditions' impact on primary production and lichens' adaptation to a very cold climate. One discovered a mechanism of two-phase hydratization/dehydratization of lichens' thallus. On the ground of palaeobotanical analyzes was reconstructed a development of flora in Western

  15. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...

  16. A solid-phase extraction procedure coupled to {sup 1}H NMR, with chemometric analysis, to seek reliable markers of the botanical origin of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beretta, Giangiacomo [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica ' Pietro Pratesi' , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 25, 20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: giangiacomo.beretta@unimi.it; Caneva, Enrico [Ciga - Centro Interdipartimentale Grandi Apparecchiature, University of Milan, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milan (Italy); Regazzoni, Luca; Bakhtyari, Nazanin Golbamaki; Maffei Facino, Roberto [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica ' Pietro Pratesi' , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 25, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2008-07-14

    The aim of this work was to establish an analytical method for identifying the botanical origin of honey, as an alternative to conventional melissopalynological, organoleptic and instrumental methods (gas-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high-performance liquid chromatography HPLC). The procedure is based on the {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profile coupled, when necessary, with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and two-dimensional NMR analyses of solid-phase extraction (SPE)-purified honey samples, followed by chemometric analyses. Extracts of 44 commercial Italian honeys from 20 different botanical sources were analyzed. Honeydew, chestnut and linden honeys showed constant, specific, well-resolved resonances, suitable for use as markers of origin. Honeydew honey contained the typical resonances of an aliphatic component, very likely deriving from the plant phloem sap or excreted into it by sap-sucking aphids. Chestnut honey contained the typical signals of kynurenic acid and some structurally related metabolite. In linden honey the {sup 1}H NMR profile gave strong signals attributable to the mono-terpene derivative cyclohexa-1,3-diene-1-carboxylic acid (CDCA) and to its 1-O-{beta}-gentiobiosyl ester (CDCA-GBE). These markers were not detectable in the other honeys, except for the less common nectar honey from rosa mosqueta. We compared and analyzed the data by multivariate techniques. Principal component analysis found different clusters of honeys based on the presence of these specific markers. The results, although obviously only preliminary, suggest that the {sup 1}H NMR profile (with HPLC-MS analysis when necessary) can be used as a reference framework for identifying the botanical origin of honey.

  17. Identification of the botanical origin of pine nuts found in food products by gas-liquid chromatography analysis of fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destaillats, Frédéric; Cruz-Hernandez, Cristina; Giuffrida, Francesca; Dionisi, Fabiola

    2010-02-24

    Pine nuts are traditionally used in various part of the world for the preparation of desserts or sauces or in salads. Local production is not sufficient to cope with the high demand of pine nuts around the world, and countries such as China or Pakistan are exporting much of their production to Western countries. Almost all the nuts that are traditionally consumed belong to the Pinus genus, but over the past years, the number of consumer complaints following consumption of commercial pine nuts increased. Some consumers experienced taste disturbance lasting for up to two weeks after consumption. Food safety agencies raised some concerns regarding pine nuts imported from Asia and their association with taste disturbance. However, even though a formal association has not been found to date, the Pinus genus comprises species that are not classified as edible and could be eventually used to adulterate edible species. Pinus spp. seed lipids are known to contain very specific polyunsaturated fatty acids know as Delta5-olefinic acids. Seed fatty acid profile of conifers had been used in the past as a taxonomic marker, and in the present study to identify the botanical origin of pine nut in nine commercial products. Fast gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) was used to resolve the complete fatty acid profile of Pinus spp. samples in less than 5 min. A diagnostic index based on the relative levels of the main fatty acids including distinctive Delta5-olefinic acids was used to identify botanical origins. Results revealed the occurrence of the following Pinus spp. in commercial products: P. pinea, P. koraiensis, P. gerardiana, P. armandii and P. massoniana. The later two species, known as Chinese white pine and Chinese red pine, are only cultivated in China and are not listed as common source of edible pine nuts by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The present study shows that the botanical origin of pine nuts can be identified in products based on the fatty acid profile.

  18. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina, Willow Bark (Salix alba, and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina, willow bark (Salix alba, and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG, β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  19. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  20. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles. PMID:22474508

  1. Wood composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lars Berglund; Roger M. Rowell

    2005-01-01

    A composite can be defined as two or more elements held together by a matrix. By this definition, what we call “solid wood” is a composite. Solid wood is a three-dimensional composite composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin (with smaller amounts of inorganics and extractives), held together by a lignin matrix. The advantages of developing wood composites are (...

  2. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    , viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous......This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry...

  3. Evaluation of pollen collected by honey bee, Apis mellifera L. colonies at Fayoum Governorate, Egypt. Part 1: Botanical origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Halim M. Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is the 1st part of 3-part study carried out at Fayoum Governorate, Egypt to evaluate the pollen species collected by honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies during two successive years, 2009 and 2010. Obtained results showed that, in 2009, total amount of trapped pollen (fresh weight was 2354.89 g/colony/year (mean 588.72 g/colony/season, with peaks in summer and spring, while declined in autumn and winter. Correlation between mean maximum and minimum temperatures and weekly pollen weights was highly positive, while it was insignificant for relative humidity. In 2010, total amount of trapped pollen decreased to 1635.36 g/colony/year (mean 408.84 g/colony/season. The largest amounts were collected in summer followed by winter then spring, while least ones were in autumn. Correlation was highly positive between weekly mean of pollen weights and maximum temperature, while it was insignificant for minimum temperature or relative humidity. There were 24 plant species of 16 botanical families from which bees collected pollen. These sources were ranked according to their predominant quantities in the 1st and 2nd years by two numbers, respectively as the following: sesame 1 and 1, maize 2 and 2, clover 3 and 7, sunflower 4 and 8, wild mustard 5 and 3, casuarina 6 and 13, olive 7 and 11, eucalyptus 8 and 4, pumpkin 9 and 9, cocklebur 10 and 5, date palm 11 and 10, chamomile 12 and 12, field bindweed 13 and 6, pepper 14 and 20, coriander 15 and 16, acacia 16 and 24, citrus 17 and 0, marigold 18 and 0, common red 19 and 17, Christ’s thorn 20 and 22, tooth pick 21 and 21, brood bean 22 and 15, belladonna 23 and 23, pea 0 and 14, marjoram 0 and 18 and fennel 0 and 19. The 1st five plants seem to be the main pollen sources for honey bee colonies and consequently pollen producing during the whole year in the tested region. These sources represented 75.61% and 66.95% of the total annual yield in the two surveyed years, respectively.

