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Sample records for borate-treated strandboard effect

  1. Effect of thermal post-treatment on some surface-related properties of oriented strandboards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Henrique Soares Del Menezzi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A very promising method for improving the dimensional stability of oriented strandboard (OSB has been studied in Brazil since 2001. According to this method, the OSB is thermally treated under mild conditions using a hot-press, where it is reheated without high level of compression stress. The properties of the treated OSB panels are different from and enhanced compared to those untreated ones. It means that the treated OSB can be used in more severe uses, like concrete formwork. This paper aims to evaluate the effect of the proposed thermal treatment on nail-holding capability and on surface hardness of OSB. Samples from 42 commercials OSB were thermally treated according to two levels of temperature (190°C and 220°C and three heating times (12, 16 and 20 min using a single opening hot-press. For comparison, control panels were kept untreated. The following surface-related properties were evaluated: Janka hardness, nail-holding capability in a plane normal to the surface, in the edge of the panel, water absorption and thickness swelling (TS of edge sealed samples, and four surface roughness parameters. According to the Dunnett test, there were significant differences between treated and untreated panels for nail-holding, dimensional stability and surface roughness. The factorial ANOVA identified that the temperature was the main factor governing these properties while the duration of the treatment had lesser effect. It was concluded that the proposed thermal treatment improved significantly dimensional stability and did not affect adversely the nail-holding capability and surface roughness of the treated OSB

  2. DIMENSIONAL STABILITY PERFORMANCE OF FIRE RETARDANT TREATED VENEER-ORIENTED STRANDBOARD COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki Candan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated dimensional stability properties of oriented strandboard (OSB panels faced with fire retardant treated (FRT veneers. The beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky veneers were treated with monoammonium phosphate (MAP, diammonium phosphate (DAP, lime water (LW, and a borax/boric acid (BX/BA (1:1 mixture. Dimensional stability tests were performed according to ASTM D-1037. The results revealed that facing veneers impregnated with fire-retardant chemicals had significant effects on the linear expansion (LE properties. The lowest LE value was obtained from the panels faced with MAP treated veneers, while the highest LE value was found in the panels faced with BX/BA treated veneers. The FRT treated veneer facing technique also affected the thickness swelling (TS properties of the OSB panels. The panels faced with LW treated veneers had the highest TS, whereas the panels faced with MAP treated veneers had the lowest TS values.

  3. Properties of Strandboard Panels Manufactured from Eastern Redcedar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Hiziroglu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated physical and mechanical properties of experimental strandboard panels with random flake alignment manufactured from eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L. logs. Panels were made at two density levels of 0.65 g/cm3 and 0.78 g/cm3 using phenol formaldehyde adhesive applied at a rate of 8%. Mechanical properties including modulus of elasticity and modulus of rupture, and internal bond strength of the panels in addition to their thickness swelling characteristics were evaluated. As expected, mechanical properties of the samples improved with increasing panel density. Thickness swelling of the samples for 2- and 24-h water soaking test ranged from 6.32% to 18.41%. Both physical and mechanical properties of the panels showed acceptable results, comparable to those found in past studies using other species to manufacture similar types of product. Based on initial findings of this study it appears that eastern redcedar, which is an under-utilized invasive resource, has potential as a raw material for structural panel manufacture.

  4. ACCELERATED LABORATORY TEST OF RUBBERWOOD ORIENTED STRANDBOARD EXPOSED TO WOOD DECAY FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmeralda Yoshico Arakaki Okino

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate the natural durability of oriented strandboards (OSB manufactured with strands of Hevea brasiliensis Müll.Arg. bonded with 5% and 8% of urea-formaldehyde (UF and phenol-formadehyde (FF resins, exposed to xilophagous fungi under laboratory conditions. In accelerated laboratory test decay, samples of OSB were exposed to the following fungi: the brown-rot fungi Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers. ex Fries Murr., Coniophora puteana (Schumach. : Fr.P. Karst., Meruliporia incrassata (Berk. & M.A. Curtis Murrill as well as the white-rot fungi Fomes annosus (Fr. : Fr. Cooke, Trametes versicolor (L. : Fr. Pilát, Ganoderma applanatum (Pers. Pat., Bjerkandera fumosa (Pers. : Fr. P. Karst. and Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burds. Among the brown-rot fungi, the Gloeophyllum trabeum was the most aggressive, showing the highest loss of mass. Trametes versicolor and Ganoderma applanatum confirmed the preference for broadleave species. All oriented strandboards at lower UF resin contents were more degraded by Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Trametes versicolor, Ganoderma applanatum, Merulia incrassata, Coniophora puteana and Gloeophyllum trabeum, with high rate of loss of mass. Coniophora puteana showed small loss of mass when FF resin was applied. Bjerkandera fumosa showed low loss of mass only at higher resin content. Oriented strandboards exposed to Coniophora puteana showed insignificant OSB degradation.

  5. Borate-treated strand board from southern wood species: Resistance against decay and mold fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwu Xu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Combined decay and mold resistance of zinc borate-(ZB and calcium borate-(CB treated oriented strand board (OSB from southern mixed hardwood (MHW and southern yellow pine (SYP was investigated. Tests were done with a brown-rot fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum, and a white-rot fungus, Trametes versicolor, for 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Wood species and fungus type had significant influence on the decay resistance. Decay caused by the brown-rot fungus was evident for all untreated SYP and mixed MHW controls. White-rot fungus did not cause significant sample weight loss for either species group. In the SYP OSB control inoculated with G. trabeum, the hyphae were abundant in wood rays and cell walls where they primarily penetrated through bordered and simple pits. The incorporation of ZB and CB into OSB provided significant protection against the fungi with no significant weight loss observed in the treated OSB. Microscopic analysis showed distinct evidence of fungal colonization and a thinning pattern of cell wall material. Untreated OSB samples from MHW and commercial OSBs were most susceptible to mold growth after 6 weeks. The borate-modified OSB from MHW and SYP effectively prevented the mold growth.

