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Sample records for boron-added low-carbon steels

  1. Plasticity of low carbon stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Kareva, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the temperature range 800-1200 0 C and with strain rates of from 10 -3 to 3 s -1 , austenitic (000Kh18N12) and austenitic-ferrite (000Kh26N6) very low carbon stainless steels containing 0.02-0.03% C exhibit no higher resilience than corresponding ordinary steels containing 0.10-0.12% C. However, the plasticity of such steels (particularly two-phase steels) at 900-1100 0 C is appreciably inferior owing to the development of intergranular brittle fracture. Pressure treatment preceded by partial cooling of the surface to 850 0 C yields rolled and forged products with acceptable indices but is inconvenient technically. At the Zlatoustovsk and Ashin metallurgical plants successful tests have been performed involving the forging and rolling of such steels heated to 1280-1300 0 C without partial cooling; it was necessary to improve the killing conditions, correct the chemical composition (increasing the proportion of ferrite) and take measures against heat loss. (author)

  2. Low carbon manganese-nickel-niobium steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heisterkamp, F.; Hulka, K.

    1983-11-01

    Experimental heats of a low carbon-manganese-0.5% nickel-0.15% niobium steel have been rolled to plates between 13.5 and 50 mm thickness and to a 16 mm hot strip. Various combinations of soaking temperatures form 1100 0 C to 1300 0 C and of finish rolling temperatures between 710 0 C and 930 0 C have been investigated. From mechanical properties obtained, one can conclude that the investigated steel composition provides very good properties e.g. for pipe steels X65 to X75. In particular, the toughness at low temperature is outstanding despite relaxed rolling conditions. Metalographic and special investigations such as electron microscopy, texture evaluation and chemical extraction, correlated with applied rolling schedules and the mechanical properties obtained resulted in a comprehensive understanding about the benefits of high niobium metallurgy combined with nickel addition. All practically applied welding processes generated mechanical properties, in particular toughness of the weldment, that meet arctic specifications.(Author) [pt

  3. Grain Refinement of Low Carbon Martensitic Steel by Heat Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    N. V. Kolebina; V. L. Danilov; S. Frechinet

    2015-01-01

    The low-carbon steels have good corrosion and technological properties. Hot deformation is the main operation in manufacturing the parts from these steels. So one of the important properties of the material is a property of plasticity. The grain size significantly influences on the ductility properties of steel. The grain size of steel depends on the chemical composition of the crystallization process, heat treatment, and steel machining. There are plenty methods to have grain refinement. How...

  4. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka. 2. E-mail: benjamin.ezekoye@unn.edu.ng; bezekoye@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, ...

  5. intercritical heat treatments effects on low carbon steels quenched

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR B. A. EZEKOYE

    hardening and precipitation effects [2]. Of all the metallic materials of engineering ... of this work was to investigate the effect of diverse intercritical heat treatments on the ... INTERCRITICAL HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON LOW CARBON STEELS QUENCHED FROM INTERMEDIATE ... Series II- Intercritical quench with.

  6. Intercritical Heat Treatment Effects on Low Carbon Steels Quenched ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six low carbon steels containing carbon in the range 0.13-0.18wt%C were studied after intercritical quenching, intercritical quenching with low temperature tempering, intercritical annealing and intercritical normalizing using specimens originally quenched from intermediate austenitizing temperature (9500C). The studies ...

  7. Ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steels after quenching and tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Kolan, C.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and Charpy V impact strength properties of new advanced ultra low carbon bainitic (ULBC) steels after water quenching and tempering (WQT) have been investigated. Their chemical compositions are given. The nine continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT) of the new ULCB steel grades have been established. The CCT diagrams for ULCB N i steels containing 9% Ni - grade 10N9 and 5% Ni - grade HN5MVNb are given. The comparison between CCT diagrams of 3.5%Ni + 1.5%Cu containing steels grade HSLA 100 and HN3MCu is shown. The effect of the increase in carbon and titanium contents in the chemical composition of ULCB M n steels 04G3Ti, 06G3Ti and 09G3Ti on the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous cooling is presented by the shifting CCT diagrams. The Charpy V impact strength and brittle fracture occurence curves are shown. The effect of tempering temperature on tensile properties of WQT HN3MCu steel is shown and Charpy V impact strength curves after different tempering conditions are shown. The optimum tempering temperatures region of HN3MCu steel for high Charpy V impact toughness at law temperatures - 80 o C(193 K) and -120 o C(153 K) is estimated. The effect of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of HN5MVNb steel is given. The low temperature impact Charpy V toughness of HN5MVNb steel is shown. The optimum range of tempering temperature during 1 hour for high toughness of WQT HN5MVNb steel is given. HN3MCu and HN5MVNb steels after WQT have high yield strength YS≥690 MPa and high Charpy V impact toughness KV≥80 J at -100 o C (173K) and KCV≥50 J/cm 2 at - 120 o C (153K) so they may be used for cryogenic applications

  8. Plasticity of low carbon steel in a hot state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konovalov, V.P.; Rizol', A.I.; Shram, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    The hot ductility (in tapered-specimen piersing test and the in wedge-shaped specimen rolling test) is studied of the Armeo-type low carbon steel produced by vacuum induction and open hearth techniques. The variations of the chemical composition within specified ranges, particularly as regards sulphur, oxygen and the Mn/S ratio, have a marked effect on the processing ductility. The temperature range of brittle fracture and acceptable hot working reductions as functions of the chemical composition have been revealed

  9. Grain Refinement of Low Carbon Martensitic Steel by Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Kolebina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The low-carbon steels have good corrosion and technological properties. Hot deformation is the main operation in manufacturing the parts from these steels. So one of the important properties of the material is a property of plasticity. The grain size significantly influences on the ductility properties of steel. The grain size of steel depends on the chemical composition of the crystallization process, heat treatment, and steel machining. There are plenty methods to have grain refinement. However, taking into account the large size of the blanks for the hydro turbine parts, the thermal cycling is an advanced method of the grain refinement adaptable to streamlined production. This work experimentally studies the heat treatment influence on the microstructure of the low-carbon 01X13N04 alloy steel and proposes the optimal regime of the heat treatment to provide a significantly reduced grain size. L.M. Kleiner, N.P. Melnikov and I.N. Bogachyova’s works focused both on the microstructure of these steels and on the influence of its parameters on the mechanical properties. The paper focuses mainly on defining an optimal regime of the heat treatment for grain refinement. The phase composition of steel and temperature of phase transformation were defined by the theoretical analysis. The dilatometric experiment was done to determine the precise temperature of the phase transformations. The analysis and comparison of the experimental data with theoretical data and earlier studies have shown that the initial sample has residual stress and chemical heterogeneity. The influence of the heat treatment on the grain size was studied in detail. It is found that at temperatures above 950 ° C there is a high grain growth. It is determined that the optimal number of cycles is two. The postincreasing number of cycles does not cause further reducing grain size because of the accumulative recrystallization process. Based on the results obtained, the thermal cycling

  10. Kinetics of electrochemical boriding of low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartal, G.; Eryilmaz, O.L.; Krumdick, G.; Erdemir, A.; Timur, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of the boride layers forming on low carbon steel substrates was investigated during electrochemical boriding which was performed at a constant current density of 200 mA/cm 2 in a borax based electrolyte at temperatures ranging from 1123 K to 1273 K for periods of 5-120 min. After boriding, the presence of both FeB and Fe 2 B phases were confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method. Cross-sectional microscopy revealed a very dense and thick morphology for both boride phases. Micro hardness testing of the borided steel samples showed a significant increase in the hardness of the borided surfaces (i.e., up to (1700 ± 200) HV), while the hardness of un-borided steel samples was approximately (200 ± 20) HV. Systematic studies over a wide range of boriding time and temperature confirmed that the rate of the boride layer formation is strongly dependent on boriding duration and has a parabolic character. The activation energy of boride layer growth for electrochemical boriding was determined as (172.75 ± 8.6) kJ/mol.

  11. Correlation Between Shear Punch and Tensile Strength for Low-Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmudi, R.; Sadeghi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The deformation behavior of AISI 1015 low-carbon steel, and AISI 304 stainless steel sheets was investigated by uniaxial tension and the shear punch test (SPT). Both materials were cold rolled to an 80% thickness reduction and subsequently annealed in the temperature range 25-850 °C to produce a wide range of yield and ultimate strength levels. The correlations between shear punch and tensile yield and ultimate stresses were established empirically. Different linear relationships having different slopes and intercepts were found for the low-carbon and stainless steel sheets, and the possible parameters affecting the correlation were discussed. It was shown that, within limits, yield and tensile strength of thin steel sheets can be predicted from the shear data obtained by the easy-to-perform SPT.

  12. Investigation of the pitting corrosion of low carbon steel containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughabghab, S.F.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken because the prediction of the degradation rate of low carbon steel contains over long time frames is one of the crucial elements in the development of a source term model for low-level shallow land burial. The principal data base considered is that of the NBS corrosion measurements of ferrous materials buried in the ground for periods of up to 18 years. In this investigation, the maximum penetration in mils, hm, due to pitting corrosion was found to conform closely to the relation h m = kt n where it is the exposure time of the sample in years, κ is the pitting parameter in mil/(years) n , and n > O is a parameter related to the aeration property of the soil. The central objective of the present investigation is the determination of the dependence of the pitting parameters κ and n on the soil properties. The result of a detailed linear correlation analysis of κ on one hand, the pH value and the resistivity of the soil on the other hand revealed that κ is principally influenced by the pH value of the soil. The resistivity of the soil is found to play a minor role

  13. Recent Progress in High Strength Low Carbon Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Zrník, J.; Mamuzić, I.; Dobatkin, S. V.

    2006-01-01

    Advanced High Strength (AHS) steels, among them especially Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Complex Phase (CP) steels, Partially Martensite (PM) steels, feature promising results in the field. Their extraordinary mechanical properties can be tailored and adjusted by alloying and processing. The introduction of steels with a microstructure consisting at least of two different components has led to the enlargement of the strength level without a deteriora...

  14. Lewis Acid-Base Properties of a Low Carbon Aluminium Killed Steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    a particular use.7–9 Low carbon aluminium killed (LCAK) steel. (steel deoxidized with aluminium in order to reduce the oxygen content to a minimum so that no reaction occurs between carbon and oxygen during solidification) was considered. This type of steel is used mostly by the packaging industry. Organic coatings.

  15. Recent Progress in High Strength Low Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrník J.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced High Strength (AHS steels, among them especially Dual Phase (DP steels, Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steels, Complex Phase (CP steels, Partially Martensite (PM steels, feature promising results in the field. Their extraordinary mechanical properties can be tailored and adjusted by alloying and processing. The introduction of steels with a microstructure consisting at least of two different components has led to the enlargement of the strength level without a deterioration of ductility. Furthermore, the development of ultra fine-grained AHS steels and their service performance are reviewed and new techniques are introduced. Various projects have been devoted to develop new materials for flat and long steel products for structural applications. The main stream line is High Strength, in order to match the weight lightening requirements that concern the whole class of load bearing structures and/or steel components and one of the most investigated topics is grain refinement.

  16. Abnormal growth of austenite grain of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingbo; Sun Ying

    2006-01-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element for the steel. To know further the effect of Nb in the steel, the contrast experiments on the austenite grain growth of the 0.015%Nb and free Nb steels were carried out using Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The experimental results indicate that the austenite grain of 0.015%Nb steel is finer than that of Nb free steel at 1150-1230 deg. C. And when the heating temperature arrives the critical temperature 1240 deg. C, the austenite grain of Nb steel suddenly grows up, while the austenite grain of Nb free steel changes little. Finally, the austenite grain of Nb steel is obviously coarser than that of Nb free steel. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a carbon extraction replica technique, the precipitates of Nb(C,N) were not observed in the 0.015%Nb steel. It is concluded that the grain-boundary internal adsorption of Nb atoms leads to the result

  17. CYCLIC RECRYSTALLIZATION OF FERRITE IN HOT-ROLLED LOW-CARBON SHEET STEEL WITH STRUCTURETEXTURAL HETEROGENEITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Nesterenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is determined that in the process of soaking at subcritical temperature 680 °C in hot-rolled rolling of low-carbon steel 08 ps recrystallization is developed with heterogeneous fu ll repeat change of the steel ferrite change by its section.

  18. A review of degradation modes of low carbon steel in brine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natalie, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    A literature search was conducted to review information on degradation modes of low carbon steel in brine solutions. A computer search was used to obtain articles from 1970 to present while a manual search was conducted for articles published prior to 1970. The published articles and reports indicated that uniform corrosion occurred in sea water, geothermal brines and simulated repository brines. The uniform corrosion rate increased with decreasing pH, increasing oxygen contest of brine and increasing temperature. Pitting of low carbon steel in brine solutions was related to scale formation due to presences of sulfur and heavy metal ions or mill scale present prior to exposure. Low carbon steel did not appear to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking, but data was limited. The presence of anaerobic bacteria greatly increased the rate of corrosion of low carbon steel as compared to sterile conditions. If sufficient hydrogen is present, low carbon steel could fail due to hydrogen embrittlement in brine solutions. However, this is an area where experimental work needs to be done under more specific conditions related to salt repositories. Corrosion fatigue and stray current corrosion require specific conditions to occur which can be avoided during waste storage and were there fore not addressed. Also, galvanic effects were not addressed as it will be possible to minimize galvanic effects by design. 226 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Corrosion Response of Low Carbon Steel in Tropical Road Mud ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles operating on the poorly maintained roads in the developing countries. These ultimately result in Deposit and Pilling ...

  20. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    called steel strip laminated Glass Re-inforced Epoxy. (SSL-GRE) pipeline materials with acceptably higher strength and rigidity (tensile strength =31MPa). These new materials appear to be very corrosion resistant but their performance has not yet been fully explored. Until these new corrosion resistant structural materials ...

  1. corrosion response of low carbon steel in tropical road mud

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    A.N.Enetanya. Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of. Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. Corrosion damages in Steel and Cast- Iron frequently occur in automobile and other vehicle undercarriage parts as a result of regular road mud and other dirt deposits on those components on those vehicles ...

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of low carbon steel by magnetic adaptive testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vértesy, G.; Tomáš, Ivan; Kobayashi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 2 (2010), s. 125-132 ISSN 1058-9759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/06/0866; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * steel * magnetic hysteresis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.771, year: 2010

  3. Strength properties of low-carbon martensitic steel O7Kh3GNM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehntin, R.I.; Kogan, L.I.; Odesskij, P.D.; Kle ner, L.M.; Tolmacheva, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    With the purpose of substitution of bainitic steels intended for manufacturing plate welded joints the low-carbon martensitic steel 07Kh3GNM is proposed. The 07Kh3GNM steel tempered at 650 deg C has guaranteed values σsub(0.2) >600-750 MPa and σsub(u) >= 700-850 MPa in combination with rather high for this strength level values of ductility, impact strength and fracture toughness. Steel possesses perfect weldability without preheating, in thermal strengthened state and has no tendency to cold cracking and to delayed fracture in heat treated state

  4. Stress corrosion cracking tests for low carbon stainless steels with work hardened layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Junichi; Kikuchi, Masahiko; Tsukada, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    To avoid introduction of Cr depletion at grain boundaries by welding process, low carbon stainless steels (SSs) were used in corrosive environment as one of countermeasures for Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC). Recently, it is reported that SCCs were introduced at portion with work hardened layer although low carbon SSs had been used at core shrouds and primary loop recirculation piping in Boiling Water Reactors. To simulate and examine the phenomenon, mechanical working, metallographic observation, hardness test and SCC tests in chloride solutions were conducted for low carbon SSs. From the results of metallographic observation and hardness test, it was confirmed that slip bands were observed around the surface and hardened layer was introduced by mechanical working. From the results of SCC tests, it was noticed that cracks which introduced from the surface, had grown into the matrix. It is thought that low carbon SSs with work hardened layer have susceptibility to SCC from the above. (author)

  5. Yttrium implantation effects on extra low carbon steel and pure iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudron, E.; Buscail, H. [Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., Le Puy en Velay (France). Lab. Vellave d`Elaboration; Jacob, Y.P.; Stroosnijder, M.F. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Joint Research Center, The European Commission, 21020, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Josse-Courty, C. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Reactivite des Solides, UMR 56-13 CNRS, UFR Sciences et Techniques, 9 Avenue A. Savary, B.P. 400, 21011, Dijon Cedex (France)

    1999-05-25

    Extra low carbon steel and pure electrolytic iron samples were yttrium implanted using ion implantation technique. Compositions and structures of pure iron and steel samples were investigated before and after yttrium implantation by several analytical and structural techniques (RBS, SIMS, RHEED and XRD) to observe the yttrium implantation depth profiles in the samples. This paper shows the different effects of yttrium implantations (compositions and structures) according to the implanted sample nature. (orig.) 23 refs.

  6. INCREASING STAMPING FORMABILITY OF LOW-CARBON COLD ROLLED THIN STEEL SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tatarkina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of surfactant (épila was studied as a method for improving the cold-formability of steel sheets. The factors of the resulting effect were analyzed. Application of épila significantly reduces the surface roughness and decreases the stress concentrates. Epilam fills pores and microcracks, displaces moisture and gases, thereby reducing metal embrittlement. The application of épila pro-vides the highest category of drawing the low carbon sheet steel 08kp.

  7. Electrochemical Performance of Low-Carbon Steel in Alkaline Model Solutions Containing Hybrid Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Hu, J.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Boshkov, N.; Radeva, T.; Milkova, V.; Van Breugel, K.

    2010-01-01

    This work reports on the electrochemical performance of low-carbon steel electrodes in model alkaline solutions in the presence of 4.9.10-4 g/l hybrid aggregates i.e. cement extract, containing PDADMAC (poly (diallyl, dimethyl ammonium chloride) / PAA (Poly (acrylic acid)/ PDADMAC over a CaO core.

  8. Numerical predictions of dry oxidation of iron and low-carbon steel at moderately elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.

    1996-11-01

    Wrought and cast low-carbon steel are candidate materials for the thick (e.g. 10 cm) outer barrier of nuclear waste packages being considered for use in the potential geological repository at Yucca Mountain. Dry oxidation is possible at the moderately elevated temperatures expected at the container surface (323-533 K or 50-260 C). Numerical predictions of dry oxidation damage were made based on experimental data for iron and low-carbon steel and parabolic oxidation theory. The Forward Euler method was implemented to integrate the parabolic rate law for arbitrary, complex temperature histories. Assuming growth of a defect-free, adherent oxide, the surface penetration of a low-carbon steel barrier following 5000 years of exposure to a severe, but repository-relevant, temperature history is predicted to be only about 0.127 mm, less than 0.13% of the expected container thickness of 10 cm. Allowing the oxide to spall upon reaching a critical thickness increases the predicted metal penetration values, but degradation is still computed to be negligible. Thus, dry oxidation is not expected to significantly degrade the performance of thick, corrosion allowance barriers constructed of low-carbon steel

  9. Influence of plasma nitriding on the hardness of AISI 304 and low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprapto; Sudjatmoko; Tjipto Sujitno

    2010-01-01

    Nitriding with plasma/ion nitriding technique for surface treatment of AISI 304 and low carbon steel as a machine component material has been done. Surface treatment is meant to improve the surface quality of metal especially its hardness. To reach the optimum condition it has been done a variation of nitriding pressure, while to analyse the result it has been done the hardness and microstructure test, and the nitrogen content. Result of the test indicates that: the optimum hardness obtained at 1.8 mbar of pressure that is 624.9 VHN or 2.98 times while the initial hardness is 210.3 VHN for AISI 304 and 581.6 VHN or 3.07 times compare with initial hardness 142.9 VHN for low carbon steel. The thickness of nitride layer for AISI 304 and low carbon steel is around 30 µm. Nitrogen contents after nitriding are 10.74% mass or 30.32% atom for AISI 304 and 6.81% mass or 21.76% atom for low carbon steel. (author)

  10. Stochastic approach to pitting-corrosion-extreme modelling in low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valor, A. [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de La Habana, San Lazaro y L, Vedado 10400, La Habana (Cuba); Caleyo, F. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)], E-mail: fcaleyo@gmail.com; Rivas, D.; Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, IPN-ESIQIE, UPALM Edif. 7, Zacatenco, Mexico DF 07738 (Mexico)

    2010-03-15

    A stochastic model previously developed by the authors using Markov chains has been improved in the light of new experimental evidence. The new model has been successfully applied to reproduce the time evolution of extreme pitting corrosion depths in low-carbon steel. The model is shown to provide a better physical understanding of the pitting process.

  11. Corrosion Behaviour of Nickel Plated Low Carbon Steel in Tomato Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluleke OLUWOLE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work investigated the corrosion resistance of nickel plated low carbon steel in tomato fluid. It simulated the effect of continuous use of the material in a tomato environment where corrosion products are left in place. Low carbon steel samples were nickel electroplated at 4V for 20, 25, 30 and 35 mins using Watts solution.The plated samples were then subjected to tomato fluid environment for for 30 days. The electrode potentials mV (SCE were measured every day. Weight loss was determined at intervals of 5 days for the duration of the exposure period. The result showed corrosion attack on the nickel- plated steel, the severity decreasing with the increasing weight of nickel coating on substrate. The result showed that thinly plated low carbon steel generally did not have any advantage over unplated steel. The pH of the tomato solution which initially was acidic was observed to progress to neutrality after 4 days and then became alkaline at the end of the thirty days test (because of corrosion product contamination of the tomatocontributing to the reduced corrosion rates in the plated samples after 10 days. Un-plated steel was found to be unsuitable for the fabrication of tomato processing machinery without some form of surface treatment - thick nickel plating is suitable as a protective coating in this environment.

  12. Work softening of drawn low carbon steel bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Paulino Aguilar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The work hardening of metals subjected to complex processing paths is different from that in monotonic deformation. Changes in the deformation mode can promote transients in the strain-hardening rate, leading to anomalous softening or hardening of the material. This paper investigates the influence of strain path changes on the tensile behavior of drawn 0.12% steel rods. Annealed or predrawn specimens were submitted to cyclic twisting and then tested in tension. The results show that the cyclic deformation causes changes in the mechanical behavior of the metal, and the effect will depend on the previous "history" of the material. Cyclic twisting causes hardening in annealed samples, but leads to softening of the drawn bars. These phenomena are in line with the corresponding substructural aspects.

  13. Influence of alloying elements on resistance to tempering of low carbon pearlitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandomirskij, M.M.; Rivkin, S.I.; Rudnev, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Specific effect of chromium, nickel, molybdenum, vanadium on stability against weakening during the tempering of low-carbon chromium-nickel-molybdenum-vanadium pearlitic steels of the 15KhNMF type is investigated. It is established that temperature dependence of the specific effect of alloying elements on stability to the tempering of low-carbon pearlitic steel is characterized by the curve with the maximum, position of which in the temperature scale increases from chromium to molybdenum and vanadium. With the increase of the tempering duration specific effect of each of the elements first increases and then, reaching a certain maximum, decreases. With the increase of chromium content from 1 % to 3 % in the steels investigated its specific effect on stability to the tempering decrease monotonously [ru

  14. Application of heat treated low-carbon electrical steels in small motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agueero, A.C.; Moyano, H.R. [CEMCOR-CIMM, Cordoba (Argentina). Inst. Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial; Actis, F.A. [SIDERAR S.A.I.C., Centro Siderurgico Gral. Savio, San Nicolas (Argentina); Casais, O. [Tamyr S.A., Benavidez, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1999-08-01

    In this work the influence of the magnetic properties of steels, at different processing conditions, on the performance of a synchronous permanent magnet motor (SPMM) with 2.7 watt power is studied. A commercial low-carbon steel was subjected to 2 different thermal treatments and characterized for microstructure, carbon content and magnetic properties. A computer model using finite element method was developed to calculate the influence of the heat treatment properties on the ampere-turns reduction. Several motor prototypes were constructed using steels in the as-received and heat-treated conditions. Torque measurements were used as indication of the motors performance. (orig.) 4 refs.

  15. Structure and properties of quenched low-carbon steel in case of plastic deformation and tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, V.K.; Drozdov, B.Ya.; Pirogov, V.A.; Plevako, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    The investigation of the processes taking place during the deformation and the tempering of grade 20 hardened steel has shown that the plastic deformation involves an increase in hardness and a drop in coercive force. The latter is due to a displacement of carbon atoms from normal interstitial locations to crystalline lattice imperfection sites. The effect of tempering has been studied on steels not worked and on those worked by 20 and 40 % after hardening. It is found that the tempering of a cold-worked steel is accompanied by a recrystallization which makes itself evident at 500 deg C after 40 % deformation and at 600 deg C after 20 % deformation. The stability of the low-carbon steel martensite during the recrsytallization is due to the absence of a substantial excess of dislocations of a single sign, and not to the inhibiting effect of the carbide particles. The heterogeneity of the structure produced by the hardening facilitates recrystallization of deformed steel

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of Carbonitrided Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taweejun, Nipon; Poapongsakorn, Piyamon; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-04-01

    Carbonitrided low-carbon steels are resistance welded in various engineering components. However, there are no reports on the microstructure and mechanical properties of their resistance spot welding (RSW) joints. Therefore, various carbonitridings were performed on the low-carbon steel sheets, and then various RSWs were applied to these carbonitrided sheets. The metallurgical and mechanical properties of the welding joint were investigated and discussed. The peak load and failure energy increased with the increases of welding current and fusion zone (FZ) size. At 11 kA welding current, the carbonitrided steel joint had the failure energy of 16 J, i.e., approximately 84 pct of untreated steel joint. FZ of carbonitrided steel joint consisted of ferrite, Widmanstatten ferrite, and untempered martensite, i.e., the solid-state transformation products, while the microstructure at the outer surfaces consisted of untempered martensite and retained austenite. The surface hardening of carbonitrided steel after RSW could be maintained, i.e., approximately 810 HV. The results can be applied to carbonitriding and RSW to achieve a good welding joint.

  17. Magnetic behaviour of low-carbon steel in parallel and perpendikular directions to tensile deformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pal'a, J.; Stupakov, Oleksandr; Bydžovský, J.; Tomáš, Ivan; Novák, Václav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 310, č. 1 (2007), s. 57-62 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 1/0143/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : degradation * low-carbon steel Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.704, year: 2007

  18. Modeling of roughness effect on hydrogen permeation in a low carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Carreño, J. A.; Uribe, I.; Carrillo, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented to evaluate the effect of the roughness and the profile of concentration of hydrogen in a low carbon steel. The model takes advantage of the Fick's Second Law, to predict the transport of hydrogen in the steel. The problem is treated as a variational one and its space solution is made numerically by means of the Finite Elements Method, while the temporal equation is solved via the Finite Differences Method, in order to determine the concentration profiles of Hydrogen in t...

  19. Features of austenite formation in low-carbon steel upon heating in the intercritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. O.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    The features of austenite formation upon continuous heating of low-carbon steel at the rates of 90-0.15 K/s in the intercritical temperature range (ICTR) have been studied. It has been found that, in the initially high-tempered, initially quenched, and initially cold-deformed steel, the α → γ transition in the ICTR consists of three stages. The thermokinetic diagrams of the austenite formation with the indication of the positions of the critical points Ac 1 and Ac 3 and also of the temperature ranges of the development of each identified stage of the α → γ transformation have been constructed. A complex of structural studies has been carried out, and a scheme of the austenite formation upon continuous heating at a rate of 90 K/s in the ICTR for the initially high-tempered steel, initially quenched steel, and initially cold-deformed low-carbon steel has been suggested, which reflects all stages of this process.

  20. Influence of Molybdenum Addition on Mechanical Properties of Low Carbon HSLA-100 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogucki R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of mechanical properties and microstructure observation of low carbon copper bearing steel with high addition of molybdenum are presented in this paper. This steels were characterized by contents of molybdenum in the range from 1% to 3% wt. After the thermo -mechanical processing the steels were subsequently quenched and tempered at different temperatures (500-800 °C for 1h. The changes of mechanical properties as function of tempering temperature were typical for the steel with the copper addition. The sudden drop of impact resistance after tempering from 575 °C to 600 °C was caused probably by precipitates of Laves phase of type Fe2Mo.

  1. The influence of molybdenum on stress corrosion in Ultra Low Carbon Steels with copper addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazur

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum content on the process of stress corrosion of ultra-low carbon structural steels with the addition of copper HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy was analyzed. The study was conducted for steels after heat treatment consisting of quenching andfollowing tempering at 600°C and it was obtained microstructure of the tempered martensite laths with copper precipitates and the phaseLaves Fe2Mo type. It was found strong influence of Laves phase precipitate on the grain boundaries of retained austenite on rate anddevelopment of stress corrosion processes. The lowest corrosion resistance was obtained for W3 steel characterized by high contents ofmolybdenum (2.94% Mo which should be connected with the intensity precipitate processes of Fe2Mo phase. For steels W1 and W2which contents molybdenum equals 1.02% and 1.88%, respectively were obtained similar courses of corrosive cracking.

  2. Mechanical and service properties of low carbon steels processed by severe plastic deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zrnik

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure and properties of the 0,09% C-Mn-Si-Nb-V-Ti, 0,1% C-Mn-V-Ti and 0,09% C-Mo-V-Nb low-carbon steels were studied after cold equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP. ECAP leads to the formation of partially submicrocrystalline structure with a grain size of 150 – 300 nm. The submicrocrystalline 0,09% C-Mn-Si-Nb-V-Ti steel compared with the normalized steel is characterized by Re higher more than by a factor of 2 and by the impact toughness higher by a factor of 3,5 at a test temperature of -40°C. The plasticity in this case is somewhat lower. The high-strength state of the submicrocrystalline 0,1% C-Mn-V-Ti and 0,09% C-Mo-V-Nb steels after ECAP is retained up to a test temperature of 500°C. The strength properties at 600°C (i.e. the fire resistance of these steels are higher by 20-25% as compared to those of the undeformed steels. The strength of the 0,09% C-Mo-V-Nb steel at 600°C is substantially higher than that of the 0,1% C-Mn-V-Ti steel.

  3. Influence of the chemical composition on transformation behaviour of low carbon microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, J.; Jung, I.-H.; Elwazri, A.M.; Bai, D.; Yue, S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to design thermomechanical schedules for processing low carbon microalloyed steels, the various critical transformation temperatures, i.e. the start and finish of the austenite transformation (A r3 , A r1 ) and the non-recrystallization temperature (T nr ), must be determined. Continuous cooling torsion and compression testing are useful ways to measure these values. In this study six low carbon microalloyed steels with different additions (Nb, Cu, Si and Mo) were examined using these techniques. Moreover, the equilibrium phase diagrams for each alloy were calculated using FactSage. The comparison of the thermomechanical testing results with the thermodynamic calculations leads to a better understanding of the effect of the different elements on the transformation behaviour of pipeline steels. Regarding transformation temperatures, Cu in residual contents showed a strong effect on decreasing both A r3 and A r1 , which indicates a hardenability effect of this element. On the other hand, increasing Nb contents increased T nr by accelerating Nb(C,N) precipitation. However, when Si was added to a Nb-microalloyed steel, the T nr decreased.

  4. Strain-tempering of low carbon martensite steel wire by rapid heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torisaka, Yasunori; Kihara, Junji

    1978-01-01

    In the production of prestressed concrete steel wires, a series of the cold drawing-patenting process are performed to improve the strength. In order to reduce cyclic process, the low carbon martensite steel wire which can be produced only by the process of hot rolling and direct quench has been investigated as strain-tempering material. When strain-tempering is performed on the low carbon martensite steel wire, stress relaxation (Re%) increases and mechanical properties such as total elongation, reduction of area, ultimate tensile strength and proof stress decrease remarkably by annealing. In order to shorten the heating time, the authors performed on the steel wire the strain-tempering with a heating time of 1.0 s using direct electrical resistance heating and examined the effects of rapid heating on the stress relaxation and the mechanical properties. Stress relaxation decreases without impairment of the mechanical properties up to a strain-tempering temperature of 573 K. Re(%) after 10.8 ks is 0% at the testing temperature 301 K, 0.49% at 363 K and 1.39% at 433 K. (auth.)

  5. Cr-Al coatings on low carbon steel prepared by a mechanical alloying technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hia, A. I. J.; Sudiro, T.; Aryanto, D.; Sebayang, K.

    2016-08-01

    Four different compositions of Cr and Al coatings as Cr10o, Cr87.5Al12.5, Cr5oAl5o, and Al100 have been prepared on the surface of low carbon steel by a mechanical alloying technique. The composition of each powder was milled for 2 hour in a stainless steel crucible with a ball to powder ratio of 10:1. Hereafter, the Cr-Al powder and substrate were mechanical alloyed in air for 1 hour. Heat treatment of coated sample were carried out at 800°C in a vacuum furnace. In order to characterize the phase composition and microstructure of the coating before and after heat treatment, XRD and SEM-EDX were used. The results show that Cr, Cr-Al or Al coatings were formed on the surface of low carbon steel. After heat treatment, new phases and interdiffusion zone were formed in the coating and at the coating/steel interface, depending on the coating composition.

  6. Effect of molybdenum on continuous cooling bainite transformation of low-carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Junhua; Xie Changsheng

    2006-01-01

    Through simulation of thermomechanical processing/on-line accelerated cooling processing and observation of microstructure, the effect of molybdenum on continuous cooling bainite transformation of ultra-low carbon microalloyed steel was studied. The continuous cooling transformation curves of the trial steels with or without molybdenum addition were also determined. The result showed that the separate temperature of bainite was obviously reduced and the size of microstructure became smaller as 0.40 wt% Mo was added to the steel. At the same time, the martensitic structure, which formed at some cooling conditions, became finer and dispersed more uniformly. The deformed austenite would transform to finer bainite even when the cooling rate was not too high

  7. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstadt, Victoria L; Côté, Gregory L; Willett, J L

    2011-06-01

    Corrosion of metals is a serious and challenging problem faced worldwide by industry. Purified Leuconostoc mesenteroides exopolysaccharide (EPS) coatings, cast from aqueous solution, inhibited the corrosion of low-carbon steel as determined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). There were two different corrosion behaviors exhibited when EPS films from different strains were cast onto the steel. One EPS coating reacted immediately with the steel substrate to form an iron (III) oxide layer ("rust") during the drying process while another did not. The samples that did not flash corrode had higher corrosion inhibition and formed an iron (II) passivation layer during EIS testing that persisted after the cells were disassembled. Corrosion inhibition was strain-specific as polysaccharides with similar structure did not have the same corrosion potential.

  8. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of low carbon stainless steel in BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami

    2008-01-01

    Some examples and characteristics of old intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the improvement methods are described. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low carbon stainless steel in the core shroud and major piping of BWR has been reported since 1990. Most parts of them start at the transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and progress to IGSCC. The shape of crack is originated by the residual tensile stress that depends on welding and mechanical processing. The chromium-deficient layer was not observed. The crack progressed from the parent materials to the deposited metal with low content of ferrite. SCC crack growth rates of type SUS316 were 1/10 of type SUS304 stainless steel. The countermeasures of SCC of low carbon stainless steel to control its generation and progressing are stated. Method for SCC of major piping can include the introduction heating stress improvement (IHSI) and narrow gap edge welding. Methods for SCC of shroud include the laser peening, water jet peening, and polish processing. (S.Y.)

  9. Effect of quenching techniques on the mechanical properties of low carbon structural steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Miernik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the impact of incomplete quenching technique on the mechanical properties of low carbon structural steel.Significant influence of the heating method to the α + γ field was observed on the strength and plasticity after hardening process. The best combination of mechanical properties was obtained for the 3th technique consisting of pre-heating the material to the austenite field, next cooling to the appropriate temperature in the α + γ and hardening from that dual phase region. The high level of toughness with relatively high strength were observed, compared to the properties obtained for the two other ways to quench annealing (incomplete hardening.

  10. Electrochemical corrosion response of a low carbon heat treated steel in a NaCl solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio, W.R.; Peixoto, L.C.; Garcia, L.R.; Garcia, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Dual-phase (DP) steels are produced from a specific heat treatment procedure and have recently emerged as a potential class of engineering materials for a number of structural and automobile applications. Such steels have high strength-to-weight ratio and reasonable formability. The present study aims to investigate the effects of four different and conventional heat treatments (i.e., hot rolling, normalizing, annealing, and intercritical annealing) on the resulting microstructural patterns and on the electrochemical corrosion behavior. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel plots were carried out on heat treated steel samples in a 0.5 M NaCl solution at 25 C with neutral pH. An equivalent circuit analysis was also used to provide quantitative support for the discussions. The normalizing and the annealing heat treatments have provided the highest and the lowest corrosion resistances, respectively. The intercritical annealing and as-received (hot rolled) low carbon steel samples have shown similar corrosion behavior. Although a deleterious effect on the corrosion resistance has been verified for DP steel due to the residual stress from the martensite formation, it combines good mechanical properties with intermediate electrochemical corrosion resistance. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Simulation of Viscoplastic Deformation of Low Carbon Steel Structures at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Maciejewski, K.; Ghonem, H.

    2012-07-01

    The deformation response of a low carbon structural steel subjected to high temperature simulating fire conditions is generated using a viscoplastic material constitutive model which acknowledges the evolution of the material hardening parameters during the loading history. The material model is implemented in an ABAQUS subroutine (UMAT) which requires the determination of the material constants as a function of temperature. Both the temperature dependency and strain-rate sensitivity of the material parameters have been examined by the analysis of a single steel beam and a steel-framed structure subjected to temperatures ranging from 300 to 700 °C. Sequentially coupled thermal-stress analysis is applied to a structure under simulated fire condition. Results of this analysis show that above a transitional temperature, the deformation of the steel is strain-rate dependent. The combined effect of heat flux and loading rate on the complex deformation of a two-story steel structure is examined and the significance of employing a viscoplastic material model is discussed.

  12. Bake hardening of ultra-fine grained low carbon steel produced by constrained groove pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alihosseini, H.; Dehghani, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► BH of UFG low carbon steel sheets was studied. ► Three passes of CGP are used for producing of UFG sheets. ► Maximum BH was achieved to the UFG specimen pre-strained 8% by baking at 250 °C. - Abstract: In the present work, the bake hardening of ultra-fine grained low carbon steel was compared with that of its coarse-grain counterpart. The ultra-fine grained sheets were produced by applying three passes of constrained groove pressing resulting the grains of 260–270 nm. The microstructure of ultra-fine grain specimens were characterized using electron back-scatter diffraction technique. Then, the bake hardenability of ultra-fine grain and coarse-grain samples were compared by pre-straining to 4, 6 and 8% followed by baking at 150 °C and 250 °C for 20 min. The results show that in case of baking at 250 °C, there was an increase about 108%, 93%, and 72% in the bake hardening for 4%, 6% and 8% pre-strain, respectively. As for baking at 150 °C, these values were 170%, 168%, and 100%, respectively for 4%, 6% and 8% pre-strain. The maximum in bake hardenability (103 MPa) and final yield stress (563 MPa) were pertaining to the ultra-fine grain specimen pre-strained 8% followed by baking at 250 °C.

  13. SPEED DEPENDENCE OF ACOUSTIC VIBRATION PROPAGATION FROM THE FERRITIC GRAIN SIZE IN LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. It is determining the nature of the ferrite grain size influence of low-carbon alloy steel on the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations. Methodology. The material for the research served a steel sheet of thickness 1.4 mm. Steel type H18T1 had a content of chemical elements within grade composition: 0, 12 % C, 17, 5 % Cr, 1 % Mn, 1, 1 % Ni, 0, 85 % Si, 0, 9 % Ti. The specified steel belongs to the semiferritic class of the accepted classification. The structural state of the metal for the study was obtained by cold plastic deformation by rolling at a reduction in the size range of 20-30 % and subsequent recrystallization annealing at 740 – 750 ° C. Different degrees of cold plastic deformation was obtained by pre-selection of the initial strip thickness so that after a desired amount of rolling reduction receives the same final thickness. The microstructure was observed under a light microscope, the ferrite grain size was determined using a quantitative metallographic technique. The using of X-ray structural analysis techniques allowed determining the level of second-order distortion of the crystal latitude of the ferrite. The speed propagation of acoustic vibrations was measured using a special device such as an ISP-12 with a working frequency of pulses 1.024 kHz. As the characteristic of strength used the hardness was evaluated by the Brinell’s method. Findings. With increasing of ferrite grain size the hardness of the steel is reduced. In the case of constant structural state of metal, reducing the size of the ferrite grains is accompanied by a natural increasing of the phase distortion. The dependence of the speed propagation of acoustic vibrations up and down the rolling direction of the ferrite grain size remained unchanged and reports directly proportional correlation. Originality. On the basis of studies to determine the direct impact of the proportional nature of the ferrite grain size on the rate of propagation of sound

  14. Corrosion of low-carbon cast steel in concentrated synthetic groundwater at 80 to 150 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.; Soo, P.

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion properties of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) A216-Grade WCA low-carbon steel were evaluated in concentrated synthetic groundwater at 80 to 150 C. The evaluation provides information on the use of the steel as a container material in the proposed Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository. Uniform corrosion rates measured over 4 months ranged from 10 to 40 microm/year, in initially aerated static solutions under gamma irradiation at 1.3 x 10 6 rad/h. Irradiation effects on uniform corrosion rates were not discernible after 4 months. Pitting corrosion was also found, but the pitting factor was small. Microstructural effects on corrosion were not significant. During corrosion under irradiation, there was an indication of a large amount of hydrogen absorption in the steel. Constant extension rate tests showed evidence for environmental assisted cracking under free corrosion conditions, and strong evidence of hydrogen embrittlement and moisture-induced ductility loss. The use of the test results in support of the Yucca Mountain project is discussed

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of plasma electrolytic borocarburizing on q235 low-carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Run [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Zhenjiang Watercraft College, Zhenjiang 212000, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Bin; Wu, Jie [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Xue, Wenbin, E-mail: xuewb@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Jin, Xiaoyue; Du, Jiancheng; Hua, Ming [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • The plasma discharge behaviors for PEB/C on steels were evaluated by OES. • Electron temperature, concentration, atomic ionization degree were calculated. • The decomposition mechanism of electrolyte and was analyzed. - Abstract: A plasma electrolytic borocarburizing process (PEB/C) in borax electrolyte with glycerin additive was employed to fabricate a hardening layer on Q235 low-carbon steel. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was utilized to investigate the spectroscopy characteristics of plasma discharge around the steel during PEB/C process. Some plasma parameters were calculated in terms of OES. The electron temperature and electron concentration in plasma discharge zone is about 3000–12,000 K and 2 × 10{sup 22} m{sup −3}–1.4 × 10{sup 23} m{sup −3}. The atomic ionization degrees of iron, carbon and boron are 10{sup −16}–10{sup −3}, and 10{sup −23}–10{sup −6}, 10{sup −19}–10{sup −4}, respectively, which depend on discharge time. The surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure of PEB/C hardening layer were observed, and the electrolyte decomposition and plasma discharge behaviors were discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of plasma electrolytic borocarburizing on q235 low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Run; Wang, Bin; Wu, Jie; Xue, Wenbin; Jin, Xiaoyue; Du, Jiancheng; Hua, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The plasma discharge behaviors for PEB/C on steels were evaluated by OES. • Electron temperature, concentration, atomic ionization degree were calculated. • The decomposition mechanism of electrolyte and was analyzed. - Abstract: A plasma electrolytic borocarburizing process (PEB/C) in borax electrolyte with glycerin additive was employed to fabricate a hardening layer on Q235 low-carbon steel. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was utilized to investigate the spectroscopy characteristics of plasma discharge around the steel during PEB/C process. Some plasma parameters were calculated in terms of OES. The electron temperature and electron concentration in plasma discharge zone is about 3000–12,000 K and 2 × 10 22 m −3 –1.4 × 10 23 m −3 . The atomic ionization degrees of iron, carbon and boron are 10 −16 –10 −3 , and 10 −23 –10 −6 , 10 −19 –10 −4 , respectively, which depend on discharge time. The surface morphology and cross-sectional microstructure of PEB/C hardening layer were observed, and the electrolyte decomposition and plasma discharge behaviors were discussed

  17. Diffusion bonding of commercially pure titanium to low carbon steel using a silver interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atasoy, Evren; Kahraman, Nizamettin

    2008-01-01

    Titanium and low carbon steel plates were joined through diffusion bonding using a silver interlayer at various temperatures for various diffusion times. In order to determine the strength of the resulting joints, tensile-shear tests and hardness tests were applied. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were carried out to determine the interface properties of the joint. The work showed that the highest interface strength was obtained for the specimens joined at 850 deg. C for 90 min. It was seen from the hardness results that the highest hardness value was obtained for the interlayer material and the hardness values on the both sides of the interlayer decreased gradually as the distance from the joint increased. In energy dispersive spectrometry analyses, it was seen that the amount of silver in the interlayer decreased markedly depending on the temperature rise. In addition, increasing diffusion time also caused some slight decrease in the amount of silver

  18. Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracio, J. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B.; Kim, H. J.; Barlat, F.; Rauch, E. F.; Yoon, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0 deg. , 45 deg. and 135 deg. with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45 deg. shear tests.

  19. Effect of Asymmetric Rolling on Plastic Anisotropy of Low Carbon Steels during Simple Shear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracio, J. J.; Kim, H. J.; Vincze, G.; Panigrahi, B. B.; Barlat, F.; Rauch, E. F.; Yoon, J. W.

    2010-06-01

    Simple shear tests are performed on low carbon steel pre-deformed in conventional, asymmetric and orthogonal-asymmetric rolling. The simple-shear tests were carried out at 0°, 45° and 135° with respect to the previous rolling direction. For a reduction ratio of 15%, a transient stagnation in the hardening rate is observed at reloading for all changes in strain path. The shear stress level, the hardening rate and extent of the plateau appear to be insensitive to the preliminary applied rolling conditions. After a reduction ratio of 50%, plastic instability was detected at reloading for all the changes of strain path and rolling conditions studied. A specific heat treatment was then designed allowing the material to become ductile after rolling while retaining the fine microstructure and therefore the high strength. Promising results were obtained essentially for 45° shear tests.

  20. Neutron diffraction study of fatigue behaviour of a low-carbon stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taran, Yu.V.; Mikula, P.; Lukas, P.; Neov, D.; Vrana, M.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Samples from a low-carbon austenite stainless steel (0.04 wt.% C) with some content of martensite produced by plastic deformation during low- (0.1 Hz) and high- (5 Hz) cycle fatigue were studied by high resolution neutron diffraction. Mean-square microstrain 2 > 1/2 have been deduced from the broadening of diffraction profiles. Practically no evolution of microstrain on the fatigue degree was observed in the austenitic and induced martensitic phases of the low-cycling samples as well as the martensitic phase of the high-cycling samples. The appreciable jump of 2 > 1/2 was found in the austenitic phase of the high-cycling samples after 5 x 10 5 cycles. The interpretation of this phenomenon is in a progress. (author)

  1. Application of Moessbauer effect to the study of austenite retained in low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements were performed in two samples of low carbon, low alloy steels, one with a bainite granular microstructure and the other a martensitic one. The concentration of the retained austenite was determined in both samples by Moessbauer spectrometry and X radiation, a very good agreement for the sample with a greater austenite content having been observed. From the assumption that the carbon atoms in the f.c.c. matrix repel one another due to Coulomb interactions, giving origin to quadrupolar interactions, it was possible to determine carbon concentration in the MA (Martensite Austenite) components of bainite, the results being in good agreement with the one obtained from metallographic considerations. (I.C.R.) [pt

  2. Effects of deformation and boron on microstructure and continuous cooling transformation in low carbon HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, H.J.; Kang, J.S.; Seo, D.H.; Kang, K.B.; Park, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    The continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram and continuous cooled microstructure were investigated for low carbon (0.05 wt.% C) high strength low alloy steels with/without boron. Microstructures observed in continuous cooled specimens were composed of pearlite, quasi-polygonal ferrite, granular bainite, acicular ferrite, bainitic ferrite, lower bainite, and martensite depending on cooling rate and transformation temperature. A rapid cooling rate depressed the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite, which resulted in higher hardness. However, hot deformation slightly increased transformation start temperature, and promoted the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite. Hot deformation also strongly promoted the acicular ferrite formation which did not form under non-deformation conditions. Small boron addition effectively reduced the formation of pearlite and quasi-polygonal ferrite and broadened the cooling rate region for bainitic ferrite and martensite

  3. Effect of B and B + Nb on the bainitic transformation in low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Kangying; Oberbillig, Carla; Musik, Celine; Loison, Didier; Iung, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → B retards slightly the bainite transformation kinetics. → Combined addition of B + Nb delayed dramatically bainite transformation kinetics. → B refines the microstructure and promotes lath morphology of bainite. → Larger packets of laths and longer laths are observed in the B + Nb steel. → More free boron/finer borocarbide precipitates on γ grain boundaries in B + Nb steel. - Abstract: Development of new, advanced high and ultra-high strength bainitic steels requires the selection of the optimum balance of bainite promoting elements allowing the production of the desired bainitic microstructure over a wide range of cooling rates. The addition of boron or a combined addition of boron and niobium is well known to retard strongly the polygonal ferrite formation but very little knowledge has been acquired on the bainitic transformation. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of boron and boron plus niobium on the bainite transformation kinetics, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in a low carbon steel (Fe-0.05C-1.49Mn-0.30Si). Isothermal and continuous cooling transformation diagrams were determined and followed by a detailed quantitative characterisation of the bainite microstructure and morphology using complementary advanced metallographic techniques (FEG-SEM-EBSD, SIMS and TEM). The relationship between microstructure and hardness has been evaluated. Finally, results of SIMS and TEM analyses coupled with microstructural investigations enable to propose a mechanism to explain the effect of the synergy between boron and niobium on the bainitic transformation and the resultant microstructure.

  4. Experimental Study on Vacuum Carburizing Process for Low-Carbon Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shaopeng; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Xianhui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Rong, Yiming

    2013-10-01

    As a low-carbon alloy steel, 20Cr2Ni4A steel has an excellent mechanical properties. It has been used for producing heavy-duty gears, which require good wear and fatigue resistance. The vacuum carburizing process can improve the quality of gears and extend the service life. In this article, a complete heat-treatment process for 20Cr2Ni4A, with carburizing, tempering, quenching and cryogenic steps involved, was proposed. A numerical method was employed to design the carburizing step. The carburized samples were characterized by analysis of carbon profile, surface-retained austenite content, microstructure, and hardness profile. A good microstructure was obtained with acicular-tempered martensite, less-retained austenite, fine granular-dispersed carbides, and was oxide free. The final surface hardness was 64.2HRC, and the case depth was 0.86 mm, which meet the requirements of products. The relationships among process, performance, and microstructure were investigated to understand the inner connection.

  5. Structural developments in un-stabilized ultra low carbon steel during warm deformation and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul, E-mail: rahulunnikrishnannair@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Kumar, Amit, E-mail: chaudhary65amit@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Khatirkar, Rajesh K., E-mail: rajesh.khatirkar@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India); Shekhawat, Satish K., E-mail: satishshekhawat@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (IITB), Powai, Mumbai 400076, Maharashtra (India); Sapate, Sanjay G., E-mail: sgsapate@yahoo.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Visvesvaraya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), South Ambazari Road, Nagpur 440010, Maharashtra (India)

    2016-11-01

    In the present investigation, ultra low carbon steel samples were deformed in plane strain compression mode in a deformation simulator. The deformation was carried out at four different temperatures in the warm rolling region (293, 473, 673 and 873 K) upto 70% strain at two different strain rates (0.1/s and 1/s). Subsequently, all the deformed samples were fully recrystallized at 1073 K. Afterwards, all the deformed and fully recrystallized samples were subjected to detailed microstructural characterization using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction. Bulk texture was measured for all the samples by X-ray diffraction. In-grain misorientation developments (kernel average misorientations) were estimated for the deformed γ-fibre (ND//<111>) and α-fibre (RD//<110>). Deformed γ-fibre showed an increase in in-grain misorientation at intermediate deformation temperatures. This increase was explained by using the plastic instability criterion. After complete recrystallization, the γ-fibre strengthened for deformation at lower temperatures (293 K and 473 K), while Goss texture developed for samples deformed at higher temperatures (673 K and 873 K). - Highlights: • ULC steel samples were deformed in near plane strain condition. • Microstructural developments were characterized using EBSD. • Increase in in-grain misorientation at intermediate deformation temperatures. • γ-fibre strengthened for low temperature deformation. • Goss texture developed for high temperature deformation.

  6. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-01-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  7. Surface Modification by Friction Stir Processing of Low-Carbon Steel: Microstructure Investigation and Wear Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Behnoosh; Shamanian, Morteza; Salimijazi, Farshid; Salehi, Mehdi

    2018-02-01

    A low-carbon steel sheet with a thickness of 5 mm was subjected to friction stir processing (FSP) by one to four different passes. The microstructures of different regions were characterized using the optical microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The Vickers micro-harness was measured at the distance of 200 μm below the processed surfaces. The influence of pass numbers (PNs) on wear resistance was studied in terms of coefficients of friction (CoFs), weight losses and wear rates. SEM topographies of the worn surfaces were also studied to evaluate the wear mechanisms. Microstructure observations showed that Widmänstatten ferrite plates were formed in stir zones (SZs) and heat affected zones. As PN increased, these grains were widened due to the increment of the carbon diffusivity and lengthened because of the high heat input and microstructure anisotropy. Besides, increasing the PN causes increasing of the hardness and wear resistance, simultaneously. Specifically, the wear rate in the SZ was reduced from 2.8 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in base metal to 0.3 × 10-2 mm3 m-1 in sample which was subjected to 4 FSP passes. However, variation in PN had no considerable effect on CoFs. Oxidative wear mechanism was observed on the worn surface of the steel and the FSPed samples while more debris was formed by increasing the PNs.

  8. Transformation Characteristics of Ferrite/Carbide Aggregate in Continuously Cooled, Low Carbon-Manganese Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, S. F.; Thewlis, G.

    2014-02-01

    Transformation characteristics and morphological features of ferrite/carbide aggregate (FCA) in low carbon-manganese steels have been investigated. Work shows that FCA has neither the lamellae structure of pearlite nor the lath structure of bainite and martensite. It consists of a fine dispersion of cementite particles in a smooth ferrite matrix. Carbide morphologies range from arrays of globular particles or short fibers to extended, branched, and densely interconnected fibers. Work demonstrates that FCA forms over similar cooling rate ranges to Widmanstätten ferrite. Rapid transformation of both phases occurs at temperatures between 798 K and 973 K (525 °C and 700 °C). FCA reaction is not simultaneous with Widmanstätten ferrite but occurs at temperatures intermediate between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite. Austenite carbon content calculations verify that cementite precipitation is thermodynamically possible at FCA reaction temperatures without bainite formation. The pattern of precipitation is confirmed to be discontinuous. CCT diagrams have been constructed that incorporate FCA. At low steel manganese content, Widmanstätten ferrite and bainite bay sizes are significantly reduced so that large amounts of FCA are formed over a wide range of cooling rates.