  4. Effects of the Botanical Compound p-Anisaldehyde on Horn Fly (Diptera: Muscidae) Repellency, Mortality, and Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, Allan T; Harlien, Jessica L

    2018-01-10

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), is an economically important obligate blood feeder that mainly attacks cattle in Europe, Asia, and North and South America. As horn fly resistance to conventional insecticides becomes more common, alternative control tactics, such as application of bioactive botanical natural products are being investigated. p-Anisaldehyde has been found in many plant species, and it has shown effects that include mortality, attractancy, and interference with host seeking. The series of bioassays we developed was effective for assessing a range of horn fly responses to chemicals and probably those of some other filth fly species. In our study, p-anisaldehyde was lethal to horn fly eggs at concentrations of 0.00001%, and possibly less. Mixed into cow manure, 5000-20,000 ppm p-anisaldehyde reduced horn fly larvae by 85.4%-100%. p-Anisaldehyde caused some immobilization of adult horn flies when exposed by direct contract with spray droplets and by fumigation. Mortality was 90%-100% in response to 5%-10% concentrations by 30 min, and LD50 and LD90 values are reported for five times from 30 min-4 h. Complete horn fly mortality was achieved by fumigation with 0.75% p-anisaldehyde by 3 h in an enclosed space, and we determined that fumigation was more (≈12.5-fold) lethal to adult horn flies than sprayed droplets. Although horn flies were not repelled by p-anisaldehyde in static air tube olfactometers, the compound completely deterred feeding from cotton pads soaked in bovine blood in response to concentrations of 0.6% and greater in ventilated containers. Although horn fly control is not likely to use fumigation methods, p-anisaldehyde might be useful for adult control using sprays and egg and larval control using feed-through techniques. Exposure to sublethal concentrations of p-anisaldehyde did not affect horn fly egg production and hatching. Aside from causing different responses in the same species of arthropod, p

  5. Evaluation of the botanical origin of commercial dry bee pollen load batches using pollen analysis: a proposal for technical standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud M. Barth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available High quality of bee pollen for commercial purpose is required. In order to attend the consumer with the best identification of the botanical and floral origin of the product, 25 bee pollen batches were investigated using two techniques of pollen grain preparation. The first started to identify pollen loads of different colors in two grams of each well mixed batch, and the second to identify pollen grains in a pool made of all the pollen loads comprised in two grams. The best result was obtained by this last technique, when a pollen grain suspension was dropped on a microscope slide and circa 500 pollen grains were counted per sample. This analysis resulted in the recognition of monofloral and bifloral pollen batches, while the use of the first technique resulted in all samples receiving a heterofloral diagnosis.É exigida alta qualidade para a comercialização de pólen apícola. A fim de atender o consumidor com a melhor identificação da origem botânica e floral do produto, 25 partidas de pólen apícola feram investigadas usande duas diferentes técnicas na preparação dos grãos de pólen. A primeira partiu da identificação das cargas polínicas contidas em dois gramas de cada partida bem misturada segundo suas cores. A segunda visava identificar os grãos de pólen de um agrupamento ("pool" de todas as cargas polínicas contidas em dois gramas de cada amostra. O melhor resultado foi obtido pela última técnica, quando uma suspensão de grãos de pólen era gotejada sobre uma lâmina de microscopia e cerca de 500 grãos de pólen eram centades por amostra. Esta análise resultou no reconhecimento de partidas monoflorais e biflorais de pólen apícola, enquanto que usando a primeira técnica, todas as amostras receberam a diagnose heterefloral.

  6. Mineral content of hay harvested in Bavarian and Swiss horse farms. Predictive value of cutting time, number of cut, botanical composition, origin and fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzle, E; Möllmann, F; Nater, S; Wanner, M; Wichert, B

    2008-12-01

    Hay samples from 29 horse farms in Southern Upper Bavaria and 31 horse farms in Switzerland were taken and analysed for minerals such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. The content of herbs and legumes in the hay was determined and the Weende analysis was performed. Comparison between Bavaria and Switzerland resulted in comparable calcium contents of approximately 4 g Ca/kg dry matter (DM) in grass hay. Hay with more than 10% of herbs and legumes found only in Switzerland showed higher Ca contents of >7 g Ca/kg DM in hay. The mineral contents of phosphorus and potassium were lower in hay from Switzerland (P: 1.8 +/- 0.7 g/kg DM, K: 15.4 +/- 5.1 g/kg DM) than from Bavaria (P: 3.8 +/- 0.6 g/kg DM, K: 20.0 +/- 6.0 DM), whereas the magnesium content of the hay showed no difference between the regions ( approximately 1.5 g Mg/kg DM). Very late first grass hay cuts showed low magnesium and calcium (horses differed from those in dairy cattle in the same region. Fertilization showed only small effects on the mineral contents of the hay produced for horses. Therefore, in calculation of ration and production of supplements for horses, these differences should be taken into account.

  7. Estimation of the Botanical Composition of Clover-Grass Leys from RGB Images Using Data Simulation and Fully Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovsen, Søren; Dyrmann, Mads; Mortensen, Anders Krogh; Steen, Kim Arild; Green, Ole; Eriksen, Jørgen; Gislum, René; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Karstoft, Henrik

    2017-12-17

    Optimal fertilization of clover-grass fields relies on knowledge of the clover and grass fractions. This study shows how knowledge can be obtained by analyzing images collected in fields automatically. A fully convolutional neural network was trained to create a pixel-wise classification of clover, grass, and weeds in red, green, and blue (RGB) images of clover-grass mixtures. The estimated clover fractions of the dry matter from the images were found to be highly correlated with the real clover fractions of the dry matter, making this a cheap and non-destructive way of monitoring clover-grass fields. The network was trained solely on simulated top-down images of clover-grass fields. This enables the network to distinguish clover, grass, and weed pixels in real images. The use of simulated images for training reduces the manual labor to a few hours, as compared to more than 3000 h when all the real images are annotated for training. The network was tested on images with varied clover/grass ratios and achieved an overall pixel classification accuracy of 83.4%, while estimating the dry matter clover fraction with a standard deviation of 7.8%.

  8. Important Florida botanical aeroallergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Joshua F; Jelks, Mary L; Lockey, Richard F

    2010-01-01

    Florida is home to approximately 4 million allergy sufferers and almost 15,000 individual species of plants. Only a few of these plants produce pollen with documented allergenicity via in vivo/in vitro testing and provocation challenges. Many plant species with proven allergenicity are present only to a limited degree. Furthermore, allergenic plants in Florida do not follow the same pollinating patterns as the rest of the country, i.e., trees in the spring, grasses in the summer, and weeds in the fall. Media outlets that report pollen counts to the general public may mislead patients without appropriate interpretation. This review highlights clinical studies that document the allergenicity of some pollens and summarizes expert opinion regarding other prevalent and allergenic pollens throughout the state.

  9. Our botanical heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stafleu, Frans A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 May 1938 our predecessor professor Pulle delivered an address on the ”stocktaking of the heritage of our forefathers” on the occasion of the opening of the enlarged and reorganized Laboratory of special Botany and Plant Geography” of the University of Utrecht. The ”renewal” had been radical: a

  10. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available THE OLDEST SCIENTIFIC NAME FOR THE CINNAMON TREECinnamomum zeylanicum BL, 1826, has been currently considered tobe the proper name for the common cinnamon tree. This name was alreadyin use during the pre-Linnean period (cf. Kostermans, Bibliogr. Laur. 364.1964.The oldest valid name, however, is Cinnamomum verum J.S. Presl,1825, This is not a pharmaceutical name, as is evident from the referencescited by Presl and by the treatment of other species. For complete refe-rences cf. Kostermans, Bibl. Laur. 360, 1964.

