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Sample records for botanical composition

  1. Effect of pasture botanical composition on milk composition in organic production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S.; Dahl, A.V.; Vae, A.H.;

    2010-01-01

    Milk samples from sixteen Norwegian Red dairy cows grazing mixed swards of either grass-red clover (GR) or mixed swards of sown and unsown species of grass, clover and other herbs (GCH) were collected during four periods. Both pastures were organically managed. Pasture botanical composition had n...... from experiments with red clover silage. The oxidative stability of the milk lipids was not affected by pasture type....

  2. Gastrointestinal metabolism of phytoestrogens in lactating dairy cows fed silages with different botanical composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njåstad, K. M.; Adler, S. A.; Hansen-Møller, J.;

    2014-01-01

    fed silages with different botanical composition. Four lactating rumen cannulated Norwegian Red cattle were assigned to a 4. ×. 4 Latin square with 1 cow per treatment period of 3 wk. The 4 treatment silages were prepared from grasslands with different botanical compositions: organically managed short...... and analyzed for the concentrations of phytoestrogens by using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique. Concentration of total isoflavones was highest in ORG-SG and lowest in CON-TI silage, whereas the content of total lignans was highest in the grass silages. The isoflavones were...

  3. Variation in content and composition of phenolic compounds in permanent pastures according to botanical variation

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaud, Aurélie; Fraisse, Didier; Cornu, Agnes; Farruggia, Anne; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Besle, Jean-Michel; Martin, Bruno; Lamaison, Jean-Louis; Paquet, Denis; Doreau, Michel; Graulet, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Phenolic compounds contribute to the micronutrient composition of pasture, which in turn may affect animal product composition. To assess the importance and variations in content of these compounds, the polyphenolic and botanical compositions of 24 permanent pastures located in one lowland and two upland regions were studied at equivalent stages of growth. Phenolic fractions were characterized and quantified using HPLC-PDA-ESI-QToF, and the total content was determined by colorimetry over eac...

  4. Phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of Tuscan bee pollen of different botanic origins

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    V. Domenici

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the apicultural products, the honey bee-pollen is growing in commercial interest due to its high nutritional properties. For the first time, bee-pollen samples from Tuscany (Italy were studied to evaluate botanical origin, phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity. The investigated pollen loads were composed of three botanical families: Castanea, Rubus and Cistus.The highest levels of proteins and lipids were detected in Rubus pollen. Castanea pollen contained greater polyphenols, flavonoids and anthocyanins content, while the highest flavonols level wasdetected in Cistus pollen. These results were also confirmed by front-face fluorescence spectroscopy, used here, for the first time, as a fast tool to characterize bee-pollens.

  5. Terpenoid compositions and botanical origins of Late Cretaceous and Miocene amber from China.

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    Gongle Shi

    Full Text Available The terpenoid compositions of the Late Cretaceous Xixia amber from Central China and the middle Miocene Zhangpu amber from Southeast China were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS to elucidate their botanical origins. The Xixia amber is characterized by sesquiterpenoids, abietane and phyllocladane type diterpenoids, but lacks phenolic abietanes and labdane derivatives. The molecular compositions indicate that the Xixia amber is most likely contributed by the conifer family Araucariaceae, which is today distributed primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but widely occurred in the Northern Hemisphere during the Mesozoic according to paleobotanical evidence. The middle Miocene Zhangpu amber is characterized by amyrin and amyrone-based triterpenoids and cadalene-based sesquiterpenoids. It is considered derived from the tropical angiosperm family Dipterocarpaceae based on these compounds and the co-occurring fossil winged fruits of the family in Zhangpu. This provides new evidence for the occurrence of a dipterocarp forest in the middle Miocene of Southeast China. It is the first detailed biomarker study for amber from East Asia.

  6. Analysis of Temporal Changes in Botanical Composition of a Long-term Grazing Experiment in Nixinasuno, Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ru-han; MASAE Shiyomi; SHIGEO Takahashi; TADAKATSU Okubo

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the temporal changes of botanical composition in grassland ecosystem, and to clarify the relation between these changes and environmental impacts, such as climatic factors and artificial disturbance, a grazing trail was carried out during a 21-year period from 1974 at a sown grassland of the National Grassland Research Institute, located in Nishinasuno, the central area of Japan. The data sets of biomass for each mouth(from April to November)of the 21-year period were analyzed in this paper. The botanical composition of aboveground biomass varied greatly witl both season and year. The biomass ratio of improved herbage species to invaded native plants gradually decreased each year. This may have been owing to meteorological factors, such as Iow air-temperature in winter, dry and hot summers, grassland management(including grazing intensity and fertilizer application), and inter-specific competition between native and introduced herbage plants.

  7. Dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition in mixed pastures of marandugrass, forage peanut and tropical kudzu

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    Carlos Mauricio Soares de Andrade

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to evaluate the dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition of a mixed pasture of marandugrass (Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu, forage peanut (Arachis pintoi cv. Mandobi and tropical kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides, rotationally stocked at four daily forage allowance levels (6.6, 10.3, 14.3 and 17.9% of live weight. Sward condition was characterized in each stocking cycle by measuring pre- and post-grazing sward height, forage mass and percentage of bare ground. Botanical composition (grass, forage peanut, tropical kudzu and weeds was evaluated before each stocking period. Swards under smaller forage allowances presented lower height, forage mass and ground cover. This condition favored the growth of forage peanut, which constituted 21.1, 15.2, 8.4 and 3.8% of forage mass in the last quarter of the experimental period, from the lowest to the highest forage allowance, respectively. Tropical kudzu was sensitive to all forage allowance levels and its percentage in the botanical composition was strongly reduced along the experimental period, especially during the dry season (July to September. Forage peanut cv. Mandobi and marandugrass form a more balanced mixture when pre-grazing sward height is maintained shorter than 45 cm. Tropical kudzu is intolerant to intensive grazing management systems when associated to marandugrass.

  8. Effects of Fertilizer Application on Forage Production and Botanical Composition of Floodplain and Steppe Rangelands of Tekirdağ

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    M. Altin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This research was planned and conducted on floodplain and steppe areas of a natural rangeland in Karamurat Village, Malkara District, Tekirdağ Province in 2005-2006 period. The purpose of this study, effects of fertilizer application on forage production and botanical composition of Floodplain and steppe rangelands of Tekirdağ. The yields of forage and dry matter vegetation was determined by cutting in blooming time and botanical composition and canopy cover via transect and point-frame measurements. In the 2005 and 2006 , in Autumn, 4 kg/da N and P and 3.6 kg/da N and P, in Spring 4.2 and 5 kg/da N was applied on the rangeland. The experimental area was 1940da. 1m2cages were placed for measurements on unfertilized areas. The rangeland was under control in both years (2005-2006. On barren and basement area of natural rangelands, fertilizing gave rise to most amount of fresh forage and dry hay in 2005 and 2006. Fertilization gave rise to significant yields in forage and dry matter in both floodplain and steppe areas in the study period. According to the averages of fresh forage and dry weights in 2005 and 2006, the estimated rangeland yields were in both fertilized and unfertilized the floodplain areas 2095.0 kg/da and 1150.0 kg/da, 620.0 kg/da and 349.0 kg/da, respectively. The yields were in fresh forage weight and dry weight in both fertilized and unfertilized of the dryland areas as 1665.0 kg/da and 845.0 kg/da, 342.0 kg/da and 240.0 kg /da in the cages, respectively. Fertilizing primarily effects botanical composition and canopy cover of a rangeland. With fertilizing, botanical composition was determined to increase rates of Fabaceae and Poaceae and reduce the rates of other families in transect and point-frame measurements in the fertilized area. The results indicated that plant-covered area measurement values on fertilized rangeland were 85.6% and 95.8% on average by transect measurement method the values on fertilized areas were 88

  9. Terpenoid composition and botanical affinity of Cretaceous resins from India and Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mallick, Monalisa [Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay (India); Kumar, Kishor [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology, Uttarakhand (India); Mann, Ulrich [Forschungzentrum Juelich (Germany). Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere; Greenwood, Paul F. [John De Laeter Mass Spectrometry and WA Biogeochemistry Centres (M090), University of Western Australia, Crawley (Australia)

    2011-01-01

    Fossil resins from the Cretaceous sediments of Meghalaya, India and Kachin, Myanmar (Burma) were analysed using Curie point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and thermochemolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to help elucidate their botanical source. The major pyrolysis products and methyl-esterified thermochemolysis products of both the resins were abietane and labdane type diterpenoids with minor amount of sesquiterpenoids. The thermochemolysis products also included methyl-16,17-dinor callitrisate, methyl-16,17-dinor dehydroabietate and methyl-8-pimaren-18-oate - the latter two from just the Myanmarese resin. The exclusive presence of both labdane and abietane diterpenoids and the lack of phenolic terpenoids may suggest that the studied Cretaceous resins were derived from Pinaceae (pine family) conifers. (author)

  10. Contribution of botanical origin and sugar composition of honeys on the crystallization phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escuredo, Olga; Dobre, Irina; Fernández-González, María; Seijo, M Carmen

    2014-04-15

    The present work provides information regarding the statistical relationships among the palynological characteristics, sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, melezitose and maltose), moisture content and sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W) of 136 different honey types (including bramble, chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia, lime, rape, sunflower and honeydew). Results of the statistical analyses (multiple comparison Bonferroni test, Spearman rank correlations and principal components) revealed the valuable significance of the botanical origin on the sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W). Brassica napus and Helianthus annuus pollen were the variables situated near F+G and G/W ratio, while Castanea sativa, Rubus and Eucalyptus pollen were located further away, as shown in the principal component analysis. The F/G ratio of sunflower, rape and lime honeys were lower than those found for the chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia and honeydew honeys (>1.4). A lower value F/G ratio and lower water content were related with a faster crystallization in the honey. PMID:24295680

  11. The presence of a common link between artistic expression and garden. Compositional solution botanical garden Strumica

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska; Atanasov, Ivica

    2012-01-01

    What is composition? It is a theory, which examines rules for union and structural elements (their relationships) and groups into a harmonious system in accordance with the fine idea of the artist. Art under composition course the construction of a work of art. This term is associated with process design and product realization. Thus we reached the goal of the composition; it is to control the viewer's eye. Observer to see what you (the designer, photographer, artist) he want to see and n...

  12. Chemical Composition of Different Botanical Origin Honeys Produced by Sicilian Black Honeybees (Apis mellifera ssp. sicula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Vista, Silvia; Tenore, Gian Carlo; Daglia, Maria

    2015-07-01

    In 2008 a Slow Food Presidium was launched in Sicily (Italy) for an early warning of the risk of extinction of the Sicilian native breed of black honeybee (Apis mellifera L. ssp sicula). Today, the honey produced by these honeybees is the only Sicilian honey produced entirely by the black honeybees. In view of few available data regarding the chemical composition of A. mellifera ssp. sicula honeys, in the present investigation the chemical compositions of sulla honey (Hedysarum coronarium L.) and dill honey (Anethum graveolens L.) were studied with a multimethodological approach, which consists of HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and NMR spectroscopy. Moreover, three unifloral honeys (lemon honey (obtained from Citrus limon (L.) Osbeck), orange honey (Citrus arantium L.), and medlar honey (Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl)), with known phenol and polyphenol compositions, were studied with NMR spectroscopy to deepen the knowledge about sugar and amino acid compositions. PMID:25730368

  13. Influence of combined botanical extract preparation on body composition – results from double blind randomized clinical trial

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    Łucja Pilaczyńska-Szcześniak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is becoming a great cause of concern in many countries. To shift the energy balance towards expenditure, dietary supplements should be designed to increase thermogenesis, lipolysis, loss of body water, and activation of digestive enzymes. Material and methods: Double blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate a botanical water extract composed of green tea extract, bean peel and asparagus. During 56 days of the study body composition, anthropometric measurements and biochemical parameters were estimated in fifty-one healthy, moderately obese subjects. Results: Forty-two subjects completed the study according to the protocol. In the active preparation group, weight, BMI, percent of body fat, waist, hip and waist-to-hip ratio were not statistically different compared to placebo. The sum of skinfolds differed significantly. When selecting a subgroup of patients with hypercholesterolaemia (n=21, in the active extract group the change in body composition index (BCI and fat mass (FM were significant (p=0.037 and p=0.019 respectively in patients with hypercholesterolaemia when compared to normocholesterolaemic patients. Fat-free mass (FFM did not change significantly in the active extract group (p=0.083 when hypercholesterolaemic and normocholesterolaemic patients were compared. None of the parallel parameters (FM and FFM change, BCI changed significantly in the placebo group when compared to hypercholesterolaemic and normocholesterolaemic subjects. Conclusions: There was no statistically significant change in weight, BMI or percent of body fat measured by bioimpedance in the active extract and placebo groups. Obese patients with hypercholesterolaemia benefited from the active extract, with reduced total fat mass and a positive influence on the body composition improvement index.

  14. Effect of a botanical composition, UP446, on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems in beagle dogs and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young Chul; Jia, Qi

    2016-06-01

    Extensive safety evaluation of UP446, a botanical composition comprised of standardized extracts from roots of Scutellaria baicalensis and heartwoods of Acacia catechu, has been reported previously. Here we carried out additional studies to assess the effect of UP446 on respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. A Functional observational battery (FOB) and whole body plethysmography system in rats and implanted telemetry in dogs were utilized to evaluate the potential CNS, respiratory and cardiovascular toxicity, respectively. UP446 was administered orally at dose levels of 800, 2000 and 5000 mg/kg to SpragueDawley rats and at 4 ascending dose levels (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg) to beagle dogs. No abnormal effects were observed on the cage side, open field, hand held, and sensori-motor observations suggestive of toxicity in respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous (CNS) systems. Rectal temperatures were comparable for each treatment groups. Similarly, respiratory rate, tidal volume and minute volume were unaffected by any of the treatment groups. No UP446 related changes were observed on blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram in beagle dogs at dose levels of 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg. Some minor incidental, non-dose correlated changes were observed in the FOB assessment. These data suggest that UP446 has minimal or no pharmaco-toxicological effect on the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous systems. PMID:27012374

  15. Species Composition and Structure of the Communities of Plant-Parasitic and Free-Living Soil Nematodes in the Greenhouses of Botanical Gardens of Ukraine

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    Gubin A.I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Species Composition and Structure of the Communities of Plant-Parasitic and Free-Living Soil Nematodes in the Greenhouses of Botanical Gardens of Ukraine. Gubin, A. I., Sigareva, D. D. — In greenhouses of botanical gardens of Ukraine 81 species of nematodes were found. The richest by the number of species was Tylenchida order that was presented by 25 species (31 % of species composition. The dominant group of nematodes was plant-parasitic (most frequent was Rotylenchus robustus (de Man, 1876 Filipjev, 1936 and Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid et White, 1919 Chitwood, 1949. The group of saprobiotic nematodes, which was presented by 52 species (64 %, appeared to be the richest by the number of species. It is shown, that formation of nematode communities in greenhouses of botanical gardens was caused by the interaction of many related factors, crucial of which is the composition of plant collections. The structure of communities is quite constant and almost independent of the quantity of nematodes species. Plant-parasitic species dominate by the number and frequency of detection, and represent a kind of a core of nematode communities.

  16. Molecular composition, chemotaxonomical aspects and botanical origin of Brazilian amber [Composição molecular, aspectos quimiotaxonômicos e origem botânica de âmbares brasileiros

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    Débora A. Azevedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amber is a plant fossil resin constituted mainly by diterpenes of several classes, such as abietanes, labdanes, pimaranes and kauranes. The botanical origin of amber is related to angiosperms and gymnosperms, depending on the geological period and where it was produced. The analysis of its chemical composition performed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance allows the determination of the possible botanical sources, allowing obtaining important information regarding the resinous flora on the geological past of the Earth. Although amber samples are studied primarily by geochemists and paleontologists in the context of paleobotany and paleozoology, the research about its molecular composition is directly related to chemotaxonomy and phytochemistry. The results obtained to Brazilian amber samples until this moment allowed the determination of three possible amber botanical sources in Cretaceous period – Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae e Cheirolepidiaceae.

  17. Safety issues of botanicals and botanical preparations in functional foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although botanicals have played a role in the marketing of health products for ages, there is an increased interest today due to their perceived health benefits. Not only do consumers increasingly take charge of their health, but the scientific information and understanding of the beneficial health effects of bioactive substances in food, functional foods and food supplements have improved. Increasing use of these products has also led to concerns about their actual safety. Recorded cases of intoxications have triggered such concerns. The safety assessment of these substances is complicated by, amongst others, the variability of composition. Furthermore, consumption of such functional products is expected to produce physiological effects, which may lead to low margins of safety as the margin between exposure of such products and the safe level of intake are likely to be small. The safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations in food and food supplement should at least involve: - the characterisation and quality of the material, its quality control; - the intended use and consequent exposure; - history of use and exposure; - product comparison(s); - toxicological information gathering; - Risk characterisation/safety assessment; As a guidance tool, a decision tree approach is proposed to assist in determining the extent of data requirements based on the nature of the such product. This guidance tool in safety assessment was developed by an expert group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI), European Branch, and is currently in press. In this paper a summarised version of this tool is presented

  18. Chemical composition, botanical evaluation and screening of radical scavenging activity of collected pollen by the stingless bees Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu-amarela

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    Tania M.S. Silva

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Stingless bees in Brazil are indigenous and found all over the country. Bee pollen is used for its nutritional value in the human diet. It is made up of natural flower pollen mixed with nectar and bee secretions. In order to evaluate the chemical composition, free radical scavenging activity, and botanical origin, sample of pollen loads from stingless bee, Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu amarela was studied. The EtOAc extract of pollen of Melipona rufiventris yielded the following compounds: p-hydroxycinnamic acid, dihydroquercetin, isorhamnetin, isorhamnetin3-O-(6"-O-E-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, luteolin, and quercetin. This is the first report of the isolation of isorhamnetin3-O-(6"O-E-p-coumaroylβ-D-glucopyranoside from pollen. The free radicalscavenging activities of different solvent extracts of pollen were determined using DPPH assay. This activity decreases in the order: EtOAc>EtOH>Hexane extract. It appears that the EtOAc extract of the pollen is a good scavenger of active oxygen species. The botanical evaluation of pollen loads showed the composition by two pollen types, with the dominant type (97.3% being Scopariadulcis (L. (Scrophulariaceae and the minor one Senna obtusifolia (L. Irwin & Barneby (Fabaceae. This suggests a specific foraging behavior in Melipona rufiventris bees, even in an environment with such a rich botanical diversity as the Northeastern Brazil.As abelhas sem ferrão são espécies indígenas encontradas em todo o Brasil. Seu pólen é utilizado devido ao seu valor nutricional na dieta humana. É produzido a partir de pólen floral misturado com néctar e líquidos secretados pelas abelhas. Visando avaliar a composição química, a atividade sequestradora de radicais livres e a origem botânica foi estudado o pólencoletado pela abelha sem ferrão Melipona rufiventris (Uruçu-amarela. Do extrato acetato de etila foram isolados os compostos: ácido phidroxicinâmico, dihidroquercetina, isoramnetina, 3O(6

  19. DEVELOPING A NEW BOTANIC GARDEN

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    Mark Richardson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Building a new botanical garden is a valuable opportunity that should be implemented as well as possible. The new botanical garden should not simply a clone of the botanical gardens botanical gardens already established, but it should have its own uniqueness, for example in terms of collecting local plant species. There are several things to be considered that the development of new botanical gardens can have a clear direction and goals, including the founding mission of botanical gardens, involvement in conservation and interpretation, as well as the continuity of the existence of botanical gardens in the future.

  20. Analgesic and anti-Inflammatory effect of UP3005, a botanical composition Containing two standardized extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba

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    Mesfin Yimam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic debilitating degenerative joint disease characterized by cartilage degradation and synovial inflammation exhibited by clinical symptoms such as joint swelling, synovitis, and inflammatory pain. Present day pain relief therapeutics heavily relies on the use of prescription and over the counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as the first line of defense where their long-term usage causes detrimental gastrointestinal and cardiovascular-related side-effects. As a result, the need for evidence based safer and efficacious alternatives from natural sources to overcome the most prominent and disabling symptoms of arthritis is a necessity. Materials and Methods: Describe the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of UP3005, a composition that contains a standardized blend of two extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba in carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, abdominal constriction (writhing′s and ear swelling assays in mouse with oral dose ranges of 100-400 mg/kg. Results: In vivo, statistically significant improvement in pain resistance, and suppression of paw edema and ear thickness in animals treated with UP3005 were observed compared with vehicle-treated diseased rats and mice. Ibuprofen was used a reference compound in all the studies. In vitro, enzymatic inhibition activities of UP3005 were determined with IC50 values of 12.4 μg/ml, 39.8 μg/ml and 13.6 μg/ml in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-1, COX-2 and lipoxygenase (5-LOX enzyme activity assay, respectively. Conclusions: These data suggest that UP3005, analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin with balanced dual COX-LOX inhibition activity, could potentially be used for symptom management of OA.

  1. Charles Darwin's Botanical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Darwin's botanical studies provide a way to expose students to his work that followed the publication of "On the Origin of Species." We can use stories from his plant investigations to illustrate key concepts in the life sciences and model how questions are asked and answered in science.

  2. A renaissance for botanical insecticides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Murray B

    2015-12-01

    Botanical insecticides continue to be a subject of keen interest among the international research community, reflected in the steady growth in scientific publications devoted to the subject. Until very recently though, the translation of that theory to practice, i.e. the commercialisation and adoption of new botanical insecticides in the marketplace, has seriously lagged behind. Strict regulatory regimes, long the bane of small pesticide producers, are beginning to relax some of the data requirements for 'low-risk' pesticide products, facilitating movement of more botanicals into the commercial arena. In this paper I discuss some of the jurisdictions where botanicals are increasingly finding favour, some of the newer botanical insecticides in the plant and animal health arsenal and some of the specific sectors where botanicals are most likely to compete effectively with other types of insecticidal product. PMID:26251334

  3. Fatty acid composition, fat soluble vitamin concentrations and oxidative stability in bovine milk produced on two pastures with different botanical composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Dahl, A V; Jensen, Søren Krogh;

    2013-01-01

    pratensis Huds.), timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover and LP contained smooth meadow grass (Poa pratensis L.), white clover and a variety of unsown species. Sixteen cows were blocked according to milk yield, days in milk and sire, and randomly within block allocated to the 2 dietary treatments with...... a daily pasture allowance of 15–20 kg dry matter per cow, supplemented with 3.0 kg barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) concentrate. Milk was sampled during the last week of 3 experimental periods and analysed for FA composition by gas chromatography, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins by high...

  4. Center for Botanical Interaction Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Dietary Supplements, Herbs, Antioxidants Program:Centers for Dietary Supplements Research: Botanicals Description:This center will look at safety and...

  5. Our botanical heritage

    OpenAIRE

    Stafleu, Frans A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 May 1938 our predecessor professor Pulle delivered an address on the ”stocktaking of the heritage of our forefathers” on the occasion of the opening of the enlarged and reorganized Laboratory of special Botany and Plant Geography” of the University of Utrecht. The ”renewal” had been radical: a totally new herbarium building had been built in the southern-most part of the old Botanical Garden at the Lange Nieuwstraat in Utrecht. Pulle’s address still merits reading. The printed version, ...

  6. Urban exterior graphical design in botanical garden

    OpenAIRE

    Despot, Katerina; Sandeva, Vaska

    2013-01-01

    Botanical Garden as an art picture and all the content is a strong source of inspiration for the creation of advertising graphics, which is an important segment for the garden, attracting tourists and description of contents. Graphic design is an activity in which a quantity of information gives a comfortable and aesthetic form. This often involves the use of typography, images, colors, and others. Graphic design incorporates in-depth knowledge of the composition and shape, color, color...

  7. Botanical Dietary Supplements: Background Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plant, but many compounds may be responsible for valerian' ;s relaxing effect. Are botanical dietary supplements safe? Many ... before their full effects are achieved. For example, valerian may be effective as a sleep aid after ...

  8. The effects of a commercially available botanical supplement on strength, body composition, power output, and hormonal profiles in resistance-trained males

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    Kreider Richard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum is a leguminous, annual plant originating in India and North Africa. In recent years Fenugreek has been touted as an ergogenic aid. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Fenugreek supplementation on strength and body composition. Methods 49 Resistance trained men were matched according to body weight and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner capsules containing 500 mg of a placebo (N = 23, 20 ± 1.9 years, 178 ± 6.3 cm, 85 ± 12.7 kg, 17 ± 5.6 %BF or Fenugreek (N = 26, 21 ± 2.8 years, 178 ± 6 cm, 90 ± 18.2 kg, 19.3 ± 8.4 %BF. Subjects participated in a supervised 4-day per week periodized resistance-training program split into two upper and two lower extremity workouts per week for a total of 8-weeks. At 0, 4, and 8-weeks, subjects underwent hydrodensiometery body composition, 1-RM strength, muscle endurance, and anaerobic capacity testing. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and are presented as mean ± SD changes from baseline after 60-days. Results No significant differences (p > 0.05 between groups were noted for training volume. Significant group × time interaction effects were observed among groups in changes in body fat (FEN: -2.3 ± 1.4%BF; PL: -0.39 ± 1.6 %BF, p 0.05. Conclusion It is concluded that 500 mg of this proprietary Fenugreek extraction had a significant impact on both upper- and lower-body strength and body composition in comparison to placebo in a double blind controlled trial. These changes were obtained with no clinical side effects.

  9. Novel botanical ingredients for beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenwald, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Natural substances are generally preferred over chemical ones and are generally seen as healthy. The increasing demand for natural ingredients, improving health and appearance, is also attracting beverages as the fastest growing segment on the functional food market. Functional beverages are launched as fortified water, tea, diary or juices claiming overall nutrition, energy, anti-aging or relaxing effects. The substitution of so called superfruits, such as berries, grapes, or pomegranate delivers an effective range of beneficial compounds, including vitamins, fatty acids, minerals, and anti-oxidants. In this context, new exotic and African fruits could be useful sources in the near future. Teas and green botanicals, such as algae or aloe vera are also rich in effective bioactives and have been used traditionally. The botanical kingdom offers endless possibilities. PMID:19168002

  10. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Grdiša; Kristina Gršić

    2013-01-01

    Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems...

  11. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Grdiša

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems. However, after decades of use, their negative side effects, such as toxicity to humans and animals, environmental contamination, and toxicity to non-target insects have become apparent and interest in less hazardous alternatives of pest control is therefore being renewed. Plant species with known insecticidal actions are being promoted and research is being conducted to find new sources of botanical insecticides. The most important botanical insecticide is pyrethrin, a secondary metabolite of Dalmatian pyrethrum, neem, followed by insecticides based on the essential oils, rotenone, quassia, ryania and sabadilla. They have various chemical properties and modes of action. However, some general characteristics include fast degradation in sunlight, air and moisture, and selectivity to non-target insects. Unfortunately, neither of these insecticides is widely used as a pest control agent but is recognized by organic crop producers in industrialized countries.

  12. Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Grdiša

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Botanical insecticides are natural compounds with insecticidal properties and their use in crop protection is as old as agricultural practice. Although they have been in use for over one hundred years, the advent of synthetic insecticides has unfortunately displaced their use today. Due to fast action, low cost, easy application and efficiency against a wide range of harmful species, synthetic insecticides have become an important part of pest management in modern agricultural systems. However, after decades of use, their negative side effects, such as toxicity to humans and animals, environmental contamination, and toxicity to non-target insects have become apparent and interest in less hazardous alternatives of pest control is therefore being renewed. Plant species with known insecticidal actions are being promoted and research is being conducted to find new sources of botanical insecticides. The most important botanical insecticide is pyrethrin, a secondary metabolite of Dalmatian pyrethrum, neem, followed by insecticides based on the essential oils, rotenone, quassia, ryania and sabadilla. Th ey have various chemical properties and modes of action. However, some general characteristics include fast degradation in sunlight, air and moisture, and selectivity to non-target insects. Unfortunately, neither of these insecticides is widely used as a pest control agent but is recognized by organic crop producers in industrialized countries. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Obična tablica"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

  13. Composição florística de pastagem natural afetada por fontes de fósforo, calagem e introdução de espécies forrageiras de estação fria Botanical composition of natural pasture as afected by phosphorus sources, lime and introduction of winter forage species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duilio Guerra Bandinelli

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Uma das características das pastagens naturais do Rio Grande do Sul é a baixa produtividade de forragem no período do outono-inverno. Uma das alternativas para melhorar os sistemas de produção baseados nessas pastagens é a introdução de espécies forrageiras de crescimento inverno-primaveril e a fertilização e correção da acidez do solo. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito de fontes de fósforo, calcário e introdução de espécies forrageiras de inverno na dinâmica das espécies de uma pastagem natural. Os tratamentos testados foram: T1 - superfosfato simples + calcário + introdução de espécies; T2 - superfosfato triplo + calcário + introdução de espécies; T3 - superfosfato triplo + introdução de espécies; T4 - hiperfosfato de Gafsa + introdução de espécies; T5 - introdução de espécies sem fósforo ou calagem; T6 - testemunha com pastagem natural. Para a avaliação da composição florística da pastagem foram realizados levantamentos botânicos periódicos, durante vinte e dois meses, utilizando-se o método BOTANAL. Os resultados mostraram que os tratamentos testados não provocaram mudanças na composição botânica das espécies nativas no período de tempo avaliado.Natural pastures of Rio Grande do Sul State, South of Brazil, have low forage productivity in the autumn-winter. An alternative to improve systems based on these pastures is introduction of winter forage species, fertilization and liming of soil. The present work had the objective of evaluating the effect of phosphorus sources, lime and introduction of winter forage species in the pasture botanical composition dynamics. The treatments used were: T1 - simple superphosphate + lime + winter forage species introduction; T2 - triple superphosphate + lime + winter forage species introduction; T3 - triple superphosphate + winter forage species introduction; T4 - Gafsa rock phosphate + winter forage species introduction; T5 - winter

  14. Composição botânica e estrutural e valor nutricional de pastagens de azevém consorciadas Botanic and structural composition and nutritional value on intercropped ryegrass pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Reimann Skonieski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho objetivou-se avaliar a influência de espécies em consórcio com azevém sobre a composição botânica e estrutural e o valor nutritivo dos pastos em um sistema de transição agroecológica. Foi avaliada a cultura do azevém (Lolium multiflorum Lam. consorciada com aveia-preta (Avena strigosa Schreb., trevo-branco (Trifolium repens L. e amendoim-forrageiro (Arachis pintoi Krapov. & Gregory. O delineamento experimental foi o inteiramente casualizado, com três tratamentos e três repetições. O primeiro pastejo foi realizado 21 dias após a emergência das plantas nas pastagens de azevém + aveia-preta e azevém + amendoim-forrageiro e 28 dias após a emergência na pastagem de azevém + trevo-branco. O segundo pastejo na pastagem de azevém + aveia-preta ocorreu 30 dias após o primeiro pastejo, enquanto nas demais pastagens ocorreu 37 dias depois. As taxas de acúmulo de matéria seca (MS do início do período de exclusão até o pico de produção de MS foram de 77,7; 75,0 e 71,3 kg/ha/dia de MS para as pastagens consorciadas com trevo-branco, amendoim-forrageiro e aveia-preta, respectivamente. A razão folha/colmo até o segundo pastejo foi elevada em todas as pastagens. A redução dos teores de PB conforme os dias de exclusão no pasto de azevém + aveia-preta é menor que nos pastos de azevém consorciado com trevo-branco ou amendoim-forrageiro.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of species intercropped with ryegrass on the botanical and structural composition and the nutritional values of pastures in an agroecological transition system. It was evaluated ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. intercropped with black oats (Avena strigosa Schreb., white clover (Trifolium repens L. and forage peanut (Arachis pintoi Krapov. & Gregory. It was used a complete random design with three treatments and three repetitions. The first grazing was done 21 days after emergence of the plants on the pastures with ryegrass

  15. Ionic profile of honey as a potential indicator of botanical origin and global environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this study was to determine by Ion Chromatography ions (Na+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+, Cl−, Br−, SO42−, NO3−, PO43−) in honeys (honeydew and floral nectar honeys) from different Italian Regions and from countries of the Western Balkan area. The compositional data were processed by multivariate analysis (PCA and HCA). Arboreal honeydew honeys from the Western Balkans had higher concentrations (from two to three times) of some environmental pollutants (Br−, SO42− and PO43− contents), due to industrial and agricultural activities, than those from Italian regions. The cationic profiles were very similar in both groups. Multivariate analysis indicated a clear difference between nectar honeys and arboreal/honeydew honeys (recognition of the botanical origin). These findings point to the potential of ionic constituents of honey as indicators of environmental pollution, botanical origin and authenticity. -- Highlights: •Analysis by IC of honeys from two areas with different environmental pollution (Italy and Balkans). •Chemometric techniques such as PCA and HCA used. •In Balkans area higher Br−, SO42− and PO43− due to industrial and agricultural activities. •Discrimination of honey botanical origin and authenticity on the base of IC data. •Honey ionic profiles as indicators of environmental pollution and botanical origin. -- Capsule: Ionic profiles of honey could be potential indicators of environmental pollution (industrial and agricultural), botanical origin and authenticity

  16. The use of botanical products and vitamins in sunscreens

    OpenAIRE

    Monico, Gabriela; Leo, Micheal; Ma, Brian; Johal, Ritika S; Ma, Thomas; Sivamani, Raja K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of botanical products and vitamins in skin care creams and sunscreens is prevalent. Herein we conduct an evaluation of sunscreens to quantitatively assess how often sunscreens incorporate botanically derived products and vitamins. The most commonly used botanicals products and vitamins are identified and stratified based on the sunscreen sun protection factor (SPF). The overall prevalence for the use of botanical agents and vitamins was 62% and 79%, respectively. Aloe vera and licoric...

  17. Possibilities of Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavela, R.; Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena; Bárnet, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 16-23. ISSN 1313-2563 Grant ostatní: MŠk(CZ) 2B08049 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : botanical insecticides * plant extracts * supercritical fluid extraction Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection

  18. Possibilities of Botanical Insecticides in Plant Protection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavela, R.; Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena; Bárnet, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 16-23. ISSN 1313-2563 Grant ostatní: GA MŠMT(CZ) 2B08049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : botanical insecticides * plant exctracts * supercritical fluid extraction Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection

  19. Molecular mapping of important agro-botanic traits in sesame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Venkata Ramana Rao, & , K. Prasuna, G. Anuradha, A. Srividya, Lakshminarayana R Vemireddy, V. Gouri Shankar, S. Sridhar, M. Jayaprada, K. Raja Reddy, N.P. Eswara Reddy and E.A. Siddiq

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. ((2n=26 is one of the most ancient oilseed crop of the world. The present study was undertaken to develop a molecular map of the important agro-botanic traits in sesame. Two sesame genotypes Chandana and TAC-89-309 that differ in respect of the important agro-botanic traits were crossed to study the inheritance of these traits. The F2 population along with the F1 and parents was evaluated under field conditions and observations were made on nine agro-botanic traits using International Board for Plant Genetic Resources (IBPGR descriptor grading. For mapping trait related QTL, a genetic framework linkage map was constructed employing a mapping population of 120 F2 individual plants and effective 60 RAPD polymorphic markers chosen based on the study of parental polymorphism (23.07 %. The linkage map places the 60 markers on nine linkage groups spanning a total length of 1547.16 cM at an average distance of 25.78 cM between markers. These nine linkage groups could be covering about 60% of the map length of the genome. Length of the linkage groups ranged between 58.8 (Linkage Group 8 to 423.8 cM (Linkage group 9. The segregation and normal distribution observed in respect of most of the traits in the F2 population have been indicative that the mapping population had sufficient amount of genetic variability for mapping trait specific QTL. Seventeen QTL have been identified for the nine agro-botanic traits by single marker analysis. In all, 19 QTL have been identified by using QTL cartographer v 2.5. Of which, 7 and 12 QTL have been identified by Simple interval mapping and Composite interval mapping respectively. Two genomic regions - one on LG 1 and the other on LG 6 had more than one QTL. The marker interval between OPAE 15350 and OPD 6480 on the linkage group 1 has three QTL viz., leaf angle, capsule hair length and stem hairiness, while on LG 6 between the markers OPP 8380 and OPR 8980, two QTL for basal leaf shape and

  20. Safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations used as ingredients in food supplements: Testing an EFS tired approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speijers, G.; Bottex, B.; Dusemund, B.; Lugasi, A.; Toth, J.; Amberg-Muller, J.; Galli, C.; Silano, V.; Rietjens, I.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes results obtained by testing the European Food Safety Authority-tiered guidance approach for safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations intended for use in food supplements. Main conclusions emerging are as follows. (i) Botanical ingredients must be identified b

  1. The use of botanical products and vitamins in sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monico, Gabriela; Leo, Micheal; Ma, Brian; Johal, Ritika S; Ma, Thomas; Sivamani, Raja K

    2015-11-01

    The use of botanical products and vitamins in skin care creams and sunscreens is prevalent. Herein we conduct an evaluation of sunscreens to quantitatively assess how often sunscreens incorporate botanically derived products and vitamins. The most commonly used botanicals products and vitamins are identified and stratified based on the sunscreen sun protection factor (SPF). The overall prevalence for the use of botanical agents and vitamins was 62% and 79%, respectively. Aloe vera and licorice root extracts were the most common botanical agents used in sunscreens. Retinyl palmitate was the most common vitamin derivative utilized in sunscreens. The prices of sunscreens significantly increased when more than one botanical product was added. Botanical products and vitamins are widely utilized in sunscreens and more research is needed to assess how their inclusion may enhance or alter the function of sunscreens. PMID:26632925

  2. Nutraceuticals and botanicals: overview and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Marcello

    2012-03-01

    The discovery, development and marketing of food supplements, nutraceuticals and related products are currently the fastest growing segments of the food industry. Functional foods can be considered part or borderline to these products and may be defined as foods or food ingredients that have additional health or physiological benefits over and above the normal nutritional value they provide. This trend is driven by several factors, mainly due to the current consumer perceptions: the first and dominant being 'Natural is good', and other secondary, such as the increasing cost of many pharmaceuticals and their negative secondary effects, the insistent marketing campaign, the increasing perception of the need of a healthy diet and its importance in the health and homeostasis organism conditions. However, the central point is that nutraceuticals, botanicals and other herbal remedies, including the entry of new functional foods, are important because of their acceptance as the novel and modern forms to benefit of natural substances. Due to the rapid expansion in this area, the development of several aspects is considered as it could influence the future of the market of these products negatively: an imbalance existing between the increasing number of claims and products on the one hand, the development of policies to regulate their application and safety on the other, rapid and valuable controls to check the composition, including the plant extracts or adulteration to improve efficacy, like the presence of synthetic drugs. It is interesting to see that, from the negative factors reported by the market analysts, a change in consumers preferences is absent. The functional properties of many plant extracts, in particular, are being investigated for potential use as novel nutraceuticals and functional foods. Although the availability of scientific data is rapidly improving, the central aspect concerns the validation of these products. The first step of this crucial aspect is

  3. Ethno-botanical studies from northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research paper efforts have been made to document the ethno-botanical knowledge of important plant species found in Northern Pakistan. It includes Thandiani, Galiat, Kaghan, Swat, Buner, Dir, Chitral and Northern Areas of Pakistan. The area has many climatic and vegetation zones or biomes. Locals residing in mountainous areas belonging to various ethnic groups are traditionally utilizing plants over many generations; these ethnic groups have their distinct life style, belief, traditions and cultural heritage. Plant collection and data regarding traditional uses in various areas of Northern Pakistan has been done periodically in different flowering /fruiting seasons. Locals of old age belonging to various ethnic groups were personally interviewed for establishing uses of plants. Photography is done for easy identification and habitat recognition. Collected plant specimens and seeds were preserved. Plant species were dried, mounted, identified and authenticated. Seventy six species were known to have traditional and ethno botanical uses. Plants have been utilized for many generations. Ethnic groups have distinct life style and have different economic uses for these plants. Due to unsustainable exploitation of natural habitats scarcity of drug plants has occurred. As consequence some species are depleting and may become extinct in near future, e. g. Morchella esculenta, Colchicum lueteum and Viola serpens are just a few of these. Although some sporadic information is available about the flora of this region but very little documented record of the ethno-botanically important plants has been established. It is expected that this research paper will be beneficial for students, researchers, farmers, foresters and general public. On the basis of data obtained it is concluded that ethno-botanical Flora of Northern Pakistan is quite rich and is diverse, due to the difference in altitude, climate and other topographic conditions. (author)

  4. Botanical Compounds: Effects on Major Eye Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan-Phat Huynh; Mann, Shivani N.; Mandal, Nawajes A.

    2013-01-01

    Botanical compounds have been widely used throughout history as cures for various diseases and ailments. Many of these compounds exhibit strong antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. These are also common damaging mechanisms apparent in several ocular diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, cataract, and retinitis pigmentosa. In recent years, there have been many epidemiological and clinical studies that have demonst...

  5. Phytopharmacology of Antiophidian Botanicals: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jitendra Nath De; Abhijit Dey

    2012-01-01

    Venomous snakebite has been a major cause of mortality and morbidity across the Asian, African and Latin American countries. Lack of medical infrastructure, ineffectiveness of conventional antivenin and malpractice by the local quacks worsen the scenario. The present review deals with the pharmacological investigations performed in different botanicals for antiophidian principles. It also includes a list of certain traditionally used medicinal plants with potential anti snake venom efficacy. ...

  6. Semeadura direta de forrageiras de estação fria em campo natural submetido à aplicação de herbicidas: II. Composição botânica No-till seeding of cold season forage on native pasture under herbicides application: II. Botanical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pérez Gomar

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A semeadura direta de espécies forrageiras de estação fria permite reduzir a marcada estacionalidade da sua produção em campos naturais. Durante quatro anos, conduziu-se um experimento de aplicação de herbicidas sobre campo nativo, em um solo Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo, de textura arenosa do norte do Uruguai visando introduzir forrageiras de estação fria e estudar o impacto dos herbicidas na composição botânica de espécies estivais. Foram testadas doses de herbicidas (glifosate 1L ha-1, glifosate 4L ha-1, paraquat 3L ha-1 e testemunha, como tratamento principal, aplicadas no ano 1994, em um delineamento blocos ao acaso. A repetição ou não das mesmas doses no ano 1995 constituiu a subparcela e a aplicação ou não das mesmas doses no ano de 1996 constituiu a sub-subparcela. No levantamento de espécies da vegetação existentes no outono de 1998, observou-se que o maior distúrbio sobre a composição botânica do campo nativo foi provocado com a aplicação continuada da dose de 4L ha-1 de glifosate, onde foram identificadas seis espécies. No levantamento de espécies existentes no tratamento testemunha, no outono, foram identificadas onze espécies, sendo que as espécies Andropogon lateralis, Paspalum notatum, Conyza bonariensis, Eryngium horridum, Desmodium incanum, Cyperus sp. e Digitaria sp. constituiram 90% da composição botânica. Com a aplicação de herbicida, ocorreu uma substituição de espécies perenes por anuais.No-till seeding of winter species may reduce seasonal fluctuations of forage production of natural grasslands. An experiment of herbicide application on native grasses was conducted for four years, on a fine-loamy, mixed Mollic Hapludalf in northern of Uruguay to introduce winter forage and study the impact of herbicide on botanical composition of grass field. The experimental design was split-splitplot with three randomized blocks, with types and dosis of herbicides (gliphosate 1L ha-1, gliphosate 4L

  7. The Study of Bogor Botanical Garden Ecotourism Value Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doni Yusri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study were : 1 to improve development of Bogor Botanical Garden ecotourism value chain, 2 to recommend strategies of development for Bogor Botanical Garden ecotourism value chain, and 3 to formulate programs that increase value added for Bogor Botanical Garden value chain, especially for involved SME’s. Data collected from survey, in depth interview, and literature was analyzed using descriptive analysis, value chain analysis, SWOT analysis. The results of SWOT analysis indicated that the strength of The Bogor Botanical Garden value chain was the well known Bogor Botanical Garden, the weakness was lack of investment to improve the Bogor Botanical Garden, the opportunity was the support of government, and the threat was the growing of ecotourism competitor. Recommended strategies were : 1 relying on the strenghts of Bogor Botanical Garden as a focal point of the plus ecoedutourism programs, 2 improving quality of human resources at each value chain, 3 increasing investment for the development of value chain, and 4 marketing Bogor Botanical Garden as past of various integrated packages with other tourism objective in Indonesia.Keywords: Bogor Botanical Garden, Ecotourism Value Chain, SWOT Analysis

  8. 36 CFR 223.277 - Forest botanical products definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., pine straw, roots, sedges, seeds, shrubs, transplants, tree sap, and wildflowers. Forest botanical..., minerals, posts and poles, rails, rocks, shingle and shake bolts, water, worms, and soil....

  9. The centenary of the School Botanical Garden from Blaj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Sorin MUNTEAN

    1982-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of the first school-botanical garden from Blaj is strongly connected with the development of botanical research at the University and Agronomy Insitute from Cluj-Napoca. The first curators of the garden A. Uilacan, A. Cheteanu, Al. Borza and I. Popu-Cimpeanu studied in Cluj. Prof. Al. Borza developed the medicinal and crop plant collections in collaboration with B. Pater, former head of our agrobotanical garden. Later the botanical garden of the University, became famous under the directorate of Al. Borza. The botanical garden of Blaj belongs today to the agroindustrial middle-school where many Romanian agronomy scientists have been educated.

  10. Integrating Biodiversity Data into Botanic Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Today's species names are entry points into a web of publicly available knowledge and are integral parts of legislation concerning biological conservation and consumer safety. Species information usually is fragmented, can be misleading due to the existence of different names and might even be biased because of an identical name that is used for a different species. Safely navigating through the name space is one of the most challenging tasks when associating names with data and when decisions are made which name to include in legislation. Integrating publicly available dynamic data to characterise plant genetic resources of botanic gardens and other facilities will significantly increase the efficiency of recovering relevant information for research projects, identifying potentially invasive taxa, constructing priority lists and developing DNA-based specimen authentication. New information To demonstrate information availability and discuss integration into botanic collections, scientific names derived from botanic gardens were evaluated using the Encyclopedia of Life, The Catalogue of Life and The Plant List. 98.5% of the names could be verified by the combined use of these providers. Comparing taxonomic status information 13 % of the cases were in disagreement. About 7 % of the verified names were found to be included in the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List, including one extinct taxon and three taxa with the status "extinct in the wild". As second most important factor for biodiversity loss, potential invasiveness was determined. Approximately 4 % of the verified names were detected using the Global Invasive Species Information Network, including 208 invasive taxa. According to Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe around 20 % of the verified names are European alien taxa including 15 of the worst European invasive taxa. Considering alternative names in the data recovery process, success increased up

  11. The Botanic Garden of Tver State University

    OpenAIRE

    Volkova O M; Notov A A

    2004-01-01

    The Botanic Garden of Tver State University is situated at the meeting place of the Volga and Tvertza rivers. It is one of the main green spaces of Tver. The history of the Garden goes back to 1879. It was planted by the merchant Ilya Bobrov at the former territory of Otroch monastery. After the October Revolution the Garden be- came national property and was used as a leisure center. The main planting occurred between 1938 and 1941 but a great number of plants disappeared during ...

  12. Scientific Opinion on a Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) approach for the safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten

    preparation for QPS status, it has been possible to develop a structured assessment scheme that provides a practical method for assessing botanicals and botanical preparations for which an adequate body of knowledge exists and therefore without the need for further testing. Reiterative applications of the...... the development of a comprehensive, systematic and transparent methodology. The Scientific Committee recommends its use as an extension of the 2009 EFSA guidance for the safety assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations intended to be used in food supplements....

  13. Uso de N-alcanos na estimativa da composição botânica em amostras com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria brizantha e Arachis pintoi Use of N-alkanes for estimations of botanical composition in samples with different proportions of Brachiaria brizantha and Arachis pintoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Côrtes

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi conduzido para se determinar a composição de n-alcanos (C24 a C36 em diferentes proporções de dietas hipotéticas de Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu e Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo (0; 15; 30; 45; 60 e 100% de Arachis pintoi e identificar a combinação de alcanos que permite calcular a composição botânica de dietas com o menor valor residual (real menos o estimado. As forragens foram amostradas no verão e os n-alcanos extraídos pelo método de saponificação direta, sendo identificados e quantificados por meio de análise de cromatografia gasosa. O alcano C34 foi utilizado como padrão interno. As proporções de A. pintoi nas dietas foram estimadas pela minimização do z (soma dos quadrados dos desvios entre a proporção real dos alcanos analisados e as proporções pré-estabelecidas (tratamentos, utilizando-se a equação de Duncan et al. (1999. Observou-se que houve predomínio das cadeias carbônicas ímpares e que a concentração total de n-alcanos decresceu à medida que se aumentou a proporção de A. pintoi nos tratamentos. Estimativas acuradas da composição botânica de misturas de A. pintoi com B. brizantha foram obtidas utilizando-se os alcanos C29, C31, C33 e C35. O alcano C35 foi fundamental para a qualidade das estimativas. Os resultados indicaram o grande potencial da técnica para estudos com animais em pastejo.This trial was carried out to determine the composition of n-alkanes (C24 to C36 in hypothetical diets comprising of pure Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu and Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory. cv. Amarillo and mixtures of these two spececies with 15%, 30%, 45%, or 60% of Arachis pintoi; it also intended to identify the combination of alkanes that allows to calculate the botanical composition of diets with the smallest residual value (real less estimated values. The forages were sampled in the summer. The n-alkanes were extracted for the direct saponification

  14. Risk assessment of botanicals and botanical preparations intended for use in food and food supplements: Emerging issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Slob, W.; Galli, C.; Silano, V.

    2008-01-01

    At present there is a growing interest for use of botanicals and botanical ingredients in medicines, for teas or in foods and in food supplements. In addition, a number of plant-derived food items form an integral part of regular human diets. Currently, there is an increasing awareness among safety

  15. Phytochemical Assays of Commercial Botanical Dietary Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krochmal

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing popularity of botanical dietary supplements (BDS has been accompanied by concerns regarding the quality of commercial products. Health care providers, in particular, have an interest in knowing about product quality, in view of the issues related to herb-drug interactions and potential side effects. This study assessed whether commercial formulations of saw palmetto, kava kava, echinacea, ginseng and St. John's wort had consistent labeling and whether quantities of marker compounds agreed with the amounts stated on the label. We purchased six bottles each of two lots of supplements from nine manufacturers and analyzed the contents using established commercial methodologies at an independent laboratory. Product labels were found to vary in the information provided, such as serving recommendations and information about the herb itself (species, part of the plant, marker compound, etc. With regard to marker compound content, little variability was observed between different lots of the same brand, while the content did vary widely between brands (e.g. total phenolic compounds in Echinacea ranged from 3.9–15.3 mg per serving; total ginsenosides in ginseng ranged from 5.3–18.2 mg per serving. Further, the amounts recommended for daily use also differed between brands, increasing the potential range of a consumer's daily dose. Echinacea and ginseng were the most variable, while St. John's wort and saw palmetto were the least variable. This study highlights some of the key issues in the botanical supplement market, including the importance of standardized manufacturing practices and reliable labeling information. In addition, health care providers should keep themselves informed regarding product quality in order to be able to appropriately advise patients utilizing both conventional and herbal medicines.

  16. The Austrian Botanic Gardens Work Group, an Example of Active Networking to Promote Small Botanic Gardens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland K. EBERWEIN

    2011-01-01

    The continuously increasing demands on botanic gardens during the last few decades have led to a huge in increase administration and an urgent need for additional specialized personnel, especially botanists, teachers, database specialists and administrative staff. Instead of meeting these requirements, many botanic gardens are faceing a severe decrease in funding and personnel. Larger gardens provide the opportunity to distribute several tasks to different employees, whereas small gardens are short staffed and often nn by a single curator who has to fulfill all functions. In order to meet actual demands more easily, the Austrian botanic gardens are linked nationally via an active workgroup.This network not only allows the distribution of information but also facilitates the sharing of duties. A listserver speeds up the communication and correspondence within the workgroup, collection priorities and projects (e. g., GSPC) are coordinated, seedbanking becomes decentralized, printedmatters are shared and distributed, etc. Small gardens with only few employees can participate in projects by taking on small-ideally using with their special resources-in order not to fall behind. In addition, there is also an urgent need for international networking by means of plant and seed exchange (Index Semihum), BGCI membership, discussion groups, personal contacts and projects. Mission statements,special marketing strategies for public relations, integrating projects of other workgroup members and adapted public awareness programs are important to focus attention to small gardens and to help them keep alive.

  17. Botanical Composition of Alpaca (Lama pacos Linn. Diet in a Central Mediterranean Range of Chile Composición Botánica de la Dieta de Alpaca (Lama pacos Linn. en un Pastizal del Secano Mediterráneo de la Zona Central de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Castellaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The re-introduction of domestic South American camelids (alpacas and llamas in the central zone of Chile makes it necessary to study their behaviour and adaptability. Since it is fundamental to characterize the camelid’s diet, the present work had as an objective the determination of the plant species selected by the alpacas (Lama pacos Linn. in different phenological stages (vegetative, reproductive and dry season. The study was carried out over three years in a paddock of 2.5 ha of sparse shrubland dominated by Acacia caven (Mol. Mol. and annual species in the herbaceous stratum, which were continually grazed by five male alpacas. The botanical composition and the forage dry matter available for grazing in the pasture was evaluated. Botanical composition of diets was estimated with the microhistological technique, using dung samples collected directly from the rectum. During the vegetative season, the most consumed plant species were annual and perennial grasses. In the reproductive season, the most important components of the diet were woody plant species, annual grasses and forbs. In the dry season, the diet was composed of a high percentage of woody plant species.La reintroducción de camélidos sudamericanos domésticos (alpaca y llamas en la zona central de Chile, hace necesario estudiar su comportamiento y adaptabilidad. En este contexto, la caracterización de la dieta es fundamental. Por ello, el presente trabajo tuvo como objetivo determinar las especies vegetales seleccionadas por las alpacas en diferentes etapas fenológicas del pastizal (vegetativo, reproductivo y seco. El estudio se realizó durante tres temporadas en un potrero de 2,5 ha ocupado por un matorral claro dominado por Acacia caven (Mol. Mol. y especies anuales en el estrato herbáceo, las cuales fueron pastoreadas continuamente por cinco alpacas macho. En la pradera se evaluó la composición botánica y la disponibilidad de la materia seca bajo pastoreo. La

  18. Grazing management strategies for massaigrass-forage peanut pastures: 1. dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition Estratégias de manejo do pastejo para pastos consorciados de capim-massai e amendoim forrageiro: 1. dinâmica da condição do pasto e da composição botânica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio Soares de Andrade

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out from October 2002 to December 2003 to evaluate the dynamics of sward condition and botanical composition of a mixed massaigrass (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai and forage peanut (Arachis pintoi Ac 01 pasture, intermittently stocked at three daily herbage allowance levels (9.0, 14.5 and 18.4% live weight. Sward condition was characterized in each grazing cycle in terms of the pre and post-grazing sward height, forage mass and percentage of bare ground. Botanical composition (grass, legume and weeds was evaluated before each grazing period. Sward height and forage mass increased linearly with increasing herbage allowance (HA levels, and higher values were observed during the rainy season. Percentage of bare ground increased primarily at the lowest HA level. Percentage of forage peanut increased throughout the experimental period, primarily in the barest and shortest swards, under the lowest HA level. In the last quarter of 2003 the legume constituted 23.5, 10.6 and 6.4% of the pasture forage mass, respectively, from the lowest to the highest HA level. These results suggest that forage peanut can be successfully associated with massaigrass, as long as the pre-grazing sward height is maintained shorter than 65-70 cm, which will prevent excessive shading to the legume.Este estudo foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar a dinâmica e a composição botânica de uma pastagem consorciada de capim-massai (Panicum maximum x P. infestum, cv. Massai e amendoim forrageiro (Arachis pintoi Ac 01, manejada sob lotação rotacionada em três níveis de oferta diária de forragem (9,0; 14,5 e 18,4% do peso vivo. A condição da pastagem foi caracterizada em cada ciclo de pastejo, em termos de altura, massa de forragem e porcentagem de solo descoberto (pré e pós-pastejo. A composição botânica da pastagem (gramínea, leguminosa e invasoras foi monitorada antes de cada período de ocupação. Houve aumento linear da altura

  19. UP3005, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba, Improves Pain Sensitivity and Cartilage Degradations in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Rat OA Disease Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesfin Yimam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a multifactorial disease primarily noted by cartilage degradation in association with inflammation that causes significant morbidity, joint pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Present-day management of OA is inadequate due to the lack of principal therapies proven to be effective in hindering disease progression where symptomatic therapy focused approach masks the actual etiology leading to irreversible damage. Here, we describe the effect of UP3005, a composition containing a proprietary blend of two standardized extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba, in maintaining joint structural integrity and alleviating OA associated symptoms in monosodium-iodoacetate- (MIA- induced rat OA disease model. Pain sensitivity, micro-CT, histopathology, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs level analysis were conducted. Diclofenac at 10 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. UP3005 resulted in almost a complete inhibition in proteoglycans degradation, reductions of 16.6% (week 4, 40.5% (week 5, and 22.0% (week 6 in pain sensitivity, statistically significant improvements in articular cartilage matrix integrity, minimal visual subchondral bone damage, and statistically significant increase in bone mineral density when compared to the vehicle control with MIA. Therefore, UP3005 could potentially be considered as an alternative therapy from natural sources for the treatment of OA and/or its associated symptoms.