  9. Bulging Behavior of Thin-walled Welded Low Carbon Steel Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIE Wen-cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the deformation behaviour of welded tubes during hydraulic bulging process,the hydraulic bulging tests of thin-walled welded low carbon steel tubes (STKM11A were conducted on the tube hydroformability testing unit.The thickness distribution,profiles of bulging area and the strain distribution were all obtained.Results show that the thickness reduction of weld zone is just 2.4%-5.5% while its effective strain is just 0.05-0.10,which is very small and negligible compared with the parent material and means that just the geometric position of weld zone is changed with the continuous bulging.The thinnest points are located on the both sides of weld seam symmetrically and the angle between the thinnest point and weld seam is about 30°,at which the necking has been occurred.When the length of bulging area increases,the fracture pressure,the thickness reduction and the ultimate expansion ratio all decrease,and the profile of the bulging area gradually steps away from the elliptical model which is powerless for the ratio of length to diameter up to 2.0.Moreover,the strain state of the tube is transformed from biaxial tension to plane strain state with the increasing length of bulging area,on the basis of this the forming limit diagram of welded STKM11A steel tubes can be established.

  10. TEM Study of the Orientation Relationship Between Cementite and Ferrite in a Bainitic Low Carbon High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Illescas Fernandez, Silvia; Brown, A.P.; He, K.; Fernández, Javier; Guilemany Casadamon, Josep Maria

    2005-01-01

    Two different bainitic structures are observed in a steel depending on the sample heat treatment. The different types of bainitic structures exhibit different orientation relationships between cementite and the ferrite matrix. Upper bainite presents a Pitsch orientation relationship and lower bainite presents a Bagaryatski orientation relationship. Different heat treatments of low carbon HSLA steel samples have been studied using TEM in order to find the orientation relationshi...

  11. Effect of Adding Cerium on Microstructure and Morphology of Ce-Based Inclusions Formed in Low-Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Adabavazeh; W. S. Hwang; Y. H. Su

    2017-01-01

    Intra-granular Acicular Ferrite (IAF), as one of the most well-known desirable microstructure of ferrite with a chaotic crystallographic orientation, can not only refine the microstructure and retard the propagation of cleavage crack but also provide excellent combination of strength and toughness in steel. The effect of adding cerium on microstructure and controlling proper cerium-based inclusions in order to improve properties in low-carbon commercial steel (SS400) were investigated. The ty...

  12. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an

  13. Measurements of the corrosion of low-carbon steel drums under environmental conditions at Hanford: One-year test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the methods used to expose low-carbon steel drums to atmospheric and soil corrosion and describes the methods used to examine specimens retrieved from both types of tests. These drums are being tested to meet requirements of radioactive waste storage for both low-level radioactive wastes and transuranic wastes

  14. Texture investigations of low carbon cold rolled steel using the X-ray and neutron diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanova, I.; Vratislav, S.; Dlouha, M.; Kostova, M.

    1987-01-01

    The texture in low carbon cold rolled steel killed with aluminium is investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. The Roe's and Bunge's mathematical formalisms are used to describe the texture respectivelly. The results are discussed in terms of optimization of the technology

  15. Modeling of roughness effect on hydrogen permeation in a low carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carreño, J. A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available A model is presented to evaluate the effect of the roughness and the profile of concentration of hydrogen in a low carbon steel. The model takes advantage of the Fick's Second Law, to predict the transport of hydrogen in the steel. The problem is treated as a variational one and its space solution is made numerically by means of the Finite Elements Method, while the temporal equation is solved via the Finite Differences Method, in order to determine the concentration profiles of Hydrogen in the steel and to quantify the roughness effect. Simultaneously, bipotentiostatic hydrogen permeation test were performed to evaluate the coefficient of mass transfer.

    El presente trabajo modela el efecto de la rugosidad y el perfil de concentración de hidrógeno en un acero, tomando como punto de partida la segunda ley de Fick para explicar el transporte de hidrógeno en el acero. El problema se trata como un problema variacional y su solución espacial se hace numéricamente por el Método de Elementos Finitos, mientras que la temporal por el Método de Diferencias Finitas, siendo estas las herramientas utilizadas para determinar los perfiles de concentración y cuantificar el efecto superficial presentado en este tipo de fenómeno. Además, a partir de la teoría se obtienen ecuaciones algebraicas que determinan el efecto que tiene la preparación superficial y el coeficiente de transferencia de masa con la permeación y concentración de hidrógeno en el acero.

  16. Effect of heating rate on intercritical annealing of low-carbon cold-rolled steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Larrin

    A study was performed on the effect of heating rate on transformations during intercritical annealing of cold-rolled low-carbon sheet steels. Two sets of experiments were developed: 1) a series of alloys (1020, 1019M, 15B25) with two different cold reductions (nominally 40 and 60 pct) were heated at different rates and transformation temperatures were determined using analysis of dilatometry and metallography of intercritically annealed samples, allowing the study of the impact of composition and cold work on transformation behavior with different heating rates. 2) A cold-rolled C-Mn-Nb steel was tested with different heating rates selected for different degrees of recrystallization during austenite formation to test the impact of ferrite recrystallization on austenite formation. Heat treated samples were analyzed with SEM, EBSD, dilatometry, and microhardness to study the changes in transformation behavior. The results of this study were extended by adding step heating tests, heat treatments with an intercritical hold, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements of Mn distribution. Austenite transformation temperatures increased logarithmically with heating rate. Greater degrees of cold work led to reduced transformation temperatures across all heating rates because the energy of cold work increased the driving force for austenite formation. The relative effects of alloying additions on transformation temperatures remained with increasing heating rate. Rapid heating minimized ferrite recrystallization and pearlite spheroidization. Austenite formation occurred preferentially in recovered ferrite regions as opposed to recrystallized ferrite boundaries. Martensite was evenly distributed in slowly heated steels because austenite formed on recrystallized, equiaxed, ferrite boundaries. With rapid heating, austenite formed in directionally-oriented recovered ferrite which increased the degree of banding. The greatest degree of banding was found with

  17. Microstructure Examinations in Corners of the Low-Carbon Steel Slabs from Continuos Caster Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwinta G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The exposed selvedge layers in slabs cast by the continuous process should be free from surface defects, which in most cases appear in the form of cracks on the casting surface and run to its interior. In addition to the parameters of the casting process, the occurrence of such defects depends on the chemical composition of cast steel, on the segregation of surface active elements and formation of the precipitates of carbides, nitrides and other phases. Due to the frequent occurrence of defects in corners of the slabs, non-destructive testing was performed on the mechanically cleaned surfaces of slabs. The test material was low-carbon API(American Petroleum Institute API 5L standard steel micro alloyed with Nb and Ti designed for the production of pipes to handle gas, oil and other liquid and gaseous fuels. Despite the use of different methods of inspection, i.e. ultrasonic, magnetic particle and penetrant, cracks were not traced in the examined material. Then, from the corners of the examined slabs, specimens were cut out for metallographic examinations. The main purpose of these examinations was to disclose the presence of possible cracks and micro cracks on the surfaces transversal and longitudinal to the direction of casting. At the same time, studies were conducted to establish the number and morphology of non-metallic inclusions in selvedge layers of the slab corners and axis. Additionally, hardness of the slabs was measured. The conducted studies revealed only some minor differences in the slab hardness along its axis (130 ÷ 135 HB and in selvedge layers (120 ÷ 123 HB.

  18. Texture evolution during the recrystallization of a warm-rolled low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Araiza, M.; Godet, S.; Jacques, P.J.; Jonas, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    The texture changes taking place during the recrystallization of a warm-rolled low-carbon steel were examined using electron backscattered diffraction. The deformation textures of the warm-rolled material are similar in shape to those of cold-rolled materials, but are somewhat more intense. The recrystallization textures resemble the deformation textures but with a more extended α fibre that includes the {1 1 3} orientation; the γ fibre extends to the {5 5 4} orientation. These two orientations are related to the {1 1 2} deformed grains by near 26 deg, rotations about selected axes. Nevertheless, both orientations appear in the early stages of recrystallization, an observation that does not support the oriented growth theory. The {1 1 1} orientations are the first to recrystallize while the α fibre is present until the end of recrystallization. It is finally consumed by all types of grains as well as by subgrain coalescence. The similarities in the growth rates for the {1 1 1} and random orientations and the late disappearance of the α fibre suggest that recrystallization takes place according to the high stored energy oriented nucleation concept

  19. Characterization of thin Zn-Ni alloy coatings electrodeposited on low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Hajjami, A.; Gigandet, M.P.; De Petris-Wery, M.; Catonne, J.C.; Duprat, J.J.; Thiery, L.; Raulin, F.; Pommier, N.; Starck, B.; Remy, P.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of initial layer formation in alkaline bath for Zn-Ni (12-15%) alloy electrodeposition on low carbon steel plates are detected in a nanometric thickness range by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), with both bulk sample and thin film on substrate correction procedure, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and gracing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). The Zn-Ni coatings were elaborated using either intensiostatic or potentiostatic mode. A preferential deposition of Ni, in the initial thin layer, is detected by these analyses; according to EPMA and GDOES measurements, a layer rich in nickel at the interface substrate/deposit is observed (90 wt.% Ni) and approved by GIXRD; the thin layer of Ni formed in the first moments of electrolysis greatly inhibits the Zn deposition. The initial layer depends upon the relative ease of hydrogen and metal discharge and on the different substrate surfaces involved. The electrodeposition of zinc-nickel alloys in the first stage is a normal phenomenon of codeposition, whereby nickel - the more noble metal - is deposited preferentially

  20. Microstructure and texture evolution during tensile deformation of symmetric/asymmetric-rolled low carbon microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Minghui; Wei, Xing; Rolfe, Bernard; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The deformation and fracture mechanisms of a low carbon microalloyed steel processed by asymmetric rolling (AsR) and symmetric rolling (SR) were compared by microstructural and texture evolutions during uniaxial tensile deformation. A realistic microstructure-based micromechanical modeling was involved as well. AsR provides more effective grain refinement and beneficial shear textures, leading to higher ductility and extraordinary strain hardening with improved yield and ultimate tensile stresses as well as promoting the occurrence of ductile fracture. This was verified and further explained by means of the different fracture modes during quasi-static uniaxial deformation, the preferred void nucleation sites and crack propagation behavior, and the change in the dislocation density based on the kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution. The equivalent strain/stress partitioning during tensile deformation of AsR and SR specimens was modeled based on a two-dimensional (2D) representative volume element (RVE) approach. The trend of strain/stress partitioning in the ferrite matrix agrees well with the experimental results

  1. Influence of modification on descriptions of low-carbon steel of ST1KP and wheeled КP-Т

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tatarko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Establishment of influence of modification on chemical composition stabilizing, improvements of morphology and location of nonmetallics and increase of stability and level of mechanical properties of steels St1kp and KП-Т. Methodology. For the performance of the given goal the modern methods of researches are used: chemical and spectral; electron microscopy; metallography; determination of mechanical properties. Chemical composition of steels was determined on DSTU 2651-2006 and specifications U 35.2-23365425-600:2006. Findings. Influence of multifunction modifiers were set on chemical composition, forming of nonmetallics and mechanical properties in low-carbon steel of St1kp and wheeled KP-T. It is proved that multifunction modifiers diminish the amount of nonmetallics and improve their morphology, facilitate chemical composition stabilization and increase of mechanical properties level of probed steels. Originality. Possibility of chemical composition stabilization and mechanical properties, changes morphology of nonmetallics due to volume crystallization at modification were first proved. Practical value. Use of modifiers of different compositions at the enterprises of JSCo «ArselorMittal Krivoi Rog» and JSCo «INTERPAYP NTZ» at smelting of steels St1kp and KП-T allowed to promote mechanical descriptions, especially shock viscidity of the prepared wheels from steel KП-T at the average on 14 %. Two new modifiers of multifunction action for treatment low-carbon and wheeled steels were developed, the novelty of which was confirmed by the patents ofUkraine № 85254 and № 93684.

  2. Impulse Excitation Internal Friction Study of Dislocation and Point Defect Interactions in Ultra-Low Carbon Bake-Hardenable Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Il-Chan; Kang, Deok-Gu; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2014-04-01

    The simultaneous presence of interstitial solutes and dislocations in an ultra-low carbon bake-hardenable steel gives rise to two characteristic peaks in the internal friction (IF) spectrum: the dislocation-enhanced Snoek peak and the Snoek-Kê-Köster peak. These IF peaks were used to study the dislocation structure developed by the pre-straining and the static strain aging effect of C during the bake-hardening process. A Ti-stabilized interstitial-free steel was used to ascertain the absence of a γ-peak in the IF spectrum of the deformed ultra-low carbon steel. The analysis of the IF data shows clearly that the bake-hardening effect in ultra-low carbon steel is entirely due to atmosphere formation, with the dislocation segment length being the main parameter affecting the IF peak amplitude. Recovery annealing experiments showed that the rearrangement of the dislocation structure lead to the elimination of the C atmosphere.

  3. Development of Low Carbon Niobium Bearing High Strength F-B Dual Phase Steel with High Hole Expansion Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Xia, Ming-sheng; Xiong, Zi-liu; Du, Yan-bing; Qiao, Zhi-ming; Zhang, Hong-bo

    In the study a low carbon niobium bearing high strength F-B dual phase automobile steel with high hole expansion property has been investigated. Steels of different chemical composition have been investigated by simulation experiments of controlled rolling and cooling process to study the influences of chemical elements, especially for C,Nb and Ti, and cooling pattern on the mechanical properties, flangeability and microstructure of strips. So-called 3-stages cooling pattern was adopted in simulation experiments, combining ultra fast cooling in first stage, air cooling in middle stage and fast cooling in the last stage, and at the end of run-out table the temperature of rolled pieces drop to below Bs point. Optical microstructure and SEM morphology have been observed. Results indicate that it is possible to obtain dual phase microstructure of polygonal ferrite plus bainite in adopting 3-stages cooling pattern. The low temperature coiling method using 3-step controlled cooling pattern after hot rolling is effective to produce low carbon Nb bearing steel with high balance of strength-ductility-flangeability, in addition, higher carbon content of steel tend to be detrimental to flangeability of steel, due to much carbide precipitation at ferrite boundary. Based on the results of simulation experiments mill trial has been carried out and hot rolled high strength steel with tensile strength higher as 600Mpa and hole expansion ratio higher as 100% has been developed successfully.

  4. The Effect of Temperature and Acid Concentration on Corrosion of Low Carbon Steel in Hydrochloric Acid Media

    OpenAIRE

    Anees A. Khadom; Aprael S. Yaro; Abdul A.H. Kadum; Ahmed S. AlTaie; Ahmed Y. Musa

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: The effect of different temperatures and acid concentrations on the corrosion of low carbon steel in hydrochloric acid were addressed in this study. Approach: The effect of temperature was explained by application of Arrhenius equation and transition state theory, while the acid concentration effect was explained using reaction kinetic equations. The combined effect of temperature and acid concentration then modeled using a nonlinear regression method. Results: A detail of ...

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a low carbon carbide-free bainitic steel co-alloyed with Al and Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Lihe; Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Fucheng; Meng, Jiangying; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Highlight: ► A low carbon carbide-free bainitic steel was produced. ► Co-alloying with Al and Si suppresses the precipitation of cementite. ► Fine carbide-free bainite laths and thin film-like retained austenite obtained. ► Excellent combination of strength, ductility and toughness enabled. -- Abstract: A low carbon, low alloy steel has been investigated for producing low carbon carbide-free bainitic microstructure by co-addition of alloying elements of aluminum and silicon. The influence of heat treatment process on microstructure, impact toughness as well as tensile properties was investigated by light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and mechanical property tests. The results demonstrate that the co-addition of aluminum and silicon in the investigated steel plays an effective role in suppressing the precipitation of cementite. A desired microstructure consisting of mainly fine-scale carbide-free bainitic ferrite and thin film-like retained austenite located between the ferrite laths was obtained and accordingly an excellent combination of toughness, ductility and strength was achieved by optimized heat treatments, i.e. by isothermal treatment at 320 °C for ∼84 min or more. The microstructure-mechanical property relationships are discussed.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  7. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inconel 625 Alloy on Low Carbon Steel by Heat Treatment after Overlay Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seungpil; Jang, Jaeho; Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Byung Jun; Sohn, Keun Yong; Nam, Dae-Geun [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Overlay welding technique is one of methods used to improve metal mechanical properties such as strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Generally, Inconel 625 alloy is used for overlay welding layer on low carbon steels for economic consideration. However, the method produces some problems in the microstructure of the cast structure and some defects, caused by the elevated temperatures of the overlay process. To resolve these problems, heat treatments are required. In this study, Inconel 625 alloy was welded on a low carbon steel by the overlay welding process to investigate the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. A double heat treatment was performed to improve the mechanical properties of the welding and substrate layers. It was found that Inconel 625 alloy had an austenite microstructure after the first heat treatment, but the low carbon steel had a ferrite-pearlite microstructure after the second heat treatment. After the double heat treatment, the sample showed the optimum hardness because of grain refinement and homogenization of the microstructure.

  8. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the Ms temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Stumpf, Waldo; Berg, Nic van der

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M s temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M s temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  9. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the M{sub s} temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maweja, Kasonde, E-mail: mawejak@yahoo.fr [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, Materials Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Stumpf, Waldo [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, Nic van der [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2009-08-30

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M{sub s} temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M{sub s} temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  10. Almen intensity effect on microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon steel subjected to severe shot peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, Okan; Varol, Remzi

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses alteration of microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon steel after severe shot peening process. An ultra fine grained surface layer was formed on AISI 1017 mild steel by means of severe shot peening process. Surface characteristics were affirmed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Nano hardness measurements were taken along the depth from shot peened surface using nanoindentation methods. The results showed that severe (unconventional) air blast shot peening process is an effective way to obtain ultra fine grained surface layer and to obtain superior mechanical properties.

  11. Structural study near the film/substrate interface of a plasma sprayed tin coating on low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E.K.

    2006-01-01

    The structure near the film/substrate interface of tin coatings deposited with the plasma spray technique on a low carbon steel substrate is examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM), focusing on the structural properties affecting the corrosion performance. This examination revealed the presence of several Fe-Sn phases, which ensure good adhesion of the coatings to the underlying steel. Furthermore, amorphous Sn or SnO x were also detected in the coating, which, being in low concentration, have no effect on the coating properties

  12. Effect of thermomechanical treatment on the resistance of low-carbon low-alloy steel to brittle fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Del'gado Reina, S. Yu.; Golosienko, S. A.; Pazilova, U. A.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-02-01

    Structure and mechanical properties of rolled plates (20-35 mm thick) of low-carbon low-alloy steel subjected to thermomechanical treatment (TMT) according to various regimes under laboratory and industrial conditions have been studied. Structural factors that favor obtaining high mechanical properties have been established. The retarding action of TMT on softening upon tempering has been revealed. The reasons for the decrease in the resistance to brittle fracture of the steel subjected to TMT, repeated quenching from the temperature of the furnace heating, and tempering have been determined.

  13. Chemical Changes at the Interface Between Low Carbon Steel and an Al-Si Alloy During Solution Heat Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe, M.; Dezellus, O.; Gardiola, B.; Braccini, M.; Viala, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work was to characterize the chemical changes during solid state solution heat treatment of a metallurgically bonded steel/Al-Si interface. For this purpose, low carbon steel plates covered with the A-S7G03 aluminium alloy (7wt%Si, 0.3wt%Mg analogous to A356) were prepared by dip coating, water-quenching to room temperature and reheating in the solid state at 480-560°C for 3 to 160 hours. Upon reheating at 535 °C, a reaction layer was observed to grow a...

  14. THE INFLUENCE MECHANISM OF FERRITE GRAIN SIZE ON STRENGTH STRESS AT THE FATIGUE OF LOW-CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vakulenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Explanation of the influence mechanism of ferrite grain size on the fatigue strength of low-carbon steel. Methodology. Material for research is the low-carbon steel with 0.1% of carbon contnent. The different size of ferrite grain was obtained due to varying the degree of cold plastic deformation and temperature of annealing. The estimation of grain size was conducted using methodologies of quantitative metallography. The microstructure of metal was investigated under a light microscope with increase up to 1500 times. As a fatigue response the fatigue strength of metal – a maximal value of load amplitude with endless endurance limit of specimen was used. Fatigue tests were carried out using the test machine «Saturn-10», at the symmetric cycle of alternating bend loading. Findings. On the basis of research the dependence for fatigue strength of low-carbon steel, which is based on an additive contribution from hardening of solid solution by the atoms of carbon, boundary of the ferrite grain and amount of mobile dislocations was obtained. It was established that as the grainy structure of low-carbon steel enlarges, the influence of grain size on the fatigue strength level is reduced. For the sizes of grains more than 100 mcm, basic influence on fatigue strength begins to pass to the solid solution hardening, which is determined by the state of solid solution of introduction. Originality. From the analysis of the obtained dependences it ensues that with the increase of ferrite grain size the required amount of mobile dislocations for maintenance of conditions for spreading plastic deformation becomes less dependent from the scheme of metal loading. Practical value. The obtained results present certain practical interest when developing of recommendations, directed on the increase of resource of products work from low-carbon steels in the conditions of cyclic loading. Estimation of separate contribution of the studied processes of

  15. Microstructure and Property of Mn-Nb-B Low Carbon Bainite High Strength Steel Under Ultra-fast Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Bing-xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel with the reducing production technology as the research target, the deformation behavior and phase transformation behavior were studied by the thermal simulation testing machine. Combining with the characteristics of the medium and heavy plate production line, the controlled rolling and controlled cooling technology based on ultra-fast cooling were designed to produce low cost high strength construction machinery steel with superior comprehensive mechanical properties. The strengthening mechanisms such as grain refinement strengthening, precipitation strengthening are effective to produce the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel. The yield strength and tensile strength of the product reach to 678MPa and 756 MPa respectively, the elongation A50 is 33% and the impact energy at -20℃ is 261J. The microstructure of the steel is composed of granular bainite, acicular ferrite and lath bainite. A large number of fine, point, granular M/A constituents and dislocation structures dispersively distributed inside the matrix, and also tiny and dispersed (Nb,Ti (C,N precipitates are observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Tensile property improvement of TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets fabricated by hot-roll-bonding with low-carbon steel or interstitial-free steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Kim, Jung-Su; Kang, Minju; Sohn, Seok Su; Cho, Won Tae; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-01-09

    TWIP-cored three-layer steel sheets were newly fabricated by hot rolling of TWIP steel sheet surrounded by low-carbon (LC) or interstitial-free (IF) steel sheets. TWIP/LC or TWIP/IF interfaces were well bonded without pores or voids, while a few pearlites were thinly formed along the interfaces. The strengths and elongation of the TWIP-cored sheets increased as the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region increased, and were also well matched with the ones calculated by a rule of mixtures based on volume fraction or force fraction. According to digital image correlation and electron back-scatter diffraction analyses, very high strain hardening effect in the initial deformation stage and active twin formation in the interfacial region beneficially affected the overall homogeneous deformation in the TWIP-cored sheets without any yield point phenomenon occurring in the LC sheet and serrations occurring in the TWIP sheet, respectively. These TWIP-cored sheets can cover a wide range of yield strength, tensile strength, and ductility levels, e.g., 320~498 MPa, 545~878 MPa, and 48~54%, respectively, by controlling the volume fraction of TWIP-cored region, and thus present new applications to multi-functional automotive steel sheets requiring excellent properties.

  17. Preparation and microstructure characteristics of low-temperature bainite in surface layer of low carbon gear steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P.; Zhang, F. C.; Wang, T. S.

    2011-06-01

    A kind of technology was proposed for the development of low-temperature bainitic microstructure in the surface layer of low-carbon gear steel 20CrMnMo, which is based on carburization and succedent low-temperature austempering. The carbon content in the surface carburization layer increases to 0.81 wt.%, making the martensite starting point depressed. Low-temperature bainite formed in the carburization layer and lath martensite with low carbon content in the center by austempering at a low temperature slightly higher than the martensite starting point of the surface layer. Aluminum is added as alloying elements with the purpose of enhancing the driving force of bainitic transformation and retarding the precipitation of cementite during austempering. With the excellent toughness of low-temperature bainite, this low-temperature austempering technology could be a potential substitute of the traditional quenching and tempering heat treatment in the manufacture of gear.

  18. Surface hardening of St41 low carbon steel by using the hot-pressing powder-pack boriding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Soegijono, Bambang

    2014-03-01

    This research describes a powder-pack boriding process by using hot-pressing technic for St41 low carbon steel which will improve the hardness on the substrate by forming boride layer solid solution. Those method can reduce the operational cost of the research if it is compared by the conventional method with the asmospheric condition both vacuum system and gas inert condition. The concept of boriding by hot-pressing technic was verified in a laboratory scale. Welldefined and reusedable technic was achieved by using the stainless steel 304 as the container and sealed with a 5 ton pressure. This container was filled boronizing powder consisting of 5%B4C, 90%SiC, and 5%KBF4 to close the St41 low carbon steel specimen inside the container. The St41 boriding specimen was treated at the temperature of 900°C for 8 hours. The boride layer on the substrate was found as FeB and Fe2B phase with the hardness about 1800 HV. This value was more than ten times if compared with the untreated specimen that only had the hardness of 123 HV. Depend on heat treatment temperature, heat treatment time, and powder-pack boriding pressure, the depth of boride layer range from 127 to 165 μm, leading to a diffusion controlled process.

  19. Relationship Between Bake Hardening, Snoek-Köster and Dislocation-Enhanced Snoek Peaks in Coarse Grained Low Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weijuan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, specimens prepared from coarse grained low carbon steel with different prestrains were baked and then, their bake hardening (BH property and internal friction were determined. TEM was used to characterize the dislocation structure in BH treated samples. The measurements of internal friction in prestrained samples and baked samples were carried out using a multifunctional internal friction apparatus. The results indicate that, in coarse grained low carbon steel, the bake hardening properties (BH values were negative, which were increased by increasing the prestrain from 2 to 5%, and then were decreased by increasing the prestrain from 5 to 10%. In the specimen with prestrain 5%, the BH value reached the maximum value and the height of Snoek-Köster peak was observed to be the maximum alike. With increasing the prestrain, both of the BH value and Snoek-Köster peak heights are similarly varied. It is concluded that Snoek-Köster and dislocation-enhanced Snoek peaks, caused by the interactions between interstitial solute carbon atoms and dislocations, can be used in further development of the bake hardening steels.

  20. Contributions of Rare Earth Element (La,Ce) Addition to the Impact Toughness of Low Carbon Cast Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Hadi; Raygan, Shahram; Garcia Mateo, Carlos; Rassizadehghani, Jafar; Palizdar, Yahya; San-Martin, David

    2018-03-01

    In this research Rare Earth elements (RE), La and Ce (200 ppm), were added to a low carbon cast microalloyed steel to disclose their influence on the microstructure and impact toughness. It is suggested that RE are able to change the interaction between the inclusions and matrix during the solidification process (comprising peritectic transformation), which could affect the microstructural features and consequently the impact property; compared to the base steel a clear evolution was observed in nature and morphology of the inclusions present in the RE-added steel i.e. (1) they changed from MnS-based to (RE,Al)(S,O) and RE(S)-based; (2) they obtained an aspect ratio closer to 1 with a lower area fraction as well as a smaller average size. Besides, the microstructural examination of the matrix phases showed that a bimodal type of ferrite grain size distribution exists in both base and RE-added steels, while the mean ferrite grain size was reduced from 12 to 7 μm and the bimodality was redressed in the RE-added steel. It was found that pearlite nodule size decreases from 9 to 6 μm in the RE-added steel; however, microalloying with RE caused only a slight decrease in pearlite volume fraction. After detailed fractography analyses, it was found that, compared to the based steel, the significant enhancement of the impact toughness in RE-added steel (from 63 to 100 J) can be mainly attributed to the differences observed in the nature of the inclusions, the ferrite grain size distribution, and the pearlite nodule size. The presence of carbides (cementite) at ferrite grain boundaries and probable change in distribution of Nb-nanoprecipitation (promoted by RE addition) can be considered as other reasons affecting the impact toughness of steels under investigation.

  1. Nature of the hardening of 15KhNMFA and GNMFA type low-carbon pearlite steels for power mechanical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandomirskij, M.M.; Sobolev, Yu.V.; Kovalev, V.A.; Astaf'ev, A.A.; Savukov, V.P.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the hardening of low-carbon pearlite steels for power mechanical engineering of the 15KhNMFA and GNMFA type due to carbide phase precepitation during tempering, is considered. The structural and phase composition of welded steels and their welded joints is studied as applied to different regimes of heat treatment. The nature of the processes which take place in steels during heat treatment and their effect on steel strength and tempering resistance are shown [ru

  2. Low-carbon transition of iron and steel industry in China: carbon intensity, economic growth and policy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Li, Xiao; Qiao, Yuanbo; Shi, Lei

    2015-02-01

    As the biggest iron and steel producer in the world and one of the highest CO2 emission sectors, China's iron and steel industry is undergoing a low-carbon transition accompanied by remarkable technological progress and investment adjustment, in response to the macroeconomic climate and policy intervention. Many drivers of the CO2 emissions of the iron and steel industry have been explored, but the relationships between CO2 abatement, investment and technological expenditure, and their connections with the economic growth and governmental policies in China, have not been conjointly and empirically examined. We proposed a concise conceptual model and an econometric model to investigate this crucial question. The results of regression, Granger causality test and impulse response analysis indicated that technological expenditure can significantly reduce CO2 emissions, and that investment expansion showed a negative impact on CO2 emission reduction. It was also argued with empirical evidence that a good economic situation favored CO2 abatement in China's iron and steel industry, while achieving CO2 emission reduction in this industrial sector did not necessarily threaten economic growth. This shed light on the dispute over balancing emission cutting and economic growth. Regarding the policy aspects, the year 2000 was found to be an important turning point for policy evolution and the development of the iron and steel industry in China. The subsequent command and control policies had a significant, positive effect on CO2 abatement. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The CCT diagrams of ultra low carbon bainitic steels and their impact toughness properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The CCT diagrams of ULCB N i steels, HN3MV, HN3MVCu having 5.1% Ni and 3.5% Ni and Cu bearing steels; HN3M1.5Cu, HSLA 100 have been determined. The reduced carbon concentration in steel, in order to prevent the formation of cementite, allowed for using nickel, manganese, chromium and molybdenum to enhance hardenability and refinement of the bainitic microstructures by lowering B S temperature. Copper and microadditions of vanadium and niobium are successfully used for precipitation strengthening of steel both in thermomechanically or heat treated conditions. Very good fracture toughness at low temperatures and high yield strength properties of HN3MVCu and HN3MV steels allowed for fulfillment of the requirements for steel plates for pressure vessels and cryogenic applications. (author)

  4. Some observations on the carburization of type 316 stainless steel foil in a low carbon activity sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorley, A.W.; Jeffcoat, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Work currently being undertaken to establish the equilibrium composition of carbides which form in stainless steel foils during their exposure to low carbon activity sodium environment is described. The time it takes the carbon to reach equilibrium during exposure to sodium of different carbon activity is discussed. The lowest carbon activity measureable in test loops where the sodium is just above carburizing to stainless steel is reported. Analytical techniques are used to determine the composition of the carbide and the austenite matrix and hence estimate the carbon activity of the equilibrium structure. This provides a comparison with carbon activity values determined by alternative methods such as the Harwell Carbon Meter and nickel tab techniques

  5. Effects of heat treatment influencing factors on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shaohong; Yuan, Xiaohong; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Hudai; Li, Jun; Zhao, Kunyu; Yang, Maosheng

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment parameters and cryogenic treatment (−75 °C) on microstructural changes and mechanical properties of a low-carbon martensitic stainless bearing steel were investigated. These analyses were performed via the optical microscope (OM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results showed that the execution of cryogenic treatment on quenched and tempered bearing steel increases hardness, tensile strength and decreases toughness with the increment of cryogenic treatment and tempering cycles. This paper also showed that the cryogenic cycle's treatment incorporating tempering can refine the martensite laths resulting in improvement of tensile strength. In addition, cryogenic treatment further reduces the retained austenite content but it cannot make retained austenite transform into martensite completely even tempering at high temperature

  6. Effect of Deformation Temperature on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the influence of deformation temperature in a range from −40°C to 200°C on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of a low-carbon high-manganese austenitic steel. The temperature range was chosen to cope at the time during sheet processing or car crash events. Experimental results show that yield stress and ultimate tensile strength gradually deteriorate with an increase in the tensile testing temperature. The dominant mechanism responsible for the strain hardening of steel changes as a function of deformation temperature, which is related to stacking fault energy (SFE changes. When the deformation temperature rises, twinning decreases while a role of dislocation slip increases.

  7. Rust Layer Formed on Low Carbon Weathering Steels with Different Mn, Ni Contents in Environment Containing Chloride Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-qin FU

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rusting evolution of low carbon weathering steels with different Mn, Ni contents under a simulated environment containing chloride ions has been investigated to clarify the correlation between Mn, Ni and the rust formed on steels. The results show that Mn contents have little impact on corrosion kinetics of experimental steels. Content increase of Ni both enhances the anti-corrosion performance of steel substrate and the rust. Increasing Ni content is beneficial to forming compact rust. Semi-quantitative XRD phase analysis shows that the quantity ratio of α/γ*(α-FeOOH/(γ-FeOOH+Fe3O4 decreases as Mn content increases but it increases as Ni content increases. Ni enhances rust layer stability but Mn content exceeding 1.06 wt.% is disadvantageous for rust layer stability. The content increase of Mn does not significantly alter the parameters of the polarization curve. However, as Ni contents increases, Ecorr has shifted to the positive along with decreased icorr values indicating smaller corrosion rate especially as Ni content increases from 0.42 wt.% to 1.50 wt.%.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12844

  8. Towards the production of 50'000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheet for the LHC superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Babic, S; Brixhe, F; Comel, S; Peiro, G; Verbeeck, T

    2002-01-01

    A total of 50'000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheet has been ordered for the LHC main magnets. After three years of production, about 10'000 tonnes of steel sheet have been produced by Cockerill-Sambre Groupe Usinor. This paper gives a summary of the manufacturing process and improvements implemented as well as an overview of the difficulties encountered during this production. Preliminary statistics obtained for the mechanical and magnetic steel properties are presented.

  9. Toward the production of 50 000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheet for the LHC superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Babic, S; Beckers, F; Brixhe, F; Peiro, G; Verbeeck, T

    2002-01-01

    A total of 50 000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheet has been ordered for the LHC main magnets. After three years of production, about 10 000 tonnes of steel sheet have been produced by Cockerill-Sambre Groupe Usinor. This paper gives a summary of the manufacturing process and improvements implemented as well as an overview of the difficulties encountered during this production. Preliminary statistics obtained for the mechanical and magnetic steel properties are presented. (6 refs).

  10. Corrosion Resistance and Pitting Behaviour of Low-Carbon High-Mn Steels in Chloride Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajcar A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion resistance of the X4MnSiAlNbTi27-4-2 and X6MnSiAlNbTi26-3-3 type austenitic steels, after hot deformation as well as after cold rolling, were evaluated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization tests. A type of nonmetallic inclusions and their pitting corrosion behaviour were investigated. Additionally, the effect of cold deformation on the corrosion resistance of high-Mn steels was studied. The SEM micrographs revealed that corrosion damage formed in both investigated steels is characterized by various shapes and an irregular distribution at the metallic matrix, independently on the steel state (thermomechanically treated or cold worked. Corrosion pits are generated both in grain interiors, grain boundaries and along the deformation bands. Moreover, corrosion damage is stronger in cold deformed steels in comparison to the thermomechanically treated specimens. EDS analysis revealed that corrosion pits preferentially nucleated on MnS and AlN inclusions or complex oxysulphides. The morphology of corrosion damage in 3.5% NaCl supports the data registered in potentiodynamic tests.

  11. The effects of deoxidation practice on the quality of thin foil low-carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Batista R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In converter steelmaking of AISI 1006 steel for thin foil products, two tapping practices are used with respect to deoxidation: silicon and manganese additions during tapping and aluminum deoxidation after complete tapping (“semikilled practice” and aluminum deoxidation during tapping, “fully killed practice”. There is a perception that the semikilled practice may be more economical and result in the same quality as the fully killed practice. In this work, the effects of the tapping practice on steel quality and cost variables were evaluated for thin foils of AISI 1006 steel. Oxygen and aluminum content, aluminum and ferro-alloy yield, the type of alumina inclusions formed, and the quality of the steel during thin foil rolling were evaluated and compared. It is shown that the fully killed practice leads to less reoxidation from slag, lower soluble oxygen, and lower total oxygen at the caster as well as better morphology of the remaining alumina inclusions than the semi-killed practice. Thus, the higher quality of the steel produced via the fully killed tapping deoxidation practice when compared with semi-killed tapping is demonstrated. It is also shown that a complete cost evaluation favors this practice in the case of products rolled for tin foil production.

  12. Application of Moessbauer effect in the study of austenite retained in low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements of two samples of low carbon alloy having micro-structure of granular bainite type and martensite type have been done. The concentration of the retained austenite in both samples was determined by Moessbauer effect and x-rays there, being agreement for the higher austenite content sample. Concentration of carbon in the MA (Martensite - Austenite) constituents of bainite is also ditermined, the results being in agreement with metallographic considerations. Carbon enrichments are shown as responsible by the stabilization of the austenite in the granular bainite. Spectra of both samples present three magnetic configurations for α-iron with medium magnetic fields iqual to 335, 307 and 280 KOe. (A.R.H.) [pt

  13. Effect of Adding Cerium on Microstructure and Morphology of Ce-Based Inclusions Formed in Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabavazeh, Z.; Hwang, W. S.; Su, Y. H.

    2017-05-01

    Intra-granular Acicular Ferrite (IAF), as one of the most well-known desirable microstructure of ferrite with a chaotic crystallographic orientation, can not only refine the microstructure and retard the propagation of cleavage crack but also provide excellent combination of strength and toughness in steel. The effect of adding cerium on microstructure and controlling proper cerium-based inclusions in order to improve properties in low-carbon commercial steel (SS400) were investigated. The type of inclusions can be controlled by changing S/O ratio and Ce content. Without Ce modification, MnS is a dominate inclusion. After adding Ce, the stable inclusion phases change from AlCeO3 to Ce2O2S. The optimum amount of cerium, 0.0235 wt.%, lead in proper grain refinement and formation of cerium oxide, oxy-sulfide and sulfide inclusions. Having a high amount of cerium results in increasing the number of inclusions significantly as a result it cannot be effective enough and the inclusions will act like barriers for others. It is found that the inclusions with a size of about 4∼7 μm can serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites for AF formation. Thermodynamic calculations have been applied to predict the inclusion formation in this molten steel as well, which show a good agreement with experimental one.

  14. Identification of optimum friction stir spot welding process parameters controlling the properties of low carbon automotive steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lakshminarayanan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir spot welding is a novel solid state process that has recently received considerable attention from various industries including automotive sectors due to many advantages over the resistance spot welding. However to apply this technique, the process parameters must be optimized to obtain improved mechanical properties compared to resistance spot welding. To achieve this, in this investigation, design of experiments was used to conduct the experiments for exploring the interdependence of the process parameters. A second order quadratic model for predicting the lap shear tensile strength of friction stir spot welded low carbon automotive steel joints was developed from the experimental obtained data. It is found that dwell time plays a major role in deciding the joint properties, which is followed by rotational speed and plunge depth. Further optimum process parameters were identified for maximum lap shear tensile strength using numerical and graphical optimization techniques.

  15. Microstructural research on hot strips of low carbon steel produced by a compact strip production line under different thermal histories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hao; Chen Qixiang; Kang Yonglin; Sun Yi

    2005-01-01

    Coupons with the same composition and thickness (4.0 mm nominal gauge) obtained from hot strips of low carbon steel underwent a series of investigations to analyze the microstructural characteristics and mechanisms responsible for their differences in mechanical properties. Two different industrial technologies were adopted, although the strips used in this research were produced on the same Compact Strip Production (CSP) line. One of the strips was produced with a routine γ→α CSP thermal history, but the other with a γ→α→γ* conventional thermal history. The only difference between them was that one technology had a α→γ* thermal history. Different specimens of both types of strips were prepared for metallographic observation, tensile tests, electron back-scattered diffraction tests and positron annihilation technique tests. Experimental results showed that the differences in mechanical properties could be ascribed to dissimilarities not only in the grain size and textural components but also in dislocation density

  16. Microstructure and phase composition of Fe-B-Al coatings on low carbon steel prepared by using mechanical alloying technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundawa, R. Y.; Aryanto, D.; Wismogroho, A. S.; Sudiro, T.

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, varying composition of FeB-Al was coated on low carbon steel by using mechanical alloying technique for 4 hours and followed by heat treatment in vacuum atmosphere of 5.9 Pa at 700 °C. The microstructure and formed phases of FeB-50 at.%Al, FeB-25 at.%Al, FeB-12.5 at.%Al and FeB coatings were intensively discussed. The cross sectional observation indicates that the coating thickness tends to increase with increasing Al content. Before heat treatment, the coatings are composed of FeB and Al phases, depending on coating composition.. After heat treatment, the intermetallic phases were identified. Interdifussion layer was also formed in the FeB-50 at.%Al coating after heat treatment.

  17. Microstructural evolution modelling of low carbon steel sheets during continuous annealing. Prediction of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petite, M.M.; Monsalve, A.; Gutierrez, I.; Zaitegui, J.; Larburu, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    A model has been developed which allows the prediction of both, the evolution of the microstructure during continuous annealing and the final mechanical properties as a function of the steel composition, the variables defining the annealing cycle and those during hot and cold rolling. (Author) 10 refs

  18. Processing of low carbon steel plate and hot strip—an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    materials, new processing techniques such as recrystallized controlled rolling and warm rolling have been developed for production of plates ... Microalloyed steel; thermomechanical processing; warm rolling; modelling of process parameters. 1. Introduction ..... ring cold rolling and batch annealing (Van Cauter et al. 2000).

  19. Corrosion protection of low-carbon steel using exopolysaccharide coatings from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion is one of the most serious and challenging problems faced worldwide by industry. This research investigates the inhibition of corrosive behavior of SAE1010 steel by bacterial exopolysaccharides. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of diffe...

  20. In situ neutron diffraction study of IF and ultra low carbon steels upon tensile deformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomota, Y.; Lukáš, Petr; Harjo, S.; Park, JH.; Tsuchida, N.; Neov, Dimitar

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2003), s. 819 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/03/0891 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : steels * neutron scattering * stress-strain relationship measurement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.059, year: 2003

  1. Low-carbon steel samples deformed by cold rolling - analysis by the magnetic adaptive testing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Vértesy, G.; Kobayashi, S.; Kadlecová, Jana; Stupakov, Oleksandr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 321, č. 17 (2009), s. 2670-2676 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA MŠk MEB040702; GA ČR GA102/06/0866; GA AV ČR 1QS100100508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic NDE * magnetic adaptive testing * plastic deformation * ow-carbon steel Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2009

  2. Phase transformations in low-carbon manganese steel 6Mn16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of phase transformations of the austenite of 6Mn16 steel during continuous cooling are presented in a CCT diagram. Manganese partitioning between ferrite and austenite during intercritical annealing is enhanced by prior soft annealing. Due to the increased Mn concentration in austenite, the temperatures BS and MS have decreased, as compared to those achieved during cooling from the complete austenite region.

  3. Passivation of Cu-Zn alloy on low carbon steel electrodeposited from a pyrophosphate medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Abdulcabbar; Yakup Hacıibrahimoğlu, M.; Bedir, Metin

    2018-01-01

    The motivation of this study is to understand whether zinc-based alloy also has a passivation behaviour similar to zinc itself. Cu-Zn alloys were electrodeposited potentiostatically from a pyrophosphate medium on a carbon steel electrode and their corrosion behaviours were studied. Pt and carbon steel electrodes were used in order to examine the corrosion/passivation behaviour of bare Cu, bare Zn and Cu-Zn alloy coatings. The passivation behaviour of all brass-modified electrodes having Zn content between 10% and 100% was investigated. The growth potential affects the morphology and structure of crystals. The brass coatings are more porous than their pure components. The crystalline structure of Cu-Zn alloys can be obtained by changing the deposition potential. The zinc content in brass increases when the deposition voltage applied decreases. However, the growth potential and the ratio of zinc in brass do not affect the passivation behaviour of the resulting alloys. The coatings obtained by applying different growth potentials were immersed in tap water for 24 h to compare their corrosion behaviours with carbon steel having pitting formation.

  4. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  5. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böttger, B; Apel, M; Santillana, B; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS, which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 and the mobility database MOB2, taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  6. Correlation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Thermomechanically Processed Low-Carbon Steels Containing Boron and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Byoungchul; Lee, Chang Gil; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2010-01-01

    The correlation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of thermomechanically processed low-carbon steels containing B and Cu was investigated in this study. Eighteen kinds of steel specimens were fabricated by varying B and Cu contents and finish cooling temperatures (FCTs) after controlled rolling, and then tensile and Charpy impact tests were conducted on them. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams of the B-free and B-added steel specimens under nondeformed and deformed conditions were constructed by a combination of deformation dilatometry and metallographic methods. The addition of a very small amount of B remarkably decreased the transformation start temperatures near a bainite start temperature (Bs) and thus expanded the formation region of low-temperature transformation phases such as degenerate upper bainite (DUB) and lower bainite (LB) to slower cooling rates. On the other hand, a deformation in the austenite region promoted the formation of quasipolygonal ferrite (QPF) and granular bainite (GB) with an increase in transformation start temperatures. The tensile test results indicated that tensile strength primarily increased with decreasing FCT, while the yield strength did not vary much, except in some specimens. The addition of B and Cu, however, increased the tensile and yield strengths simultaneously because of the significant microstructural change occasionally affected by the FCT. The Charpy impact test results indicated that the steel specimens predominantly composed of LB and lath martensite (LM) had lower upper-shelf energy (USE) than those consisting of GB or DUB, but had nearly equivalent or rather lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in spite of the increased strength. According to the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis data, it was confirmed that LB and LM microstructures had a relatively smaller effective grain size than GB or DUB microstructures, which enhanced the tortuosity of cleavage

  7. Effects of Nitride on the Tribological Properties of the Low Carbon Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Ping Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of composite heat treatment is used popularly for low friction and wear resistance of drive elements. A large number of papers about the heat treatment technology had been proposed. Especially, the nitride treatment has been used widely for the purpose of wear resistance and low friction in the industry. Therefore, the self-developed vertical ball/disk friction tester with the measurement system was used to study the effects of nitride on the tribological properties of the low carbon alloy steel—SCM415— in this study. The experiments were conducted under dry and severe wear conditions. The variations of friction coefficient and surface magnetization were simultaneously recorded during dynamic friction process. After each test, the microstructures of the wear particles were observed and analyzed under a SEM, and the depth of wear track is measured by means of a surface tester. According to the experimental results, the wear resistance of the specimens with carburizing-nitride is significantly larger than the case of nitride-carburizing. Moreover, the surface magnetization was especially larger for the case of nitride-carburizing. As a result, the wear particles always stay in the interfaces and the wear mechanism becomes complex. Therefore, it is necessary to put nitride after carburizing for the composite heat treatments.

  8. Effect of Welding Current on the Structure and Properties of Resistance Spot Welded Dissimilar (Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel) Metal Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawon, M. R. A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2015-04-01

    1.5 mm thick sheet metal coupons of austenitic stainless steel and plain low carbon steel were welded by resistance spot welding technique. The effects of welding current in the range 3-9 kA on the structure and mechanical properties of welded joint were investigated. The structure was studied by macroscopic, microscopic and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Mechanical properties were determined by tensile testing and microhardness measurements. Asymmetrical shape weld nugget was found to have formed in the welded joint which increased in size with an increase in welding current. The fusion zone showed cast structure with coarse columnar grain and dendritic with excess delta ferrite in austenitic matrix. Microhardness of the weld nugget was maximum because of martensite formation. An increase in welding current also increased tensile strength of the weld coupon. An attempt has also been made to relate the mode of fracture with the welding current.

  9. NbC precipitates EELS spectra in a very low carbon microalloyed steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancilla, J. E.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a characterization study by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS of NbC precipitates in microalloyed steel is presented. The steel was hot rolled in a laboratory scale two-high reversing mill. The shape, size, location, and number of particles per unit area in the steel microstructure are reported. The particles were semi quantitatively analyzed for the heavier alloying elements using EDS, while EELS was used for the lighter elements, e. g. carbon and nitrogen. The EELS study of the precipitates reveals that the carbon is present as a compound (NbC without nitrogen.

    En este trabajo se presenta un estudio de caracterización por espectroscopia de pérdida de energía de electrones (EPEE realizado en un microscopio electrónico de transmisión de los precipitados de NbC en un acero microaleado. El acero se laminó en caliente en un laminador dúo reversible escala laboratorio. Las partículas de precipitados se caracterizaron en tamaños, formas y distribución y se analizaron semicuantitativamente para los elementos de aleación del acero más pesados, empleando un detector por dispersión de energías de rayos X, mientras que la EPEE se empleó para los elementos más ligeros, es decir, el carbono y el nitrógeno. El estudio por EPEE de los precipitados muestra que el carbono está presente como un compuesto (NbC sin que se haya encontrado nitrógeno en los mismos.

  10. Determination of low levels of retained austenite in low-carbon high-manganese steel using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho Ferreira, Helder, E-mail: helder.ferreira@arcelormittal.com.br [ArcelorMittal Monlevade, Av. Getúlio Vargas, 100, 35930-000 João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Jose Martins Boratto, Francisco, E-mail: francisco_boratto@yahoo.com.br [Independent Consultant, Av. Aeroporto, 9, 35930-438 João Monlevade, MG (Brazil); Tadeu Lopes Buono, Vicente, E-mail: vbuono@demet.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Antonio Carlos, 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-03-25

    A method involving the decomposition of the X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks for the single wavelengths Kα{sub 1} and Kα{sub 2} was used to quantify the amount of retained austenite at levels lower than 5% in low-carbon high-manganese steels. By applying this method, it was possible to use the two main peaks of austenite (γ) and the two main peaks of ferrite (α) in the calculations, despite the partial overlapping of the (111)γ and (110)α peaks. The diffraction peaks were modeled with the Pearson VII equation using a nonlinear least-squares optimization technique. This allowed the integrated intensities of the XRD peaks to be calculated using only the Kα{sub 1} side. The method was used to measure the levels of retained austenite in samples of a metal-inert gas steel welding rod cooled at the rates of 10 °C/s and 1.6 °C/s. The accuracy of the method was determined by performing six measurements in different directions in both the longitudinal and the transverse section of the 1.6 °C/s sample.

  11. Quantitative analysis of inclusions in low carbon free cutting steel using small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Yojiro; Koppoju, Suresh; Ohnuma, Masato; Kinjo, Yuki; Tomota, Yo; Morooka, Satoshi; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Koizumi, Satoshi; Sato, Masugu; Shiraga, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure of inclusions in low carbon free cutting steel without lead addition was investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) coupled with small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The two-dimensional (2D) SAXS pattern shows clear scattering due to inclusions composed of large elongated particles aligned along the rolling direction, and small isotropic particles. From a comparison of the simulated and experimental 2D SAXS patterns, the shapes of the inclusions are regarded as ellipsoid for the larger inclusions and spherical for the smaller inclusions. The length of the minor axis in the large inclusion is 6.9 μm, while the diameter of the small inclusion is 0.50 μm. The aspect ratio of the large inclusion is estimated to be 3.8 in the lower q region, and is reduced slightly to 3.5 in the higher q region from the azimuthal plots. The results of an alloy contrast variation (ACV) analysis using both the SAXS and SANS data indicate that the chemical composition of the inclusions is almost NaCl-type manganese sulfide, and that the amount of iron sulfide is low. The volume fractions are 1.4% for the large inclusions and 0.2% for the small inclusions. This is consistent with the area fraction estimated using an optical microscope, and indicates that nearly all of the sulfur in the steel sample forms the manganese sulfide inclusions. (author)

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF FLUORINE-FREE MOULD FLUX APPLIED IN LOW CARBON STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Alves de Souza Junior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ract The mould flux is a mixture of non-metallic oxides that, in contact with liquid steel melts, becomes a liquid slag which the mainly function is to lubricate and control heat transfer between mould and strand during the continuous casting process. The mould flux without fluoride has the advantage of decreasing the wear of machine and the SEN in comparison to common mould flux. The application in Continuous Casting of Slabs has been a great challenge in relation to the operational viability together with internal and surface quality of slabs. Another differential is the decrease of environmental issues on account of the contamination of secondary cooling water by the fluorides. It is considered that properties of mould flux as chemical composition, viscosity, softening, melting flowing temperatures, fusion rate, etc, should be suitable to the chemical composition and the mechanical properties at elevated temperatures of steel and also the operational parameters such as casting temperature, casting speed, mould frequency, among others. This work presents a preliminary analysis in relation to operational viability, analysis of surface quality of slabs, measurements of fluorides content in the water of secondary cooling of machine. In addition to that, the analyses of operational features as measurements of wear of SEN, mould flux consumption, slag pool and behavior of thermocouples of detection system break outs (MSD are considered.

  13. Nondestructive examination of recovery stage during annealing of a cold-rolled low-carbon steel using eddy current testing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Seyfpour, M.; Ghanei, S.; Mazinani, M.; Kashefi, M.; Davis, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The recovery process in steel is usually investigated by conventional destructive tests that are expensive, time-consuming and also cumbersome. In this study, an alternative non-destructive test technique (based on eddy current testing) is used to characterise the recovery process during annealing of cold-rolled low-carbon steels. For assessing the reliability of eddy current results corresponding to different levels of recovery, X-ray line broadening analysis is also employed. It is shown th...