  11. Dietary and botanical anxiolytics

    OpenAIRE

    Alramadhan, Elham; Hanna, Mirna S.; Hanna, Mena S.; Goldstein, Todd A.; Avila, Samantha M.; Weeks, Benjamin S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Drugs used to treat anxiety have many negative side effects including addiction, depression, suicide, seizures, sexual dysfunction, headaches and more. Anxiolytic medications do not restore normal levels of neurotransmitters but instead manipulate the brain chemistry. For example, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) prevent the reuptake of serotonin from the synapse allowing serotonin to remain in the area of activity for a longer period of time but does not correct the la...

  12. Miscellaneous botanical notes XXIII

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1975-01-01

    A sheet of the BSIP collections, gathered in Vanikoro Island, Santa Cruz group, near the proper Solomon Is., had tentatively been identified as probably belonging to Euphorbiaceae, but was discarded by Airy Shaw in 1962 and now again in 1974. Closer examination showed it to belong to Melicytus, a

  13. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Barros de Morais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban environments, such as parks and gardens, may offer many alimentary resources, besides shelter and favorable conditions, for butterfly survival. This study aimed to make an inventory of butterflies visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM. From March 2006 to March 2007, the floral visitors were observed weekly for 2h. After 108 hours’ observations, 1114 visits by 39 butterfly species, associated with 43 plant species (21 families, were confirmed. Among the butterflies, Nymphalidae had the highest richness of species (S= 18, followed by Hesperiidae (S= 8, Pieridae (S= 7, Papilionidae (S= 4 and Lycaenidae (S= 2. The pierid Phoebis philea philea was the most frequent species (188 visits, followed by hesperiids Urbanus proteus proteus (100, U. teleus (73 and the nymphalid Heliconius erato phyllis (71. Lantana camara (Verbenaceae, Eupatorium laevigatum (Asteraceae, Russelia equisetiformis (Scrophulariaceae and Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Verbenaceae were the most visited plants. The Botanical Garden of UFSM is an example of an urban park that seems to provide floral resources for the feeding of many butterfly species, being also a potential refuge for species from forest areas nearby.

  14. In vitro safety and efficacy evaluations of a complex botanical mixture of Eugenia dysenterica DC. (Myrtaceae): Prospects for developing a new dermocosmetic product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Larissa Cleres; de Ávila, Renato Ivan; Veloso, Danillo Fabrini Maciel Costa; Pedrosa, Tatiana Nascimento; Lima, Emerson Silva; do Couto, Renê Oliveira; Lima, Eliana Martins; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Paula, José Realino; Valadares, Marize Campos

    2017-12-01

    In the context of developing a new natural product-based cosmetic, the in vitro efficacy and safety evaluations of a complex botanical mixture based on Eugenia dysenterica leaf hydroalcoholic extract (EDE) (2.5-1000μg/mL) were carried out. Chromatographic analysis demonstrated the presence of the tannin (ellagic acid) and flavonoids (quercetin and gallic acid) which characterize the EDE as a polyphenol-rich mixture. Using HFF-1 fibroblasts, it was shown that EDE promoted cell regeneration after UVA exposure. It also led to the inhibition of the collagenase, elastase and tyrosinase enzymes, which are involved in skin-related disorders. In terms of toxicological evaluation, the EDE was classified as non-phototoxic through the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake Phototoxicity Test (OECD N° 432, 2004) and non-eye irritant by Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability (OECD N° 437, 2013) assay, in conjunction with corneal histomorphometric analysis. Furthermore, the EDE has no skin sensitization potential as demonstrated by a two-out-of-three prediction model [protein-binding/haptenization (OECD N° 442C, 2015), keratinocyte and dendritic cell activations]. In addition, it was shown that the EDE seems to be non-genotoxic through the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (OECD N° 487, 2014) using HepG2 cells. When considered together, these findings support the use of EDE botanical mixture in cosmetic/pharmaceutical products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. POSSIBILITIES TO USE NATURAL EXTRACTS FROM MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS (MAP LIKE BOTANICAL REPELLENT OR INSECTICIDE COMPOUNDS AGAINST PEST INSECTS IN ECOLOGICAL CROPS (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina IONESCU-MĂLĂNCUŞ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical insecticides have long been touted as attractive alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for pest management because botanicals reputedly pose little threat to the environment or to human health. The body of scientific literature documenting bioactivity of plant derivatives to arthropods pests continues to expand i.e. repellents based on essential oils extracted from Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Rosmarinus officinalis to mosquitoes, or cinnamon oil, sandalwood oil and turmeric oil are previously reported as insect repellents evaluatede in the laboratory conditions. With the constantly increasing problems of insecticide resistance and increasing public concerns regarding pesticide safety, new, safer active ingredients are becoming necessary to replace existing compounds on the market. The present study carried out in the period 2010-2012 comprises a review of two insect repellents, followed by some new research conducted in our laboratory on plant-derived insect repellents. The two alkaloids tested against the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in laboratory conditions was obtained by water and alchohol extraction from two vegetal species, Cichorium intybus L. (Asterales:Asteraceae and Delphinium consolida L. (Ranales:Ranunculaceae. The tests carried out in laboratory and field experimentally plots under cages permit to evaluate several other compounds for repellent activity of lacctucin alkaloids.

  16. The Joint Action of Destruxins and Botanical Insecticides (Rotenone, Azadirachtin and Paeonolum Against the Cotton Aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The joint action of destruxins and three botanical insecticides, rotenone (Rot, azadirachtin (Aza and paeonolum (Pae against the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, was bioassayed. In laboratory experiment, several synergistic groups of destruxins with botanical insecticides were found by means of Sun’s Co-toxicity Coefficients (CTC and Finney’s Synergistic Coefficient (SC. The best synergistic effect was discovered in the ratio group Des/Rot 1/9 with the CTC or SC and LC50 values of 479.93 or 4.8 and 0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The second and third synergistic effects were recorded in the ratio groups Des/Rot 7/3 and 9/1. Although the ratio groups Des/Aza 6/4, Des/Pae 4/6, 3/7 and 2/8 indicated synergism by Sun’s CTC, they were determined as additive actions by Finney’s SC. Additive actions were also found in most of the ratio groups, but antagonism were recorded only in three ratio groups: Des/Pae 9/1, 7/3 and 6/4. In greenhouse tests, the highest mortality was 98.9% with the treatment Des/Rot 1/9 at 0.60 μg/mL, meanwhile, the treatments Des/Pae 4/6 and Des/Aza 6/4 had approximately 88% mortality.