  20. UP3005, a Botanical Composition Containing Two Standardized Extracts of Uncaria gambir and Morus alba, Improves Pain Sensitivity and Cartilage Degradations in Monosodium Iodoacetate-Induced Rat OA Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Tae-Woo; Moore, Breanna; Jiao, Ping; Hong, Mei; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Nam, Jeong-Bum; Kim, Mi-Ran; Oh, Jin-Sun; Cleveland, Sabrina; Hyun, Eu-Jin; Chu, Min; Jia, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease primarily noted by cartilage degradation in association with inflammation that causes significant morbidity, joint pain, stiffness, and limited mobility. Present-day management of OA is inadequate due to the lack of principal therapies proven to be effective in hindering disease progression where symptomatic therapy focused approach masks the actual etiology leading to irreversible damage. Here, we describe the effect of UP3005, a composition containing a proprietary blend of two standardized extracts from the leaf of Uncaria gambir and the root bark of Morus alba, in maintaining joint structural integrity and alleviating OA associated symptoms in monosodium-iodoacetate- (MIA-) induced rat OA disease model. Pain sensitivity, micro-CT, histopathology, and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) level analysis were conducted. Diclofenac at 10 mg/kg was used as a reference compound. UP3005 resulted in almost a complete inhibition in proteoglycans degradation, reductions of 16.6% (week 4), 40.5% (week 5), and 22.0% (week 6) in pain sensitivity, statistically significant improvements in articular cartilage matrix integrity, minimal visual subchondral bone damage, and statistically significant increase in bone mineral density when compared to the vehicle control with MIA. Therefore, UP3005 could potentially be considered as an alternative therapy from natural sources for the treatment of OA and/or its associated symptoms. PMID:25802546

  1. Molecular mapping of important agro-botanic traits in sesame

    OpenAIRE

    P. Venkata Ramana Rao, & , K. Prasuna, G. Anuradha, A. Srividya, Lakshminarayana R Vemireddy, V. Gouri Shankar, S. Sridhar, M. Jayaprada, K. Raja Reddy, N.P. Eswara Reddy and E.A. Siddiq

    2014-01-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) ((2n=26) is one of the most ancient oilseed crop of the world. The present study was undertaken to develop a molecular map of the important agro-botanic traits in sesame. Two sesame genotypes Chandana and TAC-89-309 that differ in respect of the important agro-botanic traits were crossed to study the inheritance of these traits. The F2 population along with the F1 and parents was evaluated under field conditions and observations were made on nine agro-botanic trait...

  2. Botanical studies in the Arctic National Wildlife Range: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a botanical study in the Arctic National Wildlife Range during 1970. Cooperative studies on flora and fauna were done on selected sites. Sites...

  3. Recent Trends in Studies on Botanical Fungicides in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Mi-Young Yoon; Byeongjin Cha; Jin-Cheol Kim

    2013-01-01

    Plants are attacked by various phytopathogenic fungi. For many years, synthetic fungicides have been used to control plant diseases. Although synthetic fungicides are highly effective, their repeated use has led to problems such as environmental pollution, development of resistance, and residual toxicity. This has prompted intensive research on the development of biopesticides, including botanical fungicides. To date, relatively few botanical fungicides have been registered and commercialized...

  4. Botanicals in dermatology: an evidence-based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Merfort, Irmgard; Schempp, Christoph M

    2010-01-01

    Botanical extracts and single compounds are increasingly used in cosmetics but also in over-the-counter drugs and food supplements. The focus of the present review is on controlled clinical trials with botanicals in the treatment of acne, inflammatory skin diseases, skin infections, UV-induced skin damage, skin cancer, alopecia, vitiligo, and wounds. Studies with botanical cosmetics and drugs are discussed, as well as studies with botanical food supplements. Experimental research on botanicals was considered to a limited extent when it seemed promising for clinical use in the near future. In acne therapy, Mahonia, tea tree oil, and Saccharomyces may have the potential to become standard treatments. Mahonia, Hypericum, Glycyrrhiza and some traditional Chinese medicines appear promising for atopic dermatitis. Some plant-derived substances like dithranol and methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen) [in combination with UVA] are already accepted as standard treatments in psoriasis; Mahonia and Capsicum (capsaicin) are the next candidates suggested by present evidence. Oral administration and topical application of antioxidant plant extracts (green and black tea, carotenoids, coffee, and many flavonoids from fruits and vegetables) can protect skin from UV-induced erythema, early aging, and irradiation-induced cancer. Hair loss and vitiligo are also traditional fields of application for botanicals. According to the number and quality of clinical trials with botanicals, the best evidence exists for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases, i.e. atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. However, many more controlled clinical studies are needed to determine the efficacy and risks of plant-derived products in dermatology. Safety aspects, especially related to sensitization and photodermatitis, have to be taken into account. Therefore, clinicians should not only be informed of the beneficial effects but also the specific adverse effects of botanicals used for dermatologic disorders and

  5. Molecular Targeted Therapies Using Botanicals for Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Nagi; Chornokur, Ganna

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the large number of botanicals demonstrating promise as potential cancer chemopreventive agents, most have failed to prove effectiveness in clinical trials. Critical requirements for moving botanical agents to recommendation for clinical use include adopting a systematic, molecular-target based approach and utilizing the same ethical and rigorous methods that are used to evaluate other pharmacological agents. Preliminary data on a mechanistic rationale for chemoprevention activity...

  6. Botanical modulation of menopausal symptoms: Mechanisms of action?

    OpenAIRE

    Hajirahimkhan, Atieh; Dietz, Birgit M.; Bolton, Judy L.

    2013-01-01

    Menopausal women suffer from a variety of symptoms, including hot flashes and night sweats which can affect quality of life. Although hormone therapy (HT) has been the treatment of choice for relieving these symptoms, HT has been associated with increased breast cancer risk leading many women to search for natural, efficacious, and safe alternatives such as botanical supplements. Data from clinical trials suggesting that botanicals have efficacy for menopausal symptom relief, have been contro...

  7. [Salvia officinalis l. I. Botanic characteristics, composition, use and cultivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniela, T

    1993-06-01

    Salvia officinalis L. is an essential oil containing plant, which does not wildly grow in the territories of the Czech and Slovak Republics but it can be successfully cultivated. It is a perennial half-shrub, from which non-flowering herbaceous sprouts or leaves are collected for pharmaceutical purposes. After drying at a temperature not exceeding 35 degrees C they are the plant drugs Herba salviae or Folium salviae. In PhBs, Herba salviae is official. The drug contains mainly ethereal oil (1-2%), diterpenes, triterpenes and tannin. The pharmacopoeial criterion of quality is the content of essential oil, which is produced in an increased amount in the plant in warm summer months. Herba salviae and the extracts prepared from it are used as an antiseptic agent, an antiphlogistic agent, in the inflammations of the oral cavity and gingivitis and also as a stomachic and an antihydrotic agent. Its utilization in cosmetics and food industry is also of importance. PMID:8402963

  8. Análise micro-histológica da composição botânica de misturas preestabelecidas, submetidas ao processo de digestão in vitro Microhistological analysis of the botanical composition of pre-established mixtures, submitted to the in vitro digestion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela de Oliveira Bauer

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A composição botânica de misturas preestabelecidas de seis espécies forrageiras foi estimada após diferentes tempos de digestão in vitro e comparadas com a composição real. Três misturas de seis espécies, com participações conhecidas, foram constituídas nos períodos chuvoso e seco e examinadas pela técnica micro-histológica. O período de amostragem interferiu na estimativa de apenas uma das misturas. Apesar das diferenças estatísticas entre a composição real das misturas e suas estimativas, nos períodos, seus índices de similaridade foram superiores a 85%. O tempo de digestão influenciou nas estima­tivas das misturas, dependendo da porcentagem de participação das espécies. As estimativas foram idênticas para as três misturas após 48 e 72 horas de digestão. A digestão das amostras pode melhorar ou piorar as estimativas, dependendo da porcentagem de participação e da resistência das espécies. O processo digestivo não deve ser considerado como único fator de variação quando se utiliza esta técnica, que pode ser considerada robusta, uma vez que os índices de similaridade entre os períodos, o tempo de digestão e a composição real foram superiores a 75%.The botanical composition of pre-established mixtures of six forages species was estimated after in vitro digestion times and compared with the real composition. Three mixtures of six species of known participations were made up in the rainy and dry seasons and estimated through the microhistological technique. The sampling season interfered with the estimates of only one of the mixtures. In spite of the statistical differences between the real composition of the mixtures and their estimates, the similarity indices for the periods were superior to 85%. The digestion time influenced mixtures estimates, according to the percentage of the species participation. The three mixtures estimates were identical after 48 and 72 hours of digestion. The digestion of

  9. Regulation of inflammatory gene expression in PBMCs by immunostimulatory botanicals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Denzler

    Full Text Available Many hundreds of botanicals are used in complementary and alternative medicine for therapeutic use as antimicrobials and immune stimulators. While there exists many centuries of anecdotal evidence and few clinical studies on the activity and efficacy of these botanicals, limited scientific evidence exists on the ability of these botanicals to modulate the immune and inflammatory responses. Using botanogenomics (or herbogenomics, this study provides novel insight into inflammatory genes which are induced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with immunomodulatory botanical extracts. These results may suggest putative genes involved in the physiological responses thought to occur following administration of these botanical extracts. Using extracts from immunostimulatory herbs (Astragalus membranaceus, Sambucus cerulea, Andrographis paniculata and an immunosuppressive herb (Urtica dioica, the data presented supports previous cytokine studies on these herbs as well as identifying additional genes which may be involved in immune cell activation and migration and various inflammatory responses, including wound healing, angiogenesis, and blood pressure modulation. Additionally, we report the presence of lipopolysaccharide in medicinally prepared extracts of these herbs which is theorized to be a natural and active component of the immunostimulatory herbal extracts. The data presented provides a more extensive picture on how these herbs may be mediating their biological effects on the immune and inflammatory responses.

  10. Development and Verification of Behavior of Tritium Analytic Code (BOTANIC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VHTR, one of the Generation IV reactor concepts, has a relatively high operation temperature and is usually suggested as a heat source for many industrial processes, including hydrogen production process. Thus, it is vital to trace tritium behavior in the VHTR system and the potential permeation rate to the industrial process. In other words, tritium is a crucial issue in terms of safety in the fission reactor system. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the behavior of tritium and the development of the tool to enable this is vital.. In this study, a Behavior of Tritium Analytic Code (BOTANIC) an analytic tool which is capable of analyzing tritium behavior is developed using a chemical process code called gPROMS. BOTANIC was then further verified using the analytic solutions and benchmark codes such as Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC) and COMSOL. In this study, the Behavior of Tritium Analytic Code, BOTANIC, has been developed using a chemical process code called gPROMS. The code has several distinctive features including non-diluted assumption, flexible applications and adoption of distributed permeation model. Due to these features, BOTANIC has the capability to analyze a wide range of tritium level systems and has a higher accuracy as it has the capacity to solve distributed models. BOTANIC was successfully developed and verified using analytical solution and the benchmark code calculation result. The results showed very good agreement with the analytical solutions and the calculation results of TPAC and COMSOL. Future work will be focused on the total system verification

  11. Legislation relating to nutraceuticals in the European Union with a particular focus on botanical-sourced products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutraceuticals are food or food ingredients that have defined physiological effects. They do not easily fall into the legal categories of food or drug and often inhabit a grey area between the two. These products in general terms cover health promotion, 'optimal nutrition' the concept of enhanced performance - both physically and mentally - and reduction of disease risk factors. In this paper the focus is mainly on legislation governing botanical-sourced nutraceuticals in the European Union (EU). Nutraceutical concept in general has been defined. Different pieces of legislation influencing botanical nutraceuticals are described. The issue of the borderline between food and drug is discussed. The regulatory status of botanical nutraceuticals as food supplement, food ingredient, functional and fortified food, novel foods and foods for particular nutritional use in the diversified, complex and ever-changing European regulatory environment is described. Botanical nutraceuticals present additional problems because of their complex nature and composition particularly with respect to the quality aspects, which in turn affect safety parameters and overall efficacy of the products. Quality issues relating to botanical sources, growth conditions, end products, their specifications and other technical criteria are highlighted. Guiding principles to be observed for conducting in vitro, in vivo studies in animals and their impact on clinical safety data are discussed. Finally, health claims, their types and criteria of substantiation in light of ongoing discussions with regard to the EU frame work of regulation on nutrition and health claims and role of process for the assessment of scientific support for claims (PASSCLAIM) initiative is discussed. The concept of grading of evidence to substantiate different claims and to establish standards, which should not be revoked or reversed by emerging science at a later stage has been considered. These issues are crucial and are being

  12. Adverse effects of plant food supplements and botanical preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lorenzo, Chiara; Ceschi, Alessandro; Kupferschmidt, Hugo;

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this review was to collect available data on the following: (i) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements or botanical preparations; (ii) the misidentification of poisonous plants; and (iii) interactions between plant food supplements....../botanicals and conventional drugs or nutrients. PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase were searched from database inception to June 2014, using the terms ‘adverse effect/s’, ‘poisoning/s’, ‘plant food supplement/s’, ‘misidentification/s’ and ‘interaction/s’ in combination with the relevant plant name. All papers were...... critically evaluated according to the World Health Organization Guidelines for causality assessment. Data were obtained for 66 plants that are common ingredients of plant food supplements; of the 492 papers selected, 402 (81.7%) dealt with adverse effects directly associated with the botanical and 89 (18...

  13. Botanical insecticides inspired by plant-herbivore chemical interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miresmailli, Saber; Isman, Murray B

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of secondary chemicals to protect themselves against herbivores and pathogens, some of which have been used historically for pest management. The extraction methods used by industry render many phytochemicals ineffective as insecticides despite their bioactivity in the natural context. In this review, we examine how plants use their secondary chemicals in nature and compare this with how they are used as insecticides to understand why the efficacy of botanical insecticides can be so variable. If the commercial production of botanical insecticides is to become a viable pest management option, factors such as production cost, resource availability, and extraction and formulation techniques need be considered alongside innovative application technologies to ensure consistent efficacy of botanical insecticides. PMID:24216132

  14. Conservation of indigenous medicinal botanicals in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KAYODE Joshua

    2006-01-01

    The rapid appraisal method was used to identify the botanicals used ethnomedicinally from a total of 300 randomly selected respondents drawn from the existing three geo-political zones of Ekiti State, Nigeria. The results obtained revealed that about 40% of the 71 botanicals identified presently rare. Most of the presently abundant botanicals are species primarily cultivated for other purpose other than medicine. Most of the identified species are valued for their curative effects on malaria and fever, the predominant diseases in the study area. The need for the conservation of the rare species cannot be over emphasised as most rural dwellers in the study area depend mostly on herbs from these species. Strategies towards the attainment of this goal are proposed.

  15. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Leah C; Schmidt, Alex W; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Applequist, Wendy L; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas. PMID:24465484

  16. Bacterial communities in Malagasy soils with differing levels of disturbance affecting botanical diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C Blasiak

    Full Text Available Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communities from a targeted 16S rRNA gene survey of greater than 290,000 sequences generated using 454 pyrosequencing. Two sampling plots in each of three forest conservation areas were established to represent different levels of disturbance resulting from human impact through agriculture and selective exploitation of trees, as well as from natural impacts of cyclones. In parallel, we performed an in-depth characterization of the total vascular plant morphospecies richness within each plot. The plots representing different levels of disturbance within each forest did not differ significantly in bacterial diversity or richness. Changes in bacterial community composition were largest between forests rather than between different levels of impact within a forest. The largest difference in bacterial community composition with disturbance was observed at the Vohibe forest conservation area, and this difference was correlated with changes in both vascular plant richness and soil pH. These results provide the first survey of Malagasy soil bacterial diversity and establish a baseline of botanical diversity within important conservation areas.

  17. Botanical traceability of commercial tannins using the mineral profile and stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Daniela; Santato, Alessandro; Paolini, Mauro; Barbero, Alice; Camin, Federica; Nicolini, Giorgio; Larcher, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Commercial tannins are natural polyphenolic compounds extracted from different plant tissues such as gall, the wood of different species and fruit. In the food industry they are mainly used as flavourings and food ingredients, whereas in winemaking they are classified as clarification agents for wine protein stabilisation, although colour stabilisation, metal removal, unpleasant thiol removal and rheological correction are also well-known and desired effects. Due to their particular technical properties and very different costs, the possibility of correct identification of the real botanical origin of tannins can be considered a primary target in oenology research and in fulfilling the technical and economic requirements of the wine industry. For some categories of tannins encouraging results have already been achieved by considering sugar or polyphenolic composition. For the first time this work verifies the possibility of determining the botanical origin of tannins on the basis of the mineral element profile and analysis of the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio. One hundred two commercial tannins originating from 10 different botanical sources (grapes, oak, gall, chestnut, fruit trees, quebracho, tea, acacia, officinal plants and tara) were analysed to determine 57 elements and the (13) C/(12) C isotopic ratio, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry, respectively. Forward stepwise discriminant analysis provided good discrimination between the 8 most abundant groups, with 100% correct re-classification. The model was then validated five times on subsets of 10% of the overall samples, randomly extracted, achieving satisfactory results. With a similar approach it was also possible to distinguish toasted and untoasted oak tannins as well as tannins from grape skin and grape seeds. PMID:25230175

  18. Relating Social Inclusion and Environmental Issues in Botanic Gardens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergou, Asimina; Willison, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Botanic gardens have been evolving, responding to the changing needs of society, from their outset as medicinal gardens of monasteries and university gardens to more recently as organizations that contribute to the conservation of plant genetic resources. Considering that social and environmental issues are deeply intertwined and cannot be tackled…

  19. Biological reactive intermediates (BRIs) formed from botanical dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Birgit M; Bolton, Judy L

    2011-06-30

    The use of botanical dietary supplements is increasingly popular, due to their natural origin and the perceived assumption that they are safer than prescription drugs. While most botanical dietary supplements can be considered safe, a few contain compounds, which can be converted to biological reactive intermediates (BRIs) causing toxicity. For example, sassafras oil contains safrole, which can be converted to a reactive carbocation forming genotoxic DNA adducts. Alternatively, some botanical dietary supplements contain stable BRIs such as simple Michael acceptors that react with chemosensor proteins such as Keap1 resulting in induction of protective detoxification enzymes. Examples include curcumin from turmeric, xanthohumol from hops, and Z-ligustilide from dang gui. Quinones (sassafras, kava, black cohosh), quinone methides (sassafras), and epoxides (pennyroyal oil) represent BRIs of intermediate reactivity, which could generate both genotoxic and/or chemopreventive effects. The biological targets of BRIs formed from botanical dietary supplements and their resulting toxic and/or chemopreventive effects are closely linked to the reactivity of BRIs as well as dose and time of exposure. PMID:20970412

  20. Differentiation of Anatolian honey samples from different botanical origins by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Seher; Severcan, Mete; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Kandemir, Irfan; Severcan, Feride

    2015-03-01

    Botanical origin of the nectar predominantly affects the chemical composition of honey. Analytical techniques used for reliable honey authentication are mostly time consuming and expensive. Additionally, they cannot provide 100% efficiency in accurate authentication. Therefore, alternatives for the determination of floral origin of honey need to be developed. This study aims to discriminate characteristic Anatolian honey samples from different botanical origins based on the differences in their molecular content, rather than giving numerical information about the constituents of samples. Another scope of the study is to differentiate inauthentic honey samples from the natural ones precisely. All samples were tested via unsupervised pattern recognition procedures like hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Discrimination of sample groups was achieved successfully with hierarchical clustering over the spectral range of 1800-750 cm(-1) which suggests a good predictive capability of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and chemometry for the determination of honey floral source. PMID:25306340

  1. CURRENT STATE OF THE COLLECTION OF MEDICINAL PLANTS OF THE YAKUTSK BOTANICAL GARDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenova V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article considers data on the stocktaking of plants in the collection of medicinal plants of the Yakut Botanical Garden on the following parameters: the study of the component composition, the inclusion in the Pharmacopoeia articles and the Russian State Register of medicinal products. Introduction test in the collection has been performed for 158 species from 99 genera and 41 families, currently the collection has 101 species from 79 genera and 34 families. Chemical composition of plants is known for 61 species. 17 species are pharmacopoeal and 15 species make medicinal products available. The rest of the medicinal plants can be used in folk medicine. Most represented are Asteraceae family (25, Ranunculaceae (20, Rosaceae (16, Fabaceae (15, Lamiaceae (13, among tested plants. According to the assessment of introduction capabilities, 49 species in the collection are highly stable, 51 - stable and just one is unstable

  2. Soil contamination in plant samples and in botanical reference materials. Signature, quantification and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual samples of several sets of plants (lichens, tobacco, spruce needles, grass, botanical reference materials) show highly significant correlations of Al, Fe, Hf, La, Na, Th, Ti and V with Sc. These correlations result from the terrigenous part of aerosols deposited on and measured together with the plants. The composition of this contamination is almost uniform among the different plant sets and can be approximated by the composition of the upper continental crust. The mass of the terrigenous material ranges from 100 mg/g plant. Its presence is expected to lead to concentrations of the above and of other elements that deviate substantially from those of plants without contamination. This is proved by the comparison of two sets of spruce needles, one of which was measured without and the other after removal of the aerosol. (author)

  3. The Evolving Role of Botanical Gardens and Natural Areas: A Floristic Case Study from Royal Botanical Gardens, Canada

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A. GALBRAITH; Natalie E. IWANYCKI; Brechann V. McGOEY; Jamie McGREGOR; James S. PRINGLE; Carl J. ROTHFELS; Tyler W. SMITH

    2011-01-01

    As leaders calling for the conservation of the world's plants, botanical gardens protect plants within living collections. Many also study, manage and restore plants in natural habitats. Royal Botanical Gardens (Ontario,Canada) has integrated both horticultural and natural heritage in its mission for decades. Envisioned by municipal leaders in the 1920s as a combination of nature sanctuaries and civic gardens, RBG now includes forests, wetlands and other habitats, gardens and built spaces. Today RBG is Canada's largest botanical garden on the basis of area.In the 1950s RBG began to inventory plant diversity. The checklist of spontaneous vascular plants now exceeds 1 170 species, of which 752 are native. This is 37% of Ontario's native vascular plants and 19% of the native vascular flora of Canada. The RBG nature sanctuaries are among the richest locations in Canada for species-level diversity.We examine the history of fioristic exploration within RBG and compare plant species-area relationships among protected natural areas in Ontario. This comparison supports the contention that the nature sanctuaries, and in particular Cootes Paradise, could be considered an important area for plants in Canada, and relative to the nation's flora, a biodiversity hotspot. The fact that a candidate vascular plant hotspot for Canada lies within a major botanical garden presents opportunities for raising public awareness of the importance of plant diversity, as well as focusing attention on the scientific and conservation biology needs of communities and individual species in this area.

  4. Cultivable microorganisms associated with honeys of different geographical and botanical origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinacori, Milko; Francesca, Nicola; Alfonzo, Antonio; Cruciata, Margherita; Sannino, Ciro; Settanni, Luca; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the composition of the cultivable microbial populations of 38 nectar honey and honeydew honey samples of different botanical and geographical origin were assessed. After growth in specific media, various colonies with different appearance were isolated and purified before phenotypic (morphological, physiological and biochemical traits) and genotypic [randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), repetitive DNA elements-PCR (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)] differentiation. The identification was carried out by 16S rRNA gene sequencing for bacteria and, in addition to RFLP, by sequencing the D1/D2 region of the 26S rRNA gene for yeasts and the 5.8S-ITS rRNA region for filamentous fungi. The results showed the presence of 13 species of bacteria, 5 of yeasts and 17 of filamentous fungi; the species most frequently isolated were Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Zygosaccharomyces mellis and Aspergillus niger for the three microbial groups, respectively. The highest microbial diversity was found in multifloral honeys. No correlation among the microbial species and the botanical/geographical origin was found, but some strains were highly adapted to these matrices since they were found in several samples of different origin. PMID:24290653

  5. Uso de n-alcanos na estimativa da composição botânica da dieta em ovinos alimentados com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria decumbens Stapf e Arachis pintoi Koprov e Gregory Use of n-alkanes to estimate the dietary botanical composition in sheep fed different proportions of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf and Arachis pintoi Koprov and Gregory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Massaru Fukumoto

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Neste experimento objetivou-se avaliar o poder discriminatório dos n-alcanos para estimar com acurácia e precisão a composição botânica da dieta em ovinos alimentados com diferentes proporções de Arachis pintoi Koprov & Gregory cv. Amarillo (0, 15, 30, 45 e 60% e Brachiaria decumbens Stapf. Foram utilizados 20 ovinos em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com período experimental de dez dias de adaptação à dieta e cinco dias de coleta de fezes. Nas amostras (compostas de fezes do período e nos fenos, foi analisada a concentração de n-alcanos. Para o cálculo da composição botânica, utilizou-se minimização da soma dos quadrados dos desvios, considerando as concentrações dos alcanos nos componentes da dieta e nas fezes. Para a escolha dos alcanos mais discriminatórios, foram utilizadas as análises multivariadas e as variáveis canônicas. As estimativas calculadas foram submetidas à análise de variância. As médias foram comparadas pelo teste t e as correções dos valores estimados em relação aos valores reais foram ajustadas em regressão linear. As variáveis canônicas indicaram que os alcanos C35, C33, C30, C31, C27, C29 e C36 são os de maior potencial discriminatório. O uso desses alcanos nos cálculos foi mais acurado e preciso para estimar a proporção de A. pintoi na dieta que o uso de apenas dois ou três alcanos com poder discriminatório. O melhor ajuste da regressão também foi encontrado para esses alcanos. O teste t para o intercepto da equação (a e o coeficiente de regressão (b indicaram que a = 0 e b = 1, comprovando que os valores estimados são equivalentes aos valores reais. As análises multivariadas mostraram-se ferramentas de grande importância na escolha dos n-alcanos nos cálculos nas estimativas.The objective of this experiment was to use n-alkane to estimate accurately and precisely the botanical composition of dietary forage in sheep fed different proportions of Arachis pintoi

  6. Composición botánica de la dieta de alpacas (Lama pacos L. y llamas (Lama glama L. en dos estaciones del año, en praderas altiplánicas de un sector de la Provincia de Parinacota, Chile Botanical composition of alpaca (Lama pacos L. and llama (Lama glama L. diets in two seasons of the year on highland ranges of Parinacota province, Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Castellaro G.

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó la composición de las dietas de alpacas (Lama pacos L. y llamas (Lama glama L. que pastorearon praderas altiplánicas de Parinacota, Chile (18°12' lat. Sur; 69°16' long. Oeste; 4390 m.s.n.m. utilizando microhistología fecal. Las evaluaciones se realizaron en la época seca-invernal y la lluviosa-estival. Se midió la disponibilidad de materia seca (MS y composición botánica (CB de la principal pradera, el "bofedal". La disponibilidad de MS varió entre 1860 y 2940 kg ha-1, y la CB fue dominada por Oxychloe andina (Cyperaceae y Festuca nardifolia (Poaceae. En las dietas dominaron especies del bofedal, especialmente gramíneas (F. nardifolia, Deschampsia caespitosa y Agrostis tolucensis y graminoides (O. andina, destacando también, especies del "pajonal" y el "tolar", Festuca orthophylla y Parastrephia lucida, respectivamente, especialmente en invierno y en las dietas de llamas. Las dietas difirieron en composición y diversidad, existiendo una interacción entre el tipo de herbívoro y la época del año, con una significativa superposición de 61,4% en verano y de 73,6%, en invierno, lo que sugiere un manejo del pastoreo diferenciado de estos camélidos para evitar una eventual competencia. El índice de selectividad de Ivlev, destaca a las gramíneas A. tolucensis y D. caespitosa y la ranunculácea Ranunculus uniflorus, las que obtuvieron valore positivos y cercanos a uno, indicando una alta preferencia por parte de los herbívoros. Contrariamente, la especie dominante del bofedal, O. andina, obtuvo un valor negativo (rechazo y, en consecuencia, tenderá a dominar en la CB de la pradera, teniendo un efecto negativo en la tendencia de la condición de la misma.The botanical composition of alpaca (Lama pacos L. and llama (Lama glama L. diets was determined, grazing on a highland range of Parinacota, Chile (18°12' S lat; 69°16' W long; 4390 m.o.s.l., using microhistological analysis of feces. The evaluations were carried out

  7. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian W. Millsop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other substances of plant origin and may be used in the form of dried or fresh plants, extracted plant material, or specific plant-derived chemicals. They possess multiple properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties and are, therefore, believed to be possible chemopreventive agents or substances that may suppress or reverse the process of carcinogenesis. Here, we provide a review of botanical agents studied for the treatment and prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  8. Botanicals for mood disorders with a focus on epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha Wanda, Germain Jean Magloire; Ngitedem, Steve Guemnang; Njamen, Dieudonné

    2015-11-01

    Mood disorders are among the major health problems that exist worldwide. They are highly prevalent in the general population and cause significant disturbance of life quality and social functioning of the affected persons. The two major classes of mood disorders are bipolar disorders and depression. The latter is assumed to be the most frequent psychiatric comorbidity in epilepsy. Studies published during the second half of the 20th century recognized that certain patients with epilepsy present a depressed mood. Synthesized pharmaceuticals have been in use for decades to treat both mood disorders and epilepsy, but despite their efficiency, their use is limited by numerous side effects. On the other hand, animal models have been developed to deeply study potential botanicals which have an effect on mood disorders. Studies to investigate the potential effects of medicinal plants acting on the nervous system and used to treat seizures and anxiety are increasingly growing. However, these studies discuss the two conditions separately without association. In this review, we present animal models of depression and investigative models (methods of assessing depression) of depression and anxiety in animals. Other classical test models for prediction of clinical antidepressant activity are presented. Finally, this review also highlights antidepressant activities of herbals focusing specially on depression-like behaviors associated with epilepsy. The pharmacological properties and active principles of cited medicinal plants are emphasized. This review, therefore, provides an overview of the work done on botanicals for mood disorders, potential mechanisms of action of botanicals, and the major compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". PMID:26409901

  9. FUNCTIONAL DAIRY PRODUCTS, ENRICHED WITH NON-TRADITIONAL BOTANICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Кузнецова, А.А.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the use of plant materials in the technology of dairy products. With the use of these herbal ingredients, like ginger, sesame, pumpkin suggested different functional dairy products: whey drink, fermented milk and cheese products enriched with sesame seeds and pumpkin. Extent of usefulness of insertion botanicals - mineral processing and illustrates the value of functional foods for prophylactic and therapeutic effects on the human body.

  10. FUNCTIONAL DAIRY PRODUCTS, ENRICHED WITH NON-TRADITIONAL BOTANICALS

    OpenAIRE

    Кузнецова, А.А.; Исмаилова, А.И.; КЛЮЧНИКОВА Д.В.; А. В. Тарасова

    2016-01-01

    In the article the use of plant materials in the technology of dairy products. With the use of these herbal ingredients, like ginger, sesame, pumpkin suggested different functional dairy products: whey drink, fermented milk and cheese products enriched with sesame seeds and pumpkin. Extent of usefulness of insertion botanicals - mineral processing and illustrates the value of functional foods for prophylactic and therapeutic effects on the human body.

  11. Mechanisms enforcing the estrogen receptor β selectivity of botanical estrogens

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yan; Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Martin, Teresa; Jeyakumar, Muthu; Carlson, Kathryn; Khan, Ikhlas; Smillie, Troy J.; Amar G. Chittiboyina; Rotte, Sateesh C. K.; Helferich, William G.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2013-01-01

    Because little is known about the actions of botanical estrogens (BEs), widely consumed by menopausal women, we investigated the mechanistic and cellular activities of some major BEs. We examined the interactions of genistein, daidzein, equol, and liquiritigenin with estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, with key coregulators (SRC3 and RIP140) and chromatin binding sites, and the regulation of gene expression and proliferation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells containing ERα and/or ERβ. Unlike the endog...

  12. Colon cancer chemoprevention with ginseng and other botanicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Wargovich, M J

    2001-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is becoming increasingly common in Asian countries and still remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Efforts to prevent colon cancer have targeted early detection through screening and chemoprevention. For the last ten years our laboratory has utilized an in vivo screening assay for the testing of potential cancer preventives for colon cancer. We have conducted investigations on over 150 compounds including many with botanical or herbal origin...

  13. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Millsop, Jillian W.; Sivamani, Raja K; Nasim Fazel

    2013-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other su...

  14. Central European botanic gardens as centres of dispersal of alien plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Galera

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to estimate the specific role that Central European botanic gardens play in the dispersal of alien plants, which results from the wide variety of plants cultivated in the gardens and regular international exchange of plant material between these institutions. We compared the results of recent field studies (in eight Polish botanic gardens and a review of older literature data and herbarium collections (from Central European botanic gardens. We found that in Poland the proportion of botanic garden escapes was lower (3% than would be expected from the "tens rule". Botanic gardens have played a considerable role in the development of the synanthropic flora of Central Europe in the last 200 years. We determined a group of species introduced through a network of botanic gardens and propose 5 theoretical patterns to describe the mode and pathways of the early stages of introduction of these species.

  15. Research and Development for Botanical Products in Medicinals and Food Supplements Market

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Miroddi; Carmen Mannucci; Ferdinando Mancari; Michele Navarra; Gioacchino Calapai

    2013-01-01

    Botanical products sold in the health area are generally intended as drugs, medicinal products, food supplements or substances for therapeutic use. Use of botanicals for improving or to care human health has evolved independently in different countries worldwide. Regulatory issues regarding botanical products designed for the food supplements or medicinal market and their influence on research and development are discussed. European Union (EU) and United States (US) policies regulating these ...

  16. Research Highlights from the Purdue-UAB Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Connie M.; Barnes, Stephen; Wyss, J. Michael; Kim, Helen; Morré, Dorothy M.; Morré, D. James; Simon, James E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Janle, Elsa M; Ferruzzi, Mario G.

    2009-01-01

    The Purdue-UAB Botanicals Research Center for Age Related Disease uses multidisciplinary and innovative technologies to investigate the bioavailability of bioactive polyphenolic constituents from botanicals and their relationship to human health. Many age-related diseases are associated with oxidative stress and tissue damage. One of the research goals of the Purdue-UAB Center is to investigate the bioavailability of bioactive natural compounds from a complex botanical mixture to the organ af...

  17. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Lynn S.; Seeram, Navindra P.; Hardy, Mary L.; Catherine Carpenter; David Heber

    2006-01-01

    Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa re...

  18. Effect of Botanical Insecticide of Macleya cordata on Physiology and Biochemistry of Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Li

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the effect of Cyhalothrin and botanical insecticide of Macleya cordata in the Brassica oleracea L. investigated, the contents of proline, soluble sugar and soluble protein were determined. The results showed that under the stress of botanical insecticide of Macleya cordata at the same concentration, the contents of proline, soluble sugar and soluble protein were significantly lower than those with Cyhalothrin (p<0.05 except the proline content has not significant differences between Cyhalothrin and botanical insecticide of Macleya cordata with a dosage of 50×. The degree of damage with Cyhalothrin is greater than that of botanical insecticide of Macleya cordata.

  19. „A. FATU” BOTANICAL GARDEN IASSY – THE GREENHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODORESCU GEORGETA

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In Iassy, „A. Fatu” Botanical garden’s Greenhouse complex (20 buildings with a total area of 3800 sq.m hosts a remarcable fund of exotic plants (2700 taxa, native especially in subtropical, tropical and ecuatorial areas, on every continent.This paper presents some of the plant collections grown in this space. It comes out that, by number, diversity and value (scientific/decorative of the taxa, many collections – azaleas and camelias, carnivorous plant, palm trees, bromelias, orchids, cicads, crotons, ficuses – have a unicum value in the country.

  20. „A. FATU” BOTANICAL GARDEN IASSY – THE GREENHOUSE

    OpenAIRE

    TEODORESCU GEORGETA

    2004-01-01

    In Iassy, „A. Fatu” Botanical garden’s Greenhouse complex (20 buildings with a total area of 3800 sq.m) hosts a remarcable fund of exotic plants (2700 taxa), native especially in subtropical, tropical and ecuatorial areas, on every continent.This paper presents some of the plant collections grown in this space. It comes out that, by number, diversity and value (scientific/decorative) of the taxa, many collections – azaleas and camelias, carnivorous plant, palm trees, bromelias, orchids, cicad...

  1. A botanical and pharmacological description of petasites species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tys Jerzy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this review was to evaluate the botanical and pharmacological description of Petasites species. Petasides (butterbur as a perennial shrub which was found in Europe and also in a parts of Asia and North America, has been widely used medicinally for centuries. At present, the main phytopharmacology uses for Petasides extracts are for prophylactic treatment of migraines, as well as an antispasmodic agent for bronchial asthma and pertussis. Furthermore, it has been used effectively in preventing gastric ulcers, and in urinary tract spasms and treating patients with irritable bladder. But still, there is a need for more studies on the potential applications of butterbur extract in medicine.

  2. Survey on the Quality of the Top-Selling European and American Botanical Dietary Supplements Containing Boswellic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meins, Jürgen; Artaria, Christian; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Abdel-Tawab, Mona

    2016-04-01

    In consideration of the increasing popularity of frankincense and the widely published quality problems associated with botanical dietary supplements, a survey was conducted for the first time on the quality of frankincense containing botanical dietary supplements. Six US products representing 78 % of the units sold and 70 % of the market value, and 11 European products representing 30 % of the units sold and 40 % of the market value were tested for their boswellic acid composition profile, label compliance, and claimed health benefits. Special focus was also set on the statements made with regard to the frankincense applied.Only five products out of seventeen disclosed all relevant information for the Boswellia extract, mentioning the species, the part of plant used, and the boswellic acid content. Whereas all products but one claimed to use Boswellia serrata, three products did not mention the resin as the part applied and 10 products did not declare the boswellic acid content. Apart from the different boswellic acid composition determined with a sensitive LC/MS method, 41 % of the products did not comply with the label declaration. Hence, one product from Italy did not contain any of the six characteristic boswellic acids (KBA, AKBA, αBA, βBA, AαBA, AβBA) at all and another US product contained only traces, suggesting the absence of frankincense or the use of Boswellia frereana instead of B. serrata. In another product, the ratios of the individual boswellic acids were different from B. serrata gum resin, indicating the use of another species such as Boswellia sacra or Boswellia carterii. Furthermore, two products revealed different boswellic acid contents from those declared on the label. Further, two products did not declare the use of manipulated Boswellia gum resin extract being enriched in acetyl-11-keto-boswellic acid content reaching up to 66 %. In addition, consumers could be misled by outdated literature or references to in vitro studies

  3. Probability of identification (POI): a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure which returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) mate...

  4. Prospects for Chinese Botanical Gardens%中国植物园展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-An HE; Zuo-Shuang ZHANG

    2011-01-01

    In China, a new period of development in the first decaje of the 21st Century with rapid urbanization,was marked by investment in construction of over five billion yuan. At this time of rapid change it is important for botanical gardens to follow three principles, "scientific contents, artistic appearance, and cultural display", so as not to become public parks. The scientific component is important. It is not necessary for every botanical garden to do basic botanical research but they should all be involved in plant conservation issues, especially ex-situ conservation and keep accurate data on their living collections. Although a heavy responsibility this documentation is the foundation and the bottom line of scientific meaning for a botanical garden. Economic plant research, exploring new resources, was a major contribution of botanical gardens historically and remains important for sustainable cities and the national economy of China. Education and ecotourism are important ways for botanical gardens to serve the public displaying the interesting plant collections to enhance relaxation and well-being. It is reasonable to make income through all activities in a botanical garden but this should not be the major goal. It should be understood botanical gardens are comprehensive and multi-functional bodies determined by science, the arts and culture.

  5. XVII International Botanical Congress. 100 years after the II IBC in Vienna 1905. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The program of XVII IBC 2005 includes all aspects of basic and applied botanical research. Progress in the different sub-disciplines is revealed through plenary talks, general lectures, symposia, and poster sessions. This conference emphasizes the newest developments in the botanical sciences worldwide. (botek)

  6. The Role of a Modern Botanic Garden: the Evolution of Kew

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David J. MABBERLEY

    2011-01-01

    The history of botanic gardens in the United Kingdom is sketched out with particular reference to the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew and its changing role to meet societal requirements over 250 years. Kew's position as a modem scientific institution confronting today's environmental issues through its Breathing Planet Programme yet retaining its heritage buildings and collections is pinpointed.

  7. Distribution of trace elements in land plants and botanical taxonomy with special reference to rare earth elements and actinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution profiles of trace elements in land plants were studied by neutron activation analysis and radioactivity measurements without activation. Number of botanical samples analyzed were more than three thousand in which more than three hundred botanical species were included. New accumulator plants of Co, Cr, Zn, Cd, rare earth elements, Ac, U, etc., were found. Capabilities of accumulating trace elements can be related to the botanical taxonomy. Discussions are given from view points of inorganic chemistry as well as from botanical physiology

  8. Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Hanqing; Guo, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was a literature study concerning composites. With composites becoming increasingly popular in various areas such as aerospace industry and construction, the research about composites has a significant meaning accordingly. This thesis was aim at introducing some basic information of polymer matrix composites including raw mate-rial, processing, testing, applications and recycling to make a rough understanding of this kind of material for readers. Polymeric matrices, fillers,...

  9. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Memory Pieces are open compositions to be realised solo by an improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them...

  10. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2010-01-01

    New Year is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. It is included in "From the Danish Seasons" (see under this title). See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You...

  11. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Strategies are open compositions to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample. Please DOWNLOAD them to hear them in full...

  12. Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Cue Rondo is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". Caution: streaming the sound/video files will in some cases only provide a few minutes' sample, or the visuals will not appear at all...

  13. Botanical, Phytochemical, and Anticancer Properties of the Eucalyptus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Quan V; Chalmers, Anita C; Jyoti Bhuyan, Deep; Bowyer, Michael C; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The genus Eucalyptus (Myrtaceae) is mainly native to Australia; however, some species are now distributed globally. Eucalyptus has been used in indigenous Australian medicines for the treatment of a range of aliments including colds, flu, fever, muscular aches, sores, internal pains, and inflammation. Eucalyptus oils containing volatile compounds have been widely used in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries for a multitude of purposes. In addition, Eucalyptus extracts containing nonvolatile compounds are also an important source of key bioactive compounds, and several studies have linked Eucalyptus extracts with anticancer properties. With the increasing research interest in Eucalyptus and its health properties, this review briefly outlines the botanical features of Eucalyptus, discusses its traditional use as medicine, and comprehensively reviews its phytochemical and anticancer properties and, finally, proposes trends for future studies. PMID:26080737

  14. Scorpion Anti-Venom Activity of Botanicals: A Pharmacological Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Nath De

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Scorpion bite is considered as one of the common and dangerous phenomenon throughout the world. The clinical manifestations include pulmonary edema, myocardial damage, intracerebral haemorrhage, brachial plexopathy, renal failure etc. which sometimes leads to mortality. The common antivenin therapy includes anti-scorpion venom serum or prazosin. In the vast rural areas of the third world countries phytotherapy is considered as an alternative system of medicine and scorpion sting is treated with the help of medicinal botanicals. As the safety and efficacy are considered as important aspects of anti venin therapy, conventional treatment can be supported by the herbal remedy. The present review compiles a number of medicinal plants pharmacologically evaluated in vitro and/or in vivo for scorpion antivenin properties. Considering the aspects like cost effectiveness, availability, lesser side effects and development of drug resistance, plant based anti venin therapy may be considered as a possible remedy against scorpion envenomation.

  15. Mutation breeding of roses at the National Botanic Gardens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the work done at the National Botanic Garden, Lucknow, on radiation induced somatic mutations in roses are reported. Bud-wood of various rose cultivars was exposed to radiation doses ranging from 2 to 8 kR of gamma rays. In general, irradiation delayed sprouting of rose buds and decreased bud-take. Budded plants after irradiation showed decrease in survival and height of plants and also decrease in percentage of essential oil in flowers. Various abnormalities in shape, size and colour of leaves were observed. These effects were enhanced by increase in radiation dose. An explanation of these effects is attempted on the basis of injurious biochemical and cytological changes induced in plant cells by radiation. Somatic mutants isolated and stabilised are described. (M.G.B.)

  16. Process Philosophy and the Text-Image Interface: A Study of Three Western Australian Botanical Illustrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Charles Ryan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical illustration combines scientific knowledge and artistic technique. However, whereas illustrated botanical images record static visual qualities, such as form and color, written botanical narratives supply crucial sensory, ecological, historical, and cultural contexts that complement visual representation. Understanding the text-image interface—where images and words intersect—contributes to humanities-based analyses of botanical illustration and illustrators. More specifically, a process philosophy perspective reveals the extent to which botanical representations engage the temporality, cyclicality, and contextuality of the living plants being illustrated. This article takes up these themes through a comparative theoretical study of three female Western Australian botanical illustrators, Georgiana Leake (1812–1869, Emily Pelloe (1877–1941, and Philippa Nikulinsky (born 1942, whose lives together span the 183 year history of the Swan River Colony and the state of Western Australia. I apply a processist framework to examine the text-image interface of their works. All three illustrators use some form of textuality: marginalia, annotations, written accompaniments, introductory statements, and other narrative materials. In examining their written commentaries and traces, I identify the emergence of a process mode of botanical illustration that represents plants as ecological, historical, cultural, and temporal organisms.

  17. Composição da flora arbórea e arborescente no Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Composition of the tree flora in the Botanical Garden of Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Treviso Cenci

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo o levantamento florístico e fitossociológico de uma área de 178.000 m², situada nas coordenadas 29º10'38"S e 51º27'16"W, na localidade de Linha Palmeiro, Distrito de São Pedro, no Município de Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brasil, onde se encontra o Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves, o qual se situa numa zona de transição de três formações vegetais distintas: Floresta Ombrófila Mista, Floresta Estacional Decidual e resquícios de Mata Atlântica. O local é uma área de conservação in situ no Jardim Botânico de Bento Gonçalves. O método de amostragem utilizado foi o de parcelas distribuídas ao acaso. Avaliaram-se 10 parcelas medindo 50 x 50 m cada. Dentro de cada parcela, foram amostrados indivíduos com circunferência à altura do peito (CAP superior ou igual a 30 cm. Foram amostrados 1.947 indivíduos vivos dentro de 35 famílias botânicas, além de 109 indivíduos mortos ainda em pé. As famílias mais expressivas em número de indivíduos e em espécies foram Sapindaceae, Anacardiaceae, Myrtaceae, Oleaceae e Lauraceae. As espécies com maiores valores de importância foram Matayba elaeagnoides Radlk., Araucaria angustifolia (Bertol. Kuntze, Lithraea brasiliensis Marchand, Ligustrum licidum W. T. Aiton e Sebastiania serrata (Klotzsch Müll. Arg. O índice de diversidade de Shannon foi de 3,18 nats/indivíduos, enquanto a equabilidade de Pielou (J', 0,71, valores esses considerados altos se comparados a de outros levantamentos. O número de espécies identificadas evidenciou nível alto de diversidade florística, que se caracterizou pela associação de diferentes contingentes florestais, com predomínio daquelas de ampla distribuição na área.The objective of this study was to survey the flora in an area of 178,000 square meters at 29&º10'38''S and 51&º27'16''W, in Linha Palmeiro, in São Pedro, a district of Bento Gonçalves, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil where the Botanical Garden of Bento

  18. How to Design a Phase I Trial of an Anticancer Botanical

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Phase I trials are an important part of traditional drug development in oncology. Such trials address two key issues: safety and dose. Currently, there is a dearth of phase I trials of anticancer botanicals. This may result from the apparently widespread view that a history of human use precludes the need for early-phase study. However, the safe use of a botanical by the population at large does not guarantee safety when the botanical is used in combination with other agents in the complex me...

  19. GROWING AN INTERNATIONAL MOVEMENT FOR PLANT CONSERVATION AND PLANT RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL BOTANIC GARDEN COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wyse Jackson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty to thirty years can be said to constitute a new renaissance botanical gardens around the world. One of the main causes is the growing concern of the world community associated with the issue of loss of biodiversity. In addition, because a greater need to be institutions that take part actively in the field of conservation of plant resources. Community botanical garden world is experiencing rapid development, not only in terms of the number of new botanical garden that is built up but also of the purpose and function. There are currently no less than 2,500 botanical gardens worldwide. To prepare for a global framework for policies, programs and priorities of the botanical garden world in the field of conservation of biodiversity, in 2000 BGCI has published the International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation, which contained the botanical garden's global mission.

  20. Verifying the botanical authenticity of commercial tannins through sugars and simple phenols profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacarne, Mario; Nardin, Tiziana; Bertoldi, Daniela; Nicolini, Giorgio; Larcher, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Commercial tannins from several botanical sources and with different chemical and technological characteristics are used in the food and winemaking industries. Different ways to check their botanical authenticity have been studied in the last few years, through investigation of different analytical parameters. This work proposes a new, effective approach based on the quantification of 6 carbohydrates, 7 polyalcohols, and 55 phenols. 87 tannins from 12 different botanical sources were analysed following a very simple sample preparation procedure. Using Forward Stepwise Discriminant Analysis, 3 statistical models were created based on sugars content, phenols concentration and combination of the two classes of compounds for the 8 most abundant categories (i.e. oak, grape seed, grape skin, gall, chestnut, quebracho, tea and acacia). The last approach provided good results in attributing tannins to the correct botanical origin. Validation, repeated 3 times on subsets of 10% of samples, confirmed the reliability of this model. PMID:27041326

  1. Genus Malus Mill. in Arboretum collection of Peter the Great Botanic Garden

    OpenAIRE

    Firsov Gennadiy; Vasiliev Nikolay; Tkachenko Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Genus Apples (Malus Mill.) have been known at Peter the Great Botanic Garden of the Komarov Botanical Institute Russian Academy of Sciences since the end of the XVIII century, the first exotic species was M. pumila Mill. (M. domestica Borkh.). It is here M. floribunda Siebold ex van Houtte, M. sachalinensis (Kom.) Juz. and M. sieboldii (Regel) Rehd. apparently were firstly introduced into general cultivation. The hardiest is M. baccata (L.) Borkh. which is represented here constantly since 18...

  2. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    OpenAIRE

    R J Poojari; A G Patil; V S Gota

    2012-01-01

    Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals) for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfi...

  3. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women’s Health

    OpenAIRE

    Snelten, Courtney S.; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements ...

  4. GIS-based support for the complex botanical studies at the Molnieboi Spur, Altai

    OpenAIRE

    Florinsky, I. V.; Selezneva, E. V.; Kulikova, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    The Molnieboi Spur is located at the northwestern margin of the Katun Range, the high-mountain part of the Altai Mountains. Unique geological and geophysical characteristics of the Molnieboi Spur made it an attractive target for complex botanical studies including botanical, soil, geological, geochemical, geophysical, radiation, and soil gas surveys and analyses. In this paper, we present the first version of the geographic information system (GIS) application for the Molnieboi Spur developed...

  5. Learning in botanical gardens: Investigating educational methods during an instruction about plants and water

    OpenAIRE

    Kubisch (geb. Wiegand), Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of botanical gardens to out-of-school education should be larger than it is currently in Germany. In the curricula of all school types botany plays only a minor role, although plants form the base for all animal life on earth. To increase the attractiveness of botanical gardens for teachers, offers and programs should be created and conducted in didactically sensible manners and allow students an emotional approach towards the topics through trial and experiments. Therefore i...

  6. Efficacy of dietary supplementation with botanicals on carbohydrate metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, William T; Ye, Jianping; Wang, Zhong Q

    2008-06-01

    Botanical products are widely used in nutritional supplementation for promotion of health or prevention of diseases. With the high prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism are common in the general population and obtaining glycemic control is important in reducing the complications of diabetes. If shown to be effective, botanical products have a unique position in potentially aiding the general public in regard to obesity and diabetes. They can be obtained "over-the-counter" and may have less side effects compared to many synthetic drugs. Although most of the popular botanicals have a long history in folk medicine, there is paucity of data regarding their efficacy and safety, particularly as it relates to human studies. In this review, we discuss the data that was available in the literature for nine botanicals that are frequently promoted to help manage blood glucose. They are Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia), Fenugreek (trigonella foenum graecum), Gymnema Sylvestre, Ivy Gourd (Coccinia indica), Nopal or Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia streptacantha), Ginseng, Aloe Vera, Russian Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus), and Garlic (Allium sativum). The discussion is emphasized on the clinical aspect of these botanicals. Due to the lack of sufficient evidence from clinical studies for any of the botanicals reviewed, it is premature to actively recommend use of any particular herb to treat either glucose or other risk factors. Thus, well defined randomized clinical trials are warranted in this area. PMID:18537692

  7. External calibration strategy for trace element quantification in botanical samples by LA-ICP-MS using filter paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Matheus A G; Voss, Mônica; Corazza, Gabriela; Flores, Erico M M; Dressler, Valderi L

    2016-01-28

    The use of reference solutions dispersed on filter paper discs is proposed for the first time as an external calibration strategy for matrix matching and determination of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, V and Zn in plants by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The procedure is based on the use of filter paper discs as support for aqueous reference solutions, which are further evaporated, resulting in solid standards with concentrations up to 250 μg g(-1) of each element. The use of filter paper for calibration is proposed as matrix matched standards due to the similarities of this material with botanical samples, regarding to carbon concentration and its distribution through both matrices. These characteristics allowed the use of (13)C as internal standard (IS) during the analysis by LA-ICP-MS. In this way, parameters as analyte signal normalization with (13)C, carrier gas flow rate, laser energy, spot size, and calibration range were monitored. The calibration procedure using solution deposition on filter paper discs resulted in precision improvement when (13)C was used as IS. The method precision was calculated by the analysis of a certified reference material (CRM) of botanical matrix, considering the RSD obtained for 5 line scans and was lower than 20%. Accuracy of LA-ICP-MS determinations were evaluated by analysis of four CRM pellets of botanical composition, as well as by comparison with results obtained by ICP-MS using solution nebulization after microwave assisted digestion. Plant samples of unknown elemental composition were analyzed by the proposed LA method and good agreement were obtained with results of solution analysis. Limits of detection (LOD) established for LA-ICP-MS were obtained by the ablation of 10 lines on the filter paper disc containing 40 μL of 5% HNO3 (v v(-1)) as calibration blank. Values ranged from 0.05 to 0.81  μg g(-1). Overall, the use of filter paper as support for dried aqueous

  8. Insecticidal properties of a Chenopodium-based botanical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, H; Vincent, C; Bostanian, N J

    2004-08-01

    The emulsifiable concentrate UDA-245 based on an essential oil extract from Chenopodium ambrosioides variety near ambrosioides, a North American herbaceous plant, was compared with commercially available pesticides for their effectiveness to control green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae), western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and greenhouse whitefly, Trialeurodes vaporariorium (Westwood) (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae). Side effects on the whitefly parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) also were determined. With green peach aphid, UDA-245 at 0.5% concentration was significantly more effective than the control (water) treatment in a laboratory bioassay and significantly more effective than neem oil and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap in a greenhouse assay. With the western flower thrips, UDA-245 at 0.5% was significantly more effective than neem oil, insecticidal soap and the control treatment in a laboratory bioassay, whereas in a greenhouse assay, UDA-245 at 1.0% was the only treatment that maintained control of the western flower thrips 2 wk after the last treatment period. UDA-245 at 0.5% (laboratory bioassay) was significantly more effective in managing greenhouse whitefly than neem oil, endosulfan, and the control treatment and as effective as insecticidal soap. Insecticidal soap proved to be toxic to the parasitoid E. formosa (71.9% mortality), whereas UDA-245 at 0.5% was not significantly more toxic than the control (11.2 and 4.6% mortality, respectively). Our results suggest that a greenhouse integrated pest management (IPM) program using a botanical such as UDA-245 could effectively control infestations of major pests present while having a negligible effect on biological control agents. PMID:15384351

  9. Chemometric analysis for identification of botanical raw materials for pharmaceutical use: a case study using Panax notoginseng.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiang Zhu

    Full Text Available The overall control of the quality of botanical drugs starts from the botanical raw material, continues through preparation of the botanical drug substance and culminates with the botanical drug product. Chromatographic and spectroscopic fingerprinting has been widely used as a tool for the quality control of herbal/botanical medicines. However, discussions are still on-going on whether a single technique provides adequate information to control the quality of botanical drugs. In this study, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC, capillary electrophoresis (CE and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR were used to generate fingerprints of different plant parts of Panax notoginseng. The power of these chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques to evaluate the identity of botanical raw materials were further compared and investigated in light of the capability to distinguishing different parts of Panax notoginseng. Principal component analysis (PCA and clustering results showed that samples were classified better when UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprints were employed, which suggested that UPLC- and HPLC-based fingerprinting are superior to CE- and NIR-based fingerprinting. The UPLC- and HPLC- based fingerprinting with PCA were able to correctly distinguish between samples sourced from rhizomes and main root. Using chemometrics and its ability to distinguish between different plant parts could be a powerful tool to help assure the identity and quality of the botanical raw materials and to support the safety and efficacy of the botanical drug products.

  10. Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John G.

    The Composites market is arguably the most challenging and profitable market for phenolic resins aside from electronics. The variety of products and processes encountered creates the challenges, and the demand for high performance in critical operations brings value. Phenolic composite materials are rendered into a wide range of components to supply a diverse and fragmented commercial base that includes customers in aerospace (Space Shuttle), aircraft (interiors and brakes), mass transit (interiors), defense (blast protection), marine, mine ducting, off-shore (ducts and grating) and infrastructure (architectural) to name a few. For example, phenolic resin is a critical adhesive in the manufacture of honeycomb sandwich panels. Various solvent and water based resins are described along with resin characteristics and the role of metal ions for enhanced thermal stability of the resin used to coat the honeycomb. Featured new developments include pultrusion of phenolic grating, success in RTM/VARTM fabricated parts, new ballistic developments for military vehicles and high char yield carbon-carbon composites along with many others. Additionally, global regional market resin volumes and sales are presented and compared with other thermosetting resin systems.

  11. Research and Development for Botanical Products in Medicinals and Food Supplements Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Miroddi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botanical products sold in the health area are generally intended as drugs, medicinal products, food supplements or substances for therapeutic use. Use of botanicals for improving or to care human health has evolved independently in different countries worldwide. Regulatory issues regarding botanical products designed for the food supplements or medicinal market and their influence on research and development are discussed. European Union (EU and United States (US policies regulating these products are focused with comments on the legislations delivered during the last ten years and differences existing in rules between these countries are emphasized. Research and development on botanical products nowdays strongly influenced by the product destination in the market. Addressed and differentiated research for either food supplements or medicinal markets is necessary to purchase data really useful for assessment of safe and effective use for both the categories. The main objective is to catalyze interest of academic and companies' researchers on crucial aspects to be taken into account in the research for the development of botanical products.