  14. Anti-carburizing Coating for Resin Sand Casting of Low Carbon Steel Based on Composite Silicate Powder Containing Zirconium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Chunyi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the structure and properties of anticarburizing coating based on composite silicate powder containing zirconium by X-ray diffraction analyzer, thermal expansion tester, digital microscope and other equipment. It is introduced that the application example of the coating in the resin-sand casting of ZG1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel impeller. The anti-carburizing effect of the coating on the surface layer of the cast is studied by using direct reading spectrometer and spectrum analyzer. The change of the micro-structure of the coating after casting and cooling is observed by scanning electron microscope. The analysis of anti-carburizing mechanism of the coating is presented. The results indicate that the coating possesses excellent suspension property, brush ability, permeability, levelling property and crackresistance. The coating exhibits high strength and low gas evolution. Most of the coating could be automatically stripped off flakily when the casting was shaken out. The casting possesses excellent surface finish and antimetal penetration effect. The carburizing layer thickness of the stainless steel impeller casting with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is about 1mm and maximum carburizing rate is 23.6%. The anticarburizing effect of casting surface is greatly improved than that of zircon powder coating whose maximum carburizing rate is 67.9% and the carburizing layer thickness with respect to allowable upper limit of carbon content is greater than 2mm. The composite silicate powder containing zirconium coating substantially reduces the zircon powder which is expensive and radioactive and mainly dependent on imports. The coating can be used instead of pure zircon powder coating to effectively prevent metal-penetration and carburizing of resin-sand-casting surface of low carbon steel, significantly improve the foundry production environment and reduce the production costs.

  15. Low carbon steel corrosion damage prediction in rural and urban environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz, V.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Artificial Neural Network (ANN model for the damage function of carbon steel, expressed in μm of corrosion penetration as a function of environmental variables. Working in the context of the Iberoamerican Atmospheric Corrosion Map Project, the experimental data comes as result of the corrosion of low alloy steel subtracts in three test sites in Uruguay, South America. In addition, we included experimental values obtained from short time kinetics studies, corresponding to special series from one of the sites. The ANN numerical model shows attractive results regarding goodness of fit and residual distributions. It achieves a RMSE value of 0.5 μm while a classical regression model lies in the range of 4.1 μm. Furthermore, a properly adjusted ANN model can be useful in the prediction of corrosion damage under different climatological and pollution conditions, while linear models cannot.

    Este artículo presenta la metodología de las redes neuronales artificiales (RNA como solución para el modelado de los valores experimentales obtenidos en los procesos de corrosión atmosférica. Se desarrolla el modelo de RNA para la función de daño, expresada en μm de penetración para el acero de bajo carbono en función de las variables medioambientales, en el contexto del Proyecto MICAT (Mapa Iberoamericano de Corrosión Atmosférica y programas de experimentación propios. Los datos experimentales son resultado de los estudios de calibración sobre sustratos ferrosos en tres sitios del territorio uruguayo, Sudamérica. Se incluyen, además, los valores experimentales obtenidos en los estudios de cinéticas iniciales, correspondientes a series especiales de cortos tiempos de exposición en una de las estaciones de ensayo. El modelo numérico de RNA muestra resultados con un valor de RMSE de 0,5 μm, en tanto el modelo de regresión clásico arroja un valor de 4,1 μm.

  16. Investigation of the Mechanical Properties of AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel and St 37 Low Carbon Steel Dissimilar Joint by Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Khosrovaninezhad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints between AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel and St 37 low carbon steel achieved using friction stir welding technique. The welding was carried out by means of rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speeds of 50,100,150 mm/min. EDS and XRD techniques were employed in order to determine possible phase transformations. Tensile test, shear punch test and microhardness measurements were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. The results of phase investigations showed that no carbide and brittle phase were detected at the joint boundary. Also, tensile test results demonstrated that failure occurred in the St 37 base metal. According to the shear punch test, the highest ultimate shear strength and yield shear strength was achieved for the sample welded at rotational speed of 800 rpm and linear speed of 150 mm/min, while this sample showed the least elongation. In addition, the highest microhardness was measured in the stir zone of austenitic stainless steel sample welded in the above mentioned welding condition, which can be attributed to the decrease in grain size caused by recrystallization process.

  17. The effect of deposition temperature on the surface coverage and morphology of iron-phosphate coatings on low carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popic, J.P. [ICTM-Department of Electrochemistry, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Jegdic, B.V., E-mail: borejegdic@yahoo.com [Institute GOSA, Milana Rakica 35, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bajat, J.B.; Veljovic, D. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, P.O. Box 3503, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Stevanovic, S.I. [ICTM-Department of Electrochemistry, University of Belgrade, Njegoseva 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Miskovic-Stankovic, V.B. [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, P.O. Box 3503, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-10-01

    The influence of deposition temperature and concentration of NaNO{sub 2} in the phosphating bath on the surface morphology and coverage of iron-phosphate coatings on low carbon steel was investigated. The phosphate coatings were chemically deposited on steel from phosphate bath at different temperatures (30-70 deg. C) and with the addition of different amounts of accelerator, NaNO{sub 2} (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 g dm{sup -3}). The morphology of phosphate coatings was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The composition of iron-phosphate coatings was determined using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface coverage was evaluated by the voltammetric anodic dissolution (VAD) technique. It was shown that the increase in temperature of the NaNO{sub 2}-free phosphating bath up to 70 deg. C caused an increase in surface coverage. The addition of NaNO{sub 2} in the phosphating bath significantly increased the surface coverage of phosphate coatings deposited at temperatures lower than 50 deg. C. The phosphate crystals were of laminated and needle-like structures for deposits obtained at temperatures lower than 50 deg. C, while at higher temperatures needle-like structure was transformed to laminated structure. The increase in NaNO{sub 2} concentration in the phosphating bath from 0.1 to 1.0 g dm{sup -3} did not significantly increase the surface coverage, but decreased the crystals size, consequently favouring the phosphate nucleation and better packing of the crystals.

  18. Yield behaviour associated with stacking faults in a high-temperature annealed ultra-low carbon high manganese steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Liming [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Fan, Likun [Shanghai Research Institute of Materials, 99 Handan Road, Shanghai, 200437 (China); Li, Zhigang; Sun, Nairong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Wang, Huanrong; Wang, Wei [Baosteel Research Institute, 889 Fujin Road, Shanghai, 201900 (China); Shan, Aidang, E-mail: adshan@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240 (China)

    2013-10-10

    This paper investigated the tensile behaviour of high-temperature annealed ultra-low carbon high manganese steel with 42 vol% delta-ferrite. The results show that the tensile stress-strain curve of plastic deformation exhibits three distinct stages of deformation: a yielding stage with a remarkably large elongation and a positive strain-hardening rate, a second stage in which the strain-hardening rate rapidly increases, and a third stage in which the strain-hardening rate slowly increase. The yield plateau is intrinsically associated with the increasing formation of strain-induced stacking faults. The stacking faults quickly form during yield deformation, and the yield elongation monotonically increases with the extent of the stacking faults. The localised strain concentration of delta-ferrite and the heterogeneous strain partitioning between harder delta-ferrite and softer austenite play important roles in the rapid formation of stacking faults during strain at the yield plateau, which is an important prerequisite for this yielding phenomenon. The results and analysis demonstrate that the rapid and then slow hardening deformation after the yield plateau result from strain-induced transformation and deformation twinning, respectively.

  19. Effect of Local Crystallographic Texture on the Fissure Formation During Charpy Impact Testing of Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Patra, Sudipta; Chatterjee, Arya; Chakrabarti, Debalay

    2016-06-01

    The severity of the formation of fissures (also known as splitting or delamination) on the fracture surface of Charpy impact-tested samples of a low-carbon steel has been found to increase with the decrease in finish rolling temperature [1093 K to 923 K (820 °C to 650 °C)]. Combined scanning electron microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction study revealed that crystallographic texture was the prime factor responsible for the fissure formation. Through-thickness texture band composed of cube [Normal Direction (ND)║] and gamma [ND║] orientations developed during the inter-critical rolling treatment. Strain incompatibility between these two texture bands causes fissure cracking on the main fracture plane. A new approach based on the angle between {001} planes of neighboring crystals has been employed in order to estimate the `effective grain size,' which is used to determine the cleavage fracture stress on different planes of a sample. The severity of fissure formation was found to be directly related to the difference in cleavage fracture stress between the `main fracture plane' and `fissure plane.' Clustering of ferrite grains having cube texture promoted the fissure crack propagation along the transverse `fissure plane,' by increasing the `effective grain size' and decreasing the cleavage fracture stress on that plane.

  20. Voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed atom probe tomography of a multiphase high-strength low-carbon steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Michael D; Seidman, David N

    2011-12-01

    The differences in artifacts associated with voltage-pulsed and laser-pulsed (wavelength = 532 or 355 nm) atom-probe tomographic (APT) analyses of nanoscale precipitation in a high-strength low-carbon steel are assessed using a local-electrode atom-probe tomograph. It is found that the interfacial width of nanoscale Cu precipitates increases with increasing specimen apex temperatures induced by higher laser pulse energies (0.6-2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm). This effect is probably due to surface diffusion of Cu atoms. Increasing the specimen apex temperature by using pulse energies up to 2 nJ pulse(-1) at a wavelength of 532 nm is also found to increase the severity of the local magnification effect for nanoscale M2C metal carbide precipitates, which is indicated by a decrease of the local atomic density inside the carbides from 68 ± 6 nm(-3) (voltage pulsing) to as small as 3.5 ± 0.8 nm(-3). Methods are proposed to solve these problems based on comparisons with the results obtained from voltage-pulsed APT experiments. Essentially, application of the Cu precipitate compositions and local atomic density of M2C metal carbide precipitates measured by voltage-pulsed APT to 532 or 355 nm wavelength laser-pulsed data permits correct quantification of precipitation.

  1. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    CERN Document Server

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  2. Effect of post heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness of diffusion coupled gray cast iron and low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayob, F.; Hussain, P.; Awang, M.; Zoolfakar, M. R.; Abdullah, A.; Baharudin, B. A.; Rahim, A. A. Abdul

    2018-03-01

    Experimental studies carried out on the joining of grey lamellar graphite cast iron to low carbon steel by diffusion welding techniques had successfully produced a few diffusion couples, despite facing some earlier failures. Although faced with some success, analysis on the diffusion couples showed voids and incomplete bond/joint at the interface of the joints while the tensile strength value was found to be low. In furtherance, the diffusion couples were then subjected to a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) that allowed for further diffusion process to take place to remove the voids and complete the bond/weld. The results revealed microvoids and interface lines at the interfaces of the specimens treated at temperatures of 800°C, and becoming less visible at 900°C. At an elevated temperature of 1000°C, on longer treatment times, apparently these microvoids and interface lines had disappeared, and the bond/weld at the interfaces of the diffusional welded couples seemed to be more complete. Thus, heat treatment time and temperature were found to have a strong influence on the structure, thickness and hardness of the diffusion layer produced.

  3. Composition and B-H curve analysis of low carbon steel from Krakatau Steel company using VSM And EDX for magnet design of 13 MeV cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taufik; Emy Mulyani; Kusminarto; Slamet Santosa

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotron is one type of particle accelerator that accelerate particle in circular trajectory, in order to obtain high kinetic energy. One of the main components is the cyclotron magnet system that serves to form a cyclic particle trajectories and made of forged low carbon steel. In the magnet design, the selection of magnetic materials is very important in determining whether cyclotron magnet can operate properly or not and even can be optimal. That is why we need to test samples of magnetic materials from local production in this case two samples of material produced by PT Krakatau Steel (KS). Tests performed include testing of BH curve using VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer) and material composition using EDX (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Obtained BH curve is used as material data in three-dimensional simulation using the Opera 3D with referee to magnetic model of Kirams 13. From this study it can be concluded that the position of the test object to the direction of the magnetic field induction gives different BH curve and the samples obtained from KS has a carbon content which is still high. The lower the carbon content in the iron will produce a better magnetic properties. Material samples analyzed will produce a field that is not optimal when it is used in a 13 MeV cyclotron magnet. (author)

  4. Effect of residual stress and hardening on grain boundary sliding in welds of low-carbon stainless steels with surface machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Katsuyama, Jinya

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the effects of residual stress and hardening on intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steels with surface machining, residual stress and hardness were evaluated by 3-dimentional thermo elastic-plastic analysis and grain boundary sliding behavior was examined using a constant strain rate tensile test. It was revealed that grain boundary sliding occurred in the material at 561K by the tensile test with the numerically simulated tensile residual stress due to multi-pass welding and surface machining. In addition, it was clarified that the grain boundary energy is raised by the grain boundary sliding. On the basis of these results, it was concluded that the cause of IGSCC in the welds of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel with surface hardening is the increase in grain boundary energy due to grain boundary sliding induced by residual stress of multi pass welding and surface hardening. (author)

  5. Corrosion of low-carbon steel under environmental conditions at Hanford: Two-year soil corrosion test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Divine, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    At the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, nuclear production reactors were operated from 1944 to 1970. The handling and processing of radioactive nuclear fuels produced a large volume of low-level nuclear wastes, chemical wastes, and a combination of the two (mixed wastes). These materials have historically been packaged in US Department of Transportation (DOT) approved drums made from low-carbon steel, then handled in one of three ways: (A) Before 1970, the drums were buried in the dry desert soil. It was assumed that chemical and radionuclide mobility would be low and that the isolated, government-owned site would provide sufficient protection for employees and the public. (B) After 1970, the drums containing long-lived transuranic radionuclides were protected from premature failure by stacking them in an ordered array on an asphalt concrete pad in the bottom of a burial trench. The array was then covered with a large, 0.28-mm- (011-in.-) thick polyethylene tarp and the trench was backfilled with 1.3 m (4 ft) of soil cover. This burial method is referred to as soil-shielded burial . Other configurations were also employed but the soil-shielded burial method contains most of the transuranic drums. (C) Since 1987, US Department of Energy sites have complied with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulations. These regulations require mixed waste drums to be stored in RCRA compliant large metal sheds with provisions for monitoring. These sheds are provided with forced ventilation but are not heated or cooled

  6. Friction Stir Welding of Low-Carbon AISI 1006 Steel: Room and High-Temperature Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth C.; Mansoor, Bilal; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an ecologically benign solid-state joining process. In this work, FSW of low-carbon AISI 1006 steel was carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resulting joints at both room temperature (RT) and 200 °C. In the parameter space investigated here, a rotational tool speed and translation feed combination of 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min produced a defect-free weld with balanced mechanical properties and a superior Vickers microhardness profile compared to all other conditions and to base metal (BM). At faster translation feeds (100 and 150 mm/min), wormhole defects were observed in the weld microstructure and were attributed to higher strain rate experienced by the weld zone. Under tensile loading, welded material exhibited yield strength that was up to 86 and 91% of the BM at RT and 200 °C, respectively. On the other hand, tensile strength of welded material was nearly similar to that of the base metal at both RT and 200 °C. However, at both temperatures the tensile ductility of the welded joints was observed to be significantly lower than the BM. Annealing of the 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min FSW specimen resulted in tensile strength of 102% compared to base material and 47% increase in the strain at failure compared to the as-welded specimen. The Charpy impact values revealed up to 62 and 53% increase in the specific impact energy for the 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min welded joints as compared with the BM.

  7. Development of High-Strength Bulk Ultrafine-Grained Low Carbon Steel Produced by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj Bahadur; Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Sastry, G. V. S.; Manna, R.

    2017-11-01

    Low carbon steel (LCS) workpieces have been deformed by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) at a large equivalent strain of 16.8 at room temperature. The mechanisms of microstructural refinement, strengthening, hardening, and fracture behavior are investigated. LCS becomes refined by a sequence of mechanisms of elongation of grains, splitting of elongated grains to bands at low strain, subdivision of bands to cells at intermediate strain, elongation of bands to ribbon grains, and breaking of ribbons to near-equiaxed grains at a high strain level. ECAP of LCS at ɛ vm = 16.8 refines the material to near-equiaxed grains of size 0.2 µm having a high-angle grain boundary fraction of 82.4 pct and average misorientation angle of 40.8 deg. The ultrafine-grained (UFG) LCS contains a dislocation density of 1.7 × 1015 m2. In the initial passes of ECAP, the yield and tensile strengths increase rapidly due to rapid grain refinement, reduction in domain size, and increase in dislocation density. At high strain levels, strengthening can be attributed to a combination of grain refinement, dissolution of cementite in the ferrite matrix, and increase in misorientation angle. At ɛ vm = 16.8, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) reaches >1000 MPa with a consequent drop in ductility to ≈10.6 pct. Reduction in ductility is found to be due to high dislocation density, high stored energy in the matrix, and occurrence of nonequilibrium grain boundaries. The LCS at low equivalent strain fails by ductile fracture. The dimple size and its volume fraction decrease, but their number density and stored energy increase with increasing equivalent strain. Beyond a critical equivalent strain of 9, the material fails by ductile-brittle fracture. At ɛ vm = 16.8, equal-channel angular pressed UFG LCS fails mainly by cleavage fracture.

  8. Conservation Research and Development/ New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony J. DeArdo; C. Isaac Garcia

    2003-12-15

    Conservation Research and Development/New Ultra-Low Carbon High Strength Steels with Improved Bake Hardenability for Enhanced Stretch Formability and Dent Resistance. The experimental work can be divided into four phases. In each phase, the materials were received or designed, processed and tested, to evaluate the BH increment or response, as a function of compositions and processing conditions. Microstructural characterization by various techniques was performed in order to gain insights into the mechanisms of flow stress increment by bake hardening.

  9. Surface characteristic of chemically converted graphene coated low carbon steel by electro spray coating method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell bipolar plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungsoo; Kim, Yang Do; Nam, Dae Geun

    2013-05-01

    Graphene was coated on low carbon steel (SS400) by electro spray coating method to improve its properties of corrosion resistance and contact resistance. Exfoliated graphite was made of the graphite by chemical treatment (Chemically Converted Graphene, CCG). CCG is distributed using dispersing agent, and low carbon steel was coated with diffuse graphene solution by electro spray coating method. The structure of the CCG was analyzed using XRD and the coating layer of surface was analyzed using SEM. Analysis showed that multi-layered graphite structure was destroyed and it was transformed in to fine layers graphene structure. And the result of SEM analysis on the surface and the cross section, graphene layer was uniformly formed with 3-5 microm thickness on the surface of substrate. Corrosion resistance test was applied in the corrosive solution which is similar to the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack inside. And interfacial contact resistance (ICR) test was measured to simulate the internal operating conditions of PEMFC stack. As a result of measuring corrosion resistance and contact resistance, it could be confirmed that low carbon steel coated with CCG was revealed to be more effective in terms of its applicability as PEMFC bipolar plate.

  10. The efficiency of different types of wood charcoal on increasing carbon content on surfaces of low carbon steel in the pack carburizing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narongsak Thammachot

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to compare the efficiency of five types of wood charcoal, eucalyptus, coconut shell, tamarind, bamboo and cassava root in increasing carbon content on surfaces of low carbon steel by the pack carburizing process. The experiment for pack carburized low carbon steel (grade AISI 1020 was conducted by using the different wood charcoals as carburizers, mixed with 10% limestone (by weight as the energizer. The carburizing temperature of 950°C, and carburizing times of 2, 4 and 6 hours were used in the experiment. After grinding, the specimens in each case were checked for carbon content by optical emission spectroscopy. Micro-Vickers hardness testing and microstructure inspections were carried out. The results of the experiment showed that the efficiency of eucalyptus charcoal as the carburizer (for increasing carbon content on surfaces of low carbon steel was higher than that of tamarind, cassava root, coconut shell and bamboo charcoals. The averages for carbon content were: 1.16, 1.06, 0.97, 0.83 and 0.77% respectively.

  11. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of low-carbon steel sheets for the mqw quadrupole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MQW quadrupole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 53 firms in 16 Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2619/SL/LHC) was sent on 24 September 1999 to three firms in two Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received two tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with COCKERILL-SAMBRE (BE) for the supply of 1000 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MQW quadrupole magnets for a total amount of 894 780 euros (1 423 870 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 200 tonnes of additional low-carbon steel sheets, for a total amount of 178 956 euros (284 774 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 1 073 736 euros (1 708 644 Swiss francs). The above amounts in Swiss franc...

  12. TEM study of bainitic low-carbon HSLA steel: the orientation relationships of cementite; TEM-Untersuchung eines kohlenstoffarmen bainitischen HSLA-Stahls: die Orientierungsbeziehungen von Zementit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illescas, S.; Fernandez, J.; Guilemany, J.M. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica; Asensio, J. [Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica

    2007-07-15

    Two different bainitic structures can be present in steel depending on the heat treatment to which the samples are subjected. The two different types of bainitic structures exhibit a different orientation relationship between the cementite and the ferrite matrix. The Pitsch orientation relationship is observed in upper bainite while the Bagaryatski orientation relationship is observed in lower bainite. Different heat treatment samples of low-carbon high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel were studied using TEM observations in order to ascertain the orientation relationship between ferrite and carbide in the different bainitic structures and to determine whether this relationship may indicate the type of bainitic structure. (orig.)

  13. Relationship between 0.2% proof stress and Vickers hardness of work-hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steel, 316SS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Saburo

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) occurs in shrouds and piping made of low carbon austenitic stainless steels at nuclear power plants. A work-hardened layer is considered to be one of the probable causes for this occurrence. The maximum Vickers hardness measured at the work-hardened layer is 400 HV. It is important to determine the yield strength and tensile strength of the work-hardened layer in the investigation on the causes of SCC. However, the tensile specimen cannot be obtained since the thickness of the work-hardened layer is as mall as several hundred μm, therefore, it is useful if we can estimate these strengths from its Vickers hardness. Consequently, we investigated the relationships between Vickers hardness versus yield strength and tensile strength using the results obtained on various steels in a series of Fatigue Data Sheets published by the National Institute for Materials Science and results newly obtained on a parent material and rolled materials (reduction of area: 10 - 50%, maximum hardness: 350 HV) for a low carbon stainless steel. The results showed that (1) the relationship between the 0.2% proof stress and the Vickers hardness can be described by a single straight line regardless of strength, structure, and rolling ratio, however, (2) the tensile strength is not correlated with the Vickers hardness, and the austenitic stainless steel in particular shows characteristics different from those of other steels. (author)

  14. Effect of chemical compositions and heat treatment on IGSCC resistance for strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.; Kanasaki, H.; Fujimoto, K.; Taneike, M.; Ooki, S.; Sueishi, Y.; Tezuka, H.; Takamori, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop the highly resistant alternative materials to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for the non-sensitized and strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steel in oxygenated water, the effects of chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions on the IGSCC resistance and stacking fault energy (SFE) values were studied for 33 laboratory melted steels and commercial type 310S stainless steel. The IGSCC resistance for test materials was compared by the maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area in fatigue pre-cracked CT specimens after SCC test in oxygenated high temperature water. SFE values for these test materials were measured by the transmission electron microscopy on the width of isolated extended dislocations under g-3g weak beam condition for thin foils taken from the test materials, in this study. From these experiments, the effects of the chromium, molybdenum, nitrogen, silicon and manganese contents on the SCC resistance for non-aged materials were not so pronounced in this study. It is strongly suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of the aged or non-aged and strain hardened low carbon austenitic stainless steels. (authors)

  15. Understanding the Effect of Ni on Mechanical and Wear Properties of Low-Carbon Steel from a View-Point of Electron Work Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hao; Huang, Xiaochen; Hou, Runfang; Li, D. Y.

    2018-04-01

    Electron work function (EWF) is correlated to intrinsic properties of metallic materials and can be an alternative parameter to obtain supplementary clues for guiding material design and modification. A higher EWF corresponds to a more stable electronic state, leading to higher resistance to any attempt to change the material structure and properties. In this study, effects of Ni as a solute with a higher EWF on mechanical, electrochemical, and tribological properties of low-carbon steel were investigated. Added Ni, which has more valence electrons, enhanced the electrons-nuclei interaction in the steel, corresponding to higher EWF. As a result, the Ni-added steel showed increased mechanical strength and corrosion resistance, resulting in higher resistances to wear and corrosive wear. Mechanism for the improvements is elucidated through analyzing EWF-related variations in Young's modulus, hardness, corrosion potential, and tribological behavior.

  16. Surface coverage and corrosion inhibition effect of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on the electrochemical performance of low carbon steel in dilute acid solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Tolulope Loto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition and surface protection properties of the combined admixture of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on low carbon steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 solution was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement, optical microscopy and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Results obtained confirmed the compound to be more effective in HCl solution, with optimal inhibition efficiencies of 93.26% in HCl and 87.7% in H2SO4 acid solutions with mixed type inhibition behavior in both acids. The compound shifts the corrosion potential values of the steel cathodically in HCl and anodically in H2SO4 signifying specific corrosion inhibition behavior without applied potential. Identified functional groups of alcohols, phenols, 1°, 2° amines, amides, carbonyls (general, esters, saturated aliphatic, carboxylic acids, ethers, aliphatic amines, alkenes, aromatics, alkyl halides and alkynes within the compound completely adsorbed onto the steel forming a protective covering. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction with the steel’s surface according to Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherms. Optical microscopy images of the inhibited and uninhibited steels contrast each other with steel specimens from HCl solution showing a better morphology. Keywords: Corrosion, Inhibitor, Adsorption, Steel, Acid

  17. Surface coverage and corrosion inhibition effect of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on the electrochemical performance of low carbon steel in dilute acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loto, Roland Tolulope

    2018-03-01

    Electrochemical analysis of the corrosion inhibition and surface protection properties of the combined admixture of Rosmarinus officinalis and zinc oxide on low carbon steel in 1 M HCl and H2SO4 solution was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, open circuit potential measurement, optical microscopy and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Results obtained confirmed the compound to be more effective in HCl solution, with optimal inhibition efficiencies of 93.26% in HCl and 87.7% in H2SO4 acid solutions with mixed type inhibition behavior in both acids. The compound shifts the corrosion potential values of the steel cathodically in HCl and anodically in H2SO4 signifying specific corrosion inhibition behavior without applied potential. Identified functional groups of alcohols, phenols, 1°, 2° amines, amides, carbonyls (general), esters, saturated aliphatic, carboxylic acids, ethers, aliphatic amines, alkenes, aromatics, alkyl halides and alkynes within the compound completely adsorbed onto the steel forming a protective covering. Thermodynamic calculations showed physisorption molecular interaction with the steel's surface according to Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherms. Optical microscopy images of the inhibited and uninhibited steels contrast each other with steel specimens from HCl solution showing a better morphology.

  18. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of low-carbon steel sheets for LHC resistive dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1 106 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MBW, MBXW and MCBW resistive dipole magnets for the LHC. Following a market survey (MS-2619/SL/LHC) carried out among 62 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2911/SL/LHC) was sent on 6 March 2001 to 11 firms in seven Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received one tender. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm COCKERILL SAMBRE (BE), the only bidder, for the supply of 1 106 tonnes of low-carbon steel sheets for the MBW, MBXW and MCBW resistive dipole magnets for a total amount of 984 803 euros (1 511 328 Swiss francs), not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, with an option for the supply of up to 15% additional steel sheets, for a total amount of 147 720 euros (226 699 Swiss francs), not subject to revision until 1 January 2003, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 1 132 523 euros (1 738 027 Swiss francs), not s...

  19. The Influence of Calcium Carbonate Composition and Activated Carbon in Pack Carburizing Low Carbon Steel Process in The Review of Hardness and Micro Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafni; Hadi, Syafrul; Edison

    2017-12-01

    Carburizing is a way of hardening the surface by heating the metal (steel) above the critical temperature in an environment containing carbon. Steel at a temperature of the critical temperature of affinity to carbon. Carbon is absorbed into the metal form a solid solution of carbon-iron and the outer layer has high carbon content. When the composition of the activator and the activated charcoal is right, it will perfect the carbon atoms to diffuse into the test material to low carbon steels. Thick layer of carbon Depending on the time and temperature are used. Pack carburizing process in this study, using 1 kg of solid carbon derived from coconut shell charcoal with a variation of 20%, 10% and 5% calcium carbonate activator, burner temperature of 950 0C, holding time 4 hours. The test material is low carbon steel has 9 pieces. Each composition has three specimens. Furnace used in this study is a pack carburizing furnace which has a designed burner box with a volume of 1000 x 600 x 400 (mm3) of coal-fired. Equipped with a circulation of oxygen from the blower 2 inches and has a wall of refractory bricks. From the variation of composition CaCO3, microstructure formed on the specimen with 20% CaCO3, better diffusion of carbon into the carbon steel, it is seen by the form marten site structure after quenching, and this indicates that there has been an increase of or adding carbon to in the specimen. This led to the formation of marten site specimen into hard surfaces, where the average value of hardness at one point side (side edge) 31.7 HRC

  20. Effect of 0.1 wt.% Co on the Hot Deformation and Toughness of Fine-Grained Low-Carbon Steel at Sub-zero Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiqin; Zhou, Shuangshuang; Liu, Zili; Hou, Zhiguo; Tian, Qingchao

    2017-12-01

    The effect of 0.1 wt.% Co on the hot deformation behavior of fine-grained low-carbon microalloyed steel was investigated at temperatures of 850-1200 °C and a strain rate of 5 s-1. Furthermore, the toughness of the steel with and without Co at sub-zero temperatures was evaluated. The results suggest that the addition of 0.1 wt.% Co increases the flow stress and delays the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) at the same deformation temperature and strain. The DRX fraction of steel specimens without and with 0.1 wt.% Co was about 67.4 and 43.9% at 850 °C, respectively. Then, it increased to 100% at 1100 °C. Compared with steel without Co, cementite particles in the tempered sorbite of steel with 0.1 wt.% Co decreased in size but increased in quantity, yield strength increased from 756 to 787 MPa, and Charpy V-notch energy at - 20 and - 50 °C improved from 69 and 41 to 102 and 65 J, respectively. The fracture morphology and crack propagation characteristics were consistent with the variation in impact energy.

  1. Role of Different Kinds of Boundaries Against Cleavage Crack Propagation in Low-Temperature Embrittlement of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Mizuki; Shibata, Akinobu; Terada, Daisuke; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2017-07-01

    The present paper investigated the relationship between low-temperature embrittlement and microstructure of lath martensite in a low-carbon steel from both microstructural and crystallographic points of view. The fracture surface of the specimen after the miniaturized Charpy impact test at 98 K (-175 °C) mainly consisted of cleavage fracture facets parallel to crystallographic {001} planes of martensite. Through the crystallographic orientation analysis of micro-crack propagation, we found that the boundaries which separated different martensite variants having large misorientation angles of {001} cleavage planes could inhibit crack propagation. It was then concluded that the size of the aggregations of martensite variants belonging to the same Bain deformation group could control the low-temperature embrittlement of martensitic steels.

  2. Pathways to a low-carbon iron and steel industry in the medium-term : the case of Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, Marlene; Worrell, Ernst; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Hasanbeigi, Ali; Zhang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    The iron and steel industry is a major industrial emitter of carbon dioxide globally and in Germany. If European and German climate targets were set as equal proportional reduction targets (referred to here as “flat” targets) among sectors, the German steel industry would have to reduce its carbon

  3. Technological change and industrial energy efficiency : Exploring the low-carbon transformation of the German iron and steel industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change is a key challenge of our time. The iron and steel industry emits 6.5 % of global anthropogenic CO2 that is likely to drive global warming. Greenhouse gases, among these CO2, are to be reduced to 5-20% of today’s level in industrialised countries. Thus, the steel sector must make

  4. Analysis of Boron Distribution in Steel using Neutron at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Seong, Baek-Seok; Kim, Hark-Rho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Boron is very useful element in steels to improve the mechanical properties. In steel matrix, boron exist several types such as solute, segregation in grain boundary and many kinds of precipitate, which influence the properties of the steel. But, detecting of boron using X-ray or ion-beam is not easy because boron is very light atom than iron. However neutron gives the clear image of boron distribution from the particle tracking autoradiography (PTA) method. The PTA method of boron uses the phenomenon that boron irradiated by neutron emits Liion and alpha particle. Boron distribution can be obtained by observing the traces of the emitted Li-ion and alpha particle. At HANARO, the study for observing of boron distribution has been performed several years ago. Recently, the experimental techniques were improved for the reactor power of 30 MW. In this paper, improved experimental techniques were described and some results for boron added low-carbon steel plate were introduced.

  5. Influence of metallurgical phase transformation on crack propagation of 15-5PH stainless steel and 16MND5 low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of phase transformations on crack propagation. We want to understand the changes of fracture toughness during welding. In this work, fracture toughness is expressed by J-integral. There are many experimental methods to obtain the critical toughness JIC but they are impractical for our investigation during phase transformation. That is the reason why we have proposed a method coupling mechanical tests, digital image correlation and finite element simulation. The fracture tests are implemented on pre-cracked single edge notched plate sample which is easy for machining and heat conduct during phase transformation. The tests are conducted at different temperatures until rupture. Digital image correlation gives us the displacement information on every sample. Each test is then simulated by finite element where the fracture toughness is evaluated by the method G-Theta at the crack propagation starting moment found by potential drop method and digital image correlation technical. Two materials have been studied, 15Cr-5Ni martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel and 16MND5 ferritic low carbon steel. For these two materials, different test temperatures were chosen before, during and after phase transformation for testing and failure characterization of the mechanical behavior. Investigation result shows that metallurgical phase transformation has an influence on fracture toughness and further crack propagation. For 15-5PH, the result of J1C shows that the as received 15-5PH has higher fracture toughness than the one at 200 C. The toughness is also higher than the original material after one cycle heat treatment probably due to some residual austenite. Meanwhile, pure austenite 15-5PH at 200 C has higher fracture toughness than pure martensitic 15-5PH at 200 C. For 16MND5, the result also proves that the phase transformation affects fracture toughness. The as received material has bigger J1C than the situation where it was heated

  6. A comparative study of precipitation effects in Ti only and Ti-V Ultra Low Carbon (ULC) strip steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, S.W.; Fourlaris, G.

    2006-01-01

    Two ULC steel grades were investigated, one based on combined vanadium and titanium additions and the other based on titanium only additions. It has been established that TiC formation during interphase precipitation retards grain growth of the {111} texture grains during continuous annealing and hence positively affects the r value of the Ti only steel. The formation of newly formed TiC precipitates on dislocations during continuous annealing has been found to result in an increase of the yield strength in both steel grades, as the annealing temperature is increased. It is also confirmed that VC particles formed during the coiling process dissolve during the continuous annealing cycles. Suitable continuous annealing cycles can be adopted to produce high formable steels with a bake hardening potential using the beneficial effects of combined Ti-V additions

  7. The effect of β-FeOOH on the corrosion behavior of low carbon steel exposed in tropic marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yuantai; Li Ying; Wang Fuhui

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion performance of carbon steel exposed in Wanning area, which located in the south part of China with tropic marine environment characters, was studied at different exposure periods (up to 2 years). To investigate the effect of β-FeOOH on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in high chloride ion environment, rust layer was analyzed by using infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and the rusted steel was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. The weight loss test indicated that the corrosion rate of carbon steel sharply increased during 6 months' exposure and gradually reduced after longer exposure. The results of rust analysis revealed that the underlying corrosion performance of the carbon steel was dependent on the inherent properties of the rust layers formed under different conditions such as composition and structure. Among all the iron oxide, β-FeOOH exerted significant influence. The presence of a monolayer of the rust as well as β-FeOOH accelerated the corrosion process during the initial exposure stage. EIS data implied that β-FeOOH in the inner layer was gradually consumed and transformed to γ-Fe 2 O 3 in the wet-dry cycle, which was beneficial to protect the substrate and reduced the corrosion rate

  8. Fast Salt Bath Heat Treatment for a Bainitic/Martensitic Low-Carbon Low-Alloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanec, Julia; Saastamoinen, Ari; Kivivuori, Seppo; Louhenkilpi, Seppo

    2015-11-01

    The mechanical properties of a low-alloyed steel with 0.06 wt pct C were investigated after a series of heat treatment processes using salt bath followed by quenching into water in order to obtain bainitic/martensitic steel. Salt bath holding time varied from 30 to 330 seconds. Hardness, tensile properties and toughness have been examined. The results show the obtained microstructure significantly enhances the impact strength (up to 187 J) and toughness (up to 71.4 pct critical reduction) with good hardness (239 ± 4 HV) and tensile strength (720 to 800 MPa) compared to direct quenching heat treatment without salt bath holding.

  9. Distribution of arsenic on micro-interfaces in a kind of Cr, Nb and Ti microalloyed low carbon steel produced by a compact strip production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.Z.; Li, J.C.; Liang, D.M.; Liu, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We evaluate the effect of Ti, V and Nb on grain boundary segregation of arsenic in steel. → Arsenic segregates strongly on grain boundary at the base-metal/scale interface. → Arsenic segregates on subgrain boundaries in the hot rolled steel strip. - Abstract: Distribution of arsenic on micro-interfaces in the Cr, Nb and Ti microalloyed low carbon steel strip was investigated by SEM, TEM and EDS in a compact strip production (CSP) and a following reheating processes. It is discovered that, in the CSP processes, the arsenic content within grains at the half thickness of the strip was a little higher than that at the grain boundaries, which was attributed to a quicker occupying of vacancies by carbon, Nb and Ti atoms on grain boundaries. However, arsenic segregated strongly on grain boundaries at the interface between the base metal and the oxide scale, where it had a maximum arsenic content of 2.93 wt.%. The strongly segregation of arsenic on grain boundaries at the interface between the base metal and the oxide scale may lead to difficulties in the subsequent production galvanized sheet with the hot rolled CSP strip that contains arsenic. When the hot rolled strip (CSP) was reheated to 1100 deg. C, held for half an hour, arsenic segregated strongly on subgrain boundaries for the availability of more vacancies caused by the solid solution of alloy carbonitrides.

  10. Electrochemical and quantum chemical studies of N,N'-bis(4-hydroxybenzaldehyde)-2,2-dimethylpropandiimine Schiff base as corrosion inhibitor for low carbon steel in HCl solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hojat; Danaee, Iman; Eskandari, Hadi; Rashvandavei, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    A synthesized Schiff base N,N'-bis(4-hydroxybenzaldehyde)-2,2-dimethylpropandiimine (p-HBDP) was studied as green inhibitor for the corrosion of low carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution using electrochemical, surface and quantum chemical methods. Results showed that the inhibition occurs through the adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on the metal surface. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration and de-creased with increasing temper-ature, which is due to the fact that the rate of corrosion of steel is higher than the rate of adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters for adsorp-tion and activation processes were determined. Polarization data indicated that this compound act as mixed-type inhibitors and the adsorption isotherm basically obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The calculations of reactivity indices of p-HBDP such as softness and natural charge distributions together with local reactivity by means of Fukui indices were used to explain the electron transfer mechanism between the p-HBDP molecules and the steel surface.

  11. Relationship Between Solidification Microstructure and Hot Cracking Susceptibility for Continuous Casting of Low-Carbon and High-Strength Low-Alloyed Steels: A Phase-Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2013-08-01

    Hot cracking is one of the major defects in continuous casting of steels, frequently limiting the productivity. To understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low-carbon and two high-strength low-alloyed steels. 2D simulation of the initial stage of solidification is performed in a moving slice of the slab using proprietary multiphase-field software and taking into account all elements which are expected to have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during solidification. To account for the correct thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the multicomponent alloy grades, the simulation software is online coupled to commercial thermodynamic and mobility databases. A moving-frame boundary condition allows traveling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. From the simulation results, significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are quantitatively evaluated and correlated with their hot cracking behavior according to the Rappaz-Drezet-Gremaud (RDG) hot cracking criterion. The possible role of the microalloying elements in hot cracking, in particular of traces of Ti, is analyzed. With the assumption that TiN precipitates trigger coalescence of the primary dendrites, quantitative evaluation of the critical strain rates leads to a full agreement with the observed hot cracking behavior.

  12. Microstructural evolution in ultra-low-carbon steel weldments—Part I: Controlled thermal cycling and continuous cooling transformation diagram of the weld metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonda, R. W.; Spanos, G.

    2000-09-01

    The transformation behavior and microstructural evolution of the as-deposited weld metal from an ultra-low-carbon (ULC) weldment were characterized by dilatometry, optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and microhardness measurements. These results were used to construct a continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram for this weld metal. The major microconstituents observed in this ULC weldment were (in order of decreasing cooling rate) coarse autotempered martensite, fine lath martensite, lath ferrite, and degenerate lath ferrite. No polygonal ferrite was observed. These results were also used to develop criteria to differentiate between the two predominant microstructures in these ULC steels, lath martensite, and lath ferrite, which can look quite similar but have very different properties.

  13. Experimental comparison of laser energy losses in high-quality laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using radiation from fibre and CO2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyshev, A. A.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Shulyat'ev, V. B.

    2015-09-01

    We report a comparative experimental study of laseroxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using a fibre laser with a wavelength of 1.07 μm and a CO2 laser with a wavelength of 10.6 μm at the sheet thickness of 3 - 16 mm. For the two lasers we have measured the dependence of the cutting speed on the radiation power and determined the cutting speed at which the surface roughness is minimal. The coefficient of laser radiation absorption in the laser cutting process is measured for these lasers at different values of the cutting speed and radiation power. It is found that the minimal roughness of the cut surface is reached at the absorbed laser energy per unit volume of the removed material, equal to 11 - 13 J mm-3; this value is the same for the two lasers and does not depend on the sheet thickness.

  14. Effect of composition and austenite deformation on the transformation characteristics of low-carbon and ultralow-carbon microalloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, P.; Wynne, B. P.; Davies, C. H. J.; Muddle, B. C.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2002-05-01

    Deformation dilatometry has been used to simulate controlled hot rolling followed by controlled cooling of a group of low- and ultralow-carbon microalloyed steels containing additions of boron and/or molybdenum to enhance hardenability. Each alloy was subjected to simulated recrystallization and nonrecrystallization rolling schedules, followed by controlled cooling at rates from 0.1 °C/s to about 100 °C/s, and the corresponding continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed. The resultant microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite (PF) for combinations of slow cooling rates and low alloying element contents, through to bainitic ferrite accompanied by martensite for fast cooling rates and high concentrations of alloying elements. Combined additions of boron and molybdenum were found to be most effective in increasing steel hardenability, while boron was significantly more effective than molybdenum as a single addition, especially at the ultralow carbon content. Severe plastic deformation of the parent austenite (>0.45) markedly enhanced PF formation in those steels in which this microstructural constituent was formed, indicating a significant effective decrease in their hardenability. In contrast, in those steels in which only nonequilibrium ferrite microstructures were formed, the decreases in hardenability were relatively small, reflecting the lack of sensitivity to strain in the austenite of those microstructural constituents forming in the absence of PF.

  15. Electrochemical Synthesis of Core-Shell-Structured NbC-Fe Composite Powder for Enforcement in Low-Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Song, Qiushi; Xu, Qian; Chen, Ying; Xu, Liang; Man, Tiannan

    2017-11-01

    An NbC-Fe composite powder was synthesized from an Nb₂O₅/Fe/C mixture by electrochemical reduction and subsequent carbonization in molten CaCl₂-NaCl. The composite has a core-shell structure, in which NbC acts as the cores distributing in the Fe matrix. A strong bonding between NbC and Fe is benefit from the core-shell structure. The sintering and electrochemical reduction processes were investigated to probe the mechanism for the reactions. The results show that NbC particles about several nanometers were embraced by the Fe shell to form a composite about 100 nm in size. This featured structure can feasibly improve the wettability and sinterability of NbC as well as the uniform distribution of the carbide in the cast steel. By adding the composite into steel in the casting process, the grain size of the casted steel was markedly deceased from 1 mm to 500 μm on average, favoring the hardening of the casted steel.

  16. The effect of the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence on mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Wan; Baek, Hyun Moo; Hwang, Sun Kwang; Son, Il-Heon; Bae, Chul Min; Im, Yong-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence is proposed to make high-strength wires. • The sequence was designed and applied for a low-carbon steel wire up to the 10th pass. • Many LAGBs and small grain size of the wire produced by the sequence were obtained. • High plastic deformation was imposed on the wire, resulting in grain refinement. • The sequence made fine-grained wires with improved UTS, ductility and fatigue life. - Abstract: In this study, the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence was investigated for manufacturing high-strength wires with better ductility in a simple continuous way without adding additional alloys and heat treatment considering the effect of microstructure evolution and die geometry of the sequence on the mechanical properties of low-carbon steel during the process. For this purpose, the non-circular drawing sequence was designed and applied up to the 10th pass at room temperature. Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of the specimen processed by the sequence were investigated by tension, Vickers micro-hardness, electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), and fatigue tests compared with those for the conventional wire-drawing process. From the EBSD results, the higher low angle grain boundaries length per unit area and smaller average grain size of the specimen processed by the non-circular drawing sequence were obtained than those of the specimen processed by the wire-drawing process for the 8th pass. These results indicated that more plastic deformation was imposed in the material by the non-circular drawing sequence, resulting in grain refinement of the deformed specimen compared to the wire-drawing process. It is demonstrated that the multi-pass non-circular drawing sequence could be beneficial in producing fine-grained wires with improved ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and fatigue property by simply changing drawing dies geometry of the conventional wire-drawing process

  17. Material properties characterization of low carbon steel using TBW and PWHT techniques in smooth-contoured and U-shaped geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloraier, Abdulkareem S.; Joshi, Suraj; Price, John W.H.; Alawadhi, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of the temper bead welding (TBW) technique and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on mechanical properties of multi-layer welding on low carbon steel specimens using Charpy V-notch impact testing and tensile testing. Several samples of two different weld geometries, viz. (i) smooth-contoured, and (ii) U-shaped were made with multiple bead layers using both TBW and PWHT techniques. Impact testing showed that at room temperature and below, TBW gave an impact toughness in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) better than both PWHT and the parent material. At temperatures higher than the room temperature but below 60 °C, PWHT gave better impact toughness in the HAZ. Above 60 °C, both TBW and PWHT showed impact toughness lower than that of the parent material. In tensile testing, both TBW and PWHT weld metal specimens produced acceptable results; however, TBW gave yield and tensile strengths closer to that of the actual material than PWHT. -- Highlights: • Effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) and temper bead welding (TBW) on properties are tested. • Charpy V-notch impact and tensile testing was performed on multi-layer welding of low carbon steel. • At room temperature and below, TBW gave better impact toughness than both PWHT and parent material. • Above room temperature but below 60 °C, PWHT gave better impact toughness than TBW. • Above 60 °C, both TBW and PWHT showed impact toughness lower than that of parent material

  18. Physical and chemical evaluation of the effect of a magnetic field on the electrodeposition of Ni in low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campo G, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study nickel coatings were obtained, with and without the presence of magnetic field at 60 degrees Celsius for 7, 12 and 17 minutes on substrates of AISI 1018 carbon steel, from a classical type Watts solution. The properties of the coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, hardness tester and roughness tester, the electrochemical behavior of the films was also studied through RP and EIE and also capacitance calculations, corrosion rate and thickness were made. In general, the magnetic field has a negative influence on the physical and chemical properties of an electrodeposited Ni steel AISI 1018. The details are discussed in this research. (Author)

  19. Effect of Grain Orientation and Boundary Distributions on Hydrogen-Induced Cracking in Low-Carbon-Content Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Mohammad; Coelho, Hana Livia Frota; Tavares, Sérgio Souto Maior; Silva, Cleiton Carvalho; de Abreu, Hamilton Ferreira Gomes

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) causes considerable economic losses in a wide range of steels exposed to corrosive environments. The effect of crystallographic texture and grain boundary distributions tailored by rolling at 850 °C in three different steels with a body-centered cube structure was investigated on HIC resistance. The x-ray and electron backscattered diffraction techniques were used to characterize texture evolutions during the rolling process. The findings revealed a significant improvement against HIC based on texture engineering. In addition, increasing the number of {111} and {110} grains, associated with minimizing the number of {001} grains in warm-rolled samples, reduced HIC susceptibility. Moreover, the results showed that boundaries associated with low {hkl} indexing and denser packing planes had more resistance against crack propagation.

  20. Impact of Reversed Austenite on the Impact Toughness of the High-Strength Steel of Low Carbon Medium Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanqiao; Gao, Xiuhua; Zhang, Dazheng; Du, Linxiu; Hu, Jun; Liu, Zhenguang

    2018-01-01

    We elucidate the relationship between the volume fraction of austenite and the Charpy impact toughness in a medium-Mn steel in terms of microstructural evolution with impact temperature. Different from retained austenite in the matrix after direct quenching, sub-micron lath-shaped morphology-reversed austenite in medium-Mn steel was produced by intercritical annealing. We found that reversed austenite steadily affected the fracture mode; only ductile fractures and dimples decreased with decreasing impact temperature. After the impact fracture test, the content of reversed austenite in the matrix increased slightly with a decreasing impact temperature due to the stability of the austenite grains caused by recrystallization of α' martensite. Reversed austenite slightly decreased during the impact process with a decreasing impact temperature.

  1. Phase and structural transformations in a low-carbon steel that occur upon the collapse of a cylindrical shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheifets, A. E.; Zel'dovich, V. I.; Frolova, N. Yu.; Dolgikh, S. M.; Gaan, K. V.; Shorokhov, E. V.

    2017-07-01

    An experiment has been performed on the collapse of a thick-walled shell (tube) made of steel 20 (Fe-0.2 wt % C) to a continuous cylinder under the action of explosion. The changes of the microstructure of the cylinder have been investigated that arise under the effect of two factors, i.e., a shock wave, which causes the initial pulse to the collapse, and high-strain-rate deformation upon the subsequent inertial convergence of the shell walls. Changes in the time-dependent temperature distribution in the cylinder have been calculated. As a result of the deformation, the new structure has been obtained in steel 20 due to barothermic quenching that consists of fine crystals of the α phase, which arise during the quenching at the place of free ferrite, and of regions of the retained initial pearlite. It has been shown that the uncommon order of the occurrence of the α → γ transformation is explained by the different degree of heating of the structural constituents of the steel (free ferrite; and pearlite). The conclusion has been drawn that the high-strain-rate deformation that occurs in this experiment can be used as the method that makes it possible not only to differently deform but also to differently heat the different structural components of multiphase materials.

  2. Analysis of low-carbon industrial symbiosis technology for carbon mitigation in a Chinese iron/steel industrial park: A case study with carbon flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hui; Dong, Liang; Li, Huiquan; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Tang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    CO 2 mitigation strategies in industrial parks are a significant component of the Chinese climate change mitigation policy, and industrial symbiosis can provide specific CO 2 mitigation opportunity. Technology is important to support symbiosis, but few studies in China have focused on this topic at the industrial park level. This research presented a case study in a national iron and steel industrial park in China. Focus was given onto carbon mitigation through industrial symbiosis technology using substance flow analysis (SFA). Three typical iron and steel industry technologies, including coke dry quenching (CDQ), combined cycle power plant (CCPP), and CO 2 capture by slag carbonization (CCSC) were evaluated with SFA. Technology assessment was further conducted in terms of carbon mitigation potential and unit reduction cost. Compared with the Business as usual (BAU) scenario, application with CDQ, CCPP, and CCSC reduced the net carbon emissions by 56.18, 134.43, and 222.89 kg CO 2 per ton crude steel inside the industrial parks, respectively, including both direct and indirect emissions. Economic assessment revealed that the unit costs for the three technologies were also high, thereby necessitating national financial support. Finally, relevant policy suggestions and future concerns were proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • A typical carbon mitigation case study on China iron/steel industrial park. • Using carbon SFA to investigate mitigation effects of industrial symbiosis technology. • CCPP greatly reduced the indirect carbon emission embodied in power purchase. • CCSC reduced the carbon emission by distributing fixed carbon into by-product. • Specific low carbon-tech promotion policies fit to China was discussed and proposed

  3. Structure–property relationship in a 960 MPa grade ultrahigh strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel: The significance of high frequency induction tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Z.J.; Fang, Y.P.; Han, G.; Guo, H.; Misra, R.D.K.; Shang, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the microstructure and precipitation behavior in an ultra-high strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel that was processed by quenching and high frequency induction tempering. Ultrahigh yield strength of ∼1000 MPa with high elongation of ∼15% and high low temperature toughness of 55 J (half thickness) at −40 °C was obtained after quenching from austenitization at 900 °C for 30 min, and tempering at 600 °C for 15 min by induction reheating with a reheating rate of ∼50 °C/s. While the yield strength increase on tempering was similar for both induction reheating and conventional reheating (electrical resistance reheating), there was ∼100% increase in low temperature toughness in induction reheated steel compared to the conventional reheating process. The underlying reason for the increase in toughness was attributed to the transformation of cementite film observed in conventional reheating and tempering to nanoscale cementite in induction reheating and tempering. The precipitation of nanoscale carbides is believed to significantly contribute to ultra-high strength, good ductility, and high toughness in the high frequency induction reheating and tempering process

  4. Analysis of the formation conditions and characteristics of interphase and random vanadium precipitation in a low-carbon steel during isothermal heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Sayed Ghafar; Eghbali, B.

    2018-03-01

    The characteristics of nanosized precipitates in steels depend on the heat-treatment parameters. The effects of characteristics of vanadium precipitates formed during isothermal heat treatment on the hardness of the ferrite matrix in low-carbon vanadium-alloyed steel were investigated through analysis of transmission electron microscopy images and microhardness measurements. The results show that, during isothermal holding in the temperature range from 675 to 750°C, only interphase precipitation occurs, whereas only random precipitation occurs in the ferrite matrix during holding at 600°C. Furthermore, during isothermal heat treatment between 600 and 675°C, both random and interphase precipitates occurred in the ferrite. Nanoscale vanadium carbides with different atomic ratios of vanadium (V) and carbon (C) were the dominant precipitates in the random and interphase precipitates. The sizes of random precipitation carbides were smaller than those of interphase ones. Also, the sample isothermally heat treated at 650°C for 900 s exhibited a higher hardness with a narrower hardness distribution.

  5. Effects of the carbides precipitation on the hydrogen diffusion in a low carbon steel quenched and tempered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luppo, M.I.; Ovejero Garcia, J.