  17. Effects of dietary phenolics and botanical extracts on hepatotoxicity-related endpoints in human and rat hepatoma cells and statistical models for prediction of hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yitong; Flynn, Thomas J; Ferguson, Martine S; Hoagland, Erica M; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2011-08-01

    Toxicity assessment of botanical materials is difficult because they are typically complex mixtures of phytochemicals. In the present study, 16 phenolics were tested in both human (HepG2/C3A) and rat (MH1C1) hepatoma cells using a battery of eight toxicity endpoints. Cluster analysis was used to group the phenolics into four clusters for each cell type. Comparison of overall and individual liver activity of phenolics on both human and rat hepatoma cell lines showed significant differences for some endpoints. However, the cluster membership was similar across both cell types with the majority of phenolics clustering with the solvent control group (cluster 1). Each cell type produced a cluster of compounds with reported in vivo liver toxicity (cluster 2). Five herbal extracts were prepared and then tested as above. Using the cluster model developed with the phenolics, in the HepG2/C3A cells green tea was assigned to cluster 2 and the remaining four extracts to cluster 1. In the MH1C1 cells, green tea and thyme were assigned to cluster 2, cinnamon to cluster 4, and juniper berry and peppermint to cluster 1. The data suggest that this in vitro model may be useful for identifying hepatotoxic phenolics and botanical preparations rich in phenolics. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. In vitro evaluation of the effect of botanical formulations used in the control of Aedes aegypti L. (Diptera: Culicidae on liver enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Rejane de Andrade Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Dengue fever is a viral disease transmitted by the Aedes aegypti Linn. (1792 (Diptera: Culicidae mosquito, which is endemic in several regions of Brazil. Alternative methods for the control of the vector include botanical insecticides, which offer advantages such as lower environmental contamination levels and less likelihood of resistant populations. Thus, in this study, the ability of botanical insecticide formulations to inhibit the activity of the liver enzymes serum cholinesterase and malate dehydrogenase was evaluated. METHODS: Inhibition profiles were assessed using in vitro assays for cholinesterase and malate dehydrogenase activity and quantitated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at 410nm to 340nm. RESULTS Insecticide products formulated from cashew nutshell liquid [A] and ricinoleic acid [B] showed cholinesterase activity levels of 6.26IU/mL and 6.61IU/mL, respectively, while the control level for cholinesterase was 5-12IU/mL. The products did not affect the level of 0.44IU/mL established for malate dehydrogenase, as the levels produced by [A] and [B] were 0.43IU/mL and 0.45IU/mL, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Our findings show that in vitro testing of the formulated products at concentrations lethal to A. aegypti did not affect the activity of cholinesterase and malate dehydrogenase, indicating the safety of these products.

  19. Begonia “Tuti Siregar” (Begonia listada Smith &Wasshausen x Begonia acetosa Vellozo: a new cultivar from Bali Botanic Garden, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARTUTININGSIH-M. SIREGAR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Siregar HM, Ardaka IM, Siregar M (2010 Begonia “Tuti Siregar” (Begonia listada Smith &Wasshausen x Begonia acetosa Vellozo: a new cultivar from Bali Botanic Garden, Indonesia. Biodiversitas 11: 15-18. A new Begonia cultivar was generated by crossing Begonia listada Smith & Wasshausen with Begonia acetosa Vellozo at Bali Botanic Garden began in 2005. The female flowers of B. listada were pollinated with pollen grains from B. acetosa. Begonia listada is characterized by the following characters: erect, non rhizomatous, branched subshrub to 1 m tall; leaves: blade above bronze, beneath purple with two pale green veins. B. acetosa has the following characters: creeping rhizomatous perennial to about 1 m tall; leaves: thick, blade above olive green, beneath bright red, both surfaces with a dense covering of short stiff white hairs. The results of crossing is, herb, erect, non-rhizomatous, 40-75 cm heigh, stem brownish green, hairy, stipules in pairs, marcescent, ascending, membranous. Leaves, beautiful asymmetrical leaves intermediate between both parents; petiole deeply red, covered with wooly hairs, veins yellow like B. listada. The new cultivar, Begonia ‘Tuti Siregar’, has the American Begonia Society registration number 1001 (Salisbury 2008.

  20. The role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa with special emphasis on the contributions of the Botanical Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. B. Killick

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available Five papers cover different aspects of the contributions to and role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa. Two papers sum up the contributions for the non-agricultural and agricultural sectors. The introductory paper by D. J. B. Killick provides a short historical account of the Botanical Research Institute, followed by a discussion of the contributions of the Institute to botany in South Africa through its National Herbarium and identification service as well as researches in taxonomy, plant anatomy, cyto-genetics, ecology, economic botany and data processing. B. de Winter emphasizes the fundamental role of taxonomy and bio-systematics for planning and the optimal use of the natural plant resources. The current support for taxonomy and biosystematics is examined and proposals made for improving progress in the Flora of Southern Africa series. For plant physiology, N. Grobbelaar discusses, firstly, the ways whereby the productivity of a plant species with its characteristic genetic constitution can be raised by determining and modifying for optimal response the effects of environmental factors such as spacing, mineral nutrition, water provision, etc.; and, secondly, usually when the first means has been achieved, of improving plant productivity by altering the genetic constitution of the plant so that it can perform better than its ancestors under the prevailing conditions. After discussing and illustrating the applications and roles of plant ecology, D. Edwards concludes that basic plant ecological research is required, firstly, at the regional level through regional plant ecological studies to supply the essential local knowledge needed by researchers, planners and users of the land; and, secondly, at the more detailed level where knowledge is needed of the processes and factors that govern the behaviour of vegetation so that it can be properly used, managed and manipulated. M. J. Wells discusses the role of economic

  1. The role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa with special emphasis on the contributions of the Botanical Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. B. Killick

    1979-11-01

    Full Text Available Five papers cover different aspects of the contributions to and role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa. Two papers sum up the contributions for the non-agricultural and agricultural sectors. The introductory paper by D. J. B. Killick provides a short historical account of the Botanical Research Institute, followed by a discussion of the contributions of the Institute to botany in South Africa through its National Herbarium and identification service as well as researches in taxonomy, plant anatomy, cyto-genetics, ecology, economic botany and data processing. B. de Winter emphasizes the fundamental role of taxonomy and bio-systematics for planning and the optimal use of the natural plant resources. The current support for taxonomy and biosystematics is examined and proposals made for improving progress in the Flora of Southern Africa series. For plant physiology, N. Grobbelaar discusses, firstly, the ways whereby the productivity of a plant species with its characteristic genetic constitution can be raised by determining and modifying for optimal response the effects of environmental factors such as spacing, mineral nutrition, water provision, etc.; and, secondly, usually when the first means has been achieved, of improving plant productivity by altering the genetic constitution of the plant so that it can perform better than its ancestors under the prevailing conditions. After discussing and illustrating the applications and roles of plant ecology, D. Edwards concludes that basic plant ecological research is required, firstly, at the regional level through regional plant ecological studies to supply the essential local knowledge needed by researchers, planners and users of the land; and, secondly, at the more detailed level where knowledge is needed of the processes and factors that govern the behaviour of vegetation so that it can be properly used, managed and manipulated. M. J. Wells discusses the role of economic

  2. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior...... materials. Numerical procedures are outlined which facilitate the practical analysis of any feature considered in this book. Examples are presented which illustrate the analysis of well-known materials such as concrete, hardening cement paste, ceramics, tile, wood, impregnated and reinforced materials...