  12. Mechanism of Long-Range Penetration of Low-Energy Ions in Botanic Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘峰; 王宇钢; 薛建明; 王思学; 杜广华; 颜莎; 赵渭江

    2002-01-01

    We present experimental evidence to reveal the mechanism of long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples. In the 100keV Ar+ ion transmission measurement, the result confirmed that low-energy ions could penetrate at least 60μm thick kidney bean slices with the probability of about 1.0 × 10-5. The energy spectrum of 1 MeV He+ ions penetrating botanic samples has shown that there is a peak of the count of ions with little energy loss. The probability of the low-energy ions penetrating the botanic sample is almost the same as that of the high-energy ions penetrating the same samples with little energy loss. The results indicate that there are some micro-regions with mass thickness less than the projectile range of low-energy ions in the botanic samples and they result in the long-range penetration of low-energy ions in botanic samples.

  13. Impact of botanical extracts on histopathology of silkworm (Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mude Jagadish Naik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Present study was conducted to find out the effect of various botanical extract on the tissue, cellular an d sub cellular level and histopathology of silkworm, findings of the present study gives useful data concerning the changes in the insect. Three plants extract viz Azadirachta indica, Ocimum sanctum and Parthenium hysterophorus were used as experimental while untreated leaves consider as control. These botanicals were sprayed on the tukra (Pink mealy bug infected mulberry leaves and feed to silkworm (CSR2 bivoltine hybrid. Findings of the study suggested no change in the fat body of the silkworm feed on the botanical sprayed leaves and it was with normal vacuolization cytoplasm of cells. While hypertrophied nucleus fat body and voculated cytoplasm was reported in the silkworm fed on the tukra infected chawki leaves. The outer layers of the nucleolus were reported somewhat hypertrophied and cytoplasm was reported vacuolate with mild degeneration of cell in silkworm fed on the tukra infected leaves. Silk worm fed leaves revealed almost similar changes to that of normal and there was no change in botanical sprayed fed larvae. The impact in tissue of the silkworm when fed with normal and crude botanical extracts against mealy bugs shows normalcy, but in the t ukra infected mulberry leaves fed by silk worms the tissues sho ws slight degenerative with nutritional impact upon them

  14. Greenhouse weeds in the Botanical Garden of PAS in Warsaw-Powsin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Galera

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic studies carried out in the greenhouses of the Botanical Garden - Center for Biological Diversity Conservation of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw-Powsin revealed that the flora of weeds ras very rich there. A total of 243 taxa of vascular plants and 17 species of bryophytes were recorded. With regard to the division of the flora of vascular plants according to species origin and degree of naturalization, it was found that native plants (89 species, greenhouse-escapes (87 species and permanently established aliens (48 species co-dominated there. In addition, 10 species of garden-escapes, i.e. plants cultivated in the immediate neighbourhood of greenhouses, were recorded indoors. Noteworthy were two species that had been brought accidentally to the glasshouses together with plant material - this group of plants is least numerous but quite frequent in the study area. Observations made in the vicinity of Powsin greenhouses showed that relationships between the studied flora and the plants growing outside were unilateral. In Powsin no proved example of expansion of greenhouse plants to other parts of the Garden has been recorded. By contrast, influx of diaspores to the study area is observed frequently - the flora of greenhouse weeds is dominated by plants found also in the immediate neighbourhood (147 species. The most important factors affecting the composition of the weed flora of glasshouses include the flora of the surrounding areas and the mode of greenhouse management (e.g. the range of species cultivated there. The diversity of the flora is not related to greenhouse size.

  15. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S.; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38 ± 0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5 ± 550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey EC. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1 ± 4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5 ± 4.7 mm. Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations. PMID:26594206

  16. Monitoring of pests of Coccinea suborder in the collection greenhouses at Polar-Alpine Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rak Natalja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main field of research carried out in the Polar-Alpine botanical garden-institute is the plant introduction and acclimatization. The problem of particular complexity is the protection of plant introducents from pests. The representatives of the Coccinea suborder are found in the Far North exclusively in greenhouses. Monitoring of a phytosanitary condition of Polar-Alpine Botanical Garden plant collection fund revealed the most stable pest species in relation to local conditions and methods used to fight against species of the Coccinea suborder. Сomposition of forage plants is defined and species of plant-reserves, on which pest population is formed, are selected. List of tropical and subtropical plants populated by Coccinea in the collection of the Polar-Alpine Botanical Garden is compiled (data on the years of 2004-2013

  17. Characterization of markers of botanical origin and other compounds extracted from unifloral honeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schievano, Elisabetta; Morelato, Elisa; Facchin, Chiara; Mammi, Stefano

    2013-02-27

    The possibility of tracing the botanical and geographical origin of products such as honey has become more important because of market globalization. As a consequence, numerous analytical methods have been applied to the determination of honey authenticity. The scope of the present work is to chromatographically purify and characterize 23 compounds from organic extracts of unifloral (chestnut, linden, orange, acacia, eucalyptus, honeydew) and polyfloral honeys. Of these compounds, 17 were identified as specific markers and were used for botanical discrimination in a previous study based on multivariate statistical analysis of proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) data. Together with the botanical markers, 6 other substances were isolated and characterized using NMR and mass spectrometry. These phytochemicals belong to several classes, that is, terpenes, organic acids, flavonoids, and others. For the first time, a diacylglyceryl ether and 5 other compounds present in different types of honey were identified and characterized. PMID:23360363

  18. Relationship between botanical origin and antioxidants vitamins of bee-collected pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla C. L. S. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study quantified vitamin C, E and β-carotene in samples of fresh bee-collected pollen and correlating them with the botanical origin. Vitamin content varied between 13.5 and 42.5 µg/g for vitamin E; 56.3 and 198.9 µg/g for β-carotene and 273.9 and 560.3 µg/g for vitamin C. It was concluded that the botanical origin and collecting season influenced the vitamin contents. There is a relationship between the vitamins and its botanical origin: Raphanus sp and Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with β-carotene; Raphanus sp, Eucalyptus sp, Macroptilium sp, Mimosa caesalpineafolia with vitamin E and Anadenanthera sp, Arecaceae type and Philodendron sp with vitamin C.

  19. Potentiality of botanical agents for the management of post harvest insects of maize: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soujanya, P Lakshmi; Sekhar, J C; Kumar, P; Sunil, N; Prasad, Ch Vara; Mallavadhani, U V

    2016-05-01

    Natural products derived from plants are emerging as potent biorational alternatives to synthetic insecticides for the integrated management of post harvest insects of maize. In this paper, effectiveness of botanicals including plant extracts, essential oils, their isolated pure compounds, plant based nano formulations and their mode of action against storage insects have been reviewed with special reference to maize. Plant based insecticides found to be the most promising means of controlling storage insects of maize in an eco friendly and sustainable manner. This article also throws light on the commercialization of botanicals, their limitations, challenges and future trends of storage insect management. PMID:27407183

  20. The structure and differentiation of the synanthropic flora of the botanical gardens in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Galera

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Floristic studies were carried out in eight botanical gardens in Poland in the years 1992-1999. It was demonstrated that the spontaneous synanthropic flora of the gardens consisted of 1092 taxa in the rank of a genus or lower, among which alien species constituted 55% of the flora studied. Ergasiophygophytes, of which the introduction is closely associated with the activities of the botanical gardens, dominated in the latter group of species. It appeared that the flora of the studied botanical gardens was rather similar. However, the structure of the flora of different spatial units (six types of microhabitats distinguished in the particular gardens varied, which was associated with the various management practices. The flora of microhabitats identified in the gardens differed with respect to the number of taxa and spectra of geographical-historical groups of species and life forms. Ruderal sites, arable lands and roadsides supported the highest number of taxa (the flora of the above spatial units was represented by 646, 645 and 597 taxa, respectively. Moreover, they were characterized by a high proportion of annual plants in the flora (43, 38 and 34%, respectively and by a relatively small representation of apophytes (39% in all the three types of microhabitats. The flora of wet areas and parks was, however, poor in species (154 and 403 species, respectively, but relatively rich in apophytes (72 and 55% of the flora, respectively and with a low contribution of therophytes (19 and 20%, respectively. The present data were compared with the findings of other authors who investigated the synanthropic flora of cities in which the botanical gardens were located. The comparative analysis of the flora of Poznań and Łódź showed a great richness of species (in relation to size of the area studied and a high incidence of aliens (especially those, which had not become established permanently in the botanical gardens. However comparative studies of the

  1. Botanical reconnaissance of Big Run Bog Candidate Research Natural Area. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzika, R.M.; Hunsucker, R.; DeMeo, T.

    1996-07-25

    To document the botanical diversity of the Big Run Bog candidate Research Natural Area on the Monongahela National Forest in West Virginia, a botanical survey was conducted in 1993-94. The survey identified 193 species of vascular plants in 118 genera and 52 families. Six species of rare vascular plants were found. Vascular plant families with the most species present were Cyperaceae (24), Asteraceae (23), Poaceae (16), and Ericaceae (14). For each taxon, family, species, habitat and estimated abundance are reported. Nonvascular plants totaled 87 species in 55 genera and 33 families.

  2. Field evaluation of three botanical repellents against Psorophora ferox, Aedes atlanticus, and Aedes mitchellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, Whitney A; Xue, Rui-De

    2009-09-01

    Three botanical natural repellents, Swamp Buddy Bug Chaser (AI 12% plant-based essential oils), All Sport (AI plant-based essential oils, benzophenone-3, octinoxate, and octisalate), and Geraniol (AI 25% geraniol oil and lemongrass extract) were evaluated at a field site in Elkton, Florida, to determine the protection time provided against Psorophora ferox, Aedes atlanticus, and Ae. mitchellae. These three products provided different protection times against biting mosquitoes. Geraniol provided the longest protection time from mosquito bites (4 h), followed by All Sport (1.5 h) and Swamp Buddy Bug Chaser (1 h). This study provides the first information about botanical insect repellents against these floodwater mosquito species. PMID:19852232

  3. The Bernades herbarium in the Botanic Institute of Barcelona (BC

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    Ibáñez, N.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The BC-Bernades herbarium is one of the oldest collections conserved in the Botanical Institute of Barcelona. It contains part of the field collections of Miquel Bernades i Mainader and Miquel Bernades i Clarís, doctors of medicine and botanists of Catalonian origin living in Madrid in the 18th century. The collection consists of 817 sheets, the complete list provided in the annexe. We also present information concerning the localities of certain specific recollections, the taxonomic groups and families, as well as a list of sheets of special interest. This list contains witness of cornfield weed now very rare or extinct in Iberian lands, such as Hymenocarpos circinatus (L. Savi or Securigera securidaca (L. Degen & Dörfl , and also some of the first witness known from Spain of introduced plants, such as Aster cordifolius L. or Bidens bipinnata L.

    [es] El herbario BC-Bernades es una de las colecciones más antiguas conservadas en el Instituto Botánico de Barcelona. Contiene parte de las recolecciones de Miquel Bernades y Mainader y Miquel Bernades y Clarís, médicos y botánicos catalanes del siglo XVIII establecidos en Madrid. Consta de 817 pliegos, la relación de los cuales presentamos en un anexo. También mostramos datos sobre las localidades de recolección, grupos taxonómicos y familias presentes, y una relación de pliegos de interés. Entre estos aparecen testimonios de plantas arvenses extinguidas o muy raras en tierras ibéricas como Hymenocarpos circinatus (L. Savi o Securigera securidaca (L. Degen & Dörfl , y también algunos de los primeros testimonios conocidos en España de plantas introducidas como Aster cordifolius L. o Bidens bipinnata L. [ct] L’herbari BC-Bernades és una de les col·leccions més antigues de les conservades a l’Institut Botànic de Barcelona. Conté part de les recol·leccions de Miquel Bernades i Mainader i Miquel Bernades

  4. Botanical collecting activity in the area of the Flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea during the "motor period"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2011-01-01

    The account summarizes the botanical field work in Eritrea and Ethiopia since the 1930s, in the period when motor cars have been used for transport of equipment and collections, as opposed to the "heroic" period, when pack animals were used. The use of cars for botanical collecting in Eritrea and...

  5. HIV/AIDS in a Puerto Rican/Dominican Community: A Collaborative Project with a Botanical Shop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Melvin; Santiago, Jorge

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of the literature concerning HIV/AIDS in Latino communities in the United States and Puerto Rico. Discusses the presence of botanical shops (where herbal medicines and other healing paraphernalia can be purchased) in Latino culture. Describes Projecto Cooperacion, a project that utilized botanical shops as a means of…

  6. Botanical remedies of the former Dutch East Indies (Indonesia). Part I: Eumycetes, Pteridophyta, Gymnospermae, Angiospermae (Monocotyledones only).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, H H

    1983-03-01

    The botanical remedies reported in Heyne's De Nuttige Planten van Nederlandsch-Indië (Volumes 1--IV, 1913--1922) have been screened out of economic botanical context, translated into English and summarized as a table of names, therapeutic indications, plant parts, and available details of preparation and use. PMID:6345940

  7. Botanical remedies of the former Dutch East Indies (Indonesia). Part II: Dicotyledones up to and including leguminosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, H H

    1983-07-01

    The botanical remedies reported in Heyne's De Nuttige Planten van Nederlandsch-Indië (Volumes I-IV, 1913-1922) have been screened out of economic botanical context, translated into English and summarized as a table of names, therapeutic indications, plant parts, and available details of preparation and use. PMID:6632938

  8. Species traits and plant performance: functional trade-offs in a large set of species in a botanical garden

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Z.; Klimešová, Jitka; Hrouda, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 6 (2012), s. 1522-1533. ISSN 0022-0477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/09/0963; GA ČR GA206/09/1471 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : vegetative multiplication * generative reproduction * botanical garden Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 5.431, year: 2012

  9. Antioxidant markers based TLC-DPPH differentiation on four commercialized botanical sources of Shankhpushpi (A Medhya Rasayana): A preliminary assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj K Sethiya; M K Mohan Maruga Raja; Shri Hari Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Shankhpushpi is a cognition boosting traditional ayurvedic brain supplement. Convolvulus pluricaulis (Convolvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides (Convolvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea (Papilionaceae), and Canscora decussata (Gentianaceae) are botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi. This investigation is to focus the identification of the compound based on biological marker differentiation of four botanical claimants of Shankhpushpi for their antioxidant evaluation on thin layer chromatography (TLC) by 2...

  10. Development of botanical principles for clinical use in cancer: Where are we lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R J Poojari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of drugs from plant sources (botanicals for the treatment of cancer has not been successful in India, despite a plethora of medicinal plants and an equal number of experiments demonstrating anti-cancer activity of plant principles in vitro. There are several pitfalls in our approach to botanical drug development. Foremost is the lack of industry-academia collaborations in this field. Research goals in Indian academic institutions are generally short-term and mostly aimed at fulfilling the minimum requirements of a doctoral/MD or MPharm thesis. Secondly, quality assurance of herbal formulations is difficult to achieve and good manufacturing practices are expensive to implement. This could introduce bias during the biological evaluation of botanicals. A systematic approach covering a wide range of investigations including but not limited to mechanistic studies, potential herb-drug interactions, pharmacokinetics and bioavailability could help in the optimization of herbal formulations in the preclinical stage of development before they can be considered for clinical trials. Government initiatives such as Ayurveda, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathic have encouraged research in these areas, but are insufficient to promote focused and aggressive evaluation of potential herbs. Particular emphasis should be given to clinical pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and clinical trials in specific cancers for the evaluation of dosage, safety, efficacy and concomitant use with chemotherapy. Only such policies can result in meaningful evaluation of botanicals for cancer therapy.

  11. Consumer and farmer safety evaluation of application of botanical pesticides in black pepper crop protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Moreno, J.; Soffers, A.E.M.F.; Wiratno,; Falke, H.E.; Rietjens, I.; Murk, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a consumer and farmer safety evaluation on the use of four botanical pesticides in pepper berry crop protection. The pesticides evaluated include preparations from clove, tuba root, sweet flag and pyrethrum. Their safety evaluation was based on their active ingredients being euge

  12. Flora of subfamily Prunoideae of family Rosaceae in botanical garden of Dnipropetrovsk university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Opanasenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The present state of genofond of the 24 taxa collection of subfamily Prunoideae Focke (family Rosaceae Juss in DNU botanical garden has been analysed. Valuable genotypes for practical use in the development of landscape, farm horticulture and further selection were marked out. The ways of further exploit was planned.

  13. Results of lignosa and shrubs introduction in arboretum of botanical garden of the Dnipropetrovsk university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Pakhomov

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of long-term woods and bushes introduction in the DNU botanical garden’s arboretum are considered. The total quantity of taxa of arboretum collection fund and its present state are given. The condition of largest taxonomic groups is described as well.

  14. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  15. Influence of botanic origin and amylose content on the morphology of starch nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch nanocrystals (SNC) are crystalline platelets resulting from the disruption of the semi-crystalline structure of starch granules by the acid hydrolysis of amorphous parts. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of botanic origin and amylose content of native starches on the morphology and properties of resulting nanoparticles. SNC were prepared from five different starches normal maize, high amylose maize, waxy maize, potato, and wheat; covering three botanic origins, two crystalline types, and three range of amylose content (0, 25, and 70%) for maize starch. Different types of nanocrystals were obtained with a thickness ranging between 4 and 8 nm and diameter from about 50 to 120 nm depending on the source. The comparison of their morphology, crystallinity, and rheological properties is proposed for the first time. For the same amylose content, maize, potato, and wheat resulted in rather similar size and crystallinity of SNC proving the limited influence of the botanic origin. For the same botanic origin (maize), differences in size were more important indicating the influence of the amylopectin content. Also, particles tended to show square shapes with increasing native starch’s amylopectin content and A-type crystalinity. Thus, only high amylose content starches should be avoided to prepare SNC.

  16. Extraction of Botanical Pesticides from Pelargonium graveolens using Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machalová, Zdeňka; Sajfrtová, Marie; Pavela, R.; Topiař, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, MAY (2015), s. 310-317. ISSN 0926-6690 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : botanical pesticides * geranium oil * supercritical fluid extraction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.837, year: 2014

  17. Up the Garden Path: A Chemical Trail through the Cambridge University Botanic Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Gary M.; Kyd, Gwenda O.; Groom, Colin R.; Allen, Frank H.; Day, Juliet; Upson, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    The living world is a rich source of chemicals with many medicines, dyes, flavorings, and foodstuffs having their origins in compounds produced by plants. We describe a chemical trail through the plant holdings of the Cambridge University Botanic Gardens. Visitors to the gardens are provided with a laminated trail guide with 22 stopping points…

  18. Climate Change Education: Quantitatively Assessing the Impact of a Botanical Garden as an Informal Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Although informal learning environments have been studied extensively, ours is one of the first studies to quantitatively assess the impact of learning in botanical gardens on students' cognitive achievement. We observed a group of 10th graders participating in a one-day educational intervention on climate change implemented in a botanical…

  19. THE MOCHE BOTANICAL FROG (La rana botánica mochica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna McClelland †

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Plants and animals with features which identify them as supernaturals characterize the art of the Precolumbian Moche culture of northern Peru. Among these animals is a frog with feline attributes and a consistent association with manioc tubers, stalks, and plants, the Botanical Frog. The Botanical Frog appears to have been patterned on Leptodactylus pentadactylus. It is shown copulating with felines. Fine line painted vessels and ones with low relief decoration show the Botanical Frog performing as part of a ritual involving other animals and cultivated crops, suggesting that the Botanical Frog was associated with agriculture. ESPAÑOL: El arte de la cultura mochica de la costa norte del Perú presenta plantas y animales mostrando rasgos sobrenaturales. Uno de los animales es una rana con elementos felinos y asociada con tubérculos, ramas y plantas de yuca. La Rana Botánica probablemente tiene su origen en Leptodactylus pentadactylus, una rana carnívora de la selva amazónica. La Rana Botánica copula con felinos y, en vasijas pintadas con líneas finas o con escenarios representados en bajorrelieve, toma parte en ceremonias involucrando a otros animales y cosechas domésticas. Parece ser que la Rana Botánica era un ser sobrenatural asociado con la agricultura.

  20. Carl Linnaeus, Erasmus Darwin and Anna Seward: Botanical Poetry and Female Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sam

    2014-03-01

    This article will explore the intersection between `literature' and `science' in one key area, the botanical poem with scientific notes. It reveals significant aspects of the way knowledge was gendered in the Enlightenment, which is relevant to the present-day education of girls in science. It aims to illustrate how members of the Lichfield Botanical Society (headed by Erasmus Darwin) became implicated in debates around the education of women in Linnaean botany. The Society's translations from Linnaeus inspired a new genre of women's educational writing, the botanical poem with scientific notes, which emerged at this time. It focuses in particular on a poem by Anna Seward and argues that significant problems regarding the representation of the Linnaean sexual system of botany are found in such works and that women in the culture of botany struggled to give voice to a subject which was judged improper for female education. The story of this unique poem and the surrounding controversies can teach us much about how gender impacted upon women's scientific writing in eighteenth century Britain, and how it shaped the language and terminology of botany in works for female education. In particular, it demonstrates how the sexuality of plants uncovered by Linnaeus is a paradigmatic illustration of how societal forces can simultaneously both constrict and stimulate women's involvement in science. Despite the vast changes to women's access in scientific knowledge of the present day, this `fair sexing' of botany illustrates the struggle that women have undergone to give voice to their botanical knowledge.

  1. Botanical Polyphenols Mitigate Microglial Activation and Microglia-Induced Neurotoxicity: Role of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Dennis Y; Simonyi, Agnes; Cui, Jiankun; Lubahn, Dennis B; Gu, Zezong; Sun, Grace Y

    2016-09-01

    Microglia play a significant role in the generation and propagation of oxidative/nitrosative stress, and are the basis of neuroinflammatory responses in the central nervous system. Upon stimulation by endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), these cells release pro-inflammatory factors which can exert harmful effects on surrounding neurons, leading to secondary neuronal damage and cell death. Our previous studies demonstrated the effects of botanical polyphenols to mitigate inflammatory responses induced by LPS, and highlighted an important role for cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) upstream of the pro-inflammatory pathways (Chuang et al. in J Neuroinflammation 12(1):199, 2015. doi: 10.1186/s12974-015-0419-0 ). In this study, we investigate the action of botanical compounds and assess whether suppression of cPLA2 in microglia is involved in the neurotoxic effects on neurons. Differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were used to test the neurotoxicity of conditioned medium from stimulated microglial cells, and WST-1 assay was used to assess for the cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells. Botanicals such as quercetin and honokiol (but not cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, 3CG) were effective in inhibiting LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and phosphorylation of cPLA2. Conditioned medium from BV-2 cells stimulated with LPS or IFNγ caused neurotoxicity to SH-SY5Y cells. Decrease in cell viability could be ameliorated by pharmacological inhibitors for cPLA2 as well as by down-regulating cPLA2 with siRNA. Botanicals effective in inhibition of LPS-induced NO and cPLA2 phosphorylation were also effective in ameliorating microglial-induced neurotoxicity. Results demonstrated cytotoxic factors from activated microglial cells to cause damaging effects to neurons and potential use of botanical polyphenols to ameliorate the neurotoxic effects. PMID:27339657

  2. The problem analysis of regional flors in botanical gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Kharchenko Victoria E.

    2015-01-01

    Now the climate changes become more pronounced. This affects to biodiversity and distribution of plants. Therefore, we need to study of the biodiversity and trends distribution of plants in specific environments. In this connection is necessary to clarify real composition of species in the of regional floras potential of their variability of and disseminating. A pressing problem remains the creation of a unified database of the flora of Russia, which takes into account the data of regional st...

  3. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Botanical Pesticides from Pelargonium graveolens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machalová, Zdeňka; Sajfrtová, Marie; Karban, Jindřich; Pavela, R.

    Salerno : Centro Stampa di Ateneo, 2013 - (Reverchon, E.; De Marco, I.), s. 133-138 ISBN 88-7897-061-1. [Conference on Supercritical Fluids and Their Applications /10./. Napoli (IT), 29.05.2013-06.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * Pelargonium graveolens * chemical composition Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  4. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Botanical Pesticides from Pelargonium graveolens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machalová, Zdeňka; Sajfrtová, Marie; Karban, Jindřich; Pavela, R.

    Salerno: Centro Stampa di Ateneo, 2013 - (Reverchon, E.; De Marco, I.), s. 133-138 ISBN 88-7897-061-1. [Conference on Supercritical Fluids and Their Applications /10./. Napoli (IT), 29.05.2013-06.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010578 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : supercritical fluid extraction * Pelargonium graveolens * chemical composition Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  5. Herbage yield and botanical composition of grass-legume mixture at different time of establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Simić A.; Vasiljević S.; Vučković S.; Tomić Z.; Bjelić Z.; Mandić V.

    2011-01-01

    For comparative testing of the total productivity of mixtures (intercrops) of red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.), a trial was carried out during the 2007-2009 growing seasons at experimental fields of the Institute for Animal Husbandry, Belgrade-Zemun. Intercrops included two red clover varieties (К-17 and Una) and tetraploid Italian ryegrass (К-29t) in different proportional ratios (100:0%, 75:25%, 50:50%, 25:75...

  6. Phyto-oestrogens and their metabolites in milk produced on two pastures with different botanical compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S. A.; Purup, S.; Hansen-Møller, J.;

    2014-01-01

    clover (mean 28%), shepherd[U+05F3]s-purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik.) (mean 6%), pineappleweed (Matricaria matricarioides Porter ex Britton) (mean 5%) and scentless mayweed (Tripleurospermum perforatum (Mérat) Laínz) (mean 4%), and LP contained mainly white clover (Trifolium repens L.) (mean...

  7. Effect of Organic Fertilizers on Botanical Composition of Grassland, Herbage Yield and Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štýbnarová Marie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of organicfertilizers (cow manure + dung water; cattle slurry applied in different annual doses of nitrogen (54, 84 and 120 kg/ha by different intensities of grassland utilization (extensive – two cuts per year, medium intensive – three cuts per year, intensive – four cuts per year on percentage of plant functional groups, dry matter yield, and forage quality. The study was performed on small-plot trial over 7 years on moderately moist grassland in the Czech Republic. The proportion of legumes was significantly higher in the treatments fertilized with cow manure + dung-water combined with medium intensive utilization and intensive utilization (10.2% and 10.3%, respectively. Fertilization significantly increased dry matter yields by 51.9% (cow manure + dung water and 56% (cattle slurry compared with unfertilized controls (4.81 t/ha. Grasslands fertilized with cattle slurry showed significantly higher concentration of crude protein (142.9 g/kg compared with unfertilized (126.4 g/kg. Extensive grassland utilization significantly affected the increase of crude fibre concentration (up to 282.1 g/kg, and decrease of the energy value (up to 4.68 MJ g/kg of NEL. Organic matter digestibility was also negatively influenced by extensive grassland utilization (61.0%, 65.42% and 67.44% for the extensive, medium intensive and intensive utilization, respectively. Our findings suggested that medium intensive and intensive grassland utilization by the organic fertilization, which corresponded to annual doses of nitrogen of 84 and 120 kg/ha were the most suitable from the viewpoint of animal nutrition.

  8. A hybridized membrane-botanical biofilter for improving air quality in occupied spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, David; Darlington, Alan; van Ras, Niels; Kraakman, Bart; Dixon, Mike

    Botanical biofilters have been shown to be effective in improving indoor air quality through the removal of complex mixtures of gaseous contaminants typically found in human-occupied environments. Traditional, botanical biofilters have been comprised of plants rooted into a thin and highly porous synthetic medium that is hung on vertical surfaces. Water flows from the top of the biofilter and air is drawn horizontally through the rooting medium. These botanical biofilters have been successfully marketed in office and institutional settings. They operate efficiently, with adequate contaminant removal and little maintenance for many years. Depending on climate and outdoor air quality, botanical biofiltration can substantially reduce costs associated with ventilation of stale indoor air. However, there are several limitations that continue to inhibit widespread acceptance: 1. Current designs are architecturally limiting and inefficient at capturing ambient light 2. These biofilters can add significant amounts of humidity to an indoor space. This water loss also leads to a rapid accumulation of dissolved salts; reducing biofilter health and performance 3. There is the perception of potentially actively introducing harmful bioaerosols into the air stream 4. Design and practical limitations inhibit the entrance of this technology into the lucrative residential marketplace This paper describes the hybridization of membrane and botanical biofiltration technologies by incorporating a membrane array into the rootzone of a conventional interior planting. This technology has the potential for addressing all of the above limitations, expanding the range of indoor settings where botanical biofiltration can be applied. This technology was developed as the CSA-funded Canadian component an ESA-MAP project entitled: "Biological airfilter for air quality control of life support systems in manned space craft and other closed environments", A0-99-LSS-019. While the project addressed a

  9. Report on botanical nomenclature—Vienna 2005. XVII International Botanical Congress, Vienna: Nomenclature Section, 12–16 July 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Flann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available PrefaceThis is the official Report on the deliberations and decisions of the ten sessions of the Nomenclature Section of the XVII International Botanical Congress held in Vienna, Austria, from 12–16 July 2005. The meetings of the Section took place on these five consecutive days prior to the Congress proper. The Section meetings were hosted by the Institute of Botany, University of Vienna, Austria. Technical facilities included full electronic recording of all discussion spoken into the microphones. Text of all proposals to amend the Code was displayed on one screen allowing suggested amendments to be updated as appropriate. The team at the University of Vienna (Christopher Dixon, Jeong-Mi Park, Ovidiu Paun, Carolin A. Redernig and Dieter Reich ensured that the proceedings ran smoothly and enjoyably for all.A report of the decisions of the Section was published soon after the Congress (McNeill & al. in Taxon 54: 1057–1064. 2005. It includes a tabulation of the preliminary mail vote on the published proposals, specifying how the Section acted on each and detailing amendments and new proposals approved upon motions from the floor. It also includes the report of the Nominating Committee as well as the Congress resolution ratifying the Section’s decisions, neither reproduced here. The main result of the Section’s deliberations is the Vienna Code, which was published as Regnum Vegetabile 146, on 20 Sep 2006 (McNeill & al. in Regnum Veg. 146. 2006. It was also published online, on the same date (see http://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/main.php.The present report of the proceedings of the Vienna Nomenclature Section conveys, we believe, a true and lively picture of the event. It is primarily based on the MP3 electronic recordings, with, where necessary, supplementation by the comment slips submitted by most speakers and by reference to parallel tape-recording, particularly where there were gaps in the MP3 record. With these sources combined, and

  10. Characterization of Botanical and Geographical Origin of Corsican “Spring” Honeys by Melissopalynological and Volatile Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen spectrum, physicochemical parameters and volatile fraction of Corsican “spring” honeys were investigated with the aim of developing a multidisciplinary method for the qualification of honeys in which nectar resources are under-represented in the pollen spectrum. Forty-one Corsican “spring” honeys were certified by melissopalynological analysis using directory and biogeographical origin of 50 representative taxa. Two groups of honeys were distinguished according to the botanical origin of samples: “clementine” honeys characterized by the association of cultivated species from oriental plain and other “spring” honeys dominated by wild herbaceous taxa from the ruderal and/or maquis area. The main compounds of the “spring” honey volatile fraction were phenylacetaldehyde, benzaldehyde and methyl-benzene. The volatile composition of “clementine” honeys was also characterized by three lilac aldehyde isomers. Statistical analysis of melissopalynological, physicochemical and volatile data showed that the presence of Citrus pollen in “clementine” honeys was positively correlated with the amount of linalool derivatives and methyl anthranilate. Otherwise, the other “spring” honeys were characterized by complex nectariferous species associations and the content of phenylacetaldehyde and methyl syringate.

  11. Analysis of four pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in several bioactive botanicals with gas and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldoveanu, Serban C; Scott, Wayne A

    2016-01-01

    Several pentacyclic triterpenoid acids including betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids were reported to have health beneficial properties such as antiviral and anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the capability to inhibit "in vitro" the development of various cancer cell types. For this reason betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids are used as neutraceuticals. For the analysis of the pentacyclic triterpenoid acids in complex plant materials, an improved scheme was developed, involving a qualitative screening using silylation and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis, followed by quantitation using a novel liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure. The use of the two methods provides more reliable information regarding the plant materials with unknown composition. Besides betulinic, oleanolic, and ursolic acids that were analyzed, by this procedure a fourth pentacyclic triterpenoid acid was identified and quantitated that was not previously reported to be present in plants. This acid has been identified as 3β-3-hydroxy-lupa-18,20(29)-dien-28-oic acid. The newly identified acid has a structure as a derivative of lupane, although lupane with a double bond in the 18-position was not previously reported as present in plants. The new liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry procedure developed for this study offers a very low limit of quantitation, excellent precision, and robustness. Rosemary was found to contain the largest levels of pentacyclic triterpenoid acids among all the analyzed botanicals. PMID:26549610

  12. 芝加哥植物园色彩设计的对比应用研究%Analyze on Application of Garden Colors Contrast in the Chicago Botanical Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武冬梅; 段渊古

    2013-01-01

    With Chicago botanical garden as study object, the role of colors composition in Chicago botanical garden design was discussed. And the application effect of concrete color contrast in wall body plant decoration, courtyard water view, indoor greenhouse and trees decoration in the Chicago botanical garden was analyzed with the living example, which can provide reference data for garden plants design in China.%以芝加哥植物园为研究对象,系统论述了色彩构成在芝加哥植物园园林植物设计中发挥的作用.运用实例分析了芝加哥植物园中园林植物的色彩设计,指出芝加哥植物园墙体植物装饰、庭院水景、室内花房、树体装饰的具体色彩对比应用效果,为我国园林植物设计提供了详实的借鉴资料.

  13. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadda eLAALLAM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components.Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins and its physicochemical characteristics.Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four pathogenic bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM.Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38±0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5±550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey electrical conductivity. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1±4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive with 3.9±5.4 mm. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5±4.7 mm.Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations.Keywords: Honey characterization; antibacterial effects

  14. Innovative electronic publication in plant systematics: PhytoKeys and the changes to the “Botanical Code” accepted at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. John Kress

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available PhytoKeys was established less than a year ago in response to four main publication challenges of our time: (1 the appearance of electronic publications as amendments or even alternatives to paper publications; (2 Open Access (OA as a new publishing model; (3 the linkage of electronic registers, indices, and aggregators, which summarize information on biological species through taxonomic names or their persistent identifiers; and (4 Web 2.0 technologies, which permit the semantic markup of, and semantic enhancements to, published biological texts. The appearance of the journal was concomitant with lively discussions on the validity of nomenclatural acts published electronically (Knapp and Wright 2010, Knapp et al. 2010, Penev et al. 2010, Chapman et al. 2010. At the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne in July 2011 (IBC 2011 these discussions culminated in the decision to amend the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature to allow electronic-only publishing of new taxa. Even before the end of the Congress and formal acceptance of the changes PhytoKeys was able to publish a report on the main outcomes of the Nomenclature Section on electronic publishing (Miller et al. 2011.

  15. Rapid identification of the botanical and entomological sources of honey using DNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Sean W J; Hebert, Paul D N

    2017-01-01

    Honey is generated by various bee species from diverse plants, and because the value of different types of honey varies more than 100-fold, it is a target for fraud. This paper describes a protocol that employs DNA metabarcoding of three gene regions (ITS2, rbcLa, and COI) to provide an inexpensive tool to simultaneously deliver information on the botanical and entomological origins of honey. This method was used to examine seven varieties of honey: light, medium, dark, blended, pasteurized, creamed, and meliponine. Plant and insect sources were identified in five samples, but only the botanical or insect source could be identified in the other two. Two samples were found to be misrepresented. Although this method was generally successful in determining both plant and insect sources, honeys rich in polyphenolic compounds or subject to crystallization were recalcitrant to analysis, so further research is required to combat honey adulteration and mislabeling. PMID:27507464

  16. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT SYNTHETIC AND BOTANICAL INSECTICIDE AGAINST APHID, APHIS GOSSYPII GLOVER INFESTING ISABGOL CROP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. PATEL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out during 2008-09 to evaluate the different insecticides against aphid, Aphisgossypii Glover infesting isabgol (Plantago ovata crop under field condition at Sardarkrushinagar, S. D. A. U.,Dantiwada. The result of the field study revealed that, among all the chemical and botanical insecticides used,carbosulfan @ 0.05 per cent was found to be most effective by recording lowest population of aphid as per aphidindexing method (0.99 A. I. with the highest seed yield, 11.24 q/ha and neem oil @ 0.5 per cent was superiorthan other botanical recording (1.83 A. I. with a maximum 7.21 q/ha seed yield. Thus, from the overall resultsit can be concluded that the carbosulfan @ 0.05 and neem oil 0.5 per cent proved most effective for themanagement of aphid A. gossypii in isabgol crop.

  17. Botanical Drugs as an Emerging Strategy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales, Alba; Rodriguez-Cabezas, M. Elena; Risco, Severiano; Ocete, M. Angeles; Galvez, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common categories of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which are characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that comprises the patients' life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their aetiology is not completely understood, nonfully efficient drugs have been developed and those that show effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. Therefore, many patients try with some botanical drugs, which are safe and efficient after many years of use. However, it is necessary to properly evaluate these therapies to consider a new strategy for human IBD. In this report we have reviewed the main botanical drugs that have been assessed in clinical trials in human IBD and the mechanisms and the active compounds proposed for their beneficial effects. PMID:26576073

  18. MEAT QUALITY AND CAECAL CONTENT CHARACTERISTICS OF RABBIT ACCORDING TO DIETARY CONTENT AND BOTANICAL ORIGIN OF STARCH

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nizza; Moniello, G.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract not available. Nizza, A.; Moniello, G. (2000). MEAT QUALITY AND CAECAL CONTENT CHARACTERISTICS OF RABBIT ACCORDING TO DIETARY CONTENT AND BOTANICAL ORIGIN OF STARCH. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/10264.

  19. A Prospective, Controlled Study of the Botanical Compound Mixture LCS101 for Chemotherapy-Induced Hematological Complications in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yaal-Hahoshen, Neora; Maimon, Yair; Siegelmann-Danieli, Nava; Lev-Ari, Shahar; Ron, Ilan G.; Sperber, Fani; Samuels, Noah; Shoham, Jacob; MERIMSKY, OFER

    2011-01-01

    The safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the mixture of botanical compounds known as LCS101 were evaluated in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced hematological toxicity in breast cancer patients in a prospective, controlled study.

  20. Morphological peculiarities of Dracocephalum moldavica L. with respect to its introduction in the Botanical Garden of ZhNAEU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmyla A. Kotyuk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper determines the morphological peculiarities of vegetative and generative organs of two forms of Dracocephalum moldavicaL. under its introductions in the Botanical Gardens of ZhNAEU.

  1. Flora and vegetation of the Czech Republic: introduction to special issue dedicated to the centenary of the Czech Botanical Society

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chytrý, M.; Pyšek, Petr; Kaplan, Zdeněk; Danihelka, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 3 (2012), s. 393-396. ISSN 0032-7786 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : botany * state of the art * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2012

  2. USE OF BOTANICAL INSECTICIDES AS AN ALTERNATIVE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE MEXICAN BEAN WEEVIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAREN FERREIRA DA SILVA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the insecticidal activity of eight botanical species in the behavior and biological development of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae under laboratory conditions. The botanical species were applied on bean grains (Phaseolus vulgaris Linnaeus directly as powder or indirectly within TNT bags. Three laboratory assays were performed. First, a repellent activity test was performed by exposing twenty couples of Z. subfasciatus adults in a choice-test arena. Second, a mortality test was performed for seven days after infestation. Finally, the oviposition and emergency rates of adults (% and the development from egg to adult (in days were evaluated in seven couples (males and females for seven days inside of a vial containing 0.3g of the powder from each botanical species and 10 g of bean grains (3% w.w-1. The study was conducted in a completely randomized design, and the treatments were arranged as a factorial design (2 x 9 with two factors (factor 1= powder and TNT bag application forms and factor 2= eight botanical species and control with eight replications. The powder application form was more efficient in controlling Z. subfasciatus. Azadirachta indica (powder application, Ruta graveolens (powder application, and Piper aduncum (TNT bag reduced the infestation of adults. The species A. inidica, Piper tuberculatum, Trichilia catigua, Pfaffia glomerata, R. graveolens, and Mentha pulegium inhibited the oviposition of the insects regardless of the formulation applied. R. graveolens (powder application caused 100% of mortality. The powder application of R. graveolens and M. pulegium reduced egg viability and insect emergence; therefore, they are very promising alternatives to control Z. subfasciatus in stored grains.

  3. TAXONOMIC RESEARCHES CARRIED OUT IN THE HERBARIUM OF EGE UNIVERSITY BOTANICAL GARDEN

    OpenAIRE

    PİRHAN A. F.; ŞENOL S. G.; Yildirim, H.

    2007-01-01

    The autors made a survey over the herbarium of the Ege University Botanical Garden. Over there are 33,000 herbarium sheets, gathered in 42 years of field studies over the entire area of Aegean Region. There are showed some data over the flora and vegetation of Turkey, as well as some examples of endemic plant species which are represented as holotypus, isotypus and topotypus in the herbarium.

  4. Borneo: a quantitative analysis of botanical richness, endemicity and floristic regions based on herbarium records

    OpenAIRE

    Raes, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Based on the digitized herbarium records housed at the National Herbarium of the Netherlands I developed high spatial resolution patterns of Borneo's botanical richness, endemicity, and the floristic regions. The patterns are derived from species distribution models which predict a species occurrence based on the identified relationships between species recorded presences and the ecological circumstances at those localities. A new statistical method was developed to test the species distribut...

  5. Freezing-Thawing Characteristics of Botanical Tissues and Influence of Water Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hai-Ling; MA Yuan; PENG Xiao-Feng

    2004-01-01

    @@ A series of visualization experiments were conducted to investigate the transport phenomena and interface behaviour during the freezing-thawing process of typical botanical tissues. Attention was paid to the growth of ice crystals and the advance of the phase-change interface. A comparison was made to identify the freezing/thawing behaviour for different tissues under various freezing conditions. Based on the experimental observation, analyses were conducted to explore the influence of water morphology on the freezing/thawing characteristics.

  6. Analysis of the Interactions of Botanical Extract Combinations Against the Viability of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn S. Adams

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines are often combinations of botanical extracts that are assumed to have additive or synergistic effects. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of individual botanical extracts with combinations of extracts on prostate cell viability. We then modeled the interactions between botanical extracts in combination isobolographically. Scutellaria baicalensis, Rabdosia rubescens, Panax-pseudo ginseng, Dendranthema morifolium, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and Serenoa repens were collected, taxonomically identified and extracts prepared. Effects of the extracts on cell viability were quantitated in prostate cell lines using a luminescent ATP cell viability assay. Combinations of two botanical extracts of the four most active extracts were tested in the 22Rv1 cell line and their interactions assessed using isobolographic analysis. Each extract significantly inhibited the proliferation of prostate cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner except repens. The most active extracts, baicalensis, D. morifolium, G. uralensis and R. rubescens were tested as two-extract combinations. baicalensis and D. morifolium when combined were additive with a trend toward synergy, whereas D. morifolium and R. rubescens together were additive. The remaining two-extract combinations showed antagonism. The four extracts together were significantly more effective than the two-by-two combinations and the individual extracts alone. Combining the four herbal extracts significantly enhanced their activity in the cell lines tested compared with extracts alone. The less predictable nature of the two-way combinations suggests a need for careful characterization of the effects of each individual herb based on their intended use.

  7. Analytical opportunities of information-analytical system on collection funds of botanical gardens

    OpenAIRE

    Prokhorov A A; Andrjusenko V V; Veretennikova J V; Derusova O V; Obuhova E L; Shreders M A

    2004-01-01

    Recently, the accents in the field of application of information technologies for needs of biological collections are displaced from registration and account in area of the analysis of the data. If to determine a biodiversity, as the genetic resources, distributed in space, it is easy to make a conclusion, that one of the most powerful tools of the invesigation of biodiversity are the geoinformation systems. The estimation of taxonomy representation of col- lections of botanical g...

  8. Conifers in decorative arboretum of Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University

    OpenAIRE

    Eglacheva Arina; Lopinova Ekaterina Vasilievna; Printseva Inga Vladimirovna

    2014-01-01

    The transformation that taking place during of spontaneous cultivars introduction have not taken into consideration for last 10 years. The plants introduction in the Botanic Garden PSU have a planned character in a northwest middle taiga. Decorative arboretum was laid in 2000 (Potapova, Prokhorov, 2010). By 2014, the conifers collection includes 159 specimens of 98 cultivars belonging to 28 species, 10 genera and 3 families (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Taxaceae). Taxa are presented as species wit...

  9. Does Botanical Diversity in Sewage Treatment Reed-Bed Sites Enhance Invertebrate Biodiversity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alan Feest; Ian Merrill; Philippa Aukett

    2012-01-01

    (1) This study examines the effect of increasing botanical diversity, through reed-bed planting and maintenance regimes, on sewage treatment reed-bed invertebrate biodiversity and the possible enrichment of overall catchment biodiversity. (2) Reed-bed invertebrates were identified as a good indicator group of overall site biodiversity quality and were sampled at a range of sewage treatment reed-bed sites in the same geographical area between May and August 2006 (plus one natural reed-bed cont...

  10. Sublethal effects of some synthetic and botanical insecticides on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeily Saeideh; Samih Mohammad Amin; Zarabi Mehdi; Jafarbeigi Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    In addition to direct mortality caused by insecticides, some biological traits of insects may also be affected by sublethal insecticide doses. In this study, we used the age-stage, two-sex life table method to evaluate the sublethal effects of the four synthetic insecticides: abamectin, imidacloprid, diazinon, and pymetrozin as well as the botanical insecticide taken from Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae) extract, on eggs of the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem.: Aleyrodidae). The lowes...

  11. Garden Learning: A Study on European Botanic Gardens' Collaborative Learning Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kapelari, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    "From 2007-2013 the European 7th Framework Program Science in Society (FP7) funded a multitude of formal and informal educational institutions to join forces and engage in alternative ways to teach science—inside and outside the classroom—all over Europe. This book reports on one of these projects named INQUIRE which was developed and implemented to support 14 Botanic Gardens and Natural History Museums in 11 European countries, to establish a collaborative learning network and expand their u...

  12. The botanical integrity of wheat products influences the gastric distention and satiety in healthy subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Almér Lars-Olof; Höglund Peter; Björgell Ola; Lindstedt Sandra; Hlebowicz Joanna; Darwiche Gassan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Maintenance of the botanical integrity of cereal kernels and the addition of acetic acid (as vinegar) in the product or meal has been shown to lower the postprandial blood glucose and insulin response and to increase satiety. However, the mechanism behind the benefits of acetic acid on blood glucose and satiety is not clear. We hypothesized that the gastric emptying rate could be involved. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of maintained bot...

  13. A survey on the presence of undesirable botanical substances in feed in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Raamsdonk LWD.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Directive 2002/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 May 2002 on undesirable substances in animal feed lists a range of substances from botanical origin (weed seeds and additionally some chemical compounds directly originating from specific weeds. In order to examine the actual status of enforcement and of the present occurrence of these botanical substances, a survey was carried out. A questionnaire was sent to 103 laboratories, including official control labs from all member states of the European Union. The results, indicating the frequency of occurrence as far as reported, are compared to the publications of the EU Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed (RASFF. A total of 44 questionnaires was returned (42.7% from 22 member states. Ten member states predominantly from north-western Europe appeared to have an active monitoring of botanical undesirable substances. The questionnaire results did not indicate that the other member states enforce this part of Directive 2002/32/EC. Reports on the frequency of occurrence include: a few to 25-50% of the samples contain traces of ergot (8 member states, a few to 24% contain at least some traces of thorn apple (6 member states, zero to 17% contain some castor oil plant seeds (3 member states, zero to a few samples contain Crotalaria seeds (3 member states, and zero to 6% contain traces of Sareptian mustard (4 member states. One member state conducted extra surveillance since several cases of animal intoxications have been reported. In some cases a coincidence with undesirable botanical substances was found.

  14. Commonly Used Antioxidant Botanicals: Active Constituents and their Potential Role in Cardiovascular Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; MEHENDALE, SANGEETA R.; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the US. Recent studies found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been incriminated in the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic heart disease. Many botanicals possess antioxidant properties, and these herbal antioxidants may protect against cardiovascular diseases by contributing to the total antioxidant defense system of the human body. In this article, we reviewed the antioxidant components and properties of four puta...

  15. Bacterial Communities in Malagasy Soils with Differing Levels of Disturbance Affecting Botanical Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Blasiak, Leah C.; Schmidt, Alex W.; Andriamiarinoro, Honoré; Mulaw, Temesgen; Rasolomampianina, Rado; Wendy L Applequist; Birkinshaw, Chris; Rejo-Fienena, Félicitée; Lowry, Porter P.; Schmidt, Thomas M; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Madagascar is well-known for the exceptional biodiversity of its macro-flora and fauna, but the biodiversity of Malagasy microbial communities remains relatively unexplored. Understanding patterns of bacterial diversity in soil and their correlations with above-ground botanical diversity could influence conservation planning as well as sampling strategies to maximize access to bacterially derived natural products. We present the first detailed description of Malagasy soil bacterial communitie...

  16. THE MOLDOVA VEGETATION EXPOSITION FROM THE BOTANICAL GARDEN OF THE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POSTOLACHE GHEORGHE

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Construction phases of the Moldova Vegetation Exposition from the Botanical Garden of Chişinău are presented. Twelve forest micro-expositions, one steppe vegetation exposition, one grassland micro-exposition and an area of rare plants have been created during last 35 year on an area of 14 ha. The Moldova Vegetation Exposition includes 400 species of vascular plants.

  17. Flowering and Fruiting Times on Four Species of Annona (Annonaceae) in Purwodadi Botanic Garden

    OpenAIRE

    Dewi Ayu Lestari; Siti Sofiah

    2015-01-01

    Annona is a genus belongs to Annonaceae family, consisting of numerous species that produce edible fruit. Four species namely A. glabra, A. montana, A. muricata and A. squamosa collections of Purwodadi Botanic Garden were recorded for its flowering and fruiting times, since November 2010 to April 2013. The data were scored and complemented with climate data (temperature, rainfall intensity, humidity) then analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. The result showed that humidity was...

  18. Elements of Success in Chicago Botanic Garden’s Science Career Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Science Career Continuum at the Chicago Botanic Garden is a model program for successfully encouraging youth from diverse backgrounds into STEM careers. This program has shown that when students are given an opportunity to participate in real scientific research under the mentorship of a caring professional over multiple years, they are more likely to go to college and pursue STEM careers than their peers. 

  19. The interplay between yam (Dioscorea sp.) starch botanical source, micromeritics and functionality in paracetamol granules for reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Cliff K; Adebayo, Sarafadeen A; Wheatley, Andrew O; Asemota, Helen N

    2008-09-01

    A comparative investigation of the interplay between starch botanical source, micromeritics and their functionality in formulated paediatric paracetamol granules for reconstitution was conducted using starches extracted from five local yam (Dioscorea spp.) species. Significant differences were observed in the physicochemical properties of the different starches studied (pbotanic source-dependent suggesting careful consideration of botanic source when substituting one starch product for another in granule formulation. PMID:18423995

  20. A novel insight into the cost–benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Saganová, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Background The cost–benefit model for the evolution of botanical carnivory provides a conceptual framework for interpreting a wide range of comparative and experimental studies on carnivorous plants. This model assumes that the modified leaves called traps represent a significant cost for the plant, and this cost is outweighed by the benefits from increased nutrient uptake from prey, in terms of enhancing the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf mass or area (AN) in the microsites inhabited by carnivorous plants. Scope This review summarizes results from the classical interpretation of the cost–benefit model for evolution of botanical carnivory and highlights the costs and benefits of active trapping mechanisms, including water pumping, electrical signalling and accumulation of jasmonates. Novel alternative sequestration strategies (utilization of leaf litter and faeces) in carnivorous plants are also discussed in the context of the cost–benefit model. Conclusions Traps of carnivorous plants have lower AN than leaves, and the leaves have higher AN after feeding. Prey digestion, water pumping and electrical signalling represent a significant carbon cost (as an increased rate of respiration, RD) for carnivorous plants. On the other hand, jasmonate accumulation during the digestive period and reprogramming of gene expression from growth and photosynthesis to prey digestion optimizes enzyme production in comparison with constitutive secretion. This inducibility may have evolved as a cost-saving strategy beneficial for carnivorous plants. The similarities between plant defence mechanisms and botanical carnivory are highlighted. PMID:25948113

  1. Probability of identification: a statistical model for the validation of qualitative botanical identification methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBudde, Robert A; Harnly, James M

    2012-01-01

    A qualitative botanical identification method (BIM) is an analytical procedure that returns a binary result (1 = Identified, 0 = Not Identified). A BIM may be used by a buyer, manufacturer, or regulator to determine whether a botanical material being tested is the same as the target (desired) material, or whether it contains excessive nontarget (undesirable) material. The report describes the development and validation of studies for a BIM based on the proportion of replicates identified, or probability of identification (POI), as the basic observed statistic. The statistical procedures proposed for data analysis follow closely those of the probability of detection, and harmonize the statistical concepts and parameters between quantitative and qualitative method validation. Use of POI statistics also harmonizes statistical concepts for botanical, microbiological, toxin, and other analyte identification methods that produce binary results. The POI statistical model provides a tool for graphical representation of response curves for qualitative methods, reporting of descriptive statistics, and application of performance requirements. Single collaborator and multicollaborative study examples are given. PMID:22468371

  2. Forensic botany: species identification of botanical trace evidence using a multigene barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Gianmarco; Alù, Milena; Corradini, Beatrice; Beduschi, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    Forensic botany can provide significant supporting evidence during criminal investigations. However, it is still an underutilized field of investigation with its most common application limited to identifying specific as well as suspected illegal plants. The ubiquitous presence of plant species can be useful in forensics, but the absence of an accurate identification system remains the major obstacle to the present inability to routinely and correctly identify trace botanical evidence. Many plant materials cannot be identified and differentiated to the species level by traditional morphological characteristics when botanical specimens are degraded and lack physical features. By taking advantage of a universal barcode system, DNA sequencing, and other biomolecular techniques used routinely in forensic investigations, two chloroplast DNA regions were evaluated for their use as "barcoding" markers for plant identification in the field of forensics. We therefore investigated the forensic use of two non-coding plastid regions, psbA-trnH and trnL-trnF, to create a multimarker system for species identification that could be useful throughout the plant kingdom. The sequences from 63 plants belonging to our local flora were submitted and registered on the GenBank database. Sequence comparison to set up the level of identification (species, genus, or family) through Blast algorithms allowed us to assess the suitability of this method. The results confirmed the effectiveness of our botanic universal multimarker assay in forensic investigations. PMID:19504263

  3. Plants from Abroad: Botanical Terminology in 18th-century British Encyclopaedias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Lonati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the 18th century British encyclopaedias included in their lemmata an increasing number of botanical lexis, that is the terminology pertaining to “that branch of natural history which treats of the uses, characters, classes, orders, genera, and species of plants. […] and what useful and ornamental purposes may be expected from the cultivation of it [i.e. botany]” (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1768-1771, s.v. Botany. More often than not, these terms represented migrating plants coming from exotic places, new geographical areas, whether eastwards or westwards.The general aim of this survey is to investigate the representation of the botanical science in 18th-century universal and specialized encyclopaedias, starting from prefaces and going on with the micro-texts of the single entries s.v. Botany. The starting point is thus theoretical botany. A further point in the analysis focuses on applied botany and discusses those plants such as Camellia Sinensis, Coffea Arabica, Theobroma Cacao, Saccharum Officinarum and Cinchona Officinalis which were mostly exploited for commercial and/or medical reasons.The individual entries include the most tiny details on the single headwords-topics and also display an acceptable plurality of beliefs, viewpoints and perspectives, focussing on botanical descriptions, historical information, socio-cultural issues, legal, political and commercial considerations.

  4. Otto Müller’s Surirella taxa (Bacillariophyta from East Africa, based on a Historical Collection kept at the Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jahn

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the 20th century, Otto Müller described over 100 new freshwater diatom taxa from algae samples, collected during the German “Nyassa-See– und Kinga-Gebirgs-Expedition” in East Africa. He published valuable drawings and wrote detailed descriptions of these microalgae, but subsequent authors regarded many of these African taxa to be synonyms or infraspecific of European species. In the last two decades renewed attention to the diatom flora of East Africa has made it evident that Müller’s taxa have to be reinvestigated, in terms of both light as well as scanning electron microscopy, in order to evaluate possible new or endemic species. This was recently done for his Surirella taxa, a typical component of the African Great Lakes diatom flora of which many species are endemic to this area. Additional data, originating from material of later periods in the same region (e.g. Lakes Tanganyika, Malawi, Victoria, Edward, was incorporated in the investigation to study the variability in valve morphology and the African distribution of each species. Otto Müller’s samples thus provide the means to study historical African diatom diversity as a baseline for modern biodiversity assessment. Type information and the English description for taxon have been published in international journals and online at the AlgaTerra Information System [www.algaterra.org], a site developed and updated by the Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem (BGBM. High resolution digital photographs of the Surirella taxa will also be available in the future on the API website [www.aluka.org].

  5. DNA-Based Authentication of Botanicals and Plant-Derived Dietary Supplements: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho Moraes, DF; Still, DW; Lum,, Josephine; Hirsch, AM

    2015-01-01

    Copyright © 2015, Georg Thieme Verlag KG. All rights reserved. Herbal medicines and botanicals have long been used as sole or additional medical aids worldwide. Currently, billions of dollars are spent on botanicals and related products, but minimal regulation exists regarding their purity, integrity, and efficacy. Cases of adulteration and contamination have led to severe illness and even death in some cases. Identifying the plant material in botanicals and phytomedicines using organoleptic ...