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusivity through steels at room temperature has been known to deviate considerably from the expected Arrhenius relation. This deviation is due to the attractive interactions between dissolved hydrogen and trapping sites (imperfections in the steel lattice). In a previous work it was shown that the apparent diffusion coefficients attain a minimum value in a fresh martensite and diffusivity increases in the same material tempered at 453 k during six hours. In order to explain this difference, the variation of hydrogen trapping sites with the tempering time, at the mentioned temperature, was studied by means of hydrogen permeation tests. Carbides precipitation was followed by means of the extraction replica technique using transmission electron microscopy. The hydrogen diffusivity obtained by the hydrogen permeation tests attained a minimum value in the quenched specimens and increased with increasing tempering time up to reach a constant value between three and six hours. This change in the hydrogen diffusivity was attributed to the trapping sites decrease promoted by carbides precipitation and their precipitation kinetics was described by an Avrami equation. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  6. Experimental study on variations in Charpy impact energies of low carbon steel, depending on welding and specimen cutting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaorui; Kang, Hansaem; Lee, Young Seog [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper presents an experimental study that examines variations of Charpy impact energy of a welded steel plate, depending upon the welding method and the method for obtaining the Charpy specimens. Flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) were employed to weld an SA516 Gr. 70 steel plate. The methods of wire cutting and water-jet cutting were adopted to take samples from the welded plate. The samples were machined according to the recommendations of ASTM SEC. II SA370, in order to fit the specimen dimension that the Charpy impact test requires. An X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was used to measure the as-weld residual stress and its redistribution after the samples were cut. The Charpy impact energy of specimens was considerably dependent on the cutting methods and locations in the welded plate where the specimens were taken. The specimens that were cut by water jet followed by FCAW have the greatest resistance-to-fracture (Charpy impact energy). Regardless of which welding method was used, redistributed transverse residual stress becomes compressive when the specimens are prepared using water-jet cutting. Meanwhile, redistributed transverse residual stress becomes tensile when the specimens are prepared using wire cutting.

  7. A study of the processes during high temperature oxidation that control surface hot shortness in copper-containing low carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webler, Bryan A.

    Copper is a problematic residual element in electric arc furnace steel production because it leads to "surface hot shortness," a cracking defect that occurs during hot rolling of steel. The cracking arises from a liquid, copper-rich phase that penetrates into and embrittles the austenite grain boundaries. The liquid forms because copper is nobler than iron and enriches at the oxide/metal interface during oxidation of iron after casting and reheating prior to hot rolling. This cracking can be reduced or eliminated by controlling the distribution of the copper-rich layer, i.e. preventing it from penetrating down the austenite grain boundaries. This study investigated the effect of alloy chemistry on the oxidation behavior and copper-rich liquid phase evolution. Alloy compositions were selected such that effects of copper, nickel, and reactive impurities (manganese, aluminum, and silicon) can be isolated. Industrially produced low carbon steels with varying copper, nickel and silicon contents were also studied. Alloys were oxidized in air or water vapor for times up to one hour at 1150°C. Oxidizing heat treatments were conducted in a thermogravimetric setup where the weight change could be measured during oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate in detail the oxide/metal interfaces. The modeling work focused on describing the enrichment and subsequent growth of the copper-rich layer. A fixed grid finite difference model was developed that predicts the evolution of the enriched region from given oxidation kinetics. The model predictions were validated under a variety of conditions using an iron - 0.3 wt% copper alloy. Deviations from the model predictions in these alloys suggest a critical amount of separated copper is necessary for substantial grain boundary penetration to occur and the required amount decreases when the gas contains water vapor. The parabolic oxidation rate for the iron-copper alloy did not differ from that of pure iron, but

  8. Study and modeling of the ironing process on a multi-layered polymer coated low-carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selles Canto, Miguel Angel

    The ironing process is the most crucial step in the manufacture of cans. Sheet steel covered by three polymer layers can be used as the starting material, but this coating must neither break nor fail in any manner in order to be considered as a viable and effective alternative to traditional practice. During ironing, the deformations are severe and high pressures exist at the tool-workpiece interface. Thickness reductions inherent in ironing require a large amount of surface generation. Deterioration of the coating in this delicate operation might enable direct contact of the stored food or drink with the metal. As can be appreciated, the key to the use of polymer-coated steel sheets in the manufacture of cans lies in the survival of these layers during the ironing process. Another important issue is the roughness of the newly-generated surface, because it should be possible to decorate the can without any difficulty. Changing the traditional manufacture of metallic containers such as cans and using this new coated material permits great reduction in environmental contaminants produced as a result of avoiding the formation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) during the manufacture of the polymer layers. This reduction is even greater because of not using additional lubricants due to the self-lubricanting property of the solid polymer coating layers during the drawing process. These objectives, together with the improvement of the mechanical characteristics and the adhesion of the painting or decorative priming, are realized by the use of the proposed material. In the existing bibliography about ironing processes on coated materials, some authors propose the use of the Upper Bound Theorem for modeling the material behavior. The present research shows for the first time the modeling of the ironing process on a three-layer polymer coated material. In addition, it takes into account the cases in which successful ironing is produced and those in which ones the ironing

  9. The Role of Retained Austenite on the Mechanical Properties of a Low Carbon 3Mn-1.5Ni Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Wei-na; Liu, Zhen-yu; Wang, Guo-dong

    2017-12-01

    The present studies focus on the correlation between retained austenite characteristics and the cryogenic temperature Charpy impact toughness, strength, and plasticity. The steels with different volume fractions and stabilities of retained austenite were prepared by quenching followed by intercritical heat treatment, and the microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscope, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The grain size, dislocation density, crack initiation energy, and crack propagation energy were quantified. It has been demonstrated that the volume fraction of retained austenite plays a significant role in the reduction of the measured yield strength and the effect of tempered martensite/ferrite matrix on cryogenic temperature impact toughness can be assumed to be similar due to the similar grain size, dislocation density and element content in solution for different heat treatments. It was found that the stability of retained austenite plays a determining role in the increase of cryogenic temperature impact toughness. Furthermore, the dependence of the crack propagation energy on retained austenite is much greater than that of the crack initiation energy. Generally, an excellent UTS × TEL does not produce good cryogenic temperature impact toughness.

  10. Continuous cooling transformations and microstructures in a low-carbon, high-strength low-alloy plate steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, S. W.; Vin, D. J., Col; Krauss, G.

    1990-06-01

    A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was determined for a high-strength low-alloy plate steel containing (in weight percent) 0.06 C, 1.45 Mn, 1.25 Cu, 0.97 Ni, 0.72 Cr, and 0.42 Mo. Dilatometric measurements were supplemented by microhardness testing, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The CCT diagram showed significant suppression of polygonal ferrite formation and a prominent transformation region, normally attributed to bainite formation, at temperatures intermediate to those of polygonal ferrite and martensite formation. In the intermediate region, ferrite formation in groups of similarly oriented crystals about 1 μm in size and containing a high density of dislocations dominated the transformation of austenite during continuous cooling. The ferrite grains assumed two morphologies, elongated or acicular and equiaxed or granular, leading to the terms “acicular ferrite” and “granular ferrite,” respectively, to describe these structures. Austenite regions, some transformed to martensite, were enriched in carbon and retained at interfaces between ferrite grains. Coarse interfacial ledges and the nonacicular morphology of the granular ferrite grains provided evidence for a phase transformation mechanism involving reconstructive diffusion of substitutional atoms. At slow cooling rates, polygonal ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite formed. These latter structures contained low dislocation densities and e-copper precipitates formed by an interphase transformation mechanism.

  11. Microstructural evaluation of a low carbon steel submitted to boriding treatment pre and post GTAW welding; Avaliacao microestrutural de um aco de baixo carbono submetido ao tratamento de boretacao pre e pos-soldagem GTAW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollnow, Edilson Nunes; Osorio, Alice Goncalves, E-mail: edilson.pollnow@hotmail.com, E-mail: osorio.alice@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (CDTec/UFPel), Pelotas, RS (Brazil). Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico; Araujo, Douglas Bezerra de, E-mail: dbaraujo@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (FEMEC/UFU), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Passos, Thais Andrezza dos; Souza, Daniel, E-mail: thais.andrezza.passos@gmail.com, E-mail: danielsouza@furg.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande (EE/FURG), Rio Grande, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-04-15

    Studies on surface engineering area are given great importance due to the improvement that surface modifications provide to materials. With a global market that has the need to provide parts and equipment with extended service life and low cost, to support stringent requests and thus maintain its high performance, surface treatments may bring what was impossible into reality. Among the surface treatments that have received attention recently, we have the thermochemical process of boriding. The boriding process consists of saturate the surface of steels and metal alloys with boron. This saturation provides an increase in the surface properties not inherent to the base metal, such as hardness, resistance to abrasion and corrosion. Although the properties of boriding steels have already been studied, the effects that the boriding process perform on the steel during or after the welding processes are not known. Hence, it is the purpose of this study to evaluate the microstructure of a low carbon steel treated with boriding before and after GTAW welding. The results indicated poor metallurgical weldability of low carbon steel with boride layer, with the presence of solidification cracks. Nonetheless, the steel welded previous to boring treatment presented a more ductile nucleus, with harder surface. Although the values of hardness within the nucleus of the steel had dropped drastically at the welded zone after the boring, the surface of this steel showed higher values of hardness due to the boriding layer. This fact should be considered when applications where wear resistance is needed. (author)

  12. Carbon Redistribution and Carbide Precipitation in a High-Strength Low-Carbon HSLA-115 Steel Studied on a Nanoscale by Atom Probe Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N. (NWU)

    2017-05-09

    HSLA-115 is a newly developed Cu-bearing high-strength low-carbon martensitic steel for use in Naval structural applications. This research provides, for the first time, a comprehensive compositional analysis of carbon redistribution and associated complex phase transformations in an isothermal aging study of HSLA-115 at 823 K (550 °C). Specifically, we characterize carbon segregation at lath boundaries, grain-refining niobium carbonitrides, cementite, and secondary hardening M2C carbides, in addition to copper precipitation, by 3D atom probe tomography (APT). Segregation of carbon (3 to 6 at. pct C) is observed at martensitic lath boundaries in the as-quenched and 0.12-hour aged microstructures. On further aging, carbon redistributes itself forming cementite and M2C carbides. Niobium carbonitride precipitates do not dissolve during the austenitizing treatment and are inherited in the as-quenched and aged microstructures; these are characterized along with cementite by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and APT. Sub-nanometer-sized M2C carbide precipitates are observed after the formation of Cu precipitates, co-located with the latter, indicating heterogeneous nucleation of M2C. The temporal evolution of the composition and morphology of M2C carbides at 823 K (550 °C) is described using APT; their precipitation kinetics is intertwined with Cu precipitates, affecting the bulk mechanical properties of HSLA-115. Phase compositions determined by APT are compared with computed compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium using ThermoCalc.

  13. Carbon Redistribution and Carbide Precipitation in a High-Strength Low-Carbon HSLA-115 Steel Studied on a Nanoscale by Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Divya; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.

    2017-07-01

    HSLA-115 is a newly developed Cu-bearing high-strength low-carbon martensitic steel for use in Naval structural applications. This research provides, for the first time, a comprehensive compositional analysis of carbon redistribution and associated complex phase transformations in an isothermal aging study of HSLA-115 at 823 K (550 °C). Specifically, we characterize carbon segregation at lath boundaries, grain-refining niobium carbonitrides, cementite, and secondary hardening M2C carbides, in addition to copper precipitation, by 3D atom probe tomography (APT). Segregation of carbon (3 to 6 at. pct C) is observed at martensitic lath boundaries in the as-quenched and 0.12-hour aged microstructures. On further aging, carbon redistributes itself forming cementite and M2C carbides. Niobium carbonitride precipitates do not dissolve during the austenitizing treatment and are inherited in the as-quenched and aged microstructures; these are characterized along with cementite by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and APT. Sub-nanometer-sized M2C carbide precipitates are observed after the formation of Cu precipitates, co-located with the latter, indicating heterogeneous nucleation of M2C. The temporal evolution of the composition and morphology of M2C carbides at 823 K (550 °C) is described using APT; their precipitation kinetics is intertwined with Cu precipitates, affecting the bulk mechanical properties of HSLA-115. Phase compositions determined by APT are compared with computed compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium using ThermoCalc.

  14. The Effect of Simulated Thermomechanical Processing on the Transformation Behavior and Microstructure of a Low-Carbon Mo-Nb Linepipe Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, P.; Wynne, B. P.; Davies, C. H. J.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    The present work investigates the transformation behavior of a low-carbon Mo-Nb linepipe steel and the corresponding transformation product microstructures using deformation dilatometry. The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams have been constructed for both the fully recrystallized austenite and that deformed in uniaxial compression at 1148 K (875 °C) to a strain of 0.5 for cooling rates ranging from 0.1 to about 100 K/s. The obtained microstructures have been studied in detail using electron backscattered diffraction complemented by transmission electron microscopy. Heavy deformation of the parent austenite has caused a significant expansion of the polygonal ferrite transformation field in the CCT diagram, as well as a shift in the non-equilibrium ferrite transformation fields toward higher cooling rates. Furthermore, the austenite deformation has resulted in a pronounced refinement in both the effective grain (sheaf/packet) size and substructure unit size of the non-equilibrium ferrite microstructures. The optimum microstructure expected to display an excellent balance between strength and toughness is a mix of quasi-polygonal ferrite and granular bainite (often termed "acicular ferrite") produced from the heavily deformed austenite within a processing window covering the cooling rates from about 10 to about 100 K/s.

  15. Influence of Heat Treatments on the Microstructural Evolution and Resultant Mechanical Properties in a Low Carbon Medium Mn Heavy Steel Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Lv, Meng-yang; Liu, Zhen-yu; Wang, Guo-dong

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the microstructural evolution and resultant mechanical properties in a low carbon medium Mn heavy steel plate were investigated in detail. The results show that the introduction of medium manganese alloy design in the heavy steel plate has been shown to achieve the outstanding combination of strength, ductility, low-temperature impact toughness, and strain hardening capacity. It has been found that the austenite phase mainly displays at martensitic lath boundaries and shows lath shape for the heat treating at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 to 10 hours or 893 K (620 °C) for 2 hours, and not all the austenite phase obeys the K-S or N-W orientation relationship with respect to abutting martensitic lath. Although the microstructure in the steel after heat treating at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 to 10 hours is similar to each other, the resultant mechanical properties are very different because the volume fraction and stability of retained austenite vary with the heat treatments. The best low-temperature impact toughness is achieved after heat treating at 873 K (600 °C) for 2 hours due to the formation of a considerable volume fraction of retained austenite with relatively high stability, but the strain hardening capacity and ductility are disappointing because of insufficient TRIP effect. Based on enhancing TRIP effect, the two methods have been suggested. One is to increase the isothermal holding temperature to 893 K (620 °C), and the other one is to prolong the isothermal holding time to 10 hours at 873 K (600 °C). The two methods can significantly increase strain hardening capacity and ductility nearly without harming low-temperature impact toughness. In addition, the stability of retained austenite has been discussed by the quantitative analysis and it has been demonstrated that the stability of retained austenite is related to the chemical composition, size, and morphology. Moreover, the isothermal holding temperature has a great effect on the stability of

  16. The effect of microstructure and texture evolution on mechanical properties of low-carbon steel processed by the continuous hybrid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sun Kwang; Baek, Hyun Moo; Son, Il-Heon; Im, Yong-Taek; Bae, Chul Min

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the continuous hybrid process is newly designed and applied for producing grain-refined long and large cross-section wires of low-carbon steel at high speed at room temperature. The initial specimen, with a diameter of 13 mm, continuously passes through the rolls, equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) dies, and wire-drawing dies in sequence during the process. The specimens deformed by the continuous hybrid process without and with the wire-drawing dies were obtained to investigate the role in the deformation separately. Their microstructures, textures, and mechanical properties were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), tension, and Vickers micro-hardness tests and were compared with those for the case processed by the conventional wire-drawing process. According to the present investigation, the continuous hybrid process can more efficiently manufacture fine-grained wires with a strong shear texture in a continuous way than the conventional wire-drawing process can. In addition, the ultimate tensile strength value of the specimen processed by the continuous hybrid process was 23.9% higher, although the elongation was slightly lower than the one produced by the conventional wire-drawing process. The plastic deformation was mainly imposed by the ECAP dies, and the wire-drawing dies improve the dimensional accuracy and increase the local strain homogeneity in the continuous hybrid process. It is demonstrated that the continuous hybrid process might be beneficial in commercializing a continuous application of the severe plastic deformation process for producing grain-refined wires for industrial applications

  17. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, D.

    2003-11-01

    In the context of the French nuclear waste storage, a multi-barriers disposal is envisaged. Wastes could be put in metallic overpacks disposed in a clay soil. As these overpacks could be made of low carbon steel, it is important to understand the corrosion behaviour of this material in soil during period of several centuries. Indeed, it is necessary to consolidate the empirical data by a phenomenological approach. This includes laboratory experiments and modelling of the phenomenon which have to be validated and completed by the study of archaeological artefacts. This was the aim of this PhD-work. To this purpose, an analytical protocol has been elaborated: about forty archaeological artefacts coming from five dated sites (2. to 16. centuries) have been studied on cross section in order to observe on the same sample all the constituents of the system: metallic substrate/corrosion products/environment. The corrosion products are divided into two zones: the Dense Product Layer (DPL) in contact with the metal, and the Transformed Medium (TM) which are the corrosion products formed around soil minerals (quartz grains). The metallic substrate has been studied by the classical methods of materials science (optical and scanning electron microscope, energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopies). It has been verified that despite their heterogeneity of structure and composition, they are all hypo-eutectoids steels that can contain phosphorous until 0.5 wt%. The corrosion products have been analysed by local structural analytical methods as micro-diffraction under synchrotron radiation (μXRD) and Raman micro-spectroscopy. These two complementary techniques and also the elemental composition analysis conducted to the characterisation of the corrosion forms. On the majority of the samples coming from four sites, the DPL are constituted by goethite including marbles of magnetite/maghemite. On the artefacts from the fifth site, a particular corrosion form has been identified

  18. Proposal for the award of two contracts for the supply of fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations and inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets

    CERN Document Server

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of two contracts for the supply of 5 812 000 fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations, of two different types, and 5 800 000 inserts for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets. Following a market survey carried out among 70 firms in sixteen Member States and one firm in Japan, a call for tenders (IT-2467/LHC/LHC) was sent on 3 June 1999 to seven firms in four Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received five tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of two contracts with: - FUG (DE) for the supply of 3 632 000 fine-blanked low-carbon steel yoke laminations and 3 625 000 inserts, which represents 5/8 of the total quantity required for the cold masses of the LHC superconducting dipole magnets, for a total amount of 2 525 563 euros, which at the exchange rate given in the tender correspond to 4 019 038 Swiss francs, subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of ...

  19. Effect of nickel and MnS inclusions in the metal on the pitting corrosion of low-carbon stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frejman, L.I.; Nguen, The Dong; Volkov, D.E.; Konnov, Yu.P.

    1986-01-01

    The resistance to pitting corrosion of steels on the 03Kh17-03Kh18 base containing up to 20 % Ni at different levels of S and Mn impurities contamination is investigated. It is shown that up to 50 % of nickel introduced into ordinary steels with 5-6 % Ni is spent to compensate the resistance decrease caused by MnS inclusions. Full compensation is not attained even in the 10-20 %. Ni range in which nickel practically does not affect the resistance of neither ordinary, nor pure (without MnS) steels. Titanium introduction into ordinary steel on the Kh22N6 base permits to surpass the level of 03Kh17N3 pure steel resistance and attain the level of 03Kh17N6 pure steel almost by all characteristics (including passivated characteristics in sulfuric acid) besides pitting repassivity. In this property pure steels with Ni >or approx. 3 % surpass even the molybdenum containing 03Kh21NbM2T ordinary steel though they by far concede by passivation in sulfuric acid

  20. Morphology and distribution of precipitates in extra low carbon steels micro alloyed with Ti, Nb and B tested by hot torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Julio Marcio Silveira e; Dahl, Winfried; Barbosa, Ronaldo

    1996-01-01

    In the last decade, a great number of publications has been dedicated to the study of precipitation in micro alloyed steels. The present work deals with the morphology and distribution of simple as well as complex precipitates in two extra low C steels micro alloyed with Nb T i and Nb T i-B. The effect of different pre-deformation conditions on precipitation in these steels is showed and discussed. Results indicate that both nature of sites for nucleation and distribution of precipitates are influenced by chemical composition and by pre-deformation conditioning of the austenite. (author)

  1. Effect of microalloying elements on the structure and properties of low-carbon and ultralow-carbon cold-rolled steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O. A.; Fonshtein, N. M.; Storozheva, L. M.

    1994-03-01

    Cold-rolled steels used for the forged components of automobiles should exhibit high, partly mutually-exclusive properties: high forgeability with desirably high strength, resistance to aging combined with hardenability at temperatures for drying paint coatings, etc. Satisfaction of these requirements is provided to a considerable degree by microalloying. The final mechanical properties of cold-rolled steel depend on such structural parameters of hot-rolled strip as texture, the amount of dissolved C and N atoms in α-solid solution, and ferrite grain size. With constant hot rolling production schedules these structural parameters are governed by steel composition, in particular by the type of microalloying. In this work the effect is considered for dispersed microalloying elements, i.e., phosphorus, boron, titanium, and nïobium, on the final mechanical properties of low- and ultralow-carbon steels.

  2. Effects of Inclusions and Austenite Grain Size on the Impact Behavior of a Newly Developed Low-Carbon Steel Weld Metal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackburn, J

    1999-01-01

    ... carbon steel weld metal was determined. It was concluded that austenite grain refinement was effective at improving toughness across the entire test temperature region, with the exception of the upper shelf energy when the inclusion count...

  3. Friction Welding For Cladding Applications: Processing, Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Inertia Friction Welds of Stainless Steel to Low Carbon Steel and Evaluation of Wrought and Welded Austenitic Stainless Steels for Cladding Applications in Acidchloride Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzner, Nathan

    Friction welding, a solid-state joining method, is presented as a novel alternative process step for lining mild steel pipe and forged components internally with a corrosion resistant (CR) metal alloy for petrochemical applications. Currently, fusion welding is commonly used for stainless steel overlay cladding, but this method is costly, time-consuming, and can lead to disbonding in service due to a hard martensite layer that forms at the interface due to partial mixing at the interface between the stainless steel CR metal and the mild steel base. Firstly, the process parameter space was explored for inertia friction butt welding using AISI type 304L stainless steel and AISI 1018 steel to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties effects. A conceptual model for heat flux density versus radial location at the faying surface was developed with consideration for non-uniform pressure distribution due to frictional forces. An existing 1 D analytical model for longitudinal transient temperature distribution was modified for the dissimilar metals case and to account for material lost to the flash. Microstructural results from the experimental dissimilar friction welds of 304L stainless steel to 1018 steel were used to discuss model validity. Secondly, the microstructure and mechanical property implications were considered for replacing the current fusion weld cladding processes with friction welding. The nominal friction weld exhibited a smaller heat softened zone in the 1018 steel than the fusion cladding. As determined by longitudinal tensile tests across the bond line, the nominal friction weld had higher strength, but lower apparent ductility, than the fusion welds due to the geometric requirements for neck formation adjacent to a rigid interface. Martensite was identified at the dissimilar friction weld interface, but the thickness was smaller than that of the fusion welds, and the morphology was discontinuous due to formation by a mechanism of solid

  4. Elucidation of the effects of cementite morphology on damage formation during monotonic and cyclic tension in binary low carbon steels using in situ characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Motomichi, E-mail: koyama@mech.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Yu, Yachen; Zhou, Jia-Xi [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Yoshimura, Nobuyuki [Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Sakurada, Eisaku [Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 5-3 Tokai, Aichi 476-8686 (Japan); Ushioda, Kohsaku [Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Moto-oka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka-shi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-06-14

    The effects of the morphology and distribution of cementite on damage formation were studied using in situ scanning electron microscopy under monotonic and cyclic tension. To investigate the effects of the morphology/distribution of cementite, intergranular cementite precipitation (ICP) and transgranular cementite precipitation (TCP) steels were prepared from an ingot of Fe-0.017 wt% C binary alloy using different heat treatments. In all cases, the damage incidents were observed primarily at the grain boundaries. The damage morphology was dependent on the cementite morphology and loading condition. Monotonic tension in the ICP steel caused cracks across the cementite plates, located at the grain boundaries. In contrast, fatigue loading in the ICP steel induced cracking at the ferrite/cementite interface. Moreover, in the TCP steel, monotonic tension- and cyclic tension-induced intergranular cracking was distinctly observed, due to the slip localization associated with a limited availability of free slip paths. When a notch is introduced to the ICP steel specimen, the morphology of the cyclic tension-induced damage at the notch tip changed to resemble that across the intergranular cementite, and was rather similar to the monotonic tension-induced damage. The damage at the notch tip coalesced with the main crack, accelerating the growth of the fatigue crack.

  5. The EIS investigation of powder polyester coatings on phosphated low carbon steel: The effect of NaNO2 in the phosphating bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegdic, B.V.; Bajat, J.B.; Popic, J.P.; Stevanovic, S.I.; Miskovic-Stankovic, V.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effect of NaNO 2 on surface morphology of iron-phosphate coatings were determined. → Better corrosion stability of polyester coating on phosphated steel without NaNO 2 . → EIS results and microscopic examinations correlate well with adhesion measurements. - Abstract: The effect of different type of iron-phosphate coatings on corrosion stability and adhesion characteristic of top powder polyester coating on steel was investigated. Iron-phosphate coatings were deposited on steel in the novel phosphating bath with or without NaNO 2 as an accelerator. The corrosion stability of the powder polyester coating was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), adhesion by pull-off and NMP test, while surface morphology of phosphate coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The adhesion and corrosion stability of powder polyester coatings were improved with pretreatment based on iron-phosphate coating deposited from NaNO 2 -free bath.

  6. Bainite transformation of low carbon Mn-Si TRIP-assisted multiphase steels: influence of silicon content on cementite precipitation and austenite retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, P.; Catlin, T.; Geerlofs, N.; Kop, T.; Zwaag, S. van der; Delannay, F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies dealing with TRIP-assisted multiphase steels have emphasized the crucial role of the bainite transformation of silicon-rich intercritical austenite in the achievement of a good combination of strength and ductility. The present work deals with the bainite transformation in two steels differing in their silicon content. It is shown that both carbon enrichment of residual austenite and cementite precipitation influences the kinetics of the bainite transformation. A minimum silicon content is found to be necessary in order to prevent cementite precipitation from austenite during the formation of bainitic ferrite in such a way as to allow stabilisation of austenite by carbon enrichment. (orig.)

  7. Stress corrosion inhibitors for type 18-10 stainless steels with low carbon content in hot and concentrated solutions of MgCl2. Study of some inorganic iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinard, J.-L.

    1974-01-01

    Stress corrosion inhibitors for type Z2CN18-10 austenitic stainless steels with low carbon content in a solution of Cl 2 Mg at 105 deg C were investigated. It was established that iodides are the most adequate corrosion inhibitors because they react simultaneously upon the three main components of the alloy (Fe, Ni, Cr). A difference of behavior between I 2 Mg and the other iodides was observed (in electrochemistry and in simple stress corrosion experiments) and the influence of the metallic cation associated to I - was studied. The formation of the superficial film and the phenomena liable to occur at the interface film-corrosive solution were examined: film growth in MgCl 2 ; influence of certain substances added to the solution. A mechanism of inhibition by I - is suggested. It is similar to the mechanism proposed by BERGEN for the stress corrosion cracking by Cl - [fr

  8. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's draft report on a multifactor test design to investigate uniform corrosion of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paddock, R.A.; Lerman, A.; Ditmars, J.D.; Macdonald, D.D.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Was, G.S.; Harrison, W.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents Argonne National Laboratory's review of an internal technical memorandum prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) entitled Multifactor Test Design to Investigate Uniform Corrosion of Low-Carbon Steel in a Nuclear Waste Salt Repository Environment. The several major areas of concern identified by peer review panelists are important to the credibility of the test design proposed in the memorandum and are to adequately addressed there. These areas of concern, along with specific recommendations to improve their treatment, are discussed in detail in Sec. 2 of this report. The twenty recommendations, which were abstracted from those discussions, are presented essentially in the order in which they are introduced in Sec. 2

  9. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dispersed Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Calderón-Ramos, Ismael; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of nozzle design on dispersed, two-phase flows of the steel-argon system in a slab mold are studied using a water-air model with particle image velocimetry and ultrasound probe velocimetry techniques. Three nozzle designs were tested with the same bore size and different port geometries, including square (S), special bottom design with square ports (U), and circular (C). The meniscus velocities of the liquid increase two- or threefold in two-phase flows regarding one-phase flows using low flow rates of the gas phase. This effect is due to the dragging effects on bubbles by the liquid jets forming two-way coupled flows. Liquid velocities (primary phase) along the narrow face of the mold also are higher for two-phase flows. Flows using nozzle U are less dependent on the effects of the secondary phase (air). The smallest bubble sizes are obtained using nozzle U, which confirms that bubble breakup is dependent on the strain rates of the fluid and dissipation of kinetic energy in the nozzle bottom and port edges. Through dimensionless analysis, it was found that the bubble sizes are inversely proportional to the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ 0.4. A simple expression involving ɛ, surface tension, and density of metal is derived to scale up bubble sizes in water to bubble sizes in steel with different degrees of deoxidation. The validity of water-air models to study steel-argon flows is discussed. Prior works related with experiments to model argon bubbling in steel slab molds under nonwetting conditions are critically reviewed.

  10. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dispersed Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low-Carbon Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Calderón-Ramos, Ismael; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2018-04-01

    The effects of nozzle design on dispersed, two-phase flows of the steel-argon system in a slab mold are studied using a water-air model with particle image velocimetry and ultrasound probe velocimetry techniques. Three nozzle designs were tested with the same bore size and different port geometries, including square (S), special bottom design with square ports (U), and circular (C). The meniscus velocities of the liquid increase two- or threefold in two-phase flows regarding one-phase flows using low flow rates of the gas phase. This effect is due to the dragging effects on bubbles by the liquid jets forming two-way coupled flows. Liquid velocities (primary phase) along the narrow face of the mold also are higher for two-phase flows. Flows using nozzle U are less dependent on the effects of the secondary phase (air). The smallest bubble sizes are obtained using nozzle U, which confirms that bubble breakup is dependent on the strain rates of the fluid and dissipation of kinetic energy in the nozzle bottom and port edges. Through dimensionless analysis, it was found that the bubble sizes are inversely proportional to the dissipation rate of the turbulent kinetic energy, ɛ 0.4. A simple expression involving ɛ, surface tension, and density of metal is derived to scale up bubble sizes in water to bubble sizes in steel with different degrees of deoxidation. The validity of water-air models to study steel-argon flows is discussed. Prior works related with experiments to model argon bubbling in steel slab molds under nonwetting conditions are critically reviewed.

  11. Effect of Boron on the Strength and Toughness of Direct-Quenched Low-Carbon Niobium Bearing Ultra-High-Strength Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Jaakko; Kömi, Jukka; Porter, David A.; Somani, Mahesh C.; Kaijalainen, Antti; Suikkanen, Pasi; Yang, Jer-Ren; Tsai, Shao-Pu

    2017-11-01

    The effect of boron on the microstructures and mechanical properties of laboratory-control-rolled and direct-quenched 6-mm-thick steels containing 0.08 wt pct C and 0.02 wt pct Nb were studied. The boron contents were 24 ppm and a residual amount of 4 ppm. Two different finish rolling temperatures (FRTs) of 1093 K and 1193 K (820 °C and 920 °C) were used in the hot rolling trials to obtain different levels of pancaked austenite prior to DQ. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed to reveal the effect of boron on the transformation behavior of these steels. Microstructural characterization was carried out using various microscopy techniques, such as light optical microscopy (LOM) and scanning electron microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (SEM-EBSD). The resultant microstructures after hot rolling were mixtures of autotempered martensite and lower bainite (LB), having yield strengths in the range 918 to 1067 MPa with total elongations to fracture higher than 10 pct. The lower FRT of 1093 K (820 °C) produced better combinations of strength and toughness as a consequence of a higher degree of pancaking in the austenite. Removal of boron lowered the 34 J/cm2 Charpy-V impact toughness transition temperature from 206 K to 158 K (-67 °C to -115 °C) when the finishing rolling temperature of 1093 K (820 °C) was used without any loss in the strength values compared to the boron-bearing steel. This was due to the finer and more uniform grain structure in the boron-free steel. Contrary to expectations, the difference was not caused by the formation of borocarbide precipitates, as verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations, but through the grain coarsening effect of boron.

  12. Determination of low carbon content in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champeix, L.; Chevilliard, H.; Ponty, J.

    1960-01-01

    The method of carbon determination previously used for low carbon steels has been applied to uranium. Carbon contents down to a few tens p.p.m. and probably to a few p.p.m., can be determined with satisfactory precision, sensibility and accuracy. Reprint of a paper published in 'Memoires Scientifiques Rev. Metallurg.', LVI, n. 7, 1959, p. 657-662 [fr

  13. Guideposts for Low Carbon Finance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, Billy

    2015-01-01

    The author proposes four guideposts for efficient low carbon finance: remove subsidies for high-carbon technologies, improve the cost-effectiveness of low-carbon subsidies, encourage private sector innovation and maintain transparent public policy tools that support cost-benefit accounting

  14. Microbiological Corrosion in Low Carbon Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Medina–Custodio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Microbiologically Induced Corrosion affects several industries, such as oil industry where it is estimated that 20% to 30% pipes failures are related with microorganism . The chemical reactions generate ions transfer, this validate the use of electrochemical techniques for its analysis. Coupons submerged in a nutritional medium with presence and absence of three different microorganisms during two periods, 48 hours and 28 days we restudied. Polarization resistance (Rp and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS techniques we re applied to determine the corrosivity of the systems. The results show a greater corrosive effect of abiotic system, this indicates a microorganisms protection effect to the metal, opposite to the first hypothesis. This result was ratified observing surfaces coupons by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM technique. A possible mechanism based on Evans – Tafel graph is proposed to explain inhibitor microorganism effect.

  15. Maldives Low Carbon Development Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenhann, Jørgen Villy; Ramlau, Marianne

    This report presents the findings of a study for low carbon development strategy for Maldives. The study was implemented under the Memorandum of Understanding between the Ministry of Environment and Energy (MEE), Maldives and URC and was financed by Danida, Denmark’s development aid agency under...

  16. Development of a New Armor Steel and its Ballistic Performance

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hakan Atapek

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a boron added armor steel was developed according to standard rolled homogenous armor steel, MIL-A-12560, and metallographic-fractographic examinations were carried out to understand its deformation characteristics and perforation mode after interaction with a 7.62 mm armor piercing projectile. The microstructure of the developed steel was characterized by light and scanning electron microscope to evaluate its matrix after application of several heat treatments consisting of au...

  17. Physical and chemical evaluation of the effect of a magnetic field on the electrodeposition of Ni in low carbon steel; Evaluacion fisica y quimica del efecto de un campo magnetico en la electrodeposicion de Ni en acero bajo carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo G, G. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this study nickel coatings were obtained, with and without the presence of magnetic field at 60 degrees Celsius for 7, 12 and 17 minutes on substrates of AISI 1018 carbon steel, from a classical type Watts solution. The properties of the coatings were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, hardness tester and roughness tester, the electrochemical behavior of the films was also studied through RP and EIE and also capacitance calculations, corrosion rate and thickness were made. In general, the magnetic field has a negative influence on the physical and chemical properties of an electrodeposited Ni steel AISI 1018. The details are discussed in this research. (Author)

  18. Low-Carbon Innovation and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Johnson, Bjørn; Andersen, Allan Dahl

    In this Thematic Review we communicate relevant insights from the Globelics research community to policy circles and development donor organisations. The key issues addressed are, firstly, how the notion of LICS can help us understand the challenges of low carbon development (LCD), and secondly......, a discussion of the design of support structures for the building of LICS that contribute to low-carbon development....

  19. Towards a low carbon manufacturing region

    OpenAIRE

    TWI Limited

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to map manufacturing businesses in the East Midlands and, through supply chain and value analysis, identify opportunities and risks for low carbon technologies. This was complemented by a literature and data review of trends in sectors associated with low carbon.

  20. Green Growth and Low Carbon Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anders Riel; Tonami, Aki

    This paper ask the question of what makes Low Carbon and Green Growth and Low Carbon Society policy concepts that have not only gained foothold in their countries of origin, but also globally. Autobiography analysis is employed to discover the stories that these concepts tell about developmental ...

  1. Paper making in a low carbon economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Rogers

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Paper and pulp manufacturing industry produces versatile products from renewable feedstock that are easily recycled. It is the fourth largest industrial sector in terms of energy use. Much of the energy used comes from biomass derived fuels or high efficiency combined heat and power plants so the industry is not considered as carbon intensive. But at production paper making emits five times the CO2/tonne of steel; this is gradually removed from the atmosphere by the growth of replacement trees which can take between 7 and 90 years. This study reviewed existing literature to establish estimates for future energy requirements, and way that these could be met with minimum carbon emissions in a world where there are electricity grids with low carbon intensities, high recycling rates and growing demand for sustainable biomass. It was found that energy consumption could be reduced by 20% using technologies that have been demonstrated at an industrial scale. Most virgin pulp is made using the kraft chemical processing method. It was found that it should be possible to eliminate all fossil fuel use from this process, by combustion of by-product while exporting a small amount of electricity. Recycled paper is becoming the largest source of pulp. In this case the waste streams cannot provide sufficient energy to power the process, but process heat can be produced by burning some of the collected waste paper in steam plants or by using electric heat pumps. The energy needed to produce high quality office paper is nearly twice that required for non-deinked packaging paper. This couples with the lower pulp yields obtained with high quality pulp means that the environmentally preferred option for energy supply to the recycling process is dependent on the grade of pulp being produced.

  2. Investigation on the parameter optimization and performance of laser cladding a gradient composite coating by a mixed powder of Co50 and Ni/WC on 20CrMnTi low carbon alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Jia; Yuan, Zhenyu

    2018-02-01

    In this study, a gradient composite coating was manufactured on 20CrMnTi alloy steel by laser cladding. The laser power, cladding scan velocity and powder flow rate were selected as influencing factors of the orthogonal cladding experiments. The influencing factors were optimized by the comprehensive analysis of Taguchi OA and TOPSIS method. The high significant parameters and the predicted results were confirmed by the ANOVA method. The macromorphology and microstructures are characterized by using laser microscope, SEM, XRD and microhardness tester. Comparison tests of wear resistance of gradient composite coating, 20CrMnTi cemented quenching sample and the 20CrMnTi sample were conducted on the friction-wear tester. The results show that the phases are γ-Co solid solution, Co3B, M23C6 and etc. The interlayers and wear-resisting layer also contain new hard phases as WC, W2C. The microhardness of the gradient coating was increased to 3 times as compared with that of the 20CrMnTi substrate. The wear resistance of the gradient composite coating and 20CrMnTi cemented quenching sample was enhanced to 36.4 and 15.9 times as compared with that of the 20CrMnTi.

  3. Strategies for Local Low-Carbon Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fridley, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ohshita, Stephanie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Khanna, Nina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Min, Hu [Energy Foundation China, Beijing (China); Xiulian, Hu [Energy Research Inst., Beijing (China)

    2012-11-14

    Cities around the world are implementing policies and programs with the goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as well as save energy, reduce costs, and protect the local, regional, and global environment. In China, low-carbon development is a key element of the 12th Five Year Plan. Pilot low-carbon development zones have been initiated in five provinces and eight cities and many other locations around China also want to pursue a low-carbon development pathway. This booklet provides information for government officials, policy makers, program designers and implementers, provincial and city planners, and others who want an overview of the key options available for low-carbon development at local level. These Strategies for Local Low-Carbon Development draw from successful experiences from around the world. Information is provided for low-carbon actions that can be taken in the sectors of (1) Industry, (2) Buildings and Appliances, (3) Electric Power, (4) Consumption and Waste Management, (5) Transportation and Urban Form, and (6) Agriculture and Forestry. A description of each policy is provided along with information on the stakeholders involved in implementation, the conditions for successful implementation, the expected energy and carbon savings, and the policy cost-effectiveness. Case studies show how each policy has been implemented somewhere around the world. While there are many low-carbon options available for local implementation, this booklet aims to provide guidance on those that have been most successful, that have the largest impact, and that are cost-effective in order to support low-carbon development efforts in Chinese cities.

  4. Study on Chinese Low Carbon Economic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Huifeng Li; Xiaofang Wang

    2010-01-01

    Global warming, which is caused by over consumption of fossil energy during economic development in human society, threatens global ecological balance, tampers social and economic development, imperils energy security, ecological safety, water and food safety, and endangers the entire human race. Low carbon economy is a new economic development model based on low energy consumption, low pollution, and low-emission-based. This paper analyzes the Status quo and Limits of the Chinese Low Carbon ...

  5. Aplicación del rayo láser de CO2 para soldar laminas de acero bajo carbono // Application of the ray laser of CO2 to weld sheets of steel low carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique J. Martínez D

    1999-07-01

    very thin sheets is facilitated, that which difficultly is achieved withthe processes common of welding. This technique also presents the advantage that easily you can automate, producing weldings ofhigh precision with low contamination.The study consists on carrying out an investigation on the process of welding of thin sheets using a laser of CO2 of low power incontinuous way, focusing the laser with a lens of ZnSe and using industrial argon to control the atmosphere around the treated regionand to avoid the oxidation. To carry out the process, you design a device for ' to displace the sample at 45o with regard to thetrajectory of the ray laser in precise form; the welding was carried out to it collides and without material contribution.The work was carried out on sheets of steel of low coal of caliber 24 and 26. The welded samples were subjected to: tractionrehearsal, visual analysis, analysis metalográfico and microdureza tests. The obtained results show that it can be carried out theprocess easily, by means of the control of the most important variables, in such a way that once established, the operator doesn't needa great experience in the handling of this technique to carry out the process with high quality. The carried out analyses confirm thatby means of this technique it is possible to obtain uniform welding cords, with good mechanical properties.Key words: Welding, laser.

  6. Low-Carbon Competitiveness in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugandha Srivastav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental degradation and the risks from climate change have strengthened the need for cleaner forms of economic growth. Using patent, trade and output data, we measure the current size of Asia’s low-carbon economy and assess its competitiveness across key sectors. We look at three success factors for low-carbon competitiveness at the sector level: the ability to convert to low-carbon products and processes (measured by a specialization in low-carbon innovation, the ability to gain and maintain market share (measured by existing comparative advantages and a favorable starting point (measured by current output and scale. Using this framework, we identify the ‘climate change mitigation technologies’ that Asian countries specialize in and can potentially scale up. The analysis shows that Asia’s top low-carbon economies are Japan, South Korea and China. The sectors in which Asia is particularly well placed to be globally competitive include efficient lighting, photovoltaics and energy storage. Overall, Asia is a specialist in innovating and exporting climate change mitigation technologies but there are significant regional disparities.

  7. The Future of Low-Carbon Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B. [Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720,; Brown, Nicholas R. [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802; Slaybaugh, Rachel [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720; Wilks, Theresa [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139; Stewart, Emma [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550; McCoy, Sean T. [Global Security, E Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550

    2017-10-17

    We review future global demand for electricity and major technologies positioned to supply it with minimal greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions: renewables (wind, solar, water, geothermal, and biomass), nuclear fission, and fossil power with CO2 capture and sequestration. We discuss two breakthrough technologies (space solar power and nuclear fusion) as exciting but uncertain additional options for low-net GHG emissions (i.e., low-carbon) electricity generation. In addition, we discuss grid integration technologies (monitoring and forecasting of transmission and distribution systems, demand-side load management, energy storage, and load balancing with low-carbon fuel substitutes). For each topic, recent historical trends and future prospects are reviewed, along with technical challenges, costs, and other issues as appropriate. Although no technology represents an ideal solution, their strengths can be enhanced by deployment in combination, along with grid integration that forms a critical set of enabling technologies to assure a reliable and robust future low-carbon electricity system.

  8. Financing low carbon energy access in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gujba, Haruna; Thorne, Steve; Mulugetta, Yacob; Rai, Kavita; Sokona, Youba

    2012-01-01

    Modern energy access in Africa is critical to meeting a wide range of developmental challenges including poverty reduction and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Despite having a huge amount and variety of energy resources, modern energy access in the continent is abysmal, especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Only about 31% of the Sub-Saharan African population have access to electricity while traditional biomass energy accounts for over 80% of energy consumption in many Sub-Saharan African countries. With energy use per capita among the lowest in the world, there is no doubt that Africa will need to increase its energy consumption to drive economic growth and human development. Africa also faces a severe threat from global climate change with vulnerabilities in several key areas or sectors in the continent including agriculture, water supply, energy, etc. Low carbon development provides opportunities for African countries to improve and expand access to modern energy services while also building low-emission and climate-resilient economies. However, access to finance from different sources will be critical in achieving these objectives. This paper sets out to explore the financial instruments available for low carbon energy access in Africa including the opportunities, markets and risks in low carbon energy investments in the continent. - Highlights: ► Access to finance will be critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa. ► Domestic finance will be important in leveraging private finance. ► Private sector participation in modern and clean energy in Africa is still low. ► Many financing mechanisms exist for low carbon energy access in Africa. ► The right institutional frameworks are critical to achieving low carbon energy access in Africa.

  9. Bacterial exopolysaccharides for corrosion resistance on low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion is a global issue that affects safety and economics. There is an increasing demand for bio-based polymers for industrial applications and production of polymers by micro-organisms is especially attractive. This work reports on the electrochemical and physical properties of exopolysaccharid...

  10. Investigations on Atmospheric Corrosion of Low carbon Steel in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nafiisah

    2008-07-17

    Jul 17, 2008 ... Losses due to corrosion have been found to make a significant impact on the economy of many countries. Worldwide, studies have shown that the overall cost of corrosion amounts to at least 4-5% of the gross national product, and the major contributor to this cost is atmospheric corrosion. Determining the ...

  11. Magnetic anisotropy of plastically deformed low-carbon steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr; Uchimoto, T.; Takagi, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 19 (2010), 195003/1-195003/7 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP102/09/P108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy * plastic deformation * magnetic hysteresis * Barkhausen noise Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.105, year: 2010

  12. Zinc deposition with pack cementation on low carbon steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vourlias, G.; Pistofidis, N.; Chaliampalias, D.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E.K.; Tsipas, D.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of Zn coatings formed with pack cementation at 250, 350, 380, 400 and 450 deg. C have been studied with Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness measurments. From this investigation it turned up that these coatings are composed of two layers referring to Γ-Fe 11 Zn 40 and δ-FeZn 10 phases of the Fe-Zn phase diagram, while inclusions were also detected, composed of Fe and Zn at almost equal concentrations. Furthermore it was deduced that the coating thickness at 400 and 450 deg. C is a function of t 1/2 , where t is the heating time. However, the microstructure is similar in every case. Finally, it was concluded that the microhardness of the pack coatings is higher than the microhardness of the hot-dip galvanized coatings

  13. Evaluation of new multiaxial damage parameters on low carbon steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cruces

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most mechanical components are subjected to the complex fatigue loading conditions, where both amplitude and direction of loading cycles change over the time. The estimation of damage caused by these complex loading scenarios are often done by simplified uniaxial fatigue theories, which ultimately leads to higher factor of safety during the final design considerations. Critical plane-based fatigue theories have been considered more accurate for computing the fatigue damage for multiaxial loading conditions in comparison to energy-based and equivalent stress-based theories. Two recently developed fatigue theories have been evaluated in this work for the available test data. Test data includes significant amount of biaxial load paths.

  14. Low carbon steel: Metallurgical structure vs. mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide a low cost, simple experiment for either demonstration purposes or as a laboratory experiment that will teach the student the importance of the thermal-mechanical history of a metallic alloy in determining that material's mechanical behavior. Hairpins are subjected to various treatments. The experimental equipment and procedures are discussed.

  15. Optimization of fatigue damage indication in ferromagnetic low carbon steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomáš, Ivan; Kovářík, O.; Kadlecová, Jana; Vértesy, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2015), 095603 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fatigue * residual lifetime * magnetic non-destructive evaluation * ferromagnetic construction materials Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2015

  16. Sustainable Low Carbon Transport Scenarios for India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash; Mittal, Shivika

    2014-01-01

    Transport sector’s fuel mix which is dominated by the fossil fuel imposes multiple external costs like energy security, air quality and climate change. In this study, alternate future scenarios are designed to explore the transitions of national transport system (till 2050). Several policy options...... are delineated that would facilitate the sustainable low carbon transformation of India’s transport sector. The long term energy and emission trajectory of India’s transport sector is assessed under alternate scenarios using the integrated assessment modelling framework. Co-benefits like energy security...... and local air quality that can be accrued by mainstreaming climate change polices into national sustainable development goals and sectoral plans are also estimated. There is no silver bullet that would enable the transition towards low carbon transport. An optimal mix of policies that includes fuel economy...

  17. Sustainable Low Carbon Transport Scenarios for India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash; Mittal, Shivika

    2014-01-01

    and local air quality that can be accrued by mainstreaming climate change polices into national sustainable development goals and sectoral plans are also estimated. There is no silver bullet that would enable the transition towards low carbon transport. An optimal mix of policies that includes fuel economy......Transport sector’s fuel mix which is dominated by the fossil fuel imposes multiple external costs like energy security, air quality and climate change. In this study, alternate future scenarios are designed to explore the transitions of national transport system (till 2050). Several policy options...... are delineated that would facilitate the sustainable low carbon transformation of India’s transport sector. The long term energy and emission trajectory of India’s transport sector is assessed under alternate scenarios using the integrated assessment modelling framework. Co-benefits like energy security...

  18. Contribution of archaeological analogs to the estimation of average corrosion rates and long term corrosion mechanisms of low carbon steel in soil; Apport des analogues archeologiques a l'estimation des vitesses moyennes et a l'etude des mecanismes de corrosion a tres long terme des aciers non allies dans les sols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, D

    2003-11-15

    In the context of the French nuclear waste storage, a multi-barriers disposal is envisaged. Wastes could be put in metallic overpacks disposed in a clay soil. As these overpacks could be made of low carbon steel, it is important to understand the corrosion behaviour of this material in soil during period of several centuries. Indeed, it is necessary to consolidate the empirical data by a phenomenological approach. This includes laboratory experiments and modelling of the phenomenon which have to be validated and completed by the study of archaeological artefacts. This was the aim of this PhD-work. To this purpose, an analytical protocol has been elaborated: about forty archaeological artefacts coming from five dated sites (2. to 16. centuries) have been studied on cross section in order to observe on the same sample all the constituents of the system: metallic substrate/corrosion products/environment. The corrosion products are divided into two zones: the Dense Product Layer (DPL) in contact with the metal, and the Transformed Medium (TM) which are the corrosion products formed around soil minerals (quartz grains). The metallic substrate has been studied by the classical methods of materials science (optical and scanning electron microscope, energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopies). It has been verified that despite their heterogeneity of structure and composition, they are all hypo-eutectoids steels that can contain phosphorous until 0.5 wt%. The corrosion products have been analysed by local structural analytical methods as micro-diffraction under synchrotron radiation ({mu}XRD) and Raman micro-spectroscopy. These two complementary techniques and also the elemental composition analysis conducted to the characterisation of the corrosion forms. On the majority of the samples coming from four sites, the DPL are constituted by goethite including marbles of magnetite/maghemite. On the artefacts from the fifth site, a particular corrosion form has been

  19. Development strategy research of low-carbon tourist city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaohong

    2017-04-01

    Construction of low-carbon tourist city has become a strategic choice for the development of city construction in our country, becoming the direction and goal of future city development in China. In this paper, the development strategy of low-carbon tourist city is put forward from the aspects of building low-carbon tourism culture, strengthening and perfecting the relevant rules and regulations, establishing and perfecting the decision-making management mechanism of low-carbon tourist city construction, establishing accurate, timely, efficient and comprehensive ecological environment monitoring and supervision network, building economical resource utilization system, strengthening science and technology supporting of low-carbon city construction, establishing low-carbon tourism scenic spot, low-carbon community or low-carbon demonstration area, etc.

  20. Assessing the readiness of contractors in implementing low carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the implementation of low carbon construction in our construction industry, the contractors need to be ready and have knowledge to adopt low carbon construction ... A checklist was established by summarizing the highest low carbon activities from each category which were sustainable site planning and management, ...

  1. An economic assessment of low carbon vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summerton, P. [Cambridge Econometrics CE, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Harrison, P. [European Climate Foundation ECF, Brussels (Belgium)] (eds.)

    2013-03-15

    The study aimed to analyse the economic impacts of decarbonizing light duty vehicles. As part of the study, the impacts of the European Commissions proposed 2020 CO2 regulation for cars and vans have been assessed. The analysis showed that a shift to low-carbon vehicles would increase spending on vehicle technology, therefore generating positive direct employment impacts, but potentially adding 1,000-1,100 euro to the capital cost of the average new car in 2020. However, these additional technology costs would be offset by fuel savings of around 400 euro per year, indicating an effective break-even point for drivers of approximately three years. At the EU level, the cost of running and maintaining the European car fleet would become 33-35 billion euro lower each year than in a 'do nothing scenario' by 2030, leading to positive economic impacts including indirect employment gains. Data on the cost of low carbon vehicle technologies has largely been sourced from the auto industry itself, with the study supported by a core working group including Nissan, GE, the European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA), and the European Storage Battery Manufacturers Association (Eurobat). Fuel price projections for the study were based on the IEA's World Energy Outlook, while technical modelling was carried out using the transport policy scoping tool SULTAN (developed by Ricardo-AEA for the European Commission) and the Road Vehicle Cost and Efficiency Calculation Framework, also developed by Ricardo-AEA. Macro-economic modelling was done using the E3ME model, which has previously been used for several European Commission and EU government impact assessments. This report focuses on efficient use of fossil fuels in internal combustion- and hybrid electric vehicles. It will be followed by a second report, which will focus on further reducing the use of fossil fuels by also substituting them with domestically produced energy carriers, such as electricity and

  2. Low carbon fuel and chemical production from waste gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, S.; Liew, F.M.; Daniell, J.; Koepke, M. [LanzaTech, Ltd., Auckland (New Zealand)

    2012-07-01

    LanzaTech has developed a gas fermentation platform for the production of alter native transport fuels and commodity chemicals from carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide containing gases. LanzaTech technology uses these gases in place of sugars as the carbon and energy source for fermentation thereby allowing a broad spectrum of resources to be considered as an input for product synthesis. At the core of the Lanzatech process is a proprietary microbe capable of using gases as the only carbon and energy input for product synthesis. To harness this capability for the manufacture of a diverse range of commercially valuable products, the company has developed a robust synthetic biology platform to enable a variety of novel molecules to be synthesised via gas fermentation. LanzaTech initially focused on the fermentation of industrial waste gases for fuel ethanol production. The company has been operating pilot plant that uses direct feeds of steel making off gas for ethanol production for over 24 months. This platform technology has been further successfully demonstrated using a broad range of gas inputs including gasified biomass and reformed natural gas. LanzaTech has developed the fermentation, engineering and control systems necessary to efficiently convert gases to valuable products. A precommercial demonstration scale unit processing steel mill waste gases was commissioned in China during the 2{sup nd} quarter of 2012. Subsequent scale-up of this facility is projected for the 2013 and will represent the first world scale non-food based low carbon ethanol project. More recently LanzaTech has developed proprietary microbial catalysts capable of converting carbon dioxide in the presence of hydrogen directly to value added chemicals, where-in CO{sub 2} is the sole source of carbon for product synthesis. Integrating the LanzaTech technology into a number of industrial facilities, such as steel mills, oil refineries and other industries that emit Carbon bearing

  3. Paper making in a low carbon economy

    OpenAIRE

    John G Rogers

    2018-01-01

    Paper and pulp manufacturing industry produces versatile products from renewable feedstock that are easily recycled. It is the fourth largest industrial sector in terms of energy use. Much of the energy used comes from biomass derived fuels or high efficiency combined heat and power plants so the industry is not considered as carbon intensive. But at production paper making emits five times the CO2/tonne of steel; this is gradually removed from the atmosphere by the growth of replacement tree...