  6. Copper naphthenate treatments for engineered wood composite panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J W; Barnes, H M

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports on preliminary investigation of the properties of randomly oriented strandboard which had waterborne or powdered copper naphthenate incorporated into the board during manufacture. When compared to zinc borate-treated controls, the mechanical properties of strandboard were not adversely affected by treatment with either form of copper naphthenate. In general, values for mechanical properties followed the trend untreated controls > waterborne CuN = powdered CuN > ZnB. Water absorption and dimensional properties followed a similar trend. This preliminary study suggests that CuN is a viable alternative treatment for engineered wood composites. PMID:16226025

  7. PERFORMANCE OF ZINC BORATE-TREATED ORIENTED STRUCTURAL STRAW BOARD AGAINST MOLD FUNGI, DECAY FUNGI, AND TERMITES – A PRELIMINARY TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangping Han,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of zinc borate (ZB-treated oriented structural straw board (OSSB against mold fungi, decay fungi, and termites was examined in standard laboratory evaluations. OSSB was fabricated with split wheat straw strands and diphenylmethane diisocyante (pMDI resin. The ZB was added during panel manufacture to achieve preservative levels (wt.% of 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0%, and 3.0%. It was observed that after a four-week exposure to mold fungi all samples had some mold coverage, but the coverage on the ZB-treated samples was significantly lighter compared to the untreated OSSB. Decay test showed that the weight losses of ZB-treated OSSB blocks at 1.0% and 1.5% levels were significantly reduced compared to the untreated OSSB and solid wood controls, indicating superior performance of ZB-treated OSSB against decay fungi. The termite mortality indicated that none of the termites were alive at the conclusion of the test for ZB-treated OSSB. The results from these specific laboratory studies demonstrated that ZB retentions of 1.5% and greater provide performance against decay fungi and termites for OSSB panels. In addition, untreated OSSB has high susceptibility to mold due to the chemical features of wheat straw and incomplete removal of kernels.

  8. Properties of poplar oriented strandboard containing zinc borate%硼酸锌防腐处理对杨木定向刨花板性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金菊婉; 董诗文; 李燕民; 刘刚; 丁鑫

    2009-01-01

    以速生杨木为木材原料,酚醛树脂(PF)和异氰酸酯树脂(MDI)为胶黏剂,硼酸锌(ZB)为防腐剂,制备了杨木定向刨花板(OSB),以研究ZB添加量(0.5%、1.0%和3.0%)对OSB试板的物理力学性能和防腐性能的影响.结果表明,各试板的物理力学性能均满足我国LY/T 1580-2000中OSB/3类板的要求;添加ZB显著提高了试板的防腐性能.添加0.5%的ZB对PF、MDI两种胶黏剂胶合的杨木OSB性能无不利影响.ZB添加量在0.5%~3.0%范围内,MDI胶杨木OSB的力学性能基本随ZB添加量的增加而下降.相同ZB添加量及施胶量的情况下,MDI胶杨木OSB的力学性能优于PF胶杨木OSB.

  9. Chelating efficiency and thermal, mechanical and decay resistance performances of chitosan copper complex in wood-polymer composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, John Z; Duan, Xinfang; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun

    2008-09-01

    Wood-polymer composites (WPC) have been extensively used for building products, outdoor decking, automotive, packaging materials, and other applications. WPC is subject to fungal and termite attacks due to wood components enveloped in the thermoplastic matrix. Much effort has been made to improve decay resistance of WPC using zinc borate and other chemicals. In this study, chitosan copper complex (CCC) compounds were used as a potential preservative for wood-HDPE composites. CCC was formulated by reacting chitosan with copper salts under controlled conditions. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analytical results indicated that chitosan had high chelating efficiency with copper cations. CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites had a thermal behavior similar to untreated and zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites. Incorporation of CCC in wood-HDPE composites did not significantly influence board density of the resultant composites, but had a negative effect on tensile strength at high CCC concentration. In comparison with solid wood and the untreated wood-HDPE composites, 3% CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites significantly improved the decay resistance against white rot fungus Trametes versicolor and brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum. Especially, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites were more effectively against the brown rot than the untreated and chitosan-treated wood-HDPE composites. Moreover, CCC-treated wood-HDPE composites performed well as zinc borate-treated wood-HDPE composites on fungal decay resistance. Accordingly, CCC can be effectively used as a preservative for WPC. PMID:18248812

  10. Chemotherapy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Chemotherapy Side Effects Chemotherapy drugs are powerful medicines that can cause side ... on the side effects most commonly caused by chemotherapy, this is a good place to start. Managing ...

  11. Placebo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... David C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD The placebo effect Joseph H. Friedman, MD Richard Dubinsky, MD ... truly effective, it is often compared to a placebo. WHAT IS A PLACEBO? Placebos are usually thought ...