  6. DNA-Based Authentication of Botanicals and Plant-Derived Dietary Supplements: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho Moraes, DF; Still, DW; Lum,, Josephine; Hirsch, AM

    2015-01-01

    © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart. New York 2015. Herbal medicines and botanicals have long been used as sole or additional medical aids worldwide. Currently, billions of dollars are spent on botanicals and related products, but minimal regulation exists regarding their purity, integrity, and efficacy. Cases of adulteration and contamination have led to severe illness and even death in some cases. Identifying the plant material in botanicals and phytomedicines using organoleptic means or thr...

  7. The implementation of research recommendations at the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martie Mearns

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study Biodiversity is not a static phenomenon and many variables have an effect on accelerated biodiversity loss. While most of the variables affecting biodiversity loss are caused by humankind, many species are affected by more than one variable simultaneously. Six fundamental causes for biodiversity loss have been identifi ed, namely unsustainable population growth and associated increased pressure on natural resources; a reduced spectrum of agricultural, forestry and fishery products; failure of economic systems to attach appropriate economic value to the environment and resources; inequality in ownership, flow and management of the benefits and utilisation of resources; insufficient knowledge in the application and use of resources; and legislation and institutional systems that promote unsustainable abuse of the environment (Middleton 2003:250. The worldwide loss of biodiversity makes the management of protected areas more important than ever. Protected areas are under increasing pressure to become economically viable and independent of state grants. Tourism creates the mechanism and opportunities for protected areas to increase their economic viability while advancing the appreciation of nature. The management of these protected areas therefore includes the management of visitors. South Africa is the third most bio diverse country in the world. Amongst a variety of nature conservation endeavours nine national botanical gardens are managed by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI. One of the nine national gardens is the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden situated in Roodekrans towards the west of Johannesburg. A study was launched to determine preferences of visitors to the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden by making use of semi-structured interviews. The purpose of the study was threefold. Firstly the study was launched to determine whether visitors to the garden had an increased awareness

  8. 上海植物园典型群落景观美景度评价%Scenic Beauty Evaluation of Typical Plant Communities in Shanghai Botanical Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙启臻; 吴泽民

    2012-01-01

    Based on the comprehensive field survey on plant communities of Shanghai Botanical Garden, the study made the landscape aesthetic evaluation for 33 typical communities using scenic beauty evaluation (SBE) . The results indicated that the aesthetic value of the plant communities was - 1.38 -1.37. Sixteen communities were valued≥0, all of which included almost deciduous species and had 3 layers in vertical structure. The major canopy species of the communities with higher aesthetic value were Koelreteria paniculata, Salix madthudana, Sapium sebiferum, Cinnamomum camphora, Ginkgo biloba, Diospyros kaki, Albizzia julibrissin, etc; and the major understory species were colorful leaf or flower species such as Loropetarum chinense var. rublum, Malus spp. , Rhododendron spp. , Cerasus lannesiana. The factors affecting scenic beauty of plant communities include species composition, colors, vertical structure, harmonization between communities and ambient environment, health conditions of trees and canopy line change. The plant communities in city botanical garden provides a key basis for green space establishment in urban area, so it was proposed to pay close attention to the effects of botanical garden in city greening.%在全面调查上海植物园植物群落的基础上,采用美景度评判法(SBE)对33个典型群落进行美学价值评价,结果表明其美景度值为-1.38~1.37。得分值≥0的有16个群落,其建群树种几乎全为落叶阔叶树、且多为3层结构,得分较高的群落建群树种主要包括栾树、旱柳、乌桕、香樟、银杏、柿树、合欢等,下层以彩叶或观花树种如红花檀木、海棠、杜鹃、日本晚樱、八仙花等为主。影响群落景观关学特点的因素主要有树种组成、色彩、垂直结构、群落与周围环境的协调度、树木的健康状况及林冠线变化度等。植物园的植物群落关景度评价是构建城市绿地群落的重要参考。

  9. Mitochondrial pathway mediates the antileukemic effects of Hemidesmus indicus, a promising botanical drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Fimognari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although cancers are characterized by the deregulation of multiple signalling pathways, most current anticancer therapies involve the modulation of a single target. Because of the enormous biological diversity of cancer, strategic combination of agents targeted against the most critical of those alterations is needed. Due to their complex nature, plant products interact with numerous targets and influence several biochemical and molecular cascades. The interest in further development of botanical drugs has been increasing steadily and the FDA recently approved the first new botanical prescription drug. The present study is designed to explore the potential antileukemic properties of Hemidesmus indicus with a view to contributing to further development of botanical drugs. Hemidesmus was submitted to an extensive in vitro preclinical evaluation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A variety of cellular assays and flow cytometry, as well as a phytochemical screening, were performed on different leukemic cell lines. We have demonstrated that Hemidesmus modulated many components of intracellular signaling pathways involved in cell viability and proliferation and altered the protein expression, eventually leading to tumor cell death, mediated by a loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. ADP, adenine nucleotide translocator and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors did not reverse Hemidesmus-induced mitochondrial depolarization. Hemidesmus induced a significant [Ca(2+](i raise through the mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+ stores. Moreover, Hemidesmus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of three commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs (methotrexate, 6-thioguanine, cytarabine. A clinically relevant observation is that its cytotoxic activity was also recorded in primary cells from acute myeloid leukemic patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate the molecular basis of

  10. Indian flying fox Pteropus giganteus colony in Peradeniya Botanical Gardens, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Krystufek

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A colony of Indian flying foxes in Peradeniya Botanical Gardens near Kandy, Sri Lanka, was spread over 20 hectares and numbered 24,480 bats in September 2002. The number of bats per tree varied between ten and 1200. The median value was low (= 50 bats per tree and half of the trees contained between 30 and 100 bats. The mean density was c. 1200 bats per hectare, but was significantly higher along the western margin of the colony (3250 bats per hectare. Peradeniya possibly supports the largest aggregation of the Indian flying fox known currently.

  11. Botanical investigations related to the Isau mining project, 2011-2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Christian; Simonsen, Caroline Ernberg

    is described in the affected areas along the proposed route from the coast to the mineral deposit by the ice cap and at the borrow sites, which have been proposed to provide material for construction of roads. Recommendations to minimize the environmental impact of the construction works are proposed......Botanical field studies were carried out in August 2011 and September 2012 in connection with the proposed mining activities at Isua in West Greenland. The aim was both to register and map rare and endemic vascular plants, and to localize vulnerable vegetation types. The vegetation and the flora...

  12. VARIETY OF LEGUMES IN NATURAL COMMUNITIES OF THE YAKUT BOTANICAL GARDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaeva O. A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the information about the species diversity of the family Fabaceae in the natural area of the Yakut botanical garden. It also provides the information about the method and the study area, a description of the ambient phytocenotic, taxonomic analysis, areal analysis, bio-morphological analysis (the variety of life forms given by K. Raunkier, rhythm analysis, environmental analysis (by A.P. Schennikov, analysis of phytocoenotic. We have also provided a summary of the endemics of Central Yakutia - Thermopsis lanceolata R. Br. subsp. jacutica (Czefr.

  13. Xanthones from the Botanical Dietary Supplement Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) with Aromatase Inhibitory Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balunas, Marcy J.; Su, Bin; Brueggemeier, Robert W.; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Twelve xanthone constituents of the botanical dietary supplement, mangosteen (the pericarp of Garcinia mangostina) were screened using a non-cellular, enzyme-based microsomal aromatase inhibition assay. Of these compounds, garcinone D (3), garcinone E (5)α-mangostin (8), and γ-mangostin (9) exhibited dose-dependent inhibitory activity. In a follow-up cell-based assay using SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells that express high levels of aromatase, the most potent of these four xanthones was γ-mangosti...

  14. Plants from Abroad: Botanical Terminology in 18th-century British Encyclopaedias

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Lonati

    2013-01-01

    During the 18th century British encyclopaedias included in their lemmata an increasing number of botanical lexis, that is the terminology pertaining to “that branch of natural history which treats of the uses, characters, classes, orders, genera, and species of plants. […] and what useful and ornamental purposes may be expected from the cultivation of it [i.e. botany]” (Encyclopaedia Britannica, 1768-1771, s.v. Botany). More often than not, these terms represented migrating plants coming from...

  15. Introduction of two Chirita species in the botanical garden of Oles’ Gonchar dnipropetrovsk national university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Domnitskaya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Chirita (D. Don Fritch. are introduced in the Botanical Garden of Oles’ Gonchar Dnіpropetrovsk National University. The basic morphological features of Ch. sinensis Lindl. and Ch. tamiana B. L. Burt are represented. The adaptation level to the conservatory soil is estimated. The terms of flowering periods were established. Data on morphological features of two Chirita species are important for the best understanding of their cultivation. It can be used in a selection, growing and reproduction of Chirita.

  16. Herbal medicinal products versus botanical-food supplements in the European market: state of art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilia, Anna Rita

    2015-01-01

    Botanical products marketed in Europe are diverse, classified as herbal medicinal products, dietary supplements, cosmetics, foods and beverages depending on the relevant applicable legislation. Many factors are taken into account in the classification of a botanical product (e.g. intended use, labeling, preparations and dosages) according to how it is placed on the market. Herbal medicinal products (HMPs) can only be sold in pharmacies, under the supervision of a pharmacist, and are marketed after full or simplified registration procedures according to their classification, i.e. as over-the-counter drugs (OTC) available without special restrictions and prescription only medicine (POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The dietary supplement segment is also sold in the market in dose form (such as capsules, tablets, ampoules of liquids, drops etc) and represents 15-20% of the botanical market at the European level with high variability among each country (i.e. in Italy it reaches up to 80%). In many cases the distinction between medicinal products and food supplements has generated borderline botanical-sourced products, which generally produce confusion and mislead the consumers. As a consequence, there is an urgent need of consumer education and in addition to collect comprehensive data and make this database systematically available to herbalists, nutritionists and medical specialists for a proper classification and harmonization of the use of botanical ingredients, and, as consequence, a correct use of these products. PMID:25920234

  17. Quantification of total iodine in intact granular starches of different botanical origin exposed to iodine vapor at various water activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Bruce; Ye, Mei; Holbein, Bruce E; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2011-11-01

    Iodine has been used as an effective tool for studying both the structure and composition of dispersed starch and starch granules. In addition to being employed to assess relative amylose contents for starch samples, it has been used to look at the molecular mobility of the glucose polymers within intact starch granules based on exposure to iodine vapor equilibrated at different water activities. Starches of different botanical origin including corn, high amylose corn, waxy corn, potato, waxy potato, tapioca, wheat, rice, waxy rice, chick pea and mung bean were equilibrated to 0.33, 0.75, 0.97 water activities, exposed to iodine vapor and then absorbance spectra and LAB color were determined. In addition, a new iodine quantification method sensitive to distribution of granules, and the density of the starch were also determined to explore whether high levels of long linear glucose chains and the surface area-to-volume ratio were important factors relating to the granular iodine binding. Results showed, in all cases, starches complexed more iodine as water content increased and waxy starches bound less iodine than their normal starch counterparts. However, much more bound iodine could be measured chemically with waxy starches than was expected based on colorimetric determination. Surface area appeared to be a factor as smaller rice and waxy rice starch granules complexed more iodine, while the larger potato and waxy potato granules complexed less than would be expected based on measured amylose contents. Corn, high amylose corn, and wheat, known to have starch granules with extensive surface pores, bound higher levels of iodine suggesting pores and channels may be an important factor giving iodine vapor greater access to bind within the granules. Exposing iodine vapor to moisture-equilibrated native starches is an effective tool to explore starch granule architecture. PMID:21962455

  18. Botanical notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Maxwell

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Indigofera caudata Dunn (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae is noted as a new record for Thailand. Two new combinations in Hedyotis from Oldenlandia (Rubiaceae are made, viz. Hedyotis krewanhensis (Pierre ex Pit. Maxw. and Hedyotis chevalieri (Pit. Maxw.

  19. Botanical notes

    OpenAIRE

    James F. Maxwell

    2010-01-01

    Indigofera caudata Dunn (Leguminosae, Papilionoideae) is noted as a new record for Thailand. Two new combinations in Hedyotis from Oldenlandia (Rubiaceae) are made, viz. Hedyotis krewanhensis (Pierre ex Pit.) Maxw. and Hedyotis chevalieri (Pit.) Maxw.

  20. Comparative Studies between South China Botanical Garden and the First-class Botanical Gardens in the World%华南植物园与世界一流植物园的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑祥慈; 张吉; 房迈莼; 苏国华; 廖景平

    2015-01-01

    Botanical gardens are considered to have played an important role in the studies of plant science, biodiversity conservation and sustainable utilization of plant resources of the world. They are also served as public education and knowledge dissemination centers, and performed an important function in cultural inheritance and historical continuity. The South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, UK and the Missouri Botanical Garden, USA are comprehensively compared and analyzed in three aspects, i.e., species conservation, science research, and science communication. Some suggestions are put forward for the future development of South China Botanical Garden, which will have important reference value for the development of the Chinese botanical garden community in the future.%植物园在植物科学研究、生物多样性保护和植物资源可持续利用中具有重要作用,也是公众教育和知识传播的重要平台,具有文化传承和历史延续性的功能。以中国科学院华南植物园、英国皇家植物园邱园和美国密苏里植物园为例,从物种保护、科学研究和科学传播3个方面对植物园进行了全面的比较和分析,为华南植物园未来发展提出了一些建议,可为华南植物园乃至我国植物园的发展提供参考依据。

  1. Improving indoor air quality through botanical air filtration in energy efficient residences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Daniel W.

    According to the U.S. EPA, the average American spends 90% of their time indoors where pollutants are two to five times more prevalent than outside. The consequences of these pollutants are estimated to cost the U.S. 125 billion dollars in lost health and productivity. Background literature suggests botanical air filtration may be able to solve this problem by leveraging the natural ability of plants to purify indoor air. By improving indoor air quality, energy consumption can also be reduced by bringing in less outside air to dilute contaminants within the space. A botanical air filter, called the Biowall, was designed and grown aeroponically in a sealed environmental chamber. Precise measurements of air temperature, air humidity, air quality and energy consumption were made under various lighting levels, plant species and watering strategies to optimize its performance. It was found to reduce indoor air pollutants 60 percent and has the potential to reduce heating and cooling energy consumption by 20 to 30 percent.

  2. Does Botanical Diversity in Sewage Treatment Reed-Bed Sites Enhance Invertebrate Biodiversity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Feest

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 This study examines the effect of increasing botanical diversity, through reed-bed planting and maintenance regimes, on sewage treatment reed-bed invertebrate biodiversity and the possible enrichment of overall catchment biodiversity. (2 Reed-bed invertebrates were identified as a good indicator group of overall site biodiversity quality and were sampled at a range of sewage treatment reed-bed sites in the same geographical area between May and August 2006 (plus one natural reed-bed control site. Standardised water trapping and pitfall trapping techniques were employed throughout this sampling period. (3 Statistical analysis of the sampling results revealed that the number of plant species recorded was inversely related to terrestrial invertebrate species richness, species conservation value index and biomass within the study sites. For example, the natural reed-bed sampled had the highest botanical diversity but the lowest terrestrial invertebrate species richness. (4 This study has demonstrated that sewage treatment reed-beds support a diverse range of invertebrate species, some of them being of national conservation value. This suggests that sewage treatment reed-beds may be at least as biodiverse as naturally occurring reed-beds and will add to the overall biodiversity and ecohydrology of a catchment whilst saving energy.

  3. Evaluation of the botanical origin of black cohosh products by genetic and chemical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masada-Atsumi, Sayaka; Kumeta, Yukie; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing sales of black cohosh (the dried rhizome and root of Cimicifuga racemosa L.) in the world herbal market, these products have continuous adulteration issues. The botanical authenticity of the black cohosh products is the first important step for ensuring their quality, safety and efficacy. In this study, we genetically identified the botanical sources of 10 black cohosh products and 5 Cimicifuga Rhizome crude drugs of Japanese Pharmacopoeia grade, and analyzed the metabolic profiling of 25 black cohosh products using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Consequently, we found that C. dahurica and possibly C. foetida are misused as sources of the black cohosh products and in some cases, the extracts of black cohosh were adulterated with the plant materials of C. dahurica. We demonstrated that these three species can be distinguished by three marker compounds in a specific mass range. These results must be helpful in establishing regulations for the safe use of the black cohosh products. PMID:24583864

  4. Ethnopharmacological information from the botanical correspondence of Berthold Seemann (1825 - 1871)--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmstädter, A

    2015-09-01

    Historical research may be able to contribute to the exploration of traditional knowledge about medicinal plants and promising attempts have been made investigating Byzantine texts, Early Modern herbals, and writings of Christian missionaries. In this pilot study it should be explored if publications, travel reports, diaries or correspondence of the botanical explorers of the 19th and early 20th centuries may serve a source of ethnopharmacological information as well and may be able to guide modern phytopharmacological research. Writings of Berthold Seemann (1825-1871), a German investigator exploring the botany of Middle America, the Fiji islands and other regions, are investigated as a first example. It could be shown that Seemann's heritage mainly kept at Kew Garden Archives, does contain ethnopharmacological information which in part has already been confirmed by recent study results indicating some reliability of his observations. However, there are also reports about traditional medicinal plants scarcely investigated so far, including Schultesia stenophylla Mart. (syn. S. guainensis (Aubl.) Malme), Trixis inula Crantz, Waltheria glomerata Presl., Gonophlebium attenuatum (Humb. & Bonpl. Es Wil\\d) C. Presl., or Pseudoelephantopus spicatus (Juss ex Aubl.) C.F. Baker. It is suggested to further explore their potential as medicinal plants. In general, as Seemann's example has shown, publications and correspondence of botanical explorers of the past seem to be a valuable and hitherto almost neglected source of information to be considered in further historical and ethnopharmacological research. PMID:26492648

  5. Ethno-botanical studies of economically important plants from mountainous region of gilgit-baltistan, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethno botanical studies of economically important plants from Gilgit-Baltistan were conducted during 2003-2006. Extensive field trips were conducted for collection of plants according to their flowering and fruiting period and ethno-botanical data obtained during field trips. This area has many ecological zones, lies between 3000ft to 29000ft above sea level. Due to difference in soil, climate, moisture contents, latitude, longitude, altitude and topography, great diversity of plants of economic importance were found in these areas. Locals belonging to different ethnic groups, like, sayed, Gujjar, Mughal, Sheen, Yaskuin, Wakhi, Tajik, Khowar, etc., are settled there. They have distinct life styles, beliefs, traditions, life style and culture. There is a great shortage medical treatment therefore locals use indigenous plants for treatment of various diseases at local level. Folklore treatment is considered the cheapest source of curing diseases at local level. Information regarding ethno-medicinal importance was obtained from local inhabitants of old age. These plants have been utilised over many generations by various ethnic groups. It was found that indigenous medicinal flora of the area is quite rich and is diverse, due to the difference in altitude, climate and other topographic conditions. It is expected that this paper will be beneficial for locals, students, researchers, farmers, foresters and general public alike. (author)

  6. Botanical smuts and hermaphrodites: Lydia Becker, Darwin's botany, and education reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianquitto, Tina

    2013-06-01

    In 1868, Lydia Becker (1827-1890), the renowned Manchester suffragist, announced in a talk before the British Association for the Advancement of Science that the mind had no sex. A year later, she presented original botanical research at the BAAS, contending that a parasitic fungus forced normally single-sex female flowers of Lychnis diurna to develop stamens and become hermaphroditic. This essay uncovers the complex relationship between Lydia Becker's botanical research and her stance on women's rights by investigating how her interest in evolutionary theory, as well as her correspondence with Charles Darwin, critically informed her reform agendas by providing her with a new vocabulary for advocating for equality. One of the facts that Becker took away from her work on Lychnis was that even supposedly fixed, dichotomous categories such as biological sex became unfocused under the evolutionary lens. The details of evolutionary theory, from specific arguments on structural adaptations to more encompassing theories on heredity (i.e., pangenesis), informed Becker's understanding of human physiology. At the same time, Becker's belief in the fundamental equality of the sexes enabled her to perceive the distinction between inherent, biological differences and culturally contingent ones. She applied biological principles to social constructs as she asked: Do analogous evolutionary forces act on humans? PMID:23961688

  7. A review on botanical species and chemical compounds with appetite suppressing properties for body weight control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astell, Katie J; Mathai, Michael L; Su, Xiao Q

    2013-09-01

    As obesity has reached epidemic proportions, the management of this global disease is of clinical importance. The availability and popularity of natural dietary supplements for the treatment of obesity has risen dramatically in recent years. The purpose of this paper was to review the effect of commonly available over the counter plant-derived supplements used to suppress appetite for obesity control and management. The data were obtained from the electronic databases PubMed, SpringerLink, Google Scholar, ScienceDirect, and MEDLINE with full text (via EBSCOHost) and the databases were accessed during late 2012 - early January 2013. The botanical species discussed in this review include Camellia sinensis, Caralluma fimbriata, Citrus aurantium, Coleus forskohlii, Garcinia cambogia and Phaseolus vulgaris. This review found that many botanical species including crude extracts and isolated compounds from plants have been shown to provide potentially promising therapeutic effects including appetite control and weight loss. However, many of these crude extracts and compounds need to be further investigated to define the magnitude of the effects, optimal dosage, mechanisms of action, long term safety, and potential side effects. PMID:23666454

  8. The botanical integrity of wheat products influences the gastric distention and satiety in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almér Lars-Olof

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of the botanical integrity of cereal kernels and the addition of acetic acid (as vinegar in the product or meal has been shown to lower the postprandial blood glucose and insulin response and to increase satiety. However, the mechanism behind the benefits of acetic acid on blood glucose and satiety is not clear. We hypothesized that the gastric emptying rate could be involved. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of maintained botanical integrity of cereals and the presence of acetic acid (vinegar on gastric emptying rate (GER, postprandial blood glucose and satiety. Methods Fifteen healthy subjects were included in a blinded crossover trial, and thirteen of the subjects completed the study. Equicarbohydrate amounts of the following wheat-based meals were studied: white wheat bread, whole-kernel wheat bread or wholemeal wheat bread served with white wine vinegar. The results were compared with a reference meal consisting of white wheat bread without vinegar. The GER was measured with standardized real-time ultrasonography using normal fasting blood glucose Results The whole-kernel wheat bread with vinegar resulted in significantly higher ( Conclusion The present study shows higher satiety after a whole-kernel wheat bread meal with vinegar. This may be explained by increased antral distension after ingestion of intact cereal kernels but, in this study, not by a lower gastric emptying rate or higher postprandial blood glucose response. Trial registration NTR1116

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of plants from the Mountain Botanical Garden in Zakopane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Zubek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mycorrhizal status of 77 plant species collected from the Mountain Botanical Garden of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Zakopane (southern Poland was surveyed. These plants include rare, endemic and threatened species in the Tatra Mts. (the Western Carpathians and are maintained in the botanical garden in order to develop effective methods of protection and cultivation. Plants belonging to Brassicaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Dryopteridaceae, Juncaceae, Polygonaceae, Rubiaceae and Woodsiaceae families were nonmycorrhizal. 41 species formed AM symbiosis. Spores of nine AMF spccies (Glomeromycota, including Archaeospora trappei, Glomus aggregatum, G. claroideum, G. constrictum, G. deserticola, G. geosponrum, G. microcarpum, G. mosseae and G.rubiforme were isolated for the first time from this region of Poland. In addition, the occurrence of the fine endophyte, G. tenue was detected in roots of 18 species from the study area, although formation of arbuscules by this fungus was observed rarely. AM fungi were sporadically accompanied by dark septate endophytes (DSE. 70% of nonmycorrhizal plant sepcies were devoid of DSE.

  10. Piecing together the biogeographic history of Chenopodium vulvaria L. using botanical literature and collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin J. Groom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the value of legacy literature and historic collections as a source of data on environmental history. Chenopodium vulvaria L. has declined in northern Europe and is of conservation concern in several countries, whereas in other countries outside Europe it has naturalised and is considered an alien weed. In its European range it is considered native in the south, but the northern boundary of its native range is unknown. It is hypothesised that much of its former distribution in northern Europe was the result of repeated introductions from southern Europe and that its decline in northern Europe is the result of habitat change and a reduction in the number of propagules imported to the north. A historical analysis of its ecology and distribution was conducted by mining legacy literature and historical botanical collections. Text analysis of habitat descriptions written on specimens and published in botanical literature covering a period of more than 200 years indicate that the habitat and introduction pathways of C. vulvaria have changed with time. Using the non-European naturalised range in a climate niche model, it is possible to project the range in Europe. By comparing this predicted model with a similar model created from all observations, it is clear that there is a large discrepancy between the realized and predicted distributions. This is discussed together with the social, technological and economic changes that have occurred in northern Europe, with respect to their influence on C. vulvaria.

  11. Effect of botanicals on inflammation and skin aging: analyzing the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Amanda; Oyetakin-White, Patricia; Baron, Elma D

    2014-01-01

    The skin and its immune system manifest a decline in physiologic function as it undergoes aging. External insults such as ultraviolet light exposure cause inflammation, which may enhance skin aging even further leading to cancer and signs of photoaging. There is a potential role for botanicals as an adjunct modality in the prevention of skin aging. Numerous over-the-counter anti-aging products are commercially available, many of which boast unverified claims to reduce stress, inflammation and correct signs of aging. In this article we reviewed the scientific literature for data on frequently published "anti-inflammaging" additives such as vitamins A, C and E and green tea. We also analyzed the evidence available on five promising ingredients commonly found in anti-aging products, namely, argan oil, rosemary, pomegranate, Coenzyme Q10, and Coffeeberry. Though there may be an increasing amount of scientific data on a few of these novel botanicals, in general, there remains a lack of clinical data to support the anti-aging claims made. PMID:24863255

  12. Botanical aspects of the ecological integrity of a radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botanical factors play a key role in maintaining the long term integrity of ecosystems. The results of botanical research at the Vaalputs radioactive waste disposal site in Bushmanland, South Africa, are outlined. Vaalputs is in an arid region and its vegetation is a patchy mosaic of low shrub and grass communities. Soil variation from site to site is the main determinant of community structure and erratic precipitation is a major stochastic forcing factor. Management measures to conserve taxa, ecosystems and local genetic biogeography are discussed in relation to natural and artificial disturbances which may occur over long time-scales. Restoration of vegetation over the burial trenches should as far as possible be to the site's former ecotypes except that deep-rooted species should be excluded. Precautions should be taken against the accidental establishment of exotic plant invaders at Vaalputs especially if they are deep-rooted. More is now known about plant ecology at Vaalputs than any other part of Bushmanland. It would be valuable to develop such studies further and establish Vaalputs as a permanent reserve for arid-zone biological research

  13. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  14. A response of entomopathogenic fungi to botanical fungicides and synthetic fungicides in vitro

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    Anna Sapieha-Waszkiewicz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth colonies' morphology and sporulation of entomopathogenic fungi was estimated on Sabouraud medium containing botanical fungicides (Bioczos liquid and Biosept 33 SL, and synthetic ones (Teldor 500 SC and Sumilex 500 SC. Entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana (Balls. Vuill., Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch. Sorok, and Paecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize Brown et Smith., were isolated from soil by means of Galleria mellonella larvae as baits. Isolates Bb I, Ma I, Pf I derivered from herbicide fallow from apple orchard and isolates Bb II, Ma II and Pf II from arable field adjacent to orchard. Fungicides were added to Sabouraud medium at the following concentrations: A-recommended dose, B-10-times lower than the recommended, C-100-times lower than the recommended. The growth of colonies their morphological changes and sporulations were estimated after 5 and 20 days. The same parametrs were observed when fungi were transfered from the medium containing fungicides on the medium with out fungicides. From botanical fungicides Bioczos liquid inhibited fungal growth more than Biosept 33 SL. Both of fungicides were most toxic to fungi at concentration A. Both of P. fumosoroseus isolates were the most sensitive to Bioczos liquid and M. anisopliae to Biosept 33 SL. All concentrations of synthetic fungicides (Sumilex 500 SC, Teldor 500 SC restricted growth of B. bassiana and M. anisopliae isolates more from arable soil than from herbicide fallow but opposite reaction was found with respect to P. fumosoroseus.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF THE BOTANIC ORIGIN OF HONEY PLANTS ON THE QUALITY OF HONEY

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    Anastazija Konjarević

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous parameters affect the quality of honey from different beehive types (Albert – Žindaršić AŽ, Langstroth – Roott LR i Dadant – Blatt DB, i.e. the material of beehives are made of, the origin of queenbees (natural and selected, etc. Our research focuses on the influence of the botanic origin of honey plants (Tilia sp. L. (lime, Amorpha fructirosa L. (desert false indigo, Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower, Brassica napus subsp. olifera DC. (oil beet and Robina pseudoacacia L. (acacia on the quality of honey. The physical and chemical analyses of honey (N=133 (water %, water insoluble compounds %, acidity level, mmol of acid per kg, electrical conductivity, mS/cm, reducing sugar %, sucrose %, HMF, mg/kg, and diastasic number were conducted by Harmonised methods of the European Honey. The pollen analysis was conducted byHarmonised methods of melissopalynology.The pollen analysis indicates that the botanic origin has had a statistically significant influence (P<0.001 on the quality of all investigated characteristics of honey, except on the share of the non–dissolving substances (P=0.088. The research was conducted in the Vukovar-Srijem County, the Republic of Croatia. All bees used in this research belong to the Carniolan honey bee (Apis mellifera carnica, the European bee species.

  16. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, M.; Miccono, A.; Peroni, G.; Guerriero, F.; Morazzoni, P.; Riva, A.; Guido, D.

    2016-01-01

    We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation. PMID:27051451

  17. Adverse Effects of Plant Food Supplements and Botanical Preparations: A Systematic Review with Critical Evaluation of Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lorenzo, C.; A. Ceschi; Kupferschmidt, H; S. Lüde; E. De Souza Nascimento; Dos Santos, A; F. Colombo; Frigerio, G; K. Nørby; Plumb, J; Finglas, P.; P. Restani

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The object of this review was to collect available data on 1) adverse effects observed in humans from the intake of plant food supplements (PFS) or botanical preparations; 2) the misidentification of poisonous plants; 3) interactions between PFS/botanicals and conventional drugs or nutrients. Methods: PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase were searched from database inception to June 2014, using the terms “adverse effect/s”, “poisoning/s”, “plant food supplement/s”, “misidentification/s”, and “i...

  18. A Systematic Review on the Effects of Botanicals on Skeletal Muscle Health in Order to Prevent Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rondanelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a systematic review to evaluate the evidence-based medicine regarding the main botanical extracts and their nutraceutical compounds correlated to skeletal muscle health in order to identify novel strategies that effectively attenuate skeletal muscle loss and enhance muscle function and to improve the quality of life of older subjects. This review contains all eligible studies from 2010 to 2015 and included 57 publications. We focused our attention on effects of botanical extracts on growth and health of muscle and divided these effects into five categories: anti-inflammation, muscle damage prevention, antifatigue, muscle atrophy prevention, and muscle regeneration and differentiation.

  19. Spectral and chromatographic fingerprinting with analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA): a useful tool for differentiating botanicals and characterizing sources of variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: Spectral fingerprints, acquired by direct injection (no separation) mass spectrometry (DI-MS) or liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC), in combination with ANOVA-PCA, were used to differentiate 15 powders of botanical materials. Materials and Methods: Powders of 15 botanical mat...

  20. Problems with Citrus aurantium information in "A review on botanical species and chemical compounds with appetite suppressing properties for body weight control".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J

    2013-09-01

    Various botanical extracts are used as adjuncts in treating obesity. A recent review concerning botanical products used to suppress appetite has included a discussion of Citrus aurantium and p-synephrine. The authors have incorrectly equated the actions of C. aurantium with ephedra in terms of adrenergic receptor binding, pharmacological effects and safety. Current research literature is reviewed which clarifies these issues. PMID:23904205

  1. Species richness of the genera Trachelomonas and Strombomonas (pigmented Euglenophyceae in a subtropical urban lake in the Porto Alegre Botanical Garden, RS, Brazil

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    Sandra Maria Alves-da-Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the taxonomic composition and richness of the genera Trachelomonas and Strombomonas (pigmented Euglenophyceae in a subtropical urban lake (30º03'05"S; 51º10'34"W within the Botanical Garden, in the city of Porto Alegre, located in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in order to contribute to the floristic knowledge of Euglenophyta in artificial urban lakes. From July 2007 to June 2008, we collected samples monthly from two sampling stations, using a 25-µm mesh plankton net. The samples were preserved in 4% formaldehyde. We evaluated the following environmental variables related to the water in the lake: ammonia content, silica content, organic matter content, dissolved oxygen concentration, temperature, pH, depth, transparency, electrical conductivity and rainfall. To study the species composition in relation to environmental factors, we used cluster analysis, principal components analysis, canonical correspondence analysis and indicator species analysis. At the specific and infraspecific level, 22 taxa were identified, Trachelomonas elliptica (Playf. Defl. and T. gracillima Bal. & Dast. representing new records for the state of Rio Grande do Sul. The cluster analysis indicated seasonal variation, species richness being highest in the spring of 2007. Seven indicator species were characterized as acid-tolerant.

  2. Effects of pasture management and fertilizer regimes on botanical changes in species-rich mountain calcareous grassland in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Doležal, Jiří; Lantová, P.; Kelíšek, J.; Mudrák, Ondřej

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 4 (2009), s. 443-453. ISSN 0142-5242 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0723; GA ČR GA526/07/0808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : abandonment * fertilization * grazing Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2009

  3. The Learned Gardeners of the Botanical Gardens of the University of Tartu and Their Activities (1803–1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heldur Sander

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the individual learned gardeners and assistant learned gardeners of the Botanical Garden of the University of Tartu against the backdrop of the development of botanical research areas at the university and species diversity in the botanical garden in 1803–1918. It also addresses the university’s botany professors / garden directors and assistant directors, focusing in more detail on the learned gardeners, who were more notable for their activities prior to commencing work in Tartu or during or after their Tartu period. A total of 22 learned gardeners and 14 assistant learned gardeners have been identified. Among them were persons from Germany , as well as representatives of other nationalities, including Estonians, Poles, Russians and local Germans. The employment duration of the learned gardeners at the botanical garden lasted from a few months to 42 years. The longest serving learned gardener was Wilhelm Eduard Stelling, a local German. Among the learned gardeners, the career and activities of Johann Anton Weinmann, Ludwig Riedel and Jan Muszynski stood out. After leaving Tartu, Weinmann and Muszynski became outstanding researchersin St. Petersburg and Poland, respectively, and Riedel emerged as a sucessful plant collector, scientific organiser and developer of park culture in Brazil.

  4. One hundred years of American botany: a short history of the Botanical Society of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smocovitis, Vassiliki Betty

    2006-07-01

    This paper offers highlights from the 100 (plus) years of the Botanical Society of America (BSA) and draws extensively on the archives of the BSA. In addition to examining the founding of the society and the attempt to "professionalize" botany in late 19th century America, the paper also explores the complex relations between the BSA and a number of related societies in the United States, the Society's struggle to create a coherent identity for itself, the place of botany as a whole in the context of the burgeoning biological sciences in the 20th century, and the changing role of the BSA in an international context. The paper assesses both the achievements and the challenges facing the BSA. It closes by offering some historical reflections on the status of "botany" as a science and the historical significance of terms like "plant biology" and "plant science." PMID:21642158

  5. Aphids (Hemiptera: Aphidomorpha of the Botanic Garden of the Jagiellonian University, Kraków*

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    Starowicz Marzena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of faunistic investigations of aphids (Aphidomorpha in the Botanic Garden of the Jagiellonian University, Kraków, in the Kraków – Wieluń Upland. During two seasons of research (2011, 2012 two aphid species from the family Adelgidae and 50 species from the family Aphididae, associated with 66 host plants were recorded. The following species – Eriosoma anncharlotteae Danielsson, 1979, Capitophorus elaeagni (Del Guercio, 1894, Rhopalosiphoninus (Neorhopalosiphoninus staphyleae staphyleae (Koch, 1854, Eulachnus brevipilosus Börner, 1940 and E. cembrae Börner, 1950 – are new for the Kraków – Wieluń Upland. Seven of the species recorded are regarded as alien to Poland.

  6. [Maria Bandeira: a pioneering botanist at the Botanic Garden of Rio de Janeiro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediaga, Begonha; Peixoto, Ariane Luna; Filgueiras, Tarciso S

    2016-01-01

    This article sheds light on Maria Bandeira, the first female botanist to work at the Botanic Garden of Rio de Janeiro. She was active in the 1920s, but is absent from the historiography and little cited in the scientific literature. The significant number of plant, fungus, and lichen specimens she collected, her capacity to reach far-flung places, her extensive correspondence with foreign experts, and her studies at Sorbonne are all sources for the analysis of the way botany was practiced and the social networks at play in science at the time. The end of her scientific career, when she adopted a cloistered life with the Barefoot Carmelite nuns, can be interpreted variously, and partially explains why her contributions to Brazilian botany have been forgotten. PMID:26841840

  7. Conifers in decorative arboretum of Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University

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    Eglacheva Arina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transformation that taking place during of spontaneous cultivars introduction have not taken into consideration for last 10 years. The plants introduction in the Botanic Garden PSU have a planned character in a northwest middle taiga. Decorative arboretum was laid in 2000 (Potapova, Prokhorov, 2010. By 2014, the conifers collection includes 159 specimens of 98 cultivars belonging to 28 species, 10 genera and 3 families (Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Taxaceae. Taxa are presented as species with narrow native habitat (Microbiota decussata, Thujopsis dolabrata, Chamaecyparis pisifera, Picea omorika, and with a wide (Juniperus communis. Plants were planted gradually. Annual plant monitoring include measuring of height, width of the crown, trunk diameter, needles color, seed-bearing, damage. Based on the study was identified plants groups in growth rate, seed-bearing. The number of generative samples are increased from 17 to 53% during 2007-2014. Seed-bearing is not a constant parameter and depends on a complex of abiotic factors.

  8. MANAGEMENT OF ROOT ROT DISEASE [MACROPHOMINA PHASEOLINA (TASSI. GOID] OF CHICKPEA THROUGH BOTANICALS AND OIL CAKES

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    S. S. KANSARA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of root rot disease in chickpea has become a major constraint for cultivation of chickpea. Consideringthe fact, below investigation was carried out for this pathological problem. The efficacy of various botanicals andoil cakes were evaluated against Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi. Goid causing dry root rot of chickpea. Thephyto extracts of thirteen plant species were evaluated in vitro by poisoned food technique against M. phaseolina.The extract of garlic cloves (Allium sativum L. was proved excellent with maximum inhibiting (73 % mycelialgrowth and sclerotial formation followed by rhizome extract of turmeric (Curcuma longa L (63.98 %. The fourorganic extracts were tested against M. phaseolina by poisoned food technique in vitro. Significantly least growthof mycelium and maximum mycelium inhibition was recorded in extracts of neem cake (59.40 % followed byfarm yard manure (42.56 %. Next best in order of merit were castor cake and mustard cake.

  9. EX SITU CONSERVATION OF SAUSSUREA PORCII DEGEN IN Y. FEDKOVYCH NATIONAL UNIVERSITY BOTANIC GARDEN

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    DEREVENKO TATIANA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation emphasizes on conservation of rare species ex situ as the main task and its aim is the creation of a reserve stock for the possibility of active recovery in nature. We have introduced in the culture and first have been studied rhythm of phenological development and flowering, depending on weather conditions, seed production and added guidelines for breeding the endangered Eastern Carpathians endemic species - Saussurea porcii Degen, which is listed in the Red Data Book of Ukraine and the European List of Globally Threatened Animals and Plants. We have created a field bank S. porcii – it is our contribution to the conservation of plant diversity.

  10. Biomorphological features of Serratula coronata L. (Asteraceae introduced in ZHNAEU`s Botanical Garden

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    Iryna V. Ivashchenko

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of growth, evolution and morphology of Serratula coronata L. were determined under introduction in conditions of Botanical Garden of Zhytomyr National Agroecological University that belongs to Polissya region of Ukraine. The results of investigation of S. coronata ex situ are presented for the next periods of ontogenesis: latent, pregenerative and partly generative. The features of the 6 age states of individuals are specified: achen dormant, sprouts, juvenile, immature, young generative, middle-aged generative. During the first year of life the seeds of S. coronata were passing the pregenerative period of ontogenesis. In the second year the plants got into generative period achieving middleaged generative state in the third year of growth. Plants of S. coronata formed vegetative and generative organs, as well as viable seeds and that confirms sufficient species adaptation in conditions of the described region.

  11. Berry productivity estimation of biological(botanical) reservations 'Milevichsky' and 'Zalyuchitsky'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessity of creation of local status biological (botanical) reservations in Zhitkovichi district is scientifically substantiated on he basis of performed investigations and analysis of location nature conditions of declared reservations, their nature potential and on the estimation of productivity of wild berr plantation and radiation situation. Forest districts of these reservations have high productivity of wild bilberries and great bilberry and natural background radiation. The specific radiation activity of bilverries collected in the foregoing districts of Milevichi and Zalyutichi forestry does not exceed 60 Bk/kg, that is less than 30% of the permissible rate. Main recommendations were developed for protection and utilization of reservations, for conservation of the conditions required for growing forests with optimum characteristics, which promote vegetation and high productivity of wild berry reservations

  12. Effects of botanical antifeedants on Melolontha melolontha grub feeding on Scots pine roots

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    Skrzecz Iwona

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of using botanic antifeedants to reduce the damage caused by Melolontha spp. grubs. To achieve the objective, the experiments were established in semi-field conditions to estimate the antifeedant activity of rutin, quercetin (flavonoids from buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum and an extract from black alder Alnus glutinosa leaves against Melolontha melolontha grubs. The grubs were placed individually in the pots with a soil in which 2 year old Pinus sylvestris trees were planted. The pots were put in garden pavilions placed in the open area. Then the soil in the pots were watered with the emulsions of rutin, quercetin, an extract from A. glutinosa leaves, and with pure water-comparative variant. After 4 months, the weight and mortality of grubs were compared, as well as the weight of tree roots in all pots.

  13. Wild canelas from the Brazilian Northeast: botanical, chemical and pharmocological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botanical, chemical and pharmacological studies were carried out with several types of the species Croton aff. zehntneri, called 'canelas ' at the Brazilian Northeastern region. Chemical studies showed that t-anetole, estragole, and sometimes eugenole are the most common components of the essential oils of these 'canelas'. The pharmacological studies were carried out with hidroalcoholic extract, essential oil and its aqueous phase obtained during the extraction process, by means of biological assays with various laboratory animals. Results of these tests are discussed. Emphasis is given on the possibility that some of the observed effects are due to the presence of anethole and estragole in the different types of the species studied. (M.A.)

  14. Day residue and screen memory in Freud's dream of the botanical monograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, S R

    1988-01-01

    Freud's theory of dream construction allowed the censorship to intervene only when a repressed infantile wish emerged from the unconscious. In his (1899) paper on screen memories, however, he proposed a mechanism for the defensive displacement of current events as they are sorted for introduction into permanent memory. I suggest that Freud was actually describing the conflictual process through which the day residue of the dream is formed. Day residue and screen memory are closely related as elements of the dreamer's present and past experience displaced from his more central instinctual concerns. Freud's dream of the botanical monograph clearly illustrates this relation. Substituted day residues were matched in the dream with relatively innocuous memories of past events of similar cognitive and affective significance. By retracing the substitutions, one can see how a current conflict over Fliess's role in the writing of the dream book recapitulated a series of Freud's earlier conflicts concerning his father and the power of books. PMID:3235760

  15. Sublethal effects of some synthetic and botanical insecticides on Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae

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    Esmaeily Saeideh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In addition to direct mortality caused by insecticides, some biological traits of insects may also be affected by sublethal insecticide doses. In this study, we used the age-stage, two-sex life table method to evaluate the sublethal effects of the four synthetic insecticides: abamectin, imidacloprid, diazinon, and pymetrozin as well as the botanical insecticide taken from Calotropis procera (Asclepiadaceae extract, on eggs of the cotton whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hem.: Aleyrodidae. The lowest and highest survival rates and oviposition periods were observed in whiteflies treated by diazinon and imidacloprid, respectively. We found significant differences in the net reproductive rate (R0, the intrinsic rate of increase (r, the finite rate of increase (?, and the gross reproductive rate (GRR among different insecticides. Altogether, our results showed that pymetrozin and C. procera induced the most sublethal effects, thus they may be suitable candidates for use in integrated pest management programs of B. tabaci.

  16. Microbiological decontamination of botanical raw materials and corresponding pharmaceutical products by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbiological contamination typical of botanical raw materials used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals decreases with the increasing level of processing, on going from flowers and leaves (104-108 CFU/g), to fruits and seeds (102-106 CFU/g), to liquid extracts (104-106 CFU/g), and to dry extracts (102-105 CFU/g). At the same time the resistivity of microflora to irradiation, expressed as a dose required for the first 90% reduction, increases along the same assortment as 2, 4, 5 and 5 kGy, respectively. This results in doses between 4 and 30 kGy required to treat typical contamination, or between 10 and 40 kGy for severe cases. The contamination of final products, phyto-therapeutic ointments (104-107 CFU/g), is relatively sensitive to irradiation (Dfirst90%red=1 kGy) and usually does not require doses higher than 8 kGy

  17. Immunomodulatory effects of the botanical compound LCS101: implications for cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmut IH

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Itzchak H Rachmut,1 Noah Samuels,2,* Steven J Melnick,3 Cheppail Ramachandran,4 Yedida Sharabi,1 Anya Pavlovsky,1 Yair Maimon,5 Jacob Shoham1 1The Gonda-Goldschmied Center, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel; 2Center for Integrative Complementary Medicine, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; 3Department of Pathology, 4Research Institute, Miami Children's Hospital, Miami, FL, USA; 5Refuot Integrative Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel *Joint first author Objective: To examine the effects of LSC101, a botanical compound, on adaptive and innate immunity. Materials and methods: LCS101 preparations were tested for batch-to-batch consistency using high-performance liquid chromatography. T-cell activation was quantified in murine spleen cells using 3H-thymidine incorporation, and cytokine production analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Natural killer cell activity was tested on human blood cells using flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and apoptosis using a FACSCalibur. Effects on interferon-γ production in fluorouracil/doxorubicin-treated mice were tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated batch-to-batch consistency. T-cell proliferation was increased, and a dose-dependent activation of natural killer cells and macrophage tumor necrosis factor-α secretion were observed with LCS101 treatment. Interferon-γ levels, reduced following fluorouracil treatment, were corrected in treated animals. No toxicity or compromised treatment outcomes were associated with LCS101 exposure. Conclusions: LCS101 demonstrated significant effects on a number of immune processes. Further research is needed in order to understand the molecular immunomodulatory pathways affected by this compound, as well as clinical implications for treatment. Keywords: botanical compound, immunomodulation, T-cell immunity

  18. Assessing the effectiveness of specially protected areas for conservation of Antarctica's botanical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin A; Ireland, Louise C; Convey, Peter; Fleming, Andrew H

    2016-02-01

    Vegetation is sparsely distributed over Antarctica's ice-free ground, and distinct plant communities are present in each of the continent's 15 recently identified Antarctic Conservation Biogeographic Regions (ACBRs). With rapidly increasing human activity in Antarctica, terrestrial plant communities are at risk of damage or destruction by trampling, overland transport, and infrastructure construction and from the impacts of anthropogenically introduced species, as well as uncontrollable pressures such as fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella) activity and climate change. Under the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, the conservation of plant communities can be enacted and facilitated through the designation of Antarctic Specially Protected Areas (ASPAs). We examined the distribution within the 15 ACBRs of the 33 ASPAs whose explicit purpose includes protecting macroscopic terrestrial flora. We completed the first survey using normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) satellite remote sensing to provide baseline data on the extent of vegetation cover in all ASPAs designated for plant protection in Antarctica. Large omissions in the protection of Antarctic botanical diversity were found. There was no protection of plant communities in 6 ACBRs, and in another 6, <0.4% of the ACBR area was included in an ASPA that protected vegetation. Protected vegetation cover within the 33 ASPAs totaled 16.1 km(2) for the entire Antarctic continent; over half was within a single protected area. Over 96% of the protected vegetation was contained in 2 ACBRs, which together contributed only 7.8% of the continent's ice-free ground. We conclude that Antarctic botanical diversity is clearly inadequately protected and call for systematic designation of ASPAs protecting plant communities by the Antarctic Treaty Consultative Parties, the members of the governing body of the continent. PMID:26205208

  19. Botanical identity of plant sources of Daśamūla drugs through an analysis of published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparna, S.; Ved, Devendra Kumar; Lalitha, S.; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2012-01-01

    Background: Daśamūla (DM) is a top-traded group of medicinal plants used by the Ayurvedic industry. Through literature survey and analysis, this article has enlisted the botanical sources of DM, as correlated by several scholars. Such a list is not available from any single, earlier publication. It brings to light the confusion that exists in terms of botanical sources correlated to Ayurvedic entities. There is quite a bit of difference in the botanical correlation, parts, and substitutes reported in the different scholarly works, particularly for Pṛṣṇiparṇī, and Agnimantha. For e.g., is Uraria picta the original intended Pṛṣṇiparṇī, as the Ayurvedic Formulary of India (AFI) stipulates or is it U. lagopoidiodes or Desmodium gangeticum as other scholars report? While AFI provides two botanical correlations to Agnimantha in its two editions, namely Premna integrifolia and Clerodendrum phlomidis, other scholars correlate it to other Premna and Clerodendrum species. Why has AFI provided stem bark and whole plant as substitutes for roots of DM? Are substitutes recommended by AFI only for ecological or practical convenience or is there an Ayurvedic or pharmacological explanation for the same? Aim: There are many species used in the name of Daśamūla,, in this article all the species are listed out to find the differences in the usage of the drugs. Materials and Methods: Ayurveda texts and lexicons along with the texts which have done correlation work were considered to arrive at a list of various species used as Dasmula. Results and Conclusion: Since neither the methodology nor the logic behind the correlation have been discussed in these scholarly works, including the AFI, the same is not available for analysis or scrutiny. Such a list as provided in this article can form an essential base for a much needed systematic approach at etymological analysis, botanical correlation, and further scientific work to establish legitimacy of substitutes

  20. Seed Density Significantly Affects Species Richness and Composition in Experimental Plant Communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2012), e46704. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/10/0593 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : species richness * seed rain * species composition Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  1. Comparing two metabolic profiling approaches (liquid chromatography and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry) for extra-virgin olive oil phenolic compounds analysis: A botanical classification perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoub, Aadil; Pacchiarotta, Tiziana; Hurtado-Fernández, Elena; Olmo-García, Lucía; García-Villalba, Rocío; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, the phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO) have become the subject of intensive research because of their biological activities and their influence on some of the most relevant attributes of this interesting matrix. Developing metabolic profiling approaches to determine them in monovarietal virgin olive oils could help to gain a deeper insight into olive oil phenolic compounds composition as well as to promote their use for botanical origin tracing purposes. To this end, two approaches were comparatively investigated (LC-ESI-TOF MS and GC-APCI-TOF MS) to evaluate their capacity to properly classify 25 olive oil samples belonging to five different varieties (Arbequina, Cornicabra, Hojiblanca, Frantoio and Picual), using the entire chromatographic phenolic profiles combined to chemometrics (principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA)). The application of PCA to LC-MS and GC-MS data showed the natural clustering of the samples, seeing that 2 varieties were dominating the models (Arbequina and Frantoio), suppressing any possible discrimination among the other cultivars. Afterwards, PLS-DA was used to build four different efficient predictive models for varietal classification of the samples under study. The varietal markers pointed out by each platform were compared. In general, with the exception of one GC-MS model, all exhibited proper quality parameters. The models constructed by using the LC-MS data demonstrated superior classification ability. PMID:26554295

  2. Determination of ephedrine alkaloids in botanicals and dietary supplements by HPLC-UV: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Mark C

    2004-01-01

    An international collaborative study was conducted of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV method for the determination of the major (ephedrine [EP] and pseudoephedrine [PS]) and minor (norephedrine [NE], norpseudoephedrine [NP], methylephedrine [ME], and methylpseudoephedrine [MP]) alkaloids in selected dietary supplements representative of the commercially available products. Ten collaborating laboratories determined the ephedrine-type alkaloid content in 8 blind replicate samples. Five products contained ephedra ground herb or ephedra extract. These 5 products included ground botanical raw material of Ephedra sinica, a common powdered extract of Ephedra sinica, a finished product containing only Ephedra sinica ground botanical raw material, a complex multicomponent dietary supplement containing Ma Huang, and a high-protein chocolate flavored drink mix containing Ma Huang extract. In addition, collaborating laboratories received a negative control and negative control spiked with ephedrine alkaloids at high and low levels for recovery studies. Test extracts were treated to solid-phase extraction using a strong-cation exchange column to help remove interferences. The HPLC analyses were performed on a polar-embedded phenyl column using UV detection at 210 nm. Repeatability relative standard deviations (RSDr) ranged from 0.64-3.0% for EP and 2.0-6.6% for PS, excluding the high protein drink mix. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) ranged from 2.1-6.6% for EP and 9.0-11.4% for PS, excluding the high protein drink mix. Recoveries ranged from 84.7-87.2% for EP and 84.6-98.2% for PS. The data developed for the minor alkaloids are more variable with generally unsatisfactory HORRATS (i.e., >2). However, since these alkaloids generally add little to the total alkaloid content of the products, the method gives satisfactory results in measuring total alkaloid content (RSDr 0.85-3.13%; RSDR 2.03-10.97%, HORRAT 0.69-3.23, exclusive of the results

  3. Tick repellents and acaricides of botanical origin: a green roadmap to control tick-borne diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Pavela, Roman; Canale, Angelo; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-07-01

    Arthropods are dangerous vectors of agents of deadly diseases, which may hit as epidemics or pandemics in the increasing world population of humans and animals. Among them, ticks transmit more pathogen species than any other group of blood-feeding arthropods worldwide. Thus, the effective and eco-friendly control of tick vectors in a constantly changing environment is a crucial challenge. A number of novel routes have been attempted to prevent and control tick-borne diseases, including the development of (i) vaccines against viruses vectored by ticks; (ii) pheromone-based control tools, with special reference to the "lure and kill" techniques; (iii) biological control programmes relying on ticks' natural enemies and pathogens; and (iv) the integrated pest management practices aimed at reducing tick interactions with livestock. However, the extensive employment of acaricides and tick repellents still remains the two most effective and ready-to-use strategies. Unfortunately, the first one is limited by the rapid development of resistance in ticks, as well as by serious environmental concerns. On the other hand, the exploitation of plants as sources of effective tick repellents is often promising. Here, we reviewed current knowledge concerning the effectiveness of plant extracts as acaricides or repellents against tick vectors of public health importance, with special reference to Ixodes ricinus, Ixodes persulcatus, Amblyomma cajennense, Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Haemaphysalis longicornis, Hyalomma anatolicum, Hyalomma marginatum rufipes, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, Rhipicephalus pulchellus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus turanicus. Eighty-three plant species from 35 botanical families were selected. The most frequent botanical families exploited as sources of acaricides and repellents against ticks were Asteraceae (15 % of the selected studies), Fabaceae (9 %), Lamiaceae (10 %), Meliaceae (5 %), Solanaceae (6

  4. Morphological features of Delphinium sergii Wissjul. ex situ in M.M. Gryshko National Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla M. Gnatiuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Delphinium sergii Wissjul. is an endemic of eastern coast of Black Sea. It is listed in Red book of Ukraine with conservation status “vulnerable” (Didukh 2009. It grows mainly in eastern part of Ukraine in nature and is not typical for the Kyiv region. It is a perennial plant with bright blue flowers. The individuals of this specie are cultivated in the M.M. Gryshko National Botanical Garden during last 15 years. The results of the study of ontogenetic development and morphological diversity show that D. sergii is characterized by heterophylly and common morphological variability of leaf blade. The correlation of degree between leaf blade dissection and their formation and age was established. Dissected leaves are found to be “older” while with entire laminas – “younger”. Formation of different leaves in individuals of the same age states their dependence from lighting, soil moisture, crop density, genetic heterogeneity and plasticity of individuals in different conditions of growth. We observed a difference in terms of passing through ontogenetic stages among the individuals too. Our investigation established that the individuals of D. sergii ex situ can accelerate the ontogenetic development and reach the generative stage for just 2 years. The juvenile period in some individuals may last for just one growing season. It is noted that under the unfavorable factors (thickened crops, drought, and shading development of D. sergii individuals became slower. This species can be reproduced both by seed and vegetative. Propagation by seeds is the main way for distribution of these plants. Vegetative reproduction could be realized by particulation of individuals at g and ss stages. In Кyiv region D. sergii is blooming in June-July. Delphinium is well known as such representing the “bee-flowers syndrome”. According to our observations the main pollinators of D. sergii in conditions of our botanical garden were Bombus pascuorum (Scopoli

  5. 湘潭师院生物园植物系统分类区的分区及植物种类配置原理%The compounding theory of botanical varieties and the sectionaligtion of systematic and classified division in the biological garden of XiangTan Normal Univensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘享平

    2001-01-01

    To introduce the principal botanical varieties in each part of the biological garden of Xiang Tan Normal Univeseity. Starting with the research of the basical characteristies of natural botanical community, the thesis has probed the construction of artificial botanical community, the composition and compounding of the varieties. It has also expounded the compounding theory and methods on the relationship of varieties, the construction and development of communities.%介绍湘潭师范学院生物园植物系统分类区全部10个小区的主要植物种类。从研究自然植物群落的基本特点入手,探索作为人工植物群落的结构、种类组合、配置问题。并就种间关系、群落结构、群落演替等方面阐述配置的原理与方法。

  6. Effect of picung (Pangium edule) plant extracts as a botanical pesticide on mortality of coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei)

    OpenAIRE

    soekadar wiryadiputra

    2014-01-01

    Coffee pests known as coffe berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei) were main pests which decreasing the productivity of Indonesian coffee. One of pests controlling was done by insecticides. Generally, plant uses for insecticide show high security level, because the breaking molecule was easy as not dangerous compound. Pangium edule contains of flavanoide, cyanide acid and saponin had potential as an botanical insecticide. The purpose of this research was to prove the potential extract of seed...