  4. A Review of Urban Low-carbon Traffic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Yao, Jingjing

    2017-12-01

    Transportation not only promote social and economic development, but also improve people’s living standards, but its high energy consumption and high pollution brought a series of energy and environmental problems. In order to reduce the impact on the environment, countries are developing low-carbon transport as part of the socio-economic development mentioned on the agenda. On the basis of understanding the background and connotation of low-carbon transportation, this paper reviews and collates the evaluation index system and evaluation method of urban low-carbon transportation, which is used to provide reference for urban low-carbon transportation research.

  5. Low Carbon Development Pathways in Indian Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sonam Wangyel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Indian agriculture sector is a significant emitter of Green House Gas (GHG, which is projected to increase by 47% between 2011 and 2020. In response to this, India has committed itself to voluntarily reduce its emissions intensity (emissions per unit GDP between 20 to 25 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. This would require rapid and significant scaling up of mitigation efforts including the agriculture sector, which remains a challenge, as mitigation is not a priority in Indian agriculture. The study found out that in-spite of numerous mitigation technologies that are readily available for takeoff, the scale of adoption and deployment is far from sufficient to meet the emission targets set by the Government of India, mainly due to lack of financial incentives, capacity building of farmers, and an enabling policy at different levels. This study identified a suite of feasible interventions for promoting low carbon agriculture such as: low tillage systems as it has negative costs due to savings on tillage and fuel; introduction of superior livestock breeds to reduce numbers (especially unproductive cattle and increase yield; use of livestock wastes to produce energy for cooking and heating through bio-gas technology can not only reduce methane emission but also save electricity costs for the households and; introduction of carbon credits and exploration of domestic carbon markets. An enabling policy environment must be created for these interventions to take off.

  6. Low-carbon infrastructure strategies for cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. A.; Ibrahim, N.; Hoornweg, D.

    2014-05-01

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions to avert potentially disastrous global climate change requires substantial redevelopment of infrastructure systems. Cities are recognized as key actors for leading such climate change mitigation efforts. We have studied the greenhouse gas inventories and underlying characteristics of 22 global cities. These cities differ in terms of their climates, income, levels of industrial activity, urban form and existing carbon intensity of electricity supply. Here we show how these differences in city characteristics lead to wide variations in the type of strategies that can be used for reducing emissions. Cities experiencing greater than ~1,500 heating degree days (below an 18 °C base), for example, will review building construction and retrofitting for cold climates. Electrification of infrastructure technologies is effective for cities where the carbon intensity of the grid is lower than ~600 tCO2e GWh-1 whereas transportation strategies will differ between low urban density (~6,000 persons km-2) cities. As nation states negotiate targets and develop policies for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, attention to the specific characteristics of their cities will broaden and improve their suite of options. Beyond carbon pricing, markets and taxation, governments may develop policies and target spending towards low-carbon urban infrastructure.

  7. Metal supply constraints for a low-carbon economy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, A. de; Kleijn, R.; Huppes, G.; Sprecher, B.; Engelen, G. van; Tukker, A.

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbon energy systems are more metal-intensive than traditional energy systems. Concerns have been expressed that this may hamper the transition to a low-carbon economy. We estimate the required extraction of Fe, Al, Cu, Ni, Cr, In, Nd, Dy, Li, Zn, and Pb until 2050 under several

  8. Contingency theory, climate change, and low-carbon operations management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furlan Matos Alves, Marcelo Wilson; Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Ana Beatriz; Kannan, Devika

    2017-01-01

    of sustainability managers on the adoption of low-carbon operations management practices and their related benefits. Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this goal, this research uses NVivo software to gather evidence from interviews conducted with ten high-level managers in sustainability and related areas from...... seven leading companies located in Brazil. Findings: The authors present four primary results: a proposal of an original framework to understand the relationship between contingency theory, changes in organisational structure to embrace low-carbon management, adoption of low-carbon operations practices......-change contingencies at the supply chain level, organisational structure for low-carbon management and low-carbon operations management practices and benefits. This research also highlights evidence from an emerging economy and registers future research propositions....

  9. Low carbon transition and sustainable development path of tourism industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongbing; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Lei; Jin, Shenglang

    2017-05-01

    The low carbon transition is as much a transformative technology shift as it represents a response to global environment challenges. The low carbon paradigm presents a new direction of change for tourism industry. However, the lack of theoretical frameworks on low carbon transformation in tourism industry context provides a significant knowledge gap. This paper firstly investigates the relationships between low carbon and sustainable development, followed by exploring the existing challenges of tourism sustainable development. At last, this paper presents a sustainable development path framework for low carbon transition of tourism industry, which include accelerating deployment of renewable energy, energy-saving green building construction, improving green growth investment, and adopting a sustainable consumption and production system, in order to promote energy and water efficiency, waste management, GHG emissions mitigation and eventually enhance its sustainability.

  10. Influencia de la cantidad de O2 adicionado al CO2 en el gas de protección sobre la microestructura del metal depositado en uniones soldadas de bordes rectos en aceros de bajo contenido de carbono con el proceso GMAW Influence of O2 content, added to CO2 in the shielding gas, on the microstructure of deposited metal in butt welded joint with straight edges, in low carbon steels using GMAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Díaz-Cedré

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La presencia de ferrita acicular (FA en la microestructura del cordón de soldadura, dentro de determinado rango de valores, eleva considerablemente la tenacidad de las uniones soldadas. Es por ello, que el presente trabajo trata sobre un estudio que relaciona la cantidad de ferrita acicular en el cordón en función del contenido de oxígeno presente en la mezcla activa CO2+O2, durante la realización de uniones soldadas de bordes rectos en aceros de bajo carbono con el proceso con electrodo fusible y protección gaseosa (GMAW en condiciones invariables de parámetros de proceso (corriente de soldadura, voltaje de arco, velocidad de soldadura, longitud libre y flujo de gas protector. Como resultado del trabajo se estableció la relación gráfica existente entre la ferrita acicular y el contenido de oxígeno en la mezcla.The presence of acicular ferrite (AF in the microstructure of weld bead, in a specified range of values, increase considerably the toughness of welded joints. The present paper, for that reason, study the relationship between the acicular ferrite quantity in the deposited metal and the oxygen present in the active gas mixture of CO2+O2, during the execution of butt welded joints with straight edges, in low carbon steels with consumable electrode and gas protection (GMAW in invariable conditions of process parameters (welding current, arc voltage, welding speed, electrode extension, and gas flow. The graphic relation between the acicular ferrite and the oxygen content was established, as result of the research work.

  11. Distributed Leadership in a Low-Carbon City Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azalia Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses Spillane’s (2001 theory and Gronn’s (2000 concerted efforts approach to examine distributed leadership in a low-carbon city agenda. The main purpose of the paper is to find empirical evidence of a relationship between distributed leadership and the achievement of the agenda. Eight constructs emerged that informed our understanding of distributed leadership dimensions within the low-carbon city framework: vision, organizational framework, organizational culture, consensus, instructional programs, expertise, team leader leadership, and team member leadership. The evidence shows that there is a positive relationship between distributed leadership and the outcome of the low-carbon city agenda, and that a dispersed pattern in distributing leadership is required to enhance community engagement. The findings also suggest that an organizational culture that facilitates multiple sources of leadership may largely contribute to the effectiveness of distributed leadership practices in realizing the low-carbon city agenda.

  12. Natural Gas Based Electricity Production and Low Carbon Technology Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns regarding air quality, global climate change, and the national energy security impacts of the intensive use of fossil fuels and their environmental impacts in the power generation sector have raised interest in alternative low carbon electricity generation technology and...

  13. European Dialogue Report. Lessons from ten low-carbon dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    Øye, Olav; Aelenei, Laura; Barkved, Line; Beaubien, Stan; Bertrand, Teresa; Cherbib, Miriame; Creamer, Emily; Engen, Sirin; Ernst, Anna; Gemeni, Vasiliki; Ha-Duong, Minh; Hrivnakova, Lucia; Hladik, Vit; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Maynard, Carly

    2015-01-01

    The R&Dialogue project has facilitated ten low-carbon dialogues with representatives from energy, the low-carbon R&D community, social actors and others. In each of the ten countries involved, a ‘coalition of the willing’ explored the challenges and articulated their view on improving the dialogue. This European Dialogue Report is a collection of these experiences, and it reflects upon the themes emerging from those dialogues.

  14. Have You Switched to a Low-Carbon Diet? The Ultimate Value of Low-Carbon Consumerism

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ling Lin; Hong-Wen Lin

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1990s many governments around the world have been encouraging their people to participate in green or low carbon living. With the background of rising consumer awareness in environmental protection, green consumption, and green marketing are receiving growing attention from consumers and enterprises. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify the goals and values of 60 Taiwanese consumers in a low-carbon diet. This study uses the theory of Mean-end chain as basis, applying ...

  15. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II : Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  16. Nested barriers to low-carbon infrastructure investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granoff, Ilmi; Hogarth, J. Ryan; Miller, Alan

    2016-12-01

    Low-carbon, 'green' economic growth is necessary to simultaneously improve human welfare and avoid the worst impacts of climate change and environmental degradation. Infrastructure choices underpin both the growth and the carbon intensity of the economy. This Perspective explores the barriers to investing in low-carbon infrastructure and some of the policy levers available to overcome them. The barriers to decarbonizing infrastructure 'nest' within a set of barriers to infrastructure development more generally that cause spending on infrastructure--low-carbon or not--to fall more than 70% short of optimal levels. Developing countries face additional barriers such as currency and political risks that increase the investment gap. Low-carbon alternatives face further barriers, such as commercialization risk and financial and public institutions designed for different investment needs. While the broader barriers to infrastructure investment are discussed in other streams of literature, they are often disregarded in literature on renewable energy diffusion or climate finance, which tends to focus narrowly on the project costs of low- versus high-carbon options. We discuss how to overcome the barriers specific to low-carbon infrastructure within the context of the broader infrastructure gap.

  17. The Deployment of Low Carbon Technologies in Energy Intensive Industries: A Macroeconomic Analysis for Europe, China and India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nabernegg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Industrial processes currently contribute 40% to global CO2 emissions and therefore substantial increases in industrial energy efficiency are required for reaching the 2 °C target. We assess the macroeconomic effects of deploying low carbon technologies in six energy intensive industrial sectors (Petroleum, Iron and Steel, Non-metallic Minerals, Paper and Pulp, Chemicals, and Electricity in Europe, China and India in 2030. By combining the GAINS technology model with a macroeconomic computable general equilibrium model, we find that output in energy intensive industries declines in Europe by 6% in total, while output increases in China by 11% and in India by 13%. The opposite output effects emerge because low carbon technologies lead to cost savings in China and India but not in Europe. Consequently, the competitiveness of energy intensive industries is improved in China and India relative to Europe, leading to higher exports to Europe. In all regions, the decarbonization of electricity plays the dominant role for mitigation. We find a rebound effect in China and India, in the size of 42% and 34% CO2 reduction, respectively, but not in Europe. Our results indicate that the range of considered low-carbon technology options is not competitive in the European industrial sectors. To foster breakthrough low carbon technologies and maintain industrial competitiveness, targeted technology policy is therefore needed to supplement carbon pricing.

  18. Boron Steel: An Alternative for Costlier Nickel and Molybdenum Alloyed Steel for Transmission Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Case Carburized (CC low carbon steels containing Ni, Cr and Mo alloying elements are widely used for transmission gears in automobile, as it possesses desired mechanical properties. In order to cut cost and save scarce materials like Ni and Mo for strategic applications, steel alloyed with Boron has been developed, which gives properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel. In the process of steel development, care was taken to ensure precipitation of boron which results in precipitation hardening. The characterization of the developed boron steel had exhibited properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel and superior to conventional boron steel.

  19. Low Carbon Supplier Selection in the Hotel Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Hsu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a model for evaluating the carbon and energy management performance of suppliers by using multiple-criteria decision-making (MCDM. By conducting a literature review and gathering expert opinions, 10 criteria on carbon and energy performance were identified to evaluate low carbon suppliers using the Fuzzy Delphi Method (FDM. Subsequently, the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL method was used to determine the importance of evaluation criteria in selecting suppliers and the causal relationships between them. The DEMATEL-based analytic network process (DANP and VlseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR were adopted to evaluate the weights and performances of suppliers and to obtain a solution under each evaluation criterion. An illustrative example of a hotel company was presented to demonstrate how to select a low carbon supplier according to carbon and energy management. The proposed hybrid model can help firms become effective in facilitating low carbon supply chains in hotels.

  20. Global low-carbon transition and China's response strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Kun He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paris Agreement establishes a new mechanism for post-2020 global climate governance, and sets long-term goals for global response to climate change, which will accelerate worldwide low-carbon transformation of economic development pattern, promote the revolutionary reform of energy system, boost a fundamental change in the mode of social production and consumption, and further the civilization of human society from industrial civilization to eco-civilization. The urgency of global low-carbon transition will reshape the competition situation of world's economy, trade and technology. Taking the construction of eco-civilization as a guide, China explores green and low-carbon development paths, establishes ambitious intended nationally determined contribution (INDC targets and action plans, advances energy production and consumption revolution, and speeds up the transformation of economic development pattern. These strategies and actions not only confirm to the trend of the world low-carbon transition, but also meet the intrinsic requirements for easing the domestic resources and environment constraints and realizing sustainable development. They are multi-win-win strategies for promotion of economic development and environmental protection and mitigation of carbon emissions. China should take the global long-term emission reduction targets as a guide, and formulate medium and long-term low-carbon development strategy, build the core competitiveness of low-carbon advanced technology and development pattern, and take an in-depth part in global governance so as to reflect the responsibility of China as a great power in constructing a community of common destiny for all mankind and addressing global ecological crisis.

  1. Possibilities and Challenges designing low-carbon-energy technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Araceli

    Though there is broad consensus that one of the solutions to the current environmental challenge will be based on the use of low-carbon technologies, and even though there is a big potential to turn to a more sustainable design and innovation, there are several elements that need to be taken...... as a study object and discusses the question: What are the main possibilities and challenges when designing low-carbon illumination technologies? To answer this question, we use a systemic approach including environmental, economic, energy and political issues using relevant concepts from the Ecological...

  2. 76 FR 66901 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From the People's Republic of China: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... least one of the chemical elements exceeds those listed above (including, e.g., American Society for... lamination steels. IF steels are recognized as low carbon steels with micro-alloying levels of elements such... and nitrogen elements. HSLA steels are recognized as steels with micro-alloying levels of elements...

  3. Developing low carbon policies for road transport in Poland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, R.; Rahman, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of work done for the World Bank to develop low carbon policies for road transport in Poland. Here, we outline the development of Green House Gas (GHG) emissions, develop a Business As Usual (BAU) scenario based on social-economic-, infrastructure-, car market, vehicle

  4. Low Carbon and Climate Resilient Investments: Is South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The aim of this paper is to review South Africa's response to climate change, with a special focus on investments in low carbon and climate resilient action. It highlights the successes to date and the challenges that still have to be addressed.

  5. Low-Carbon Sustainable Precincts: An Australian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Bunning

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Australia’s urban built environment contributes significantly to the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions; therefore, encouraging urban development to pursue low-carbon outcomes will aid in reducing carbon in the overall economy. Cities and urban areas are configured in precincts, which have been identified as an ideal scale for low-carbon technologies that address energy, water and waste. Even though new governance models and systems are being created to enable low-carbon precincts to operate with a degree of independence within a broader centralised utility structure, greater effort is required to refocus governance on this smaller scale of delivery. Furthermore, at this time, no consistent carbon accounting framework is in place to measure emissions or emission reductions at this scale, thereby limiting the ability to acknowledge or reward progressive, sustainable low-carbon developments. To respond to this situation, a framework is proposed that could form both the basis of a carbon certification scheme for the built environment and provide a platform for generating carbon credits from urban development.

  6. Funding pathways to a low-carbon transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foulds, Chris; Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2016-01-01

    The framing of funding programmes can sustain existing ways of conceptualizing particular problems, as well as create new ones. Yet, without more prominent roles for social sciences and humanities, the techno-economic conceptualization of energy consumers could hinder long-term low-carbon aspirat...

  7. Walking away from a low-carbon economy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundaca T., Luis; Markandya, Anil; Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    of continuous improvement (e.g. reduced energy intensity in Asia, decarbonisation of of energy supply in OECD Europe), they are incapable of offsetting the effects of economic growth and increased energy use. With the exception of Africa, most regions appear to have missed the ‘low-carbon economy opportunity...

  8. Assessment of low carbon energy technologies: fossil fuels and CCS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramirez, C.A.; Bakshi, B.; Gibon, T.; Hertwich, E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results that are part of a larger effort driven by the International Resource Panel of the United Nations Environment Program. The reports aims to identify and, when possible, quantify the trade-offs, benefits, and risks of low carbon energy technologies. In order to provide a

  9. Wood-burning stoves in low-carbon dwellings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luis Teles de Carvalho, Ricardo; Jensen, Ole Michael; Afshari, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    combustion technology and automatics, controlling the interplay between stove and house, can make wood-burning stoves suitable for low-carbon dwellings and meet the remaining heat demand during the coldest period. It was further concluded that new guidelines need to be elaborated about how to install...

  10. Renewable energy and low carbon economy transition in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash; Fujino, Junichi

    2010-01-01

    that aligns India’s emissions to an optimal 450 ppmv CO2-eq. stabilization global response. The second emissions pathway assumes an underlying sustainable development pattern. A low carbon future will be good for renewable energy under both the development pathways, though the share of renewable energy...

  11. Construction and applied research of low-carbon building evaluation index system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwen; Dong, Xiaohong; Gao, Pengzhao

    2017-04-01

    Energy conservation in building is a key link on alleviating energy-deficient contradiction, improving the quality of human life environment, and realizing sustainable development in our country. In this paper, we construct low-carbon building evaluation index system and evaluation method from five aspects—low-carbon structure, low-carbon materials, low-carbon energy, low-carbon technology and low-carbon management. Finally, taking “Solar Valley” in Dezhou as an example, we make the evaluation to its situation of low-carbon building.

  12. Overview of Low Carbon Logistics Development in China and Foreign Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dongxiang; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-12-01

    High energy consumption is a major feature of the logistics industry. Under the current low-carbon development requirements, the low carbon development of logistics is bound to be a new direction, and more scholars will turn their attention to low-carbon logistics. This paper presents a detailed introduction to low-carbon logistics from four aspects: the definition of low-carbon logistics, the influencing factors and Countermeasures of development, and the evaluation of carbon emission efficiency.

  13. Have You Switched to a Low-Carbon Diet? The Ultimate Value of Low-Carbon Consumerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ling Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s many governments around the world have been encouraging their people to participate in green or low carbon living. With the background of rising consumer awareness in environmental protection, green consumption, and green marketing are receiving growing attention from consumers and enterprises. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify the goals and values of 60 Taiwanese consumers in a low-carbon diet. This study uses the theory of Mean-end chain as basis, applying the “Soft-laddering” of “Laddering” to understand the perceived value of low carbon food in depth interviews. The results revealed that the attributes of users care for green living in the, order of, Less meat more vegetables, Seasonal food, Local food, Food with minimal artificial processing, Energy-saving preparation and Carbon footprint. After classifying by content analysis, we draw the Hierarchical value map (HVM to explore that consumer’s pursuit of the final value and benefits by adopting a low-carbon diet relate to healthy living.

  14. Effect of Cr and Ni on diffusion bonding of Fe3Al with steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Microstructure at the diffusion bonding interface between Fe3Al and steel including Q235 low carbon steel and Cr18–Ni8 stainless steel was analysed and compared by means of scanning electron micro- scopy and transmission electron microscopy. The effect of Cr and Ni on microstructure at the Fe3Al/steel ...

  15. Low carbon national strategy. A macro-economical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiz, Adam; Monnoyer-Smith, Laurence; Callonnec, Gael

    2016-11-01

    This publication briefly reports the use of the Three-ME model (Multi-sector Macroeconomic Model for the Evaluation of Environmental and Energy) to assess the combined effect of the several instruments mobilised for the transition towards a low carbon economy within the French National Low Carbon Strategy (SNBC). It first presents the Three-ME model which has been developed since 2008 by the OFCE and the Ademe, is a neo-Keynesian and hybrid model, and which comprises 14.000 equations and 70.000 parameters dealing with prices, interest rates, investments, salaries, foreign trade, State policy, a production function, and a consumption function. Some characteristics of the SNBC scenario are indicated, as well as those of a reference trend-based scenario. Obtained results are then briefly commented in terms of positive ecological and economic impacts of a carbon tax and of sector-based measures defined within the SNBC

  16. Scenarios for transition towards a low-carbon world in 2050: What's at stake for heavy industries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    Launched in 2004, the study Scenarios for transition towards a low-carbon world in 2050: What's at stake for heavy industries explores how major industrial sectors will be impacted by a carbon constraint stabilizing atmospheric CO 2 concentration at 450 ppm. By means of an innovative hybrid modelling platform and ongoing dialogue between researchers and industrialists, the study produces conclusions concerning both general climate policy as well as the economic response of industrial sectors - specifically of the steel, aluminium, cement, and sheet glass sectors, as well as of the energy sector. (authors)

  17. Bridging analytical approaches for low-carbon transitions

    OpenAIRE

    Geels, Frank W.; Berkhout, Frans; Van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-01-01

    Low-carbon transitions are long-term multi-faceted processes. Although integrated assessment models have many strengths for analysing such transitions, their mathematical representation requires a simplification of the causes, dynamics and scope of such societal transformations. We suggest that integrated assessment model-based analysis should be complemented with insights from socio-technical transition analysis and practice-based action research. We discuss the underlying assumptions, stren...

  18. The development of low-carbon vehicles in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Mingfa; Liu Haifeng; Feng Xuan

    2011-01-01

    Reducing CO 2 emissions from vehicles in China is crucial and will significantly alleviate the environmental burden of the Earth. Some promising technologies that make possible low-carbon vehicles are reviewed in this work, including electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, hybrid vehicles, biofuels vehicles, other alternative fuel vehicles, and conventional internal combustion engine vehicles with improvement. In the short term, expanding the use of mature technologies in conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles is the most realistic, effective, and timely solution for China to meeting the urgent challenges of energy saving and greenhouse gas reduction; while in the long run biofuel is a promising candidate due to their renewability and carbon neutrality. The blueprint of low-carbon vehicles for China depends on three aspects: breakthroughs in technology, awareness of public, and government guidance. - Highlights: → Reducing CO 2 emissions and saving energy from vehicles in China is crucial. → Low-carbon depends on technology breakthrough, public awareness, and government guidance. → Use of mature technologies in ICEVs is the most realistic solution for China. → Biofuels are the key to realize neutral carbon emission in the long run.

  19. Health benefits, ecological threats of low-carbon electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, Thomas; Hertwich, Edgar G.; Arvesen, Anders; Singh, Bhawna; Verones, Francesca

    2017-03-01

    Stabilizing global temperature will require a shift to renewable or nuclear power from fossil power and the large-scale deployment of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) for remaining fossil fuel use. Non-climate co-benefits of low-carbon energy technologies, especially reduced mortalities from air pollution and decreased ecosystem damage, have been important arguments for policies to reduce CO2 emissions. Taking into account a wide range of environmental mechanisms and the complex interactions of the supply chains of different technologies, we conducted the first life cycle assessment of potential human health and ecological impacts of a global low-carbon electricity scenario. Our assessment indicates strong human health benefits of low-carbon electricity. For ecosystem quality, there is a significant trade-off between reduced pollution and climate impacts and potentially significant ecological impacts from land use associated with increased biopower utilization. Other renewables, nuclear power and CCS show clear ecological benefits, so that the climate mitigation scenario with a relatively low share of biopower has lower ecosystem impacts than the baseline scenario. Energy policy can maximize co-benefits by supporting other renewable and nuclear power and developing biomass supply from sources with low biodiversity impact.

  20. Low Carbon Footprint mortar from Pozzolanic Waste Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Mehman navaz, Hossein Ali; Moayed Zefreh, Fereshteh; Aboata, Zahra

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, Portland cement clinker leads to emission of CO2 into the atmosphere and therefore causes greenhouse effect. Incorporating of Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) and Pulverized Fuel Ash (PFA) as partial cement replacement materials into mix of low carbon mortar decreases the amount of cement use and reduces high dependence on cements compared to ordinary mortar. The result of this research supported use of the new concept in preparing low carbon mortar for industrial constructions. Strength of low carbon mortar with POFA and PFA replacement in cement was affected and changed by replacing percent finesse, physical and chemical properties and pozzolanic activity of these wastes. Waste material replacement instead of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) was used in this study. This in turn was useful for promoting better quality of construction and innovative systems in construction industry, especially in Malaysia. This study was surely a step forward to achieving quality products which were affordable, durable and environmentally friendly. Disposing ash contributes to shortage of landfill space in Malaysia. Besides, hazard of ash might be another serious issue for human health. The ash disposal area also might create a new problem, which is the area's sedimentation and erosion.

  1. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  2. Precipitation Strengthening by Induction Treatment in High Strength Low Carbon Microalloyed Hot-Rolled Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzabal, G.; Isasti, N.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J. M.; Uranga, P.

    2018-03-01

    The use of microalloyed steels in the production of thick plates is expanding due to the possibility of achieving attractive combinations of strength and toughness. As market requirements for high strength plates are increasing and new applications require reduced weight and innovative designs, novel approaches to attaining cost-effective grades are being developed. The mechanism of precipitation strengthening has been widely used in thin strip products, since the optimization of the coiling strategy offers interesting combinations in terms of final properties and microalloying additions. Precipitation strengthening in thick plates, however, is less widespread due to the limitation of interphase precipitation during continuous cooling after hot rolling. With the main objective of exploring the limits of this strengthening mechanism, laboratory thermomechanical simulations that reproduced plate hot rolling mill conditions were performed using low carbon steels microalloyed with Nb, NbMo, and TiMo additions. After continuous cooling to room temperature, a set of heat treatments using fast heating rates were applied simulating the conditions of induction heat treatments. An important increase of both yield and tensile strengths was measured after induction treatment without any important impairment in toughness properties. A significant precipitation hardening is observed in Mo-containing grades under specific heat treatment parameters.

  3. Precipitation Strengthening by Induction Treatment in High Strength Low Carbon Microalloyed Hot-Rolled Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzabal, G.; Isasti, N.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J. M.; Uranga, P.

    2018-01-01

    The use of microalloyed steels in the production of thick plates is expanding due to the possibility of achieving attractive combinations of strength and toughness. As market requirements for high strength plates are increasing and new applications require reduced weight and innovative designs, novel approaches to attaining cost-effective grades are being developed. The mechanism of precipitation strengthening has been widely used in thin strip products, since the optimization of the coiling strategy offers interesting combinations in terms of final properties and microalloying additions. Precipitation strengthening in thick plates, however, is less widespread due to the limitation of interphase precipitation during continuous cooling after hot rolling. With the main objective of exploring the limits of this strengthening mechanism, laboratory thermomechanical simulations that reproduced plate hot rolling mill conditions were performed using low carbon steels microalloyed with Nb, NbMo, and TiMo additions. After continuous cooling to room temperature, a set of heat treatments using fast heating rates were applied simulating the conditions of induction heat treatments. An important increase of both yield and tensile strengths was measured after induction treatment without any important impairment in toughness properties. A significant precipitation hardening is observed in Mo-containing grades under specific heat treatment parameters.

  4. A Fuzzy-Grey Multicriteria Decision Making Approach for Green Supplier Selection in Low-Carbon Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Pang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing awareness of global warming and environmental protection, many practitioners and researchers have paid much attention to the low-carbon supply chain management in recent years. Green supplier selection is one of the most critical activities in the low-carbon supply chain management, so it is important to establish the comprehensive criteria and develop a method for green supplier selection in low-carbon supply chain. The paper proposes a fuzz-grey multicriteria decision making approach to deal with these problems. First, the paper establishes 4 main criteria and 22 subcriteria for green supplier selection. Then, a method integrating fuzzy set theory and grey relational analysis is proposed. It uses the membership function of normal distribution to compare each supplier and uses grey relation analysis to calculate the weight of each criterion and improves fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. The proposed method can make the localization of individual green supplier more objectively and more accurately in the same trade. Finally, a case study in the steel industry is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. An exploration of residents’ low-carbon awareness and behavior in Tianjin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yin; Liu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the empirical evidence of the link between residents’ low-carbon awareness and their behaviors in China. A questionnaire measuring seven dimensions (including low-carbon knowledge, low-carbon value, low-carbon attitude, private low-carbon behavior, public low-carbon behavior, barrier and motivator) was distributed to the residents of Tianjin, yielding 354 valid responses. The results indicated that there was a low-carbon awareness–behavior gap. In particular, the level of behavior was higher than awareness because the motivators were stronger than the barriers. Second, in exploring the affects of motivators versus barriers on the residents’ private and public low-carbon behaviors, we found that motivators promoted both private and public low-carbon behaviors while barriers significantly inhibited public low-carbon behaviors. Third, Chinese social and cultural factors are discussed to inform our exploration of the mechanisms forming the residents’ awareness–behavior gap. - Highlights: • There was a low-carbon awareness–behavior gap. • The level of behavior was higher than awareness. • The motivators promoted both private and public low-carbon behaviors. • The barriers significantly inhibited public low-carbon behaviors

  6. Fostering low-carbon growth initiatives in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criqui, Patrick; Peytral, Pierre-Olivier; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Valadier, Cecile

    2012-02-01

    The current debate on climate strategy and low-carbon economy has increased in complexity: negotiations on the international scene are lacking clear prospects, while the world economic context, international governance and growth prospects remain highly uncertain. In spite of these difficulties, contributors to this study consider that there is a major opportunity for Thailand to address climate change mitigation as part of its overall development strategy, within the 11. NESDP (2012-2016). We strongly believe that Thailand could maximize the benefits of proactive strategies to address climate change adaptation and mitigation by strengthening and expanding already substantial efforts and existing policies. It is also considered that climate policy can be seen as a relevant component of both sustainable development strategy and promotion of national competitiveness. Several key points can be stressed here regarding climate change mitigation strategies and policies in Thailand: - A set of existing policies has already been implemented, mostly focused on the energy sector. - Substantial experience of government departments and agencies has built up over the past two decades in identifying options, coordinating exchanges of views and implementing targeted policies. - A national scientific potential is already established, with a diversity of expertise and a capacity for nationwide field work. Coordinated initiatives of the private sector have been diverse and substantial in major sectors of activity. - Growing awareness in civil society, which is nevertheless combined with entrenched attitudes, resistance to change in everyday life, as in most other countries, whether developed or developing. Recent policy debate, backed by a strong corpus of scientific analysis, considers that a national strategy for Green Economy, or Low-Carbon Economy, should comprise both cross-sector policies and targeted sector-oriented policies. A preliminary analysis of the existing policy mix

  7. Transition pathways for a UK low carbon electricity future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foxon, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving long-term targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions, such as the UK's legally-binding target of reducing its emissions by 80% by 2050, will require a transition in systems for meeting and shaping energy service demands, involving radical substitution to low-carbon supply technologies and improvements in end-use energy efficiency. This paper describes the development and high-level analysis of a set of transition pathways to a UK low carbon electricity system, explaining key features of the core pathways developed and the distinctiveness and value of the approach. The pathways use an ‘action space’ concept to explore the dynamic interactions between choices made by actors, which are influenced by the competing governance ‘framings’ or ‘logics’ that different actors pursue. The paper sets out three core transition pathways – Market Rules, Central Co-ordination and Thousand Flowers, in which market, government and civil society logics respectively dominate. It summarises the key technological and institutional changes in these pathways, and the roles of actors in bringing these about. This leads to an identification of the key risks to the realisation of each of the pathways, and of the challenges for individuals, businesses, social movements and policy-makers in taking action to bring them about and sustain them. - Highlights: ► Development of a set of transition pathways to a UK low carbon electricity system. ► Action space to explore the dynamic interactions between choices made by actors. ► Three core pathways in which market, government and civil society logics dominate. ► Key technological and institutional changes, and the roles of actors in pathways. ► Challenges for different actors in realising pathways.

  8. The role of utilities in developing low carbon, electric megacities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Chris; Stewart, Iain D.; Facchini, Angelo; Mele, Renata

    2017-01-01

    Development of electric cities, with low carbon power supply, is a key strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions. We analyze the role of electric utilities as important actors to catalyze the transition to electric cites, drawing upon data for the world's 27 megacities. Progress towards the ideal electric city is most advanced for Paris, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Buenos Aires for low carbon electricity, while Indian megacities have relatively high use of carbon-intensive electricity as a percentage of total energy use. There is wide variety in the structure of markets for electricity provision in megacities, with a dominant, public utility being the most common model. We review literature on electricity sector business models and broadly propose future models dependent on the predominance of locally dispersed generation and the nature of the ownership of the electric grid within the city. Where a high proportion of electricity can be provided by locally distributed supply within a city, the role of utilities could predominantly become that of enabler of exchange with the grid, but new pricing structures are required. A further challenge for utilities in enabling the electric city is to provide a higher level of resilience to events that disrupt power supply. - Highlights: • Amongst 27 megacities, Paris, Rio, Sao Paulo and Buenos Aires are most progressed low carbon electric cities. • Indian megacities have relatively high use of electricity as a percentage of total energy use. • Wide variety in electricity market structure in megacities; dominant, public utility the most common model. • Utilities could become enablers of exchange with the grid, but new pricing models required.

  9. Development Situations and Countermeasures of Low Carbon Ecological Circular Agriculture: A Case Study of Nantong City

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chun-he; Qiao, Qi-cheng; Gu, Wei-bing; Sun, Jia-feng

    2012-01-01

    Developing the low carbon ecological circular agriculture is an effective approach to realizing low carbon development of agriculture. Through investigation on existing measures and performance of development of low carbon type ecological circular agriculture in Nantong City, we analyzed the potential and problems of Nantong City in developing low carbon type ecological circular agriculture. Finally, with reference to domestic and foreign research achievements and practical experience, we put...

  10. Key Assets for a Sustainable Low Carbon Energy Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carre, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century, concerns of energy security and climate change gave rise to energy policies focused on energy conservation and diversified low-carbon energy sources. Provided lessons of Fukushima accident are evidently accounted for, nuclear energy will probably be confirmed in most of today's nuclear countries as a low carbon energy source needed to limit imports of oil and gas and to meet fast growing energy needs. Future challenges of nuclear energy are then in three directions: i) enhancing safety performance so as to preclude any long term impact of severe accident outside the site of the plant, even in case of hypothetical external events, ii) full use of Uranium and minimization long lived radioactive waste burden for sustainability, and iii) extension to non-electricity energy products for maximizing the share of low carbon energy source in transportation fuels, industrial process heat and district heating. Advanced LWRs (Gen-III) are today's best available technologies and can somewhat advance nuclear energy in these three directions. However, breakthroughs in sustainability call for fast neutron reactors and closed fuel cycles, and non-electric applications prompt a revival of interest in high temperature reactors for exceeding cogeneration performances achievable with LWRs. Both types of Gen-IV nuclear systems by nature call for technology breakthroughs to surpass LWRs capabilities. Current resumption in France of research on sodium cooled fast neutron reactors (SFRs) definitely aims at significant progress in safety and economic competitiveness compared to earlier reactors of this type in order to progress towards a new generation of commercially viable sodium cooled fast reactor. Along with advancing a new generation of sodium cooled fast reactor, research and development on alternative fast reactor types such as gas or lead-alloy cooled systems (GFR & LFR) is strategic to overcome technical difficulties and/or political

  11. Study on environmental cost accounting under low-carbon economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhoukun

    2017-03-01

    With the strengthen of people's ability to use and transform nature, on the one hand, people acquire more resources from nature and make life more comfortable, on the other hand, the amount of waste that people emit has also increased rapidly. Excessive excavation of resources and disposal of waste emissions led to the deterioration of the environment, affecting the country's sustainable development and the Earth's ecological balance. In this paper, from the perspective of low-carbon economy, to explore corporate environmental cost recognition, measurement, collection, distribution methods, expectations for the relevant enterprises, especially high-polluting, high-emission energy-based enterprises to learn from.

  12. Research on Development of Low-carbon Tourism of Jiangxi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-ping, Xiong

    2017-03-01

    Jiangxi is rich in tourism resources. A lot of tourists are attracted to Jiangxi for sightseeing and traveling, which has not only brought economic benefits, but also caused damage to the beautiful ecological environment of Jiangxi to a certain extent. This paper analyzes the rich resources and policies of Jiangxi and the problem of environmental disruption faced by the tourism development of Jiangxi. On this basis, the paper suggests the concept and measures for promoting the low-carbon tourism of Jiangxi so that the tourism industry of Jiangxi can develop sustainably.

  13. Seoul: Public policies to walk through a low carbon era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guadalupe Figueroa González

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic and demographic growth that Seoul has experienced in recent decades has led to an increase in demand and energy consumption at the expense of the environment. In accordance with national green growth vision, Seoul is implementing a number of strategies that involve various actors for the transition to a low carbon era. The paper addresses Korea’s vision for green growth, analyzes presidential leadership to articulate policies in the domestic and international level and the actions executed locally by the Seoul Metropolitan Government.

  14. Fusion power in a future low carbon global electricity system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabal, H.; Lechón, Y.; Bustreo, C.

    2017-01-01

    Fusion is one of the technologies that may contribute to a future, low carbon, global energy supply system. In this article we investigate the role that it may play under different scenarios. The global energy model ETM (originally EFDA TIMES Model) has been used to analyse the participation...... of fusion technologies in the global electricity system in the long term. Results show that fusion technologies penetration is higher in scenarios with stricter CO2 emissions reduction targets. In addition, investment costs and discount rates of fusion technologies are key factors for fusion implementation....... Finally, the main competitors for fusion in future are Carbon Capture and Storage and fission technologies....

  15. Local hardening evaluation of carbon steels by using frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Yuji; Kudo, Yuki; Enokizono, Masato

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents our proposed frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method (FSES method) by a magnetic sensor for non-destructive testing of hardened low carbon steels. This method can evaluate the magnetic properties of low carbon steels which were changed after induction heating treatment. It was examined by our proposed method that the degrees of yield strength of low carbon steels were varied depending on hardened conditions. Moreover, it was made clear that the maximum magnetic field strength, Hmax, derived from the measured B-H loops was very sensitive to the hardening if the surface of the samples were flat.

  16. Key factors of low carbon development strategy for sustainable transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaveewatanaseth, K.; Limjirakan, S.

    2018-02-01

    Cities become more vulnerable to climate change impacts causing by urbanization, economic growth, increasing of energy consumption and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. People who live in the cities have already been affected from the impacts in terms of socioeconomic and environmental aspects. Sustainable transport plays the key role in CO2 mitigation and contributes positive impacts on sustainable development for the cities. Several studies in megacities both in developed and developing countries support that mass transit system is an important transportation mode in CO2 mitigation and sustainable transport development. This paper aims to study key factors of low carbon development strategy for sustainable transport. The Bangkok Mass Rapid Transit System (MRT) located in Bangkok was the study area. Data collection was using semi-structured in-depth interview protocol with thirty respondents consisting of six groups i.e. governmental agencies, the MRT operators, consulting companies, international organizations, non-profit organizations, and experts. The research findings highlighted the major factors and supplemental elements composing of institution and technical capacity, institutional framework, policy setting and process, and plan of implementation that would support more effective strategic process for low carbon development strategy (LCDS) for sustainable transport. The study would highly recommend on readiness of institution and technical capacities, stakeholder mapping, high-level decision- makers participation, and a clear direction of the governmental policies that are strongly needed in achieving the sustainable transport.

  17. Low Carbon-Economy Development: China's Pattern and Policy Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Xiangsheng

    2013-01-01

    For a developing country such as China, it is important to select a fair pattern that is suitable for China's national conditions for low carbon-economy development, as it has a direct impact on the success (or not) of low carbon-economy development. This research shows that, under the real-life conditions of China's development, different development patterns should be practised depending on specific socioeconomic conditions. Among them, one of the most critical issues is how to make full use of natural forces, and thus the nature-oriented development pattern should be practised in full. At the same time, China should still practise either the single regional differential or the multi-regional linkage development pattern under different conditions and either the imposed or the induced development pattern at the different stages of development. - Highlights: • It is particularly important to select a suitable development pattern. • Nature-oriented development pattern should be selected. • Single regional differentiation-typed or multi-regional linkage-typed pattern should be selected. • Either the imposed pattern or the induced pattern of development will be selected

  18. Positioning Nuclear Power in the Low-Carbon Electricity Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviel Verbruggen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing climate change requires de-carbonizing future energy supplies in an increasingly energy-dependent world. The IEA and the IPCC (2014 mention the following as low-carbon energy supply options: ‘renewable energy, nuclear power and fossil fuels with carbon capture and storage’. Positioning nuclear power in the decarbonization transition is a problematic issue and is overridden by ill-conceived axioms. Before probing these axioms, we provide an overview of five major, postwar energy-related legacies and some insight into who is engaged in nuclear activities. We check whether low-carbon nuclear power passes the full sustainability test and whether it is compatible with the unfettered deployment of variable renewable power sourced from the sun and from wind and water currents, which delivers two negative answers. We show that the best approach of the sustainable energy transition was Germany’s 2011 decision to phase out nuclear power for a fast development and full deployment of renewable power. This is the best approach for the sustainable energy transition. We offer five practical suggestions to strengthen and accelerate carbon- and nuclear-free transitions. They are related to institutional issues like the role of cost-benefit analysis and the mission of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to the costs of nuclear risks and catastrophes, and to the historical record of nuclear technology and business.

  19. Scenarios for low carbon and low water electric power plant ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the water-energy nexus, water use for the electric power sector is critical. Currently, the operational phase of electric power production dominates the electric sector's life cycle withdrawal and consumption of fresh water resources. Water use associated with the fuel cycle and power plant equipment manufacturing phase is substantially lower on a life cycle basis. An outstanding question is: how do regional shifts to lower carbon electric power mixes affect the relative contribution of the upstream life cycle water use? To test this, we examine a range of scenarios comparing a baseline with scenarios of carbon reduction and water use constraints using the MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) energy systems model with ORD's 2014 U.S. 9-region database (EPAUS9r). The results suggest that moving toward a low carbon and low water electric power mix may increase the non-operational water use. In particular, power plant manufacturing water use for concentrating solar power, and fuel cycle water use for biomass feedstock, could see sharp increases under scenarios of high deployment of these low carbon options. Our analysis addresses the following questions. First, how does moving to a lower carbon electricity generation mix affect the overall regional electric power water use from a life cycle perspective? Second, how does constraining the operational water use for power plants affect the mix, if at all? Third, how does the life cycle water use differ among regions under

  20. A proposal to finance low carbon investment in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aglietta, Michel; Espagne, Etienne; Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste

    2015-02-01

    This year, Europe is confronted with a critical double challenge: addressing the climate change issue and pulling itself out of a persistent low growth trap. Today these two challenges are addressed separately. On the one hand, climate negotiations must reach a historical agreement in the Paris conference in December 2015. On the other hand, the Juncker Plan of 315 billion euros of investment, and above all the ECB announcement of a massive purchase of assets for an amount of around 1100 billion euros, must help to avoid a deflationary spiral and stimulate a new flow of investments. Regarding climate policies, public regulators have essentially focused on a carbon price, which remains today at an insufficient level to trigger the financing needs of the low carbon transition. The potential of the banking and saving channels (targets of the asset purchase program of the ECB) to scale up climate finance is however neglected. This 'Note d'analyse' proposes to make private low-carbon assets eligible for the ECB asset purchase program. The carbon impact of these assets would benefit from a public guarantee that would value their carbon externality at a level sufficient to compensate the absence of an adequate carbon price. This mechanism would immediately impact the investment decisions of private actors with a positive effect on growth. It would also strongly incite governments to progressively implement carbon pricing tools to ensure that the public backing of the value of the carbon assets remains neutral with respect to public budgets. (authors)

  1. Methodological review of UK and international low carbon scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, Nick; Strachan, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Scenarios have a long history in business, politics and military planning, as a tool for strategic planning to inform protective, proactive or consensus-based decision making in the face of uncertain futures. Recent years have seen a growth in scenarios for assessing the implications of low carbon futures, but relatively little work has linked these energy scenarios to the broader literature on scenario development. This paper undertakes a methodological review of a selection of UK and international low carbon scenario studies, using a typology of 'trend based', 'technical feasibility' and 'modelling' studies. Dominant methodologies in such studies have been the 2x2 axis and the 'back-casting' approach. Strengths of the studies reviewed include technological detail, and identification of key economic and social constraints. Weaknesses include the over-reliance on constructs such as exogenous emissions constraints, and high level trends, which diminish the ability to understand how the various future scenarios could be brought about or avoided. This is compounded by the lack of depiction of specific system actors; the tendency to abstract policy from the scenarios; and the resulting failure to consider policy, technology and behaviour in an iterative, 'co-evolving' fashion.

  2. Delivering a secure electricity supply on a low carbon pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boston, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The energy system can only be considered sustainable in the long term if it is low carbon, affordable and secure. These three create a complex trilemma for all stakeholders in the energy business who have to strike a careful balance without neglecting any one aspect. This discussion paper examines the issues surrounding security of supply of the power system which has received less attention than the other aspects. It looks at how threats and mitigation measures can be classified in terms of where they act on the supply chain and the timescale over which they act. Only by considering the full range of timescales from seconds to decades can the full picture emerge of the effects of new technologies on security of supply. An examination of blackouts over the past 40 years sheds light on the causes of failure to supply and the most vulnerable aspects of the supply chain. - Highlights: ► Energy systems are only sustainable if they are low carbon, affordable and secure. ► Threats to security can be classified by timescale and position in the supply chain. ► The impact of new technologies on security must be considered across all timescales. ► Recent blackouts show the network is most vulnerable and weather the leading cause

  3. Paving the way for low-carbon development strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tilburg, X.; Wuertenberger, L.; De Coninck, H.; Bakker, S.

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this report is to help move forward the discussion on low-carbon development strategies (LCDS) towards a useful climate policy instrument. It does so through a historical perspective on the use of an LCDS in a national and international context in order to provide high-level guidance to governments and experts who plan the development of an LCDS. The ultimate aim of a low-carbon development strategy is to catalyse concrete actions that support development with lower emissions. Therefore the process of LCDS development should not focus narrowly on producing a strategy document. Depending on the national context, an LCDS can serve different audiences and have different purposes, adding robustness to the attainment of mitigation actions. Rather than specifying a target or producing a document, an LCDS should provide a process that, depending on the developing country's readiness, meets needs to develop and to fill capacity, knowledge and information gaps. It should bring stakeholders from government, the private sector and civil society on the same page and eventually lead to greenhouse gas emissions that are lower compared to the situation in which the LCDS process had not been undertaken. International support could be sought for an LCDS process, but should not be made obligatory.

  4. Research of low-carbon transition path of star hotels--A case study of Guilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Fengling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A general trend of the world economic development is the low-carbon economic transition. With a wide influencing range and rapid development, the hotel industry has prominent problems in the energy con-sumption, resources occupancy and environmental unfriendliness, so it is imperative to develop low-carbon ho-tels. This paper proposes the low-carbon transition of the star hotels in Guilin in terms of constructing the energy conservation and innovative management mode, adopting new technologies and ways, developing low-carbon hotel products and guiding low-carbon consumption through analysis about the inevitability of establishing low-carbon hotels in Guilin, the running status of the existing star hotels and the situation of energy consumption, thus further promoting the development of low-carbon tourism in Guilin.

  5. Policy and innovation in low-carbon energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemet, Gregory Frank

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GhG) emissions by several gigatons of CO 2-equivalents per year, while affordably meeting the world's growing demand for energy, will require the deployment of tens of terawatts of low-carbon energy production and end-use technologies over the next several decades. But improvements are needed because existing technologies are expensive, limited in availability, or not sufficiently reliable for deployment at that scale. At the same time, the presence of multiple market failures implies that private actors will under-invest in climate-related innovation without government intervention. To help resolve this impasse, policy makers will need to select from a vast set of policy instruments that may stimulate innovation in, and adoption of, these technologies. In this thesis, four studies are used to contribute to understanding the characteristics of the innovation process---and its interactions with policy---for low-carbon energy technologies. These include analyses of: (1) the trends and future prospects for U.S. energy R&D investment, (2) the effectiveness of demand-pull for wind power in California, (3) the sources of cost reductions in photovoltaics (PV), and (4) the effect of widespread deployment of PV on the earth's albedo. When considering these studies together, the uncertainty in expectations about future policies that increases the risk for investments in innovation emerges as a central problem. As observed in multiple instances in this thesis, the lags between investments in innovation and the payoffs for private actors can last several years. These distant payoffs rely heavily on the status of future government policies because externalities are pervasive for the development of climate-relevant technologies. When expectations about the future level---or existence---of these policy instruments are uncertain, then firms discount the value of these future policies and under-invest in innovation. The diffusion of institutional innovation

  6. Assessment of technologies to meet a low carbon fuel standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P; Parker, Nathan C

    2009-09-15

    California's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) was designed to incentivize a diverse array of available strategies for reducing transportation greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It provides strong incentives for fuels with lower GHG emissions, while explicitly requiring a 10% reduction in California's transportation fuel GHG intensity by 2020. This paper investigates the potential for cost-effective GHG reductions from electrification and expanded use of biofuels. The analysis indicates that fuel providers could meetthe standard using a portfolio approach that employs both biofuels and electricity, which would reduce the risks and uncertainties associated with the progress of cellulosic and battery technologies, feedstock prices, land availability, and the sustainability of the various compliance approaches. Our analysis is based on the details of California's development of an LCFS; however, this research approach could be generalizable to a national U.S. standard and to similar programs in Europe and Canada.

  7. Energy modelling towards low carbon development of Beijing in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Guerrero, Josep M.; Jiang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    scenario 2030, (ii) BAU (business as usual) scenario 2030 and (iii) RES (renewable energies) scenario 2030. The results shows that the share of renewables can increase to 100% of electricity and heat production in the RE scenario. The primary fuel consumption is reduced to 155.9 TWh, which is 72 % of fuel......Beijing, as the capacity capital of China, is under the pressure of climate change and pollution. Nonrenewable energy generation and consumption is one of the most important sources of CO2 emissions, which cause climate changes. This paper presents a study on the energy system modeling towards...... renewable energy and low carbon development for the city of Beijing. The analysis of energy system modeling is organized in two steps to explore the potential renewable energy alternative in Beijing. Firstly, a reference energy system of Beijing is created based on the available data in 2014. The Energy...

  8. Low Carbon Energy Supply for South East Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Bačeković, I.; Ćosić, B.

    2015-01-01

    -neutral. Smart energy systems’ approach has been used in planning of 100% RES, which considers significant integration of the electrical, heating and gas sectors. Many technologies have been employed in the year 2050, but the major share is put on photovoltaics and wind energy, followed by geothermal, solar......South East Europe consists of several smaller countries in terms of energy systems and thus,integrating energy systems of the whole region has significant benefits for all the countries included. However, as there are large differences between energy mixes of the countries included, careful energy...... planning needs to be carried out in order to satisfy energy needs of all the countries of the region.Due to the significant differences in geography and the climate of different parts of the region, many different technologies need to be introduced in order to have optimal, low-carbon energy mix...

  9. Energy policies for low carbon sustainable transport in Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, P.R.; Dhar, Subash

    2015-01-01

    equivalent to 2 °C stabilization. Accounting for heterogeneity of national transport systems, these papers use diverse methods, frameworks and models to assess the response of the transport system to environmental policy, such as a carbon tax, as well as to a cluster of policies aimed at diverse development......Transformation of Asia's transport sector has vital implications for climate change, sustainable development and energy indicators. Papers in this special issue show how transport transitions in Asia may play out in different socio-economic and policy scenarios, including a low carbon scenario...... measures. Authors therefore advocate policies that target multiple dividends vis-à-vis carbon mitigation, energy security and local air quality. Whereas four papers focus on emissions mitigation policies, one paper examines challenges to adapt fast growing transport infrastructures to future climate change...

  10. Low-carbon energy generates public health savings in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Christina B.; Yang, Chris; Yeh, Sonia; Ogden, Joan; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2018-04-01

    California's goal to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to a level that is 80 % below 1990 levels by the year 2050 will require adoption of low-carbon energy sources across all economic sectors. In addition to reducing GHG emissions, shifting to fuels with lower carbon intensity will change concentrations of short-lived conventional air pollutants, including airborne particles with a diameter of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ozone (O3). Here we evaluate how business-as-usual (BAU) air pollution and public health in California will be transformed in the year 2050 through the adoption of low-carbon technologies, expanded electrification, and modified activity patterns within a low-carbon energy scenario (GHG-Step). Both the BAU and GHG-Step statewide emission scenarios were constructed using the energy-economic optimization model, CA-TIMES, that calculates the multi-sector energy portfolio that meets projected energy supply and demand at the lowest cost, while also satisfying scenario-specific GHG emissions constraints. Corresponding criteria pollutant emissions for each scenario were then spatially allocated at 4 km resolution to support air quality analysis in different regions of the state. Meteorological inputs for the year 2054 were generated under a Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 future climate. Annual-average PM2.5 and O3 concentrations were predicted using the modified emissions and meteorology inputs with a regional chemical transport model. In the final phase of the analysis, mortality (total deaths) and mortality rate (deaths per 100 000) were calculated using established exposure-response relationships from air pollution epidemiology combined with simulated annual-average PM2.5 and O3 exposure. Net emissions reductions across all sectors are -36 % for PM0.1 mass, -3.6 % for PM2.5 mass, -10.6 % for PM2.5 elemental carbon, -13.3 % for PM2.5 organic carbon, -13.7 % for NOx, and -27.5 % for NH3. Predicted deaths associated with air

  11. Energy modelling towards low carbon development of Beijing in 2030

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Guerrero, Josep M.; Jiang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Beijing, as the capital of China, is under the high pressure of climate change and pollution. The consumption of non-renewable energy is one of the most important sources of the CO2 emissions, which cause climate changes. This paper presents a study on the energy system modelling towards renewable...... scenario 2030, (ii) BAU (business as usual) scenario 2030, and (iii) RES (renewable energies) scenario 2030. The 100% renewable energy system with zero CO2 emission can be achieved by increasing solar energy, biomass and municipal solid waste (MSW) and optimizing heating system. The primary fuel...... energy and low carbon development for the city of Beijing. The analysis of energy system modelling is organized in two steps to explore the alternative renewable energy system in Beijing. Firstly, a reference energy system of Beijing is created based on the available data in 2014. The Energy...