  12. Acoustic Monitoring of Adhesive Bond Curing in Wood Laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biernacki, Jacek Marek

    Challenges in manufacturing of wood products, such as glulam, include difficulty in controlling bonding variables and assessing bond quality. This dissertation investigates an ultrasonic method as a means of monitoring of curing and assessing bond quality in wood laminates. The effect of curing on ultrasonic transmission was studied using specimens of clear Douglas-fir, 100 x 200 x 600 mm, with the adhesive bond in the center of the specimen. Monitoring was performed simultaneously at normal and angular (5 ^circ nominal) incidence to the bond plane. Acoustic measurements were supplemented with destructive cure monitoring, standard bond strength measurement, monitoring of bulk viscosity curing, gel time measurement, and microscopic (SEM) examination. Angular incidence gave greater sensitivity to bond quality and curing status than did normal incidence. Analysis of wave propagation showed that displacement for transmission at a small angle (on the order of 5^circ ) was nearly parallel to the bond, which seems to explain greater sensitivity of angular incidence. Experimental results showed that this method was effective in detection of curing phases, such as spread, penetration, and hardening, defective bonds, and the effect of clamping pressure. An "unloading effect", measured as a relative transmission reduction after the clamping load was released, was sensitive to defective bonds, including uncured (kissing), underspread, and uneven spread bonds. Thick bonds (0.5 and 1.0 mm) caused the greatest increase in transmission, since waves at start of curing were highly attenuated. In angular transmission, thick-bond curing curves showed a characteristic inflection, which may be used to identify thick bonds and measure the curing rate. The results of this dissertation could be utilized to develop commercial systems in glulam manufacturing, which could evaluate: (a) phase of and completion of curing (b) bond quality (c) optimum clamping pressure. Similar systems could also

  13. Systems effectiveness

    CERN Document Server

    Habayeb, A R

    1987-01-01

    Highlights three principal applications of system effectiveness: hardware system evaluation, organizational development and evaluation, and conflict analysis. The text emphasizes the commonality of the system effectiveness discipline. The first part of the work presents a framework for system effectiveness, partitioning and hierarchy of hardware systems. The second part covers the structure, hierarchy, states, functions and activities of organizations. Contains an extended Appendix on mathematical concepts and also several project suggestions.

  14. "Further Effects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinigstein, Steven Michael

    In writing Further Effects, I intended to illustrate the benefits that are to be had from the use of effects - processing, when applied at the compositional level, rather than as a post-compositional afterthought. When effects are used creatively in the compositional stage, they will influence the very nature of a piece. They are capable of expressing rhythmic and metric ideas. They can alter the natural timbre of an instrument. This can be done on levels of abstraction ranging from discreet subtlety to disguise beyond recognition. There is one effect (known as "pitch shift.") that allows an instrument to play pitches that are well outside of its range. In Further Effects, I direct the performers to use a volume pedal (which I view as a tool, rather than an effect) for the broadened creative use of dynamics that it so efficiently grants. The use of an effects processor and volume pedal creates a need for ancillary equipment. An amplifier, cables, and an electric hook-up (a microphone or a pickup) will be required for each instrument. While an amplifier serves to project the processed sound, there must also be a device or method to suppress unprocessed sound. A great deal of thought and work goes into the use of effects; yet I feel it is wasteful to use this musical resource merely as post-compositional decoration.

  15. Effective Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... come, like your child's school play and his soccer games. Your Current Parenting Experiences Spend some time ... and be unable to handle the tasks of running a family as effectively. Take a moment to ...

  16. Facebook Effect

    OpenAIRE

    STOICA, Anamaria

    2011-01-01

    This research paper is intended to understand the effects that Facebook, the social networking site has upon us, whether it influences our lives in a good or in a bad way. In order to understand the Facebook Effect we are trying to see how it impacts our lives at economic level,social level, political level, terminology level , psychological level and cultural level . Starting from the question : What does Facebook want? we found several answers consisting in pros and cons of this phenomenon ...

  17. Effective Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Jacob

    To investigate the use of VTLoE as a basis for formal derivation of functional programs with effects. As a part of the process, a number of issues central to effective formal programming are considered. In particular it is considered how to develop a proof system suitable for pratical reasoning......, how to implement this system in the generic proof assistant Isabelle and finally how to apply the logic and the implementation to programming....

  18. Effective nonvanishing, effective global generation

    CERN Document Server

    De Cataldo, M A A

    1997-01-01

    We prove a multiple-points higher-jets nonvanishing theorem by the use of local Seshadri constants. Applications are given to effectivity problems such as constructing rational and birational maps into Grassmannians, and the global generation of vector bundles.

  19. Treatment Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heckman, James J.; Lopes, Hedibert F.; Piatek, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low-dimensional v......This paper contributes to the emerging Bayesian literature on treatment effects. It derives treatment parameters in the framework of a potential outcomes model with a treatment choice equation, where the correlation between the unobservable components of the model is driven by a low...... observe the same person in both the treated and untreated states, but it also turns out to be straightforward to implement. Formulae are provided to compute mean treatment effects as well as their distributional versions. A Monte Carlo simulation study is carried out to illustrate how the methodology can...

  20. Ventilation Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundt, M.; Mathisen, H. M.; Moser, M.;

    Improving the ventilation effectiveness allows the indoor air quality to be significantly enhanced without the need for higher air changes in the building, thereby avoiding the higher costs and energy consumption associated with increasing the ventilation rates. This Guidebook provides easy...

  1. Communicating Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  2. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1948-1953 a large scale field survey was conducted to investigate the possible genetic effects of A-bomb radiation on over 70,000 pregnancy terminations in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indices of possible genetic effect including sex ratio, birth weight, frequency of malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, deaths within 9 months and anthropometric measurements at 9 months of age for these children were investigated in relation to their parent's exposure status to the A-bomb. There were no detectable genetic effects in this sample, except for a slight change in sex ratio which was in the direction to be expected if exposure had induced sex-linked lethal mutations. However, continued study of the sex ratio, based upon birth certificates in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for 1954-1962, did not confirm the earlier trend. Mortality in these children of A-bomb survivors is being followed using a cohort of 54,000 subjects. No clearly significant effect of parental exposure on survival of the children has been demonstrated up to 1972 (age 17 on the average). On the basis of the regression data, the minimal genetic doubling dose of this type of radiation for mutations resulting in death is estimated at 46 rem for the father and 125 rem for the mother. (auth.)