  7. IN-VITRO EVALUATION OF THE ENTOMOPA THOGENIC FUNGAL ISOLATES OF METARHIZIUM ANISOPLIAE FOR COMPATIBILITY WITH PESTICIDES, FUNGICIDES AND BOTANICALS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Naren Babu; J. Usha; V. Padmaja

    2014-01-01

    Isolates of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliaewere tested for their compatibility with insecticides, fungicides and botanical pesticides, which are being used in the field, as a prerequisite for developing as mycopesticides and their use in IPM programmes. Three concentrations (0.1X, 0.5X and 1X) of each chemical were evaluated in the laboratory based on the recommended dose for field application by food poison technique. Variation in vegetative growth and sporulation of M. an...

  8. Monitoring of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) in food supplements with botanicals and other ingredients on the Dutch market

    OpenAIRE

    Martena, Martijn J.; Grutters, Michiel; De Groot, Henk; Konings, Erik; Rietjens, Ivonne M. C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Food supplements can contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has defined 16 priority PAH that are both genotoxic and carcinogenic and identified 8 priority PAH (PAH8) or 4 of these (PAH4) as good indicators of the toxicity and occurrence of PAH in food. The current study aims to determine benzo[a]pyrene and other EFSA priority PAH in different categories of food supplements containing botanicals and other ingredients. In 20...

  9. Characterization of Botanical and Geographical Origin of Corsican “Spring” Honeys by Melissopalynological and Volatile Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yin Yang; Marie-José Battesti; Jean Costa; Julien Paolini

    2014-01-01

    Pollen spectrum, physicochemical parameters and volatile fraction of Corsican “spring” honeys were investigated with the aim of developing a multidisciplinary method for the qualification of honeys in which nectar resources are under-represented in the pollen spectrum. Forty-one Corsican “spring” honeys were certified by melissopalynological analysis using directory and biogeographical origin of 50 representative taxa. Two groups of honeys were distinguished according to the botanical origin ...

  10. Gene Expression Profiling and Pathway Network Analysis Predicts a Novel Antitumor Function for a Botanical-Derived Drug, PG2

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Yu-Lun; Chen, Chun-houh; Chuang, Tsung-Hsien; Hua, Wei-Kai; Lin, Wey-Jinq; Hsu, Wei-Hsiang; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Huang, Tse-Hung; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2015-01-01

    PG2 is a botanical drug that is mostly composed of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS). Its role in hematopoiesis and relieving cancer-related fatigue has recently been clinically investigated in cancer patients. However, systematic analyses of its functions are still limited. The aim of this study was to use microarray-based expression profiling to evaluate the quality and consistency of PG2 from three different product batches and to study biological mechanisms of PG2. An integrative molecular...

  11. Chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis and biological activity on cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus

    OpenAIRE

    Leticia Barrientos; Herrera, Christian L.; Gloria Montenegro; Ximena Ortega; Jorge Veloz; Marysol Alvear; Alejandro Cuevas; Nicolás Saavedra; Salazar, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a non-toxic natural substance with multiple pharmacological properties including anti-cancer, antioxidant, fungicidal, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory among others. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical and botanical characterization of Chilean propolis samples and to evaluate their biological activity against the cariogenic bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus. Twenty propolis samples were obtained from beekeeping producers from t...

  12. Structural Characterization, Biological Effects, and Synthetic Studies on Xanthones from Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), a Popular Botanical Dietary Supplement

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Young-Won; Kinghorn, A. Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L., Clusiaceae) is a popular botanical dietary supplement in the United States, where it is used principally as an antioxidant. It is referred to as the “queen of fruits” in Thailand, a country of origin. The major secondary metabolites of mangosteen, the xanthones, exhibit a variety of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, antiinflammatory, antioxidant, antiplasmodial, cytotoxic, and potential cancer chemopreventive activities. Moreover, s...

  13. Effect of some botanicals for the management of plant-parasitic nematodes and soil-inhabiting fungi infesting chickpea

    OpenAIRE

    RIZVI, Rose; MAHMOOD, Irshad; TIYAGI, Sartaj Ali; KHAN, Zehra

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted during 2009-2011 at the University Agricultural Research Farm to evaluate the efficacious nature of some botanicals such as Argemone mexicana, Calotropis procera, Solanum xanthocarpum, and Eichhornia echinulata in combination with normal as well as deep ploughing against plant-parasitic nematodes and soil-inhabiting fungi infesting chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) cultivar K-850 in relation to its growth characteristics. Significant reduction was observed in the ...

  14. Water-insoluble fractions of botanical foods lower blood ethanol levels in rats by physically maintaining the ethanol solution after ethanol administration

    OpenAIRE

    Shunji Oshima; Sachie Shiiya; Tomomasa Kanda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have analyzed the functions of foods and dietary constituents in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. However, few studies have reported the function of dietary fibers in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. Objective: We assessed the effects of botanical foods that contain dietary fibers on alcohol metabolism. Methods: The ability of the water-insoluble fraction (WIF) of 18 kinds of botanical foods to maintain 15% (v/v) ethanol solution was examined using ea...

  15. POSSIBILITIES TO USE NATURAL EXTRACTS FROM MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS (MAP) LIKE BOTANICAL REPELLENT OR INSECTICIDE COMPOUNDS AGAINST PEST INSECTS IN ECOLOGICAL CROPS (II)

    OpenAIRE

    Irina IONESCU-MĂLĂNCUŞ; Traian MANOLE; Petru NICULIŢĂ

    2013-01-01

    Botanical insecticides have long been touted as attractive alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for pest management because botanicals reputedly pose little threat to the environment or to human health. The body of scientific literature documenting bioactivity of plant derivatives to arthropods pests continues to expand i.e. repellents based on essential oils extracted from Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Rosmarinus officinalis to mosquitoes, or cinnamon oil, sandalwo...

  16. Botanicals, selective insecticides, and predators to control Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae) in citrus orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azhar A; Afzal, Muhammad; Qureshi, Jawwad A; Khan, Arif M; Raza, Abubakar M

    2014-12-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama vectors pathogens that cause huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening devastating and economically important disease present in most citrus growing regions. Young citrus shoots are required for psyllid reproduction and development. During winter citrus trees produce little or no new growth. Overwintering adults reproduce in spring on newly emerging shoots also attractive to other pests and beneficial insects. Botanicals and relatively selective insecticides could help to conserve beneficial insects and reduce pest resistance to insecticides. Sprays of Azadirachtin (Neem), Tropane (Datura), Spirotetramat, Spinetoram, and broad-spectrum Imidacloprid were evaluated to control ACP in spring and summer on 10-year-old "Kinow" Citrus reticulata Blanco trees producing new growth. Psyllid populations were high averaging 5-9 nymphs or adults per sample before treatment application. Nymphs or adults were significantly reduced to 0.5-1.5 per sample in all treatments for 3 weeks, average 61%-83% reduction. No significant reduction in ladybeetles Adalia bipunctata, Aneglei scardoni, Cheilomenes sexmaculata, and Coccinella septempunctata was observed. Syrphids, spiders and green lacewings were reduced in treated trees except with Tropane. Studies are warranted to assess impact of these predators on ACP and interaction with insecticides. Observed reduction in ACP populations may not be enough considering its reproductive potential and role in the spread of HLB. Follow-up sprays may be required to achieve additional suppression using rotations of different insecticides. PMID:25205398

  17. Nutritional and botanical interventions to assist with the adaptation to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G S

    1999-08-01

    Prolonged stress, whether a result of mental/emotional upset or due to physical factors such as malnutrition, surgery, chemical exposure, excessive exercise, sleep deprivation, or a host of other environmental causes, results in predictable systemic effects. The systemic effects of stress include increased levels of stress hormones such as cortisol, a decline in certain aspects of immune system function such as natural killer cell cytotoxicity or secretory-IgA levels, and a disruption of gastrointestinal microflora balance. These systemic changes might be a substantial contributor to many of the stress-associated declines in health. Based on human and animal research, it appears a variety of nutritional and botanical substances - such as adaptogenic herbs, specific vitamins including ascorbic acid, vitamins B1 and B6, the coenzyme forms of vitamin B5 (pantethine) and B12 (methylcobalamin), the amino acid tyrosine, and other nutrients such as lipoic acid, phosphatidylserine, and plant sterol/sterolin combinations - may allow individuals to sustain an adaptive response and minimize some of the systemic effects of stress. PMID:10468649

  18. Mutual Transformation of Colonial and Imperial Botanizing? The Intimate yet Remote Collaboration in Colonial Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung

    2016-06-01

    Argument Mutuality in "contact zones" has been emphasized in cross-cultural knowledge interaction in re-evaluating power dynamics between centers and peripheries and in showing the hybridity of modern science. This paper proposes an analytical pause on this attempt to better invalidate centers by paying serious attention to the limits of mutuality in transcultural knowledge interaction imposed by asymmetries of power. An unusually reciprocal interaction between a Japanese forester, Ishidoya Tsutomu (1891-1958), at the colonial forestry department, and his Korean subordinate Chung Tyaihyon (1883-1971) is chosen to highlight an inescapable asymmetry induced by the imperial power structure. Ishidoya, positioning himself as a settler expert, as opposed to a scientist in Tokyo, pursued localized knowledge in growing interaction with Chung, resulting in Ishidoya's career change as a herbalist focusing on traditional medicine and Chung's leadership in Korean-only botanizing. However, their mutual transformations, limited by asymmetric constraints on their choices, did not unsettle the imperial power structure or the centrality of centers. PMID:27171892

  19. Ayurveda and botanical drugs for epilepsy: Current evidence and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriranjini, Sitaram Jaideep; Sandhya, Kumar; Mamta, Vernekar Sanjeeva

    2015-11-01

    The understanding of epilepsy has progressed since its earliest impression as a disease associated with paranormal and superstitious beliefs. Landmark advances have been made in deciphering the pathophysiological substrates involved in the disease process, and treatment advances have contributed significantly to ameliorating the seizures. However, disease-modifying agents are yet to be discovered. Ayurveda is a system of medicine that stresses a holistic approach to disease, and treatment is focused on disease modification and symptom management. Herbs form the core of Ayurveda medicine; though many of them have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity, very few actually mention the reference of these herbs in Ayurveda literature. Other therapeutic interventions used in Ayurveda are relatively unexplored, and future research will need to focus on this. The current manuscript briefly discusses the understanding of epilepsy as per Ayurveda and reviews herbs that have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity mentioned in Ayurveda literature. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". PMID:26141933

  20. Botanical and biological pesticides elicit a similar Induced Systemic Response in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretali, Luca; Bernardo, Letizia; Butterfield, Timothy S; Trevisan, Marco; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    Natural pesticides have attracted substantial interest due to the increase in organic agriculture and enhanced attention to environmental pollution. Plant Growth Promoting Bacteria (PGPB) are applied for both disease control and growth enhancement; PGPBs are known to elicit Induced Systemic Response (ISR) in plants. However, less is known about the effect of botanical pesticides, such as the azadirachtin-containing neem extracts, on plant metabolism. This study aimed to investigate the effects of foliar application of the above-mentioned natural pesticides on the metabolic profiling of tomato. Leaf application of Bacillus subtilis fostered Induced Systemic Resistance (ISR) in treated plants via the Jasmonic acid pathway, and enhanced production of secondary metabolites such as flavonoids, phytoalexins and auxins. Changes in sterols and terpenes, as well as an increase in glucosinolates were also observed. Interestingly, azadirachtin-treated tomatoes also showed an increase in ISR and our results revealed that most of the enriched metabolites are shared with a B. subtilis treatment, suggesting conserved biochemical responses. These (un)expected findings indicate that plants are not insensitive to application of natural pesticide and while Azadirachtin is applied as a direct pesticide, it also stimulates a defense response in tomatoes very similar to B. subtilis induced ISR. PMID:27251587

  1. Contribution of the Heart of Borneo (HoB initiative towards botanical exploration in Sabah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Sabran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Heart of   Borneo (HoB declaration is a conservation agreement initiated by WWF and signed by three countries, i.e., Brunei       Darussalam, Indonesia and Malaysia in Bali, Indonesia on 12th February 2007 to protect more than 23 million hectares of forested region on Borneo Island. These forested areas could be well protected when conservation management plan is in place. One of the crucial activities to facilitate the planning and formulation of conservation plan is to conduct  scientific expeditions that include botanical exploration. The primary objective of the expedition is to identify the key conservation targets within the forest reserves. For the past five years, several expeditions have been conducted by the Sabah Forestry Department under the auspices of the HoB project to explore various forest reserves with conservation issues within the Heart of Borneo area. This paper will present the findings which include plant richness, endemism and plant conservation status in each forest reserves that has been explored. 

  2. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Emily H; Martini, Xavier; Hoyte, Angel; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2016-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices. PMID:27429006

  3. The botanical origin of kratom (Mitragyna speciosa; Rubiaceae) available as abused drugs in the Japanese markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takuro; Kawamura, Maiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Goda, Yukihiro

    2009-07-01

    Kratom is the leaves of Mitragyna speciosa (Rubiaceae). Recently, kratom has been sold in street shops or on the Internet in Japan for the purpose of abuse due to its opium-like effects. In this study, we investigated the botanical origin of the commercial kratom products using the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis of rDNA in preparation for future regulation of this product. In addition, a previously reported method to authenticate the plant, utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was applied to the same products in order to estimate the method's accuracy and utility. The ITS sequence analysis of the commercial kratoms revealed that most of them were derived from M. speciosa or closely related plants, while the others were made from the same tribe plant as M. speciosa. The reported PCR-RFLP method could clearly distinguish kratoms from the other psychoactive plants available in the Japanese markets and also from related plants. The authentication method is considered to be useful for the practical regulation of the plant due to its wide range of application, high accuracy and simplicity. PMID:19294483

  4. ANTI-HELMINTHIC POTENTIAL OF SO LVENT EXTRACTS OF INDIGENOUS BOTANICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Jain

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethno botanical studies reveal that the indigenous knowledge of a community is a key player in the identification of medicinal plants and such plants have beenoften tested by generations of indigenous people. In the present investigation, the hydro-alcoholic extracts of leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neemand Swertia chirayta(Chirayta were assessed for anti-helminthic potential against helminths (earthworms were used as model at 10, 50 and 100 mg/ml. No anti-helminthic potential was observed at 10 mg/ml of dose of the hydro-alcoholic extracts of Swertia chirayta. The hydro-alcoholic extracts of both the plants showed significant anti-helminthicactivity on selected worms at higher doses. Hydro-alcoholic leaves extracts of Azadirachta indica (Neemwasfound to be more active as compared tohydro-alcoholic whole plant extracts of Swertia chirayta(Chirayta at concentration of 100 mg/ml. It was observed that with the variation in dose, the death time and paralysis time of the worms’ decreases. The results indicated that extracts possessed dose dependent anti-helminthic activity. The results were compared toPiperazine citrate and Albendazole (15 mg/ml. The hydro-alcoholic extracts demonstrated paralysis as well as death ofworms in a less time in comparison to the standard drugs. The anti-helminthic activity of the extracts indicates the presence of active principle responsible for anti-helminthic activity.

  5. Repellent Activity of Botanical Oils against Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily H. Kuhns

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, is the insect vector of the pathogen causing huanglongbing. We selected three botanical oils to evaluate behavioral activity against D. citri. In laboratory olfactometer assays, fir oil was repellent to D. citri females, while litsea and citronella oils elicited no response from D. citri females. In choice settling experiments, D. citri settled almost completely on control plants rather than on plants treated with fir oil at a 9.5 mg/day release rate. Therefore, we conducted field trials to determine if fir oil reduced D. citri densities in citrus groves. We found no repellency of D. citri from sweet orange resets that were treated with fir oil dispensers releasing 10.4 g/day/tree as compared with control plots. However, we found a two-week decrease in populations of D. citri as compared with controls when the deployment rate of these dispensers was doubled. Our results suggest that treatment of citrus with fir oil may have limited activity as a stand-alone management tool for D. citri and would require integration with other management practices.

  6. Edible Cyanobacteria (Nostochopsis spp. from Glass House, Queen Sirikit Botanical Garden, Thailand

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    Manita Motham

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nostochopsis spp. are edible and rare cyanobacteria which form thick mucilaginous colonies, 0.1-8 cm in size, attached on the rocks or cobbles in transparent shallow streams or rivers. They are classified in the Order Nostocales, Family Hapalosiphonaceae. The objective of this study was to investigate the colonial growth, pigments and quality of water in the ponds at 3 glass houses in the Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden, Chiang Mai Province in which these cyanobacteria were growing during April-June 2012. The three glass houses were; the Aquatic house, the Bromeliad house and Orchids and Fern house. Ten colonies from each sampling site were measured once a week. The average increase in colonial size was found to be 0.17±0.06, 0.30±0.08 and 0.15±0.08 cm/week respectively. Chlorophyll, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and carotenoid were highest in the samples from Aquatic house as 16.22±4.28, 11.95±8.55, 73.62±4.07 and 12.70±1.54 mg/g.dw, respectively. These cyanobacteria grew at 22-30°C, pH 6.17-8.75 and conductivity 112-171 µs/cm. The water quality was clean-moderate and in oligo-mesotrophic status.

  7. Using species distribution modeling to delineate the botanical richness patterns and phytogeographical regions of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Gang; Slik, J. W. Ferry; Ma, Ke-Ping

    2016-03-01

    The millions of plant specimens that have been collected and stored in Chinese herbaria over the past ~110 years have recently been digitized and geo-referenced. Here we use this unique collection data set for species distribution modeling exercise aiming at mapping & explaining the botanical richness; delineating China’s phytogeographical regions and investigating the environmental drivers of the dissimilarity patterns. We modeled distributions of 6,828 woody plants using MaxEnt and remove the collection bias using null model. The continental China was divided into different phytogeographical regions based on the dissimilarity patterns. An ordination and Getis-Ord Gi* hotspot spatial statistics were used to analysis the environmental drivers of the dissimilarity patterns. We found that the annual precipitation and temperature stability were responsible for observed species diversity. The mechanisms causing dissimilarity pattern seems differ among biogeographical regions. The identified environmental drivers of the dissimilarity patterns for southeast, southwest, northwest and northeast are annual precipitation, topographic & temperature stability, water deficit and temperature instability, respectively. For effective conservation of China’s plant diversity, identifying the historical refuge and protection of high diversity areas in each of the identified floristic regions and their subdivisions will be essential.

  8. Flowering and Fruiting Times on Four Species of Annona (Annonaceae in Purwodadi Botanic Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Ayu Lestari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Annona is a genus belongs to Annonaceae family, consisting of numerous species that produce edible fruit. Four species namely A. glabra, A. montana, A. muricata and A. squamosa collections of Purwodadi Botanic Garden were recorded for its flowering and fruiting times, since November 2010 to April 2013. The data were scored and complemented with climate data (temperature, rainfall intensity, humidity then analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. The result showed that humidity was the most affected climate factors on the flowering and fruiting times of those species. Specifically, rainfall intensity (0-550 mm affected to Annona muricata, temperature (25,56-28,33°C and humidity (66,83-85,02% to Annona squamosa, and humidity to A. glabra (71,62-85,02% and A. montana (71,62 to 82,94 % as well. Flowering time of A. glabra occurs three times a year in wet and dry, and fruiting occurs twice a year in the same month. Annona muricata is flowering throughout the year and fruiting twice a year in wet. A. montana and A. squamosa recorded one a year during the wet month.

  9. The use of botanicals for health purposes by members of a prepaid health plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J S; Marcy, S A

    1991-10-01

    Interviews were conducted with 100 adults (27 men, 73 women) enrolled in a prepaid medical health plan to investigate their use of botanical remedies. They were asked which of 50 listed herbs they or members of their families had used for health purposes and with what effect; which of 60 listed health problems they had treated with home remedies; and what additional home remedies or alternative health care resources they had used. Over 100 different home remedies were identified, with most considered effective. Individual respondents used from 0 to 33 herbal and plant remedies (Md = 7), some of which have toxic properties. A remedy was reported for almost every health problem listed. Substances most frequently used were aloe vera, honey, peppermint, garlic, eucalyptus, and rose hips; health problems most frequently treated were burns, colds, indigestion, insect bites, insomnia, rashes. Persons who were married, from larger households, of higher socioeconomic status, who had consulted alternative healers, or who had patronized health food stores tended to use home remedies more than their counterparts. Implications for further evaluation of self-care practices are discussed. PMID:1891620

  10. Ion irradiation-induced structure damage to botanic samples using the ion transmission energy spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the mechanism of irradiation-induced damage of botanic samples caused by low energy heavy ions, transmission energy spectrum measurement was performed. Kidney bean slice samples 100 μm in thickness were irradiated by 50 keV N+ ions. The irradiation beam current density was about 30 μA/cm2, and the irradiation ion doses were 1 x 1015, 1 x 1016, 3 x 1016 and 1 x 1017 ions·cm-2, respectively. A target set up that could greatly reduce the incident ion current density was designed to achieve the damage-free measurement. The 3.2 MeV H+ transmitted ion energy spectrum measurement was carried out before and after the irradiation. From the transmission ion energy spectrum, it was found that the kidney bean slice itself was structurally inhomogeneous compared with the PET films (C10H8O4). The results indicated that the average mass thickness changed little when the N+ ion dose was below 3 x 1016 ions·cm-2, but changed obviously when ion dose was beyond 3 x 1016 ions·cm-2

  11. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

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    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  12. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species. PMID:27167225

  13. The potentiality of botanicals and their products as an alternative to chemical insecticides to sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae: A review

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    Diwakar Singh Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of chemical pesticides is the current method for controlling sandflies. However, resistance is being developed in sandflies against the insecticide of choice that is DDT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane. Botanicals have potential to act as an alternative to chemical insecticides as the crude extracts and active molecules of some plants show insecticidal effect to sandflies. This will lead to safe, easy and environment friendly method for control of sandflies. Therefore, information regarding botanicals acting as alternative to chemical insecticide against sandflies assumes importance in the context of development of resistance to insecticides as well as to prevent environment from contamination. This review deals with some plants and their products having repellent and insecticidal effect to sandflies in India and abroad. Different methods of extraction and their bioassay on sandflies have been emphasized in the text. Various extracts of some plants like Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae, Solanum jasminoides (Solanaceae, Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae, Capparis spinosa (Capparidaceae, Acalypha fruticosa (Euphorbiaceae and Tagetes minuta (Asteraceae had shown repellent/insecticidal effect on sandflies. This review will be useful in conducting the research work to find out botanicals of Indian context having insecticidal effect on sandflies.

  14. Assesing the Efficacy of Aqueous Leaf Extract of Some Botanicals for Control of Field Insects of Watermelon (Citrillus lanatus In Southern Guinea Savanna, Nigeria

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    E. Ndor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Field trials were conducted during 2009 and 2010 rainy season to assess the efficacy of leaf extract of some botanicals for production of watermelon (Citrillus lanatus in Southern Guinea Savanna Nigeria. The treatments consisted of leaf extracts from 3 botanicals: Bush tea (Hyptis suaveolens, Moringa (Moringa oleifera and Pawpaw (Carica papaya and one synthetic insecticide Labdacyalothrin (karate. The experiment was laid in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD and replicated 3 times to form fifteen plots. The results showed that, there was significant effect among the different botanicals used on all the parameters assessed except on the vinelength of watermelon, at various stages of growth in both years. Application of leaf extract of pawpaw gave better performance in all the parameters assessed when compared to the other botanicals in both years. Application of karate produced the best results in both years; while poor result were obtained from the control plots. Application of pawpaw leaf extract conferred high protection on the fruit when compared to other botanicals, which is statistically similar with result of karate in both 2009 and 2010 cropping season. Pawpaw leaf extracts appears to be a better botanical option in watermelon production.

  15. Multi-Element Composition of Honey as a Suitable Tool for Its Authenticity Analysis

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    Oroian Mircea

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition of 36 honey samples of 4 different botanical origins (acacia, sun flower, tilia and honeydew from the North East region of Romania. An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS method was used to determine 27 elements in honey (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn. We would like to achieve the following goal: to demonstrate that the qualitative and quantitative multi-element composition determination of honey can be used as a suitable tool to classify honey according to its botanical origin. The principal component analysis allowed the reduction of the 27 variables to 2 principal components which explained 74% of the total variance. The dominant elements which were strongly associated with the principal component were K, Mg and Ca. Discriminant models obtained for each kind of botanical honey confirmed that the differentiation of honeys according to their botanical origin was mainly based on multi-element composition. A correct classification of all samples was achieved with the exception of 11.1% of honeydew honeys.

  16. An Overview of Okra Fibre Reinforced Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasababu, Nadendla

    2015-05-01

    Increasing attention towards “sustainable environment” invited the development of new materials to satisfy the needs of the public with less/no damage on surroundings. In this regard a specific attempt is made by the author to do review and understand the performance of the variable vegetable fibres of okra which is botanically called ‘Abelmoschus Esculentus’ and their composites under various conditions of load. Further the results exist in the literature are also reviewed for the purpose of comparison.

  17. Herbage Quality, Biomass, and Animal Performance of Cattle. Part I: Forage Biomass, Botanical Composition, and Nutritive Values

    OpenAIRE

    Abaye, A. O. (Azenegashe Ozzie); Rotz, Jonathan Daniel; Scaglia Alonso, Guillermo, 1963-; Fike, John Herschel; Smith, Ray Lee, 1962-

    2009-01-01

    An experiment to determine the effects of grazing beef cattle on persistence, yield, and quality of Lakota prairie grass, KY31 endophyte-free tall fescue , KY31 endophyte-infected tall fescue, and Quantum 542 tall fescue.

  18. Effect of silage botanical composition on ruminal biohydrogenation and transfer of fatty acids to milk in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Thuen, E;

    2013-01-01

    condition score at the start of the experiment] fitted with rumen cannulas. Treatments consisted of 4 experimental silages: a mix of the first and third cut of organically managed short-term grassland with timothy (Phleum pratense L.) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L.; 2 yr old; ORG-SG); organically...... Kjeldahl-N was lower for CON-TI than for the other silages. Silage type had no effect on dry matter intake, but milk yield was lower for CON-TI than for the other silages. Apparent biohydrogenation of C18:3n-3 was lower for ORG-SG (932 g/kg) than for ORG-LG (956 g/kg), CON-PR (959 g/kg), and CON-TI (958 g...

  19. Pharmacokinetics of chlorogenic acid and corydaline in DA-9701, a new botanical gastroprokinetic agent, in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ji Won; Kim, Ju Myung; Jeong, Jin Seok; Son, Miwon; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Myung Gull; Kang, Hee Eun

    2014-07-01

    1.Few studies describing the pharmacokinetic properties of chlorogenic acid (CA) and corydaline (CRD) which are marker compounds of a new prokinetic botanical agent, DA-9701, have been reported. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetic properties CA and CRD following intravenous and oral administration of pure CA (1-8 mg/kg) or CRD (1.1-4.5 mg/kg) and their equivalent dose of DA-9701 to rats. 2.  Dose-proportional AUC and dose-independent clearance (10.3-12.1 ml/min/kg) of CA were observed following its administration. Oral administration of CA as DA-9701 did not influence the oral pharmacokinetic parameters of CA. Incomplete absorption of CA, its decomposition in the gastrointestinal tract, and/or pre-systemic metabolism resulted in extremely low oral bioavailability (F) of CA (0.478-0.899%). 3.  CRD showed greater dose-normalized AUC in the higher dose group than that in lower dose group(s) after its administration due to saturation of its metabolism via decreased non-renal clearance (by 51.3%) and first-pass extraction. As a result, the F of CRD following 4.5 mg/kg oral CRD (21.1%) was considerably greater than those of the lower dose groups (9.10 and 13.8%). However, oral administration of CRD as DA-9701 showed linear pharmacokinetics as a result of increased AUC and F in lower-dose groups (by 182% and 78.5%, respectively) compared to those of pure CRD. The greater oral AUC of CRD for DA-9701 than for pure CRD could be due to decreased hepatic and/or GI first-pass extraction of CRD by other components in DA-9701. PMID:24417753

  20. The botanical legacy of Thomas Hardwicke’s journey to Srinagar in 1796

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Turner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1796, Thomas Hardwicke travelled through northern India between what is now Fatehgarh in Uttar Pradesh and Srinagar in Uttarakhand. Hardwicke collected and described plants encountered and had many of the plants illustrated from life. He published an account of the journey in 1799 including a list of plant species. I review the names validated in the original paper, and also those published subsequently by Sir James Edward Smith and William Roxburgh based partly or wholly on the material or drawings acquired by Hardwicke on the journey to Srinagar. The large collection of Hardwicke plant drawings now held in the British Library, and a smaller set in the Botany Library of the Natural History Museum, are considered in relation to the application and typification of plant names related to Hardwicke’s botanical exploration in India. The names of seven plant species were validly published in the 1799 paper (Androsace rotundifolia Hardw., Ficus laminosa Hardw., Justicia thyrsiformis Roxb. ex Hardw., Linum trigynum Roxb. ex Hardw., Lonicera quinquelocularis Hardw., Salvia integrifolia Roxb. ex Hardw. and Volkameria bicolor Hardw., plus one new combination (Echites antidysentericus (L. Roxb. ex Hardw.. As concluded by Britten more than a century ago, Ficus laminosa is the correct name for the fig variously referred to F. saemocarpa Miq. or F. squamosa Roxb. Smith based Rhododendron arboreum Sm. and Bignonia undulata Sm. on Hardwicke plants. At least a dozen Roxburgh names, including Crataegus integrifolia Roxb., Gardenia tetrasperma Roxb. and Morus serrata Roxb., are based, at least partly, on Hardwicke’s collections. In total, 23 names are lectotypified here and one neotype is designated.

  1. Intracultural Differences in Local Botanical Knowledge and Knowledge Loss among the Mexican Isthmus Zapotecs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saynes-Vásquez, Alfredo; Vibrans, Heike; Vergara-Silva, Francisco; Caballero, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the socio-demographic and locality factors that influence ethnobiological knowledge in three communities of Zapotec indigenous people of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Mexico. It uses local botanical nomenclature as a proxy for general ethnobiological knowledge. In each of these communities (one urban and two rural), 100 adult men were interviewed aided with a field herbarium. Fifty had a background in farming, and 50 worked in the secondary or tertiary sector as their main economic activity, totaling 300 interviews. Using a field herbarium with samples of 30 common and rare wild regional species, we documented visual recognition, knowledge of the local life form, generic and specific names and uses (five knowledge levels measuring knowledge depth). The relationship between sociodemographic variables and knowledge was analyzed with simple correlations. Differences between the three communities and the five knowledge levels were then evaluated with a discriminant analysis. A general linear analysis identified factors and covariables that influenced the observed differences. Differences between the groups with different economic activities were estimated with a t-test for independent samples. Most of the relationships found between sociodemographic variables and plant knowledge were expected: age and rurality were positively related with knowledge and years of formal schooling was negatively related. However, the somewhat less rural site had more traditional knowledge due to local circumstances. The general linear model explained 70–77% of the variation, a high value. It showed that economic activity was by far the most important factor influencing knowledge, by a factor of five. The interaction of locality and economic activity followed. The discriminant analysis assigned interviewees correctly to their localities in 94% of the cases, strengthening the evidence for intracultural variation. Both sociodemographic and historic intracultural

  2. Resins and gums in historical iatrosophia texts from Cyprus - a botanical and medico-pharmacological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndreasLardos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores historical iatrosophia texts from Cyprus from a botanical and medico-pharmacological point of view focusing on remedies containing resins and gums. The iatrosophia are a genre of Greek medical literature of Byzantine origin and can be described as medicine handbooks which serve as therapeutic repositories containing recipes or advice. To extract and analyse information on plant usage in such sources – which are largely unedited texts and so far have not been translated – we investigate i the relationship of the iatrosophia to Dioscorides' De Materia Medica as well as historic pharmaceutical books or standard texts on modern phytotherapy and ii the validity of the remedies by comparing them to modern scientific data on reported biological activities. In the six texts investigated 27 substances incorporating plant exudates are mentioned. They are obtained from over 43 taxa of higher plants and in particular are used to treat dermatological, gastrointestinal and respiratory tract conditions. The comparison to historic pharmaceutical books and phytotherapy texts reflects the gradual decline of the use of plant exudates in Western medicine. While remarkable parallels to Dioscorides’ text exist, the non-Dioscoridean influence suggests a complex pattern of knowledge exchange. Overall, this resulted in an integration of knowledge from so far poorly understood sources. The comparison with bioscientific data reveals a fragmentary picture and highlights the potential of these unexplored substances and their uses. Where relevant bioscientific data are available, we generally found a confirmation. This points to a largely rational use of the associated remedies. Taken together, the iatrosophia are a valuable resource for ethnopharmacological and natural product research. Most importantly they contribute to the understanding of the development of herbal medicines in the (Eastern Mediterranean and Europe.

  3. INVASIVE WEEDS IN BOGOR BOTANIC GARDENS, INDONESIA AND ITS IMPLICATION ON SURROUNDING LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Santosa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation areas with the objective for collection and exchange plant materials have been speculated as weed bank for surrounding areas. Objective of this study was to identify and characterize ruderal invasive weeds in the Bogor Botanic Gardens (BBG. Observations were conducted in all vak (collection blocks in the BBG in order to identify the weeds species, determine their invasiveness, dominance and distribution. Weeds associations with host plants were observed. Current weed control program and data of dead trees collection were analyzed in relevant to weed. Distribution of weeds outside BBG was observed by transects method following river and road directions. Results showed that there were seven invasive weeds, i.e., Cecropia adenopus (Cecropiaceae, Cissus nodosa Blume (Vitaceae, Cissus sicyoides Blume (Vitaceae, Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae, Ficus elastica Roxb. (Moraceae, Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Paraserianthes falcataria (L. Nielsen (Fabaceae. These seven weeds species invaded 41 out of 215 plant families in BBG. Six species of weeds, i.e., C. adenopus, C. nodosa Blume., C. sicyoides Blume., D. bulbifera L., M. micrantha H.B.K. and P. falcataria (L. Nielsen, were introduced as BBG collections for the first time while the F. elastica Roxb was considered as native. It is most likely that the weeds dispersal agents are the wind, birds, bats, visitors, and waters. All of these weeds existed in surrounding areas outside BBG. Given the detrimental impact of invasive weeds on the plant collection in BBG, it is necessary to develop long–term comprehensive control measures both inside and neighboring areas by involving other government authorities beyond BBG.

  4. Metal bioaccumulation in plant leaves from an industrious area and the Botanical Garden in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-ju; DING Hui; ZHU Yong-guan

    2005-01-01

    The concentrations of Fe, Mn, Al, Zn, Pb, Ni, Cr, and As were measured in soils and leaves from 21 plant species growing on hills near the Beijing Steel Factory(BSF) and 17 plant species in the Beijing Botanical Garden(BBG). The results showed that soils from BSF were Zn contaminated according to the threshold of natural background of China. There was a metal contamination of the soils by Ni,and Cr in BSF comparing with those in BBG. The comparison between concentrations of metals in leaves from both sites indicated that, in general, accumulation of metals in the leaves of the same species was significantly different between the two sites. Even within the same locality each species accumulation of metals was significantly variable. The study aimed to screen landscape plants for the capacity to clean-up toxic metals in soils, and developed an overall metal accumulation index(MAI) for leaves and then categorized the MAI that can be applied broadly in the selection of species in polluted areas. To do this, the spectrum of MAI values were divided into four classes:strongly accumulated(SA or grade Ⅰ), moderately accumulated(MA or grade Ⅱ), intermediately accumulated( IA or grade Ⅲ), and weakly accumulated(WA or grade Ⅳ). The results showed that elemental association between Fe, Al, Ni, and As was generally highly correlated with each other in the sampling sites. This may suggest their common biochemical characteristics. Generally, those species containing strong and moderate accumulation in both sites are considered including Vitex negundo, Broussonetia papyrifera, Ulmus pumila, and Rubia cordifolia. At BSF and other industrial sites with a similar ecosystem, strong and moderate accumulation species include Sophora japonica, Ampelopsis aconitifolia var. glabra, Platycladus orientalis, Wikstroemia chamaedaphne, Cleistogenes squarro sa, Grewia biloba, and in BBG, in addition Setaria viridis, Cotinus coggygria, Lespedeza floribunda, Rhamnus parvifolia, Lespedeza

  5. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  6. Scientific basis of botanical medicine as alternative remedies for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cindy L H; Or, Terry C T; Ho, Marco H K; Lau, Allan S Y

    2013-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune inflammatory disorder that causes permanent disability and mortality to approximately 1 to 100 people in the world. Patients with RA not only suffer from pain, stiffness, swelling, and loss of function in their joints, but also have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and lymphoma. Typically prescribed medications, including pain-relieving drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, can help to relieve pain, reduce inflammation and slow the course of disease progression in RA patients. However, the general effectiveness of the drugs has been far from satisfactory. Other therapeutic modalities like TNF-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors and interleukin-1 receptor antagonists targeting precise pathways within the immune system are expensive and may be associated with serious side effects. Recently, botanical medicines have become popular as alternative remedies as they are believed to be efficacious, safe and have over a thousand years experience in treating patients. In this review, we will summarize recent evidence for pharmacological effects of herbs including Black cohosh, Angelica sinensis, Licorice, Tripterygium wilfordii, Centella asiatica, and Urtica dioica. Scientific research has demonstrated that these herbs have strong anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effects. A wide range of phytochemicals including phenolic acids, phenylpropanoid ester, triterpene glycosides, phthalide, flavonoids, triterpenoid saponin, diterpene and triterpene have been isolated and demonstrated to be responsible for the biological effects of the herbs. Understanding the mechanisms of action of the herbs may provide new treatment opportunities for RA patients. PMID:22700248

  7. Identification and analysis of the active phytochemicals from the anti-cancer botanical extract Bezielle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Chen

    Full Text Available Bezielle is a botanical extract that has selective anti-tumor activity, and has shown a promising efficacy in the early phases of clinical testing. Bezielle inhibits mitochondrial respiration and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS in mitochondria of tumor cells but not in non-transformed cells. The generation of high ROS in tumor cells leads to heavy DNA damage and hyper-activation of PARP, followed by the inhibition of glycolysis. Bezielle therefore belongs to a group of drugs that target tumor cell mitochondria, but its cytotoxicity involves inhibition of both cellular energy producing pathways. We found that the cytotoxic activity of the Bezielle extract in vitro co-purified with a defined fraction containing multiple flavonoids. We have isolated several of these Bezielle flavonoids, and examined their possible roles in the selective anti-tumor cytotoxicity of Bezielle. Our results support the hypothesis that a major Scutellaria flavonoid, scutellarein, possesses many if not all of the biologically relevant properties of the total extract. Like Bezielle, scutellarein induced increasing levels of ROS of mitochondrial origin, progressive DNA damage, protein oxidation, depletion of reduced glutathione and ATP, and suppression of both OXPHOS and glycolysis. Like Bezielle, scutellarein was selectively cytotoxic towards cancer cells. Carthamidin, a flavonone found in Bezielle, also induced DNA damage and oxidative cell death. Two well known plant flavonoids, apigenin and luteolin, had limited and not selective cytotoxicity that did not depend on their pro-oxidant activities. We also provide evidence that the cytotoxicity of scutellarein was increased when other Bezielle flavonoids, not necessarily highly cytotoxic or selective on their own, were present. This indicates that the activity of total Bezielle extract might depend on a combination of several different compounds present within it.

  8. Recommendations for Development of Botanical Polyphenols as "Natural Drugs" for Promotion of Resilience Against Stress-Induced Depression and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Libby; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2016-09-01

    Extensive evidence has demonstrated that psychological stress has detrimental effects on psychological health, cognitive function, and ultimately well-being. While stressful events are a significant cause of psychopathology, most individuals exposed to adversity maintain normal psychological functioning. The mechanisms underlying such resilience are poorly understood, and there is an urgent need to identify and target these mechanisms to promote resilience under stressful events. Botanicals have been used throughout history to treat various medical conditions; however, the development of botanical compounds into potential preventative and therapeutic agents in studies promoting brain health is hindered by the fact that most orally consumed botanicals are extensively metabolized during absorption and/or by post-absorptive xenobiotic metabolism. Therefore, the primary objective of this review article is to provide recommendations for developing natural compounds as novel therapeutic strategies to promote resilience in susceptible subjects. The development of botanical polyphenols to ultimately attenuate mood disorders and cognitive impairment will rely on understanding (1) the absorption and bioavailability of botanical polyphenols with emphasis on flavan-3-ols, (2) the characterization of tissue-specific accumulation of biologically available polyphenols and their mechanisms of action in the brain, and eventually (3) the characterization of biologically available polyphenol metabolites in mechanisms associated with the promotion of resilience against mood disorders and cognitive impairment in response to stress. We also summarize exciting new lines of investigation about the role of botanicals such as polyphenols in the promotion of cognitive and psychological resilience. This information will provide a strategical framework for the future development of botanicals as therapeutic agents to promote resilience, ultimately preventing and/or therapeutically treating

  9. Effect of picung (Pangium edule plant extracts as a botanical pesticide on mortality of coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soekadar wiryadiputra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee pests known as coffe berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei were main pests which decreasing the productivity of Indonesian coffee. One of pests controlling was done by insecticides. Generally, plant uses for insecticide show high security level, because the breaking molecule was easy as not dangerous compound. Pangium edule contains of flavanoide, cyanide acid and saponin had potential as an botanical insecticide. The purpose of this research was to prove the potential extract of seed and leaves of picung (Pangium edule as an botanical insecticide for CBB. This research used a complete random design. There were 8 treatments with the concentration of the extract from leaves and seed of picung, one positive control treatment (Carbaril 0,02% formulation and one negative control treatment (aquades. The treatment was repeated four times and carried out observation on every day until six days. The concentrations leaf and seed extracts were 1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0%. The result of the research show that between concentration applied the were no significant different and at observation six days after application the mortality of CBB only around 35 -40% on both extracts (ewater and methanol. The result of the research also show that there were no real differentiation between leaves and seed of picung. LT-50 values were 1.25% and 0.96%, for leaves and seed extract in water for six day observation. From this observation could be concluded that picung tree (Pangium edule is not effective in the controlling CBB in the interval concentration applied and extraction method used. Key words: Botanical pesticide, picung tree, Pangium edule, mortality, Hypothenemus hampei, water extraction, methanol extraction.

  10. Horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.; hemiptera: cimicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Akhtar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal transfer of insecticide occurs when insects contact or ingest an insecticide, return to an aggregation or a nest, and transfer the insecticide to other conspecific insects through contact. This phenomenon has been reported in a number of insects including social insects, however it has not been reported in bed bugs. Since horizontal transfer can facilitate the spread of insecticide into hard to reach spaces, it could contribute greatly to the management of these public health pests. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: To demonstrate horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in C. lectularius, an exposed (donor bed bug, following a 10-minute acquisition period, was placed with unexposed (recipient bed bugs. Mortality data clearly demonstrates that diatomaceous earth (DE 51 was actively transferred from a single exposed bug to unexposed bugs in a concentration dependent manner. LC50 values varied from 24.4 mg at 48 h to 5.1 mg at 216 h when a single exposed bed bug was placed with 5 unexposed bed bugs. LT50 values also exhibited a concentration response. LT50 values varied from 1.8 days to 8.4 days when a 'donor' bug exposed to 20 and 5 mg of dust respectively was placed with 5 'recipient' bugs. Dust was also actively transferred from adult bed bugs to the nymphs. In addition we observed horizontal transfer of botanical insecticides including neem, ryania, and rotenone to varying degrees. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data clearly demonstrate horizontal transfer of diatomaceous earth and botanical insecticides in the common bed bug, C. lectularius. Use of a fluorescent dust provided visual confirmation that contaminated bed bugs transfer dust to untreated bed bugs in harborage. This result is important because bedbugs live in hard-to-reach places and interaction between conspecifics can be exploited for delivery and dissemination of management products directed at this public health pest.

  11. Determination of aflatoxins in botanical roots by a modification of AOAC Official Method 991.31: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Carol M; Trucksess, Mary W

    2010-01-01

    AOAC Official Method 991.31 for the determination of aflatoxins (AFs; sum of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2) in corn, raw peanuts, and peanut butter by using immunoaffinity column cleanup with LC has been modified and applied to the determination of AFs in botanical roots. The modifications were necessary to improve the performance of the method for matrixes beyond corn and peanuts. The extraction solvent was changed from a mixture of methanol and water to acetonitrile and water. The accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility characteristics of this method were determined. Replicates of 10 test portions of each powdered root (black cohosh, echinacea, ginger, ginseng, kava kava, and valerian) at each spiking level (AFs at 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 ng/g) were analyzed on 3 separate days. Test portions were extracted with acetonitrile-water (84 + 16, v/v), and the extracts were centrifuged, diluted with phosphate-buffered saline, filtered, and applied to an immunoaffinity column containing antibodies specific for AFs. After the column was washed with water, the toxins were eluted from the column with methanol and quantified by HPLC with fluorescence detection. All test materials except kava kava were found to contain AF at < 0.1 ng/g. Kava kava was naturally contaminated with AFs at 0.5 ng/g. Average within-day and between-days recoveries of AFs from botanical roots ranged from 88 to 112 and from 86 to 118%, respectively. Total RSD values for within-day and between-days repeatability ranged from 1.4 to 15.9%. HorRat values were < 0.4 for all of the matrixes examined. The modified AOAC Official Method 991.31 was found to be applicable to an analysis of the six botanical roots. PMID:20334179

  12. Thinking on the Construction and Development of Zhengzhou Botanical Garden%郑州植物园建设与发展的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋良红; 郭欢欢; 赵建霞

    2015-01-01

    指出了植物园是一个城市文明建设的象征,担负着植物保护、科学研究、科普教育、休闲娱乐的职责。分析了国内几个城建系统植物园发展特色,从科学建园、文化建园、科普教育、优质服务、园容园貌等方面探讨了郑州植物园的未来建设与发展思路。%As a symbol of the civilization of a city ,the botanical garden takes the responsibility of plant con‐servation ,scientific research ,public education and entertainment .The Zhengzhou botanical garden was con‐structed in 2007 and locates in west outskirts of Zhengzhou which is the capital of Henan province .It is atta‐ched to the Zhengzhou Municipal Bureau of Landscape and it is a member of the botanical gardens which be‐longs to the urban construction system .Through the description and analysis of the development features of several botanical gardens in urban construction system ,this article explores the future construction and de‐velopment of the Zhengzhou botanical garden from the aspects of scientific establishment ,cultural establish‐ment ,science popularization education ,first -rate service ,and garden's appearance ,etc .

  13. Contamination from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil of a botanic garden localized next to a former manufacturing gas plant in Palermo (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Botanical Garden lies within the city of Palermo, a few meters away from one of the largest unused Manufacturing Gas Plant in Sicily. The total concentrations of PAHs (23 compounds) in the soil of Botanical Garden ranged from 947 to 18,072 μg/kg. The wide range of PAH concentrations (RSD = 84%) found in the soil samples indicates heterogeneous levels of contamination in the area and this can be explained by considering the different tree distributions which prevents the homogeneous deposition of pollutants on the soil. Soils collected in the Botanical Garden generally showed the highest PAH concentrations, being almost 2-3 times higher than the concentration samples obtained in the urban reference sites and about 20 times higher than those in the rural stations. The total PAH concentrations, in the Botanical Garden soil, resulted higher than the maximum concentrations allowed by the Italian legislation for the green areas. Perylene, was found in all the stations. From a careful study of the isomeric ratios, we can hypothesize that the soils of the Botanical Garden are mainly affected by localized MGP particulate deposition, suggesting that the partitioning between organic matter and PAHs is not the dominant process in the soils with higher organic matter content.

  14. DNA-Based Authentication of Botanicals and Plant-Derived Dietary Supplements: Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho Moraes, Denise F; Still, David W; Lum, Michelle R; Hirsch, Ann M

    2015-06-01

    Herbal medicines and botanicals have long been used as sole or additional medical aids worldwide. Currently, billions of dollars are spent on botanicals and related products, but minimal regulation exists regarding their purity, integrity, and efficacy. Cases of adulteration and contamination have led to severe illness and even death in some cases. Identifying the plant material in botanicals and phytomedicines using organoleptic means or through microscopic observation of plant parts is not trivial, and plants are often misidentified. Recently, DNA-based methods have been applied to these products because DNA is not changed by growth conditions unlike the chemical constituents of many active pharmaceutical agents. In recent years, DNA barcoding methods, which are used to identify species diversity in the Tree of Life, have been also applied to botanicals and plant-derived dietary supplements. In this review, we recount the history of DNA-based methods for identification of botanicals and discuss some of the difficulties in defining a specific bar code or codes to use. In addition, we describe how next generation sequencing technologies have enabled new techniques that can be applied to identifying these products with greater authority and resolution. Lastly, we present case histories where dietary supplements, decoctions, and other products have been shown to contain materials other than the main ingredient stipulated on the label. We conclude that there is a fundamental need for greater quality control in this industry, which if not self-imposed, that may result from legislation. PMID:25856442

  15. Genetic Diversity in ex-situ Conserved Lens culinaris for Botanical Descriptors, Biochemical and Molecular Markers and Identification of Landraces from Indigenous Genetic Resources of Pakistan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tayyaba Sultana; Abdul Ghafoor

    2008-01-01

    Lentil, one of the oldest legumes was Investigated for diversity based on botanical descriptors, total seed proteins,isozymes and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. About one fourth of accessions were heterogeneous for botanical descriptors and a seed protein profile. The germplaem collected from the province of Baluchistan revealed the prevalence of indigenous landraces as high diversity was observed for all of the techniques. Diversity explored through various techniques revealed validity Irrespective of the sample size or geographic pattern, RAPD being the best choice for Investigating both inter- and intra-accession variation In lentil. Although all of the techniques were able to resolve genetic diversity In lentil, isozymes and seed proteins gave low levels of genetic diversity, suggesting that more investigation into isozymes of specific proteins is required. RAPD is the best option for determining inter- and Intra-accession variation, and will be required to extend germplasme and primers to continue the study of botanical descriptors.

  16. Authentication of the botanical origin of unifloral honey by infrared spectroscopy coupled with support vector machine algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, L.; Zeković, I.; Dramićanin, T.; Tešić, Ž.; Milojković-Opsenica, D.; Dramićanin, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, the potential of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy coupled with different chemometric tools in food analysis has been established. This technique is rapid, low cost, and reliable and requires little sample preparation. In this work, 130 Serbian unifloral honey samples (linden, acacia, and sunflower types) were analyzed using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). For each spectrum, 64 scans were recorded in wavenumbers between 4000 and 500 cm-1 and at a spectral resolution of 4 cm-1. These spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), and calculated principal components were then used for support vector machine (SVM) training. In this way, the pattern-recognition tool is obtained for building a classification model for determining the botanical origin of honey. The PCA was used to analyze results and to see if the separation between groups of different types of honeys exists. Using the SVM, the classification model was built and classification errors were acquired. It has been observed that this technique is adequate for determining the botanical origin of honey with a success rate of 98.6%. Based on these results, it can be concluded that this technique offers many possibilities for future rapid qualitative analysis of honey.

  17. Determination of Multiresidue Pesticides in Botanical Dietary Supplements Using Gas Chromatography-Triple-Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Lopez, Salvador; Hayward, Douglas G; Park, Hoon Yong; Wong, Jon W; Kim, Suyon S; Wan, Jason; Reddy, Ravinder M; Quinn, Daniel J; Steiniger, David

    2016-08-10

    A simplified sample preparation method in combination with gas chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) analysis was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 227 pesticides in green tea, ginseng, gingko leaves, saw palmetto, spearmint, and black pepper samples. The botanical samples were hydrated with water and extracted with acetonitrile, magnesium sulfate, and sodium chloride. The acetonitrile extract was cleaned up using solid phase extraction with carbon-coated alumina/primary-secondary amine with or without C18. Recovery studies using matrix blanks fortified with pesticides at concentrations of 10, 25, 100, and 500 μg/kg resulted in average recoveries of 70-99% and relative standard deviation of 5-13% for all tested botanicals except for black pepper, for which lower recoveries of fortified pesticides were observed. Matrix-matched standard calibration curves revealed good linearity (r(2) > 0.99) across a wide concentration range (1-1000 μg/L). Nine commercially available tea and 23 ginseng samples were analyzed using this method. Results revealed 36 pesticides were detected in the 9 tea samples at concentrations of 2-3500 μg/kg and 61 pesticides were detected in the 23 ginseng samples at concentrations of 1-12500 μg/kg. PMID:27101866

  18. Mass spectrometric analysis of pharmaceutical adulterants in products labeled as botanical dietary supplements or herbal remedies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaclavik, Lukas; Krynitsky, Alexander J; Rader, Jeanne I

    2014-11-01

    The increased availability and use of botanical dietary supplements and herbal remedies among consumers has been accompanied by an increased frequency of adulteration of these products with synthetic pharmaceuticals. Unscrupulous producers may add drugs and analogues of various classes, such as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors, weight loss, hypoglycemic, antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory agents, or anabolic steroids, to develop or intensify biological effects of dietary supplements or herbal remedies. The presence of such adulterated products in the marketplace is a worldwide problem and their consumption poses health risks to consumers. Analytical methods that allow rapid and reliable testing of dietary supplements for the presence of synthetic drugs are needed to address such fraudulent practices. Mass spectrometry (MS) and hyphenated techniques such as liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) have become primary tools in this endeavor. The present review critically assesses the role and summarizes the applications of MS in the analysis of pharmaceutical adulterants in botanical dietary supplements and herbal remedies. The uses of MS techniques in detection, confirmation, and quantification of known pharmaceutical adulterants as well as in screening for and structure elucidation of unexpected adulterants and novel designer drugs are discussed. PMID:25270866

  19. Effects of sublethal doses of selected botanical molluscicides on oxygen consumption of the brown garden snail, Eobania vermiculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Mohamed H. Beltagi, Mohammed Salah. Ab. Ab. Al-Shinnawy, Nabawy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory bioassays were carried out for evaluating the efficacy of certain plant materials including Nicotine, Thymol, Menthol, Caffeine and Camphor as molluscicides against the brown garden snail, Eobania vermiculata using the topical application method. The obtained results proved that Nicotine and Thymol were the most promising from the molluscicidal point of view with LD50 204.02 and 551.20g/snail for the two materials, respectively. The effects of sublethal doses (LD25 and LD50 of the most potent materials, Thymol and Nicotine, on the oxygen consumption of E. vermiculata snails after 1, 7 and 15 days post treatment were evaluated. Results indicated that only snails treated with LD50 Thymol showed significant decrease in their oxygen uptake; while all the other treatments stimulated significant increase in the oxygen consumption along the three periods of estimation. This stimulation was most pronounced with the low sublethal doses of the both examined botanical molluscicides. The succession of time post exposure did not enable the treated snails to eliminate the adverse effects of the applied materials. Depending on the results of the current investigation, we can conclude that the both examined botanical materials, Thymol and Nicotine, are effective in killing the agricultural pest E. vermiculata but further studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of these materials as safe and economic molluscicides in the field.