  3. Historical soil erosion rates in rangelands of SW Spain determined using botanical evidences and high resolution 3D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Rubio-Delgado, Judit; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2014-05-01

    The estimation of medium-term sheet erosion rates represents still a challenge in areas with long land use history. In the present paper, a new methodology for estimating medium-term sheet erosion rates is presented and applied in a wooded rangeland (dehesa). This human-induced semi-natural ecosystem is widespread in SW Iberian Peninsula and is characterized by centuries of agrosilvopastoral land use, being livestock breeding the most important economic activity at present. Vast areas are covered by shallow and poor soils, pointing to a long history of soil erosion. Research carried out in a representative area with open plots revealed low soil loss rates and degradation studies showed high spatial variation related with land use intensity. Knowledge on past soil erosion rates and its relation with land use is necessary in order to understand present soil properties and also for giving adequate advice on land management. The present paper presents results of a pilot study on historical soil erosion in Mediterranean wooded rangelands. The methodology is based on the analysis of the morphology of tree stems, exposed roots and surface micro-topography using data obtained with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. Specifically, botanical evidences were used to estimate the antecedent level of the soil surface. Afterwards, previous and current surfaces were confronted in order to obtain a volume of soil loss in the area influenced by the tree canopy, as well as for the open spaces. On the other hand, the age of the trees in the study area was estimated by means of an existing tree growth model. Finally, soil erosion rates were calculated using the volume of soil loss and the estimated age of every tree. The sampling was carried out in a farm in the Spanish province of Cáceres, with a two-layered vegetation, of grasses and scattered trees (Quercus ilex). Climate is Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 160C and an annual rainfall of 620 mm. Soils are very shallow

  4. Composition: PHHS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    PHHS is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance...... instructions as well as specially designated recordings, as long as the author(s) is (are) mentioned. Please see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ for details....

  5. Compositional C++: Compositional Parallel Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Chandy, K. Mani; Kesselman, Carl

    1992-01-01

    A compositional parallel program is a program constructed by composing component programs in parallel, where the composed program inherits properties of its components. In this paper, we describe a small extension of C++ called Compositional C++ or CC++ which is an object-oriented notation that supports compositional parallel programming. CC++ integrates different paradigms of parallel programming: data-parallel, task-parallel and object-parallel paradigms; imperative and declarative programm...

  6. Composite Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Tamke, Martin

    2012-01-01

    and assembly of the fibre reinforced composite structure Composite Territories, in which the property of bending is activated and varied so as to match solely through material means a desired form. This case study demonstrates how one might extend the geometric model so that it is able to engage and reconcile...

  7. Composite Nacelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Rohr Industries, Inc. is currently researching composite jet nacelle engines. As composites can only tolerate heat up to 350 degrees, heat flow is a major concern. The company employs TRASYS to predict how much heat will be generated and how fast it will be dissipated under different conditions. Developed at JSC, TRASYS enables Rohr to realize considerable savings on nacelle design costs.

  8. Botanical Files on Lettuce (Lactuca sativa). On the chance for gene flow between wild and cultivated Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. including L. serriola L., Compositae) and the generalized implications for risk-assessments on genetically modified plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frietema de Vries, F.T.; Meijden, van der R.; Brandenburg, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    In Botanical Files, a study of the real chances for gene flow from cultivated plants to the wild a system of dispersal codes (Dpdf) was introduced (see text box Dpdf).³7 They are indications of already occurring gene flow from cultivated plants to the wild flora, as can be deduced from herbarium

  9. Non-targeted volatile profiles for the classification of the botanical origin of Chinese honey by solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Jin, Linghe; Fan, Chunlin; Wang, Wenwen

    2017-09-19

    A potential method for the discrimination and prediction of honey samples of various botanical origins was developed based on the non-targeted volatile profiles obtained by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics. The blind analysis of non-targeted volatile profiles was carried out using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for 87 authentic honey samples from four botanical origins (acacia, linden, vitex, and rape). The number of variables was reduced from 2734 to 70 by using a series of filters. Based on the optimized 70 variables, 79.12% of the variance was explained by the first four principal components. Partial least squares discriminant analysis, naïve Bayes analysis, and back-propagation artificial neural network were used to develop the classification and prediction models. The 100% accuracy revealed a perfect classification of the botanical origins. In addition, the reliability and practicability of the models were validated by an independent set of additional 20 authentic honey samples. All 20 samples were accurately classified. The confidence measures indicated that the performance of the naïve Bayes model was better than the other two models. Finally, the characteristic volatile compounds of linden honey were tentatively identified. The proposed method is reliable and accurate for the classification of honey of various botanical origins. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive.

  11. Representation of arborescent plants, registered in Red Data Book of the Russian Federation, in Ukrainian Forest-steppe botanical gardens and arboretums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovich Sergey Yurevich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of three year inventory research of rare species of arborescent plants of the Red Book of the Russian Federation (2008, cultivated in botanical gardens and arboretums located in Ukrainian Forest-steppe . It is established that 51 species grow on the territories of these two categories of natural reserve fund in the region. Out of this number, fourteen species are included in the Red List of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, three species are on the European Red List, seven species are in the Red Book of Ukraine. Most of the species are classified as "rare". Representativeness of species, categories and objects of the investigated rare arborescent plants is identified according to the degree of scientific value and the number of habitats.

  12. Arachnids from the greenhouses of the Botanical Garden of the PJ Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia (Arachnida: Araneae, Opiliones, Palpigradi, Pseudoscorpiones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šestáková, Anna

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This is the first detailed contribution on the arachnid fauna from heated greenhouses in the Botanical Garden of the P.J. Šafárik University in Košice (Slovakia. Over ten years 62 spider taxa in 21 families were found. Two spiders, Mermessus trilobatus (Emerton, 1882 and Hasarius adansoni (Audouin, 1826, were recorded in Slovakia for the first time. Another interesting record was the cellar spider Hoplopholcus sp. and a new locality for the exotic spiders Coleosoma floridanum Banks, 1900 and Triaeris stenaspis Simon, 1891 was discovered. Additionally, a short survey of other arachnids (except Acari was done. A single specimen of a provisionally identifiable palpigrade species (cf. Eukoenenia florenciae, one harvestmen species, Opilio canestrinii (Thorell, 1876, and four pseudoscorpion species were recorded. The rare pseudoscorpion species Chthonius ressli Beier, 1956 was collected for the second time in Slovakia.

  13. Vinča-Belo Brdo, a late neolithic site in Serbia consideration of the macro-botanical remains as indicators of dietary habits

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    Filipović Dragana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of macro-botanical remains from the late Neolithic site of Vinča-Belo Brdo has provided first information on the range of crops and wild plants present at the site, and revealed their potential role as foodstuffs. The abundance and distribution of certain plant taxa across different archaeological deposits suggests to what extent they were used within the settlement. The analyzed plant remains also offer insight into the types of food consumed by Vinča residents and serve as a basis for inferring the seasonality and method of food provision/production and activities related to plant use. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177012: Society, spiritual and material culture and communications in prehistory and early history of the Balkans

  14. The use of ALS, botanical, and soil data to monitor the environmental hazards and regeneration capacity of areas devastated by highway construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Dominik; Woziwoda, Beata; Forysiak, Jacek; Sławik, Łukasz; Ptak, Agnieszka; Charążka, Edyta

    2016-07-01

    The impact of viaduct construction on the vegetation of a river valley was studied in Central Poland (Natura 2000 site PLH100006). The research aimed at assessing the suitability of ALS (airborne laser scanning), soil, and botanical data for monitoring the environmental effects of right-of-way reclamation 1 year after the road construction. Based on the data mentioned above, the following problems were identified: changes in topography and hydrological conditions of the valley as a result of improper land levelling, the use of inadequate soil for reclamation, no spontaneous regeneration of natural vegetation along the entire right-of-way, as well as the abundant occurrence of invasive species. The results of analysis were used to define strategies for mitigation of adverse impacts of the viaduct construction.