  3. Health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahieu, L

    1998-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of health effects at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality and morbidity in nuclear workers in Belgium; (2) to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (3) to participate in the IARC study; (4) to elucidate the mechanisms of the effects of ionizing radiation on the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (5) to assess the genetic risks of material exposure to ionizing radiation; (6) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (7) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas for 1997 are reported.

  4. Tectonomagnetic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the actual stress within the Earth and its changes with time are very difficult. It is much easier to monitor the direct effects of this stress, such as ground strain, or the indirect effects, such as changes in resistivity, strain, changes in seismic velocity or changes in magnetic field, and so forth. The latter technique is one of the more promising methods for monitoring substantial volumes of the Earth's crust near active faults with only a few instruments. It derives from the piezomagnetic properties of rocks (that is, the change in rock magnetization and, therefore, local magnetic field due to a change in applied stress). AS stress and strain fields along active faults vary, these variations should be reflected in changing local magnetic fields. In particular, rapidly changing fields might be expected to occur just before a large earthquake.

  5. Thermal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Zhang, Panyue; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    This review focuses on the research literatures published in 2015 relating to topics of thermal effects in water pollution control. This review is divided into the following sections: biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal, wastewater treatment for organic conversion, industrial wastewater treatment, anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and solid waste, sludge biochar preparation and application, pyrolysis of sewage sludge, reduction heavy metal in sewage sludge and soil, and other issues of wastewater and sludge treatment. PMID:27620109

  6. Effective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. King Miller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the educational strategies that can be used to support female students of African descent in their persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM education and careers. STEM careers have historically been White male and White female dominated, which has yielded an underrepresentation of those of African descent. Drawing from a grounded qualitative case study, the data used for this article share the responses of Afro-Caribbean females in STEM who have immigrated to the United States from the country of Panama. As Latinas, they are representative of the changing face in the American educational system—bilingual, multicultural, and of African descent. The strategies offered reflect their own teaching practices, their former teachers, or experiences with their children’s teachers. What emerged were descriptions of four strategies and behaviors of effective teachers that align with Ladson-Billings’s culturally relevant pedagogy and Gay’s culturally responsive teaching. Included in the findings are the high standards and expectations embodied by effective teachers that serve to positively inspire their students. Culturally responsive teachers create an atmosphere of learning that supports academic success, conveying their belief in their students’ ability based upon their own reflectivity. As the U.S. educational system continues to become multilingual and multicultural, there is need for strategies for the successful inclusion and progression of students in STEM educational pathways and careers. This will occur as teachers challenge themselves to be the agents of change in the lives of their students.

  7. Effective Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Keinan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article defines a new term, Effective Area, K, of a given territory as a function of four independent parameters: its nominal acreage, A, the intellectual competence of its inhabitants, B, their social competence, C, and their global influence, D, using a simple formalism: K = A x B x C x D. This analysis demonstrates that in our current world any consideration of the physical area of a given territory is meaningless if the quality of its population is ignored. K is a much more useful parameter than A, certainly for political and economical considerations, explaining why claims for territorial expansion are placed low on the national ladder of priorities in the developed countries. In many respects, large geographical areas may become a burden rather than an advantage. Thus, the importance of armed conflicts over geographical territories, which have taken a dominant part of the entire human history, is fading away. Furthermore, although the global acreage is constant, the total effective area of planet Earth keeps growing, providing sufficient room for the growing human population.

  8. Shockingly effective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Maurice

    2011-12-15

    This paper presents the Electropure technology developed by Ground Effects Environmental Services Inc. This electric-based, chemical-free technology can treat hydraulic fracturing flowback and is capable of removing almost 99% of the contaminants while simultaneously minimizing water transportation costs for the treated volume. The technology uses a two-stage, vacuum-enhanced electro-catalytic oxidation process to disrupt and remove contaminants like, guar gums, iron, scaling agents, suspended solids, and polymers found in frac water. It has successfully treated some of the most difficult to treat wastewater, including gel and hybrid frac water. The treated water can be reused in fracturing operations, which eliminates the need and cost to replace the treated volume with fresh water and simultaneously reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Although treated water using this technology cannot be compared to drinking water, it is more applicable for fracture operations and other industrial uses.

  9. Side Effects of Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction ... Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When to Seek Help PSA Rising ...

  10. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  11. Intensional Effect Polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Yuheng; Liu, Yu David; Rajan, Hridesh

    2015-01-01

    Type-and-effect systems are a powerful tool for program construction and verification. We describe intensional effect polymorphism, a new foundation for effect systems that integrates static and dynamic effect checking. Our system allows the effect of polymorphic code to be intensionally inspected through a lightweight notion of dynamic typing. When coupled with parametric polymorphism, the powerful system utilizes runtime information to enable precise effect reasoning, while at the same time...