  20. Authentication of the botanical origin of unifloral honey by infrared spectroscopy coupled with support vector machine algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the potential of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy coupled with different chemometric tools in food analysis has been established. This technique is rapid, low cost, and reliable and requires little sample preparation. In this work, 130 Serbian unifloral honey samples (linden, acacia, and sunflower types) were analyzed using attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). For each spectrum, 64 scans were recorded in wavenumbers between 4000 and 500 cm−1 and at a spectral resolution of 4 cm−1. These spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA), and calculated principal components were then used for support vector machine (SVM) training. In this way, the pattern-recognition tool is obtained for building a classification model for determining the botanical origin of honey. The PCA was used to analyze results and to see if the separation between groups of different types of honeys exists. Using the SVM, the classification model was built and classification errors were acquired. It has been observed that this technique is adequate for determining the botanical origin of honey with a success rate of 98.6%. Based on these results, it can be concluded that this technique offers many possibilities for future rapid qualitative analysis of honey. (paper)

  1. [Botanical journey of Josef A. Knapp in Galicia as a part of exploration of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokińska, Beata

    2011-01-01

    Josef Armin Knapp (1843-1899) as Austrian botanist was interested in development of botanical knowledge of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy--his maternal country. Monarchy, during the long regency of emperor Franz Josef I, was multinational, very much diversified geographically territory. This large empire had included, among others, such countries as present Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Ukraine, Romania and the southern part of present Poland--previously known as Galicia. J. A. Knapp was interested in studying these parts of empire which were considered peripheries and less-known. It seems to have met the requirements of science, economy and administration of Vienna. J. A. Knapp in his large floristic researches had included explorations of considerable part of the Monarchy and had left an interesting scientific legacy. His research papers were results of botanical explorations in selected areas of the Monarchy--area of Nitra (currently a city in Slovakia), Slavonia (presently a land in Croatia) and Galicia (the historical area in the south of Poland). This article refers to the botanical journey of J. A. Knapp in Galicia in summer 1868. The main purpose of his journey was to visit and explore selected places in Galicia--the surroundings of Jaslo and Sanok towns and some specific areas within the Bieszczady Mountains, which are part of the Carpathians Mountains. Botanical researches in the Bieszczady Mountains provided by J. A. Knapp can be considered nowadays as very important and pioneering in that area. In the second part of XIX century this area was highly populated and the observed anthropogenic pressure applied to the nature was strong. Now, the area is considered a very valuable natural territory--since 1973 it has been occupied by the Bieszczady National Park--one of Polish national parks. J. A. Knapp had spent more than two months in Galicia thanks to the great hospitality of Polish people, especially botanists: A. Rehmann, I. R. Czerwiakowski, W. Jab

  2. Adjunctive treatment with oral AKL1, a botanical nutraceutical, in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brockwell C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Claire Brockwell,1 Sundari Ampikaipakan,1,2 Darren W Sexton,1 David Price,3,4 Daryl Freeman,5 Mike Thomas,6 Muzammil Ali,4 Andrew M Wilson1,21Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; 2Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK; 3Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; 4Research in Real Life, Cambridge, UK; 5Mundesley Medical Centre, Mundesley, Norwich, UK; 6Primary Care Research, Aldermoor Health Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, UKPurpose: The objective of this pilot trial was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AKL1, a patented botanical formulation containing extracts of Picrorhiza kurroa, Ginkgo biloba, and Zingiber officinale, as add-on therapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and chronic cough.Patients and methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial enrolled male and female patients >18 years old with COPD and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ score of <18. The 10-week study period comprised a 2-week single-blind placebo run-in period followed by add-on treatment with AKL1 or placebo twice daily for 8 weeks. The primary study endpoint was the change from week 0 to week 8 in cough-related health status, as assessed by the LCQ.Results: Of 33 patients enrolled, 20 were randomized to AKL1 and 13 to placebo. Patients included 19 (58% men and 14 (42% women of mean (standard deviation [SD] age of 67 (9.4 years; 15 (45% patients were smokers and 16 (49% were ex-smokers. The mean (SD change from baseline in LCQ score at 8 weeks was 2.3 (4.9 in the AKL1 group and 0.6 (3.7 in the placebo group, with mean difference in change of 1.8 (95% confidence interval: –1.5 to 5.1; P=0.28. The St George's Respiratory Questionnaire score improved substantially in the AKL1 treatment group by a mean (SD of –7.7 (11.7 versus worsening in the placebo group (+1.5 [9.3], with mean difference in change of –9.2 (95% confidence

  3. 仙湖植物园风景林群落调查及其景观优化策略%Investigation on Scenic Forest Community and Research of Optimized Strategy on Plant Landscape of Fairylake Botanical Garden in Shenzhen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶显龙; 王丹; 王晓明; 包志毅

    2015-01-01

    采用样方调查法对深圳仙湖植物园马占相思( Acacia mangium)群落特征和物种多样性进行调查分析。结果表明,在3200 m2的样地中,共有维管束植物58种,隶属于35科49属,整个群落的物种丰富度指数Margalef指数为7.4428,Shan-non-Wiener指数为3.6308,Simpson指数为0.8433,均匀度指数为0.8980,该群落的层次格局为灌木层>草本层>藤本层>乔木层,成层现象较为明显;该群落是以马占相思为主的单优种群落,群落种类组成多样性和水平分布不均匀,其外貌终年常绿,种群处于退化状态。在尊重原有自然植被的前提下,提出仙湖植物园内的面状风景林植被提升改造策略,从而恢复仙湖植物园地域性的季风常绿阔叶林植物景观。%The characteristics and species diversity of the Acacia mangium community at Fairylake Botanical Garden in Shenzhen, were studied by quadrat survey.The results showed that there are 58 species of vascular plants belonging to 35 families in the sample plots totaling 3200 m2.The species diversity of the community is relatively low with Margalef index of 7.4428,Shannon-Wiener index of 3.6308,Simpson index of 0.8433,and the evenness index of 0.8980.The diversity pattern from maximum to minimum is ordered by shrub,herb,liana and arbor.Litsea glutinosa is the dominant species of the community and its composition diversity and horizontal distribution is uneven.The analysis on species important value and frequency showed that the physiognomy of the community was ev-ergreen.The age structure of dominant population showed that the main population of the community belongs to rudimentary popula-tion.On the premising the respect for the original natural vegetation, this paper puts forward a improve transformation strategy for fairy lake botanical garden planar scenic forest vegetation to restore the fairy lake regional monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest bo-tanical garden

  4. Nitrate leaching and spring wheat bread making quality following cultivation of grasslands of different composition, age and management

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, J.; Pedersen, L.; Jørgensen, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of sward botanical composition and ley age on grassland residual effects, quality of spring wheat and subsequent nitrate leaching was investigated. Grazed grasslands of different age (1, 2 and 8 production years) and composition (unfertilised grass-clover and fertilised perennial ryegrass) were ploughed and followed by spring wheat and spring barley. For reference, an adjacent field without grassland history but with the same crop sequence in 2002-2003 was treated with increasin...

  5. Impact of botanical pesticides derived from Melia azedarach and Azadirachta indica on the biology of two parasitoid species of the diamondback moth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charleston, D.S.; Kfir, R.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of two botanical pesticides was tested on two species of parasitoids, Cotesia plutellae and Diadromus collaris. Aqueous leaf extracts from the syringa tree, Melia azedarach and commercial formulations from the neem tree, Azadirachta indica, Neemix 4.5 were investigated in the laboratory a

  6. Compendium of botanicals reported to contain naturally occuring substances of possible concern for human health when used in food and food supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten

    health” replaces the first version published in 2009; it lists in alphabetical order botanicals without any judgment on whether they are suitable or not suitable for food applications in Europe; it has no legal or regulatory force pertaining to the legal classification of products or substances....

  7. Further investigations on the zooplankton of water bodies in the Botanical Garden of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komala, Z; Przyboś, E

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to register the zooplanktonic organisms in water bodies in the Botanical Garden of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, especially from the point of view of the occurrence of species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. In one pond, artificially constructed, the presence of P. tetraurelia was revealed. PMID:11080920

  8. Effects of a botanical larvicide derived from Azadirachta indica (the neem tree) on oviposition behaviour in Anopheles gambiae s.s. mosquitoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, A.F.V.; Adongo, E.A.; Vulule, J.; Githure, J.

    2011-01-01

    More focus is given to mosquito larval control due to the necessity to use several control techniques together in integrated vector management programmes. Botanical products are thought to be able to provide effective, sustainable and cheap mosquito larval control tools. However, bio-larvicides like

  9. Characterization and screening of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and N-oxides from various parts of many botanicals and dietary supplements using liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The UHPLC-QToF-MS analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from various parts of 37 botanicals and 7 dietary supplements was performed. A separation by LC was achieved using a reversed-phase column and a gradient of water/acetonitrile each containing formic acid as the mobile phase. MS-MS detection was u...

  10. EFFECT OF BOTANICAL PROBIOTIC CONTAINING LACTOBACILLI ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND POPULATIONS OF BACTERIA IN THE CECA, CLOACA, AND CARCASS RINSE OF BROILER CHICKENS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of feeding a botanical probiotic containing Lactobacillus on growth performance of broiler chickens from 1 to 42 d of age. At 56 d, five broilers per pen were killed and processed to determine bacteria populations in the ceca, cloaca, and carcass rinse....

  11. Post Occupancy Evaluation of Qinhuangdao Botanical Garden%秦皇岛植物园使用后评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      作为使用后评价(POE)的项目,对土人景观规划设计研究所设计的秦皇岛植物园进行深入调查,针对使用人群、可达性、景观偏好、植物、设施建设5个方面展开问卷调查,并提出优化方向。%As an post occupancy evaluation project, Qinhuangdao botanical garden designed by Turen Design Institute was investigated. the questionnaire survey was carried out from five aspects of users, traffic accessibility, landscape preference, plants, infrastructure construction, and the optimization direction was put forward.

  12. A new detection method in studying penetration depth of low-energy heavy ions in botanic samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new detection method has been applied to study the penetration depth of low-energyheavy ions in botanic samples. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) pieces were placed behind the target samples with certain thickness to receive energetic penetrated ions during the irradiation. After irradiation, statistic number density of protrusion-like damage induced by energetic penetrated ions can be ob tained through scanning tunneling microscope (STM) observation on the surfaces of HOPG. The results of test indicate that the detection limit can be as low as 1.0× 109 protrusions/em2. With the method, the penetration depth of at least 60μm can be detected in kidney bean slices irradiated by N+ ions with dose of 0.3-3× 1017ions/cm2.

  13. Oxygen consumption by oak chips in a model wine solution; Influence of the botanical origin, toast level and ellagitannin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, María; Kontoudakis, Nikolaos; Giordanengo, Thomas; Gómez-Alonso, Sergio; García-Romero, Esteban; Fort, Francesca; Canals, Joan Miquel; Hermosín-Gutíerrez, Isidro; Zamora, Fernando

    2016-05-15

    The botanical origin, toast level and ellagitannin content of oak chips in a model wine solution have been studied in terms of their influence on oxygen consumption. French oak chips released significantly higher amounts of ellagitannins than American oak chips at any toast level. The release of ellagitannins by oak chips decreased as the toast level increased in the French oak but this trend was not so clear in American oak. Oxygen consumption rate was clearly related to the level of released ellagitannins. Therefore, oak chips should be chosen for their potential to release ellagitannins release should be considered, not only because they can have a direct impact on the flavor and body of the wine, but also because they can protect against oxidation. PMID:26776040

  14. Characteristics of water and wetland plants of the water reservoirs in the UMCS Botanical Garden in Lublin, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Dąbrowska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compile an inventory and determine the ecological characteristics of the spontaneous flora of the restored water reservoirs and their wet banks in the western part of Lublin in the years 1997–2013. The study objects are small reservoirs located at the UMCS Botanical Garden in the Czechówka River valley. These ponds are subjected to strong anthropogenic pressure. 68 plant species from 33 families and 58 genera were recorded in the flora of the ponds and their wet banks. An important feature of the described water bodies is the large proportion of native species (94% of the flora. Cryptophytes and hemicryptophytes as well as biological groups combining the features of hemicryptophytes and cryptophytes are the predominant life forms. Perennials account for 80% of the flora. The ponds and their wet banks are inhabited by 25 medicinal and 19 bee forage plants.

  15. Taï chimpanzees use botanical skills to discover fruit: what we can learn from their mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmaat, Karline R L; Ban, Simone D; Boesch, Christophe

    2013-11-01

    Fruit foragers are known to use spatial memory to relocate fruit, yet it is unclear how they manage to find fruit in the first place. In this study, we investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) in the Taï National Park make use of fruiting synchrony, the simultaneous emergence of fruit in trees of the same species, which can be used together with sensory cues, such as sight and smell, to discover fruit. We conducted observations of inspections, the visual checking of fruit availability in trees, and focused our analyses on inspections of empty trees, so to say "mistakes". Learning from their "mistakes", we found that chimpanzees had expectations of finding fruit days before feeding on it and significantly increased inspection activity after tasting the first fruit. Neither the duration of feeding nor density of fruit-bearing trees in the territory could account for the variation in inspection activity, which suggests chimpanzees did not simply develop a taste for specific fruit on which they had fed frequently. Instead, inspection activity was predicted by a botanical feature-the level of synchrony in fruit production of encountered trees. We conclude that chimpanzees make use of the synchronous emergence of rainforest fruits during daily foraging and base their expectations of finding fruit on a combination of botanical knowledge founded on the success rates of fruit discovery, and a categorization of fruit species. Our results provide new insights into the variety of food-finding strategies employed by primates and the adaptive value of categorization capacities. PMID:23576098

  16. Multiplexed shotgun sequencing reveals congruent three-genome phylogenetic signals for four botanical sections of the flax genus Linum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Dong, Yibo; Yang, Mo-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A genome-wide detection of phylogenetic signals by next generation sequencing (NGS) has recently emerged as a promising genomic approach for phylogenetic analysis of non-model organisms. Here we explored the use of a multiplexed shotgun sequencing method to assess the phylogenetic relationships of 18 Linum samples representing 16 species within four botanical sections of the flax genus Linum. The whole genome DNAs of 18 Linum samples were fragmented, tagged, and sequenced using an Illumina MiSeq. Acquired sequencing reads per sample were further separated into chloroplast, mitochondrial and nuclear sequence reads. SNP calls upon genome-specific sequence data sets revealed 6143 chloroplast, 2673 mitochondrial, and 19,562 nuclear SNPs. Phylogenetic analyses based on three-genome SNP data sets with and without missing observations showed congruent three-genome phylogenetic signals for four botanical sections of the Linum genus. Specifically, two major lineages showing a separation of Linum-Dasylinum sections and Linastrum-Syllinum sections were confirmed. The Linum section displayed three major branches representing two major evolutionary stages leading to cultivated flax. Cultivated flax and its immediate progenitor were formed as its own branch, genetically more closely related to L. decumbens and L. grandiflorum with chromosome count of eight, and distantly apart from six other species with chromosome count of nine. Five species of the Linastrum and Syllinum sections were genetically more distant from cultivated flax, but they appeared to be more closely related to each other, even with variable chromosome counts. These findings not only provide the first evidence of congruent three-genome phylogenetic pathways within the Linum genus, but also demonstrate the utility of the multiplexed shotgun sequencing in acquisition of three-genome phylogenetic signals of non-model organisms. PMID:27165939

  17. Profenofos Resistance and the Efficacy of Botanical Insecticide From Extracts Refining Waste of Vetiver (Vetiveria zizanoides L. against Crosidolomia pavonana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entun Santosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study aims to determine the resistance status of C. Pavonana to synthetic insecticides of profenofos and compare with the methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste in managing resistance C. Pavonana. Study design: The experiments were performed using two testing methods , namely the effect of contact and residual effect of feed on the leaves . Place and Duration of Study: The larvae of C. Pavonana is derived from the population Cikajang taken from three locations: Village Padasuka , Mekarsari , and Cibodas. And the experiment was conducted also at Laboratory of Faculty of Agriculture , University of Padjadjaran , Jatinangor. The experiment conducted from April to June 2013 Methodology: Completely Randomized Design with four replications , each replication using a ten instar larvae II . As a comparison used insect larvae C. Pavonana standards obtained from the Laboratory of Insect Physiology and Toxicology ( Department of Plant Protection , Faculty of Agriculture , IPB . Which has been maintained over 20 generations in the laboratory . Results: The experimental results showed that C. Pavonana populaton of Cikajang had been resistant to synthetic insecticides profenofos , with resistance value ratio ( RV , which is more than one . The highest value found in the village of Padasuka at 3.67 and the lowest value at 2.15 in Cibodas village . The larvae of C. Pavonana resistant to insecticides is sensitive to botanical methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste . This is evidenced by the resistance value less than one . Resistance value (RV C. Pavonanathe methanol extract of botanical insecticides vetiver oil refining waste ( test method leaves a residual effect on feed at Padasuka Village , Mekarsari village and Cibodas village resistance value respectively 0.62; 0.83 and 0.61 . Thus the methanol extract of vetiver oil refining waste can be used to overcome the problem of resistance C. Pavonana to synthetic insecticides profenofos

  18. Evaluation of estrogenic activity of licorice species in comparison with hops used in botanicals for menopausal symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieh Hajirahimkhan

    Full Text Available The increased cancer risk associated with hormone therapies has encouraged many women to seek non-hormonal alternatives including botanical supplements such as hops (Humulus lupulus and licorice (Glycyrrhiza spec. to manage menopausal symptoms. Previous studies have shown estrogenic properties for hops, likely due to the presence of 8-prenylnarigenin, and chemopreventive effects mainly attributed to xanthohumol. Similarly, a combination of estrogenic and chemopreventive properties has been reported for various Glycyrrhiza species. The major goal of the current study was to evaluate the potential estrogenic effects of three licorice species (Glycyrrhiza glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata in comparison with hops. Extracts of Glycyrrhiza species and spent hops induced estrogen responsive alkaline phosphatase activity in endometrial cancer cells, estrogen responsive element (ERE-luciferase in MCF-7 cells, and Tff1 mRNA in T47D cells. The estrogenic activity decreased in the order H. lupulus > G. uralensis > G. inflata > G. glabra. Liquiritigenin was found to be the principle phytoestrogen of the licorice extracts; however, it exhibited lower estrogenic effects compared to 8-prenylnaringenin in functional assays. Isoliquiritigenin, the precursor chalcone of liquiritigenin, demonstrated significant estrogenic activities while xanthohumol, a metabolic precursor of 8-prenylnaringenin, was not estrogenic. Liquiritigenin showed ERβ selectivity in competitive binding assay and isoliquiritigenin was equipotent for ER subtypes. The estrogenic activity of isoliquiritigenin could be the result of its cyclization to liquiritigenin under physiological conditions. 8-Prenylnaringenin had nanomolar estrogenic potency without ER selectivity while xanthohumol did not bind ERs. These data demonstrated that Glycyrrhiza species with different contents of liquiritigenin have various levels of estrogenic activities, suggesting the importance of precise labeling of

  19. Water-insoluble fractions of botanical foods lower blood ethanol levels in rats by physically maintaining the ethanol solution after ethanol administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunji Oshima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have analyzed the functions of foods and dietary constituents in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. However, few studies have reported the function of dietary fibers in the dynamics of alcohol metabolism. Objective: We assessed the effects of botanical foods that contain dietary fibers on alcohol metabolism. Methods: The ability of the water-insoluble fraction (WIF of 18 kinds of botanical foods to maintain 15% (v/v ethanol solution was examined using easily handled filtration. A simple linear regression analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the filtered volumes and blood ethanol concentration (BEC in F344 rats 4 h after the ingestion of 4.0 g/kg of ethanol following dosage of 2.5% (w/v WIF of the experimental botanical foods. Furthermore, the supernatant (6.3 Brix; water-soluble fraction and precipitate (WIF of tomato, with a strong ethanol-maintaining ability, were obtained and BEC and the residual gastric ethanol in rats were determined 2 h after the administration of 4.0 g/kg of ethanol and the individuals fractions. Results: The filtered volumes of dropped ethanol solutions containing all the botanical foods tested except green peas were decreased compared with the ethanol solution without WIF (control. There was a significant correlation between the filtered volumes and blood ethanol concentration (BEC. There was no significant difference in the residual gastric ethanol between controls and the supernatant group; however, it was increased significantly in the WIF group than in controls or the supernatant group. Consistent with this, BEC reached a similar level in controls and the supernatant group but significantly decreased in the WIF group compared with controls or the supernatant group. Conclusions: These findings suggest that WIFs of botanical foods, which are mostly water-insoluble dietary fibers, possess the ability to absorb ethanol-containing solutions, and this ability correlates

  20. Applicability of physico-chemical parameters of honey for identification of the botanical origin

    OpenAIRE

    Stanisław Kowalski; Marcin Łukasiewicz; Wiktor Berski

    2013-01-01

    Background. Efforts are being made to apply physicochemical parameters analysis in the identifi cation of varietal honeys. With many variables describing a given population, it is feasible to differentiate between basing on principal component analysis (PCA). The aim of this study was to investigate selected physicochemical quality characteristics of nectar honey, with particular emphasis paid to carbohydrate composition, and to determine its applicability in identifying the variety of fl ora...

  1. Oil-bearing plants of Zaire. III. Botanical families providing oils of relatively high unsaturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngiefu, C.K.; Paquot, C.; Vieux, A.

    1977-01-01

    Data are tabulated on the seed oil composition of 16 species of Leguminosae (including Albizia lebbeck, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, and Delonix regia), 6 species of Euphorbiaceae (including Aleurites moluccana, Hevea brasiliensis and Jatropha curcas) and 1 species (Kigelia africana) of Bignoniaceae. The most interesting for food and industrial purposes appear to be Afzelia bella, Adenanthera pavonina and Pentaclethra macrophylla, in addition to A. moluccana and H. brasiliensis.

  2. Effect of country origin on physicochemical, sugar and volatile composition of acacia, sunflower and tilia honeys

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Borras, María del Sol; Doménech Antich, Eva Mª; HELLEBRANDOVA, MAGDALENA; Escriche Roberto, Mª Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of country (Spain, Romania, and Czech Republic) and botanical origin, on the physicochemical (HMF, diastase activity, moisture content, electrical conductivity), color (Pfund scale and CIEL*a*b*), principal sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose) and volatile composition of acacia, sunflower and tilia honeys. PCA analyses considering these variables showed that honey type had a far greater influence on the differentiation of samples (above al...

  3. THE "PREFERRED FUTURES" OF BOTANIC GARDENS%植物园的“最佳未来”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    斯特顿

    2002-01-01

    The National Botanic Garden of Walse is the first national botanic garden to be built with a clear vision derived from the principles of sustainability laid down at the Rio Earth Summit. although the garden is embracing sustainability as its overall theme that is not our focus-merely how we go about our business. Sustainability at the Garden of Wales is based on a holistic approach within a social, political, economic, cultural, spiritual and environmental context. The garden offers a wide range of approaches to help people make new choices about their futures. It will be a flag-bearer for "preferred futures". The paper describes how the Garden of Wales is helping regenerate the region economically by adopting a preferred futures approach which involves envisioning a desired future then working back from there ("backcasting") in partnership with others to change the present in order to achieve that future. Examples covered include: Biotechnium (the world′s first Biosciences business incubator within a botanic garden); new partnership-based tourism products for Walse; local and regional product development and sourcing for retail outlets in the garden; and the creation of traditional healing and lifelong learning centres in the garden. Reference will also be made to: how the garden recycles water, deals with its effluent in a "Living Machine", generates its heat and power in a Biomass Boiler, runs its farms organically, uses slate waste as mulch, is creating genetic and global warming gardens, planning its demonstration organic and heritage vegetable gardens and biomass plantations. A broad outline will also be given of the scientific role of the garden and the role it will play in conserving the flora of Wales and West Atlantic Europe. A key theme of the paper is that through ideas generated in the paper that botanic gardens can and should help increase economic wealth, improve health and promote stable communities. It is how we map out our futures and set tough

  4. Information on plant foods in eBASIS: what is in a correct botanical scientific name?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Eriksen, Folmer Damsted; Sørensen, Marten;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the plant information included in the eBASIS (BioActive Substances in Foods Information System) database on composition and biological activity of selected bioactive compounds from European plant/mushroom foods with putative beneficial and/or toxic effects. The European Food...... Information Resource (EuroFIR)-NETTOX Plant List (2007) presents scientific and vernacular names in 15 European languages for around 325 major European plant/mushroom foods and also for different parts of these foods. This list and its predecessor, the NETTOX List of Food Plants, have been used by national...... food authorities and within the European Union for consideration of plants and mushrooms that have been used to a significant degree up to 1997 and are therefore not covered by the novel food regulation (European Parliament and Council of the European Union, 1997). The species and the plant part...

  5. Botanical Gardens, Recreation.shp, parcels; University of Georgia owned property included in tax parcel layer; polygon, Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Athens-Clarke County Planning Department.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Botanical Gardens dataset, published at 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2008. It is described as...

  6. Skin Whitening and Anti-aging Effect of Fine Hydro-gel Cream Formulation with Botanical Oil Complex Using PIT Emulsifying System

    OpenAIRE

    Hyun-Dae Cho1

    2014-01-01

    This study was to get unique formulation of multi-functional activity for preparing hydro-gel cream using PIT emulsifying system. In order to develop the good safety, adsorption and multi-functions, we made a new formulation using phase inversion temperature (PIT) containing 4 botanical oils such as camellia japonica seed oil, macadamia integrifolia seed oil, limnanthes alba (meadowfoam) seed oil, argania spinosa kernel oil, 0.04wt% of adenosine and 2wt% of niacinamide. The fi...

  7. A proposal for chemical characterization and quality evaluation of botanical raw materials using glandular trichome microsampling of yacón (Polymnia sonchifolia, Asteraceae), an Andean medicinal plant

    OpenAIRE

    K. Schorr; F.B. Da Costa

    2003-01-01

    A proposal for chemical characterisation and quality evaluation of botanical raw materials by analysing the glandular trichomes from the leaves of two different populations of yacón (Polymnia sonchifolia Poeppig & Endlicher, Asteraceae) is described. This species is an Andean medicinal plant and the tea prepared with their leaves displays hypoglycemic property. The method was based on the glandular trichome microsampling using LC/DAD. Qualitative chromatographic fingerprints of the glands wer...

  8. Determination of Aflatoxins and Ochratoxin A in Ginseng and Other Botanical Roots by Immunoaffinity Column Cleanup and Liquid Chromatography with Fluorescence Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Trucksess, Mary; Weaver, Carol; Oles, Carolyn; D’Ovidio, Kathleen; Rader, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by certain molds and are common contaminants of many important food crops, such as grains, nuts, and spices. Some mycotoxins are found in fruits, vegetables, and botanical roots. These contaminants have a broad range of toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicity. The public health concerns related to both acute and chronic effects of mycotoxins in animals have prompted...

  9. Variability of the cleistothecia and distribution of Erysiphe magnifica (U. Braun U. Braun & S. Takam. on Magnolia L. plants in O.V. Fomin Botanical garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petro Chumak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The variability of morphometrie characteristics of the cleistothecia of fungus Erysiphe magnifica on different species from the genus Magnolia L. has been considered. It has been shown that on the different nutrient plants are forming the micropopulations of fungus which are notable for the cleistothecia parameters frequency of distribution and variability of their indices. The invasion activity of fungus increases in сonditions of the Botanical garden, it dеmages 8 species of plants of the genus Magnolia.

  10. Living collections of botanic gardens as a means of ex situ conservation : A case study of African Violets (Saintpaulia) in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Miranto, Mari

    2006-01-01

    In all plant conservation, the priority is to maintain wild populations in situ (on site), which means that plants are conserved within their natural environment. Sometimes, as in the case of severely endangered Saintpaulia H. Wendl. (African violets), this is however, no sufficient. In that case, ex situ (off site) conservation in the form of live and in vitro collections and seed banks is necessary. In recent years, the role of botanic gardens in conservation and reintroduction of threatene...

  11. Estrogenic botanical supplements, health-related quality of life, fatigue, and hormone-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors: a HEAL study report

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Huiyan; Sullivan-Halley Jane; Smith Ashley W; Neuhouser Marian L; Alfano Catherine M; Meeske Kathleen; George Stephanie M; McTiernan Anne; McKean-Cowdin Roberta; Baumgartner Kathy B; Ballard-Barbash Rachel; Bernstein Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It remains unclear whether estrogenic botanical supplement (EBS) use influences breast cancer survivors' health-related outcomes. Methods We examined the associations of EBS use with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), with fatigue, and with 15 hormone-related symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats among 767 breast cancer survivors participating in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study. HRQOL was measured by the Medical Outcomes Study short fo...

  12. Effect of the Botanical Compound LCS101 on Chemotherapy-Induced Symptoms in Patients with Breast Cancer: A Case Series Report

    OpenAIRE

    Noah Samuels; Yair Maimon; Zisk-Rony, Rachel Y.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer invariably results in severe and often debilitating symptoms that can cause significant distress and severely impair daily function and quality-of-life (QOL). We treated a series of 20 female breast cancer patients with the botanical compound LCS101 as adjuvant to conventional chemotherapy. At the end of the treatment regimen, patients rated their symptoms. 70% reported that they had either no or mildly severe levels of fatigue; 60% none to mildly severe weaknes...

  13. Intakes of Fruit, Vegetables, and Specific Botanical Groups in Relation to Lung Cancer Risk in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Margaret E.; Park, Yikyung; Subar, Amy F; Neal D Freedman; Albanes, Demetrius; Hollenbeck, Albert; Leitzmann, Michael F.; Schatzkin, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Increased fruit and vegetable consumption may protect against lung cancer, although epidemiologic findings are inconclusive. The authors prospectively examined associations between lung cancer risk and intakes of fruit, vegetables, and botanical subgroups in 472,081 participants aged 50–71 years in the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-AARP Diet and Health Study. Diet was assessed at baseline (1995–1996) with a 124-item dietary questionnaire. A total of 6,035 incident lung cancer cases were...

  14. Transcriptomic analysis identifies gene networks regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ that control distinct effects of different botanical estrogens

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C. Michael; Helferich, William G.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S.

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ mediate the actions of endogenous estrogens as well as those of botanical estrogens (BEs) present in plants. BEs are ingested in the diet and also widely consumed by postmenopausal women as dietary supplements, often as a substitute for the loss of endogenous estrogens at menopause. However, their activities and efficacies, and similarities and differences in gene expression programs with respect to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) are not f...

  15. AKL1, a botanical mixture for the treatment of asthma: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca Sofia; Smith Natalie; Sheran Jane; Thomas Michael; Lee Amanda J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite effective treatments, asthma outcomes remain suboptimal. Interest exists in complementary therapies, particularly in herbal remedies for asthma treatment, currently with inconclusive evidence of efficacy. The encapsulated botanical mixture AKL1 has anecdotal evidence of effectiveness in asthma. Methods We performed a randomised controlled cross over study comparing the effectiveness of AKL1 with indistinguishable placebo as add-on therapy in patients uncontrolled o...

  16. Applicability of physico-chemical parameters of honey for identification of the botanical origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Kowalski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Efforts are being made to apply physicochemical parameters analysis in the identifi cation of varietal honeys. With many variables describing a given population, it is feasible to differentiate between basing on principal component analysis (PCA. The aim of this study was to investigate selected physicochemical quality characteristics of nectar honey, with particular emphasis paid to carbohydrate composition, and to determine its applicability in identifying the variety of fl oral honey. Material and methods. The experimental materials were samples of commercial honey available at retail in Krakow in 2005-2007 period. The following analyses were performed: water content by the refractometric method, sugars content according to Luff-Schoorl, content of sugars using HPLC, electrical conductivity, specifi c rotation, and acidity of honey.   Results. Application of HPL C allowed the precise qualitative identifi cation of sugars, which was impossible to be determined by Luff-Schoorl method. The obtained results were analysed using principal component analysis (PCA. Conclusions. Based on the obtained results and performing the statistical analysis, it was found that the relationship between specifi c rotation and the total acidity can be used to distinguish buckwheat honeys from other analysed varieties. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the relationship between the specifi c rotation and maltose content can be used to distinguish between acacia honeys vs. buckwheat and lime honeys.

  17. Botanical inventory of the Rocky Flats AEC site. Final report, April 29, 1976--July 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webber, P.J.

    1979-04-01

    The present plant life of the Rocky Flats site and surrounding area was documented. This documentation is intended as a base-line description which may be used by researchers and managers. The analysis of natural vegetation, including plant species inventory, vegetation composition study, and identification of major environmental control factors at the Rocky Flats site provides a data base on which future environmental decisions concerning, for example, future construction and handling of disturbance on this site can be made. The establishment of morphological norms for potential plant indicators of mutagenic hazards serves as a start for development of a vegetation-based system for detection of possible changes in plant life induced by accidental plutonium release around the plant. This study is not directed towards assessing any past or present industrial impacts of plutonium processing. The principal products from the contract are a list of vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens, a 1:12,000 color vegetation map, five large scale (1:500) maps of special study and experimental areas, and a description of the morphological norms of two common vascular plant species.

  18. Identification of Potential Plants Producing Tannin-protein Complex for a-amylase as Botanical Pesticide

    OpenAIRE

    Asriyah Firdausi; Tri Agus Siswoyo; Soekadar Wiryadiputra

    2013-01-01

    Research  on  the  development  of  botanical  pesticides  should  be developed  through  new  methods,  such  as  by  inhibiting the  activity  of  digestive enzymes  by  secondary  metabolites.  The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  identify some  of  potential  plants  as  a  source  of  tannin-protein  complexes  to  inhibitthe  activity  of  - amylase.  The  study  of  identification  of  potential  plants producing  the  active  ingredient  tannin-protein  complex  was  divided  into  th...

  19. Antioxidative free and bound phenolic constituents in botanical fractions of Indian specialty maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit K; Singh, Vasudeva

    2016-06-15

    Specialty maize genotypes viz. QPM (quality protein maize), Baby corn, Popcorn and Sweet corn, which are usually consumed in whole forms can be good supplements of phenolic antioxidants. Botanical fractions of these maize genotypes were analyzed to explore the distribution of free and bound phenolics. HPLC and ESI-MS/MS results indicated the presence of vanillic, syringic, p-hydroxybenzoic, caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic and isoferulic acids along with cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, kaempferol and quercetin. Germs of maize samples contained significantly higher free phenolics than pericarps, whereas, pericarps contained 74-83% of bound ones. QPM and Popcorn contained only 3% free phenolics whereas, Baby corn and Sweet corn had 14-17%. Unlike in peroxide scavenging and reducing capacity, anti-radical capacity of free phenolics of germs was significantly higher than that of pericarps. Free phenolics contributed 0.2-1.65%, 2-5% and 42-49% in anti-radical, peroxide scavenging and reducing capacity, respectively. Among lipophilic tocochromanols γ-tocopherol was the most abundant isomer in the samples among which Sweet corn contained the most (84.2 μg/g). Data showed that specialty maize genotypes are rich sources of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactives and are natural antioxidants. PMID:26868580

  20. Spatial genetic structure of Salvia japonica Thunb. population (Labiatae in Botanical Garden of Osaka City University, Kisaichi, Osaka Prefecture, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUDARMONO

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvia japonica Thunb. (Japan: Aki-no-Tamurasou was a perennial herb, protandry insect-pollinated, and self-incompatible with water-flow dispersed seed. We used allozyme loci to know genetic structure of a S. japonica population. We examined spatial autocorrelation of individuals within five distance class with Moran`s I statistics. The area of observation was in plot 5x5 m2 in Botanical Garden of Osaka City University, Kisaichi, Katano, Osaka Prefecture. The 8 loci examined were polymorphic, namely Aat-1, Aat-2, Pgi, Mnr, Pgm-1, Pgm-2, Idh, and 6-Pgd. Low levels of genetic diversity were found for 29 individuals. Ninety-two percent cases for all of distance class were similar and only 8% (8 of 105 cases were significant differences. This result indicated that the spatial genetic distributions in all of distance classes were all similar and no spatial autocorrelation of genotypes. Only in distance class 2 had one significantly positive cases (0.15 in Pgm-1c, indicating that spatial genetic structure in the study population was weak at most. In the other word that spatial pattern of the individuals within S. japonica population was random. Overall of the result was indicating that genotype among individuals of S. japonica changed distantly and tended to isolation in distance by seed dispersed.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 5% Foam in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Men With Androgenic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaney, Terrence C; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Androgenic alopecia (AGA) is the most common type of hair loss in men, characterized by hair miniaturization, hairline recession, and vertex balding. It affects approximately 50% of men, negatively affecting self-esteem and sociability. Topical minoxidil formulations are approved up to a 5% concentration for men, but patient adherence to treatment is challenged by gradual results that may be perceived as a lack of initial benefit. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 5% minoxidil foam used in combination with a novel botanical hair solution was evaluated in a 12-week, multicenter, single-arm, open label study in 56 subjects with mild to moderate AGA. Assessments included investigator ratings of improvement and subject self-ratings of satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in scalp hair coverage and perception of overall treatment benefit in as early as 4 weeks (P J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(4):406-412. PMID:27050695

  2. Phenological behaviour of desert plants in response to temperature change: a case study from turpan eremophytes botanical garden, northwest china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phenology of three genera of desert plants (viz., Calligonum L., Haloxylon L., and Tamarix L.) was investigated in response to temperature changes in Turpan. Eremophytes Botanical Garden The temperature was raised gradually from 1977 to 2006, while the phenophases of Calligonum L., Haloxylon L., and Tamarix L. genera were slowly and insignificantly changed in the study area. Their phenophase were similar and did not change significantly over the duration of the study except the beginning of flowering of the average of the three genera from 1977 to 1990 and 1991 to 2006, respectively. The summed temperature of the first four months was the major factor that affected the spring and flowering phenophases of the respective genera. The bud of Calligonum species was expanded during 1977 to 1990 and 1991 to 2006, the flower-buds in Tamarix species appeared during 1977 to 2006, the fruit setting of Haloxylon species started 1990 to 2006 and leaf discoloration of Tamarix species appeared during 1977 to 1990. (author)

  3. EXOTIC PLANTS IN THE CIBODAS BOTANIC GARDENS REMNANT FOREST: INVENTORY AND CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF SEVERAL ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decky Indrawan Junaedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to potential impact of invasive alien (exotic species to the natural ecosystems, inventory of exotic species in the Cibodas Botanic Gardens (CBG remnant forest area is an urgent need for CBG. Inventory of exotic species can assist gardens manager to set priorities and plan better responses for possible or existed invasive plants in the CBG remnants forest. The objectives of this study are to do inventory of the exotic species in the CBG remnant forest and to determine whether several environmental variables play role to the existence of exotic species in the CBG remnant forests. There are 26 exotic plant species (23 genera, 14 families found and recorded from all four remnant forests in CBG. Cluster analysis of four environmental variables shows that clustering of environmental factors of exotic species correlates with the abundances of those exotic species. The relation between environmental factor clusters and the abundance of those exotics signify the role of environmental variables on the existence of exotic plant species. The information of exotic plant species in the remnants forest is the base information for gardens manager to manage exotic species in CBG remnants forest. The relation of several environmental factors with exotic species abundance could assist gardens manager to understand better the supportive and or suppressor factors of exotics in the CBG remnants forest. Further study on these species is needed to set priorities to decide which species should be treated first in order to minimize the impact of exotic plant species to native ecosystem of CBG.

  4. Gene Expression Profiling and Pathway Network Analysis Predicts a Novel Antitumor Function for a Botanical-Derived Drug, PG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lun Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PG2 is a botanical drug that is mostly composed of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS. Its role in hematopoiesis and relieving cancer-related fatigue has recently been clinically investigated in cancer patients. However, systematic analyses of its functions are still limited. The aim of this study was to use microarray-based expression profiling to evaluate the quality and consistency of PG2 from three different product batches and to study biological mechanisms of PG2. An integrative molecular analysis approach has been designed to examine significant PG2-induced signatures in HL-60 leukemia cells. A quantitative analysis of gene expression signatures was conducted for PG2 by hierarchical clustering of correlation coefficients. The results showed that PG2 product batches were consistent and of high quality. These batches were also functionally equivalent to each other with regard to how they modulated the immune and hematopoietic systems. Within the PG2 signature, there were five genes associated with doxorubicin: IL-8, MDM4, BCL2, PRODH2, and BIRC5. Moreover, the combination of PG2 and doxorubicin had a synergistic effect on induced cell death in HL-60 cells. Together with the bioinformatics-based approach, gene expression profiling provided a quantitative measurement for the quality and consistency of herbal medicines and revealed new roles (e.g., immune modulation for PG2 in cancer treatment.

  5. A Review of Botanical Characteristics, Traditional Usage, Chemical Components, Pharmacological Activities, and Safety of Pereskia bleo (Kunth DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sogand Zareisedehizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pereskia bleo, a leafy cactus, is a medicinal plant native to West and South America and distributed in tropical and subtropical areas. It is traditionally used as a dietary vegetable, barrier hedge, water purifier, and insect repellant and for maintaining health, detoxification, prevention of cancer, and/or treatment of cancer, hypertension, diabetes, stomach ache, muscle pain, and inflammatory diseases such as dermatitis and rheumatism. The aim of this paper was to provide an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the botanical characteristics, traditional usage, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, and safety of P. bleo. A literature search using MEDLINE (via PubMed, Science direct, Scopus and Google scholar and China Academic Journals Full-Text Database (CNKI and available eBooks and books in the National University of Singapore libraries in English and Chinese was conducted. The following keywords were used: Pereskia bleo, Pereskia panamensis, Pereskia corrugata, Rhodocacus corrugatus, Rhodocacus bleo, Cactus panamensis, Cactus bleo, Spinach cactus, wax rose, Perescia, and Chinese rose. This review revealed the association between the traditional usage of P. bleo and reported pharmacological properties in the literature. Further investigation on the pharmacological properties and phytoconstituents of P. bleo is warranted to further exploit its potentials as a source of novel therapeutic agents or lead compounds.

  6. Transforming an Exposure trip to Botanical Expedition: Introducing Ecological Research thru Exposure Trip in an Eco-tourism Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo C. Lunar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available – Fieldtrips can be considered as one of the three avenues through which science can be taught - through formal classroom teaching, practical work and field trips. An exposure trip at Bangkong Kahoy Valley Field Study Center was arranged for a class of BS Biology and BS Education students enrolled in Ecology Course. This approach purposefully transformed the usual exposure trip from being a casual site visit into a focused and productive learning experience. This transformation from exposure trip to a botanical expedition has exceeded the initial activity goals. Rather than a day off from learning, the time spent at the study center has been a meaningful opportunity to engage students in an active ecological research project while delivering valuable science content. Employing the descriptive survey design, the learning gains of the students were assessed and students were directed to do a guided reflection writing using the ORID Model of Focused Conversation. The learning gains and reflections of the students confirmed that students can collaboratively develop focused research questions, make meaning from a variety of sources, carry out a vegetation analysis and conduct surveys on socio-economic status, plant resource utilization and ecotourism assessment of the host community. As students prepared for their trip and synthesized their learning afterward, they were able to come up with very impressive and scientifically sound research outputs.

  7. Discrete wetland groundwater discharges revealed with a three-dimensional temperature model and botanical indicators (Boxford, UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Andrew R.; Sorensen, James P. R.; Gooddy, Daren C.; Newell, Andrew J.; Marchant, Ben; Mountford, J. Owen; Scarlett, Peter; Williams, Peter J.; Old, Gareth H.

    2015-03-01

    Wetlands provide unique goods and services, as habitats of high biodiversity. Hydrology is the principal control on wetland functioning; hence, understanding the water source is fundamental. However, groundwater inflows may be discrete and easily missed. Research techniques are required with low cost and minimal impact in sensitive settings. In this study, the effectiveness of using a three-dimensional (3D) temperature model and botanical indicators to characterise groundwater discharge is explored at the CEH (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) River Lambourn Observatory, Boxford, UK. This comprises a 10 ha lowland riparian wetland, designated for its scientific interest and conservation value. Temperature data were collected in winter at multiple depths down to 0.9 m over approximately 3.6 ha and transformed into a 3D model via ordinary kriging. Anomalous warm zones indicated distinct areas of groundwater upwelling which were concurrent with relic channel structures. Lateral heat propagation from the channels was minimal and restricted to within 5-10 m. Vertical temperature sections within the channels suggest varying degrees of groundwater discharge along their length. Hydrochemical analysis showed that warmer peat waters were akin to deeper aquifer waters, confirming the temperature anomalies as areas of groundwater discharge. Subsequently, a targeted vegetation survey identified Carex paniculata as an indicator of groundwater discharge. The upwelling groundwater contains high concentrations of nitrate which is considered to support the spatially restricted growth of Carex paniculata against a background of poor fen communities located in reducing higher-phosphate waters.

  8. Control of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae with botanical insecticides and mineral oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Neves Celestino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate botanical oils, mineral oils and an insecticide that contained azadirachtin (ICA for the control of Hypothenemus hampei, in addition to the effects of residual castor oil. We evaluated the effectiveness of the vegetable oils of canola, sunflower, corn, soybean and castor, two mineral oils (assist® and naturol®, and the ICA for the control of H. hampei. The compounds were tested at a concentration of 3.0% (v v-1. The median lethal concentration (LC50 was estimated with Probit analysis. The oil of castor bean and extract of castor bean cake were also evaluated at concentrations of 3.0% (v v-1 and 3.0% (m v-1, respectively. The mortality rates for H. hampei caused by the ICA and the castor oil were 40.8 and 53.7%, with LC50 values of 6.71 and 3.49% (v v-1, respectively. In the castor oil, the methyl esters of the fatty acids were palmitic (1.10%, linoleic (4.50%, oleic (4.02%, stearic (0.50% and ricinoleic acids (88.04%. The extract of the castor bean cake was not toxic to H. hampei. The persistence of the castor oil in the environment was low, and the cause of mortality for H. hampei was most likely the blockage of the spiracles, which prevented the insects from breathing.

  9. Volatile Compounds in Honey: A Review on Their Involvement in Aroma, Botanical Origin Determination and Potential Biomedical Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy E. Manyi-Loh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs in honey are obtained from diverse biosynthetic pathways and extracted by using various methods associated with varying degrees of selectivity and effectiveness. These compounds are grouped into chemical categories such as aldehyde, ketone, acid, alcohol, hydrocarbon, norisoprenoids, terpenes and benzene compounds and their derivatives, furan and pyran derivatives. They represent a fingerprint of a specific honey and therefore could be used to differentiate between monofloral honeys from different floral sources, thus providing valuable information concerning the honey’s botanical and geographical origin. However, only plant derived compounds and their metabolites (terpenes, norisoprenoids and benzene compounds and their derivatives must be employed to discriminate among floral origins of honey. Notwithstanding, many authors have reported different floral markers for honey of the same floral origin, consequently sensory analysis, in conjunction with analysis of VOCs could help to clear this ambiguity. Furthermore, VOCs influence honey’s aroma described as sweet, citrus, floral, almond, rancid, etc. Clearly, the contribution of a volatile compound to honey aroma is determined by its odor activity value. Elucidation of the aroma compounds along with floral origins of a particular honey can help to standardize its quality and avoid fraudulent labeling of the product. Although only present in low concentrations, VOCS could contribute to biomedical activities of honey, especially the antioxidant effect due to their natural radical scavenging potential.

  10. AGRO BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATION IN HAND FAN PAINTING AS A RESOURCE OF INFORMATION ON BREEDING AND PLANT INTRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsenko L. V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses agro-botanical illustration of hand fans painting as an independent resource of visual information on the history of culture of introduction, distribution, species diversity and plant breeding. We have reviewed the history of the fan and the causes of widespread of fans and the respective painting plants. The article shows the different trends in the filing of a visual image in the fan art: from accurate, detailed drawing of the image, until smooth, blurred contours, made in the "boneless" or "acyclic" technique. On the example of pumpkins, lagenaria, soybeans, corn, flowers, namely asters and peonies we have shown various aspects of breeding and agronomic work for several centuries. The article uses the method of visual analysis as a tool for collection and analysis of data on breeding and introduction of a number of crops on the example of specific crops, particularly soybeans. The analysis includes a description of morphotypes, area of origin, distribution, physiology, individual characteristics, and insects found in the ecological niche. It is noted that visual analysis can be successfully applied in the study of varietal diversity of a number of flower crops: asters, peonies, chrysanthemums, and some fruits and vegetables

  11. Use of botanical extracts, cassava wastewater and nematicide for the control of root-knot nematode on carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Lopes Baldin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous extracts of several plant species have shown promising in controlling root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid & White, one of the most limiting agents for carrot cultivation. The current study evaluated the effect of aqueous extracts from seven botanical species applied to 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 days after sowing 'Nantes' carrots in soil infested with root-knot nematode. Three other treatments included cassava wastewater, distilled water (control, which were applied in the same periods of the extracts application, in addition to carbofuran 50G (80Kg/ha, which was applied once at 60 days after carrot sowing. Evaluations were performed at 90 days after inoculation to determine shoot and root fresh weight, as well as the diameter and the length of principal roots and the number of galls on primary and secondary roots. Plants treated with cassava wastewater, extracts of Ricinus communis L. seeds, Crotalaria juncea L. seeds, R. communis leaves + branches + fruits, Chenopodium ambrosioides L. leaves + branches + inflorescences and Azadirachta indica A. Juss. seeds showed the highest rates of total weight (root + shoot and shoot weight. The extract of R. communis leaves + branches + fruits provides the highest total root weight and principal root diameter. Cassava wastewater and extracts of R. communis seeds provided the highest principal root weight. The extract of R. communis seeds and cassava wastewater can be considered promising for the alternative control of M. incognita.

  12. A comprehensive platform for quality control of botanical drugs (PhytomicsQC: a case study of Huangqin Tang (HQT and PHY906

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilton Robert

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing botanical extracts as globally-accepted polychemical medicines and a new paradigm for disease treatment, requires the development of high-level quality control metrics. Based on comprehensive chemical and biological fingerprints correlated with pharmacology, we propose a general approach called PhytomicsQC to botanical quality control. Methods Incorporating the state-of-the-art analytical methodologies, PhytomicsQC was employed in this study and included the use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS for chemical characterization and chemical fingerprinting, differential cellular gene expression for bioresponse fingerprinting and animal pharmacology for in vivo validation. A statistical pattern comparison method, Phytomics Similarity Index (PSI, based on intensities and intensity ratios, was used to determine the similarity of the chemical and bioresponse fingerprints among different manufactured batches. Results Eighteen batch samples of Huangqin Tang (HQT and its pharmaceutical grade version (PHY906 were analyzed using the PhytomicsQC platform analysis. Comparative analysis of the batch samples with a clinically tested standardized batch obtained values of PSI similarity between 0.67 and 0.99. Conclusion With rigorous quality control using analytically sensitive and comprehensive chemical and biological fingerprinting, botanical formulations manufactured under standardized manufacturing protocols can produce highly consistent batches of products.

  13. Skin Whitening and Anti-aging Effect of Fine Hydro-gel Cream Formulation with Botanical Oil Complex Using PIT Emulsifying System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Dae Cho1

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was to get unique formulation of multi-functional activity for preparing hydro-gel cream using PIT emulsifying system. In order to develop the good safety, adsorption and multi-functions, we made a new formulation using phase inversion temperature (PIT containing 4 botanical oils such as camellia japonica seed oil, macadamia integrifolia seed oil, limnanthes alba (meadowfoam seed oil, argania spinosa kernel oil, 0.04wt% of adenosine and 2wt% of niacinamide. The fine botanical nutritive emulsion using PIT emulsifying method is easy absorbed into the stratum corneum because of fine droplet size. Appearance was high concentrated bluish liquid ulation was very safety to protect on the skin, major droplet was mean 105nm containing 20wt% of PIT botanical complex. And also, there are fine wrinkle improvement and whitening effect containing. Skin in-vivo evaluations carried out the efficacy and functions of hydro-gel cream such as moisturizing effect, TEWL, fine wrinkle improvement and whitening activity. This hydro-gel cream is to find an optimum way to enhance the strengthening effect on skin barrier functions of cosmetic formulations.

  14. Evaluation of honeys and bee products quality based on their mineral composition using multivariate techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembecka, Małgorzata; Szefer, Piotr

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to estimate honeys and bee products quality in view of their mineral composition using multivariate techniques. Fourteen elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb) were determined in 66 honeys and bee products from different places of Poland and Europe and various botanical origins. The total metals contents were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry using deuterium-background correction after wet digestion with nitric acid in an automatic microwave digestion system. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by a spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by analysis of the certified reference materials tea (NCS DC 73351) and cabbage (IAEA-359). The analytical data indicated a good level of quality of honeys, especially with regard to the concentration of toxic trace elements, such as Cd and Pb. Results were submitted to multivariate analysis, including such techniques as factor and cluster analyses in order to evaluate the existence of data patterns and the possibility of classification of honeys from different botanical origins according to their mineral content. The nine metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. There was a significant influence of the botanical and geographical provenance as well as technological processing on the elemental composition of honeys. PMID:22930187

  15. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Govasmark, E;

    2013-01-01

    time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long......-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Within ORG farms, SG farms differed from LG farms in herbage botanical composition, but not in concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, or milk yield. Within CON farms, herbage composition......, concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, and milk yield showed no or insignificant variations. The ORG farms differed from CON farms in herbage botanical composition, concentrate FA concentrations, concentrate intake, and milk yield. Compared with ORG-LG farms, ORG-SG farms produced milk fat with...

  16. Identification of Potential Plants Producing Tannin-protein Complex for a-amylase as Botanical Pesticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asriyah Firdausi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research  on  the  development  of  botanical  pesticides  should  be developed  through  new  methods,  such  as  by  inhibiting the  activity  of  digestive enzymes  by  secondary  metabolites.  The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  identify some  of  potential  plants  as  a  source  of  tannin-protein  complexes  to  inhibitthe  activity  of  - amylase.  The  study  of  identification  of  potential  plants producing  the  active  ingredient  tannin-protein  complex  was  divided  into  three stages,  1  identification  of  potential  plants  producing  tannin,  2  isolation  of tannin-protein  complexes,  and  3  in  vitro  test  of  tannin-protein  complexes effect  of  the  -amylase activity.  Some  of  the observed  plants  were  sidaguri  leaf (Sida rhombifolia, melinjo leaf (Gnetum gnemon, gamal leaf (Gliricidia sepium,lamtoro  leaf  (Leucaena  leucocephala ,  betel  nut  (Areca  catechu ,  and  crude gambier  (Uncaria  gambir a s  a  source of  tannins  and  melinjo  seed was  used  asprotein  source.  Betel  nut  and  melinjo  seed  were  the  best  source  of  tannin-protein  complex,  tannin  content  1.77  mg  TAE/mL  with  antioxidant  activity  of  90%,the  ability  to  inhibit  the  activity  of  -amylase by  95%  with  IC 50  values  of 10 mg/mL.Key words: Tannin, protein, -amylase, botanical pesticides,Areca catechu, Gnetum gnemon.

  17. Fossil wood from the upper Miocene Mpesida Beds at Cheparain (Baringo District, Kenya): Botanical affinities and palaeoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, Dario; Bamford, Marion; Pickford, Martin; Senut, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Seven wood samples from a petrified forest, in situ in ash flow deposits at Cheparain in the Tugen Hills (Kenya) in the Mpesida Beds, were discovered and studied. The age of the Mpesida Formation is estimated to be about 6.3 Ma on the basis of radio-isotope age determinations on the volcanic deposits, which overlie and underlie the sedimentary levels. The wood samples are mineralized with obvious sectors of differential mineralization, and different degrees of silica impregnation. All samples show heteroxylous structures corresponding to angiosperm dicotyledon trees. One sample consists in a half cylinder showing a well preserved mineralized structure of heteroxylous wood and probably corresponds to a fragment of root. This wood, with solitary (or in radial group) vessels, heterocellular multiseriate rays, paratracheal parenchyma in wide bands, and partly storied fusiform cells, clearly shows affinities with the genus Erythrina (Fabaceae). A slightly compressed branch, partly disturbed by injuries and highly mineralized shows solitary (or in short radial group) vessels, the rays uni-(bi) seriate are heterocellular, and the apotracheal parenchyma is in thin tangential bands. The closest affinities are with the genus Spirostachys (Euphorbiaceae). The other structures are poorly preserved (highly mineralized) and precise botanical affinities cannot be accessed. But the growth rings are distinct or diversely marked and the samples show semi-ring porous structures. They exhibit two different patterns. The growth rings reveal the presence of seasonal climate, and numerous injuries, a disturbance of the vegetation by animals and/or strong climatic events. Erythrina and Spirostachys are present in the extant vegetation of the Tana River Valley, in Kenya, which could represent a modern analogue for the vegetation of the Mpesida Beds prior to the major uplift of the Tugen Hills at the end of the Miocene.

  18. Protective effects of alisol B 23-acetate from edible botanical Rhizoma alismatis against carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiang; Chen, Xinli; Wang, Changyuan; Liu, Qi; Sun, Huijun; Sun, Pengyuan; Huo, Xiaokui; Liu, Zhihao; Liu, Kexin

    2015-04-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatotoxicity is a common syndrome with simultaneous severe hepatocyte death and acute cholestasis. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the hepatoprotective effect of alisol B 23-acetate (AB23A), a natural triterpenoid from edible botanical Rhizoma alismatis, on acute hepatotoxicity induced by CCl4 in mice, and further to elucidate the involvement of farnesoid X receptor (FXR), signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) in the hepatoprotective effect. H&E staining, BrdU immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay were used to identify the amelioration of histopathological changes, hepatocyte proliferation and apoptosis. Real-time PCR and western blot assay were used to elucidate the mechanisms underlying AB23A hepatoprotection. The results indicated that AB23A treatment in a dose-dependent manner resulted in protection against hepatotoxicity induced by CCl4via FXR activation. Through FXR activation, AB23A promoted hepatocyte proliferation via an induction in hepatic levels of FoxM1b, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin B1. AB23A also reduced hepatic bile acids through a decrease in hepatic uptake transporter Ntcp, bile acid synthetic enzymes Cyp7a1, Cyp8b1, and an increase in efflux transporter Bsep, Mrp2 expression. In addition, AB23A induced the expression of STAT3 phosphorylation, and STAT3 target genes Bcl-xl and SOCS3, resulting in decreased hepatocyte apoptosis. In conclusion, AB23A produces a protective effect against CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, due to FXR and STAT3-mediated gene regulation. PMID:25747392

  19. Liposomes containing cholesterol analogues of botanical origin as drug delivery systems to enhance the oral absorption of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng; Wu, Wei; Hovgaard, Lars; Lu, Yi; Chen, Dawei; Qi, Jianping

    2015-07-15

    In fear of animal-associated diseases, there is a trend in searching for non-animal derived substitutes for existing excipients in the pharmaceutical industries. This paper aimed to screen cholesterol analogues as membrane stabilizers of liposomes from botanical sterols, including β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ergosterol and lanosterol. Liposomes containing four kinds of sterols were prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo as oral delivery system of insulin. Liposomes containing β-sitosterol (Si-Lip), stigmasterol (St-Lip) and lanosterol (La-Lip) was found not to protect insulin against degradation. Only 10% of the initial insulin in liposomes was preserved after a 30 min exposure to simulated gastric fluids. However, the protective ability of liposomes containing ergosterol (Er-Lip) was similar to that of liposomes containing sodium glycocholate (Sgc-Lip) and superior to that of liposomes containing cholesterol (Ch-Lip). In addition, the blood glucose level can decrease to about 50% of initial level after oral Er-Lip which was significantly superior to the in vivo performance of Si-Lip and Ch-Lip and similar to Sgc-Lip. Er-Lips of ergosterol/phospholipids ratios of 1:4 or 1:6 exerts more pronounced protective ability of insulin in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and hypoglycemic effects in rats than other formulations. Furthermore, Er-Lips exerted low toxicity to Caco-2 cells through a cell viability study. Meahwhile, insulin permeability was significantly increased across Caco-2 monolayers by encapsulating in Er-Lip. It was concluded that ergosterol could be used as a substitute for cholesterol and bile salt derivatives in liposomes to enhance oral bioavailability of insulin. PMID:25957702

  20. [History of Polish botanical and mycological researches on sheets of land of Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic in the years 1977-2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Piotr; Olech, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The work includes a description of the period from the moment of setting up Polish Polar Station on King George Island (1977) to the end of International Polar Year IV in 2009. Researches on flower plants focused, among others, on plants' morphology, morphological composition of the pollen and anatomical ultra-structure of the leaves. There were also carried out biochemical and other searches for the internal mutability. Within physiological studies one concentrated on the problem of reaction to temperature stress. Biological researches focused mainly on solving taxonomic and bio-geographic problems. Finally, were published several monographs and, among others, the first in history complete description of moss' flora of the whole of Antarctic (2008). Research works over algae included also such issues as floristics, bio-geography, taxonomy and ecology (for instance, the rookery's impact on distribution of algae, or the influence of inanimate factors on dynamics of condensing the Diatoma in different water and soil-bound tanks). Up till now, within mycological investigations has been identified a variety of lichen fungi that for the most part of Antarctic are a novelty. There were scientifically described new for science genera and species of Western Antarctic. Lichenological studies were made in the field of taxonomy, geography, lichenometry, biochemistry of lichens, lichenoindication, ecophysiology and from the point of analysis of base metals' content. There were also described new for science species. Since 1991, were published the results of searches for the base metals' content and vestigial chemical elements in lichens' thallus. Ecophysiological researches concerned both micro-climatic conditions' impact on primary production and lichens' adaptation to a very cold climate. One discovered a mechanism of two-phase hydratization/dehydratization of lichens' thallus. On the ground of palaeobotanical analyzes was reconstructed a development of flora in Western

  1. Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    This book deals with the mechanical and physical behavior of composites as influenced by composite geometry. "Composite Materials" provides a comprehensive introduction for researchers and students to modern composite materials research with a special emphasis on the significance of phase geometry....... The book enables the reader to a better understanding of the behavior of natural composites, improvement of such materials, and design of new materials with prescribed properties. A number of examples are presented: Special composite properties considered are stiffness, shrinkage, hygro...