  15. The botanical lexicon in “Il Viaggio all’Indie Orientali” by Father F. Vincenzo Maria di S. Caterina da Siena (1672

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Drocco

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of the XVII century the Discalced Carmelite Padre Vincenzo Maria of Saint Caterina of Siena visited India and, when he returned, drew up his travel account, titled Il Viaggio alle Indie Orientali. This work plays a key role in the context of Italian travel accounts about India. However, despite its importance, it is rather surprising that no significant research has been conducted to investigate in deep this text, edited for the last time in 1683. The aim of the present paper is to pursue its analysis, in particular offering an etymological research and a critical examination of a consistent part of the botanical terms mentioned and explained by Padre Vincenzo Maria. As we will show, many of these terms appeared for the first time, in an Italian text and in some few cases in an European one, in Padre Vincenzo Maria’ s work.

  16. [Pollinosis caused by Parietaria. Clinical observations in Northern Sardinia and botanical and allergic considerations on P. officinalis L. and P. judaica L. (P. diffusa Mert. and Koch)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzei, A D; Vargiu, G

    1984-09-01

    Botanical and allergological relations between two Parietaria species with greater pollinosic incidence, P. officinalis and P. judaica-P. diffusa, are examined: taxonomic and morphological aspects are discussed, and a key for their determination is proposed. Results of clinical-allergological survey on pollinosic subjects in North Sardinia during several years by means of Prick or Scratch Test are now presented. Diagnostic assays have been effected with extracts found on the market while the therapy has been carried out with extracts of "allergoids" and "modified" type, as well as with extracts of P. judaica. Cross-reactivity between P. officinalis and P. judaica has been evidenced, and greater therapeutic efficacy has been observed by employing "purified" and "modified" vaccines.

  17. Patterns and drivers of plant functional group dominance across the Western Hemisphere: a macroecological re-assessment based on a massive botanical dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Engemann; Sandel, Brody Steven; Enquist, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Plant functional group dominance has been linked to climate, topography and anthropogenic factors. Here, we assess existing theory linking functional group dominance patterns to their drivers by quantifying the spatial distribution of plant functional groups at a 100-km grid scale. We use...... a standardized plant species occurrence dataset of unprecedented size covering the entire New World. Functional group distributions were estimated from 3 648 533 standardized occurrence records for a total of 83 854 vascular plant species, extracted from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN......) database. Seven plant functional groups were considered, describing major differences in structure and function: epiphytes; climbers; ferns; herbs; shrubs; coniferous trees; and angiosperm trees. Two measures of dominance (relative number of occurrences and relative species richness) were analysed against...

  18. A proposal for chemical characterization and quality evaluation of botanical raw materials using glandular trichome microsampling of yacón (Polymnia sonchifolia, Asteraceae, an Andean medicinal plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schorr

    Full Text Available A proposal for chemical characterisation and quality evaluation of botanical raw materials by analysing the glandular trichomes from the leaves of two different populations of yacón (Polymnia sonchifolia Poeppig & Endlicher, Asteraceae is described. This species is an Andean medicinal plant and the tea prepared with their leaves displays hypoglycemic property. The method was based on the glandular trichome microsampling using LC/DAD. Qualitative chromatographic fingerprints of the glands were obtained by isocratic runs and then compared between the two populations, showing the same qualitative profile. The two main metabolites detected in the glands were later isolated from a leaf rinse extract by preparative separation and identified as the melampolides enhydrin and uvedalin. These compounds, subtypes of sesquiterpene lactones, were used as chemical markers. This technique is applicable to other medicinal plants and can be used for the evaluation of the quality of dried material or leaf rinse extracts.

  19. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Beebread – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina URCAN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Beebread is a product of the hive obtained from pollen collected by bees, to which they add honey, digestive enzymes and subsequently is stored in the combs. The bees transform the bee pollen in beebread by an anaerobic fermentation process. A proper hive management promotes beebread collection, aimed at marketing it for human consumption since it can be considered a valuable food supplement due to its content of a wide range of nutrients. Its value is given by the content in protein, amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, mineral salts, polyphenols and flavonoids, which depends on the botanical source of bee pollen. The nutritional and functional composition of beebread is widely reported; nevertheless, few studies on transformation processes of the pollen to improve the availability of the compounds present in this product were found. Overall, beebread is a recent collected and consumed bee product and at this stage it can be used as a food supplement.

  20. In vivo assessment of botanical supplementation on human cytochrome P450 phenotypes: Citrus aurantium, Echinacea purpurea, milk thistle, and saw palmetto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Bill J; Gardner, Stephanie F; Hubbard, Martha A; Williams, D Keith; Gentry, W Brooks; Carrier, Julie; Khan, Ikhlas A; Edwards, David J; Shah, Amit

    2004-11-01

    Phytochemical-mediated modulation of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity may underlie many herb-drug interactions. Single-time point phenotypic metabolic ratios were used to determine whether long-term supplementation of Citrus aurantium , Echinacea purpurea , milk thistle (Silybum marianum), or saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) extracts affected CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, or CYP3A4 activity. Twelve healthy volunteers (6 women, 6 men) were randomly assigned to receive C aurantium , E purpurea , milk thistle, or saw palmetto for 28 days. For each subject, a 30-day washout period was interposed between each supplementation phase. Probe drug cocktails of midazolam and caffeine, followed 24 hours later by chlorzoxazone and debrisoquin (INN, debrisoquine), were administered before (baseline) and at the end of supplementation. Presupplementation and postsupplementation phenotypic trait measurements were determined for CYP3A4, CYP1A2, CYP2E1, and CYP2D6 by use of 1-hydroxymidazolam/midazolam serum ratios (1-hour sample), paraxanthine/caffeine serum ratios (6-hour sample), 6-hydroxychlorzoxazone/chlorzoxazone serum ratios (2-hour sample), and debrisoquin urinary recovery ratios (8-hour collection), respectively. The content of purported "active" phytochemicals was determined for each supplement. Comparisons of presupplementation and postsupplementation phenotypic ratios suggested that these particular supplements had no significant effect on CYP1A2, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, or CYP3A4 activity. Phytochemical profiles indicated that C aurantium was devoid of the CYP3A4 inhibitor 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin. Quantities of fatty acids, flavonolignans, and cichoric acid were consistent with label claims for saw palmetto, milk thistle, and E purpurea , respectively. Botanical supplements containing C aurantium , milk thistle, or saw palmetto extracts appear to pose a minimal risk for CYP-mediated herb-drug interactions in humans. Although the effects of E purpurea on CYP activity were minor, further

  1. Cyto-architectural Alterations in the Corpuscles of Stannius of Stinging Catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after Exposure to a Botanical Pesticide (Nerium indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ManiRam Prasad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This investigation describes the cyto-architectural alterations observed in the corpuscles of Stannius of stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after treatment with a botanical pesticide Nerium indicum. Methods: Heteropneustes fossilis were subjected to 11.27 and 2.81 mg/L of Nerium indicum leaf extract over short- and long-term exposure periods, respectively. Blood was collected for calcium analysis and corpuscles of Stannius (CS gland were fixed on 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in the short-term experiment and after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in the long-term experiment. Results: Serum calcium levels decreased from 48 h to 96 h. CS remains unaffected till 72 h. After the 96-hour treatment, increased granulation was observed in AF- positive cells. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited no change throughout the short-term treatment. Slight increases in nuclear volume of AF-negative cells were recorded after 96 h. Nerium indicum caused decreases in serum calcium levels of H. fossilis from day 14 to 28. CS exhibited no alterations up to 14 days of exposure. AF-positive cells of CS depicted increased granulation after 21 days of treatment. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited a slight decrease from day 21 to 28. Heavy accumulation of AF-positive granules was observed and few degenerating cells were noticed. Nuclear volume of AF-negative cells increased after 21 and 28 days of treatment. Vacuolization and degeneration occurred in certain places. Conclusion: It is inferred from the present study that the botanical pesticide Nerium indicum induced severe changes in the corpuscles of Stannius of catfish.