  12. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  13. The mirror effect and the spacing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Bennet

    2003-09-01

    In the mirror effect, there are fewer false negatives (misses) and false positives (false alarms) for rare (low-frequency) words than for common (high-frequency) words. In the spacing effect, recognition accuracy is positively related to the interval (spacing or lag) between two presentations of an item. These effects are related in that they are both manifestations of a leapfrog effect (a weaker item jumps over a stronger item). They seem to be puzzles for traditional strength theory and at least some current global-matching models. A computational strength-based model (EICL) is proposed that incorporates excitation, inhibition, and a closed-loop learning algorithm. The model consists of three nonlinear coupled stochastic difference equations, one each for excitation (x), inhibition (y), and context (z). Strength is the algebraic sum (i.e., s = x - y + z). These equations are used to form a toy lexicon that serves as a basis for the experimental manipulations. The model can simulate the mirror effect forced-choice inequalities and the spacing effect for single-item recognition, all parameters are random variables, and the same parameter values are used for both the mirror and the spacing effects. No parameter values varied with the independent variables (word frequency for the mirror effect, lag for the spacing effect), so the model, not the parameters, is doing the work. PMID:14620350

  14. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space and a Rindler space with the surface gravity for acceleration.

  15. Schwinger Effect, Hawking Radiation, and Unruh Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the Schwinger effect in de Sitter, anti-de Sitter spaces and charged black holes, and explore the interplay between quantum electrodynamics and the quantum gravity effect at one-loop level. We then advance a thermal interpretation of the Schwinger effect in curved spacetimes. Finally, we show that the Schwinger effect in a near-extremal black hole differs from Hawking radiation of charged particles in a non-extremal black hole and is factorized into those in an anti-de Sitter space...

  16. The Pinball Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Wiewiura, Joachim Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?......You might have heard of the bystander-effect, but what about the Pinball-effect, which disrupts your attention on important tasks?...

  17. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  18. Galvanomagnetic effects in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Boiko, I. I.

    2010-01-01

    Galvanomagnetic effects in graphene Magnetoresistivity and Hole-effect were theoretically investigated for neutral and gated graphene. It is shown that in neutral graphene Hall-effect is totally absent. In gated, exactly monopolar graphene effect of magnetoresistivity vanishes; here Hall-constant does not involve any relaxation characteristic in contrast to result obtained for popular method of relaxation time approximation.

  19. Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Shuichi

    2005-01-01

    A brief review is given on the spin Hall effect, where an external electric field induces a transverse spin current. It has been recognized over 30 years that such effect occurs due to impurities in the presence of spin-orbit coupling. Meanwhile, it was proposed recently that there is also an intrinsic contribution for this effect. We explain the mechanism for this intrinsic spin Hall effect. We also discuss recent experimental observations of the spin Hall effect.

  20. Quantum Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to write a review about different quantum Hall effects. This review focuses on the integer and relativistic quantum Hall effect in graphene. The quantum Hall effect is a newly discovered phenomena that was experimentally observed in 1980 and relativistic quantum Hall effect in graphene was observed in 2005. This project takes a theoretical approach to describe the quantum Hall effects and graphene itself. Experiments has shown that for very strong magnetic fi...

  1. Sheepskin Effects in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Thomas K.; Dross, Patrick J; Haisken-DeNew, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Using data for the 1990’s, this paper examines the role of sheepskin effects in the returns to education for Japan. Our estimation results indicate that sheepskin effects explain about 50% of the total returns to schooling. We further find that sheepskin effect are only important for workers in small firms with the size of these effects being similar to comparable estimates for the US. Finally, the estimated sheepskin effects are decreasing with firm tenure, in particular for small firms. The...

  2. [Placebo and placebo effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulas, J-J

    2005-11-01

    The word placebo appeared for the first time in an English medical dictionary in 1785. In French, it appeared much latter in 1958. This word defines an experimental tool used for rigourous evaluation of a specific effect of pharmacological treatment and the non specific effect of any therapy. The placebo effect is the strictly psychological or psychophysiological effect of a placebo. The two principal components of placebo effect as a pain killer, which has been extensively studied in this field, are positive expectancies of both the patient and the physician. Although the mechanisms of action of placebo effect are not well understood, results of several recent works are particularly interesting. PMID:16292233

  3. DAFX Digital Audio Effects

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The rapid development in various fields of Digital Audio Effects, or DAFX, has led to new algorithms and this second edition of the popular book, DAFX: Digital Audio Effects has been updated throughout to reflect progress in the field. It maintains a unique approach to DAFX with a lecture-style introduction into the basics of effect processing. Each effect description begins with the presentation of the physical and acoustical phenomena, an explanation of the signal processing techniques to achieve the effect, followed by a discussion of musical applications and the control of effect parameter

  4. Experiences with effects specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten; Barlach, Anders

    2011-01-01

    workshops with effects specification with management and end-users and an agile development process including prototypes configured from the effects specifications. We describe the project and the effects-specification process through which effects were related to the system design and instruments for......We describe the effects-specification process from a project that was conducted during the fall 2010 and spring of 2011 in this chapter. The project configured and implemented an electronic patient record system at a maternity ward at a hospital located in a European region. The process comprised...... measuring effects were designed. The project is analyzed and lessons learned are discussed....

  5. Effective Business Communication requires effective practices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨福明

    2011-01-01

    @@ The topic of this essay is that effective businees communication requires effective practices.This essay will focus on communication practices that can assist an organi- zation in reaching its strategic goals and objectives.This article will present this topic by analyzing the communication theory, writing process and business writing style, team building and interpersonal communication, negotiation and persuasion tech- niques and intercultural communication.

  6. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  7. Side Effects (Management)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer care is relieving side effects, called symptom management, palliative care, or supportive care. It is important ... treat them. To learn about the symptoms and management of the long-term side effects of cancer ...