  12. Gauging citizen support for a low carbon fuel standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, Ekaterina; Axsen, Jonn; Jaccard, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007, several variations of a low carbon fuel standard (LCFS) have been implemented around the world. While emerging research tends to focus on greenhouse gas emission reductions from an LCFS, no studies have assessed the policy's political acceptability—a critical component of implementation. We elicit public support for an existing LCFS in British Columbia and a hypothetical (proposed) LCFS for the rest of Canada using survey data collected from a representative sample of Canadian citizens (n=1306). Specifically, we assess: (1) citizen awareness of British Columbia's LCFS, (2) stated citizen support for the LCFS, and (3) how individual characteristics relate to levels of citizen support. We find that British Columbia's LCFS is almost unknown among British Columbia respondents, but once explained, 90% of respondents support it. We refer to this combination of low knowledge and high support as “passive support.” We find similarly broad support in all other Canadian provinces, implying that citizen opposition is unlikely in jurisdictions considering an LCFS. Statistical analysis identifies some individual characteristics associated with LCFS support, including attitudes, demographics, and contextual factors. Results indicate where policymakers might anticipate opposition if it arises due to increased policy stringency or media coverage. - Highlights: • Most citizens are unaware of British Columbia's low carbon fuel standard (LCFS). • We observe passive support: low awareness and high support of the policy. • An LCFS achieves broad support among British Columbia's and Canadian citizens. • Households relying on single occupancy vehicles are less likely to support an LCFS

  13. Status and outlook for Thailand's low carbon electricity development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawangphol, Narumitr; Pharino, Chanathip

    2011-01-01

    Thailand is facing an urgency to enhance its energy security and capacity to cope with global warming impacts, as demands on fossil fuel consumption keep rising. This paper reviewed the latest situation on renewable powers and developmental strategies toward low carbon electricity generation in Thailand. Government recently has spent tremendous financial and legislative supports to promote the uses of indigenous renewable energy resources and fuel diversification while contributing in reduction of global greenhouse gas. Major policy challenge is on which types of renewable energy should be more pronounced to ensure sustainable future of the country. Regions in Thailand present different potentials for renewable supply on biomass, municipal wastes, hydropower, and wind. To maximize renewable energy development in each area, location is matter. Currently, energy-derived biomass is widely utilized within the country, however if droughts happen more often and severe, it will not only affect food security but also energy security. Life cycle of biomass energy production may cause other social issues on land and chemical uses. Meanwhile, deployment of wind and solar energy has been slow and needs to speed up to the large extent in comparison with energy proportion from biomass. Nuclear power has already been included in the Thai power development plan 2010 (PDP-2010). However, public acceptance is a major issue. Setting up strategic renewable energy zone to support power producer according to pre-determined potential location may assist development direction. Furthermore, government has to strongly subsidize research and development to lower technology cost and promote private investment on renewable energy industry. In the future, revision of electricity price is needed to allow fair competition between non-renewable and renewable energy once subsidy programs are ended. Environmental tax according to fuel types could help government progressing toward low carbon

  14. Electrochemical evaluation for corrosion resistance of bacterial exopolysaccharides on low carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrosion is a global issue that affects safety and economics. There is an increasing demand for bio-based polymers for industrial applications and production of polymers by microorganisms is especially attractive. This work reports on the electrochemical and physical properties of 29 strains or fr...

  15. EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF A LOW CARBON STEEL WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BOUHALAIS

    2009-12-01

    microstructure of the material in as received and deformed conditions. It is found that tensile properties depend on the wiredrawing area reduction (τw. The annealing temperatures and the grain size are determined; they also vary with τw .

  16. Traditional, Barkhausen and MAT magnetic response to plastic deformation of low-carbon steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Oleksandr; Tomáš, Ivan; Pal'a, J.; Bydžovský, J.; Bošanský, J.; Šmída, T.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, Suppl. D (2004), D47-D50 ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech and Slovak Conference on Magnetism. Košice, 12.07.2004-15.07.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : plastic deformation * magnetic properties * Barkhausen noise Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  17. Austenite – ferrite transformation temperature regression equations for low carbon steels with cooling rate account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhumenský, P.; Kohútek, I.; Semeňák, J.

    2017-12-01

    The austenite-ferrite transformation temperatures evaluated by dilatometry using thermo-mechanical simulator Gleeble 1500D are investigated in this paper. The effect of cooling rates 1, 5, 10 and 15°C/s on the upper and lower critical transformation temperatures was evaluated for 30 specimens of six material groups. Considering the cooling rate from dilatometry tests and chemical composition (C ≤ 0.2%, Mn ≤ 2%, Si ≤ 0.26%) of particular specimens, the regression equations for both transformation temperatures were derived. These relations have to be satisfied to avoid the crack formation during continuous casting, as well as to provide the hot rolling control. The proposed regression equations are compared with 32 similar ones adopted from 1961 to 2017 and exhibit a good conformity and accuracy.

  18. Effects of Nitride on the Tribological Properties of the Low Carbon Alloy Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Yuh-Ping; Wang, Jin-Chi; Horng, Jeng-Haur; Chu, Li-Ming; Hwang, Yih-Chyun

    2013-01-01

    The technology of composite heat treatment is used popularly for low friction and wear resistance of drive elements. A large number of papers about the heat treatment technology had been proposed. Especially, the nitride treatment has been used widely for the purpose of wear resistance and low friction in the industry. Therefore, the self-developed vertical ball/disk friction tester with the measurement system was used to study the effects of nitride on the tribological properties of the low ...

  19. Processing of low carbon steel plate and hot strip—an overview

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ment of warm or ferrite rolling technology (Perry et al. 2000; Tomitz and Kaspar 2000) that has direct impact in substituting cold rolled and annealed products for market segments where a much higher drawability and surface finish are less demanding. The computer simulation and process modelling have made production ...

  20. Apparent Fracture Toughness of Low-carbon Steel CSN 411353 as Related to Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Siegl, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 32, 8/9 (2011), s. 4348-4353 ISSN 0261-3069 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052; GA ČR(CZ) GPP105/10/P555 Grant - others:GAMPO(CZ) FT-TA5/076 Program:FT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : corrosion * fracture * fractography Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2011

  1. Microbiological corrosion in low carbon steels; Corrosion microbiologica en aceros de bajo carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina-Custodio, O; Ortiz-Prado, A; Jacobo-Armendariz, V. H; Schouwenaars-Franssens, R [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: medina_1979@yahoo.com; armandoo@servidor.unam.mx; vjacobo@dgapa.unam.mx; raf_schouweenaars@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    The Microbiologically Induced Corrosion affects several industries, such as oil industry where it is estimated that 20% to 30% pipes failures are related with microorganism. The chemical reactions generate ions transfer, this validate the use of electrochemical technique for its analysis. Coupons submerged in a nutritional medium with presence and absence of three different microorganisms during two periods, 48 hours and 28 days were studied. Polarization resistance (Rp) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) techniques were applied to determine the corrosively of the systems. The results show a greater corrosive effect of abiotic systems, this indicates a microorganisms protection effect to the metal, opposite to the first hypothesis. This result was ratified observing surface coupons by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) technique. A possible mechanism based on Evans - Tafel graph is proposed to explain inhibitor microorganism effect. [Spanish] La corrosion microbiologica es un tipo comun de deterioro que afecta diversas industrias, una de ellas es la petrolera en la que se estiman que el 20% o 30% de fallas en las tuberias de trasporte de hidrocarburos es favorecida por microorganismos. Las reacciones quimicas que sustentan estos, generan transferencia de iones, lo que justifica el empleo de tecnicas electroquimicas para su analisis. En este trabajo, se estudiaron probetas de acero de bajo carbono SAE 1018, sumergidas en un medio nutritivo rico en cloruros en presencia y ausencia de tres diferentes cargas microbianas, en tiempos de exposicion de 48 horas y 28 dias. Se realizaron ensayos de resistencia a la polarizacion (Rp) y espectroscopia de impedancia electroquimica (EIS) para determinar el efecto corrosivo de los diferentes sistemas. Los resultados muestran que el medio abiotico causa el mayor efecto corrosivo, lo que indica un efecto protector de los microorganismos al metal contradiciendo la hipotesis inicialmente propuesta. La observacion de las superficies en el microscopio electronico de barrido (MEB) apoya lo obtenido por las tecnicas electroquimicas. Para explicar la disminucion de la corrosividad del medio en presencia de microorganismos se propone un posible mecanismo de polarizacion catodica.

  2. EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF A LOW CARBON STEEL WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H BOUHALAIS

    2011-12-01

    microstructure of the material in as received and deformed conditions. It is found that tensile properties depend on the wiredrawing area reduction (τw. The annealing temperatures and the grain size are determined; they also vary with τw .

  3. Lewis Acid-Base Properties of a Low Carbon Aluminium Killed Steel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An important factor in achieving maximum adhesion of a particular coating system to the substrate lies in the proper preparation of the substrate prior to the application of paint. The Lewis acid-base properties of the outer metal surface play a determinant role in many of these applications, and the chemical reactions involved ...

  4. Investing for a low carbon economy. Special issue COP21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guez, Herve; Basselier, Clotilde; Bennani, Zineb; Coeslier, Manuel; Dufour, Mathilde; Dunand-Chatellet, Lea; Guez, Herve; Lauverjat Celine; Ostiari, Emmanuelle; Smia, Ladislas; Bonnin, Marguerite; Briand, Marc; Favier, Julien; Finidori, Esther; Wigley, Chris; Dobie, Jacqueline; Mary Ellis, Susannah; Kiernan, Shannon; Lefer, Elizabeth; Perrin, Elsa; Treadwell, Christopher; Zerner, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Mirova, an asset management firm dedicated to responsible investment, has published today Investing in a low-carbon economy, a guide for investors to become COP21 compliant. Mirova's study provides an in-depth analysis highlighting the challenges of climate change and presents methods for investors to effectively measure their carbon footprint. Mirova offers a unique range of investment solutions promoting energy transition across all asset classes. COP21: mobilising private investors is a necessity To maintain the economy in a '2 degree' trajectory, it is vital to redirect savings towards companies and projects promoting energy transition. Philippe Zaouati, Head of Mirova explains: 'The energy transition can only succeed if we manage to mobilise private investors' savings. The success of COP21 therefore also depends on the ability of asset management firms to propose solutions in response to the climate challenge, whilst delivering the returns expected by investors'. Accurately measuring your carbon footprint. In response to growing demands on investors to make greener investments, Mirova, in partnership with the leading carbon strategy specialist consultant Carbone 4, has developed an innovative methodology to measure the carbon footprint of an investment portfolio. This decision-making tool assesses a company's contribution to the reduction of global greenhouse gas emissions (GGE). Measuring the overall impact of a business on the environment is an essential step towards acting against global warming. Assessing the carbon footprint is therefore an indispensable stage in the construction of portfolios contributing to energy transition. Low-carbon investments across all asset classes In order to redirect capital towards investments promoting energy transition, Mirova is proposing solutions involving all asset classes: - Renewable energy infrastructures: 100% low carbon allocation For more than 10 years now, Mirova has provided

  5. A Low Carbon EU Energy System and Unconventional Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracceva, F.; Kanudia, A.; Tosato, GC.

    2013-01-01

    The paper investigates the potential role of unconventional fossil fuels in a global low carbon energy system. Making use of a systemic approach, the paper presents an original application of a global partial equilibrium energy system model (TIAM-JET). In order to give a worldwide perspective with higher detail on European energy systems, the model links a set of extra-European macro-regions to the 30 European countries. First, a review of the most recent estimates of the available stocks of unconventional hydrocarbon resources is used to build the set of assumption for the scenario analysis. Secondly, a set of scenarios assuming different availability and cost of unconventional fuels are added to both a Current Trend scenario and a Carbon Constrained (CC) scenario, to explore the perspectives of unconventional gas and oil in a scenario halving CO 2 emissions by 2050, which is consistent with a 2 degree temperature increase. The results show if/how unconventional sources can contribute to the robustness of the European energy system with respect to the stress of a strong carbon constraint. We define this robustness as the capacity of the energy system to adapt its evolution to long-term constraints and keep delivering energy services to end users. In our approach robustness represents the long-term dimension of energy security. Assessing this ''system property'' requires analysing the wide range of factors that can exercise a stabilizing influence on the energy services delivery system, together with their relations, actual interactions and synergies. The energy system approach used for the analysis seeks to take into account as much of this complexity as possible. We assess the robustness of the EU system to the carbon constraint by looking at how the CC scenario affects energy system costs and energy prices under scenarios with different deployment of unconventional sources. This provides insights on the synergies and/or trade-offs between energy security and

  6. The US Electricity Industry and the Low-Carbon Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Carole

    2016-04-01

    While the wave of liberalisation produced a fragmented, but now stabilised, industrial landscape, the US power sector is about to undergo another major transformation with the low-carbon transition. Against a background of combined weak demand for electricity, a boom in distributed solar PV power and a decline in the profitability of merchant assets, incumbent stakeholders are currently dealing with further questions about the future of their business models. Driven as much by market forces as by government support mechanisms, these destabilising factors have an impact, which is still difficult to assess, but the need to control future transformation is already at the heart of debate. In areas where output is priced on the wholesale markets, new tools are being studied to secure compensation for some power stations, with the issue of possible excessive dependency on natural gas in the background. At the same time, an increasing number of states are questioning the design of their support mechanisms for distributed energy. If net metering, the main support mechanism for distributed solar PV power, has been a resounding success because of its simplicity, it is now criticised because of the problems of covering grid costs and the cross-subsidies it leads to. Although reforms are always difficult to implement, since they involve a conflict of increasingly organised interests, consensus is beginning to emerge regarding the structure of retail sales tariffs. Nevertheless, calls for an assessment of distributed generation according to its actual value for the system are increasing, without any real convergence of views on the methodology to be adopted to date. Conventional stakeholders are also looking to adapt in order to find growth opportunities where primarily only challenges appear. The diversification of activities is an important lever for transformation, even if the case of NRG Energy illustrates the difficulty in making strategic shifts while maintaining

  7. Research of low-carbon transition path of star hotels--A case study of Guilin

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Fengling

    2016-01-01

    A general trend of the world economic development is the low-carbon economic transition. With a wide influencing range and rapid development, the hotel industry has prominent problems in the energy con-sumption, resources occupancy and environmental unfriendliness, so it is imperative to develop low-carbon ho-tels. This paper proposes the low-carbon transition of the star hotels in Guilin in terms of constructing the energy conservation and innovative management mode, adopting new technologie...

  8. China in the transition to a low-carbon economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongxiang

    2010-01-01

    China, from its own perspective cannot afford to and, from an international perspective, is not allowed to continue on the conventional path of encouraging economic growth at the expense of the environment. Instead, China needs to transform its economy to effectively address concern about a range of environmental problems from burning fossil fuels and steeply rising oil import and international pressure on it to exhibit greater ambition in fighting global climate change. This paper first discusses China's own efforts towards energy saving and pollutants cutting, the widespread use of renewable energy and participation in clean development mechanism, and puts carbon reductions of China's unilateral actions into perspective. Given that that transition to a low carbon economy cannot take place overnight, the paper then discusses China's policies on promoting the use of clean coal technologies and nuclear power. Based on these discussions, the paper provides some recommendations on issues related to energy conservation and pollution control, wind power, nuclear power and clean coal technologies and articulates a roadmap for China regarding its climate commitments to 2050.

  9. Challenges to China's transition to a low carbon electricity system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahrl, Fredrich; Williams, Jim; Ding Jianhua; Hu Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    We examine the challenges to China's transition to a low carbon electricity system, in which renewable energy would play a significant role. China's electricity system currently lacks the flexibility in planning, operations, and pricing to respond to conflicting pressures from demand growth, rising costs, and environmental mandates in a way that simultaneously maintains reliability, decarbonizes the system, and keeps prices within acceptable bounds. Greater flexibility crucially requires the ability to more systematically and transparently manage and allocate costs. This will require re-orientating sector institutions still rooted in central planning, and strengthening independent regulation. Some of the necessary changes require fundamental political and legal reforms beyond the scope of energy policy. However, the system's flexibility can still be increased through the development of traditional planning and regulatory tools and approaches, such as an avoided cost basis for energy efficiency investments, more integrated planning to improve the coordination of generation, transmission, and demand-side investments, and a transparent ratemaking process. The judicious application of OECD electricity sector experience and skills can support these developments. - Research highlights: → China's electricity system currently lacks the flexibility to integrate renewables and reduce CO 2 emissions on a large scale at an acceptable cost and level of reliability. → The challenges to increased flexibility are more institutional than technological. → Chinese government agencies need new approaches to basic power system planning and ratemaking. → OECD countries can help address these challenges through the transfer of 'soft' technologies.

  10. LOW-CARBON ECONOMY IN THE MUNICIPALITY OF SUCHA BESKIDZKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Petryk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of proecological activities undertaken by the management of the Municipality of Sucha Beskidzka. The activites aimed at limiting low emission and, consequent-ly, at introducing low-carbon economy in the area. The municipality is determined to phase out the burning of fossil fuels and replace it with cleaner and safer energy sources, which is sup-posed to contribute to the reduction of PM10 and PM2.5 particulate matter emissions and air pollution. To combat the problem of low emission, the municipality developed a Low Emission Reduction Programme (LERP in 2014. The town of Sucha Beskidzka also participates in the Life Program and as part of it, an eco-adviser has been employed. The implementation of LERP has been reflected in the Area Development Plan of the municipality. Actions taken by the local government to protect air are effective. The Municipality of Sucha Beskidzka was one of the two municipalities in the entire Malopolska province which fully implemented the Air Protection Program for the years 2013-2015. In the years 2014-2016 as many as 103 buildings underwent thermo-modernization. In 2016 RES (solar installations were installed in 402 detached houses. In the period 2014-2016, 1 055 coal boilers were dismantled and replaced by gas boilers or 5th class boilers.

  11. Positioning infrastructure and technologies for low-carbon urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Mikhail V.; Sperling, Josh; Stokes, Eleanor; Allenby, Braden; Kockelman, Kara; Kennedy, Christopher; Baker, Lawrence A.; Keirstead, James; Hendrickson, Chris T.

    2014-10-01

    The expected urbanization of the planet in the coming century coupled with aging infrastructure in developed regions, increasing complexity of man-made systems, and pressing climate change impacts have created opportunities for reassessing the role of infrastructure and technologies in cities and how they contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Modern urbanization is predicated on complex, increasingly coupled infrastructure systems, and energy use continues to be largely met from fossil fuels. Until energy infrastructures evolve away from carbon-based fuels, GHG emissions are critically tied to the urbanization process. Further complicating the challenge of decoupling urban growth from GHG emissions are lock-in effects and interdependencies. This paper synthesizes state-of-the-art thinking for transportation, fuels, buildings, water, electricity, and waste systems and finds that GHG emissions assessments tend to view these systems as static and isolated from social and institutional systems. Despite significant understanding of methods and technologies for reducing infrastructure-related GHG emissions, physical, institutional, and cultural constraints continue to work against us, pointing to knowledge gaps that must be addressed. This paper identifies three challenge themes to improve our understanding of the role of infrastructure and technologies in urbanization processes and position these increasingly complex systems for low-carbon growth. The challenges emphasize how we can reimagine the role of infrastructure in the future and how people, institutions, and ecological systems interface with infrastructure.

  12. Green growth: Policies for transition towards low carbon economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Thorvald

    2012-11-01

    For the next fifty years and beyond, the world faces twin challenges: -Enhancing economic opportunities and living standards for a growing global population; -Addressing the environmental threats that, if left largely unaddressed, could undermine our abilities for longer term economic growth and development and the ability to reduce poverty. For twenty years the world community has attempted to face up to these challenges, notably global warming by a 'top down' international negotiation process under the auspices of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The paper discusses why this process has failed so far. To get out of this impasse, a 'bottom up' policy framework for green growth based on national preferences, possibilities and policies should be considered and is discussed in some detail. However, while green growth may enhance the transition towards low-carbon economies in the short and medium term, it is argued that a 'Global Green Deal' with regional and global rules of the game is needed to reduce the risk for unsustainable development in the longer term.(auth)

  13. Nuclear energy for a low-carbon France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faudon, Valerie; Jouette, Isabelle; Le Ngoc, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This publication states the opinion of the SFEN (the French Society of Nuclear Energy) about the implementation of the French Multi-year Energy Programming (PPE). The authors first outline that the PPE must firstly aim at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. As a second point, they outline that the PPE must remain flexible in order to be able to face uncertainties related to supply (growth of renewable energies) and demand (economic recovery, pace of energetic installation renewal), and to guard against energy-related events (oil shocks, Russian-Ukrainian crisis, and so on) through a right planning of the energy mix diversification with taking the improvement of economic and technological performance of renewable energies into account. As a third point, they outline that nuclear energy is the base of a low-carbon France. They finally discuss perspectives to strengthen this base by a sustained investment in the nuclear fleet, in the fuel recycling sector, and in research for the development of a new generation of reactors

  14. Bridging analytical approaches for low-carbon transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geels, Frank W.; Berkhout, Frans; van Vuuren, Detlef P.

    2016-06-01

    Low-carbon transitions are long-term multi-faceted processes. Although integrated assessment models have many strengths for analysing such transitions, their mathematical representation requires a simplification of the causes, dynamics and scope of such societal transformations. We suggest that integrated assessment model-based analysis should be complemented with insights from socio-technical transition analysis and practice-based action research. We discuss the underlying assumptions, strengths and weaknesses of these three analytical approaches. We argue that full integration of these approaches is not feasible, because of foundational differences in philosophies of science and ontological assumptions. Instead, we suggest that bridging, based on sequential and interactive articulation of different approaches, may generate a more comprehensive and useful chain of assessments to support policy formation and action. We also show how these approaches address knowledge needs of different policymakers (international, national and local), relate to different dimensions of policy processes and speak to different policy-relevant criteria such as cost-effectiveness, socio-political feasibility, social acceptance and legitimacy, and flexibility. A more differentiated set of analytical approaches thus enables a more differentiated approach to climate policy making.

  15. Evaluation criteria of structural steel reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zav'yalov, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Different low-carbon and medium-carbon structural steels are investigated. It is stated that steel reliability evaluation criteria depend on the fracture mode, steel suffering from the brittle fracture under the influence of the stresses (despite their great variety) arising in articles during the production and operation. Fibrous steel fracture at the given temperature and article thickness says about its high ductility and toughness and brittle fractures are impossible. Brittle fractures take place in case of a crystalline and mixed fracture with a predominant crystalline component. Evaluation methods of article and sample steel structural strength differing greatly from real articles in a thickness (diameter) or used at temperatures higher than possible operation temperatures cannot be reliability evaluation criteria because at a great thickness (diameter) and lower operation temperatures steel fracture and its strain mode can change resulting in a sharp reliability degradation

  16. Scenarios of technology adoption towards low-carbon cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohareb, Eugene A.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Technological change has often been presented as a readily accepted means by which long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions can be achieved. Cities are the future centers of economic growth, with the global population becoming predominantly urban; hence, increases or reductions of GHG emissions are tied to their energy strategies. This research examines the likelihood of a developed world city (the Greater Toronto Area) achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions through policy-enabled technological change. Emissions are examined from 3 major sources: light duty passenger vehicles, residential buildings and commercial/institutional buildings. Logistic diffusion curves are applied for the adoption of alternative vehicle technologies, building retrofits and high performance new building construction. This research devises high, low and business-as-usual estimates of future technological adoption and finds that even aggressive scenarios are not sufficient to achieve an 80% reduction in GHG emissions by 2050. This further highlights the challenges faced in maintaining a relatively stable climate. Urban policy makers must consider that the longer the lag before this transition occurs, the greater the share of GHG emissions mitigation that must addressed through behavioural change in order to meet the 2050 target, which likely poses greater political challenges. - Highlights: • Explores policy options in a city targeting an 80% GHG emission reduction target by 2050. • Aggressive building code changes will have minimal impact on GHG mitigation. • Support of low-carbon electricity for the majority of generation necessary by 2050. • Internal combustion engine use must be mostly eliminated from the vehicle stock. • Policies supporting elimination of physical exchange space should be promoted

  17. California's Low-Carbon Fuel Standard - Compliance Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcover, J.; Yeh, S.

    2013-12-01

    Policies to incentivize lower carbon transport fuels have become more prevalent even as they spark heated debate over their cost and feasibility. California's approach - performance-based regulation called the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) - has proved no exception. The LCFS aims to achieve 10% reductions in state transport fuel carbon intensity (CI) by 2020, by setting declining annual CI targets, and rewarding fuels for incremental improvements in CI beyond the targets while penalizing those that fail to meet requirements. Even as debate continues over when new, lower carbon fuels will become widely available at commercial scale, California's transport energy mix is shifting in gradual but noticeable ways under the LCFS. We analyze the changes using available data on LCFS fuels from the California Air Resources Board and other secondary sources, beginning in 2011 (the first compliance year). We examine trends in program compliance (evaluated through carbon credits and deficits generated), and relative importance of various transport energy pathways (fuel types and feedstocks, and their CI ratings, including new pathways added since the program's start). We document a roughly 2% decline in CI for gasoline and diesel substitutes under the program, with compliance achieved through small shifts toward greater reliance on fuels with lower CI ratings within a relatively stable amount of transport energy derived from alternatives to fossil fuel gasoline and diesel. We also discuss price trends in the nascent LCFS credit market. The results are important to the broader policy debate about transportation sector response to market-based policies aimed at reducing the sector's greenhouse gas emissions.

  18. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  19. Analysis and study of low-carbon clothing design and fashion lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbon is not only a slogan, but also a global action to protect the environment. In the clothing industry, low-carbon clothing design has drawn public focus and it also conveyed the notion that we should respect for nature and advocate the concept of conservation. Through the analysis and study of low-carbon clothing design, it comes to two conclusions: On the subjective aspect, low-carbon design consciousness of designers which humanization of costume design, design clothing beyond beauty, thinking and caring about people; on the objective aspects, low-carbon clothing design is analyzed in three main aspects: fabric, color and styling. It is necessary to put low-carbon concept into people’s behavior consciousness and let the slow fashion environmental concept return back to people’s fashion lifestyle, so that consumers can look for their self-positioning and rational thinking. Therefore, the design of low-carbon clothing should be raised to the design of humanistic care to ensure that low-carbon concept is a global need and responsibility.

  20. Impact assessment of the carbon reduction strategy for transport, low carbon transport : a greener future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This is an impact assessment for the Carbon Reduction Strategy for Transport (DfT, 2009), Low Carbon Transport: A Greener Future, which is part of the UK Governments wider UK Low Carbon Transition Plan (DECC, 2009), Britains path to ta...

  1. Transition to a low-carbon city: lessons learned from Suzhou in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Wenling, Wenling; Wang Can,; Xie Xi,; Mol, A.P.J.; Chen Jining,

    2012-01-01

    Climate change has become one of the most serious challenges facing humanity; developing a low-carbon economy provides new opportunities for addressing this issue. Building a low-carbon city has been pursued by people with a high degree of enthusiasm in China. Different from actions at the national

  2. Designing trust: how strategic intermediaries choreograph homeowners’ low-carbon retrofit experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, de M.; Spaargaren, G.

    2018-01-01

    In the Netherlands, as in other European countries, the uncertain, fragmented character of the low-carbon retrofit market hampers a transition towards sustainable housing. Connecting homeowners to supply-side actors of low-carbon retrofit procedures, products and technologies in ways satisfactory to

  3. Controlling the mechanical properties of carbon steel by thermomechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balavar, Mohsen; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2018-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing and heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon steel was studied. It was revealed that the dual phase ferritic-martensitic microstructure shows a good combination of tensile strength and ductility along with superior work hardening response. On the other hand, the bimodal-sized structure containing ultrafine grained (UFG) and micron-sized ferrite phase can be easily produced by cold rolling and annealing of the dual phase starting microstructure. This steel showed high yield stress, tensile strength, and ductility, but poor work hardening ability. The full annealed ferritic-pearlitic sheet with banded morphology exhibited low strength and high total elongation with the appearance of the yield point phenomenon. The martensitic steels, however, had high tensile strength and low ductility. By comparing the tensile properties of these steels, it was shown that it is possible to control the mechanical properties of low carbon steel by simple processing routes.

  4. Fuzzy evaluation of low carbon development levels for logistic enterprises in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Under the background of global warming, low carbon economy, which is based on low waste and low pollution, has become a globally focused topic. Energy conservation, emission reduction and low carbon development have become irresistible trends of social development. A new set of low carbon evaluation index system for logistics enterprises is proposed. It is helpful for the better monitor of low carbon production and provide the optimization of industrial policies in China.Design/methodology/approach: Based on the problem that logistic analyses are facing under the background of low carbon economy, this paper firstly establishes a set of new evaluation indexes system, including 5 first-level indices and 28 second-level indices, for the low carbon development levels of logistics enterprises in China. To simplify the new evaluation system, the weight judgment method is then used to select indices, the validity judgment method and reliability coefficient judgment method are respectively used to test the validity and reliability of the evaluation systems. The simplified evaluation system consists of 4 first-class indices and 20 second-class indexes. Finally, numerical examples illustrate the validity and operability of the evaluation system.Findings: From the analysis and evaluation results, it is not difficult to obtain the rank of logistics enterprise according to the selected indexes or the overall evaluation indices. Low scores of some key indexes in strategy indices and technical indices cause low carbon emission performance. Moreover, The reason for the good low carbon performance of one enterprises is that it is in the lead on the key indexes of high weighs such as Perfection degree of low carbon development strategy, Level of transportation route optimization, etc. The new evaluation index system also helps enterprises to realize the sustainable development by identifying the key factors that affect the low carbon development level

  5. Industrial trial to produce a low clinker, low carbon cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vizcaíno-Andrés, L. M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary assessment of conditions for the industrial manufacture of a new cementitious system based on clinker-calcined clay and limestone, developed by the authors, referred as “low carbon cement” is presented. The new cement enables the substitution of more than 50% of the mass of clinker without compromising performance. The paper presents the follow-up of an industrial trial carried out in Cuba to produce 130 tonnes of the new cement at a cement plant. The new material proved to fulfill national standards in applications such as the manufacture of hollow concrete blocks and precast concrete. No major differences either in the rheological or mechanical properties were found when compared with Portland cement. Environmental assessment of the ternary cement was made, which included comparison with other blended cements produced industrially in Cuba. The new cement has proven to contribute to the reduction of above 30% of carbon emissions on cement manufacture.Se presenta la evaluación preliminar de las condiciones de fabricación industrial de un nuevo sistema cementicio a partir del empleo de clínquer; arcillas calcinadas y piedra caliza; desarrollado por los autores; denominado “cemento de bajo carbono”. El nuevo cemento posibilita la reducción de más de un 50% de la masa de clínquer; sin comprometer el comportamiento del material. El presente trabajo presenta el monitoreo de la producción industrial en una planta en Cuba; de 130 t del nuevo cemento. El cemento obtenido cumple con las regulaciones nacionales de calidad y su empleo tiene similar rendimiento que el cemento Pórtland para la producción de bloques y hormigón de 25 MPa. Se realiza el análisis de impacto ambiental del cemento ternario mediante la comparación con otros cementos producidos industrialmente. El nuevo cemento puede contribuir a la reducción de más del 30% de las emisiones de CO2 asociadas a la manufactura de cemento.

  6. Low carbon society scenario 2050 in Thai industrial sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvakkumaran, Sujeetha; Limmeechokchai, Bundit; Masui, Toshihiko; Hanaoka, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thai industrial sector has been modelled using AIM/Enduse model. • Potential mitigation of CO 2 for 2050 is approximately 20% from Baseline scenario. • Abatement cost curves show that varied counter measures are practical in the industrial sector. • Energy security is enhanced due to CO 2 mitigation in the LCS scenario. - Abstract: Energy plays a dominant role in determining the individual competitiveness of a country and this is more relevant to emerging economies. That being said, energy also plays an important and ever expanding role in carbon emissions and sustainability of the country. As a developing country Thailand’s industrial sector is vibrant and robust and consumes majority of the energy. In addition, it also has the highest CO 2 emissions, provided the emissions of power generation are taken into account. Industry also accounts for the highest consumption of electricity in Thailand. The objective of this study is to model the Thai industrial energy sector and estimate the mitigation potential for the timeframe of 2010–2050 using the principles of Low Carbon Society (LCS). In addition, the paper would also evaluate emission tax as a key driver of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation along with Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) analysis. Another secondary objective is to analyse the impact of mitigation on energy security of the industrial sector. The Thai industrial sector was modelled using AIM/Enduse model, which is a recursive dynamic optimisation model belonging to the Asia–Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) family. Thai industrial sector was divided into nine sub-sectors based on national economic reporting procedures. Results suggest that the mitigation potential in 2050, compared to the Baseline scenario, is around 20% with positive impacts on energy security. The Baseline emission will approximately be 377 Mt-CO 2 in the industrial sector. All four indicators of energy security, Primary Energy Intensity, Carbon Intensity, Oil

  7. Facilitating Low-Carbon Living? A Comparison of Intervention Measures in Different Community-Based Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schäfer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of facilitating a shift towards sustainable housing, food and mobility has been taken up by diverse community-based initiatives ranging from “top-down” approaches in low-carbon municipalities to “bottom-up” approaches in intentional communities. This paper compares intervention measures in four case study areas belonging to these two types, focusing on their potential of re-configuring daily housing, food, and mobility practices. Taking up critics on dominant intervention framings of diffusing low-carbon technical innovations and changing individual behavior, we draw on social practice theory for the empirical analysis of four case studies. Framing interventions in relation to re-configuring daily practices, the paper reveals differences and weaknesses of current low-carbon measures of community-based initiatives in Germany and Austria. Low-carbon municipalities mainly focus on introducing technologies and offering additional infrastructure and information to promote low-carbon practices. They avoid interfering into residents’ daily lives and do not restrict carbon-intensive practices. In contrast, intentional communities base their interventions on the collective creation of shared visions, decisions, and rules and thus provide social and material structures, which foster everyday low-carbon practices and discourage carbon-intensive ones. The paper discusses the relevance of organizational and governance structures for implementing different types of low-carbon measures and points to opportunities for broadening current policy strategies.

  8. An Empirical Study on Low-Carbon: Human Resources Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbon logistics meets the requirements of a low-carbon economy and is the most effective operating model for logistic development to achieve sustainability by coping with severe energy consumption and global warming. Low-carbon logistics aims to reduce carbon intensity rather than simply reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. Human resources are an important part of the great competition in the logistics market and significantly affect the operations of enterprises. Performance evaluations of human resources are particularly important for low-carbon logistics enterprises with scarce talents. Such evaluations in these enterprises are of great significance for their strategic development. This study constructed a human resource performance evaluation system to assess non-managerial employees’ low-carbon job capacity, job performance, and job attitude in the low-carbon logistics sector. The case study results revealed that the investigated company enjoyed initial success after having promoted low-carbon concepts and values to its non-managerial employees, and the success was demonstrated by excellent performance in its employees’ job attitude and knowledge. This study adopts the AHP method to reasonably determine an indicator system of performance evaluation and its weight to avoid certain human-caused bias. This study not only fills the gap in the related literature, but can also be applied to industrial practice.

  9. An Empirical Study on Low-Carbon: Human Resources Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Zhai, Yuming; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Jian; Chang, Li-Chung; Li, Guodong; Zheng, Yuxiang; Wang, Jiangtao

    2018-01-03

    Low-carbon logistics meets the requirements of a low-carbon economy and is the most effective operating model for logistic development to achieve sustainability by coping with severe energy consumption and global warming. Low-carbon logistics aims to reduce carbon intensity rather than simply reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. Human resources are an important part of the great competition in the logistics market and significantly affect the operations of enterprises. Performance evaluations of human resources are particularly important for low-carbon logistics enterprises with scarce talents. Such evaluations in these enterprises are of great significance for their strategic development. This study constructed a human resource performance evaluation system to assess non-managerial employees' low-carbon job capacity, job performance, and job attitude in the low-carbon logistics sector. The case study results revealed that the investigated company enjoyed initial success after having promoted low-carbon concepts and values to its non-managerial employees, and the success was demonstrated by excellent performance in its employees' job attitude and knowledge. This study adopts the AHP method to reasonably determine an indicator system of performance evaluation and its weight to avoid certain human-caused bias. This study not only fills the gap in the related literature, but can also be applied to industrial practice.

  10. Demonstration analysis for the low-carbon factors index system of logistics enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the background of the low-carbon economy, the basic position of the logistics and its high energy consumption, high emission characteristics determine its special status in the low-carbon economy. The purpose of this paper is providing ideas for logistics companies to implement low-carbon management.Design/methodology/approach: This paper analyses the characteristics and the processes of the logistics enterprises in China. Analyze the low-carbon management factors from the perspective of energy consumption. Then do the demonstration analysis by calculating the connection degree of the indicators and the logistics energy consumption, using the method of grey connection analysis.Findings: Establish the logistics enterprise’s low-carbon management factors index system. And the connection degree is greater than 0.5, indicating that various factors impact significantly on the low-carbon management of logistics enterprises.Originality/value: The study provides ideas for logistics companies to implement low-carbon management.

  11. An Empirical Study on Low-Carbon: Human Resources Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Jian; Chang, Li-Chung; Li, Guodong; Zheng, Yuxiang; Wang, Jiangtao

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbon logistics meets the requirements of a low-carbon economy and is the most effective operating model for logistic development to achieve sustainability by coping with severe energy consumption and global warming. Low-carbon logistics aims to reduce carbon intensity rather than simply reduce energy consumption and carbon emissions. Human resources are an important part of the great competition in the logistics market and significantly affect the operations of enterprises. Performance evaluations of human resources are particularly important for low-carbon logistics enterprises with scarce talents. Such evaluations in these enterprises are of great significance for their strategic development. This study constructed a human resource performance evaluation system to assess non-managerial employees’ low-carbon job capacity, job performance, and job attitude in the low-carbon logistics sector. The case study results revealed that the investigated company enjoyed initial success after having promoted low-carbon concepts and values to its non-managerial employees, and the success was demonstrated by excellent performance in its employees’ job attitude and knowledge. This study adopts the AHP method to reasonably determine an indicator system of performance evaluation and its weight to avoid certain human-caused bias. This study not only fills the gap in the related literature, but can also be applied to industrial practice. PMID:29301375

  12. Developments in HSLA steel products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paules, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The technology of microalloyed steels is expanding beyond its original emphasis on low-carbon, severely control-rolled strip and plate products. A variety of economical, high-strength, tough, as-rolled or as-forged microalloyed products are replacing more expensive heat-treated steels. Recrystallization-controlled rolling is being utilized to produce very fine ferrite grain sizes and good toughness in strip, plate and bar products processed with relatively high rolling temperatures. High-strength microalloyed long products such as railroad joint bars, truck frame rails and flat bars for truck trailer construction are replacing heat-treated parts. Microalloyed, medium-carbon forging steels are used extensively for automobile engine and suspension components. Fully pearlitic high-carbon rods are being microalloyed to enhance the properties of wire and springs.

  13. Building low carbon communities in China: The role of individual’s behaviour change and engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ping; Chen, Yihui; Xu, Bin; Dong, Wenbo; Kennedy, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Low carbon sustainability has been addressed in China’s national development strategies. This research explores individual behaviour change and engagement in building low carbon communities in China through a case study looking at the building of a low carbon campus at Fudan University, Shanghai. Individual behaviour directly influences the overall energy consumption and carbon emissions on Fudan University’s campus. Even though relevant polices have been issued for energy conservation, the energy consumption increased by 5% every year, which suggests that the “top-down” approach telling students and staff “what to do” does not work effectively. Based on a comprehensive method which includes the individual and social aspects related to the energy behaviour, the research analyses the promotion of individual engagement in building a low carbon campus through behaviour change based on four main aspects: (1) awareness raising and behaviour forming; (2) approaches to encourage behaviour change; (3) beyond the barriers and the constraints; and (4) systems and mechanisms for the long-term engagement. A low carbon management system is proposed for not only addressing management and technical solutions at the university level, but also based on the contributions from behaviour changes in establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University at the individual level. - Highlights: • The “top-down” approach is not an effective way to building low carbon communities in China. • Individuals’ behaviour change and engagement play a key role in low carbon sustainability. • Awareness raising, proper approaches and sound mechanisms are necessary to encourage long-term behaviour changes. • An integrated management system is developed for comprehensibly establishing a low carbon campus at Fudan University

  14. A low carbon industrial revolution? Insights and challenges from past technological and economic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, Peter J.G.; Foxon, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts to promote a transition to a low carbon economy have been influenced by suggestions that a low carbon transition offers challenges and might yield economic benefits comparable to those of the previous industrial revolutions. This paper examines these arguments and the challenges facing a low carbon transition, by drawing on recent thinking on the technological, economic and institutional factors that enabled and sustained the first (British) industrial revolution, and the role of ‘general purpose technologies’ in stimulating and sustaining this and subsequent industrial transformation processes that have contributed to significant macroeconomic gains. These revolutions involved profound, long drawn-out changes in economy, technology and society; and although their energy transitions led to long-run economic benefits, they took many decades to develop. To reap significant long-run economic benefits from a low carbon transition sooner rather than later would require systemic efforts and incentives for low carbon innovation and substitution of high-carbon technologies. We conclude that while achieving a low carbon transition may require societal changes on a scale comparable with those of previous industrial revolutions, this transition does not yet resemble previous industrial revolutions. A successful low carbon transition would, however, amount to a different kind of industrial revolution. - Highlights: ► Investigates lessons for a low carbon transition from past industrial revolutions. ► Explores the implications of ‘general purpose technologies’ and their properties. ► Examines analysis of ‘long waves’ of technological progress and diffusion. ► Draws insights for low carbon transitions and policy.

  15. A study on rural low-carbon tourism development in Jiangxi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen-ping

    2017-04-01

    Jiangxi features rich tourism resources in rural areas and favorable eco-environment, and it’s worth in-depth exploration how to develop rural tourism while protecting the beautiful rural environment in Jiangxi. Therefore, the new perspective of developing rural low-carbon tourism in Jiangxi was proposed in the paper to revisit rural tourism. Starting with the ecological concerns for rural tourism in Jiangxi, the paper probes into the necessity of rural low-carbon tourism development in the province and the path of rural low-carbon tourism development in the province on the basis of analyzing the principles to follow in developing the tourism, in anticipation of serving as reference for the theories and practices of sustainable development of rural low-carbon tourism in Jiangxi Province.

  16. An Analysis on the Low-carbon Benefits of Smart Grid of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liwen, Fu; Huiru, Zhao; Sen, Guo

    In order to research the relation between smart grid and low carbon economics, it makes quantitative analysis on the influence exerted by carbon emissions in the power industry over the years, which partially indicates the necessity of low carbon power development. Considered current technology level of smart grid, it proposes suggestions about how to achieve low-carbon electricity. By the method of linear smoothing, it forecasts the value of carbon emissions in the power industry .Meanwhile, figures out the cost of carbon emissions in accordance with the carbon emission prices in international carbon market. Thus, low-carbon benefit of smart grid is 224.57billion yuan, which provides a reference for the construction of smart grid in the coming years.

  17. Low carbon thermal technologies in an ageing society – What are the issues?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a commentary on the theme of this special issue, low carbon thermal technologies and older age, and the Conditioning Demand project. Drawing on the project findings, I discuss some key aspects of ageing that are relevant to the roll-out of low carbon technologies in domestic settings in ageing, developed societies. These include biological, cognitive, institutional and social dimensions. I conclude with some suggestions for ways of working to maximise the potential benefits of low carbon thermal technologies for older people. -- Highlights: •The specific needs of older people must be considered in low carbon transitions. •The vulnerability discourse however dominates in a way which is unhelpful. •Some physiological aspects of ageing affect person-technology fit. •Cultural aspects influence the success of integration of LCTs into domestic settings. •More inclusive design is needed if older people are to benefit from LCTs

  18. Scenarios for low carbon and low water electric power plant operations: implications for upstream water use

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset includes all data used in the creation of figures and graphs in the paper: "Scenarios for low carbon and low water electric power plant operations:...

  19. Iceland as a demonstrator for a transition to low carbon economy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbjornsson, Einar Jon; Stefansson, Hlynur; Finger, David Christian

    2017-04-01

    The energy supply in Iceland is quite unique, about 85% of the total primary energy is coming from renewable resources. Nevertheless, the ecological footprint of an average Icelander is with 6.5 worlds, one of the highest worldwide and the energy consumption per capita is about 7 times higher than the European average. Recent developments have shown that there is a great potential to reduce the footprint and develop towards low carbon economy. With its small population, well educated and governed society and clear system boundaries to the outside world, Iceland is a good research laboratory and an ideal demonstrator for a transition towards a low carbon economy. This presentation will outline how several innovative research projects at Reykjavik University could lead Iceland towards a sustainable and low carbon economy. The presentations will conclude with a visionary outlook how Iceland can become a demonstration nation towards a prosperous, low carbon and sustainable economy, helping stabilize global warming at an acceptable level.

  20. Trading scheme 'key' to low-carbon economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Federal Opposition Leader Kim Beazley has emphasised the importance of getting the economics of environmental policy right by introducing market-based mechanisms for pricing emissions. 'Market-based mechanisms such as emissions trading are central to moving to a low-carbon economy,' he said in his latest blueprint. 'A functioning carbon market will deliver a price signal, so there is a long-term incentive to cut emissions further, and a mechanism for trading, so that energy can be allocated efficiently in the economy. It will also encourage greater private investment in clean energy technology.' Mr Beazley said the new market would also reward the many companies who were already adapting to a carbon-constrained world. 'This includes those global companies in Australia that already operate in emissions trading markets overseas. An effective price signal for carbon in Australia will allow these companies to benefit directly from their good corporate citizenship and long-term vision.' Mr Beazley has committed a federal Labor government to work with state governments and business to establish the national trading scheme. He also criticised the Federal Government for refusing to ratify the Kyoto Protocol, which he argued excluded Australian businesses from participating in the emerging global carbon trade. This made it harder for businesses to break into the market for cleaner production technologies overseas. While again admitting Kyoto was not perfect, Mr Beazley said ratification would see Australia part of what would potentially be 'the biggest market in the world by 2020'. He said the recent Asia Pacific Climate Change Pact was a positive step but was not an alternative to Kyoto. 'Above all, it has no economic mechanisms to drive further change. 'Without ratifying Kyoto some of our businesses are missing out on effective participation in international schemes that offer substantial financial rewards for greenhouse gas reductions. 'By ratifying Kyoto and adopting

  1. Process Reengineering of Cold Chain Logistics of Agricultural Products Based on Low-carbon Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hong-xia; Shao, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Through the process analysis of cold chain logistics of agricultural products, we find that cold chain logistics of agricultural products contradict the development model of low-carbon economy to some extent. We apply the development idea of low-carbon economy, introduce the third-party logistics companies, establish distribution center of cold chain logistics of agricultural products, and strengthen information sharing, to reengineer the process of cold chain logistics of agricultural produc...

  2. Win-win strategies in directing low-carbon resilient development path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masui, Toshihiko; Kainuma, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    This section explores big win-win strategies in directing low carbon resilient development path. There are lots of “leapfrog” development possibilities in developing countries, which go directly from a status of under-development through to efficient and environmentally benign lifestyle. To achieve low carbon resilient paths, not only technology development but also institutional and behavioral changes are required. Science-policy nexus is also discussed.

  3. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  4. Transformation of intermetallic layer due to oxidation heat treatment on hot-dipped aluminium coated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishamuddin Husain; Abdul Razak Daud; Muhamad Daud; Nadira Kamarudin

    2013-01-01

    Heat treatment was introduced onto the aluminum coated low carbon steel to promote the formation of thin layer of oxide for enhancement of oxidation protection of steel. This process has transformed the existing intermetallic layer formed during hot dip aluminising process. Experiment was conducted on the low carbon steel substrates with 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm dimension. Hot dip aluminising of low carbon steel was carried out at 750 degree Celsius dipping temperature in a molten pure aluminum for 5 minutes. Aluminized samples were heat treated at 600, 700, 800, and 900 degree Celsius for 1 hour. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and EDAX were used in investigation. From the observation, it showed the intermetallic thickness increased with the increase in temperature. The result of EDAX analysis revealed the existence of oxide phase and the intermetallics. The XRD identified the intermetallics as Fe 2 Al 5 and FeAl 3 . (Author)

  5. Optimal Strategies for Low Carbon Supply Chain with Strategic Customer Behavior and Green Technology Investment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is mainly caused by excessive emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. In order to reduce carbon emissions, cap and trade policy is implemented by governments in many countries, which has significant impacts on the decisions of companies at all levels of the low carbon supply chain. This paper investigates the decision-making and coordination of a low carbon supply chain consisting of a low carbon manufacturer who produces one product and is allowed to invest in green technology to reduce carbon emissions in production and a retailer who faces stochastic demands formed by homogeneous strategic customers. We investigate the optimal production, pricing, carbon trading, and green technology investment strategies of the low carbon supply chain in centralized (including Rational Expected Equilibrium scenario and quantity commitment scenario and decentralized settings. It is demonstrated that quantity commitment strategy can improve the profit of the low carbon supply chain with strategic customer behavior. We also show that the performance of decentralized supply chain is lower than that of quantity commitment scenario. We prove that the low carbon supply chain cannot be coordinated by revenue sharing contract but by revenue sharing-cost sharing contract.

  6. Geographies of energy transition: Space, place and the low-carbon economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridge, Gavin; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Bradshaw, Michael; Eyre, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This paper makes a case for examining energy transition as a geographical process, involving the reconfiguration of current patterns and scales of economic and social activity. The paper draws on a seminar series on the ‘Geographies of Energy Transition: security, climate, governance' hosted by the authors between 2009 and 2011, which initiated a dialogue between energy studies and the discipline of human geography. Focussing on the UK Government's policy for a low carbon transition, the paper provides a conceptual language with which to describe and assess the geographical implications of a transition towards low carbon energy. Six concepts are introduced and explained: location, landscape, territoriality, spatial differentiation, scaling, and spatial embeddedness. Examples illustrate how the geographies of a future low-carbon economy are not yet determined and that a range of divergent – and contending – potential geographical futures are in play. More attention to the spaces and places that transition to a low-carbon economy will produce can help better understand what living in a low-carbon economy will be like. It also provides a way to help evaluate the choices and pathways available. - Highlights: ► Examines transition as a geographical process, reconfiguring patterns and scales of activity. ► Provides concepts for assessing geographical implications of transition to a low-carbon economy. ► Outlines location, landscape, territoriality, uneven development, scaling, and embeddedness.

  7. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  8. Crack path morphology in dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarwar, M.

    1995-01-01

    The crack path morphology in low carbon, low alloy dual phase steel has been investigated. Thermomechanical processing and inter critical heat treatments were used to vary proportion, morphology, and distribution of the ferrite and martensite phases. The tortuous morphology of crack path was observed in unrolled material at high delta K. In thermo mechanically processed material, the crack tended to cross martensite frequently and crack path become less circuitous. (author)

  9. Martensitic — Ferritic steels and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prnka, T.; Mazanets, K.; Zil'bernagel', A.

    1981-07-01

    Biphase low-carbon low-alloy steels (0.065-0.13% C, 1-2% Mn, 0.3-1.5% Si, 0.5% Cr, with 0.1% V or 0.1-0.4% Mo) are presently used in the form of strips up to 10 mm thick for parts manufactured by cold pressing (automobile parts such as disks and wheel rims).

  10. Resistance microwelding of 316L stainless steel wire to block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Khan, M.I.; Bay, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel coupled with its non-magnetic properties makes it ideal for biomedical applications. The typical joint geometry for microcomponents, such as medical implants, includes joining of fine wire to a larger block. However...

  11. Mechanical properties of ITER coil CICC steel jackets production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, Gennaro; Vostner, Alexander; Bessette, Denis; Pong, Ian; Bevillard, Gregory; Zhou, Chao; Devred, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    ITER cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) used in the superconducting magnet system consists of a cable made of Nb3Sn or Nb-Ti strands inserted in a stainless steel tube (called jacket or conduit). Depending on the coil type, the jacket material is either made of a low carbon AISI 316LN (for toroidal

  12. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low....... The weld mechanisms are analyzed numerically and compared with metallographic analyses showing how the primary bonding mechanism between the thin, low-carbon steel sheet and the thicker sheet of high-strength steel is solid-state bonding, whereas the two high-strength steels are joined by melting, forming...... a weld nugget at their mutual interface. Despite the absence of the typical fusion nugget through the interface between the low-carbon steel and high-strength steel, the weld strengths obtained are acceptable. The failure mechanism in destructive testing is ductile fracture with plug failure....

  13. Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Behaviors of Low and Medium Carbon Steels in Agro-Fluid Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were carried out to study critically the corrosion behaviour and Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC of low and medium carbon steels in cassava and cocoa extracts by weight loss measurement and constant extension to fracture method respectively. The results obtained showed that medium carbon steel is more susceptible to corrosion than low carbon steel in both media. SCC is also more in medium carbon steel than low carbon steel in the two media under study. These deductions are due to higher carbon content in medium carbon steel coupled with various aggressive corrosion constituents contained in these media. Hydrogen embrittlement, as well as carbon cracking, is responsible for SCC of these materials in the agro-fluid media.