  2. Short term study of human skin irritation by single application closed patch test: assessment of four multiple emulsion formulations loaded with botanical extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Tariq; Akhtar, Naveed

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of skin irritation potential is a major concern in safety assessment of cosmetics, when long-term use of these products are expected. Non-invasive bioengineering probes have been used previously to measure skin irritation potential of cosmetic ingredients. Experimentation carried out to weigh up the skin irritation potential of four multiple emulsion formulations via visual and non-invasive measurements. Immediate effects of formulations and comparison of two assessment techniques were also tried to establish. Four multiple emulsion formulations one control (without botanical active) and three containing the functional botanical actives plus additives were tested in this study using the following techniques: transepidermal water loss (TEWL), COLIPA visual scoring method (CVSM), Mexameter MPA 5 (Courage + Khazaka, Germany) and capacitance [Corneometer MPA 5 (Courage + Khazaka, Germany)]. Visual examination and non-invasive measurements were performed at baseline and after 24 h. The formulations were applied on the forearm of 12 healthy volunteers of same sexes aged 20-25 years. We found that none of the formulation produced irritation both on visual and instrumental evaluation. However, formulations MeB and MeC have comparable immediate effects on dryness, erythema, melanin and TEWL. Formulation MeC produced more effective results on different parameters, may be due to synergistic effect of two extracts, while MeA failed to produce any immediate effects on skin parameters. Moreover results of both assessment methods are parallel to each other. None of the formulation produce irritant effects, barrier impairment effects or immediate effects except for the formulation MeC which produced appreciable results than other formulations but statistically these results were insignificant (p > 0.05). Based on these results, it could be concluded that formulations may be implied safely as skin rejuvenating candidates.

  3. Determination of Aflatoxins and Ochratoxin A in Ginseng and Other Botanical Roots by Immunoaffinity Column Cleanup and Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucksess, Mary; Weaver, Carol; Oles, Carolyn; D’Ovidio, Kathleen; Rader, Jeanne

    2008-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by certain molds and are common contaminants of many important food crops, such as grains, nuts, and spices. Some mycotoxins are found in fruits, vegetables, and botanical roots. These contaminants have a broad range of toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicity. The public health concerns related to both acute and chronic effects of mycotoxins in animals have prompted more than 100 countries to establish regulatory limits for some of the well-known mycotoxins, such as the aflatoxins (AFL). Our research focused on method development for 2 of these toxins, AFL and ochratoxin A (OTA), in ginseng and other selected botanical roots. Methods using an immunoaffinity column (IAC) cleanup, liquid chromatographic separation, and fluorescence detection were modified and evaluated. Two types of IAC cleanup were evaluated: IAC for AFL, and IAC for both AFL and OTA. Three derivatization techniques to enhance the fluorescence of the AFL were compared: precolumn trifluoroacetic acid, postcolumn bromination, and postcolumn ultraviolet irradiation. No derivatization was needed for OTA. Results for AFL using the single analyte IAC cleanup and the 3 derivatization techniques were all comparable for ginseng and for other roots such as ginger, licorice, and kava-kava. Recoveries of added AFL for ginseng at levels from 2 to 16 ng/g were about 80%. Using IAC cleanup for both AFL and OTA recoveries of added AFL for ginseng at 4–16 ng/g were about 70%, and for ginger, licorice, and kava-kava were about 60%. Recoveries of added OTA for ginseng, ginger, and echinacea at 4 ng/g were about 55%. PMID:16792061

  4. Clinical and biochemical effects of a combination botanical product (ClearGuard™ for allergy: a pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yumei

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botanical products are frequently used for treatment of nasal allergy. Three of these substances, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Malpighia glabra, and Bidens pilosa, have been shown to have a number of anti-allergic properties in-vitro. The current study was conducted to determine the effects of these combined ingredients upon the nasal response to allergen challenge in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Methods Twenty subjects were randomized to receive the combination botanical product, (CBP 2 tablets three times a day, loratadine, 10 mg once a day in the morning, or placebo, using a randomized, double-blinded crossover design. Following 2 days of each treatment and during the third day of treatment, subjects underwent a nasal allergen challenge (NAC, in which nasal symptoms were assessed after each challenge dose and every 2 hours for 8 hours. Nasal lavage fluid was assessed for tryptase, prostaglandin D2, and leukotriene E4 concentrations and inflammatory cells. Results Loratadine significantly reduced the total nasal symptom score during the NAC compared with placebo (P = 0.04 while the CBP did not. During the 8 hour period following NAC, loratadine and the CBP both reduced NSS compared with placebo (P = 0.034 and P = 0.029, respectively. Analysis of nasal lavage fluid demonstrated that the CBP prevented the increase in prostaglandin D2 release following NAC, while neither loratadine nor placebo had this effect. None of the treatments significantly affected tryptase or leukotriene E4 release or inflammatory cell infiltration. Conclusion The CBP significantly reduced NSS during the 8 hours following NAC and marginally inhibited the release of prostaglandin D2 into nasal lavage fluid, suggesting potential clinical utility in patients with allergic rhinitis.

  5. Explosive compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, J.F.M.; Falconer, E.L.

    1971-04-13

    A thickening agent for an aqueous slurry explosive composition consists of the combination of a cross-linked galactomannan with psyllium flour in specific proportions. This thickener provides good fluidity and reduced tackiness. (7 claims)

  6. Compositional Idioms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, David; Katz, Jerrold J.

    2000-01-01

    Argues that there is a large class of expressions, typified by "plastic flower," stuffed animal," and "kosher bacon," that have a unique semantics combining compositional, idiomatic, and decompositional interpretation. (Author/VWL)

  7. Computational composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.; Redström, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Computational composite is introduced as a new type of composite material. Arguing that this is not just a metaphorical maneuver, we provide an analysis of computational technology as material in design, which shows how computers share important characteristics with other materials used in design...... and architecture. We argue that the notion of computational composites provides a precise understanding of the computer as material, and of how computations need to be combined with other materials to come to expression as material. Besides working as an analysis of computers from a designer’s point of view......, the notion of computational composites may also provide a link for computer science and human-computer interaction to an increasingly rapid development and use of new materials in design and architecture....