  8. The Hydrophobic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huque, Entazul M.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the physical basis and current understanding of hydrophobic effects. The thermodynamic background of the effects, hydrophobic hydration, and hydrophobic interactions are described. Four existing controversies are outlined. (YP)

  9. Gravitomagnetic Effect in Magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Debarati; Bandyopadhyay, Debades

    2016-01-01

    Rotating bodies in General Relativity produce frame dragging (or Lense-Thirring effect), also known as the {\\it Gravitomagnetic effect} in analogy with Classical Electromagnetism. In this work, we study the effect of strong magnetic fields in neutron stars on the Gravitomagnetic effect, which is produced as a result of its rotation. We show that the magnetic field has a non-negligible impact on frame dragging. The maximum effect of the magnetic field appears along the polar direction, where the Lense-Thirring frequency decreases with increase in magnetic field, and along the equatorial direction, where its magnitude increases. For intermediate angles, the effect of the magnetic field decreases, and goes through a minimum for a particular angular value at which magnetic field has no effect on Gravitomagnetism. Beyond that particular angle Gravitomagnetic effect increases with increasing magnetic field. We try to identify this "Null Region" for the case of magnetars, both inside and outside, as a function of th...

  10. Topological Spin Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Gen; Liu, Yizhou; Barlas, Yafis; Zang, Jiadong; Lake, Roger K.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic spin Hall effect (SHE) originates from the topology of the Bloch bands in momentum space. The duality between real space and momentum space calls for a spin Hall effect induced from a real space topology in analogy to the topological Hall effect (THE) of skyrmions. We theoretically demonstrate the topological spin Hall effect (TSHE) in which a pure transverse spin current is generated from a skyrmion spin texture.

  11. Effects of teacher training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Larsen, Lea Lund

    2010-01-01

    The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning.......The article gives a short overview over existing knowledge concerning the effect of teacher training in relation to adult learning. It presents a research design for measuring the effect of teacher traning....

  12. Effective graph resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, W.; Spieksma, F.M.; Mieghem, P. van; Jamakovic, A.; Kooij, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies an interesting graph measure that we call the effective graph resistance. The notion of effective graph resistance is derived from the field of electric circuit analysis where it is defined as the accumulated effective resistance between all pairs of vertices. The objective of the

  13. Effects of Nuclear Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Leo

    1983-01-01

    Fundamental principles governing nuclear explosions and their effects are discussed, including three components of a nuclear explosion (thermal radiation, shock wave, nuclear radiation). Describes how effects of these components depend on the weapon's yield, its height of burst, and distance of detonation point. Includes effects of three…

  14. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... effects of the medications on your hearing and balance systems. The team will discuss with you how these side effects will affect your quality of life. What are the effects I may notice from ... speech is affected. Balance problems can also occur as a result of ...

  15. Magnetic effects in electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEBOJSA D. NIKOLIC

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of imposed magnetic fields onto the electrodeposition of magnetic (nickel and non – magnetic (copper metals was analysed. Also, magnetic properties of electrochemically obtained nanocontacts were examined. An effort to establish a possible correlation between the morphologies of the nanocontacts and the effect of the very large ballistic magnetoresistance (BMR effect was made.

  16. Network effects in railways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landex, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Railway operation is often affected by network effects as a change in one part of the network can influence other parts of the network. Network effects occur because the train runs may be quite long and since the railway system has a high degree of interdependencies as trains cannot cross....../overtake each other everywhere in the network. First this paper describes network effects in general (section 1). In section 2 the network effects for trains and how they can be measured by scheduled waiting time is described. When the trains are affected by network effects the passengers are also affected....... Therefore, sections 3 and 4 describe the network effects for passengers and how they can be measured using passenger delay models. Before the concluding remarks in section 6, section 5 discusses how the operation can be improved by examining network effects in the planning process. © 2012 WIT Press....

  17. Spread effects - methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of technology, environmental effects and rebound effects are the principal effects from the funding of renewable energy and energy economising. It is difficult to estimate the impact of the spread effects both prior to the measures are implemented and after the measures are carried out. Statistical methods can be used to estimate the spread effects, but they are insecure and always need to be complemented with qualitative and subjective evaluations. It is more adequate to evaluate potential spread effects from market and market data surveillance for a selection of technologies and parties. Based on this information qualitative indicators for spread effects can be constructed and used both ex ante and ex post (ml)

  18. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  19. EFFECTIVE DISCHARGE CALCULATION GUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.S.BIEDENHARN; C.R.THORNE; P.J.SOAR; R.D.HEY; C.C.WATSON

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure for calculating the effective discharge for rivers with alluvial channels.An alluvial river adjusts the bankfull shape and dimensions of its channel to the wide range of flows that mobilize the boundary sediments. It has been shown that time-averaged river morphology is adjusted to the flow that, over a prolonged period, transports most sediment. This is termed the effective discharge.The effective discharge may be calculated provided that the necessary data are available or can be synthesized. The procedure for effective discharge calculation presented here is designed to have general applicability, have the capability to be applied consistently, and represent the effects of physical processes responsible for determining the channel, dimensions. An example of the calculations necessary and applications of the effective discharge concept are presented.

  20. The Hubble effective potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, T.M.; Miao, S.P.; Prokopec, T. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Leuvenlaan 4, Postbus 80.195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Woodard, R.P., E-mail: T.M.Janssen@uu.nl, E-mail: S.Miao@uu.nl, E-mail: T.Prokopec@uu.nl, E-mail: woodard@phys.ufl.edu [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    We generalize the effective potential to scalar field configurations which are proportional to the Hubble parameter of a homogeneous and isotropic background geometry. This may be useful in situations for which curvature effects are significant. We evaluate the one loop contribution to the Hubble Effective Potential for a massless scalar with arbitrary conformal and quartic couplings, on a background for which the deceleration parameter is constant. Among other things, we find that inflationary particle production leads to symmetry restoration at late times.