  2. A solid-phase extraction procedure coupled to 1H NMR, with chemometric analysis, to seek reliable markers of the botanical origin of honey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to establish an analytical method for identifying the botanical origin of honey, as an alternative to conventional melissopalynological, organoleptic and instrumental methods (gas-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high-performance liquid chromatography HPLC). The procedure is based on the 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profile coupled, when necessary, with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and two-dimensional NMR analyses of solid-phase extraction (SPE)-purified honey samples, followed by chemometric analyses. Extracts of 44 commercial Italian honeys from 20 different botanical sources were analyzed. Honeydew, chestnut and linden honeys showed constant, specific, well-resolved resonances, suitable for use as markers of origin. Honeydew honey contained the typical resonances of an aliphatic component, very likely deriving from the plant phloem sap or excreted into it by sap-sucking aphids. Chestnut honey contained the typical signals of kynurenic acid and some structurally related metabolite. In linden honey the 1H NMR profile gave strong signals attributable to the mono-terpene derivative cyclohexa-1,3-diene-1-carboxylic acid (CDCA) and to its 1-O-β-gentiobiosyl ester (CDCA-GBE). These markers were not detectable in the other honeys, except for the less common nectar honey from rosa mosqueta. We compared and analyzed the data by multivariate techniques. Principal component analysis found different clusters of honeys based on the presence of these specific markers. The results, although obviously only preliminary, suggest that the 1H NMR profile (with HPLC-MS analysis when necessary) can be used as a reference framework for identifying the botanical origin of honey

  3. Determination of Aflatoxins in Botanical Roots by a Modification of AOAC Official MethodSM 991.31: Single-Laboratory Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Carol M.; Trucksess, Mary W.

    2010-01-01

    AOAC Official MethodSM 991.31 for the determination of aflatoxins (AFs; sum of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2) in corn, raw peanuts, and peanut butter by using immunoaffinity column cleanup with LC has been modified and applied to the determination of AFs in botanical roots. The modifications were necessary to improve the performance of the method for matrixes beyond corn and peanuts. The extraction solvent was changed from a mixture of methanol and water to acetonitrile and water. The accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility characteristics of this method were determined. Replicates of 10 test portions of each powdered root (black cohosh, echinacea, ginger, ginseng, kava kava, and valerian) at each spiking level (AFs at 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 ng/g) were analyzed on 3 separate days. Test portions were extracted with acetonitrile–water (84 + 16, v/v), and the extracts were centrifuged, diluted with phosphate-buffered saline, filtered, and applied to an immunoaffinity column containing antibodies specific for AFs. After the column was washed with water, the toxins were eluted from the column with methanol and quantified by HPLC with fluorescence detection. All test materials except kava kava were found to contain AF at <0.1 ng/g. Kava kava was naturally contaminated with AFs at 0.5 ng/g. Average within-day and between-days recoveries of AFs from botanical roots ranged from 88 to 112 and from 86 to 118%, respectively. Total RSD values for within-day and between-days repeatability ranged from 1.4 to 15.9%. HorRat values were <0.4 for all of the matrixes examined. The modified AOAC Official Method 991.31 was found to be applicable to an analysis of the six botanical roots. PMID:20334179

  4. A solid-phase extraction procedure coupled to {sup 1}H NMR, with chemometric analysis, to seek reliable markers of the botanical origin of honey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beretta, Giangiacomo [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica ' Pietro Pratesi' , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 25, 20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: giangiacomo.beretta@unimi.it; Caneva, Enrico [Ciga - Centro Interdipartimentale Grandi Apparecchiature, University of Milan, via Golgi 19, 20133 Milan (Italy); Regazzoni, Luca; Bakhtyari, Nazanin Golbamaki; Maffei Facino, Roberto [Istituto di Chimica Farmaceutica e Tossicologica ' Pietro Pratesi' , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Milan, via Mangiagalli 25, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2008-07-14

    The aim of this work was to establish an analytical method for identifying the botanical origin of honey, as an alternative to conventional melissopalynological, organoleptic and instrumental methods (gas-chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), high-performance liquid chromatography HPLC). The procedure is based on the {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) profile coupled, when necessary, with electrospray ionisation-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and two-dimensional NMR analyses of solid-phase extraction (SPE)-purified honey samples, followed by chemometric analyses. Extracts of 44 commercial Italian honeys from 20 different botanical sources were analyzed. Honeydew, chestnut and linden honeys showed constant, specific, well-resolved resonances, suitable for use as markers of origin. Honeydew honey contained the typical resonances of an aliphatic component, very likely deriving from the plant phloem sap or excreted into it by sap-sucking aphids. Chestnut honey contained the typical signals of kynurenic acid and some structurally related metabolite. In linden honey the {sup 1}H NMR profile gave strong signals attributable to the mono-terpene derivative cyclohexa-1,3-diene-1-carboxylic acid (CDCA) and to its 1-O-{beta}-gentiobiosyl ester (CDCA-GBE). These markers were not detectable in the other honeys, except for the less common nectar honey from rosa mosqueta. We compared and analyzed the data by multivariate techniques. Principal component analysis found different clusters of honeys based on the presence of these specific markers. The results, although obviously only preliminary, suggest that the {sup 1}H NMR profile (with HPLC-MS analysis when necessary) can be used as a reference framework for identifying the botanical origin of honey.

  5. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeill John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  6. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  7. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon. PMID:21917189

  8. Control of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) with botanical insecticides and mineral oils

    OpenAIRE

    Flávio Neves Celestino; Dirceu Pratissoli; Lorena Contarini Machado; Hugo José Gonçalves dos Santos Junior; Vagner Tebaldi de Queiroz; Leonardo Mardgan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate botanical oils, mineral oils and an insecticide that contained azadirachtin (ICA) for the control of Hypothenemus hampei, in addition to the effects of residual castor oil. We evaluated the effectiveness of the vegetable oils of canola, sunflower, corn, soybean and castor, two mineral oils (assist® and naturol®), and the ICA for the control of H. hampei. The compounds were tested at a concentration of 3.0% (v v-1). The median lethal concentration (L...

  9. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina, Willow Bark (Salix alba, and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shakibaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina, willow bark (Salix alba, and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG, β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was examined by western blotting. Results. The botanical extracts suppressed IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, p65 phosphorylation, and p65 nuclear translocation. These events correlated with downregulation of NF-κB targets including COX-2 and MMPs. The extracts also reversed the IL-1β-induced downregulation of collagen type II, CSPG, β1-integrin, and cartilage-specific transcription factor SOX-9 protein expression. In high-density cultures botanical extracts stimulated new cartilage formation even in the presence of IL-1β. Conclusions. Botanical extracts exerted anti-inflammatory and anabolic effects on chondrocytes. The observed reduction of IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation suggests that further studies are warranted to demonstrate the effectiveness of plant extracts in the treatment of OA and other conditions in which NF-κB plays pathophysiological roles.

  10. Seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and soil profile CO2 concentrations in arboretum of Moscow botanical garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Olga; Udovenko, Maria; Matyshak, Georgy

    2016-04-01

    To analyse and predict recent and future climate change on a global scale exchange processes of greenhouse gases - primarily carbon dioxide - over various ecosystems are of rising interest. In order to upscale land-use dependent sources and sinks of CO2, knowledge of the local variability of carbon fluxes is needed. Among terrestrial ecosystems, urban areas play an important role because most of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide originate from these areas. On the other hand, urban soils have the potential to store large amounts of soil organic carbon and, thus, contribute to mitigating increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Research objectives: 1) estimate the seasonal dynamics of carbon dioxide production (emission - closed chamber technique and profile concentration - soil air sampling tubes method) by soils of Moscow State University Botanical Garden Arboretum planted with Picea obovata and Pinus sylvestris, 1) identification the factors that control CO2 production. The study was conducted with 1-2 weeks intervals between October 2013 and November 2015 at two sites. Carbon dioxide soil surface efflux during the year ranged from 0 to 800 mgCO2/(m2hr). Efflux values above 0 mgCO2/(m2hr) was observed during the all cold period except for only 3 weeks. Soil CO2 concentration ranged from 1600-3000 ppm in upper 10-cm layer to 10000-40000 ppm at a depth of 60 cm. The maximum concentrations of CO2 were recorded in late winter and late summer. We associate it with high biological activity (both heterotrophic and autotrophic) during the summer, and with physical gas jamming in the winter. The high value of annual CO2 production of the studied soils is caused by high organic matter content, slightly alkaline reaction, good structure and texture of urban soils. Differences in soil CO2 production by spruce and pine urban forest soils (in the pine forest 1.5-2.0 times higher) are caused by urban soil profiles construction, but not temperature regimes. Seasonal

  11. Evaluation of the botanical origin of commercial dry bee pollen load batches using pollen analysis: a proposal for technical standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud M. Barth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available High quality of bee pollen for commercial purpose is required. In order to attend the consumer with the best identification of the botanical and floral origin of the product, 25 bee pollen batches were investigated using two techniques of pollen grain preparation. The first started to identify pollen loads of different colors in two grams of each well mixed batch, and the second to identify pollen grains in a pool made of all the pollen loads comprised in two grams. The best result was obtained by this last technique, when a pollen grain suspension was dropped on a microscope slide and circa 500 pollen grains were counted per sample. This analysis resulted in the recognition of monofloral and bifloral pollen batches, while the use of the first technique resulted in all samples receiving a heterofloral diagnosis.É exigida alta qualidade para a comercialização de pólen apícola. A fim de atender o consumidor com a melhor identificação da origem botânica e floral do produto, 25 partidas de pólen apícola feram investigadas usande duas diferentes técnicas na preparação dos grãos de pólen. A primeira partiu da identificação das cargas polínicas contidas em dois gramas de cada partida bem misturada segundo suas cores. A segunda visava identificar os grãos de pólen de um agrupamento ("pool" de todas as cargas polínicas contidas em dois gramas de cada amostra. O melhor resultado foi obtido pela última técnica, quando uma suspensão de grãos de pólen era gotejada sobre uma lâmina de microscopia e cerca de 500 grãos de pólen eram centades por amostra. Esta análise resultou no reconhecimento de partidas monoflorais e biflorais de pólen apícola, enquanto que usando a primeira técnica, todas as amostras receberam a diagnose heterefloral.

  12. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available THE OLDEST SCIENTIFIC NAME FOR THE CINNAMON TREECinnamomum zeylanicum BL, 1826, has been currently considered tobe the proper name for the common cinnamon tree. This name was alreadyin use during the pre-Linnean period (cf. Kostermans, Bibliogr. Laur. 364.1964.The oldest valid name, however, is Cinnamomum verum J.S. Presl,1825, This is not a pharmaceutical name, as is evident from the referencescited by Presl and by the treatment of other species. For complete refe-rences cf. Kostermans, Bibl. Laur. 360, 1964.

  13. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES 4 )

    OpenAIRE

    A. J. G. H. KOSTERMANS

    2015-01-01

    THE OLDEST SCIENTIFIC NAME FOR THE CINNAMON TREECinnamomum zeylanicum BL, 1826, has been currently considered tobe the proper name for the common cinnamon tree. This name was alreadyin use during the pre-Linnean period (cf. Kostermans, Bibliogr. Laur. 364.1964).The oldest valid name, however, is Cinnamomum verum J.S. Presl,1825, This is not a pharmaceutical name, as is evident from the referencescited by Presl and by the treatment of other species. For complete refe-rences cf. Kostermans, Bib...

  14. Cholinesterase inhibitors from botanicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiyaz Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer′s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, wherein a progressive loss of cholinergic synapses occurs in hippocampus and neocortex. Decreased concentration of the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh, appears to be critical element in the development of dementia, and the most appropriate therapeutic approach to treat AD and other form of dementia is to restore acetylcholine levels by inhibiting both major form of cholinesterase: Acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE. Consequently, researches have focused their attention towards finding cholinesterase inhibitors from natural products. A large number of such inhibitors have been isolated from medicinal plants. This review presents a comprehensive account of the advances in field of cholinesterase inhibitor phytoconstituents. The structures of some important phytoconstituents (collected through www.Chemspider.com are also presented and the scope for future research is discussed.

  15. Our botanical heritage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stafleu, Frans A.

    1985-01-01

    On 31 May 1938 our predecessor professor Pulle delivered an address on the ”stocktaking of the heritage of our forefathers” on the occasion of the opening of the enlarged and reorganized Laboratory of special Botany and Plant Geography” of the University of Utrecht. The ”renewal” had been radical: a

  16. CAS Botanical Gardens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ China is a large country with rich plant resources. Because of its unique geographical position, on its 9,600,000 km2 of territory are found about 30,000 species of higher plants, accounting for 10% of the world's flora species and ranking the country third in the world in abundance of plant species.

  17. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES XXVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. G. J. VAN STEENIS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pertelaan polong dan pohon tipe Ormosia incerta Koord. (yang direduksi ke O. penangensis Ridl. dari Jawa diberikan. Trifidacanthus Merr. direduksi menjadi Desmodium dan suatu kombinasi baru diusulkan. Platyspermation Guillaumin, semula dimasukkan dalam Myrtaeeae, dipindah ke Saxifragaceae. Juncus bufonius L. direkam sebagai pendatang di G. Kinabalu. Dua Fimbristylis direkam dari Australia Utara dan Oreobolus kiikenthalii Steen.  direkam   dari  G.   Mulu   (Sarawak.

  18. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES XXVI

    OpenAIRE

    C. G. G. J van Steenis; J. F. VELDKAMP

    2014-01-01

    Pertelaan polong dan pohon tipe Ormosia incerta Koord. (yang direduksi ke O. penangensis Ridl.) dari Jawa diberikan. Trifidacanthus Merr. direduksi menjadi Desmodium dan suatu kombinasi baru diusulkan. Platyspermation Guillaumin, semula dimasukkan dalam Myrtaeeae, dipindah ke Saxifragaceae. Juncus bufonius L. direkam sebagai pendatang di G. Kinabalu. Dua Fimbristylis direkam dari Australia Utara dan Oreobolus kiikenthalii Steen.  direkam   dari  G.   Mulu   (Sarawak).

  19. Botanicals as Mosquito Larvicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Nath,

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Methanol extracts of 19 indigenous plants were evaluated as mosquito larvicide. Amongthese, pericarp of Zanthoxylum limonella was found to have the most promising larvicidalproperties against Aedes(s albopictus and Culex quinquefasciatus with LC90 values at 0.47 ppmand 0.73 ppm, respectively. The extract of Piper nigrum was also found very effective (LC90on the larvae of both the species at 6.8 ppm and 8.4 ppm, respectively. The extracts of theremaining plant parts showed LC90 values at above 100 ppm concentration. Extract of Calotropisgigantea was found to be the least effective ( LC90 values at 962.8 ppm and 1091.8 ppm againstthe larvae of both the species. However, plant extracts were found more effective against Aedes(salbopictus larvae than against Culex quinquefasciatus larvae.

  20. MISCELLANEOUS BOTANICAL NOTES 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.J.G.H KOSTERMANS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 1.   Durio  cupreus Ridley is considered to  represent a  distinct  species.2.   Durio wyatt-smithii Kosterm. is reported from Borneo.3.   Machilus nervosa Merr. represents Meliosma bontoeensis Merr.4.   Beilschmiedia brassii Allen represents Vavaea brassii (Allen Kosterm.5.   The author of the generic name Heritiera is Aiton.6.   Heritiera macrophylla (non Wall. Merr. is conspecific with H. ungus-tata Pierre.7.   Some specimens from N. Celebes, attributed formerly to H. sylvatica Merr., belong to H. arafurensis Kosterm.8.   Additional note on Heritiera littoralis Ait. and H. macrophylla Wall, ex Kurz.9.   Heritiera   montana   Kosterm.,   nov.   spec,   from   New   Guinea   and H. khidii Kosterm., nov. spec, from Northern Siam.10.   Additional note on Heritiera, novoguineensis Kosterm. and H. pereo-riacea Kosterm. and an undescribed species.11.   Heritiera acuminata Wall, ex Kurz represents a distinct species.12.   Heritiera  solomonensis  Kosterm.,  nov.  spec,  from the  Solomon  Isl.13.   A note on Firmiana bracteata A. DC.14.   Firmiana fulgens (Wall, ex King  Corner is based on a mixtum com-positum and has been the source of constant confusion. For the element, which occurs in Malaysia a new name is coined: F. malayana Kosterm. It does not occur in Tenasserim.15.   A revised bibliography of Firmiana colorata R. Br., F. pallens Stearn and F. malayana Kosterm. is presented.16.   Additional note on Firmiana hainanensis Kosterm.17.   Firmiana kerrii (Craib Kosterm., comb, nov., based on Sterculia kerrii Craib.18.   Additional specimens of Firmiana papuana Mildbr.19.   Cryptocarya hintonii Allen is referred to Primus as Primus hintonii (Allen  Kosterm.20.   Beilschmiedia wallichiana (G. Don   Kosterm., based on Sideroxylon wallichianum, G. Don, is described. Formerly it was relegated to Litsea by Kurz.21.   New species in Lauraceae: Beilschmiedia aborensis Kosterm., B. ele-gantissima Kosterm., B. lanatella Kosterm., Persea pomifera Kosterm., Ocotea scandens Kosterm. and Actinodaphne auricolor Kosterm,

  1. Miscellaneous botanical notes XXV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenis, van C.G.G.J.

    1978-01-01

    Though Sambucus javanica Reinw. ex Bl. ranges widely from Japan to China and through the SE. Asian countries to Malesia as far as the Philippines, Celebes, and Lombok, it was in 1951 not collected in the Malay Peninsula, the Moluccas, and New Guinea. Cf. Fl. Males. 1, 4 (1951) 191. This is rather su

  2. The evaluation of the state of grass species composition in some degraded tribal areas in the Zeerust district / Ntombi Elizabeth Mkhosi

    OpenAIRE

    Mkhosi, Ntombi Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation of the state of grass species composition was conducted as an attempt to confirm the survey conducted by the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD), where the Zeerust District was identified as an area with serious degradation problems. Quantitative data was obtained through botanical surveys (April 2001-February 2002) and verified by household surveys (March 2001-April 2002). Study sites included Braklaagte, Dinokana, Doomlaagte, Serake and ...

  3. 现代城市观光植物园规划的研究——以池州市植物园规划为例%Study on Modern City Tour Botanical Garden——Chizhou Botanical Garden as An Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵佳坤; 黄成林; 刘地

    2012-01-01

    Along with the in-depth urbanizing construction, the need of returning back nature is more valued by people. Modern city tour botanical garden has become a city symbol of spiritual civilization. This article started a brief introduction about the classification, function recognition based on the botanical garden at home and abroad, Took Chizhou botanical garden as the researching object. In the aspect of the function subarea, the garden was divided to 4 functional areas: plants specific area, characteristic plants area, greenhouse exhibition area, leisure area. Based on the principle of unification of scientific and artistic, various plants were arranged to construct the artificial plant community, which has abundant species and graceful garden landscape. By the analysis of Chizhou botanical garden, in hopes of that could take a part in the construction of those new city tour botanical gardens.%随着城市化建设的不断深入,人们对回归自然的要求越来越迫切。现代城市观光植物园已经成为一个城市精神文明建设的象征。笔者对国内外植物园的分类依据、功能定位做简单介绍,以池州市植物园为例,将其划分为植物专类园区、特色植物区、温室展览区、休闲区等4个部分,按照科学性与艺术性相统一的原则,构建了景色优美、物种丰富的人工森林植被群落。通过对池州市植物园规划的分析,可对新建的城市观光植物园建设起到一定的借鉴作用。

  4. Alzheimer's disease: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical, nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies, with a discussion of treatment strategies from the perspective of patients and practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollen, Keith A

    2010-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dysfunctional intracellular and extracellular biochemical processes that result in neuron death. This article summarizes hypotheses regarding cell dysfunction in AD and discusses the effectiveness of, and problems with, different therapies. Pharmaceutical therapies discussed include cholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, antihypertensive drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, secretase inhibitors, insulin resistance drugs, etanercept, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and immunization. Nutritional and botanical therapies included are huperzine A, polyphenols, Ginkgo, Panax ginseng, Withania somnifera, phosphatidylserine, alpha-lipoic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, acetyl L-carnitine, coenzyme Q10, various vitamins and minerals, and melatonin. Stimulatory therapies discussed are physical exercise, cognitive training, music, and socialization. Finally, treatment strategies are discussed in light of the benefits and drawbacks of different therapeutic approaches. It is concluded that potential risks of both approved and non-approved therapies should be weighed against the potential benefits and certain consequences of disease progression. Approaches that target several dysfunctions simultaneously and that emphasize nutritional, botanical, and stimulatory therapies may offer the most benefit at this time. PMID:21155625

  5. The Joint Action of Destruxins and Botanical Insecticides (Rotenone, Azadirachtin and Paeonolum Against the Cotton Aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The joint action of destruxins and three botanical insecticides, rotenone (Rot, azadirachtin (Aza and paeonolum (Pae against the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii, was bioassayed. In laboratory experiment, several synergistic groups of destruxins with botanical insecticides were found by means of Sun’s Co-toxicity Coefficients (CTC and Finney’s Synergistic Coefficient (SC. The best synergistic effect was discovered in the ratio group Des/Rot 1/9 with the CTC or SC and LC50 values of 479.93 or 4.8 and 0.06 μg/mL, respectively. The second and third synergistic effects were recorded in the ratio groups Des/Rot 7/3 and 9/1. Although the ratio groups Des/Aza 6/4, Des/Pae 4/6, 3/7 and 2/8 indicated synergism by Sun’s CTC, they were determined as additive actions by Finney’s SC. Additive actions were also found in most of the ratio groups, but antagonism were recorded only in three ratio groups: Des/Pae 9/1, 7/3 and 6/4. In greenhouse tests, the highest mortality was 98.9% with the treatment Des/Rot 1/9 at 0.60 μg/mL, meanwhile, the treatments Des/Pae 4/6 and Des/Aza 6/4 had approximately 88% mortality.

  6. 辰山植物园景观特色分析%Investigation and Research of Chenshan Botanical Garden Landscape Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振玲; 吴秀臣; 芦建国

    2015-01-01

    从生态恢复、园林风貌、植物特色、文化特色、科普教育5个方面对辰山植物园景观进行分析。结果表明,辰山植物园以海派园林为主,江南园林为辅并展现出时间序列景观;植物选择突出珍稀濒危物种及地域特色;中西文化相结合,景观新颖别致;在生态恢复上突出保育区就地保护、增加生物多样性。%Chenshan Botanical Garden is a modern garden with outstand characters.Ecological recovery highlighted in situ protection, increase biodiversity in conservation area,and highly artificial ecological restoration in wetland plant species-divided gardens,and ec-ological revetment of east lake in east China area.Garden landscape is Shanghai-based garden,supplemented by southern garden and shows the time series.Plant selection highlight of rare and endangered species and geographical features;Combination of Chinese and western culture lead to elegant landscape.Entertaining on science.Through the above five aspects to analyze and reviewe the features of Chen shan botanical garden landscape construction.

  7. Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperioidea visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Barros de Morais

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban environments, such as parks and gardens, may offer many alimentary resources, besides shelter and favorable conditions, for butterfly survival. This study aimed to make an inventory of butterflies visiting flowers in the Botanical Garden of the Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM. From March 2006 to March 2007, the floral visitors were observed weekly for 2h. After 108 hours’ observations, 1114 visits by 39 butterfly species, associated with 43 plant species (21 families, were confirmed. Among the butterflies, Nymphalidae had the highest richness of species (S= 18, followed by Hesperiidae (S= 8, Pieridae (S= 7, Papilionidae (S= 4 and Lycaenidae (S= 2. The pierid Phoebis philea philea was the most frequent species (188 visits, followed by hesperiids Urbanus proteus proteus (100, U. teleus (73 and the nymphalid Heliconius erato phyllis (71. Lantana camara (Verbenaceae, Eupatorium laevigatum (Asteraceae, Russelia equisetiformis (Scrophulariaceae and Stachytarpheta cayennensis (Verbenaceae were the most visited plants. The Botanical Garden of UFSM is an example of an urban park that seems to provide floral resources for the feeding of many butterfly species, being also a potential refuge for species from forest areas nearby.

  8. The handling of the proposal to conserve the name Acacia at the 17th International Botanical Congress—an attempt at minority rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Moore

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The handling of controversial Proposal 1584 to conserve the name Acacia with a conserved type for the Australian acacias during the Nomenclature Section meeting at the 17th International Botanical Congress (Vienna in 2005 is reviewed. Through a simple majority vote, this Section adopted rules requiring a 60% majority of votes to approve any proposal to modify the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature and a simple majority to approve all other motions; motions not receiving the required majority were to be rejected. However, for the motion addressing Proposal 1584, 45.1% voted to conserve the type of the name Acacia for Australian acacias, and 54.9% voted to retain the current African type for the name Acacia. Even though this motion failed to get a 60% majority either way as required by the Section’s own rules, Section officials have concluded that the name Acacia is to be conserved for Australian acacias. Treating a motion as approved, even though it received only minority support, also violates the fundamental principle of standard parliamentary procedure—the right of the majority to approve proposals. For Acacia to be formally conserved, the Nomenclature Section needed to approve a motion addressing Proposal 1584 with a majority vote, and this never happened in Vienna. Recommendations are made on how this process might be improved.

  9. POSSIBILITIES TO USE NATURAL EXTRACTS FROM MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS (MAP LIKE BOTANICAL REPELLENT OR INSECTICIDE COMPOUNDS AGAINST PEST INSECTS IN ECOLOGICAL CROPS (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina IONESCU-MĂLĂNCUŞ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Botanical insecticides have long been touted as attractive alternatives to synthetic chemical insecticides for pest management because botanicals reputedly pose little threat to the environment or to human health. The body of scientific literature documenting bioactivity of plant derivatives to arthropods pests continues to expand i.e. repellents based on essential oils extracted from Chenopodium ambrosioides, Eucalyptus saligna, Rosmarinus officinalis to mosquitoes, or cinnamon oil, sandalwood oil and turmeric oil are previously reported as insect repellents evaluatede in the laboratory conditions. With the constantly increasing problems of insecticide resistance and increasing public concerns regarding pesticide safety, new, safer active ingredients are becoming necessary to replace existing compounds on the market. The present study carried out in the period 2010-2012 comprises a review of two insect repellents, followed by some new research conducted in our laboratory on plant-derived insect repellents. The two alkaloids tested against the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in laboratory conditions was obtained by water and alchohol extraction from two vegetal species, Cichorium intybus L. (Asterales:Asteraceae and Delphinium consolida L. (Ranales:Ranunculaceae. The tests carried out in laboratory and field experimentally plots under cages permit to evaluate several other compounds for repellent activity of lacctucin alkaloids.

  10. The role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa with special emphasis on the contributions of the Botanical Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. B. Killick

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available Five papers cover different aspects of the contributions to and role of botany in the development of the Republic of South Africa. Two papers sum up the contributions for the non-agricultural and agricultural sectors. The introductory paper by D. J. B. Killick provides a short historical account of the Botanical Research Institute, followed by a discussion of the contributions of the Institute to botany in South Africa through its National Herbarium and identification service as well as researches in taxonomy, plant anatomy, cyto-genetics, ecology, economic botany and data processing. B. de Winter emphasizes the fundamental role of taxonomy and bio-systematics for planning and the optimal use of the natural plant resources. The current support for taxonomy and biosystematics is examined and proposals made for improving progress in the Flora of Southern Africa series. For plant physiology, N. Grobbelaar discusses, firstly, the ways whereby the productivity of a plant species with its characteristic genetic constitution can be raised by determining and modifying for optimal response the effects of environmental factors such as spacing, mineral nutrition, water provision, etc.; and, secondly, usually when the first means has been achieved, of improving plant productivity by altering the genetic constitution of the plant so that it can perform better than its ancestors under the prevailing conditions. After discussing and illustrating the applications and roles of plant ecology, D. Edwards concludes that basic plant ecological research is required, firstly, at the regional level through regional plant ecological studies to supply the essential local knowledge needed by researchers, planners and users of the land; and, secondly, at the more detailed level where knowledge is needed of the processes and factors that govern the behaviour of vegetation so that it can be properly used, managed and manipulated. M. J. Wells discusses the role of economic

  11. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1 beta-Induced NF-kappa B Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Shakibaei, Mehdi; Allaway, David; Nebrich, Simone; Mobasheri, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1 beta for up to 72h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), beta 1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-1...

  12. Botanical Extracts from Rosehip (Rosa canina), Willow Bark (Salix alba), and Nettle Leaf (Urtica dioica) Suppress IL-1β-Induced NF-κB Activation in Canine Articular Chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Shakibaei; David Allaway; Simone Nebrich; Ali Mobasheri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anti-inflammatory mode of action of botanical extracts from rosehip (Rosa canina), willow bark (Salix alba), and nettle leaf (Urtica dioica) in an in vitro model of primary canine articular chondrocytes. Methods. The biological effects of the botanical extracts were studied in chondrocytes treated with IL-1β for up to 72 h. Expression of collagen type II, cartilage-specific proteoglycan (CSPG), β1-integrin, SOX-9, COX-2, and MMP-9 and MMP-13 was e...

  13. Historical soil erosion rates in rangelands of SW Spain determined using botanical evidences and high resolution 3D data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Rubio-Delgado, Judit; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Álvaro

    2014-05-01

    The estimation of medium-term sheet erosion rates represents still a challenge in areas with long land use history. In the present paper, a new methodology for estimating medium-term sheet erosion rates is presented and applied in a wooded rangeland (dehesa). This human-induced semi-natural ecosystem is widespread in SW Iberian Peninsula and is characterized by centuries of agrosilvopastoral land use, being livestock breeding the most important economic activity at present. Vast areas are covered by shallow and poor soils, pointing to a long history of soil erosion. Research carried out in a representative area with open plots revealed low soil loss rates and degradation studies showed high spatial variation related with land use intensity. Knowledge on past soil erosion rates and its relation with land use is necessary in order to understand present soil properties and also for giving adequate advice on land management. The present paper presents results of a pilot study on historical soil erosion in Mediterranean wooded rangelands. The methodology is based on the analysis of the morphology of tree stems, exposed roots and surface micro-topography using data obtained with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. Specifically, botanical evidences were used to estimate the antecedent level of the soil surface. Afterwards, previous and current surfaces were confronted in order to obtain a volume of soil loss in the area influenced by the tree canopy, as well as for the open spaces. On the other hand, the age of the trees in the study area was estimated by means of an existing tree growth model. Finally, soil erosion rates were calculated using the volume of soil loss and the estimated age of every tree. The sampling was carried out in a farm in the Spanish province of Cáceres, with a two-layered vegetation, of grasses and scattered trees (Quercus ilex). Climate is Mediterranean with mean annual temperature of 160C and an annual rainfall of 620 mm. Soils are very shallow

  14. Caracterização botânica de cultivares de morangueiro Botanical characterization of strawberry cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Benetti Queiroz Voltan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo de caracterização botânica em seis cultivares de morangueiro (Fragaria X ananassa Duch. quatro desenvolvidos no Brasil - 'Campinas (IAC-2712', 'Guarani (IAC-5074', 'AGF 080' e 'IAC Princesa Isabel' - e dois introduzidos - 'Reiko', do Japão, e 'Sequóia', dos Estados Unidos - visando sua distinção taxonômica. Os experimentos foram desenvolvidos na Estação Experimental de Monte Alegre do Sul (SP durante os anos agrícolas de 1992/93. Os caracteres morfológicos que se mostraram úteis na diferenciação dos seis cultivares foram os seguintes: tipo de planta; número de folíolos; coloração da folha; razão entre o comprimento e a largura dos folíolos medianos; ângulo da base do limbo do folíolo mediano; comprimento das estipulas; posição das flores primárias em relação à folhagem; número de pétalas das flores primárias; razão entre o comprimento e a largura das pétalas; receptáculo do ovário; forma das infrutescências e da base da infrutescência; posição do cálice e calículo; espaços vazios no interior da infrutescência e comprimento e largura da infrutescência. Para a identificação dos cultivares, foi elaborada uma chave analítica. Os cultivares AGF 080 e Campinas não foram distinguidos com base nos caracteres analisados.Six strawberry cultivars (Fragaria X ananassa Duch., four developed in Brazil (AGF 080, Campinas, Guarani and IAC Princesa Isabel and two introduced (Reiko from Japan and Sequoia from USA were botanically evaluated in order to screening morphological vegetativa and reproductive characters to get the taxonomical distinction of them. Two experiments were carried out in 1992 and 1993 at the Experimental Station of Monte Alegre do Sul, Instituto Agronômico (IAC, State of São Paulo, Brazil. The following morphological characters were screened to distinguish the cultivars studied: growing habit; leaflet number; leaf colour; middle leaflet length and width ratio; middle

  15. Composition: PHHS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2012-01-01

    PHHS is an open composition to be realised by improvising musicians. See more about my composition practise in the entry "Composition - General Introduction". This work is licensed under a Creative Commons "by-nc" License. You may for non-commercial purposes use and distribute it, performance...

  16. Multi-Element Composition of Honey as a Suitable Tool for Its Authenticity Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Oroian Mircea; Amariei Sonia; Leahu Ana; Gutt Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition of 36 honey samples of 4 different botanical origins (acacia, sun flower, tilia and honeydew) from the North East region of Romania. An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) method was used to determine 27 elements in honey (Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Ga, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn). We would like to achieve the following goal: to demonstrate that the qualitative and quantita...

  17. 广西靖西县壮族民间对植物的命名%Indigenous Botanical Nomenclature Used by the Zhuang People in Jingxi County, Guangxi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄玉绿; 郭志永; 刘宇婧; 王业玲; 罗斌圣; 龙春林

    2013-01-01

    The common plants occurring in Jingxi County,Guangxi,were investigated,based on ethnobotanical approaches.An ethnobotanical inventory that includes 103 plant species,together with local names,was produced and is presented in this paper.The indigenous botanical nomenclature used by the Zhuang people in Jingxi County was analyzed.We concluded that a “folk binomial nomenclature” is used where the “genus” concept includes a plant's life form or economic features,while the “species” component refers to its characteristics and/or usage.A comparison between the indigenous botanical nomenclature used by the Zhuang people in Jingxi County and the nomenclature used by other ethnic groups in terms of scientific binomial systems was analyzed.A comparative linguistic analysis between Zhuang and Dai showed similarities in type of botanical nomenclature used and also pronunciation.%采用民族植物学方法,对广西靖西县常见植物进行了调查,完成了103种当地植物的民族植物学编目.通过分析这些植物的命名规律,结果发现:靖西县壮族民间对植物的命名采用了“双名”法,植物名称的前面部分包含了植物的形态型或用途类型,而后面的部分则包含了植物的形态特征、颜色、生长环境、性状和用途等方面.本文还对靖西县壮族民间植物命名与双名法以及其他民族命名进行了比较,探讨了其相似之处和不同点.从对植物的命名和发音等方面来看,壮族和傣族两个民族具有语言上的相似性.

  18. The use of ALS, botanical, and soil data to monitor the environmental hazards and regeneration capacity of areas devastated by highway construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Dominik; Woziwoda, Beata; Forysiak, Jacek; Sławik, Łukasz; Ptak, Agnieszka; Charążka, Edyta

    2016-07-01

    The impact of viaduct construction on the vegetation of a river valley was studied in Central Poland (Natura 2000 site PLH100006). The research aimed at assessing the suitability of ALS (airborne laser scanning), soil, and botanical data for monitoring the environmental effects of right-of-way reclamation 1 year after the road construction. Based on the data mentioned above, the following problems were identified: changes in topography and hydrological conditions of the valley as a result of improper land levelling, the use of inadequate soil for reclamation, no spontaneous regeneration of natural vegetation along the entire right-of-way, as well as the abundant occurrence of invasive species. The results of analysis were used to define strategies for mitigation of adverse impacts of the viaduct construction. PMID:26527333

  19. The structure of bacterial communities in natural and anthropogenic brown forest soils of the Botanical Garden on Murav'eva-Amurskogo Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, G. V.; Dobrovol'Skaya, T. G.; Golovacheva, A. V.

    2007-05-01

    The microbiological characterization of the brown forest soils in the territory of the Botanical Garden-Institute of the Far East Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences in southern Primor’e is given. The high humus content and weakly acid reaction of these soils were shown to provide the optimal conditions for the development of bacteria. In the brown forest soils differing in the thickness of the humus horizons, all the ecologic-trophic groups of bacteria were present and the bacterial communities were highly diverse. The structure of the bacterial communities was identical in all the organomineral horizons of the soils and varied greatly by the seasons. In the anthropogenically disturbed soils, the share of corynebacteria, which are resistant to stress and capable of the destruction of xenobiotics, decreased.

  20. Safeguarding China's Botanical Heritage——BGCI's integrated conservation programme in China%保护中国的植物遗产

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-Ying WEN; Joachim GRATZFELD; Sheng-Ji PEI

    2011-01-01

    China's rich floral diversity includes more than 33 000 vascular plant species, representing approximately 10 percent of all known plant species. Over half of these species are endemic to China. However, China's rapid economic development in the last 30 years and continuous population growth have seriously damaged plant resources in the wild and the ecological environment, resulting in a dramatic increase in the number of endangered species. There are nearly 4 000 to 5 000 higher plants that are now threatened or on the verge of extinction. To help halt the loss of Chinese plant diversity, Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) has developed a China programme and opened its first office based in Guangzhou in 2008. This office works along with Chinese partners aiming to secure Chinese plant diversity through integrated conservation approaches with reintroduction/population reinforcement, engagement of local communities in conservation activities, capacity building in horticulture and environmen tal education and public outreach.

  1. Patterns and drivers of plant functional group dominance across the Western Hemisphere: a macroecological re-assessment based on a massive botanical dataset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Engemann; Sandel, Brody Steven; Enquist, Brian;

    2016-01-01

    standardized plant species occurrence dataset of unprecedented size covering the entire New World. Functional group distributions were estimated from 3 648 533 standardized occurrence records for a total of 83 854 vascular plant species, extracted from the Botanical Information and Ecology Network (BIEN......Plant functional group dominance has been linked to climate, topography and anthropogenic factors. Here, we assess existing theory linking functional group dominance patterns to their drivers by quantifying the spatial distribution of plant functional groups at a 100-km grid scale. We use a......) database. Seven plant functional groups were considered, describing major differences in structure and function: epiphytes; climbers; ferns; herbs; shrubs; coniferous trees; and angiosperm trees. Two measures of dominance (relative number of occurrences and relative species richness) were analysed against...

  2. Practice of Developing Low-carbon Leisure Agriculture in Agricultural Sci-tech Experiment and Demonstration Park: A Case Study of Xinglong Tropical Botanical Park

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan; OUYANG; Huasong; WU; Aiqin; LIU; Huan; YU; Hongmei; FU

    2013-01-01

    The Agricultural Science and Technology Experiment and Demonstration Park,as a unique tourist scenic spot,is a new model for the development of low-carbon leisure agriculture.In this paper,with Xinglong Tropical Botanical Park as a study case,the practice of developing a model of low-carbon agricultural science and technology tourism in the park is explored.Main measures for developing low-carbon leisure agriculture in Agricultural Science and Technology Experiment and Demonstration Park are summarized,including development of low carbon attractors,construction of low carbon facilities,strengthening low-carbon management,building low-carbon environment and so on,according to analysis on the models for development of low-carbon agricultural science tourism in this park.

  3. Cyto-architectural Alterations in the Corpuscles of Stannius of Stinging Catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after Exposure to a Botanical Pesticide (Nerium indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ManiRam Prasad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This investigation describes the cyto-architectural alterations observed in the corpuscles of Stannius of stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after treatment with a botanical pesticide Nerium indicum. Methods: Heteropneustes fossilis were subjected to 11.27 and 2.81 mg/L of Nerium indicum leaf extract over short- and long-term exposure periods, respectively. Blood was collected for calcium analysis and corpuscles of Stannius (CS gland were fixed on 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in the short-term experiment and after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in the long-term experiment. Results: Serum calcium levels decreased from 48 h to 96 h. CS remains unaffected till 72 h. After the 96-hour treatment, increased granulation was observed in AF- positive cells. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited no change throughout the short-term treatment. Slight increases in nuclear volume of AF-negative cells were recorded after 96 h. Nerium indicum caused decreases in serum calcium levels of H. fossilis from day 14 to 28. CS exhibited no alterations up to 14 days of exposure. AF-positive cells of CS depicted increased granulation after 21 days of treatment. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited a slight decrease from day 21 to 28. Heavy accumulation of AF-positive granules was observed and few degenerating cells were noticed. Nuclear volume of AF-negative cells increased after 21 and 28 days of treatment. Vacuolization and degeneration occurred in certain places. Conclusion: It is inferred from the present study that the botanical pesticide Nerium indicum induced severe changes in the corpuscles of Stannius of catfish.

  4. Clinical and biochemical effects of a combination botanical product (ClearGuard™ for allergy: a pilot randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yumei

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Botanical products are frequently used for treatment of nasal allergy. Three of these substances, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Malpighia glabra, and Bidens pilosa, have been shown to have a number of anti-allergic properties in-vitro. The current study was conducted to determine the effects of these combined ingredients upon the nasal response to allergen challenge in patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Methods Twenty subjects were randomized to receive the combination botanical product, (CBP 2 tablets three times a day, loratadine, 10 mg once a day in the morning, or placebo, using a randomized, double-blinded crossover design. Following 2 days of each treatment and during the third day of treatment, subjects underwent a nasal allergen challenge (NAC, in which nasal symptoms were assessed after each challenge dose and every 2 hours for 8 hours. Nasal lavage fluid was assessed for tryptase, prostaglandin D2, and leukotriene E4 concentrations and inflammatory cells. Results Loratadine significantly reduced the total nasal symptom score during the NAC compared with placebo (P = 0.04 while the CBP did not. During the 8 hour period following NAC, loratadine and the CBP both reduced NSS compared with placebo (P = 0.034 and P = 0.029, respectively. Analysis of nasal lavage fluid demonstrated that the CBP prevented the increase in prostaglandin D2 release following NAC, while neither loratadine nor placebo had this effect. None of the treatments significantly affected tryptase or leukotriene E4 release or inflammatory cell infiltration. Conclusion The CBP significantly reduced NSS during the 8 hours following NAC and marginally inhibited the release of prostaglandin D2 into nasal lavage fluid, suggesting potential clinical utility in patients with allergic rhinitis.

  5. Determination of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A in ginseng and other botanical roots by immunoaffinity column cleanup and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucksess, Mary; Weaver, Carol; Oles, Carolyn; D'Ovidio, Kathleen; Rader, Jeanne

    2006-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by certain molds and are common contaminants of many important food crops, such as grains, nuts, and spices. Some mycotoxins are found in fruits, vegetables, and botanical roots. These contaminants have a broad range of toxic effects, including carcinogenicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and reproductive and developmental toxicity. The public health concerns related to both acute and chronic effects of mycotoxins in animals have prompted more than 100 countries to establish regulatory limits for some of the well-known mycotoxins, such as the aflatoxins (AFL). Our research focused on method development for 2 of these toxins, AFL and ochratoxin A (OTA), in ginseng and other selected botanical roots. Methods using an immunoaffinity column (IAC) cleanup, liquid chromatographic separation, and fluorescence detection were modified and evaluated. Two types of IAC cleanup were evaluated: IAC for AFL, and IAC for both AFL and OTA. Three derivatization techniques to enhance the fluorescence of the AFL were compared: precolumn trifluoroacetic acid, postcolumn bromination, and postcolumn ultraviolet irradiation. No derivatization was needed for OTA. Results for AFL using the single analyte IAC cleanup and the 3 derivatization techniques were all comparable for ginseng and for other roots such as ginger, licorice, and kava-kava. Recoveries of added AFL for ginseng at levels from 2 to 16 ng/g were about 80%. Using IAC cleanup for both AFL and OTA recoveries of added AFL for ginseng at 4-16 ng/g were about 70%, and for ginger, licorice, and kava-kava were about 60%. Recoveries of added OTA for ginseng, ginger, and echinacea at 4 ng/g were about 55%. PMID:16792061

  6. Structural characterization and discrimination of Chinese medicinal materials with multiple botanical origins based on metabolite profiling and chemometrics analysis: Clematidis Radix et Rhizoma as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lin-Xiu; Li, Rui; Liu, Ke; Yang, Jie; Li, Hui-Jun; Li, Song-Lin; Liu, Jian-Qun; Liu, Li-Fang; Xin, Gui-Zhong

    2015-12-18

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs)-based products are becoming more and more popular over the world. To ensure the safety and efficacy, authentication of Chinese medicinal materials has been an important issue, especially for that with multiple botanical origins (one-to-multiple). Taking Clematidis Radix et Rhizoma (CRR) as a case study, we herein developed an integrated platform based on metabolite profiling and chemometrics analysis to characterize, classify, and predict the "one-to-multiple" herbs. Firstly, the predominant constituents, triterpenoid saponins, in three Clematis CRR were rapid characterized by a novel UPLC-QTOF/MS-based strategy, and a total of 49 triterpenoid saponins were identified. Secondly, metabolite profiling was performed by UPLC-QTOF/MS, and 4623 variables were extracted and aligned as dataset. Thirdly, by using pattern recognition analysis, a clear separation of the three Clematis CRR was achieved as well as a total number of 28 variables were screened as the valuable variables for discrimination. By matching with identified saponins, these 28 variables were corresponding to 10 saponins which were identified as marker compounds. Fourthly, based on the relative intensity of the marker compounds-related variables, genetic algorithm optimized support vector machines (GA-SVM) was employed to predict the species of CRR samples. The obtained model showed excellent prediction performance with a prediction accuracy of 100%. Finally, a heatmap visualization was employed for clarifying the distribution of identified saponins, which could be useful for phytochemotaxonomy study of Clematis herbs. These results indicated that our proposed platform was a powerful tool for chemical profiling and discrimination of herbs with multiple botanical origins, providing promising perspectives in tracking the formulation processes of TCMs products. PMID:26610614

  7. 植物提取物抗光老化研究进展%Advance in Botanical Extract in the Prevention of Photoaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨汝斌; 万屏; 刘玲

    2011-01-01

    近年来由于大气臭氧层的破坏,辐射到地球表面的紫外线逐渐增多,由此引起的各种皮肤病明显增多,长期紫外线照射能引起皮肤的光老化及皮肤癌等.怎样有效地预防及治疗紫外线引起的皮肤损伤,己成为国际皮肤界关注的课题.经实验室和临床证实许多天然植物含有多种活性成分可从不同角度起防治光老化作用,这些天然活性成分大多有强大的抗氧化活性,且具有杭炎及免疫调节作用,是一类较为理想的防治皮肤光老化药物.%In recent years,skin diseases are increasing with increasing ultraviolet radiation to the surface of the earth owing to the ozonosphere destruction. Chronic exposure to ultraviolet can cause skin photoaging,cutaneous carcinoma and etc. Scientists have focused on how to effectively prevent damage caused by ultraviolet. Laboratory and clinical investigation of botanical extract has reveatled different mechanisms to prevent cutaneous sun damage. Most of botanical agents not only possess potent antioxidant activity,but also anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory, which can be exploited as ideal chemopreventive agents for the photoprotection of the skin.

  8. Columbia Wind Farm number-sign 1 EIS: Botanical resources technical report for the Conservation and Renewable Energy System. Appendix B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones and Stokes Associates conducted botanical investigations of the Conservation and Renewable Energy Systems (CARES) project site from April through July 1994. Presurvey investigations were conducted to gain information regarding potential special-status plant species and vegetation communities that might exist on the project area. Field surveys were conducted to determine the presence of special-status plant species, map and describe potential vegetation communities, and document the presence of other species onsite, including culturally important species. Field surveys also were used to identify possible mitigation measures as a means to reduce potential project impacts to botanical resources. Floristically, the project area is located in the Columbia Basin Province dominated by shrub-steppe grassland vegetation. Completion of the presurvey and field investigations documented that the project area is dominated by native bunchgrass communities. Field surveys also determined that no special-status plant species were found on the study area. Implementation of the project would result in moderately significant impacts to the vegetation resource. Impacts include the following direct impacts: removal or disturbance of approximately 38 hectares (95 acres) of vegetation, including 32 hectares (80 acres) of native, natural communities, from project construction and the initiation of development into relatively undisturbed native vegetation communities. Indirect impacts to vegetation are associated with impacts that could occur in the future. Ongoing activities that are required to maintain the site's function of producing wind power could result in vegetation trampling and removal of vegetation. This disturbance could create areas where invasive weeds could establish and provide a continual source of weed seed in the project area

  9. 植物精油缓释技术研究进展%Research Progress of Sustained-Release Technology for Botanic Essential Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊采; 邓宁; 黎茂; 周洋; 孟子晗; 万军; 周霞

    2015-01-01

    精油作为天然香精、香料的重要组成部分,应用广泛,但由于其稳定性较差而使应用受到一定限制,以包合为技术特点的缓释技术可有效解决挥发油稳定性的问题,并延缓释放速度使其作用更加持久。该文通过对近年来国内外精油缓释技术相关研究成果的总结,综述了不同精油缓释技术的研究方向及其存在的问题,为植物精油的开发利用提供借鉴。%Botanic essential oil as an important component of natural essence and perfume has wide application. But due to its poor sta-bility, its application is subject to certain restrictions. The stability problem of volatile oil can be effectively resolved by using the sus-tained-release technology with the inclusion as the technical characteristic, which can slow the release rate for making its role more durable. By summarizing the research results related to sustained-release technology of essential oil in recent years, this article reviews the research direction of sustained-release technology for different essential oils and the existing problems to provide a reference for the development and utilization of botanic essential oil.

  10. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S.; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Esch...

  11. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Hadda eLAALLAM; Larbi eBOUGHEDIRI; Samia eBISSATI; Taha eMENASRIA; Mohamed Saïd eMOUZAOUI; Soumia eHADJAJ; Rokia eHAMMOUDI; Haroun eChenchouni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components.Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins and its physicochemical characteristics.Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four pathogenic bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Es...

  12. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A.; Christopher T. Elliott; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-01-01

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classificat...

  13. Energetic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danen, Wayne C.; Martin, Joe A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for providing chemical energy and energetic compositions of matter consisting of thin layers of substances which will exothermically react with one another. The layers of reactive substances are separated by thin layers of a buffer material which prevents the reactions from taking place until the desired time. The reactions are triggered by an external agent, such as mechanical stress or an electric spark. The compositions are known as metastable interstitial composites (MICs). This class of compositions includes materials which have not previously been capable of use as energetic materials. The speed and products of the reactions can be varied to suit the application.

  14. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennouri, Monia; Ammar, Imene; Khemakhem, Bassem; Attia, Hamadi

    2014-08-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica f. inermis (cactus pear) flowers have wide application in folk medicine. However, there are few reports focusing on their biological activity and were no reports on their chemical composition. The nutrient composition and hexane extracts of Opuntia flowers at 4 flowering stages and their antibacterial and antifungal activities were investigated. The chemical composition showed considerable amounts of fiber, protein, and minerals. Potassium (K) was the predominant mineral followed by calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), iron (Fe), and zinc (Zn). The main compounds in the various hexane extracts were 9.12-octadecadienoic acid (29-44%) and hexadecanoic acid (8.6-32%). The antibacterial activity tests showed that O. inermis hexane extracts have high effectiveness against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, making this botanical source a potential contender as a food preservative or food control additive. PMID:24650181

  15. Mineral composition of some varieties of beans from Mediterranean and Tropical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Giuseppa; Naccari, Clara; Bua, Giuseppe Daniel; Rastrelli, Luca; Lo Turco, Vincenzo; Potortì, Angela Giorgia; Dugo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    In this study has been evaluated the mineral composition (Cd, Pb, As, Hg, Ba, Cr, Co, Ni, Se, Sb, V, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mo, Na, K, Ca, Mg) of some varieties of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Vigna unguiculata and V. angularis) from Mediterranean and Tropical areas of the world (Italy, Mexico, India, Japan, Ghana and Ivory Coast); the correlation between beans mineral composition in micro and macroelements and botanical and/or geographical origin; trace elements dietary intake by beans consumption. The results showed a correlation between beans mineral composition and their geographical origin, with higher values in Ivory Coast samples. Moreover, minerals content found confirmed the importance of these legumes in the diet for the significant content of essential micro and macroelements and a safe consumption of beans for the low residual levels of toxic metals. PMID:26940501

  16. Composite gravity and composite supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the composite YM H-gauge theory can be constructed from σ-fields taking values in a symmetric Riemannian space G/H. We extend such a framework to graded σ-fields taking values in supercosets. We show that from supercoset σ-fields one can construct composite gravity, and from supercoset σ-superfields the composite supergravity models. (author)

  17. Compositional C++: Compositional Parallel Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Chandy, K. Mani; Kesselman, Carl

    1992-01-01

    A compositional parallel program is a program constructed by composing component programs in parallel, where the composed program inherits properties of its components. In this paper, we describe a small extension of C++ called Compositional C++ or CC++ which is an object-oriented notation that supports compositional parallel programming. CC++ integrates different paradigms of parallel programming: data-parallel, task-parallel and object-parallel paradigms; imperative and declarative programm...

  18. Composite Z'

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a possibility of a composite Z' vector boson. For the compositeness, the required gauge coupling g in low energy is not so big, g^2/(4\\pi) > 0.015 in the case of the U(1)_{B-L} model. We show that the Stueckelberg model is effectively induced in low energy via the fermion loop from the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model having the vectorial four-fermion interaction. In terms of the renormalization group equations (RGE's), this situation is expressed by the compositeness conditions. We find that the solutions of the RGE's with the compositeness conditions are determined by the infrared fixed points. As a result, the ratio of the masses of the extra electroweak singlet scalar and the right-handed neutrino is fixed. The mass of the composite Z' boson contains the contribution \\Delta of the Stueckelberg mass term. This nonzero \\Delta might be a remnant of a strongly interacting theory in high energy.

  19. Composite Territories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicholas, Paul; Tamke, Martin

    2012-01-01

    assembly of the fibre reinforced composite structure Composite Territories, in which the property of bending is activated and varied so as to match solely through material means a desired form. This case study demonstrates how one might extend the geometric model so that it is able to engage and reconcile...... varied composition of material, an extension of the digital chain that foregrounds a new need to engage materials at multiple scales within the design process. Recognising that the process of making materials affords perspectives not available with found materials, this paper reports the design and...

  20. Identification of vegetable oil botanical speciation in refined vegetable oil blends using an innovative combination of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Maria Teresa; Haughey, Simon A; Elliott, Christopher T; Koidis, Anastasios

    2015-12-15

    European Regulation 1169/2011 requires producers of foods that contain refined vegetable oils to label the oil types. A novel rapid and staged methodology has been developed for the first time to identify common oil species in oil blends. The qualitative method consists of a combination of a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to profile the oils and fatty acid chromatographic analysis to confirm the composition of the oils when required. Calibration models and specific classification criteria were developed and all data were fused into a simple decision-making system. The single lab validation of the method demonstrated the very good performance (96% correct classification, 100% specificity, 4% false positive rate). Only a small fraction of the samples needed to be confirmed with the majority of oils identified rapidly using only the spectroscopic procedure. The results demonstrate the huge potential of the methodology for a wide range of oil authenticity work. PMID:26190602

  1. Composition changes of phototrophic microbial communities along the salinity gradient in the solar saltern evaporation ponds of Eilat, Israel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řeháková, Klára; Zapomělová, Eliška; Prášil, Ondřej; Veselá, J.; Medová, Hana; Oren, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 636, č. 1 (2009), s. 77-88. ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/06/0462; GA AV ČR KJB600960703; GA AV ČR 1QS600170504; GA AV ČR 1QS500200570 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : phototrophic microbial community * salterns * species composition Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.754, year: 2009

  2. Computational composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Anna K. A.; Redström, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Computational composite is introduced as a new type of composite material. Arguing that this is not just a metaphorical maneuver, we provide an analysis of computational technology as material in design, which shows how computers share important characteristics with other materials used in design...... and architecture. We argue that the notion of computational composites provides a precise understanding of the computer as material, and of how computations need to be combined with other materials to come to expression as material. Besides working as an analysis of computers from a designer’s point...... of view, the notion of computational composites may also provide a link for computer science and human-computer interaction to an increasingly rapid development and use of new materials in design and architecture....