  8. Hybrid composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacob John, Maya

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available conventional glass reinforced plastics with biocomposites that exhibit structural and functional stability during storage and use and yet are susceptible to environmental degradation upon disposal. An interesting approach in fabricating biocomposites... natural fibre / biofibre in a matrix. Hybridization with glass fibre provides a method to improve the mechanical properties of natural fibre composites and its effect in different modes of stress depends on the design and construction of the composites...

  9. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [Knoxville, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Solihull, GB; Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  10. Magnetoelectric Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, G.

    2010-08-01

    In a composite of magnetostrictive and piezoelectric phases, mechanical strain mediates magnetoelectric (ME) coupling between the magnetic and the electric subsystems. This review discusses recent advances in the physics of ME interactions in layered composites and nanostructures and potential device applications. The ME phenomena of importance are giant low-frequency interactions and coupling when the electric and/or the magnetic subsystems show resonance, including electromechanical resonance (EMR) in the piezoelectric phase, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in the magnetic phase, and magnetoacoustic resonance at the overlap of EMR and FMR. Potential device applications for the composites are magnetic-field sensors, dual electric-field- and magnetic-field-tunable microwave and millimeter-wave devices, and miniature antennas.

  11. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  12. Computational Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.

    to understand the computer as a material like any other material we would use for design, like wood, aluminum, or plastic. That as soon as the computer forms a composition with other materials it becomes just as approachable and inspiring as other smart materials. I present a series of investigations of what...... Computational Composite, and Telltale). Through the investigations, I show how the computer can be understood as a material and how it partakes in a new strand of materials whose expressions come to be in context. I uncover some of their essential material properties and potential expressions. I develop a way...

  13. Using plant wax markers to estimate the diet composition of grazing Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, C; Südekum, K-H; Gill, F L; Dohme-Meier, F; Schori, F

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to test whether diet selection of dairy cows under grazing conditions could be estimated using plant wax markers. Furthermore, differences between 2 cow strains and the effect of concentrate supplementation on plant species selection were investigated. The experiment was a study with a crossover design performed on an organic farm with 12 Swiss Holstein cows and 12 New Zealand Holstein cows. Both experimental periods consisted of a 21-d adaptation and a 7-d measurement period. All cows grazed full time in a rotational stocking system and received either no concentrate or 6 kg/d of a commercial cereal-grain mix. Representative herbage samples of each grazed paddock were taken and botanical composition of subsamples was manually determined. The average proportions of the plant species were 27.8% Lolium perenne, 6.1% Dactylis glomerata, 10.4% Trifolium repens, and 9.0% Taraxacum officinale. Other grass species were merged as "other grass" (38.2%) and other forb species as "other forbs" (8.5%). n-Alkanes, long-chain fatty acids, and long-chain alcohols (LCOH) were analyzed in the samples of plant species, concentrate, and feces from each cow. A linear discriminant analysis indicated that diet components were differentiated best with LCOH (96%) and worst with the combination of all marker groups together (12%). For each marker, the fecal marker recovery (FR) relative to dosed ytterbium was determined in 2 ways. Estimation of diet composition was performed with the software "EatWhat," and results were compared with botanical composition with the Aitchison distance. The results indicate that the diet composition of grazing dairy cows can be estimated using plant wax markers. Additionally, the calculation of FR led to mostly reliable results, yet this approach needs further validation. The most accurate estimation was achieved with the marker combination of n-alkanes and LCOH with a correction for FR. Less accurate estimations were achieved

  14. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A; Elliott, Christopher T; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-12-15

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classification criteria were developed and all data were fused into a simple decision-making system. The single lab validation of the method demonstrated the very good performance (96% correct classification, 100% specificity, 4% false positive rate). Only a small fraction of the samples needed to be confirmed with the majority of oils identified rapidly using only the spectroscopic procedure. The results demonstrate the huge potential of the methodology for a wide range of oil authenticity work. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Music Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, music programs in K-12 schools have emphasized performance opportunities for children and young people. Until the release of the 1994 National Standards in Music, targeted instruction in composition was frequently overlooked due to the emphasis on performance as well as the expectations of what a school music program ought to produce…

  16. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    . Not only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...

  17. Treatments of non-wood plant fibres used as reinforcement in composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Ange Arsène

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a summary of the knowledge on fibres and pulps of non wood tropical plants used as reinforcement in cementitious composites accumulated during the recent years by Guadeloupean and Brazilian teams participating in collaborative work. Vegetable fibres represent a good alternative as non-conventional materials for the construction of ecological and sustainable buildings. The use of such renewable resources contributes to the development of sustainable technologies. The main objective of the paper is to emphasize the use of agricultural wastes in the production of cement based composites. The botanical, chemical, physical, morphological and mechanical properties of fibres from various plants are described. The effects of different treatments on physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fibres are presented. The most effective treatments in influencing the mechanical and physical properties are pyrolysis and alkaline ones, according to the type of plant. The final choice will have to consider fibre availability, and treatment costs.

  18. Evaluation of antimicrobial activities of crude ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts of Morinda lucida leaf, stem, and bark growing in Adekunle Ajasin University Botanical Garden against selected clinical isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Osuntokun, Oludare T.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research work is to determine the antimicrobial activities of crude ethyl acetate and ethanolic extracts of Morinda lucida leaf, stem, and bark growing in Adekunle Ajasin University Botanical Garden against selected clinical isolates. The plant Morindal lucida falls under the family Rubiaceae known to have wide usage in traditional medicine. Morinda lucida is a tropical West African tree of medium-size about 18–25 m tall, the bark is grey to brown in color, flowers are whi...

  19. Castanea spp. buds as a phytochemical source for herbal preparations: botanical fingerprint for nutraceutical identification and functional food standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donno, Dario; Beccaro, Gabriele Loris; Mellano, Maria Gabriella; Bonvegna, Luca; Bounous, Giancarlo

    2014-11-01

    Many plant species may be used for the production of herbal preparations containing phytochemicals with significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities and health benefits: Castanea spp. is among the most commonly used herbal medicines. The aim of this research was to perform an analytical study of chestnut bud preparations, in order to identify and quantify the main bioactive compounds, and to obtain a specific chemical fingerprint to evaluate the single class contribution to the herbal preparation phytocomplex. The analyses were performed using a high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to a diode array detector. Castanea spp. was identified as a rich source of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds: the observed analytical fingerprint demonstrated that these bud preparations represent a rich source of bioactive compounds (104.77 ± 1.14 g kg(-1) FW) in relation to different genotypes, specific sampling sites and several phenological stages. This study showed that the observed analytical fingerprint can be considered an important tool for assessing the chemical composition and bioactivities of the chestnut-derived products, considering the Castanea genus as a new source of natural health-promoting compounds. This study allowed the development of an effective tool for quality control by fingerprinting the bud preparation in order to develop a new generation of standardised preparations. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    . The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro-thermal behavior......, viscoelastic behavior, and internal stress states. Other physical properties considered are thermal and electrical conductivities, diffusion coefficients, dielectric constants and magnetic permeability. Special attention is given to the effect of pore shape on the mechanical and physical behavior of porous...... materials. Numerical procedures are outlined which facilitate the practical analysis of any feature considered in this book. Examples are presented which illustrate the analysis of well-known materials such as concrete, hardening cement paste, ceramics, tile, wood, impregnated and reinforced materials...