  1. Effective communication with seniors

    OpenAIRE

    PONCAROVÁ, Ester

    2008-01-01

    My bachelor thesis is called "The Effective Communication With Seniors". The aim of this thesis is to describe communication, its various kinds and the basic principles of the effective communication. I will also describe the communication with seniors suffering from dementia. Another aim of this thesis is to find out whether workers in the senior houses know and use the principles of the effective communication.

  2. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  3. The Atomic Lighthouse Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Máximo, C E; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  4. Adverse effects of benzodiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Claire Gudex

    1990-01-01

    The growing realisation that the benzodiazepines have potential for causing serious harm has caused concern due to their wide and common use. This has stimulated interest in the costs and benefits of their use. This paper is a review of the adverse effects of benzodiazepines, and concentrates on four areas of particular concern: drug dependence which the consequent withdrawal symptoms; psychological effects while on the drugs; use by the elderly’ and tolerance to the drug effects. Although th...

  5. Impedance and Collective Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, E; Rumolo, R; Herr, W

    2013-01-01

    This document is part of Subvolume C 'Accelerators and Colliders' of Volume 21 'Elementary Particles' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I 'Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It contains the Chapter '4 Impedance and Collective Effects' with the content: 4 Impedance and Collective Effects Introduction 4.1 Space Charge 4.2 Wake Fields and Impedances 4.3 Coherent Instabilities 4.4 Landau Damping 4.5 Two-Stream Effects (Electron Cloud and Ions) 4.6 Beam-Beam Effects 4.7 Numerical Modelling

  6. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  7. On the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Shnirelman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The term "butterfly effect" means an extreme sensitivity of a dynamical system to small perturbations: "The beating of a butterfly wing in South America can result in the considerable change of positions and force of a tropical cyclon in Atlantic 2 weeks later". Numerical simulations of R.Robert show the absence of the butterfly effect in some simple flows of 2-d ideal incompressible fluid which is a model of the atmosphere. In this work a more complicated flow is considered. Numerical simulation demonstrates the butterfly effect in the strongest form. The effect is robust, and the experiment is 100% reproducible.

  8. Modeling quantization effects in field effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulation in the field of semiconductor device development advanced to a valuable, cost-effective and flexible facility. The most widely used simulators are based on classical models, as they need to satisfy time and memory constraints. To improve the performance of field effect transistors such as MOSFETs and HEMTs these devices are continuously scaled down in their dimensions. Consequently the characteristics of such devices are getting more and more determined by quantum mechanical effects arising from strong transversal fields in the channel. In this work an approach based on a two-dimensional electron gas is used to describe the confinement of the carriers. Quantization is considered in one direction only. For the derivation of a one-dimensional Schroedinger equation in the effective mass framework a non-parabolic correction for the energy dispersion due to Kane is included. For each subband a non-parabolic dispersion relation characterized by subband masses and subband non-parabolicity coefficients is introduced and the parameters are calculated via perturbation theory. The method described in this work has been implemented in a software tool that performs a self-consistent solution of Schroedinger- and Poisson-equation for a one-dimensional cut through a MOS structure or heterostructure. The calculation of the carrier densities is performed assuming Fermi-Dirac statistics. In the case of a MOS structure a metal or a polysilicon gate is considered and an arbitrary gate bulk voltage can be applied. This allows investigating quantum mechanical effects in capacity calculations, to compare the simulated data with measured CV curves and to evaluate the results obtained with a quantum mechanical correction for the classical electron density. The behavior of the defined subband parameters is compared to the value of the mass and the non-parabolicity coefficient from the model due to Kane. Finally the presented characterization of the subbands is applied

  9. Effects of Leadership Roles on Team Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Ethem Duygulu; Nurcan Ciraklar

    2009-01-01

    In this study we aim to explain the patterns of leadership roles for team effectiveness in non profit organizations compared to economic organizations. For this purpose, we studied three successful organization types, i.e the amateur sports clubs (football, basketball), theater companies and, regional folk groups. Our basic hypothesis is that the relationship between the type of organization (specially teams) and the role of leadership is not random. Therefore, we believe that an empirical ap...

  10. Adverse Effects of Bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  11. Adverse effects of bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    tolerated by the majority of patients, but serious adverse events have been recorded in some cases. Only the most common of adverse effects are robustly observable in clinical trials. In general, studies were not powered to detect effects that were lower in incidence than fractures. This review of adverse...

  12. Occlusion effects, Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    The present report studies the mechanism of the occlusion effect by means of literature studies, experiments and model estimates. A mathematical model of the occlusion effect is developed. The model includes the mechanical properties of the earmould and the airborne sound as well as the body...

  13. En "Copenhagen effect"?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Artiklen efterprøver på grundlag af den danske selskabsreform 2009/10, om den liberalisering og internationalisering, der herved har fundet sted af den danske lovgivning om aktie- og anpartsselskaber, er så betydningsfuld, at det fremtidigt giver mening at tale om en "Copenhagen effect" i...... konkurrence med den allerede kendte "London effect". Udgivelsesdato: Juni 2009...