  14. Past performance and future needs for low carbon climate resilient infrastructure– An investment perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Christopher; Corfee-Morlot, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the investment implications of moving to low-carbon, climate-resilient infrastructure. It begins with analysis of gross fixed capital formation and decarbonisation trends to examine past performance of OECD countries in reducing GHG emissions from 1997 to 2007. Many OECD countries made progress in decoupling GHG emissions from infrastructure investment in residential buildings, and to a lesser extent from power and industry, but increased efforts are required, especially in the transportation sector. The analysis highlights the need to accelerate the pace and scale of change to reverse GHG emission trends to bring into reach ambitious climate policy goals. It then assesses future global infrastructure needs under low-carbon and business-as-usual (BAU) global warming scenarios, and the incremental costs of going “low-carbon” are estimated to be small relative to the magnitude of the BAU infrastructure investment needs. Global infrastructure needs for 2015–2020, including buildings and transportation vehicles, are approximately 6.7 trillion USD/year under BAU. Incremental costs of low-carbon infrastructure are of the order −70 to +450 billion USD/year. Achieving climate resilient infrastructure may add costs, but there is potentially synergistic overlap with low-carbon attributes. Although estimates are incomplete, the technical and financial inter-dependency between infrastructure systems suggests the potential to generate infrastructure investment to support a “virtuous cycle” of low-carbon growth. - Highlights: • Conceptualisation of interactions between low carbon and climate resilient infrastructure (Fig. 1). • New performance measures of national GHG emissions vs. capital formation (Section 2). • Comparion of global infrastructure costs under low and high carbon scenarios (Table 1). • Understanding of infrastructures that support virtuous cycles of low carbon growth (Fig. 8)

  15. Climate consequences of low-carbon fuels: The United States Renewable Fuel Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Jason; Tajibaeva, Liaila; Polasky, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A common strategy for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from energy use is to increase the supply of low-carbon alternatives. However, increasing supply tends to lower energy prices, which encourages additional fuel consumption. This “fuel market rebound effect” can undermine climate change mitigation strategies, even to the point where efforts to reduce GHG emissions by increasing the supply of low-carbon fuels may actually result in increased GHG emissions. Here, we explore how policies that encourage the production of low-carbon fuels may result in increased GHG emissions because the resulting increase in energy use overwhelms the benefits of reduced carbon intensity. We describe how climate change mitigation strategies should follow a simple rule: a low-carbon fuel with a carbon intensity of X% that of a fossil fuel must displace at least X% of that fossil fuel to reduce overall GHG emissions. We apply this rule to the United States Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS2). We show that absent consideration of the fuel market rebound effect, RFS2 appears to reduce GHG emissions, but once the fuel market rebound effect is factored in, RFS2 actually increases GHG emissions when all fuel GHG intensity targets are met. - Highlights: • Low-carbon fuels partially displace petroleum via fuel market rebound effect. • Synthesis of recent analyses shows incomplete petroleum displacement by biofuels. • Fuel market rebound effect can reduce or reverse climate benefit of low-carbon fuels. • Fossil fuel displacement must exceed relative carbon footprint of a low-carbon fuel. • The Renewable Fuel Standard increases greenhouse gas emissions when mandate is met.

  16. Key policy considerations for facilitating low carbon technology transfer to developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ockwell, David G.; Watson, Jim; MacKerron, Gordon; Pal, Prosanto; Yamin, Farhana

    2008-01-01

    Based on Phase I of a UK-India collaborative study, this paper analyses two case studies of low carbon technologies-hybrid vehicles and coal-fired power generation via integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). The analysis highlights the following six key considerations for the development of policy aimed at facilitating low carbon technology transfer to developing countries: (1) technology transfer needs to be seen as part of a broader process of sustained, low carbon technological capacity development in recipient countries; (2) the fact that low carbon technologies are at different stages of development means that low carbon technology transfer involves both vertical transfer (the transfer of technologies from the R and D stage through to commercialisation) and horizontal transfer (the transfer from one geographical location to another). Barriers to transfer and appropriate policy responses often vary according to the stage of technology development as well as the specific source and recipient country contexts; (3) less integrated technology transfer arrangements, involving, for example, acquisition of different items of plant from a range of host country equipment manufacturers, are more likely to involve knowledge exchange and diffusion through recipient country economies; (4) recipient firms that, as part of the transfer process, strategically aim to obtain technological know-how and knowledge necessary for innovation during the transfer process are more likely to be able to develop their capacity as a result; (5) whilst access to Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) may sometimes be a necessary part of facilitating technology transfer, it is not likely to be sufficient in itself. Other factors such as absorptive capacity and risks associated with new technologies must also be addressed; (6) there is a central role for both national and international policy interventions in achieving low carbon technology transfer. The lack of available empirical analysis

  17. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    testing (ASTM G5) of low pressure cold spray austenitic stainless steel coatings. Several different powders and heat treatments will be applied to...diffusion eliminating the local low chromium region. The low carbon type stainless steel alloys as used here are generally considered to be...maximum 200words) This thesis presents research on the corrosion properties and effects of heat treatment on austenitic stainless steel coatings

  18. Public financial institutions and the low carbon transition: five case studies on low-carbon infrastructure and project investment. Environment working paper No. 72:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, Ian; Hubert, Romain; Marchal, Virginie; Youngman, Robert; Rus, Katerina; Baker, Jade; Kynaston, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Public financial institutions (PFIs) are well-positioned to act as a key leverage point for governments' efforts to mobilise private investment in low-carbon projects and infrastructure. The study identifies the tools, instruments and approaches used by five PFIs to directly support and scale-up domestic private sector investment in sustainable transport, energy-efficiency and renewable energy in OECD countries. Between 2010-2012, these five institutions - Group Caisse des Depots in France, KfW Bankengruppe in Germany, the UK Green Investment Bank, the European Investment Bank, and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development - have provided over 100 billion euros of equity investment and financing for energy efficiency, renewable energy and sustainable transport projects. They use both traditional and innovative approaches to link low-carbon projects with finance through enhancing access to capital; facilitating risk reduction and sharing; improving the capacity of market actors; and shaping broader market practices and conditions. (authors)

  19. Comprehensive evaluation on low-carbon development of coal enterprise groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bang-Jun; Wu, Yan-Fang; Zhao, Jia-Lu

    2017-12-19

    Scientifically evaluating the level of low-carbon development in terms of theoretical and practical significance is extremely important to coal enterprise groups for implementing national energy-related systems. This assessment can assist in building institutional mechanisms that are conducive for the economic development of coal business cycle and energy conservation as well as promoting the healthy development of coal enterprises to realize coal scientific development and resource utilization. First, by adopting systematic analysis method, this study builds low-carbon development evaluation index system for coal enterprise groups. Second, to determine the weight serving as guideline and criteria of the index, analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is applied using integrated linear weighted sum method to evaluate the level of low-carbon development of coal enterprise groups. Evaluation is also performed by coal enterprise groups, and the process comprises field analysis and evaluation. Finally, industrial policies are proposed regarding the development of low-carbon coal conglomerate strategies and measures. This study aims mainly to guide the low-carbon development of coal enterprise groups, solve the problem of coal mining and the destruction of ecological environment, support the conservation of raw materials and various resources, and achieve the sustainable development of the coal industry.

  20. Benefits of Low Carbon Development Strategies in Emerging Cities of Developing Country: a Case of Kathmandu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Raj Shakya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kathmandu is one of the fastest growing cities in South Asia facing various challenges related to climate change, local pollutants emissions and energy security of supply. This study analysed the greenhouse gas mitigation potential in different economic sectors of the city by using Long-range Energy Planning (LEAP frame work. It shows that the effect of implementing various low carbon development strategy options can reduce 35.2% of total greenhouse gas emission from energy use as compared to the base case scenario in 2030. This indicates the need for exploring the possibility of utilizing the global climate funds and adopting voluntary mechanisms for greenhouse gas mitigation. The estimated demand side technology investment cost of low carbon measures for different sectors ranges from less than US$ 1/tonne CO2e for residential sector to US$ 99/tonne CO2e for transport sector. The low carbon options also results co-benefits in terms of significant reduction in emission of local pollutants and improvement of energy security. As Government of Nepal has envisioned following low carbon economic development path on the long run, there is the need of establishment of regulatory framework, institutional framework and development of clear action plans for realizing the implementation of low carbon development strategy measures in the country.

  1. Evolutionary pattern, operation mechanism and policy orientation of low carbon economy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Dou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The essence of low carbon economy development is a continuous evolution and innovation process of socio-economic system from traditional high carbon economy to new sustainable green low carbon economy to achieve a sustainable dynamic balance and benign interactive development of various elements between society, economy and natural ecosystem. At the current stage, China’s socio-economy is showing the feature of "three high" (high energy consumption, high emissions and high pollution. In this case, quickly to promote the development of green low carbon economy is necessary and urgent. This research indicates that, low carbon economy development is achieved by micro-economic agents such as households, businesses and social intermediary organizations through Government’s guidance and the role of market mechanism. In low carbon economy development, the state (government is a leader and markets are core, while economic agents (e.g., households, businesses and social intermediary organizations are basis. For this reason, it is necessary to build an effective cleaner development and incentive-compatible policy system oriented to end-users.

  2. Exploration of low-carbon rural tourism in zhejiang: A Case Study of Tian Mu Village, Lin an County

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jian Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the advancement of the construction of ecological civilization, low-carbon economy and low-carbon tourism are increasingly affecting the production and life style of human beings. Low carbon tourism is in the process of tourism development, through the use of low-carbon technologies, promote carbon absorbing mechanism and advocate low carbon tourism consumption to obtain higher tourism experience quality and greater tourism economic, social and environmental benefits of a sustainable development of tourism in new ways . Low carbon has become a recognized future development direction of the tourism industry. Closely linked to this paper, vigorously develop low carbon tourism industry requirements, to Lin an, Zhejiang Tian mu village, for example, through on-the-spot investigation, the problems existed in the village rural tourism low carbon analysis, and put forward the corresponding countermeasures, in order to rural tourism and low-carbon development in our province to find a feasible and with a demonstration of the significance of the road, and for other areas to carry out low carbon tourism experience.

  3. Operation management for a low-carbon economy: a literature review on stakeholders, barriers and motivations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Andriani Ribeiro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify stakeholders acting as barriers and/or motivations for the adoption of low- -carbon operation management practices through the lens of the stakeholder theory. Stakeholders have a strong influence on companies to adopt environmental practices due to the climate change context and its consequences on the economic, environmental and social scenario. Thus, this study conducts a literature review in the Scopus database with searches that relate stakeholder theory and low-carbon practices to identify stakeholders. As a result, Customers and Government are the most active stakeholders as drivers or barriers to the adoption of environmental practices. Therefore, it is important to understand the different attributes of each stakeholder and their demands in order to trace hierarchy strategies of adopting any low-carbon operation management practices and creating mechanisms of collaboration with those stakeholders who drive the adoption of those practices.

  4. The Impact of Transport Mode and Carbon Policy on Low-Carbon Retailer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbon retail has become a strategic target for many developed and developing economies. This study discusses the impact of transport mode and carbon policy on achieving this objective. We investigated the retailer transportation mode, pricing, and ordering strategy, which all consider carbon-sensitive demand under the carbon cap-and-trade policy. We analyzed the optimal decision of retailer and their maximum profit affected by transport mode and cap-and-trade policy parameters. Results show that the two elements (cap-and-trade policy and consumer low-carbon awareness could encourage the retailer to choose low-carbon transportation. The two elements also influence the profit and optimal decision of retailer. Finally, a numerical example is presented to illustrate the applicability of the model.

  5. Low carbon Finland 2050. VTT clean energy technology strategies for society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koljonen, T.; Simila, L.; Sipila, K. [and others

    2012-11-15

    The Low Carbon Finland 2050 project by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland aims to assess the technological opportunities and challenges involved in reducing Finland's greenhouse gas emissions. A target for reduction is set as at least 80% from the 1990 level by 2050 as part of an international effort, which requires strong RD and D in clean energy technologies. Key findings of the project are presented in this publication, which aims to stimulate enlightening and multidisciplinary discussions on low-carbon futures for Finland. The project gathered together VTT's technology experts in clean energy production, smart energy infrastructures, transport, buildings, and industrial systems as well as experts in energy system modelling and foresight. VTT's leading edge 'Low Carbon and Smart Energy' enables new solutions with a demonstration that is the first of its kind in Finland, and the introduction of new energy technology onto national and global markets. (orig.)

  6. Exploring the reducing role of boron: added insights from theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangat, Yuvraj; Vanka, Kumar

    2016-04-14

    Carbon-carbon coupling in CO molecules is a challenging proposition, and very few main group complexes have been shown to effect this process. A recently reported triply bonded diboryne system (1) is notable for coupling four CO molecules to produce a (bis)boralactone species. The current full quantum chemical computational investigation with density functional theory (DFT) provides important insights into the nature of the CO coupling process by triply bonded diboryne systems. The complete reaction pathway leading to the formation of the (bis)boralactone has been determined. Factors that make this system so successful in coupling CO groups have been elucidated, and pertinent issues, such as why the coupling process stops after four CO additions, have been explored. Also, importantly, insights have been gained through the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis into how the back-donation from diboryne activates CO.

  7. Low-Carbon Transportation Oriented Urban Spatial Structure: Theory, Model and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyao Ye

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Optimising the spatial structure of cities to promote low-carbon travel is a primary goal of urban planning and construction innovation in the low-carbon era. There is a need for basic research on the structural characteristics that help to reduce motor traffic, thereby promoting energy conservation. We first review the existing literature on the influence of urban spatial structure on transport carbon dioxide emissions and summarise the influence mechanisms. We then present two low-carbon transportation oriented patterns of urban spatial structure including the traditional walking city and the modern transit metropolis, illustrated by case studies. Furthermore, we propose an improved model Green Transportation System Oriented Development (GTOD, which is an extension of traditional transit-oriented development (TOD and includes the additional features of a walking city and an emphasis on the integration of land use with a green transportation system, consisting of the public transportation and non-auto travel system. A compact urban form, effective mix of land use and appropriate scale of block are the basic structural features of a low-carbon transportation city. However, these features are only effective at promoting low-carbon transportation when integrated with the green traffic systems. Proper integration of the urban structural system with the green space system is also required. The optimal land use/transportation integration strategy is to divide traffic corridors with wedge-shaped green spaces and limit development along the transit corridors. This strategy forms the basis of the proposed urban structural model to promote low-carbon transportation and sustainable urban growth management.

  8. Study on China's low carbon development in an Economy-Energy-Electricity-Environment framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhaoguang; Yuan Jiahai; Hu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    Emissions mitigation is a major challenge for China's sustainable development. We summarize China's successful experiences on energy efficiency in past 30 years as the contributions of Energy Usage Management and Integrated Resource Strategic Planning, which are essential for low-carbon economy. In an Economy-Energy-Electricity-Environment (E4) framework, the paper studies the low-carbon development of China and gives an outlook of China's economy growth, energy-electricity demand, renewable power generation and energy conservation and emissions mitigation until 2030. A business-as-usual scenario is projected as baseline for comparison while low carbon energy and electricity development path is studied. It is defined as low carbon energy/electricity when an economy body manages to realize its potential economic growth fueled by less energy/electricity consumption, which can be characterized by indexes of energy/electricity intensity and emissions per-unit of energy consumption (electricity generation). Results show that, with EUM, China, could save energy by 4.38 billion ton oil equivalences (toes) and reduce CO 2 emission by 16.55 billion tons; with IRSP, China, could save energy by 1.5 Btoes and reduce CO 2 emission by 5.7 Btons, during 2010-2030. To realize the massive potential, China has to reshape its economic structure and rely much on technology innovation in the future. - Research highlights: → In an E4 framework China's low-carbon development is compared with BAU scenario. → Low carbon energy/electricity and their related measuring indexes are discussed. → China's successful experiences on energy efficiency are summarized as EUM and IRSP. → With them China could save energy by 5.8 Btoe and reduce CO 2 by 22.2 Bton until 2030. → China must restructure its economy and rely on technology innovation for them.

  9. A Study on Life Cycle CO2 Emissions of Low-Carbon Building in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Cho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been much interest and many efforts to control global warming and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG emissions throughout the world. Recently, the Republic of Korea has also increased its GHG reduction goal and searched for an implementation plan. In buildings, for example, there have been technology developments and deployment policies to reduce GHG emissions from a life cycle perspective, covering construction materials, building construction, use of buildings and waste disposal. In particular, Korea’s Green Standard for Energy and Environmental Design is a certification of environmentally-friendly buildings for their energy saving and reduction of environmental pollution throughout their lives. In fact, the demand and adoption of the certification are rising every year. In construction materials and buildings, as a result, an environmentally-friendly aspect has become crucial. The importance of construction material and building development technologies that can reduce environmental load by diminishing GHG emissions in buildings has emerged. Moreover, there has been a rising necessity to verify the GHG reduction effects of buildings. To assess the reduction of carbon emissions in the buildings built with low-carbon construction technologies and materials, therefore, this study estimated life cycle carbon emissions in reference buildings in which general construction materials are used and in low-carbon buildings. For this, the carbon emissions and their reduction from construction materials (especially concrete between conventional products and low-carbon materials were estimated, using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA. After estimating carbon emissions from a building life cycle perspective, their reduction in low-carbon buildings compared to the reference buildings was reviewed. The results found that compared to conventional buildings, low-carbon buildings revealed a 25% decrease in carbon emissions in terms of the reduction of Life Cycle

  10. Strategy research of harbin city green transport and sustainable development from low carbon ecological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Wang; Xiao-jie, Qi

    2017-04-01

    With quick development of urbanization and mechanization, there exist some problems in the cities, such as traffic jam, traffic safety, and traffic pollution and so on. It is extremely urgent for the city to develop green transport, in order to relieve these problems and push forward low carbon ecological construction in Harbin. Strategy research of Harbin city green transport and sustainable development is done from the eight aspects of building public transport system of integration, bicycle, walking, and slow-moving system and so on based on analyzing demands of low carbon ecology on city green transport development, and Harbin traffic development state.

  11. Digital earth for manipulating urban greens towards achieving a low carbon urban society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, N G; Bedi, P

    2014-01-01

    Urban greens are integral components of urban ecosystem, contributing towards quality of life and sustainable urban development. Urban greens can help in creating Low Carbon Society (LCS) by playing an integral role through sequestering carbon. India is undergoing significant change in the process and pace of its urbanization. As the growing population becomes more urban, the importance of the way urban areas are developed and managed will be a central point of intervention for addressing climate change and maintaining low carbon trajectories in Indian cities

  12. Financing the low-carbon transition in a fragile world economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    An unfavorable economic situation will hinder the launching of the 'low-carbon transition' in compliance with an increase of approximately 2 deg. C - the official goal set by the international community for global warming. Reversing the perspective, this transition is seen, herein, as the grounds for a 'sustainable' growth based on a monetary policy that ties the emission of liquidities to investments in low-carbon facilities. 'Climate remediation [sic] assets' with a social value set by an agreement in the framework of the Convention on the Climate are discussed

  13. China's Development of Low-Carbon Eco-Cities and Associated Indicator Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); He, Gang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Christopher [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    China's urban population surpassed its rural population historically in 2011, when the number of Chinese living in towns and cities reached about 690 million1. In the years to come, cities in China will face major challenges as their rapidly increasing populations burden already crowded infrastructure systems and exacerbate environmental and climate change issues, threatening public health and quality of life. Low-carbon cities may be key to addressing those challenges, especially as regards mitigating and adapting to climate change. Government entities at both the central and local level have moved aggressively on building low-carbon eco-cities. According to statistics reported by the Chinese Society for Urban Studies, by February of 2011, China will have 230 cities at the prefecture-and-above level that have proposed to establish themselves as “eco-cities,” accounting for 80.1% of the 287 such cities nationally. Of those 230 cities, 133, or 46.3%, have established targets to develop specifically as “lowcarbon cities” (Chinese Society for Urban Studies 2011). Given the proposed scale of the effort, China’s potential success or failure in demonstrating and implementing low-carbon eco-cities could greatly affect how the world addresses both the climate change impacts of urbanization and the sustainable development of cities. Despite the multiple guidelines that have been developed, it remains unclear what defines a low-carbon eco-city. Additionally, although more than 100 indicators have been used or proposed for assessing such cities, few relate directly to energy use or carbon emissions. Nonetheless, policy makers and leaders continue to demand comprehensive toolboxes to facilitate development of low-carbon eco-cities. This paper presents the results of an extensive literature review of the development of low-carbon eco-cities in China. The paper also qualitatively and quantitatively analyzes 11 major indicator systems that researchers, planners

  14. Techno-economic and environmental analysis of low carbon energy technologies: Indian perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Vijay Prakash; Kumar, Rahul; Kumar, Manish; Deswal, Surinder; Chandna, Pankaj

    2010-09-15

    In this paper, techno-economic and an environmental investigation and analysis of Low Carbon Technologies (LCTs) has been presented, with special emphasis on India. The paper identify, analyze and recommend, on the basis of available and collected / collated information and data, the promising and potential low carbon energy technology options suited to Indian conditions for grid connected power generation. The evaluation criteria adopted include - emission reduction potential, technological feasibility, and economic viability; and on its basis recommend a detailed action plan and strategy for guiding future research and development with a more focused approach considering current Indian policy framework.

  15. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  16. Nuclear Repository steel canister: experimental corrosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporuscio, F.; Norskog, K.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Spent Fuel & Waste Science & Technology campaign evaluates various generic geological repositories for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel. This experimental work analyzed and characterized the canister corrosion and steel interface mineralogy of bentonite-based EBS 304 stainless steel (SS), 316 SS, and low-carbon steel coupons in brine at higher heat loads and pressures. Experiments contrasted EBS with and without an argillite wall rock. Unprocessed bentonite from Colony, Wyoming simulated the clay buffer and Opalinus Clay represented the wall rock. Redox conditions were buffered at the magnetite-iron oxygen fugacity univariant curve. A K-Na-Ca-Cl-based brine was chosen to replicate generic granitic groundwater compositions, while Opalinous Clay groundwater was used in the wall rock series of experiments. Most experiments were run at 150 bar and 300°C for 4 to 6 weeks and one was held at elevated conditions for 6 months. The two major experimental mixtures were 1) brine-bentonite clay- steel, and 2) brine-bentonite clay-Opalinus Clay-steel. Both systems were equilibrated at a high liquid/clay ratio. Mineralogy and aqueous geochemistry of each experiment were evaluated to monitor the reactions that took place. In total 4291 measurements were obtained: 2500 measured steel corrosion depths and 1791 were of phyllosilicate mineral reactions/growths at the interface. The low carbon steel corrosion mechanism was via pit corrosion, while 304 SS and 316 SS were by general corrosion. The low carbon steel corrosion rate (1.95 μm/day) was most rapid. The 304 SS corrosion rate (0.37 μm/day) was slightly accelerated versus the 316 SS corrosion rate (0.26 μm/day). Note that the six month 316 SS experiment shows inhibited corrosion rates (0.07 μm/day). This may be in part due to mantling by the Fe-saponite/chlorite authigenic minerals. All phyllosilicate growth rates at the interface exhibit similar growth rate patterns to the steels (i.e. LCS>304>316> 316 six month).

  17. Public Awareness of Low-Carbon Economy in Nigeria: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... favourably towards the prospect of LCE. Results of the study, at this preliminary stage, suggest that the general public in Nigeria has the potential to be a facilitator of environmental improvements in the country. @JASEM. Keywords: Low-Carbon Economy, Nigeria, Sustainable Development, Climate Change, Awareness ...

  18. Energy Intensive Sectors of the Indian Economy : Path to Low Carbon Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2011-01-01

    Energy Intensive Sectors of the Indian Economy: Path to Low Carbon Development is the product of a collaborative effort between the World Bank and the Government of India, under the overall leadership of the Planning Commission and the Ministry of Power, and with the financial assistance of the Department for International Development (DFID) and the Energy Sector Management Assistance Prog...

  19. Exploring a low carbon development in rural China : the role of households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Wenling, Wenling

    2013-01-01

    As the largest emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world, China is facing great pressure to reduce these emissions in order to mitigate global climate change. Developing a low carbon economy has been initiated in many countries, including China, as a means to tackle this issue. China’s actions

  20. Energy and low carbon development efforts in Ghana: institutional arrangements, initiatives, challenges and the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Kofi Ackom

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, Ghana has invested considerable effort and resources together with international partners to develop the energy sector and to mainstream energy low carbon pathways into national development plans. Low carbon development (LCD provides a good opportunity, of not only building upon earlier energy and climate change local processes and structures but also help to mainstream low carbon agenda in economic activities and national development plans. For this to work however, require efficient institutions and effective institutional arrangements. Based on extensive literature analysis, personal communications and inputs from stakeholders, the paper highlights the key institutional arrangements, their interactions, challenges and proffers recommendations for improvements. To improve energy and low carbon development effort from the perspectives of institutional structures, would require, clearer institutional mandates, continuous improvements in institutional coordination (intra and inter, capacity and skills development, sustained visibility of the essence of energy and LCD at high political levels as well as engagement by civil societies. Equally important are the issues of finance, data availability and quality, monitoring and evaluation.

  1. Development of Affordable, Low-Carbon Hydrogen Supplies at an Industrial Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Dermot J.

    2008-01-01

    An existing industrial hydrogen generation and distribution infrastructure is described, and a number of large-scale investment projects are outlined. All of these projects have the potential to generate significant volumes of low-cost, low-carbon hydrogen. The technologies concerned range from gasification of coal with carbon capture and storage…

  2. Public Awareness of Low-Carbon Economy in Nigeria: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Public Awareness of Low-Carbon Economy….. 22. ETIM, E E; ASUQUO, J E; GABRIEL, F A. The current research seeks to address a gap in understanding concerning the attitudes and behaviours of the general public towards LCE in an economically rapidly developing part of Nigeria. Focusing on Akwa Ibom state, a major ...

  3. Scaling-up low-carbon urban initiatives: Towards a better understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doren, D.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Runhaar, H.A.C.; Giezen, Mendel

    2018-01-01

    In cities worldwide, low-carbon urban initiatives (LCUIs) are realised by pioneers that prove that climate mitigation strategies can be integrated in urban development trajectories. Practitioners and scholars reflect on the need to scale-up such initiatives in order to accelerate the transition to

  4. Scaling-up low-carbon urban initiatives: towards a better understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doren, van D.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Runhaar, Hens; Giezen, M.

    2018-01-01

    In cities worldwide, low-carbon urban initiatives (LCUIs) are realised by pioneers that prove that climate mitigation strategies can be integrated in urban development trajectories. Practitioners and scholars reflect on the need to scale-up such initiatives in order to accelerate the transition to

  5. Exploring a low carbon development in rural China : the role of households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu Wenling, Wenling

    2013-01-01

    As the largest emitter of greenhouse gasses in the world, China is facing great pressure to reduce these emissions in order to mitigate global climate change. Developing a low carbon economy has been initiated in many countries, including China, as a means to tackle this issue. China’s actions

  6. Operational flexibility and economics of power plants in future low-carbon power systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne Sjoerd; van den Broek, Machteld; Seebregts, Ad; Faaij, André

    2015-01-01

    Future power systems will require large shares of low-carbon generators such as renewables and power plants with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) to keep global warming below 2. °C. Intermittent renewables increase the system-wide demand for flexibility and affect the operation of thermal power

  7. Renewable and low-carbon energies as mitigation options of climate change for China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urban, F.; Benders, R. M. J.; Moll, H. C.

    This article discusses how renewable and low-carbon energies can serve as mitigation options of climate change in China's power sector. Our study is based on scenarios developed in PowerPlan, a bottom-up model simulating a countries' power sector and its emissions. We first adjusted the model to

  8. A Guidebook for Low-Carbon Development at the Local Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Ohshita, Stephanie; Zheng, Nina; Min, Hu

    2011-10-31

    This report aims to provide a manual with a menu of the successful policies and measures for local governments in China to create low carbon plan or climate action plans. This manual includes a comprehensive list of successful policies and best practices.

  9. Promoting low-carbon city through industrial symbiosis: A case in China by applying HPIMO model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Liang; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Zhang, Hui; Dai, Ming; Fujii, Minoru; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Geng, Yong; Liu, Zhu

    2013-01-01

    China launched low-carbon city strategy to respond global climate change. Industrial symbiosis (IS) could generate both economic and environmental benefits in clustered industries and communities. This research shed light on how industrial symbiosis contributes to city's low-carbon development. An urban-level hybrid physical input and monetary output (HPIMO) model which covers physical energy inputs and air pollutants emissions, is established for addressing case study in a Chinese typical industrial city (Liuzhou). Based on current energy consumption and industrial symbiosis and the application of HPIMO model, scenarios related to industrial symbiosis, including waste plastics recycling, scrap tires recycling, flying ash recycling and biomass utilization are explored. Results show that compared with business-as-usual (BAU) scenario, IS can reduce solid wastes and further contribute to the co-benefits of energy saving, CO 2 emissions reduction and air pollutants reduction. The finding is critical for national low-carbon strategy. Finally, policy implications to support the ever-improvement of IS promotion in China are proposed and discussed. - Highlights: • Industrial symbiosis could contribute to low-carbon city in terms of co-benefit. • Co-benefit of IS was in terms of waste reduction and air pollutants reduction. • Waste plastics recycling and biomass utilization generated large co-benefit. • Coal fly ash recycling reduced the solid waste while increased air pollutants. • The prices of wastes and facilities investment affected the total cost-benefit

  10. Developing and Using Green Skills for the Transition to a Low Carbon Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mike

    2015-01-01

    One of the strategies being advocated in response to climate change is the need to transition to a low carbon economy. Current projections show that within this transition, new jobs will be created, some eliminated and most others subjected to change. This article reports findings from interviews with a selection of twenty participants who are…

  11. Local transition strategies for low carbon construction and housing – studies of innovative Danish municipalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jesper; Søndergård, Bent; Stauning, Inger

    The paper sets out to discuss and characterize the innovative local practices among Danish municipalities, when it comes to clean-tech related CO2 reductions from the housing sector. This paper is part of our general aim to identify and develop planning concepts of transition for low carbon...

  12. Accelerating the transition to low-carbon cities : Strategies for scaling-up local initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doren, D.

    2018-01-01

    As centres of energy consumption and innovation, cities can play an important role in combatting climate change. In cities worldwide, low-carbon initiatives are realized by pioneers that demonstrate that climate mitigation can be reconciled with urban development needs. Examples incude the creation

  13. Managing Risk Aversion for Low-Carbon Supply Chains with Emission Abatement Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinpeng; He, Longfei

    2018-01-01

    Reducing carbon emissions, including emission abatement outsourcing at the supply-chain level, is becoming a significant but challenging problem in practice. Confronting this challenge, we therefore break down the practice to focus on a low-carbon supply chain consisting of one supplier, one manufacturer and one third-party emission-reducing contractor. The contractor offers a carbon reduction service to the manufacturer. In view of the increasing proportion of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions and absence of carbon reduction policies in developing countries, we adopt the prospect of consumers’ low-carbon preferences to capture the demand sensitivity on carbon emission. By exploiting the Mean-Variance (MV) model, we develop a supply chain game model considering risk aversion. Comparing the supply chain performances of the cases under risk neutrality and risk aversion, we investigate the impact of the risk aversion of the supplier and the manufacturer on the low-carbon supply chain performances, respectively. We show that the risk aversion of chain members will not influence the relationship underlain by the profit-sharing contract between the manufacturer and contractor, whereas they may extend the supplier’s concerning range. Although the manufacturer’s risk aversion has a positive impact on the wholesale price, interestingly, the supplier’s impact on the wholesale price is negative. Furthermore, we propose a contract to coordinate the risk-averse low-carbon supply chain by tuning the aversion levels of the supplier and the manufacturer, respectively. Through numerical study, we draw on managerial insights for industrial practitioners to adopt a low carbon strategy potentially by managing the risk attitudes along the supply chain channel. PMID:29466281

  14. Managing Risk Aversion for Low-Carbon Supply Chains with Emission Abatement Outsourcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinpeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Reducing carbon emissions, including emission abatement outsourcing at the supply-chain level, is becoming a significant but challenging problem in practice. Confronting this challenge, we therefore break down the practice to focus on a low-carbon supply chain consisting of one supplier, one manufacturer and one third-party emission-reducing contractor. The contractor offers a carbon reduction service to the manufacturer. In view of the increasing proportion of Greenhouse Gases (GHG emissions and absence of carbon reduction policies in developing countries, we adopt the prospect of consumers’ low-carbon preferences to capture the demand sensitivity on carbon emission. By exploiting the Mean-Variance (MV model, we develop a supply chain game model considering risk aversion. Comparing the supply chain performances of the cases under risk neutrality and risk aversion, we investigate the impact of the risk aversion of the supplier and the manufacturer on the low-carbon supply chain performances, respectively. We show that the risk aversion of chain members will not influence the relationship underlain by the profit-sharing contract between the manufacturer and contractor, whereas they may extend the supplier’s concerning range. Although the manufacturer’s risk aversion has a positive impact on the wholesale price, interestingly, the supplier’s impact on the wholesale price is negative. Furthermore, we propose a contract to coordinate the risk-averse low-carbon supply chain by tuning the aversion levels of the supplier and the manufacturer, respectively. Through numerical study, we draw on managerial insights for industrial practitioners to adopt a low carbon strategy potentially by managing the risk attitudes along the supply chain channel.

  15. Managing Risk Aversion for Low-Carbon Supply Chains with Emission Abatement Outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinpeng; He, Longfei

    2018-02-21

    Reducing carbon emissions, including emission abatement outsourcing at the supply-chain level, is becoming a significant but challenging problem in practice. Confronting this challenge, we therefore break down the practice to focus on a low-carbon supply chain consisting of one supplier, one manufacturer and one third-party emission-reducing contractor. The contractor offers a carbon reduction service to the manufacturer. In view of the increasing proportion of Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions and absence of carbon reduction policies in developing countries, we adopt the prospect of consumers' low-carbon preferences to capture the demand sensitivity on carbon emission. By exploiting the Mean-Variance (MV) model, we develop a supply chain game model considering risk aversion. Comparing the supply chain performances of the cases under risk neutrality and risk aversion, we investigate the impact of the risk aversion of the supplier and the manufacturer on the low-carbon supply chain performances, respectively. We show that the risk aversion of chain members will not influence the relationship underlain by the profit-sharing contract between the manufacturer and contractor, whereas they may extend the supplier's concerning range. Although the manufacturer's risk aversion has a positive impact on the wholesale price, interestingly, the supplier's impact on the wholesale price is negative. Furthermore, we propose a contract to coordinate the risk-averse low-carbon supply chain by tuning the aversion levels of the supplier and the manufacturer, respectively. Through numerical study, we draw on managerial insights for industrial practitioners to adopt a low carbon strategy potentially by managing the risk attitudes along the supply chain channel.

  16. Low-Carbon City Policy Databook: 72 Policy Recommendations for Chinese Cities from the Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for Low Carbon Cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Lynn [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Zhou, Nan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Fridley, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Ohshita, Stephanie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Khanna, Nina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Lu, Hongyou [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Hong, Lixuan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; He, Gang [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Romankiewicz, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area. Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Division. China Energy Group; Min, Hu [Energy Foundation China, Beijing (China)

    2016-07-01

    This report is designed to help city authorities evaluate and prioritize more than 70 different policy strategies that can reduce their city’s energy use and carbon-based greenhouse gas emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Local government officials, researchers, and planners can utilize the report to identify policies most relevant to local circumstances and to develop a low carbon city action plan that can be implemented in phases, over a multi-year timeframe. The policies cover nine city sectors: industry, public and commercial buildings, residential buildings, transportation, power and heat, street lighting, water & wastewater, solid waste, and urban green space. See Table 1 for a listing of the policies. Recognizing the prominence of urban industry in the energy and carbon inventories of Chinese cities, this report includes low carbon city policies for the industrial sector. The policies gathered here have proven effective in multiple locations around the world and have the potential to achieve future energy and carbon savings in Chinese cities.

  17. Visualizing the application of GIS in transformation towards a sustainable development and a low carbon society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M H; Ariffin, A; Malik, T A

    2014-01-01

    A strategy for sustainable development is a significant milestone on the road to a more socially, economically and environmentally responsible society. It creates a framework within which the stakeholders can make a strong contribution to a better future. Because of the merits and growing interest in sustainable development, the race is on for researchers and stakeholders in the construction sector to initiate actions to reduce the negative impacts of development and sharpen their competitive edge. The cities should be created with a vision which supports harmonious communities and living conditions through sustainable urban development. The resources must be used efficiently while reducing the development impact on human health and environment during the buildings' life cycle. Environmental auditing and pressure-state response based models to monitor sustainable development in Malaysia should be developed. A data availability and sharing system should be developed and implemented to facilitate for the use in the establishment of sustainable development and low carbon society. Ideas which affect millions of people and guide the policies of nations must be accessible to all. Only thus can they permeate the institutions from the local to the global level. Creating sustainable development and low carbon societies depends on the knowledge and involvement of all stakeholders in the industry. So what is our level of understanding of GIS and its application? The development of geospatial data in Malaysia is important because the successful implementation of sustainable development and low carbon projects depend largely on the availability of geospatial information. It would facilitate the stakeholders and resolve some of the problems regarding the availability, quality, organisation, accessibility and sharing of spatial information. The introduction of GIS may change the way for better sustainable urban development and low carbon society performance. The use of GIS

  18. Visualizing the application of GIS in transformation towards a sustainable development and a low carbon society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M. H.; Ariffin, A.; Malik, T. A.

    2014-02-01

    A strategy for sustainable development is a significant milestone on the road to a more socially, economically and environmentally responsible society. It creates a framework within which the stakeholders can make a strong contribution to a better future. Because of the merits and growing interest in sustainable development, the race is on for researchers and stakeholders in the construction sector to initiate actions to reduce the negative impacts of development and sharpen their competitive edge. The cities should be created with a vision which supports harmonious communities and living conditions through sustainable urban development. The resources must be used efficiently while reducing the development impact on human health and environment during the buildings' life cycle. Environmental auditing and pressure-state response based models to monitor sustainable development in Malaysia should be developed. A data availability and sharing system should be developed and implemented to facilitate for the use in the establishment of sustainable development and low carbon society. Ideas which affect millions of people and guide the policies of nations must be accessible to all. Only thus can they permeate the institutions from the local to the global level. Creating sustainable development and low carbon societies depends on the knowledge and involvement of all stakeholders in the industry. So what is our level of understanding of GIS and its application? The development of geospatial data in Malaysia is important because the successful implementation of sustainable development and low carbon projects depend largely on the availability of geospatial information. It would facilitate the stakeholders and resolve some of the problems regarding the availability, quality, organisation, accessibility and sharing of spatial information. The introduction of GIS may change the way for better sustainable urban development and low carbon society performance. The use of GIS is to

  19. Capturing low-carbon power system dynamics : Interactions between intermittent renewables and power plants with CO2 capture and storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Anne-Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    Low-carbon power systems are needed by the year 2050 to meet climate change mitigation targets. This dissertation investigates the operational and economic feasibility of such future low-carbon power systems by simulating the Dutch and European power systems. Particular attention is paid to the

  20. Pitting corrosion resistance of a novel duplex alloy steel in alkali-activated slag extract in the presence of chloride ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin-jie; Ming, Jing; Liu, Xin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, two types of reinforcing steels (conventional low-carbon steel and a novel duplex alloy steel with Cr and Mo) were exposed to chloride-contaminated extract solutions (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) extract and alkali-activated slag (AAS) extract) to investigate their pitting corrosion resistance. The results confirm that the pitting corrosion resistance of the alloy steel is much higher than that of the low-carbon steel in both extract solutions with various NaCl concentrations. Moreover, for each type of steel, the AAS extract contributes to a higher pitting corrosion resistance compared with the OPC extract in the presence of chloride ions, likely because of the formation of flocculent precipitates on the steel surface.

  1. Tendances Carbone no. 77 'Low-carbon innovation is up, but not because of the EU ETS'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calel, Raphael; Dechezlepretre, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Tendances Carbone' bulletin specifically studies the developments of the European market for CO 2 allowances. This issue addresses the following points: The EU ETS is the main instrument of European climate policy, and many policy-makers envisage it as a driving force of the EU's transition to a low-carbon economy. By putting a price on emissions, the scheme is expected to encourage heavy polluters to develop new low-carbon technologies. At first glance it is encouraging to notice, then, that patenting for low-carbon technologies has surged in Europe since 2005. When analysing new data we find compelling evidence that the EU ETS has indeed encouraged regulated companies to develop new low-carbon technologies, but this effect is concentrated among too few companies to account for the surge in low-carbon patenting

  2. The effect of immersion time to low carbon steel hardness and microstructure with hot dip galvanizing coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, A. A.; Rajagukguk, T. O.; Sumardi, S.

    2018-01-01

    Along with developing necessities of metal materials, these rise demands of quality improvements and material protections especially the mechanical properties of the material. This research used hot dip galvanizing coating method. The objectives of this research were to find out Rockwell hardness (HRb), layer thickness, micro structure and observation with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) from result of coating by using Hot Dip Galvanizing coating method with immersion time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes at 460°C. The result shows that Highest Rockwell hardness test (HRb) was at 3 minutes immersion time with 76.012 HRb. Highest thickness result was 217.3 μm at 12 minutes immersion. Microstructure test result showed that coating was formed at eta, zeta, delta and gamma phases, while Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) showed Fe, Zn, Mn, Si and S elements at the specimens after coating.

  3. Utilizing electromagnetic properties to determine the micro-plastic limit of low-carbon steel CSN 411375

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Kaiser, J.; Mentl, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2014), s. 23-33 ISSN 1383-5416 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/10/2052 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : damage * fatigue * microplastic limit * electrical impedance Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.815, year: 2014 http://iospress.metapress.com/content/j16473863q2thh40/?p=09ecef602ca94ee08740cc9f2e44ec32&pi=2

  4. Conducting polyaniline/multi-wall carbon nanotubes composite paints on low carbon steel for corrosion protection: electrochemical investigations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Deshpande, P. P.; Vathare, S. S.; Vagge, S. T.; Tomšík, Elena; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 8 (2013), s. 1072-1078 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/1626 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : corrosion * polyaniline * conducting polymer Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2013

  5. Bringing the Low-Carbon Agenda to China: A Study in Transnational Policy Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hofem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study traces the transnational interactions that contributed to introducing the low-carbon economy agenda into Chinese policymaking. A microprocessual two-level analysis (outside-in as well as inside-access is employed to analyse transnational and domestic exchanges. The study provides evidence that low-carbon agenda-setting – introduced by transnational actors, backed by foreign funding, promoted by policy entrepreneurs from domestic research institutes, propelled by top-level attention, but only gradually and cautiously adopted by the government bureaucracy – can be considered a case of effective transnational diffusion based on converging perceptions of novel policy challenges and options. Opinion leaders and policy-brokers from the government-linked scientific community functioned as effective access points to the Chinese government’s policy agenda.

  6. A low-carbon future: Spatial planning's role in enhancing technological innovation in the built environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, Jenny; French, Will

    2008-01-01

    The scope of spatial planning activity includes issues of governance, corporate organisation, policy integration, statutory and regulatory frameworks, and technical analysis and design. The nature of its potential contribution to achieving low-carbon built environments will vary according to the resolution of tensions between pressures for leadership, consistent decision making and speed of change and the value placed on diversity, flexibility and innovation. A planning system that can support technological innovation will be characterised by high levels of organisational and institutional capacity and high-quality knowledge systems that support a focus on delivering place-based objectives. The paper reflects on further aspects of such a system and the issues that spatial planning needs to address in delivering low-carbon energy systems

  7. Developing nuclear power to realize low-carbon and economic sustainable development of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xingfa

    2012-01-01

    Thermal power is the primary power energy of China, whose basic primary energy consumption is mostly burning coal. And thereby carbon dioxide emission reduction becomes much difficult in China. Seeking low-carbon discharge power energy is the necessary trend in China electric power development. Among the new energy, wind power, hydropower and solar energy have some distinctive shortcoming, which can not make up the energy growth demand with the rapid growth of the economy. Comparing to other kinds of electric energy, the nuclear power possesses the evident advantages, it will become the basis energy to carry out the goal of energy conservation and emission reduction in China and developing nuclear power can realize the sustainable development of China economy under low-carbon condition. (author)

  8. Research of System Building Basing on the Low Carbon Economy About Carbon Accounting for the Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liqiong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As global warming has become truth, is developing as a new economic model, The new economic development model has given rise to an important branch of environmental accounting, namely carbon accounting. At first, this paper discusses the carbon accounting theoretical foundation comprehensively, and then analyzes the environment of the construction of the carbon accounting system. The focus of the article is to build enterprise carbon accounting system, it covers the confirmation and measurement, record and information disclosure of the enterprise carbon accounting on the way of low carbon economy, its core is the processing of carbon emission rights, information disclosure mode and content, etc.; The purpose of this paper is to build enterprise carbon accounting system which is suitable for China’s national conditions, in order to provide certain reference and theoretical support for the low carbon economy development of our country.

  9. Analysis of responses to the microgeneration strategy and low carbon buildings programme consultation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbard, J.; Long, S.; McCartney, K.; Rushton, K.

    2005-10-15

    This report summarises and analyses the written responses to the consultation document, 'Microgeneration Strategy and Low Carbon Buildings Programme', issued by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) in June 2005. Responses were received from 204 different organisations representing 29 stakeholder groups. The consultation document contained 41 core questions divided into eight sections: general; product development and deployment; communications; economics; installation; Low Carbon Buildings Programme; physical infrastructure; and local authorities and regional bodies. In the analysis, the responses to these questions were categorised according to whether they represented a 'clear consensus', a 'majority view', 'supporting themes' and 'divergent themes'. Using these categories, stakeholder agreement on the eight strategic issues is summarised in a matrix. The report is divided into three sections: introduction; summary of responses; and key findings. The respondents are listed in an appendix. Another appendix reproduces the consultation questions.

  10. An Optimal Allocation Model of Public Transit Mode Proportion for the Low-Carbon Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjun Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Public transit has been widely recognized as a potential way to develop low-carbon transportation. In this paper, an optimal allocation model of public transit mode proportion (MPMP has been built to achieve the low-carbon public transit. Optimal ratios of passenger traffic for rail, bus, and taxi are derived by running the model using typical data. With different values of traffic demand, construction cost, travel time, and accessibilities, MPMP can generate corresponding optimal ratios, benefiting decision impacts analysis and decision makers. Instead of considering public transit as a united system, it is separated into units in this paper. And Shanghai is used to test model validity and practicality.

  11. Study on Chinese model of low carbon economy-energy-electricity-environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zhaoguang

    2010-09-15

    With the successful experience on energy efficiency in the past 30 years in China, it can be summarized as Energy Usage Management(EUM) and Integrated Resource Strategic Planning(IRSP). They will play essential role in Low Carbon Economy. The model of Low Carbon Economy-Energy-Electricity-Environment and an outlook of Chinese economic growth, energy-electricity demand, and renewable energy generation have been studied in this paper. It has been shown that China would save energy 4.38 billion toe and reduce CO2 emission 16.55 billion ton by EUM, and would save energy 1.5 billion toe and reduce CO2 emission 5.7 Btons by IRSP during 2010-2030.

  12. Low Carbon Design Research on the Space Layout Types of Office Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing

    2018-01-01

    It is beneficial to find out the relationship of the spatial layout and low-carbon design in order to reduce buildings’ carbon emissions in the conceptual design phase. This paper analyzes and compares shape coefficient values, annual energy consumption and lighting performance of office buildings of different space layout types in Shanghai. Based on morphological characteristics of different types, the study also analyzes and presents low-carbon design strategies for each single type. This study assumes that architects should conduct passive and active design according to the specific building space layout, so that to make best use of the advantages and bypassing the disadvantages, in order to maximally reduce buildings’ carbon emissions.

  13. A monetary plan for upgrading climate finance and support the low-carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hourcade, Jean Charles; Cassen, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This article examines how carbon finance can be part of a general reform of the financial system. Climate policies can indeed stimulate a sustainable and inclusive climate finance, in line with the call of the Cancun Agreement for a paradigm shift in climate negotiations. The mechanism described in this article is based on the adoption by Parties to the negotiations of a social value of carbon to trigger a wave of low-carbon investments in the world. Central banks offer credit lines for commercial banks backed by this social value of carbon, which are then used to cut the risk to invest in low- carbon investments. A future agreement in Paris next year should support this type of mechanisms.

  14. Opportunities and challenges for innovation in the design of low-carbon energy technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Araceli; Kjær, Tyge; Andersen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Footprint, concepts and tools from Life Cycle Assessment, and relevant elements from eco-efficiency theoretical frameworks. Often systemic approaches tend to be driven by completely rational models. However, our main contribution is to consider a more holistic approach that also includes socio-psychological...... as a study object and discusses the question: What are the main possibilities and challenges when designing low-carbon illumination technologies? To answer this question, we use a systemic approach including environmental, economic, energy and political issues using relevant concepts from the Ecological......Though there is broad consensus that one of the solutions to the current environmental challenge will be based on the use of low-carbon technologies, and even though there is a big potential to turn to a more sustainable design and innovation, there are several elements that need to be taken...

  15. Low Carbon Grid Study: Analysis of a 50% Emission Reduction in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, Gregory [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jorgenson, Jennie [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ehlen, Ali [Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies, Sacramento, CA (United States); Caldwell, James H. [Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The California 2030 Low Carbon Grid Study (LCGS) analyzes the grid impacts of a variety of scenarios that achieve 50% carbon emission reductions from California's electric power sector. Impacts are characterized based on several key operational and economic metrics, including production costs, emissions, curtailment, and impacts on the operation of gas generation and imports. The modeling results indicate that achieving a low-carbon grid (with emissions 50% below 2012 levels) is possible by 2030 with relatively limited curtailment (less than 1%) if institutional frameworks are flexible. Less flexible institutional frameworks and a less diverse generation portfolio could lead to higher curtailment (up to 10%), operational costs (up to $800 million higher), and carbon emissions (up to 14% higher).

  16. Chinese energy policy progress and challenges in the transition to low carbon development, 2006-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Basso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available If the world is not to jeopardize the chances for human life on Earth, climate change must be mitigated; therefore, achieving low carbon development is crucial. China is the world's greatest GHG emitter, energy producer and energy consumer; investigating its energy-climate policy developments and international positions are of utmost importance to understand and tackle current stumbling blocks of the global energy and climate governance.

  17. Assessment of wind and solar power in global low-carbon energy scenarios: An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luderer, Gunnar; Pietzcker, Robert C.; Carrara, Samuel; de Boer, Harmen Sytze; Fujimori, Shinichiro; Johnson, Nils; Mima, Silvana; Arent, Douglas

    2017-04-07

    This preface introduces the special section on the assessment of wind and solar in global low-carbon energy scenarios. The special section documents the results of a coordinated research effort to improve the representation of variable renewable energies (VRE), including wind and solar power, in Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and presents an overview of the results obtained in the underlying coordinated model inter-comparison exercise.

  18. Safety and effective developing nuclear power to realize green and low-carbon development

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Qi-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the role of nuclear power of China's energy structure and industry system. Comparing with other renewable energy the nuclear power chain has very low greenhouse gas emission, so it will play more important role in China's low-carbon economy. The paper also discussed the necessity of nuclear power development to achieve emission reduction, energy structure adjustment, nuclear power safety, environmental protection, enhancement of nuclear power technology, nuclear waste trea...

  19. Understanding the development trends of low-carbon energy technologies: A patent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albino, Vito; Ardito, Lorenzo; Dangelico, Rosa Maria; Messeni Petruzzelli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Governments’ strategies set important frameworks to develop and sustain low-carbon energy technologies. • Commercial activities play a key role in the low-carbon energy technologies’ development. • The number of patents that are based upon basic research is growing. - Abstract: Eco-innovations are being recognized as fundamental means to foster sustainable development, as well as to create new business opportunities. Nowadays, the eco-innovation concept is gaining ground within both academic and practitioner studies with the attempt to better understand the main dynamics underlying its nature and guide policymakers and companies in supporting its development. This paper contributes to the extant literature on eco-innovation by providing a comprehensive overview of the evolution of a specific type of eco-innovations that are playing a crucial role in the current socio-economic agenda, namely low-carbon energy technologies. Accordingly, we focus our attention on the related patenting activity of different countries and organizations over time, as well as on influencing policy initiatives and events. Hence, we collected 131,661 patents granted at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (U.S.PTO.) between 1971 and 2010, and belonging to the “Nuclear power generation”, “Alternative energy production”, and “Energy conservation” technological classes, as indicated by the International Patent Classification (IPC) Green Inventory. Our findings report the development trends of low-carbon energy technologies, as well as identify major related environmental programs, historical events, and private sector initiatives explaining those trends, hence revealing how these different circumstances have significantly influenced their development over time

  20. Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelich, Katy; Dawson, David A.; Purnell, Phil; Knoeri, Christof; Revell, Ruairi; Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a method to analyse material criticality of infrastructure transitions. • Criticality is defined as the potential for, and exposure to, supply disruption. • Our method is dynamic reducing the probability of lock-in to at-risk technologies. • We show that supply disruption potential is reducing but exposure is increasing. - Abstract: Decarbonisation of existing infrastructure systems requires a dynamic roll-out of technology at an unprecedented scale. The potential disruption in supply of critical materials could endanger such a transition to low-carbon infrastructure and, by extension, compromise energy security more broadly because low carbon technologies are reliant on these materials in a way that fossil-fuelled energy infrastructure is not. Criticality is currently defined as the combination of the potential for supply disruption and the exposure of a system of interest to that disruption. We build on this definition and develop a dynamic approach to quantifying criticality, which monitors the change in criticality during the transition towards a low-carbon infrastructure goal. This allows us to assess the relative risk of different technology pathways to reach a particular goal and reduce the probability of being ‘locked in’ to currently attractive but potentially future-critical technologies. To demonstrate, we apply our method to criticality of the proposed UK electricity system transition, with a focus on neodymium. We anticipate that the supply disruption potential of neodymium will decrease by almost 30% by 2050; however, our results show the criticality of low carbon electricity production increases ninefold over this period, as a result of increasing exposure to neodymium-reliant technologies

  1. Optimization and allocation of spinning reserves in a low-carbon framework

    OpenAIRE

    Bruninx, Kenneth; Van den Bergh, Kenneth; Delarue, Erik; D'haeseleer, William

    2016-01-01

    Low-carbon electric power systems are often characterized by high shares of renewables, such as wind power. The variable nature and limited predictability of some renewables will require novel system operation methods to properly size and cost-efficiently allocate the required reserves. The current state-of-the-art stochastic unit commitment models internalize this sizing and allocation process by considering a set of scenarios representing the stochastic input during the unit commitment opti...

  2. Urban greening for low carbon cities—introduction to the special issue

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Thornbush

    2016-01-01

    As a measure to counteract the effects of urban sprawl, with the continued growth of cities worldwide, different modes of urban greening are being increasingly recognized. This special issue addresses current developments in the transition to low carbon cities employing a variety of urban greening techniques. The special issue consists of 10 papers, including four review papers on the topics of biophilic architecture; environmental versus marketable aesthetics; urban agriculture; and the rati...