  3. Identificação botânica e química de espécies vegetais de uso popular no Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil Botanical and chemical identification of plant species of popular use in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Félix-Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plantas medicinais são utilizadas mundialmente como uma das principais formas de cuidado primário de saúde. No entanto, a literatura indica que muitas espécies podem apresentar composição química variável, toxicidade ou difícil identificação. O objetivo do presente estudo foi obter critérios úteis para o controle de qualidade farmacognóstico das principais espécies vegetais de uso popular no estado do Rio Grande do Norte, utilizando metodologias de análise botânica (morfodiagnose macro e microscópica e química (triagem fitoquímica e cromatografia em camada delgada, evitando assim adulterações ou uso inadequado dessas plantas medicinais no estado. No total, sete espécies foram analisadas Acmella oleracea, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Lippia alba, Mentha piperita, Ocimum gratissimum, Peumus boldus e Rosmarinus officinalis. Diversos marcadores botânicos e fitoquímicos foram identificados, contribuindo dessa forma para a correta identificação destas espécies de plantas medicinais importantes no estado do Rio Grande do Norte.Medicinal plants are worldwide used as one of the main forms of primary healthcare. However, the literature indicates that many species may have variable chemical composition, toxicity, or even difficult identification. The aim of this study was to obtain useful criteria for pharmacognostic quality control of the main plant species of popular use in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, using methods of botanical (macro and microscopic morphodiagnosis and chemical (phytochemical screening and thin-layer chromatography analysis, thus preventing adulteration or inappropriate use of these medicinal plants in the state. In total, seven species were analyzed Acmella oleracea, Chenopodium ambrosioides, Lippia alba, Mentha piperita, Ocimum gratissimum, Peumus boldus and Rosmarinus officinalis. Several botanical and phytochemical markers were identified, thereby contributing to the correct identification of these

  4. Diversity of Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the Ceará Botanical Park, Caucaia - CE, Brazil = Diversidade de Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) no Parque Botânico do Ceará, Caucaia - CE, Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Goretti Araújo de Lima; Rodolpho Peixoto de Almeida Silva; Maria Danielle Feitosa de Sousa; Ewerton Marinho Costa

    2013-01-01

    Abstract - The objective of this study was to survey and analyze richness, abundance, equitability and diversity of Scarabaeinae species in two different environments, Carnaúba Riparian Forest and in Tabuleiro Forest in Ceará Botanic Park, Caucaia - CE, Brazil. Samples were collected monthly during the period from March to November 2008. To capture the scarabs were used 48 traps Pitfall, baited with human feces, being 24 traps in each area, distributed in two parallel transects constituted by...

  5. Combining Multivariate Analysis and Pollen Count to Classify Honey Samples Accordingly to Different Botanical Origins Clasificación del Origen Botánico de la Miel Mediante la Combinación de Análisis Multivariado y Recuento de Polen

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Corbella; Daniel Cozzolino

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the combination of multivariate techniques and pollen count analysis to classify honey samples accordingly to botanical sources, in samples from Uruguay. Honey samples from different botanical origins, namely Eucalyptus spp. (n = 10), Lotus spp. (n = 12), Salix spp. (n = 5), “mil flores” (Myrtaceae spp.) (n = 12) and coronilla (Scutia buxifolia Reissek) (n = 10) were analysed using Melissopalynology (pollen identification). Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear disc...

  6. Total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae—a possible contributor to inorganic arsenic exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Rokkjær, Inge; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The content of total and inorganic arsenic was determined in 16 dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae purchased on the Danish market. The dietary supplements originated from various regions, including Asia, Europe and USA. The contents of total and inorganic arsenic...... was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively, were in the range of 0.58 to 5.0 mgkg−1 and 0.03 to 3.2 mg kg−1, respectively, with a ratio between inorganic arsenic and total arsenic ranging between 5 and 100 %. Consumption of the recommended...... dose of the individual dietary supplement would lead to an exposure to inorganic arsenic within the range of 0.07 to 13 μg day−1. Such exposure from dietary supplements would in worst case constitute 62.4 % of the range of benchmark dose lower confidence limit values (BMDL01 at 0.3 to 8 μg kg bw−1 kg−1...

  7. Analysis of the natural repair in areas of botanical recuperation, in the Abadia de Goias State Park, according to the status of soil degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several plant species exhibit aggressive behaviour. They act in a pioneer fashion, repopulating inhospitable soils, those with a low concentration of organic matter, with excess acidity as well as those soils which are deficient in terms of chemical and physical structures. Such species would develop with the onset of the occupation, in an unprotected environment, but in many cases, they thwart the growth of trees which make up the original vegetable cover. In the process of botanical recuperation in the area which surrounds the deposit of radioactive waste, the native species which occupied the degraded soils were analysed, as well as those introduced in the region and which today, act in a pioneer fashion. They mainly protect the soil against erosion and supply organic matter. Through phyto-sociological studies carried out in the area whose soils have exposed for 9 years, it was possible to observe which were the species with greater ability to populate rustic terrain with the original cerrado cover. (author)

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Minoxidil 2% Solution in Combination With a Botanical Hair Solution in Women With Female Pattern Hair Loss/Androgenic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Amy; Pham, Hanh; von Grote, Erika; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-04-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL), also known as female androgenic alopecia, affects over 21 million women in the United States with devastating effects on self-esteem and psychosocial functioning. Topical minoxidil 2% and 5% formulations are the only US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for FPHL. The length of time it typically takes to observe the benefits is a challenge for many patients, and may affect adherence to treatment. Herbal extracts, which are also believed to promote healthier-looking hair, have a long history of use in hair care formulations. The safety and efficacy of a twice-daily regimen of 2% minoxidil solution used in combination with the botanical hair solution for 12 weeks in 54 subjects was evaluated in a multicenter, single-arm, open-label study. Assessments included investigator and subject ratings of improvement and subject satisfaction. Investigator ratings indicated significant improvement in hair growth and overall treatment benefits in as early as 6 weeks (P J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(4):398-404. PMID:27050694

  9. Botanical Knowledge Acquisition from Text%从文本中获取植物知识方法的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗贝; 吴洁; 曹存根; 邵志清

    2005-01-01

    知识获取一直是人工智能中的一个关键问题.当前,知识的文本挖掘(KAT)已经成为计算机领域的一个重要的研究课题.本文中,给出了基于植物本体的从海量网页文本库中自动获取植物领域知识的方法.该方法包括两个部分,一是植物本体(Botanical Ontology),它是顾芳博士等建立的生物本体的扩展.第二部分是以植物本体为基础,在网络文本库中进行文本挖掘(Text Mining),自动获取植物知识.实验证明,基于本体的文本挖掘是一种有效的知识获取方法.

  10. Historical gardens and parks, arboreta, and botanical gardens; 1 : 1 000 000; Historical gardens and parks entered in the Central List of Cultural Monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The category of historical parks in the sense of the Act of the National Council of the Slovak Republic No. 27/1987 on state conservation of monuments in wording of later issued provisions covers 315 parks with distinct characteristics of style, historical and architectural value, which qualify them among the cultural monuments. The second category comprises important parks, gardens, and other cultural vegetational formations, which do not fulfil the criteria of cultural monuments but they do fulfil those of natural assets. They are important from dendrological, cultural, recreational or architectural points of view and declared national natural monuments of the Slovak Republic classified into the category of protected areas in the sense of the Decree of the Ministry of Environment of the Slovak Republic No. 293/1996 of Coll. Among them are arboreta (6), botanical gardens (5), 88 parks and other elements of vegetation of Slovakia (for instance calvaries for their tree species and historical value). This map was produced based in source material provided by the Institute for Monuments, Bratislava (Situation in 1999). (author)

  11. Warfarin and coumarin-like Murraya paniculata extract down-regulate EpCAM-mediated cell adhesion: individual components versus mixture for studying botanical metastatic chemopreventives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingwei; Zhou, Suxia; Jiang, Zhou; Chi, Ting; Ma, Ji; Kuo, Minliang; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Jia, Lee

    2016-01-01

    We recently defined cancer metastatic chemoprevention as utilizing safe and effective molecules to comprehensively prevent the spark of activation-adhesion-extravasation-proliferation metastatic cascade caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The strategy focuses on preventing the most important starting point of the cascade. We identified an extract from a well-known medical plant Murraya paniculata, which inhibited both embryonic implantation to human endometrium as traditionally-used for abortion and CTC adhesion to human endothelium. Here, we separated and characterized five coumarin-containing components (Z1-Z5) from the botanic extract. Flow cytometry revealed that within 1-100 μg/mL, Z3 and Z5 down-regulated EpCAM expression in human colon HCT116, whereas, Z1 and Z2 did oppositely. Warfarin and Z1-Z5 component mixture (CM) also down-regulated EpCAM expression. The down-regulation of EpCAM by Z3, Z5, CM and warfarin was confirmed by western blotting, and caused inhibition on adhesion of cancer cells to human endothelial cells. Rat coagulation study showed that warfarin prolonged prothrombin time, whereas, Z3 did not. The present studies revealed that, for the first time, warfarin and coumarin-like components Z3, Z5 and CM from Murraya paniculata could directly inhibit EpCAM-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:27480614

  12. A simple GC-MS method for the screening of betulinic, corosolic, maslinic, oleanolic and ursolic acid contents in commercial botanicals used as food supplement ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiani, Augusta; Malavasi, Giulia; Palla, Gerardo; Marseglia, Angela; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Bruni, Renato

    2013-01-15

    The occurrence of triterpene pentacyclic acids in plants is extensive, but little is known about their availability in commercial extracts. A simple GC-MS method for the simultaneous determination of betulinic, corosolic, maslinic, oleanolic and ursolic acids was developed and applied to 38 different commercial plant extracts sold as ingredients for dietary supplements. A suitable protocol was set up to perform routine control of a diverse array of samples with different botanical, chemical and physical characteristics. Remarkable quantities of corosolic acid were found in dried extracts from aerial parts of Lagerstroemia speciosa and Ortosiphon stamineus (14233 and 1132 mg/kg, respectively), while oleanolic acid was abundant in O. stamineus and Crataegus monogyna flowers (2774 and 2339 mg/kg); ursolic was identified in O. stamineus, C. monogyna, L. speciosa and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi leaves (7773, 4165, 2108 and 1034 mg/kg). Only L. speciosa was rich in maslinic acid (4958 mg/kg), while minor amounts of betulinic acid (257 and 80 mg/kg) were detected in L. speciosa and C. monogyna extracts. Lower quantities of triterpenic acids were identified in dried extracts of Harpagophyton procumbens root, propolis, Punica granatum root, Styrax benzoin, Vaccinium myrtillus fruits and Vitis vinifera seeds. Decoctions and fluid extracts lacked or contained very low amounts of triterpenic acids. Results are discussed in terms of quality and safety of these ingredients. PMID:23122121

  13. Environmental Education Functions and Implementary Approaches of Medicinal Botanical Garden in Colleges And Universities%高校药用植物园的环境育人功能与实施途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尚智; 王英; 原霁虹

    2014-01-01

    国内外药用植物园历史悠久,科研与教学功能萌芽较早。目前,国内高校特别是医科院校普遍附设有药用植物园,其类型、规划设计不尽相同,但功能相近。探索高校药用植物园的环境育人功能与有效的实施途径,是充分利用教学资源、开展实践教学、提升校园文化水平的有益尝试。%The medicinal botanical garden has a long history both at home and abroad , the function of scientific research and teaching also started very early .At present,most colleges and universities in china are equipped with medicinal botanical garden especially medical colleges and universities .Although they have different types and design styles,the functions are very similar .To explore the environmental education function of medicinal botanical garden and the effective implementary ways are useful attempt to make full use of teaching resources ,carrying out the teaching practice and improving the level of campus culture.

  14. Composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O' Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  15. Composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  16. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity but...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p<0.0001). More paramarginal enamel fractures were observed after loading in teeth restored with Grandio when compared to Charisma (p=0.......008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can be...

  17. Plugging composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhrimenko, V.Ye.; Antonov, V.A.; Bulatov, A.I.; Gagay, G.I.; Levshin, V.A.; Minakova, V.I.

    1982-01-01

    A plugging composite is proposed for preparing muds containing binding agent with polymer of styrene type. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve the quality of the mud by improving its heat resistance, the polymer of styrene type used is a copolymer of styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 with the following ratio of ingredients, % by mass: binding agent 50-90; styrene and divinylbenzene-resin KU-2 copolymer 10-50. The composite is also distinguished by the fact that it contains as the binding agent Portland cement or Portland cement with granulated slag.

  18. Physical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Atomistic metaphysics motivated an explanatory strategy which science has pursued with great success since the scientific revolution. By decomposing matter into its atomic and subatomic parts physics gave us powerful explanations and accurate predictions as well as providing a unifying framework for the rest of science. The success of the decompositional strategy has encouraged a widespread conviction that the physical world forms a compositional hierarchy that physics and other sciences are progressively articulating. But this conviction does not stand up to a closer examination of how physics has treated composition, as a variety of case studies will show.

  19. Ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved ceramic compositions useful for cutting tools and the like are described. They are composed of an essentially homogeneous admixture of sintered powders of an aluminum oxide base material with other refractories including zirconium oxide, titanium oxide, hafnium oxide, titanium nitride, zirconium nitride, and tungsten or molybdenum carbide. In addition to their common and improved properties of hardness and strength, many of these compositions may be made by simple cold-pressing and sintering procedures. This avoids the known drawbacks of conventional hot press production

  20. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...

  1. Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

    2014-06-24

    Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

  2. Visiting motivation and satisfaction of visitors to Chinese botanical gardens%中国植物园游客游览动机及满意度调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺赫; 陈进

    2011-01-01

    Botanical gardens (BGs) have attracted millions of visitors worldwide; therefore, BGs have become important sites for displaying and education for biodiversity. Understanding garden visitors' motivations and their traveling satisfactory degree is crucial for BG management and its role in public education. In this study, we conducted survey in five Chinese BGs, I.e., Xiamen BG, Wuhan BG of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing BG, Kunming BG of CAS and Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden of CAS. We aimed to understand visitors' traveling motivation and the degree of satisfaction after they visited the gardens by questionnaire survey. The main results are as follows: (1) The motivations for visitors differed among the five BGs. "To get close to nature" was the most common motivation, followed by "To get relax" and "To enjoy the beautiful scenery". In Xiamen BG, "To be together with friends or relatives" was also one of the motivations. (2) "To gain relative knowledge" as the motivation did not get significant support. (3) The visitors were satisfied by the visit to the five BGs. The authors also discussed how BGs could adjust their management in order to fit visitors' motivation meanwhile play a better role in scientific and environmental education.%植物园每年都吸引大量的游客,是向公众展示生物多样性和开展生物多样性教育的重要场所.了解游客参观植物园的动机以及游览后的满意度,对植物园的运营及科普功能的发挥至关重要.作者选择厦门园林植物园、中国科学院武汉植物园、北京市植物园、中国科学院昆明植物研究所植物园和中国科学院西双版纳热带植物园5个植物园为研究对象,通过向游览后即将离园的游客发放问卷,调查游客的游览动机和满意度,分析了其社会学因素,得到了以下研究结果:(1)不同植物园的游客参观植物园的动机不尽相同.“亲近自然”是游客游览植物园的普遍动机,

  3. Estrogenic botanical supplements, health-related quality of life, fatigue, and hormone-related symptoms in breast cancer survivors: a HEAL study report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Huiyan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It remains unclear whether estrogenic botanical supplement (EBS use influences breast cancer survivors' health-related outcomes. Methods We examined the associations of EBS use with health-related quality of life (HRQOL, with fatigue, and with 15 hormone-related symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats among 767 breast cancer survivors participating in the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL Study. HRQOL was measured by the Medical Outcomes Study short form-36 physical and mental component scale summary score. Fatigue was measured by the Revised-Piper Fatigue Scale score. Results Neither overall EBS use nor the number of EBS types used was associated with HRQOL, fatigue, or hormone-related symptoms. However, comparisons of those using each specific type of EBS with non-EBS users revealed the following associations. Soy supplements users were more likely to have a better physical health summary score (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-2.70. Flaxseed oil users were more likely to have a better mental health summary score (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.05-2.94. Ginseng users were more likely to report severe fatigue and several hormone-related symptoms (all ORs ≥ 1.7 and all 95% CIs exclude 1. Red clover users were less likely to report weight gain, night sweats, and difficulty concentrating (all OR approximately 0.4 and all 95% CIs exclude 1. Alfalfa users were less likely to experience sleep interruption (OR = 0.28, 95% CI = 0.12-0.68. Dehydroepiandrosterone users were less likely to have hot flashes (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.14-0.82. Conclusions Our findings indicate that several specific types of EBS might have important influences on a woman's various aspects of quality of life, but further verification is necessary.

  4. Target and non-target toxicity of botanical insecticide derived from Couroupita guianensis L. flower against generalist herbivore, Spodoptera litura Fab. and an earthworm, Eisenia foetida Savigny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsankar, Athirstam; Vasantha-Srinivasan, Prabhakaran; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan; Thanigaivel, Annamalai; Edwin, Edward-Sam; Selin-Rani, Selvaraj; Kalaivani, Kandaswamy; Hunter, Wayne B; Alessandro, Rocco T; Abdel-Megeed, Ahmed; Paik, Chae-Hoon; Duraipandiyan, Veeramuthu; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2016-11-01

    Botanical insecticides may provide alternatives to synthetic insecticides for controlling Spodoptera litura (F.) and they are target specific, biodegradable, and harmless to mammals. Eight natural chemical compounds with larvicidal activity were identified from fraction F6 of C. guianensis flower extract. Probit analysis of 95% confidence level exposed an LC50 of 223ppm against S. litura third instar larvae. The growth and development of S. litura was affected in sub-lethal concentrations of fraction F6 (50, 100, 150 and 200ppm) compared to controls. Similarly nutritional indices values decreased significantly compared to controls. Fraction F6 also damaged the gut epithelial layer and brush border membrane (BBM). This study also resolved the effects of toxicity to non-target earthworm treated with fraction F6 and chemical pesticides (monotrophos and cypermethrin) and the results showed that fraction F6 had no harmful effect on E. fetida. Further, fraction F6 was eluted and sub fractions F6c (50ppm) showed high mortality against S. litura third instar larvae. Octacosane from fraction F6c was established and confirmed using IR spectrum and HPLC. The time of retention of fraction F6c was confirmed with the octacosane standard. Fraction F6 of C. guianensis extract caused dose-dependent mortality towards S. litura. Octacosane in fraction F6c was establish to be the prominent chemical compound associated with causing mortality but other compounds present in the fraction F6 were shown to be associated with changes in development of S. litura at low dosages. S. litura at low dosage. Therefore, these findings suggest that octacosane may be one of the major insecticidal compounds affecting S. litura survival. PMID:27476000

  5. Team Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio S. Mello

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a model of team composition. Heterogeneous teams have a greater variety of information sources than homogeneous teams. If information and preferences can be expressed openly, heterogeneous teams reach better decisions. However, members of heterogeneous teams are more likely to diverge in their preferences with respect to courses of action, which is reflected in lower effort. Team leaders who are likely to be either uninformed or well informed about project payoffs prefer t...

  6. Composite Higgses

    CERN Document Server

    Bellazzini, Brando; Serra, Javi

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of composite Higgs models in light of the discovery of the Higgs boson. The small value of the physical Higgs mass suggests that the Higgs quartic is likely loop generated, thus models with tree-level quartics will generically be more tuned. We classify the various models (including bona fide composite Higgs, little Higgs, holographic composite Higgs, twin Higgs and dilatonic Higgs) based on their predictions for the Higgs potential, review the basic ingredients of each of them, and quantify the amount of tuning needed, which is not negligible in any model. We explain the main ideas for generating flavor structure and the main mechanisms for protecting against large flavor violating effects, and present a summary of the various coset models that can result in realistic pseudo-Goldstone Higgses. We review the current experimental status of such models by discussing the electroweak precision, flavor and direct search bounds, and comment on UV completions and on ways to incorporate dark ma...

  7. The Genus Myrtus L. in Algeria: Composition and Biological Aspects of Essential Oils from M. communis and M. nivellei: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzabata, Amel; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange; Cavaleiro, Carlos; Salgueiro, Ligia; Tomi, Félix

    2016-06-01

    The genus Myrtus L. (Myrtaceae family) comprises two species, Myrtus communis L. (known as common myrtle) growing wild all around the Mediterranean basin and Myrtus nivellei Batt. and Trab. (known as Saharan myrtle), found in central Sahara. Only one country, Algeria, hosts both species, M. communis in the North and M. nivellei in the South. The aim of this review was to collect, summarize, and compare the main results reported relative to the essential oils isolated from aerial parts of both species: botanical aspects, habitat, traditional use, chemical composition, new compounds, antimicrobial activity, antioxidant activity, anti-inflammatory effect, and insecticidal activity. Both essential oils have potential applications in human health. PMID:27159587

  8. Translation into Portuguese of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Jefferson Prado, Regina Y. Hirai, and Cíntia Kameyama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  9. Translation into Russian of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?” Translated by Irina V. Belyaeva and Maria S. Vorontsova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  10. Translation into Chinese of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Li-Bing Zhang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Knapp

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC. The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank. Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon.

  11. Fitossociologia e similaridade florística entre trechos de Cerrado sentido restrito em interflúvio e em vale no Jardim Botânico de Brasília, DF Phytossociology and floristic similarity between plateau and valley `Cerrado` woody vegetation in the Brasília Botanic Gardens, Federal District, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Souza da Fonseca

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a composição florística, densidade e área basal do componente lenhoso do cerrado sentido restrito em duas situações num gradiente topográfico, designadas interflúvio (I e vale (V, no Jardim Botânico de Brasília, DF. Foram alocadas em cada área 10 parcelas permanentes de 20x50m para amostragem de todos os indivíduos com diâmetro basal DB(30cm> 5cm. A classificação por UPGMA (Índices de Sørensen e Morisita foi usada para a avaliação da similaridade entre parcelas. A análise da fitossociologia mostrou que as espécies mais importantes no interflúvio foram: Ouratea hexasperma (A. St.Hil Baill., Miconia ferruginata DC. e Dalbergia miscolobium Benth., enquanto que no vale foram: Eriotheca pubescens (Mart. & Zucc. Schott & Endl., Ouratea hexasperma (A. St.-Hil. Baill. e Schefflera macrocarpa (Seem D.C. Frodin. Os índices de similaridade variaram entre 0,26 a 0,81 (Sørensen e 0,06 a 0,92 (Morisita. A classificação por UPGMA indicou dois grupos principais, que coincidiram com as posições no relevo: interflúvio e vale. Os resultados salientaram a topografia como forte determinante na distribuição de algumas das populações e comunidades lenhosas, por meio de sua influência na variação da profundidade do lençol freático, que afetou a composição florística, a densidade (I/V=1.219/956 ind.ha-1 e a área basal (I/V=8,56/5,64m².ha-1 nos Cerrados sentido restrito de interflúvio (I e vale (V estudados.This study aims to check differences in the floristic composition and structure of the woody vegetation of the cerrado (sensu stricto in two distinct topographic positions, Interfluve (I and Valley Slope (V area in the Brasília Botanic Gardens, Federal District, Brazil. In each area ten 20x50m permanent plots were located to survey individuals, basal diameter BD(30cm > 5cm. UPGMA classification (Sørensen and Morisita similarity indices was used to assess similarity among plots

  12. Concrete compositions and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irvin; Lee, Patricia Tung; Patterson, Joshua

    2015-06-23

    Provided herein are compositions, methods, and systems for cementitious compositions containing calcium carbonate compositions and aggregate. The compositions find use in a variety of applications, including use in a variety of building materials and building applications.

  13. Travel in Famous World Botanica GardenS:San Paulo Botanical Garden%世界著名植物园之旅--巴西圣保罗植物园

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢维荪

    2005-01-01

    @@ 巴西圣保罗植物园Sao PauloBotanical Garden位于圣保罗市Agua Funda区.圣保罗是巴西最大的城市,也是巴西的制造业中心,素有"巴西的老黄牛"之称.尽管如此,该市仍辟出143公顷土地建设植物园,而且该园的运行经费主要由州政府负担,足见巴西政府对园林事业的重视.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis identifies gene networks regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ that control distinct effects of different botanical estrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ping; Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep; Li, Jilong; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C Michael; Helferich, William; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ mediate the actions of endogenous estrogens as well as those of botanical estrogens (BEs) present in plants. BEs are ingested in the diet and also widely consumed by postmenopausal women as dietary supplements, often as a substitute for the loss of endogenous estrogens at menopause. However, their activities and efficacies, and similarities and differences in gene expression programs with respect to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol (E2) are not fully understood. Because gene expression patterns underlie and control the broad physiological effects of estrogens, we have investigated and compared the gene networks that are regulated by different BEs and by E2. Our aim was to determine if the soy and licorice BEs control similar or different gene expression programs and to compare their gene regulations with that of E2. Gene expression was examined by RNA-Seq in human breast cancer (MCF7) cells treated with control vehicle, BE or E2. These cells contained three different complements of ERs, ERα only, ERα+ERβ, or ERβ only, reflecting the different ratios of these two receptors in different human breast cancers and in different estrogen target cells. Using principal component, hierarchical clustering, and gene ontology and interactome analyses, we found that BEs regulated many of the same genes as did E2. The genes regulated by each BE, however, were somewhat different from one another, with some genes being regulated uniquely by each compound. The overlap with E2 in regulated genes was greatest for the soy isoflavones genistein and S-equol, while the greatest difference from E2 in gene expression pattern was observed for the licorice root BE liquiritigenin. The gene expression pattern of each ligand depended greatly on the cell background of ERs present. Despite similarities in gene expression pattern with E2, the BEs were generally less stimulatory of genes promoting proliferation and were more pro-apoptotic in their

  15. A randomized, double blind, placebo and active comparator controlled pilot study of UP446, a novel dual pathway inhibitor anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampalis John S

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current use of prescribed or over the counter non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs for pain and osteoarthritis (OA have untoward gastrointestinal and cardiovascular related side effects, as a result the need for a safe and effective alternative has become unequivocally crucial. Method A randomized, double blind, placebo and active controlled pilot study of a novel dual pathway, COX1/2 and LOX, inhibitor anti-inflammatory agent of botanical origin, UP446 was conducted. Sixty subjects (age 40-75 with symptomatic OA of the hip or knee were assigned to 4 treatment groups (n = 15; Group A0 (Placebo, CMC capsule, Group A1 (UP446 250 mg/day, Group A2 (UP446 500 mg/day and Group A3 (Celecoxib, 200 mg/day. MOS-SF-36 and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC data were collected at baseline and after 30, 60 and 90 days of treatment as a measure of efficacy. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, plasma thrombin time (PTT, fructosamine, Hematology, clinical chemistry and fecal occult blood were monitored for safety. Results Statistically significant decrease in WOMAC pain score were observed for Group A1 at day 90, Group A2 at 30 and 90 days and Group A3 at 60 and 90 days. Statistically significant decrease in WOMAC stiffness score were observed for Group A1 and Group A2 at 30, 60 and 90 days; but not for Group A0 and Group A3. The mean change in WOMAC functional impairment scores were statistically significant for Group A1 and Group A2 respectively at 30 days (p = 0.006 and p = 0.006, at 60 days (p = 0.016 and p = 0.002 and at 90 days (p = 0.018 and p = 0.002, these changes were not significant for Group A0 and Group A3. Based on MOS -SF-36 questionnaires, statistically significant improvements in physical function, endurance and mental health scores were observed for all active treatment groups compared to placebo. No significant changes suggestive of toxicity in routine hematologies

  16. AKL1, a botanical mixture for the treatment of asthma: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Sofia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite effective treatments, asthma outcomes remain suboptimal. Interest exists in complementary therapies, particularly in herbal remedies for asthma treatment, currently with inconclusive evidence of efficacy. The encapsulated botanical mixture AKL1 has anecdotal evidence of effectiveness in asthma. Methods We performed a randomised controlled cross over study comparing the effectiveness of AKL1 with indistinguishable placebo as add-on therapy in patients uncontrolled on standard asthma treatment. Thirty two adult asthmatics completed a 36 week trial consisting of a 4 week single blind run in period, during which placebo was added to usual treatment, a 12 week double blind active phase in which subjects received AKL1 or placebo, a single blind 8 week washout period receiving placebo and a final 12 week double blind cross-over active treatment phase. Daily diaries were kept of peak expiratory flow and symptoms, and spirometry, validated symptom and health status questionnaire scores and adverse events were monitored at study visits. Paired T tests were used to compare the effects of placebo and AKL1 on outcomes. Changes in outcome measures over treatment phases are presented as means and 95% confidence intervals (CI of means. Results No significant differences in lung function (active-placebo were found (Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second: mean difference [95% CI] = 0.01 [-0.12 to 0.14] L, p = 0.9. Peak Expiratory Flow: -4.08 [-35.03 to 26.89]. L/min, p = 0.8. Trends to clinical improvements favouring active treatment were however consistently seen in the patient-centered outcomes: Asthma Control Questionnaire mean difference (active – placebo [95% CI] = -0.35 [-0.78 to 0.07], p = 0.10, Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire mean difference 0.42 [-0.08 to 0.93], p = 0.09, Leicester Cough Questionnaire mean difference 0.49, [-0.18 to 1.16], p = 0.15. Nine exacerbations occurred during placebo treatment and five whilst on

  17. Research on a pesticide residue screening platform in botanical food%植物源性食品中农药残留筛选平台研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯超; 徐骞; 金玉娥; 卢大胜; 陈冲; 熊丽蓓; 汪国权

    2015-01-01

    目的:针对植物源性食品中的未知农药残留,在原农药残留筛选平台的基础上,采用气相色谱-三重四极杆质谱联用仪和UPLC-Q-Orbitrap两种色质技术并配合商业和自建农药筛查库建立共1200多个农药及其降解产物的筛选平台,满足未知农残的快速筛选要求。方法建立筛选平台相关筛选方法和准则,并通过两次欧盟国际比对(EUPT)对该平台进行验证评估。结果该平台在24 h内可完成农残筛选,筛选方法基于农药数据库和空白基质,两次能力验证中阳性化合物的检出率均在90%以上且结果无假阳性。结论该平台利用串联质谱和高分辨质谱的高选择性,结合农药数据库和智能筛选软件,在无标准参考物质的情况下实现非靶向农药的快速筛查。%Objective To establish a rapid non-targeted pesticide residue screening platform involving more than 1200 pesticides residues and their degradation products by using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry/mass-spectrometry and ultra performance liquid chromatography-Q-Orbitrap technology for unknown pesticide residue in botanical food, on the basis of original screening platform. Methods The principal and criterion of pesticides screening platform were established, and the platform was evaluated through twice proficient tests from Europe Union Reference Lab. Results The platform successfully completed the tests based on comprehensive database and blank matrix in 24 h with 90% screening rate and without false positive. Conclusion The platform achieved rapid screening of non-targeted pesticide residue without reference of standard materials by using the properties of high selectivity of triple quadrupole and high-resolution mass spectrometer combined with comprehensive pesticides database and advanced compound screening software.

  18. 杭州植物园野生鸟类多样性调查%Wild Bird Diversity of Hangzhou Botanic Garden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于炜; 吕敏; 刘锦

    2011-01-01

    2009年7月~2010年8月,采用样线法和定点观测法对杭州植物园所辖范围内的野生鸟类进行调查观测,共记录到鸟类9目26科94种,占浙江省鸟类种数的22.71%。其中,国家Ⅱ级保护物种1种。从留居类型看,留鸟49种,夏候鸟16种,冬候鸟24种,旅鸟5种。属古北界的有37种,占39.36%,东洋界54种,占57.45%,两界广布种3种,占3.19%,鸟类组成具有由东洋界向古北界过渡的特征。该区鸟类多样性水平较高,从调查研究的4种生境看,多样性指数(Shannon-Wiener指数)从高到低分别是疏林、灌丛、山林、水域。对比分析发现疏林和山林之间的物种相似性指数最高,水域和疏林之间的相似性指数最低。%We completed line - transect surveys and point - counts at Hangzhou Botanic Garden to quantify wild bird diversity between July 2009 and August 2010.We recorded 94 bird species of 26 families and 9 orders,accounting for 23%of the bird species reported for Zhejiang Province.Among our records,1 recorded species is nationally protected at category 2,49 species are resident in Hangzhou,16 species are summer visitors,24 species are winter visitors,and 5 species are typically recorded only on migration.Recorded species are palaearctic(37 species or 39%),oriental(54 species or 57%) and globally widespread species(3 species or 3%).The avifauna of the Hangzhou region represents a transition from the Palaearctic to the Oriental. The wild bird diversity of this region was high and the bird diversity indices of various habitats ranked from high to low as:open forest,shrub,mountain forest,and water body.Similarity was highest between open forest and mountain forest,and lowest between water body and open forest.

  19. Composite seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns the area of annular composite seals particularly intended for being pressed between two surfaces to be applied tightly to each other, in a leak tight manner. Metal seals, particularly those of the type comprising a core made of a spiral spring and surrounded by a metal lining, are growing considerably in use at the present time, particularly because of their ability to withstand high temperatures and their life which is very superior to elastomer seals and they are being considered for use in applications linked to a relatively dangerous environment, for instance in the area of nuclear energy, where the techniques make use of highly toxic gases, acid solutions, and more generally different types of dangerous substances

  20. Lubricant composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubricating compositions and shaped articles composed thereof are described which consist essentially of about 30 to about 60% by weight of an oil of lubricating viscosity, about 20 to about 50% by weight of a high molecular weight polymer, and about 20 about 50% by weight of a heat conductive agent capable of conducting heat away from a bearing surface where it is generated. The high molecular weight polymer may, for example, be polyethylene, having average molecular weights in the range from about 1.0 X 105 to about 5.0 X 106. The oil may be a mineral oil, a diester oil or preferably a synthetic hydrocarbon oil having a viscosity in the range from about 13 to about 1200 mm''/s (Mm2/s) at 380C. (1000F.) the heat conductive agent may be powdered zinc oxide, aluminum powder, or equivalents thereof in this invention. The compositions are semi-rigid gels which may be formed in a mold and used as is, or which may be shaped further after molding. The gels are formed by blending the heat conductive agent and polymer and then blending that mixture with the oil and heating to a temperature above the softening temperature of the polymer for a period of time (About 5 to about 75 minutes) sufficient that the mixture will form a firm, tough solid gel on cooling having an oily surface provided by oil exuding from the gel thus producing a lubricative mass operable for extended periods of time. The heat conductive substance dispersed in the gel aids in dissipating heat produced at the bearing surfaces during use thus improving the performance of the gel both in withstanding higher bulk operating temperatures and in resisting breakdown of the gel under prolonged use

  1. Botanic tissue structure and microscopic identification of Agriophyllum squarrosum%沙蓬的组织构造和显微鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕铭; 董焱; 李玉山

    2012-01-01

    目的 对蒙药沙蓬的组织构造和显微特征进行研究.方法 对沙蓬根和茎横切面的组织构造进行显微鉴定,并对根、茎、叶以及果实的粉末显微特征进行鉴别.结果 沙蓬根的横切面呈现异常生长的三生组织构造特征,轴器官为双螺旋状式样结构类型,异常维管束为外韧型维管束.茎的横切面组织构造呈现异常生长的三生构造特征,轴器官为同心环状式样结构类型,皮层附加异常维管束为外韧型维管束,3、4轮同心环状排列.异常维管束之间的结合组织结构式样为径向厚壁木质化型,束间薄壁组织细胞高度木质化,轮层间的薄壁组织细胞较大.根的粉末可见大量草酸钙簇晶,螺纹、网纹、孔纹等多种类型导管,薄壁细胞高度木质化,纤维细长高度木质化,细胞腔明显.茎部粉末可见不等式或不定式气孔,草酸钙簇晶数量众多,导管为螺纹、网纹、孔纹.叶部粉末亦可见不等式或不定式气孔,草酸钙簇晶数量众多,散在或镶嵌于薄壁细胞中,薄壁细胞细长.果实粉末可见大量分支状非腺毛和胚乳细胞,草酸钙簇晶存在于薄壁细胞腔内或镶嵌于细胞间隙,数目极多.结论 该研究成果可用于沙蓬药材的显微鉴定,为制定沙蓬药材的质量标准打下基础.%Objective To study on the botanic tissue structures and microscopic identification of Agriophyllum squarrosum. Methods Observing the botanic tissue structures of the cross sections of the root and stem,microscopic characteristics of the powders of the root, stem, leaf as well as fruit of A. squarrosum with microscopic identification method. Results The tertiary structure characteristics generated due to the abnormal growth were observed in the cross section of the root and stem of A. squarrosum. The axis organ was observed to be the double helix structural type. The xylem occupied inside and the phloem occupied outside in the additional abnormal bundle

  2. --Essential-oil composition of the fruits of six Heracleum L. species from Iran: chemotaxonomic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radjabian, Tayebeh; Salimi, Azam; Rahmani, Nosrat

    2014-12-01

    The fruit essential oils of Heracleum persicum, H. rechingeri, H. gorganicum, H. rawianum, H. pastinacifolium, and H. anisactis from Iran were obtained by hydrodistillation and characterized by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. The oils of the six species were compared to determine the similarities and differences among their compositions. Overall, 36 compounds were identified in the fruit oils, accounting for 92.40-96.74% of the total oil compositions. Aliphatic esters constituted the main fraction of the oils (86.61-94.31%), with octyl acetate and hexyl butyrate as the major components. The oil compositions of species belonging to section Pubescentia (H. persicum, H. gorganicum, and H. rechingeri) were discriminated by equally high contents of both octyl acetate (13.84-20.48%) and hexyl butyrate (17.73-38.36%). On the other hand, the oils of H. rawianum, H. pastinacifolium and H. anisactis, belonging to section Wendia, showed lower hexyl butyrate contents (3.62-6.6%) and higher octyl acetate contents (48.71-75.36%) than the former. Moreover, isoelemicin was identified at low amounts (0.10-2.51%) only in the oils of the latter species. The differences in the oil composition among the six species were investigated by hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses, which indicated that the oil composition confirmed well the taxonomical classification based on the morphological and botanical data, and, thus, may provide a reliable marker to discriminate Heracleum species at the intersectional level. PMID:25491338

  3. The Landscape Planning Analysis of the Orchid Garden in South China Botanical Garden%华南植物园兰园景观规划设计分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚南

    2015-01-01

    植物专类园作为植物园的重要组成部分,具有植物搜集、科研生产、科普展示、园林观赏等功能。华南植物园的兰园是由科研生产型专类园向现代化多功能综合专类园转变的积极尝试,通过对华南植物园兰园的总体布局、景观节点、植物分区、植物种植设计进行分析,以期为植物专类园的构建提供参考和思路。%As an important part of botanical garden, the specified plant garden has the functions of plants collection, scientific research, science popularization exhibition and ornamental show and so on. The Orchid Garden in South China Botanical Garden is a positive experiment from a simple scientific research and production plant theme garden to a modern multi-functional plant theme garden. This paper analyzes overall layout, landscape nodes, plant partitions and planting design of this Orchid Garden, which aims to provide some references for other plant theme garden construction.

  4. Landscape Planning and Design of Shaanxi Crested Ibis Scenic Botanic Garden%陕西朱鹮景区珍稀植物园园林规划设计研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈祺; 陈书文; 魏永强

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of analysis on domestic current situation of the botanical garden building ,according to the Shaanxi Crested Ibis scenic master plan ,planning and design ideas of the rare botanical garden were presen‐ted ,which were divided into three quarters of the southern slope of landscaped tourist area ,display area of Qin‐ba rare plants ,farm game tea catering and entertainment district ,bamboo yuandang valley resort and cultural background of evergreen pear area of north slope ,in accordance with the principles of scientific ,ornamental ,ed‐ucational and artistic unity to build a beautiful ,floral species‐rich forest communities .%在分析国内植物园建设现状的基础上,根据陕西朱鹮景区总体规划方案,提出了珍稀植物园规划设计的思路,将其划分为南坡三季花木观光区、秦巴珍稀植物展示区、农家茶苑饮食娱乐区、筼筜谷竹文化游览区和北坡梨园常绿背景区五个部分,按照科学性、观赏性、教育性与艺术性相统一的原则,构建了景色优美、物种丰富的林木花卉群落。

  5. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  6. Analysis of Rain Garden Construction Technology for Chenshan Botanical Garden in Shanghai%上海辰山植物园雨水花园营建技术浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚丽艳; 陈伟良; 李婷婷; 汤雨琴; 车生泉

    2012-01-01

    在上海辰山植物园“绿环”的堆筑建设及水生专类园的营建技术上,采用雨水花园这种新型节能绿地营造技术,对雨水渗透和滞留以控制雨水径流及控制径流污染为目的,通过功能性植物的合理配置,改变传统雨水管理模式,使园内水资源被重新整理分配,园内地下水得以补充;通过对雨水进行过滤处理,控制水体资源的水质污染,改善了上海辰山植物园的绿地环境、城市水资源调配,并为上海带来了新的绿地景观,为市民提供了游憩环境,更为城市水资源尤其是为雨水资源的利用及管理提供了理论和实践依据.%Rain garden, a new construction technique for energy - saving green belt, is applied to the building of " ring" and A-quatic Plant Garden in Chenshan Botanical Garden of Shanghai. And it performs perfectly in several aspects. Firstly, through retaining and infiltrating the rainwater, and configuring the functional plants appropriately, it replaces the rough traditional rainwater management, which means reallocating the water recourse and supplementing groundwater in garden; secondly, through filtering the rainwater, the rain garden can control water body pollution, which improves the green environment in Chenshan Botanical Garden, and optimizes the reallocation of urban water recourse. At the same time, it brings new green landscape, provides the citizens recreational setting. Besides, it provides theoretical and practical bases for the utilization and management of the urban water recourse, especially rainwater. In sum, the construction technology of rain garden in Chenshan Botanical Garden is a kind of comprehensive technology bringing economic, social and ecological benefits at the same time, which contains great significance for the urban ecological and sustainable development.

  7. Process conditions and volumetric composition in composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is linked to the gravimetric composition, and it is influenced by the conditions of the manufacturing process. A model for the volumetric composition is presented, where the volume fractions of fibers, matrix and porosity are calculated as a...... function of the fiber weight fraction, and where parameters are included for the composite microstructure, and the fiber assembly compaction behavior. Based on experimental data of composites manufactured with different process conditions, together with model predictions, different types of process related...... effects are analyzed. The applied consolidation pressure is found to have a marked effect on the volumetric composition. A power-law relationship is found to well describe the found relations between the maximum obtainable fiber volume fraction and the consolidation pressure. The degree of fiber...

  8. Letter to the Editor Regarding “A Prospective, Controlled Study of the Botanical Compound Mixture LCS101 for Chemotherapy-Induced Hematological Complications in Breast Cancer” by Yaal-Hahoshen et al. (The Oncologist 2011;16:1197–1202)

    OpenAIRE

    Mooiman, Kim D.; Goey, Andrew K.L.; Meijerman, Irma; Beijnen, Jos H.; Schellens, Jan H. M.

    2012-01-01

    A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study by Yaal-Hahoshen et al. published in a recent issue of The Oncologist that concluded that the botanical mixture LCS101 prevented hematological complications in breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline- and taxane-based chemotherapy is critically reviewed.

  9. Trametes versicolor extract modifies human fecal microbiota composition in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhuo-Teng; Liu, Bo; Mukherjee, Purna; Newburg, David S

    2013-06-01

    Trametes versicolor is a mushroom used as a traditional Chinese medicine (Yun-zhi) for a wide array of seemingly disparate conditions. We hypothesized that many of its multiple purported activities could be mediated through stimulation of beneficial mutualist components of the microbiota. Human fecal microbiota was cultured anaerobically to determine its ability to ferment a common extract of T. versicolor, designated polysaccharide peptide (PSP), and the ability of PSP to alter the composition of the microbial community. The presence of PSP and fructooligosaccharides (FOS, a common prebiotic) in the medium, but not cellulose, significantly increased levels of Bifidobacterium spp. PSP also elevated Lactobacillus spp., while reducing Clostridium spp., Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp. Levels of Streptococcus spp., Bacteroides spp. and Escherichia did not significantly change. Fermentation of PSP increased the concentration of organic acids (lactate and short-chain fatty acids), decreased the pH, and induced β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase activities. The genera of the human microbiota that are promoted by FOS and other prebiotics are also stimulated by the Trametes versicolor extract, PSP. Thus, Trametes versicolor, a common East Asian botanical, contains putative prebiotic agents that alter human gut microbiota and pH. This prebiotic-like activity may help explain some of the plethora of the health benefits attributed to this traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:23435630

  10. ARQUEOLOGÍA URBANA E IMAGINARIO: EL SUPUESTO POLVORÍN COLONIAL EN EL JARDÍN BOTÁNICO DE BUENOS AIRES (Urban Archaeology and Imaginary: the Colonial Powder Keg in the Buenos Aires Botanical Garden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Schávelzon

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Durante los meses de agosto a noviembre de 2005 se hicieron excavaciones en el lugar considerado como el del antiguo polvorín de Cueli, depósito de armas y pólvora de los últimos años del gobierno colonial, ahora localizado en los terrenos del Jardín Botánico. Este informe presenta los resultados obtenidos, los que contrastamos con los de una pequeña excavación de 1986, ya que contradice lo asumido en dicha oportunidad. ENGLISH: During the months of August to November of 2005, excavations were made at the site of Cueli, an old powder keg. This site, now located on the grounds of the Botanical Garden, includes gun and powder reserves from the last years of colonial rule. This report is contrasted with the results of a small excavation made in 1986, as it contradicts the assumptions made at that time.

  11. 植物源农药防治根结线虫研究进展%Research Progresses on the Prevention and Control of Meloidogyne spp.by Botanical Nematocides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘计权; 韩晓静; 谢树莲

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the prevention and control of Meloidogyne spp. are the hotspots in the field of nematode research at present and it has been widely concerned preventing and controlling Meloidogyne spp. by botanical nematocides at home and abroad. More than 300 plant species with nematicidal activity have been reported concerning the application of botanical extracts and powders. The active ingredients include alkaloids, bioflavonoids, terpenes and other compounds. The mechanisms may influence the nutrient contents and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, damaging the nervous system excitatory transmission and injuring nematode body wall and digestive tract and so on. In addition, the present problems were proposed and the future developments were prospected.%根结线虫的防治是目前线虫研究领域的热点.近年来植物源农药防治根结线虫已引起了国内外学者的广泛关注,已报道的具有杀线活性的植物约有300多种.作用方式有利用植物源提取液和植物源材料粉末处理土壤.有效化学成分包括生物碱类、生物类黄酮、萜烯类和其他化合物.作用机制包括影响线虫体内营养物质含量,影响抗氧化酶系活性,影响神经系统兴奋传导和损伤线虫体壁、消化道等.提出了目前存在的问题及对未来发展前景的展望.

  12. Volumetric composition in composites and historical data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilholt, Hans; Madsen, Bo

    2013-01-01

    The obtainable volumetric composition in composites is of importance for the prediction of mechanical and physical properties, and in particular to assess the best possible (normally the highest) values for these properties. The volumetric model for the composition of (fibrous) composites gives...... guidance to the optimal combination of fibre content, matrix content and porosity content, in order to achieve the best obtainable properties. Several composite materials systems have been shown to be handleable with this model. An extensive series of experimental data for the system of cellulose fibres...... and polymer (resin) was produced in 1942 – 1944, and these data have been (re-)analysed by the volumetric composition model, and the property values for density, stiffness and strength have been evaluated. Good agreement has been obtained and some further observations have been extracted from the...

  13. Comparison of Botanical Characters and Composition of Essential Oil of Four Varieties of Mint%四种薄荷植物学性状和精油成分的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶兰荣; 姚雷; 徐勇; 张艳玲; 吴亚妮; 杨森艳

    2006-01-01

    本研究对上海地区引种成功的四种薄荷:黑胡椒薄荷(Menthaxpiperita cv.)、薰衣草薄荷(Mentha piperita'Lavandula')菠萝薄荷(Metha suaveolens'Variegata')以及留兰香(Mentha spicata)的植物学性状和精油成分进行了分析比较.结果表明:四种薄荷的植物学性状差异显著;黑胡椒薄荷和薰衣草薄荷的精油含有率较高,分别为0.42和0.34 mL·(100g)-1·FW,菠萝薄荷和留兰香的精油含有率低,分别为0.009和0.088 mL·(100g)-1·FW;黑胡椒薄荷精油的主要成分为薄荷呋喃27.49%、薄荷醇27.47%以及薄荷酮18.76%等,薰衣草薄荷精油中芳樟醇51.11%和乙酸芳樟酯13.58%是其主要成分,菠萝薄荷精油中氧化胡椒烯酮的含量超过80%,留兰香精油的主要成分为氧化胡椒烯酮39.66%和柠檬烯20.49%.目前引种的四种薄荷,黑胡椒薄荷精油尚没有达到国际该类产品的质量标准;薰衣草薄荷既可以提取精油,也具有较高的观赏性;菠萝薄荷只适宜作为观赏性品种种植;本地区引种的留兰香,不宜用于提取留兰香油.

  14. Gênero Pimenta: aspectos botânicos, composição química e potencial farmacológico Pimenta genus: botanical aspects, chemical composition and pharmacological potential

    OpenAIRE

    J.A.M Paula; J.B. Reis; L.H.M. Ferreira; A.C.S. Menezes; J.R. Paula

    2010-01-01

    A família Myrtaceae possui representantes de grande interesse medicinal e o gênero Pimenta é um dos que merecem destaque. A maioria das espécies desse gênero é nativa da América Central, com exceção da Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus (Gomes) L. R. Landrum, nativa nas regiões centro-oeste e sudeste do Brasil. O presente estudo teve como objetivo revisar aspectos botânicos, químicos e farmacológicos descritos na literatura sobre o gênero Pimenta. Os dados foram obtidos de artigos originais e revisõe...

  15. Forage intake and botanical composition of feed for cattle fed Brachiaria/legume mixtures Consumo e composição da forragem ingerida por bovinos alimentados com Brachiaria e uma leguminosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Macedo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A key contribution to study the cycling of nutrients in soil/plant/animal systems is the evaluation of the consumption of forage and their nutrients by cattle. The objective of this study was to test techniques to evaluate faecal production, in vitro digestibility, forage consumption and the proportion of legume in the acquired diet. Five Zebu steer calves were confined and fed five diets of different combinations of Brachiaria dictyoneura and Desmodium ovalifolium. All quantities of faeces were collected per animal and these values were found to compare favourably with those derived from using the chromium oxide technique. In vitro digestibility ranged from 7 to 10% higher than the actual in vivo digestibility. Faecal samples from steers fed with diets with 25% or more of grass in the mixture were found to be depleted in δ13C between 1.7 and 2.1‰, but no depletion was observed when the diet was 100% D. ovalifolium. There was a positive linear regression (r² = 0.97*** of the δ13C of the diet with the δ13C of faeces, but if the acquired diet contained a very high proportion of legume, the legume content could be underestimated by as much as 10%. None of the internal indicators, such as lignin or ash content of the diets, were useful to predict feed intake, but the chromium oxide external indicator performed satisfactorily. The 13C analysis of the faeces was an effective predictor of the proportion of the legume in the consumed diet.Uma contribuição fundamental para o estudo da ciclagem de nutrientes no sistema solo/planta/ animal é a avaliação do consumo pelo gado de forragem e dos nutrientes nela contidos. Testaram-se, sob condições controladas, técnicas para avaliar a produção fecal, digestibilidade in vitro, consumo de forragem e a proporção de leguminosa ingerida na dieta. Cinco novilhos de Zebu foram confinados e alimentados com quantidades conhecidas de cinco rações com diferentes proporções de Brachiaria dictyoneura e Desmodium ovalifolium. Todas as fezes bovinas foram recolhidas e pesadas e estes valores foram comparáveis com as estimativas da produção fecal derivadas do uso da técnica de óxido de cromo. A digestibilidade in vitro variou de 7 a 10% acima da digestibilidade in vivo atual. Amostras de fezes de novilhos alimentados com dietas com 25% ou mais de capim na mistura apresentaram abundância de 13C por entre 1,7 e 2,1‰, mas este empobrecimento isotópico não foi observado quando a dieta era com 100% D. ovalifolium. Houve correlação positiva linear (r² = 0,97*** entre δ13C da dieta com o δ13C das fezes, mas o conteúdo de leguminosa foi subestimado em mais de 10% quando a dieta ingerida foi de 100% de leguminosa. Nenhum dos indicadores internos, como o conteúdo de lignina ou cinzas, foram úteis para prever o consumo de forragem, mas os resultados da técnica utilizando óxido crômico como indicador externo foram satisfatórios. A abundância de 13C das fezes foi indicador adequado da proporção da leguminosa na dieta.

  16. 两种药用植物叶的营养成分和药用价值分析%Analysis of Nutrient Composition and Pharmaceutic Values of Two Types of Pharmaceutic Botanic Leaver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高贵珍; 曹稳根; 刘小阳; 方雪梅

    2003-01-01

    本文对豆腐柴、杜仲两种药用植物叶的营养成分含量和氨基酸的组成、营养价值进行了研究评价,并对两种植物的药用价值进行了分析,为更好的开发利用这两种资源植物提供科学依据.

  17. Identification of the genotype from the content and composition of the essential oil of lemon verbena (Aloysia citriodora Palau).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Alejandra; Van Baren, Catalina M; Di Leo Lira, Paola M; Bandoni, Arnaldo L

    2007-10-17

    Aloysia citriodora accessions from cultivated material, botanical collections, and wild populations were studied by means of their biomass and essential oil production and composition to assist the selection of the most promising genotype. The study was carried out through both field experiments during two year's time and laboratory processes. Data were evaluated by means of univariate and multivariate techniques. Aloysia citriodora intraspecific variation was accounted for by differences in both yield and chemical profiles of the essential oils, but no differences were found in the biomass production. Three chemotypes were identified according to qualitative and quantitative differences of the essential oils. For the higher contents of neral and geranial, Mendoza accession was the most promising to be encouraged for future crops. PMID:17880159

  18. Effects of Livestock Grazing on Vegetation Composition and Soil Moisture Properties in Grazed and Non-Grazed Range Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of vegetation and soil dynamics on grazed and non-grazed rangelands are important prerequisites for improving range management. For this reason, the effects of excluding grazing animals for 26 years were studied on vegetation and soil dynamics at two rangeland condition sites (enclosure and exclosure in Isfahan province, Iran. The vegetation cover and edaphic characteristics were studied simultaneously in both grazed and non-grazed range sites. In this study vegetation characteristics, as well as vegetation floristic, canopy cover, plant density, botanical composition, plant biodiversity and soil moisture infiltration were recorded during the grazing seasons of 2006 to 2007. Vegetation characteristics, in particular vegetation cover and plant density, differed significantly between the non-grazed (enclosed and grazed sites and increased significantly in the non-grazed range site. The vegetation cover in the non-grazed site consisted mainly of class I and II plants while class III plants predominated in the grazed site. There was no significant difference in the botanical composition of the two areas. There was a significant increase in Gramineae in the enclosure site compared to the surrounding grazed site, but there was a considerable decrease in forb species. We also observed a significant decrease in soil infiltration rates in the grazed range site compared to the enclosed range site. Litter content was higher inside and exposed bare soil greater outside the enclosure. Infiltration rates were higher in the enclosed area than in the grazed exclosure area throughout the grazing season. A comparison of vegetation and soil infiltration within the enclosure showed that vegetation condition and soil infiltration were good and that removal of grazing animals, as in the enclosure, causes an improvement in rangeland condition in this region.

  19. Pasture management effects on diet composition and cattle performance on continuously stocked rhizoma peanut-mixed grass swards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, E; Williams, M J; Chase, C C; Sollenberger, L E; Hammond, A C; Kalmbacher, R S; Kunkle, W E

    2001-09-01

    In Florida, rhizoma peanut (RP; Arachis glabrata Benth.), a tropical legume, combines the attributes of excellent nutritive value, competitive ability with tropical grasses, and high animal performance. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spring N fertilization (0 vs 35 kg/ha) and summer stocking rate (1.5 and 2.5 bulls/ha) on herbage mass, nutritive value, herbage allowance, and diet botanical composition of grazed RP-grass swards and their interaction with growth and development of bulls (Senepol, and Brahman or Angus). The study was conducted in 1995 and 1996 at the USDA, ARS, Subtropical Agriculture Research Station in Brooksville, FL. Nitrogen was applied in April of each year, and all pastures were stocked with 1.5 bulls/ha until approximately July of each year, when stocking rate was increased on half the pastures to 2.5 bulls/ha. Herbage mass (HM, kg/ha), herbage allowance (HA, kg/kg BW), nutritive value (CP and in vitro organic matter digestibility [IVOMD]), and diet botanical composition (fecal microhistological) readings were determined. Animal measurements included total and seasonal (spring vs summer), ADG, hip height (cm), scrotal circumference (SC, cm), and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, mg/dL). Herbage mass (3.0 +/- 0.12 Mg/ha and 3.4 +/- 0.13 Mg/ha in 1995 and 1996, respectively) was not affected by nitrogen fertilization or stocking rate but was affected by season (P x breed interactions (P Angus than for Senepol or Brahman. There were no differences in final BW, SC, BCS, hip height, or PUN due to treatments, but breed differences were noted (P < 0.05) for all measures except BCS. PMID:11583434

  20. EFFECTS OF CREATINE, GINSENG, AND ASTRAGALUS SUPPLEMENTATION ON STRENGTH, BODY COMPOSITION, MOOD, AND BLOOD LIPIDS DURING STRENGTH-TRAINING IN OLDER ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Rogers

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of supplemental dietary creatine and a botanical extract consisting of ginseng and astragalus were evaluated in 44 adults aged 55-84 years participating in a 12-week strength-training program. Participants consumed creatine only (Cr, creatine plus botanical extract (CrBE, or placebo (PL, and performed bench press, lat pull down, biceps curl, leg press, knee extension, and knee flexion for 3 sets of 8-12 reps on 3 days per week for 12 weeks. The 1-repetition maximum for each exercise, body composition (full-body DEXA, blood lipids, and mood states were evaluated before and after the intervention. Training improved (p < 0.05 strength and lean mass for all groups, however greater gains were observed with Cr and CrBE compared with placebo (but no difference was found between Cr and CrBE. Only CrBE improved blood lipids and self-reported vigor, and the CrBE group lost significantly more body fat and gained more bench press strength than Cr. These results indicate that strength and lean mass gains achieved by older adults participating in a strength training program can be enhanced with creatine supplementation, and that ginseng and astragalus may provide additional health and psychological benefits. However, these herbs do not appear to have an additive effect on strength and lean mass gains during training