  3. Breaking the climate deadlock. A Global Deal for Our Low-Carbon Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beinhocker, E.; Howard, S.; Kenber, M.; Morgan, J.; Oppenheim, J.

    2008-06-01

    This report outlines the 10 building blocks for an agreement that will create a prosperous low carbon climate-resilient world. The report is targeted at G8 + 5 leaders, policy makers, business leaders, and opinion formers from key countries. It identifies the actions and questions that need to be resolved by political and business leaders over the next 18 months to achieve a successful outcome to the UN climate change negotiations in Copenhagen in December 2009

  4. Green and sustainable City will become the development objective of China's Low Carbon City in future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Qun, Liu; Chun-Xia, Liu; Yun-Guang, Gao

    2014-01-14

    Environmental pollution and greenhouse gas emissions are becoming significant environmental issues in China, thus the sustainable development and revival of the country is impossible using the conventional path of encouraging economic growth at the expense of the environment. In response to the global warming, the prices of the traditional energy rise considerably, and a series of environmental problems, China must improve its own mode of economic development. Hundreds of Chinese cities have billions of square meters of buildings and most industry and the annual energy demand is an astronomical figure. China's government is facing increasing pressure in the low carbon international backdrop, and the low carbon city becomes the inevitable developmental direction of Chinese city in the foreseeable future. The description is first centered on energy structure/energy consumption per unit/urbanized status, and urban energy consumption status, and then concerned with the efforts and measures of Chinese government, to realize the energy saving. Finally, we present the developmental prospect and barriers and the promotion measures related to the low carbon city under the government policy, financial incentives and funding supports, etc.

  5. The future of Japan's power business in a low-carbon society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the implication and detail of the agreement of COP 21, and clarifies the task for electric power companies and the direction of development based on this. In face of the formulation of energy mix policy for 2030, in July 2015, Japan established a greenhouse gas reduction target of 25% compared to 2013, and registered it. Although the goal for achieving a low-carbon society has been completed by setting energy saving target and energy mix policy, how to realize it during the progress of power system innovation is important and it is not easy. As the energy policy, the following are important: (1) steady realization of energy saving, (2) cost reduction and balancing of introduction of renewable energy, (3) clean use of fossil fuels, and (4) ensuring the safety of nuclear power and steady restart. This study discusses what will be made for each item, and what will be needed. To make Japan's efforts toward a low-carbon society a reality, the securement of zero-emission power sources of 44% is indispensable, and 20% to 22% (a little less of half of it) is expectedly depending on nuclear power. With the Paris Agreement at COP 21, the buildup of a low-carbon society in Japan is now an urgent issue. However, there are various hurdles for realizing it, and in addition, the system innovation of electric power business has entered a full-fledged stage, making the task further complicated. (A.O.)

  6. Ecological Network Analysis for a Low-Carbon and High-Tech Industrial Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial sector is one of the indispensable contributors in global warming. Even if the occurrence of ecoindustrial parks (EIPs seems to be a good improvement in saving ecological crises, there is still a lack of definitional clarity and in-depth researches on low-carbon industrial parks. In order to reveal the processes of carbon metabolism in a low-carbon high-tech industrial park, we selected Beijing Development Area (BDA International Business Park in Beijing, China as case study, establishing a seven-compartment- model low-carbon metabolic network based on the methodology of Ecological Network Analysis (ENA. Integrating the Network Utility Analysis (NUA, Network Control Analysis (NCA, and system-wide indicators, we compartmentalized system sectors into ecological structure and analyzed dependence and control degree based on carbon metabolism. The results suggest that indirect flows reveal more mutuality and exploitation relation between system compartments and they are prone to positive sides for the stability of the whole system. The ecological structure develops well as an approximate pyramidal structure, and the carbon metabolism of BDA proves self-mutualistic and sustainable. Construction and waste management were found to be two active sectors impacting carbon metabolism, which was mainly regulated by internal and external environment.

  7. Towards low carbon business park energy systems: Classification of techno-economic energy models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, Jonas; Vandevelde, Lieven; Van Eetvelde, Greet

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate climate destabilisation, human-induced greenhouse gas emissions urgently need to be curbed. A major share of these emissions originates from the industry and energy sectors. Hence, a low carbon shift in industrial and business park energy systems is called for. Low carbon business parks minimise energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by maximal exploitation of local renewable energy production, enhanced energy efficiency, and inter-firm heat exchange, combined in a collective energy system. The holistic approach of techno-economic energy models facilitates the design of such systems, while yielding an optimal trade-off between energetic, economic and environmental performances. However, no models custom-tailored for industrial park energy systems are detected in literature. In this paper, existing energy model classifications are scanned for adequate model characteristics and accordingly, a confined number of models are selected and described. Subsequently, a practical typology is proposed, existing of energy system evolution, optimisation, simulation, accounting and integration models, and key model features are compared. Finally, important features for a business park energy model are identified. - Highlights: • A holistic perspective on (low carbon) business park energy systems is introduced. • A new categorisation of techno-economic energy models is proposed. • Model characteristics are described per model category. • Essential model features for business park energy system modelling are identified. • A strategy towards a techno-economic energy model for business parks is proposed

  8. Building capacity for low-carbon communities: The role of grassroots initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middlemiss, Lucie; Parrish, Bradley D.

    2010-01-01

    Grassroots initiatives for change rely on people with limited power, limited resources and limited ability to influence others. From this position, people acting from the bottom up can change their own actions, seek to influence others around them and seek to change the social structures that they inhabit. These acts are invariably conceived, initiated and enacted within communities, and there is an emerging interest from practitioner, policy and academic circles in the importance of community as a space for realising pro-environmental change. In this paper, we ask what role grassroots initiatives can have in creating low-carbon communities. Using a theoretical framework from work on community-based practice change initiatives, we discuss the interplay between grassroots action and community capacity. We then present two cases of grassroots low-carbon community initiatives in light of this theoretical work. We conclude by discussing key themes emerging from the cases, including the potential for grassroots initiatives to build community capacity for low-carbon practices, and the importance of locally crafted solutions according to the structures specific to place.

  9. A Low Carbon Development Guide for Local Government Actions in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Ohshita, Stephanie

    2011-05-01

    Local level actions are crucial for achieving energy-saving and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Yet it is challenging to implement new policies and actions due to a lack of information, funding, and capacity. This is particularly the case in developing countries such as China. Even though national energy intensity and carbon intensity targets have been set, most local governments do not have the knowledge regarding actions to achieve the targets, the cost-effectiveness of policies, the possible impact of policies, or how to design and implement a climate action plan. This paper describes a guidebook that was developed to motivate and provide local governments in China with information to create an action plan to tackle climate change and increase energy efficiency. It provides a simple step-by-step description of how action plans can be established and essential elements to be included - from preparing a GHG emission inventory to implementation of the plan. The guidebook also provides a comprehensive list of successful policies and best practices found internationally and in China to encourage low carbon development in industry, buildings, transportation, electric power generation, agriculture and forestry. This paper also presents indicators that can be used to define low-carbon development, as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of actions taken at an aggregated (city) level, and at a sectoral or end use level. The guidebook can also be used for low carbon development by local governments in other developing countries.

  10. Informed public preferences for electricity portfolios with CCS and other low-carbon technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Lauren A; De Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Morgan, M Granger

    2010-09-01

    Public perceptions of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and other low-carbon electricity-generating technologies may affect the feasibility of their widespread deployment. We asked a diverse sample of 60 participants recruited from community groups in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to rank 10 technologies (e.g., coal with CCS, natural gas, nuclear, various renewables, and energy efficiency), and seven realistic low-carbon portfolios composed of these technologies, after receiving comprehensive and carefully balanced materials that explained the costs and benefits of each technology. Rankings were obtained in small group settings as well as individually before and after the group discussions. The ranking exercise asked participants to assume that the U.S. Congress had mandated a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions from power plants to be built in the future. Overall, rankings suggest that participants favored energy efficiency, followed by nuclear power, integrated gasification combined-cycle coal with CCS and wind. The most preferred portfolio also included these technologies. We find that these informed members of the general public preferred diverse portfolios that contained CCS and nuclear over alternatives once they fully understood the benefits, cost, and limitations of each. The materials and approach developed for this study may also have value in educating members of the general public about the challenges of achieving a low-carbon energy future. © 2010 Society for Risk Analysis.

  11. Ecological network analysis for a low-carbon and high-tech industrial park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Su, Meirong; Liu, Gengyuan; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Shiyi; Jiang, Meiming

    2012-01-01

    Industrial sector is one of the indispensable contributors in global warming. Even if the occurrence of ecoindustrial parks (EIPs) seems to be a good improvement in saving ecological crises, there is still a lack of definitional clarity and in-depth researches on low-carbon industrial parks. In order to reveal the processes of carbon metabolism in a low-carbon high-tech industrial park, we selected Beijing Development Area (BDA) International Business Park in Beijing, China as case study, establishing a seven-compartment- model low-carbon metabolic network based on the methodology of Ecological Network Analysis (ENA). Integrating the Network Utility Analysis (NUA), Network Control Analysis (NCA), and system-wide indicators, we compartmentalized system sectors into ecological structure and analyzed dependence and control degree based on carbon metabolism. The results suggest that indirect flows reveal more mutuality and exploitation relation between system compartments and they are prone to positive sides for the stability of the whole system. The ecological structure develops well as an approximate pyramidal structure, and the carbon metabolism of BDA proves self-mutualistic and sustainable. Construction and waste management were found to be two active sectors impacting carbon metabolism, which was mainly regulated by internal and external environment.

  12. Low carbon renewable natural gas production from coalbeds and implications for carbon capture and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zaixing; Sednek, Christine; Urynowicz, Michael A; Guo, Hongguang; Wang, Qiurong; Fallgren, Paul; Jin, Song; Jin, Yan; Igwe, Uche; Li, Shengpin

    2017-09-18

    Isotopic studies have shown that many of the world's coalbed natural gas plays are secondary biogenic in origin, suggesting a potential for gas regeneration through enhanced microbial activities. The generation of biogas through biostimulation and bioaugmentation is limited to the bioavailability of coal-derived compounds and is considered carbon positive. Here we show that plant-derived carbohydrates can be used as alternative substrates for gas generation by the indigenous coal seam microorganisms. The results suggest that coalbeds can act as natural geobioreactors to produce low carbon renewable natural gas, which can be considered carbon neutral, or perhaps even carbon negative depending on the amount of carbon sequestered within the coal. In addition, coal bioavailability is no longer a limiting factor. This approach has the potential of bridging the gap between fossil fuels and renewable energy by utilizing existing coalbed natural gas infrastructure to produce low carbon renewable natural gas and reducing global warming.Coalbeds produce natural gas, which has been observed to be enhanced by in situ microbes. Here, the authors add plant-derived carbohydrates (monosaccharides) to coal seams to be converted by indigenous microbes into natural gas, thus demonstrating a potential low carbon renewable natural gas resource.

  13. Strategies for Low-Carbon Green Growth and Urban Management in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichung Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: National policies and strategies for low-carbon green growth in Korea are reviewed in this study. Providing standards and guidelines for urban comprehensive planning and management plans is necessary so that the series of plans can deal with possible effects from climate changes. Urban planning guidelines for management and improvements to achieve low carbon green growth were set up and implemented, focusing on institutional and regulatory foundations. These deal with climate change influences on urban planning, reduction of green house gas emissions and elevation of energy efficiency based on plans of land use units. In the case of Seoul city, transit-oriented compact development, public transportation-oriented structure, green space expansion, and pleasant living spaces are implemented in relation to urban structure and land use. We should suggest systematic and comprehensive countermeasures against greenhouse gas emissions and climate changes in terms of spatial structure, transportation systems, natural resource conservation, environment management, energy and open spaces. For the Seoul mega-city, plans show the capabilities of the policy department including many policy tools. Reflecting smart city, ubiquitous city, and U-Eco city concepts and human behavior, we should move towards increasing efficiency and maintaining sustainable economic growth. KEYWORDS: Low-carbon green growth, urban management, Korea, Seoul

  14. Research on Price of Railway Freight Based on Low-Carbon Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenling Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation is one of the major energy consumption and carbon emission industries. Railway transport is a typical low-carbon transport. To accelerate the green low-carbon transportation development and improve the railway market share, this paper defines the concept of carbon saving profit to study the price of railway freight after the government functions were separated from railway enterprise management. First, taking full account of market factors and on the principle of utility maximization and maximum likelihood method, the sharing ratio model of transportation modes is established. Then consideration is given to both the profit of railway enterprises and social benefits, and income maximization model of railway freight based on low-carbon economy is established. The model can scientifically guide the transportation users who prefer to use resource-saving and environmental-friendly transportation modes, optimize transportation structure, and comprehensively improve the efficiency of transportation system. Finally, case analysis is conducted to verify the rationality and validity of the model, and reference for the rail freight pricing is provided.

  15. Self-evaluation System for Low carbon Industrial Park--A Case Study of TEDA Industrial Park in Tianjin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenyan, W.; Fanghua, H.; Ying, C.; Ouyang, W.; Yuan, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Massive fossil fuel burning caused by industrialization development is one major reason of global climate change. After Copenhagen climate summit, the studies of low-carbon city gain attentions from many countries. On 25th Nov. 2009, the State Council executive meeting announced that by 2020 China will reduce the carbon dioxide emissions per unit of GDP by 40% to 45% compared with the level of 2005. Industrial Park as an important part of city, has developed rapidly in recent years, and turns into a key element and an alternative mechanism to achieve emission reduction target. Thus, establishing a low carbon development model for industrial park is one of the most effective ways to build sustainable low carbon cities. By adopting the self-evaluation system of low carbon industrial park, this research aims to summarize the low carbon concept in industrial park practice. According to The Guide for Low Carbon Industrial Development Zones, the quantitative evaluation system is divided into 4 separate categories with 23 different quantitative indicators. The 4 categories include: 1) energy and GHG management (weigh 60%), 2) circular economy and environmental protection (weigh 15%), 3) administration and incentive mechanisms of industrial parks (weigh 15%), and 4) planning and urban forms (weigh 10%). By going through the necessary stages and by leading continuous improvements low carbon development goals can be achieved. Tianjin TEDA industrial park is selected as one case study to conduct an assessment on TEDA low-carbon development condition. Tianjin TEDA Industrial Park is already an ecological demonstration industrial park in China, with good foundations on environmental protection, resource recycling, etc. Based on the self-evaluation system, the indicators, such as the energy using efficiency and the degree of land intensive utilization, are also analyzed and assessed. Through field survey and data collection, in accordance with the quantitative self

  16. Carbon Impact Analytics - Designing low carbon indices based on Carbon Impact Analytics indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Investors are increasingly exposed to carbon risks and now face the challenge of managing these risks and developing climate-resilient investment strategies. Carbon Impact Analytics (CIA), an innovative methodology for analyzing the full carbon impact of a portfolio or index, equips investors and asset managers with the tools necessary to reduce their climate-related risks but also to seize the opportunities offered by the ongoing energy transition. Investors, asset managers and other financial institutions may use CIA results to: - measure and manage risks, - optimize their contribution to the energy transition, - seize opportunities associated with climate change mitigation, - report on GHG emissions and savings (for regulatory purposes or voluntarily), - engage in dialogue with companies, - reallocate investment portfolios, - and build new low-carbon indices. In this report, Carbone 4 offers a detailed look into how CIA indicators can be used to either 1) reallocate an existing portfolio or index to achieve maximal carbon performance or 2) build new low carbon indices from the ground up, drawn from Carbone 4's ever-growing database of CIA-analyzed firms. Two main levers were used to optimize CIA output: 1. Sectorial reallocation: exclusion of fossil fuel-related sectors or insertion of low carbon pure players; 2. Intra-sectorial reallocation: best-in-class approach within a sector. Sectorial and intra-sectorial methods may be applied in conjunction with one another to maximize results. For example, a best-in-class + fossil fuel-free index may be constructed by first excluding the fossil fuel sector and then applying a CIA best-in-class approach to all remaining sectors. This report offers a detailed look into how CIA indicators can be used to rework portfolios or indices to maximize carbon performance or to build low carbon indices from the ground up. These methods are illustrated via two preliminary examples of indices designed by Carbone 4: the

  17. Aging phenomena in high-Si steels studied by internal friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, D.; Rivera-Tovar, J.L.; Segers, D.; Vandenberghe, R.E.; Houbaert, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Si-steels with various Si-contents (1.9-5.6 wt.%) have been analyzed by internal friction and compared with an ultra-low carbon steel. Measurements have been carried out immediately after different thermomechanical treatments to study a believed aging phenomenon. Adding Si lowers the Snoek peak of carbon and produces a new peak associated to the formation of Si-C pairs. For Si contents higher than 4.6 wt.%, another peak appears at very low frequencies, which can be attributed to a Zener relaxation of Si-atom pairs. A room-temperature aging effect has been detected in the Si-steels, but not in the ultra-low carbon steel. This aging is caused by the migration of C atoms to the structural defects and by formation of short-range order in the Fe-Si solution

  18. Going Clean - The Economics of China's Low-carbon Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallding, Karl; Thai, Helen; Han, Guoyi; Olsson, Marie; Kartha, Sivan (Stockholm Environment Inst. (Sweden)); Eklund, Klas (SEB, Stockholm (Sweden)); SU Ming (Peking Univ. (China)); Cao Jing (Tsinghua Univ. (China)); Luderer (Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact (Germany))

    2009-11-15

    This report shows that China can achieve the transition to a low-carbon economy. China can make these emissions reductions within the tight constraints of a global 2 deg C target while still meeting development and economic growth goals over the next four decades. There are strong mitigation potentials in the building, industry, transport and electricity generation sectors. China would benefit from early mitigation, but immediate action is critical for the world to have a reasonable chance of keeping warming below the 2 deg C target. Such a transition would also be an essential part of China's modernisation. A low-carbon transition presents opportunities for China to improve its energy security and move its economy up the value chain in the production of international goods and services. A low-carbon China is a country with a larger service sector, more advanced labour skills and less environmental degradation. During this transition, new, green job opportunities will emerge, and support an overall shift to a low-carbon economy. Active labour market and social policies, vocational training and upgrading of skills are imperative to facilitate this modernisation and reduce the impact of jobs lost in resource-intensive industries. With today's low price on carbon emissions, the incentives for a low-carbon transition are not sufficiently strong. Consumption and production patterns must be steered in a more resource-sustainable direction. A first step is to phase out subsidies on fossil fuels. Another is to place a price on carbon, either through a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade system, which would create incentives for companies and individuals to produce and consume less carbon-intensive goods and services, and to undertake abatement opportunities to reduce their overall carbon footprint. Advancing technology and innovation need to be fundamental, shared policy objectives in this transition. Early investment reduces costs and paves the way for large

  19. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  20. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility of various stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akashi, Masatsune; Kawamoto, Teruaki

    1978-01-01

    In order to evaluate new plant materials for their future applications to boiling water reactors (BWRs), the creviced bent beam SCC tests (CBB tests) were conducted on various sensitized stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water. The results obtained are as follows. 1. Field SCC can be easily reproduced by the CBB test using the specimens taken from the 304 stainless steel pipe weld joints. 2. The SCC susceptibility of 18Cr-11Ni stainless steel in oxygenated high temperature water decreases markedly with the reduction of the carbon content. 3. The SCC susceptibility of low carbon stainless steels (304L, 316L) and stabilized stainless steels (321, 347) is significantly lower than that of the 304 and 316 stainless steels. 4. The addition of molybdenum causes the sensitization of stainless steels to delay at lower temperatures, improving the SCC resistance of the weld joints of BWR pipe materials. (auth.)

  1. Prototype steel-concrete LEP dipole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    1981-01-01

    The magnetic field needed in the LEP dipole magnets was rather low, of a fraction of tesla. This lead to the conception of a novel yoke structure consisting of stacks of 1.5 mm thick low-carbon steel laminations spaced by 4.1 mm with the spaces filled with concrete. The excitation coils were also very simple: aluminium bars insulated by polyester boxes in this prototype, by glass-epoxy in the final magnets. For details see LEP-Note 118,1978 and LEP-Note 233 1980. See also 8111529,7908528X.

  2. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-27

    it is stated that pickling and cathodic electrolysis can also cause great supersaturation, because these processes produce hydrogen concentrations on...and H.Alzer: "Hydrogen Permeation in a Low Carbon Martensitic Stainless Steel Exposed to H2S Containing Brines at Free Corrosion", Corrosion99, Paper No

  3. Heat treatment and effects of Cr and Ni in low alloy steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The effects of Cr and Ni on low carbon steel was observed. Undissolved carbide particles refine the austenite grain size. In the presence of nickel, chromium carbide is less effective in austenite grain refinement than chromium carbide in absence of nickel at temperature below 975°C. Nickel does not produce any ...

  4. Mapping and Measuring European Local Governments’ Priorities for a Sustainable and Low-Carbon Energy Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Grafakos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to assess the priorities of local governments (LGs in Europe regarding climate change mitigation technologies evaluation in the electricity sector and to provide important insights for energy policy design. The study applies a hybrid weighting methodology to elicit LGs’ preferences in a constructive and iterative way regarding the evaluation criteria of low-carbon energy technologies. Furthermore, the study employs three data collection and preference elicitation methods, namely: survey, workshop, and webinar. The study was conducted across thirty one (31 European LGs that were categorized according to three variables: population size, geographical region and gross domestic product (GDP per capita. The analysis shows that “CO2 emissions” is the most important criterion among European LGs, followed by “mortality and morbidity” and “ecosystem damages”. The results illustrate the potential synergies of climate and energy policies for addressing both CO2 emissions and air pollution. It was also found, based on a correlation analysis, that LGs with higher GDP per capita tend to provide higher weights to criteria related to security of energy supply and technological innovation. The current study provides insights on the actual LGs’ priorities that are important to consider during low-carbon energy technologies evaluation and energy policy design. Interestingly, the results of the European LGs’ preferences clearly show that the EU climate policy objectives have reached different levels of governance—and at this particular case, the local level. Furthermore, the developed methodology could be applied at different geographical regions to map other regions’ LG priorities, but also at a group decision making context to elicit relevant stakeholders’ preferences regarding low-carbon energy technologies and policy objectives.

  5. Low-Carbon Communities between Vision and Implementation The Case of Borg Al Arab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riham Nady

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several cities are facing the problem of running-out of fossil fuels and are contributed to an estimated 70% of the world’s energy-related greenhouse gases (GHGs. Consequently, there is a tremendous need for low-carbon communities which will lead to more livable, efficient and ultimately sustainable cities. Furthermore, well-planned and designed communities can effectively provide the basic human needs and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Some communities have developed strategies to reach net zero-carbon future by reducing demands for energy and supplying the remaining demands with renewable resources.In the meantime, Egyptian cities face the problem of greenhouse gases and the lack of energy and water. Therefore, passive, energy efficient and energy offset design are needed. This can be achieved through sustainable transportation systems and the shift to efficient management of water and waste.The paper discusses the problem of climate change and its relation with communities. It investigates examples of communities that have focused on reducing their carbon emissions in different parts of the world. Also, it examines some of the most important aspects of design strategies that help to implement low-carbon communities and how could they be achieved in the Egyptian context (Borg Al Arab-Alexandria.The aim of the paper is to highlight certain cities that demonstrate a deeper understanding of what a low-carbon community is and how to achieve it through reducing energy demand and providing the best options for passive design and renewable energy supply in the Egyptian communities to become self-contained in terms of energy.  

  6. Transitioning to low carbon communities-from behaviour change to systemic change: Lessons from Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloney, Susie; Horne, Ralph E.; Fien, John

    2010-01-01

    Transitioning to low carbon communities requires an understanding of community practices and resultant emissions, as well as the technologies, infrastructures and institutions associated with and accessed by communities. Moreover, it requires an understanding of the connections between these integrated system components, its dynamics, a defined transition and potential 'levers' involved in 'transitioning'. This paper accepts the notion that 'levers' include programmes designed to achieve practice or behaviour change in households which result in less carbon intensive lifestyles, and focuses on the factors that shape human behaviour and influence householder energy consumption. Research to date by the authors and others indicates that a comprehensive socio-technical framework that considers both individual psychological factors as well as the systems, standards and norms under which individuals operate is fundamental to the development of successful strategies to shift towards low carbon communities. A database has been compiled of over one hundred local programmes aimed at realising carbon neutral communities across Australia largely through approaches to behaviour change. This paper presents the findings of an analysis of these programmes, particularly with regard to the extent to which they take account of a socio-technical framework or understanding of domestic consumption behaviours and whether they are aware of or aim to influence changing standards and expectations around consumption practices within the home. While a number of exemplary community-based programmes adopt an integrated approach to addressing both technical and behavioural dimensions in the shift to low carbon communities, it was found that most fail to take sufficient account of the systems, standards and norms shaping consumption. Conclusions include directions for policy and programme design based on the study findings.

  7. Alpine hydropower in a low carbon economy: Assessing the local implication of global policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    In the global transition towards a more efficient and low-carbon economy, renewable energy plays a major role in displacing fossil fuels, meeting global energy demand while reducing carbon dioxide emissions. In Europe, Variable Renewable Sources (VRS), such as wind and solar power sources, are becoming a relevant share of the generation portfolios in many countries. Beside the indisputable social and environmental advantages of VRS, on the short medium term the VRS-induced lowering energy prices and increasing price's volatility might challenge traditional power sources and, among them, hydropower production, because of smaller incomes and higher maintenance costs associated to a more flexible operation of power systems. In this study, we focus on the Swiss hydropower sector analysing how different low-carbon targets and strategies established at the Swiss and European level might affect energy price formation and thus impact - through hydropower operation - water availability and ecosystems services at the catchment scale. We combine a hydrological model to simulate future water availability and an electricity market model to simulate future evolution of energy prices based on official Swiss and European energy roadmaps and CO2 price trends in the European Union. We use Multi-Objective optimization techniques to design alternative hydropower reservoir operation strategies, aiming to maximise the hydropower companies' income or to provide reliable energy supply with respect to the energy demand. This integrated model allows analysing to which extent global low-carbon policies impact reservoir operation at the local scale, and to gain insight on how to prioritise compensation measures and/or adaptation strategies to mitigate the impact of VRS on hydropower companies in increasingly water constrained settings. Numerical results are shown for a real-world case study in the Swiss Alps.

  8. Is ecological personality always consistent with low-carbon behavioral intention of urban residents?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Jia; Chen, Hong; Long, Ruyin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of low-carbon economics, researchers have become interested in residential consumption as a potential means for reducing carbon emissions. By analyzing and expanding the fundamental concept of personality, a type of personality, namely ecological personality (EP), was defined and a structural model of EP was constructed based on a five-factor model. The study surveyed 890 urban residents to examine the relationship between EP and low-carbon behavioral intention (LCBI). Ecological personality is a five-dimensional concept comprising eco-neuroticism, eco-agreeableness, eco-openness, eco-extraversion, and eco-conscientiousness. Ecological personality traits were positively correlated with the LCBI. However, a quadrifid graph model showed that the EP is not always consistent with LCBI, and respondents fell into two groups: one group comprised ecological residents with consistent traits (positive EP and high LCBI) and non-ecological residents with consistent traits (negative EP and low LCBI), and their EP was consistent with LCBI; the other group comprised ecological residents with gap traits (positive EP and low LCBI) and non-ecological residents with gap traits (negative EP and high LCBI), and neither showed any consistency between personality and intentions. A policy to guide the conversion of different groups into ecological residents with consistent traits is discussed. - Highlights: • The structural model of ecological personality was constructed. • The relationship between personality and behavioral intention was examined. • Ecological personality and low-carbon behavioral intention donot always match up. • A policy urging residents to be ecological was discussed.

  9. Media discourses of low carbon housing: The marginalisation of social and behavioural dimensions within the British broadsheet press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Catherine; Hopfe, Christina; MacGillivray, Brian; Pidgeon, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Decarbonising housing is a key UK government policy to mitigate climate change. Using discourse analysis, we assess how low carbon housing is portrayed within British broadsheet media. Three distinct storylines were identified. Dominating the discourse, Zero carbon housing promotes new-build, low carbon houses as offering high technology solutions to the climate problem. Retrofitting homes emphasises the need to reduce emissions within existing housing, tackling both climate change and rising fuel prices. A more marginal discourse, Sustainable living, frames low carbon houses as related to individual identities and 'off-grid' or greener lifestyles. Our analysis demonstrates that technical and economic paradigms dominate media discourse on low carbon housing, marginalising social and behavioural aspects. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Diverse and uneven pathways towards transition to low carbon development: The case of diffusion of solar PV technology in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iizuka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Transition towards low carbon development (LCD) is an urgent challenge for the global community. As increased economic activities usually result in more carbon emissions, this challenge is particularly crucial for rapidly growing emerging countries. For these countries, reducing carbon emissions

  11. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sandor, Debra [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Steward, Darlene [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Vimmerstedt, Laura [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Webster, Karen W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  12. Strengthening the European Union Climate and Energy Package. To build a low carbon, competitive and energy secure European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, E.; Spencer, Th.

    2011-07-01

    As the EU's climate and energy goals defined in its Climate and Energy Package (CEP) are to protect the climate, to protect EU economic competitiveness, and to protect EU energy security, the authors first define these notions (time consistency, competitiveness, energy security) and stress the importance of strengthening the CEP, notably by fostering low carbon technology investment and low carbon products and services innovation. They discuss several policy recommendations for the development of a low carbon, competitive and energy secure EU. These recommendations are notably based on the strengthening of current instruments and on the implementation of new tools to reach the 20% energy efficiency target, on an increase stringency and predictability of the EU ETS, and on the use of direct public financial support to facilitate the transition towards a EU low carbon economy

  13. Strengthening the European Union Climate and Energy Package. To build a low carbon, competitive and energy secure European Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, E.; Spencer, Th.

    2011-01-01

    As the EU's climate and energy goals defined in its Climate and Energy Package (CEP) are to protect the climate, to protect EU economic competitiveness, and to protect EU energy security, the authors first define these notions (time consistency, competitiveness, energy security) and stress the importance of strengthening the CEP, notably by fostering low carbon technology investment and low carbon products and services innovation. They discuss several policy recommendations for the development of a low carbon, competitive and energy secure EU. These recommendations are notably based on the strengthening of current instruments and on the implementation of new tools to reach the 20% energy efficiency target, on an increase stringency and predictability of the EU ETS, and on the use of direct public financial support to facilitate the transition towards a EU low carbon economy

  14. Low carbon electricity systems. Methodology and results for the EU (European Union)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmelink, M.; Graus, W.; Blok, K.; Voogt, M.

    2003-05-01

    As background information for its new POWER SWITCH! campaign in the electricity sector WWF (World Wildlife Fund) commissioned Ecofys to determine the possibilities for achieving carbon neutral electricity production. This report discusses the methodology used to determine the possibilities for a low carbon electricity future (the Power Switch scenario) and presents the results for the European Union. In a four-step methodology emission reduction options are determined for a broad range of saving options, both to save electricity demand and to lower the carbon content of electricity production. All emission reductions are analysed against a Business-As-Usual (BAU-scenario)

  15. Surface analyses of carbon fibers produced from polyacrylonitrile fibers at low carbonization temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing carbon fibers from polyacrylonitrile at low carbonization temperatures was studied. The bulk and surface properties of fibers obtained after reaction with benzoic acid, air and carbonizing in nitrogen or a dilute acetylene atmosphere are discussed. All fiber products had different surface and internal compositions. Samples produced at temperatures up to 950 C and carbonized in nitrogen contained substantial quantities of nitrogen and oxygen at the surface. During carbonization, the surface nitrogen converted into two new forms, possibly nitrile and an azo or a new carbon-nitrogen bond. Samples carbonized in acetylene contained a carbon-rich surface stable to oxidation.

  16. Green Recovery: A Program to Create Good Jobs & Start Building a Low-Carbon Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Pollin; Heidi Garrett-Peltier; James Heintz; Helen Scharber

    2008-01-01

    September 2008As the nation debates its energy future, this report shows that the U.S. can create two million jobs by investing in a rapid green economic recovery program, which will strengthen the economy, increase energy independence, and fight global warming.Green Recovery – A Program to Create Good Jobs and Start Building a Low-Carbon Economy was prepared by PERI under commission by the Center for American Progress and released by a coalition of labor and environmental groups. Focusing on...

  17. Energy outlook to 2035 in Asia and its pathways towards a low carbon energy system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi

    2010-09-15

    This report analyzes energy outlook in Asia and the world to 2035. In Technologically Advanced Scenario, advanced low-carbon technology yields, in 2035, 2,305 Mtoe or 14% of the saving in world primary energy demand and 12.3 Gt or 30% of the reduction in global CO2 emissions compared with the Reference Scenario. In these savings, Asia will account for 58% in the world primary energy reduction and 55% of the world CO2 mitigation, emphasizing immense potential of energy and CO2 saving in Asia and the importance of the deployment of clean energy technology through technology transfer to Asian region.

  18. Pathways of low carbon transition at the lowest cost. Pathways of low carbon transition in France at the lowest cost - Dynamics and average abatement costs (MACC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste; Foussard, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The objective to divide greenhouse gas emissions in France by a factor four by 2050 implies the mobilisation at the lowest cost of the whole set of known sources of reduction of emissions in all economic sectors. In this context, this report is based on a methodology (D-CAM in French for dynamics - average abatement costs, MACC in English for Medium Abatement Cost Curves) which relies on a theoretical business-as-usual scenario, on a database on the potential, rate of development, and cost of mobilizable sources, and on a dynamic model of cost minimisation. The MACC tool is used to explore, for each sector, scenarios of de-carbonation which allow objectives of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to be reached at different time horizons. An aggregated approach of this tool modifies the distribution of efforts of emission reduction between sectors with respect to a sector-based approach. Thus, a macro-assessment of low carbon transition does not reveal any obvious over-cost with respect to the business-as-usual scenario. A second document is a Power Point presentation which contains the same information, curves and graphs

  19. Homes as machines: Exploring expert and public imaginaries of low carbon housing futures in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Cherry, C.; Hopfe, C.; MacGillivray, B.; Pidgeon, N.

    2017-01-01

    Low carbon housing policies embody visions of the future that shape and constrain current choices between different technological pathways. These socio-technical imaginaries include expectations around new ways of living and interacting with technology, with implications for everyday lives. This paper investigates existing expert visions of low carbon housing, and explores these futures with members of the public; utilising empirical data from policy documents, expert interviews and public fo...

  20. Media and carbon literacy: shaping opportunities for cognitive engagement with low carbon transition in Irish media 2000-2013

    OpenAIRE

    McNally, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    This paper sheds light on the challenges facing communication praxis for transition by reporting on an exploratory, thematic analysis of media reports about reducing carbon emissions. It maps the deployment of ideas about the rationale and multi-faceted processes for moving to a low carbon society in the Irish press. The aim is to show whether and how media reports prioritize or marginalize specific conceptualizations of low carbon transition and decarbonisation. The findings shed light on th...

  1. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  2. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  3. The effects of temperature and strain rate on the dynamic flow behaviour of different steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.-S.; Liu, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    A compressive type split-Hopkinson pressure bar is utilized to compare the impact plastic behaviour of three steels with different levels of carbon content. S15C low carbon steel, S50C medium alloy heat treatable steel (abbreviated hereafter to medium carbon steel) and SKS93 tool steel with a high carbon and low alloy content (abbreviated hereafter to high carbon steel) are tested under strain rates ranging from 1.1 x 10 3 s -1 to 5.5 x 10 3 s -1 and temperatures ranging from 25 to 800 deg. C. The effects of the carbon content, strain rate and temperature on the mechanical responses of the three steels are evaluated. The microstructures of the impacted specimens are studied using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is found that an increased carbon content enhances the dynamic flow resistance of the three steels. Additionally, the flow stress increases with strain and strain rate in every case. A thermal softening effect is identified in the plastic behaviour of the three steels. The activation energy, ΔG * , varies as a function of the strain rate and temperature, but is apparently insensitive to the carbon content level. The present study identifies maximum ΔG * values of 58 kJ/mol for the S15C low carbon steel, 54.9 kJ/mol for the S50C medium carbon steel, and 56.4 kJ/mol for the SKS93 high carbon steel. A Zerilli-Armstrong BCC constitutive model with appropriate coefficients is applied to describe the high strain rate plastic behaviours of the S15C, S50C and SKS93 steels. The errors between the calculated stress and the measured stress are found to be less than 5%. The microstructural observations reveal that the dislocation density and the degree of dislocation tangling increase with increasing strain rate in all three steels. Additionally, the TEM observations indicate that a higher strain rate reduces the size of the dislocation cells. The annihilation of dislocations occurs more readily at elevated temperatures. The square root of the dislocation

  4. Engaging the public with low-carbon energy technologies: Results from a Scottish large group process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, Rhys; Shackley, Simon; Mabon, Leslie; Ashworth, Peta; Jeanneret, Talia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a large group process conducted in Edinburgh, Scotland investigating public perceptions of climate change and low-carbon energy technologies, specifically carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). The quantitative and qualitative results reported show that the participants were broadly supportive of efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and that there is an expressed preference for renewable energy technologies to be employed to achieve this. CCS was considered in detail during the research due to its climate mitigation potential; results show that the workshop participants were cautious about its deployment. The paper discusses a number of interrelated factors which appear to influence perceptions of CCS; factors such as the perceived costs and benefits of the technology, and people's personal values and trust in others all impacted upon participants’ attitudes towards the technology. The paper thus argues for the need to provide the public with broad-based, balanced and trustworthy information when discussing CCS, and to take seriously the full range of factors that influence public perceptions of low-carbon technologies. - Highlights: • We report the results of a Scottish large group workshop on energy technologies. • There is strong public support for renewable energy and mixed opinions towards CCS. • The workshop was successful in initiating discussion around climate change and energy technologies. • Issues of trust, uncertainty, costs, benefits, values and emotions all inform public perceptions. • Need to take seriously the full range of factors that inform perceptions

  5. Low Carbon-Oriented Optimal Reliability Design with Interval Product Failure Analysis and Grey Correlation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Feng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The problem of large amounts of carbon emissions causes wide concern across the world, and it has become a serious threat to the sustainable development of the manufacturing industry. The intensive research into technologies and methodologies for green product design has significant theoretical meaning and practical value in reducing the emissions of the manufacturing industry. Therefore, a low carbon-oriented product reliability optimal design model is proposed in this paper: (1 The related expert evaluation information was prepared in interval numbers; (2 An improved product failure analysis considering the uncertain carbon emissions of the subsystem was performed to obtain the subsystem weight taking the carbon emissions into consideration. The interval grey correlation analysis was conducted to obtain the subsystem weight taking the uncertain correlations inside the product into consideration. Using the above two kinds of subsystem weights and different caution indicators of the decision maker, a series of product reliability design schemes is available; (3 The interval-valued intuitionistic fuzzy sets (IVIFSs were employed to select the optimal reliability and optimal design scheme based on three attributes, namely, low carbon, correlation and functions, and economic cost. The case study of a vertical CNC lathe proves the superiority and rationality of the proposed method.

  6. intensifying and reorienting transfer of low carbon technologies for climate change prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisani-Ferry, Jean; Monange, Herve; Gorges, Delphine; Senne, Valerie; Roulle, Jean-Michel

    2013-10-01

    The transfer of 'low carbon' technologies is crucial in order to moderate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by developing countries, which are set to rise significantly. Their implementation will determine the success of a global agreement on climate change in 2015, and this is the task of the Technology Mechanism, created in 2010. This policy brief sets out the principal results of a study commissioned from the Mines ParisTech Industrial Economics Centre (CERNA). The study shows that, unlike China, Mexico, South Africa and, to a lesser extent, Brazil, India is currently left out of international flows of low carbon technologies transfer - it is therefore a top priority, as is the rest of developing Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. To intensify these transfers, ambitious greenhouse gas emissions reduction policies need to be implemented and absorptive capacities need to be created in countries that receive such technologies. In emerging countries, which possess a genuine capacity for innovation, and which are involved in international trade, the strengthening of intellectual property rights and the lowering of barriers to trade and investment are to be recommended. However, in the least developed countries, emphasis must be placed on technology absorptive capacities and in particular on the development of a qualified labour force

  7. Low-carbon communities as a context for individual behavioural change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiskanen, Eva; Johnson, Mikael; Robinson, Simon; Vadovics, Edina; Saastamoinen, Mika

    2010-01-01

    Previous attempts to change energy-related behaviour were targeted at individuals as consumers of energy. Recent literature has suggested that more focus should be placed on the community level and that energy users should be engaged in the role of citizens, and not only that of consumers. This article analyses different types of emerging low-carbon communities as a context for individual behavioural change. The focus is on how these communities offer solutions to problems in previous attempts to change individual behaviour. These problems include social dilemmas, social conventions, socio-technical infrastructures and the helplessness of individuals. Different community types are examined, including geographical communities as well as sector-based, interest-based and smart mob communities. Through four case studies representing each of these community types, we examine how different communities reframe problems on the individual level to reduce carbon emissions. On the basis of an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of various community solutions, implications are drawn for further research and for the design and support of low-carbon communities.

  8. Choice of technological change for China's low-carbon development: Evidence from three urban agglomerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pinrong; Li, Ke; Shao, Shuai

    2018-01-15

    China's three urban agglomerations, namely, "Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei", "Yangtze River Delta", and "Pearl River Delta", are the most developed regions in China. These agglomerations are also expected to play a leading role in China's low-carbon development. Energy-saving and carbon-free technological changes play key roles in the low-carbon development transformation of these regions. This study investigates the elasticities of the output and substitution of factors, and the biased technological change in the three urban agglomerations based on the stochastic frontier analysis with a translog production function. The results indicate that the economic growth of the three urban agglomerations is mainly driven by the increase in capital stock caused by investment, energy shortage, and environmental degradation. The relationship between electricity input and carbon dioxide emissions is affected by power generation and economic cycles and transforms from complementarity to substitution. However, this relationship varies among regions. Technological change is conducive to electricity saving, but it does not present an emission-reduction effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulation of a dynamical ecotourism system with low carbon activity: A case from western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Huang, Ping; Xu, Hong

    2018-01-15

    Currently, sustainable tourism is becoming more and more important in developing ecological economies. To achieve low-carbon development, some industries, such as logistics and municipal solid waste, have already taken action, but tourism has not attached sufficient importance to this issue. This paper designs an ecotourism system including tourism, carbon waste (solid waste and sewage), and ecology (water supply and green areas) to simulate low-carbon ecotourism through a quantitative approach. This paper explores the tourism system as well as some interactive factors and studies their quantitative relationship based on historical data. A feedback-loop dynamical system model is designed to simulate tourism, waste carbon, and ecology simultaneously. Finally, a case study applying the feedback-loop dynamical system model to Leshan City, a typical travel destination with colorful natural resources in western China, is conducted to indicate the development of ecotourism in an environmentally friendly economy, which verifies the positive effects of the model. Results show a coordinating upward tendency of tourism, solid waste carbon, and ecology from the dynamical model. When tourism increases, solid waste accumulation increases; however, the amount of sewage dumped directly into nature decreases sharply. After analysis of investment policy scenarios, the research indicates that more funds for sewage treatment will attract more tourists. To maintain the equilibrium of carbon waste, more funds shall be invested in solid waste treatment in the long term. Some discussions about local policy are included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport and low-carbon fuel: A study of public preferences in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, Maria L.; Labandeira, Xavier; Hanemann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Transport is essential for the control of future greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and thus a target for active policy intervention in the future. Yet, social preferences for policies are likely to play an important role. In this paper we first review the existing literature on preferences regarding low-GHG car fuels, but also covering policy instruments and strategies in this area. We then present the results of a survey of Spanish households aimed at measuring preferences for climate change policies. We find a positive willingness to pay (WTP) (in the form of higher car fuel prices) for a policy to reduce GHG emissions through biofuels. There is, however, significant heterogeneity in public preferences due to personal motivations (accounted for via factor analysis of responses to attitudinal questions) and to socio-demographic variables. - Highlights: • Road transport is the cause of important energy-related problems, particularly the emission of greenhouse gases and local pollution. • This paper explores public attitudes and preferences towards low-carbon fuel policies in Spain via contingent valuation. • A factor analysis is performed, showing the existence of pro-social and economic factors related to preferences for policies. • Drivers were willing to pay an extra of 115.5 Euros per year for low-carbon fuels, roughly an extra 0.07 (0.08) Euros/liter for gasoline (diesel). • The results encourage the use of these low-GHG policies as feasible alternatives for climate policies in the transport area

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emission Accounting and Management of Low-Carbon Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the major source of greenhouse gas (GHG emission, cities have been under tremendous pressure of energy conservation and emission reduction for decades. Community is the main unit of urban housing, public facilities, transportation, and other properties of city's land use. The construction of low-carbon community is an important pathway to realize carbon emission mitigation in the context of rapid urbanization. Therefore, an efficient carbon accounting framework should be proposed for CO2 emissions mitigation at a subcity level. Based on life-cycle analysis (LCA, a three-tier accounting framework for the carbon emissions of the community is put forward, including emissions from direct fossil fuel combustion, purchased energy (electricity, heat, and water, and supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods. By compiling a detailed CO2 emission inventory, the magnitude of carbon emissions and the mitigation potential in a typical high-quality community in Beijing are quantified within the accounting framework proposed. Results show that emissions from supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods cannot be ignored. Specific suggestions are also provided for the urban decision makers to achieve the optimal resource allocation and further promotion of low-carbon communities.

  12. Greenhouse gas emission accounting and management of low-carbon community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Su, Meirong; Yang, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2012-01-01

    As the major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, cities have been under tremendous pressure of energy conservation and emission reduction for decades. Community is the main unit of urban housing, public facilities, transportation, and other properties of city's land use. The construction of low-carbon community is an important pathway to realize carbon emission mitigation in the context of rapid urbanization. Therefore, an efficient carbon accounting framework should be proposed for CO₂ emissions mitigation at a subcity level. Based on life-cycle analysis (LCA), a three-tier accounting framework for the carbon emissions of the community is put forward, including emissions from direct fossil fuel combustion, purchased energy (electricity, heat, and water), and supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods. By compiling a detailed CO₂ emission inventory, the magnitude of carbon emissions and the mitigation potential in a typical high-quality community in Beijing are quantified within the accounting framework proposed. Results show that emissions from supply chain emissions embodied in the consumption of goods cannot be ignored. Specific suggestions are also provided for the urban decision makers to achieve the optimal resource allocation and further promotion of low-carbon communities.

  13. Market influence on the low carbon energy refurbishment of existing multi-residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, Jonathan G.B.; Jackson, Tim; Mullings-Smith, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the energy market; the political and regulatory context; and energy design decisions for existing multi-residential buildings, to determine what form the energy market landscape would take if tailored to encourage low carbon solutions. The links between market dynamics, Government strategies, and building designs are mapped to understand the steps that achieve carbon reduction from building operation. This is achieved using a model that takes financial and energy components with market and design variables to provide net present cost and annual carbon outputs. The financial component applies discounted cash flow analysis over the building lifespan, with discount rates reflecting contractual characteristics; the carbon component uses Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) 2005. A scenario approach is adopted to test alternative strategies selected to encourage low carbon solutions in two residential and two office designs. The results show that the forward assumption of energy price escalation is the most influential factor on energy investment, together with the expected differentiation between the escalation of gas and electricity prices. Using this, and other influencing factors, the research reveals trends and strategies that will achieve mainstream application of energy efficiency and microgeneration technologies, and reduce carbon emissions in the existing multi-residential sector.

  14. An integrated new product development framework - an application on green and low-carbon products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Lee, Amy H. I.; Kang, He-Yau

    2015-03-01

    Companies need to be innovative to survive in today's competitive market; thus, new product development (NPD) has become very important. This research constructs an integrated NPD framework for developing new products. In stage one, customer attributes (CAs) and engineering characteristics (ECs) for developing products are collected, and fuzzy interpretive structural modelling (FISM) is applied to understand the relationships among these critical factors. Based on quality function deployment (QFD), a house of quality is then built, and fuzzy analytic network process (FANP) is adopted to calculate the relative importance of ECs. In stage two, fuzzy failure mode and effects analysis (FFMEA) is applied to understand the potential failures of the ECs and to determine the importance of ECs with respect to risk control. In stage three, a goal programming (GP) model is constructed to consider the outcome from the FANP-QFD, FFMEA and other objectives, in order to select the most important ECs. Due to pollution and global warming, environmental protection has become an important topic. With both governments and consumers developing environmental consciousness, successful green and low-carbon NPD provides an important competitive advantage, enabling the survival or renewal of firms. The proposed framework is implemented in a panel manufacturing firm for designing a green and low-carbon product.

  15. Antipulverization Electrode Based on Low-Carbon Triple-Shelled Superstructures for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Lianhai; Su, Qingmei; Zhu, Feng; Chen, Bingjie; Lu, Huanhuan; Peng, Chengxin; He, Ting; Du, Gaohui; He, Pengfei; Chen, Kai; Yang, Shihe; Yang, Jinhu; Peng, Huisheng

    2017-09-01

    The realization of antipulverization electrode structures, especially using low-carbon-content anode materials, is crucial for developing high-energy and long-life lithium-ion batteries (LIBs); however, this technology remains challenging. This study shows that SnO 2 triple-shelled hollow superstructures (TSHSs) with a low carbon content (4.83%) constructed by layer-by-layer assembly of various nanostructure units can withstand a huge volume expansion of ≈231.8% and deliver a high reversible capacity of 1099 mAh g -1 even after 1450 cycles. These values represent the best comprehensive performance in SnO 2 -based anodes to date. Mechanics simulations and in situ transmission electron microscopy suggest that the TSHSs enable a self-synergistic structure-preservation behavior upon lithiation/delithiation, protecting the superstructures from collapse and guaranteeing the electrode structural integrity during long-term cycling. Specifically, the outer shells during lithiation processes are fully lithiated, preventing the overlithiation and the collapse of the inner shells; in turn, in delithiation processes, the underlithiated inner shells work as robust cores to support the huge volume contraction of the outer shells; meanwhile, the middle shells with abundant pores offer sufficient space to accommodate the volume change from the outer shell during both lithiation and delithiation. This study opens a new avenue in the development of high-performance LIBs for practical energy applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Climate Change in Central and West Asia. Routes to a More Secure, Low-Carbon Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-11-15

    ADB's Central and West Asian countries are Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Geoclimatic and environmental factors make this region highly vulnerable to the risks and hazards of climate change. For example, accelerated glacial melt has serious implications for agriculture, water supply, and energy generation - problems exacerbated by overexploitation of natural resources. Countries may find it difficult to shift to low-carbon growth, since many have abundant fossil fuel and tend to use energy inefficiently. ADB is responding to these climate hazards and low-carbon pathways with a comprehensive strategy that strengthens policies, governance, and capacity support; expands the use of clean and renewable energy; encourages sustainable transport and urban development; promotes development that will be more resilient to climate change, especially in water-dependent sectors; and manages land use and forests for carbon sequestration. ADB's support is helping its developing member countries face the challenges of climate change and, with partners, is providing innovative solutions, while continuing to work to reduce poverty.

  17. The Geography of Solar Photovoltaics (PV and a New Low Carbon Urban Transition Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Newton

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the early phases of a 21st century energy transition that involves distributed generation technologies employing low or zero carbon emission power sources and their take-up within Australia, with particular reference to the major cities and solar photovoltaics (PV. This transition is occurring in a nation with significant path dependency to overcome in relation to fossil fuel use. Tracking the diffusion of solar PV technology within Australia over the past decade provides a basis for assessing those factors underpinning its exponential growth and its associated geography of diffusion. Positive evidence that there are pathways for cities to decarbonise is apparent but there appear to be different pathways for different city forms with lower density suburban areas showing the biggest take-up of household-based energy technologies. This suggests a model for the low carbon urban transition involving combinations of simple technological changes and harder structural changes, depending upon which parts of the urban fabric are in focus. This is being called a New Low Carbon Urban Transition Theory.

  18. The main problems faced Ukraine in case of low-carbon economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemenko L. P.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents main thoughts covering the process of implementation of low-carbon economy principles in Ukraine, presented main problems towards this aim and proposes one of the main steps to be taken on this long-term way. In case of the damaged limit of the natural recourses to be developed in Ukraine nowadays (especially gas, oil, coil, etc., lost of competitive position on international market to be always placed by Ukrainian manufactories, disability to cut the value of carbon gases and then, as a result, disability to ensure Ukrainian obligations by the Kyoto protocol, Ukrainian Government needs to find better solution for solving the problems mentioned above. In this case we should take into account that the main part of these problems appeared in case of the low-carbon economy movement in the world. As we declare our desire to be next to the leaders countries, than we have to find solutions for our problems based on the main international best practices.

  19. Secure and Efficient Electricity Supply. During the Transition to Low Carbon Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    Electricity shortages can paralyse our modern economies. All governments fear rolling black-outs and their economic consequences, especially in economies increasingly based on digital technologies. Over the last two decades, the development of markets for power has produced cost reduction, technological innovation, increased cross border trade and assured a steady supply of electricity. Now, IEA countries face the challenge of maintaining security of electricity supply during the transition to low-carbon economies. Low-carbon policies are pushing electricity markets into novel territories at a time when most of the generation and network capacity will have to be replaced. Most notably, wind and solar generation, now an integral part of electricity markets, can present new operating and investment challenges for generation, networks and the regional integration of electricity markets. In addition, the resilience of power systems facing more frequent natural disasters is also of increasing concern. IEA Ministers mandated the Secretariat to work on the Electricity Security Action Plan (ESAP), expanding to electricity the energy security mission of the IEA. This paper outlines the key conclusions and policy recommendations to ''keep the lights on'' while reducing CO2 emissions and increasing the efficiency.

  20. Low-carbon Scenarios Development for Modal Shift in the Chemical Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocicka Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supply chain managers have to deal with the performance requirement to significantly reduce CO2 emissions in searching for excellence in green business processes management. The purpose of this article is to examine the perspectives on low-carbon scenarios development for modal shift in the chemical industry. The author outlines main research findings from the Interreg Central Europe ChemMultimodal project realised by 14 partners from 7 countries, among others by Department of Logistics at Warsaw School of Economics in Poland. The project idea is focused on analysing the potential and growth opportunities for multimodal transport usage in chemical supply chain management. Firstly, the objectives, current status and methodology of the project are explained. Then, the results of the research carried out among chemical and logistics companies operating in Poland are discussed. Furthermore, there is recognised that transport modal shift decisions determine changes in supply chain configurations that might be supported by planning and management tools. Consequently, the elements of the ChemMultimodal toolbox are outlined and its potential significance for low-carbon scenarios development is highlighted. As a result, both theoretical and practical implications of the research findings are indicated.