  14. Relative Effects at Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeken, Johan; Mulder, Joris; Wood, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of predictors has been of historical importance in a variety of disciplines including management, medicine, economics, and psychology. When approaching hypotheses on the relative ordering of the magnitude of predicted effects (e.g., the effects of discrimination

  15. The Chelate Effect Redefined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, J. J. R. Frausto

    1983-01-01

    Discusses ambiguities of the accepted definition of the chelate effect, suggesting that it be defined in terms of experimental observation rather than mathematical abstraction. Indicates that the effect depends on free energy change in reaction, ligand basicity, pH of medium, type of chelates formed, and concentration of ligands in solution. (JN)

  16. Effective rigidity of membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliti, L.

    1986-12-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations of shape (undulations) in reducing the effective rigidity of membranes is reviewed. The consequences of this effect on vesicle size distribution and on the structure of microemulsions, as well as on other physical phenomena, are sketched.

  17. School Effectiveness and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, I. I.; Oakley, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Fiedler's contingency theory relates school effectiveness to a combination of principals' leadership style and situational favorability for the principal. Data from teacher questionnaires on school climate and effectiveness and measures of principal's leadership in 176 Canadian elementary schools did not support Fiedler's model. Contains 54…

  18. Dimensions of Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimberly, Ronald C.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes a study of teacher effectiveness in college departments of sociology, anthropology, and social work. Five types of teacher effectiveness were found to be potentially useful for student, faculty, and administrative purposes. They include teacher task responsiveness, respect for students, teacher capability, student development, and…

  19. Binary effectivity rules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Hans; Peleg, Bezalel

    2006-01-01

    is binary if it is rationalized by an acyclic binary relation. The foregoing result motivates our definition of a binary effectivity rule as the effectivity rule of some binary SCR. A binary SCR is regular if it satisfies unanimity, monotonicity, and independence of infeasible alternatives. A binary...

  20. The Aid Effectiveness Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL consists of empirical macro studies of the effects of development aid. At the end of 2004 it had reached 97 studies of three families, which we have summarized in one study each using meta-analysis. Studies of the effect on investments show that they rise by 1/3 of the aid – the rest is c...

  1. Safeguards system effectiveness modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general methodology for the comparative evaluation of physical protection system effectiveness at nuclear facilities is presently under development. The approach is applicable to problems of sabotage or theft at fuel cycle facilities. In this paper, the overall methodology and the primary analytic techniques used to assess system effectiveness are briefly outlined

  2. Presenting Food Science Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K.

    2016-01-01

    While the need to present food science information effectively is viewed as a critical competency for food scientists by the Institute of Food Technologists, most food scientists may not receive adequate training in this area. Effective presentations combine both scientific content and delivery mechanisms that demonstrate presenter enthusiasm for…

  3. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S-L; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect-the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt/YIG structures.

  4. Radiation damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summarized data suggest that both glass and crystalline waste forms may sustain substantial doses of α-decay damage and still retain their durability. Radiation effects in glasses are less pronounced and less complicated than that in single or poly-phase ceramics; thus, the latter category requires careful research and consideration. Perhaps the most important conclusion is that short-term actinide doping experiments in crystalline phases provide a realistic simulation of long-term effects based on the comparison of observed radiation effects in Pu-doped zircon and naturally damaged zircon (there is a 107 difference in dose rate). Deviations from the similarity in effect (e.g., saturation dose) may be attributed to low-temperature, long-term annealing effects

  5. [Psychoanalysis and Side Effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirahase, Joichiro

    2015-01-01

    A study of psychoanalysis from the perspective of side effects reveals that its history was a succession of measures to deal with its own side effects. This, however, does not merely suggest that, as a treatment method, psychoanalysis is incomplete and weak: rather, its history is a record of the growth and development of psychoanalysis that discovered therapeutic significance from phenomena that were initially regarded as side effects, made use of these discoveries, and elaborated them as a treatment method. The approach of research seen during the course of these developments is linked to the basic therapeutic approach of psychoanalysis. A therapist therefore does not draw conclusions about a patient's words and behaviors from a single aspect, but continues to make efforts to actively discover a variety of meanings and values from them, and to make the patient's life richer and more productive. This therapeutic approach is undoubtedly one of the unique aspects of psychoanalysis. I discuss the issue of psychoanalysis and side effects with the aim of clarifying this unique characteristic of psychoanalysis. The phenomenon called resistance inevitably emerges during the process of psychoanalytic treatment. Resistance can not only obstruct the progress of therapy; it also carries the risk of causing a variety of disadvantages to the patient. It can therefore be seen as an adverse effect. However, if we re-examine this phenomenon from the perspective of transference, we find that resistance is in fact a crucial tool in psychoanalysis, and included in its main effect, rather than a side effect. From the perspective of minimizing the character of resistance as a side effect and maximizing its character as a main effect, I have reviewed logical organization, dynamic evaluation, the structuring of treatment, the therapist's attitudes, and the training of therapists. I conclude by stating that psychoanalysis has aspects that do not match the perspective known as a side

  6. Nocebo effect in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidharth Sonthalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocebo effect, originally denoting the negative counterpart of the placebo phenomenon, is now better defined as the occurrence of adverse effects to a therapeutic intervention because the patient expects them to develop. More commonly encountered in patients with a past negative experience, this effect stems from highly active processes in the central nervous system, mediated by specific neurotransmitters and modulated by psychological mechanisms such as expectation and conditioning. The magnitude of nocebo effect in clinical medicine is being increasingly appreciated and its relevance encompasses clinical trials as well as clinical practice. Although there is hardly any reference to the term nocebo in dermatology articles, the phenomenon is encountered routinely by dermatologists. Dermatology patients are more susceptible to nocebo responses owing to the psychological concern from visibility of skin lesions and the chronicity, unpredictable course, lack of ′permanent cure′ and frequent relapses of skin disorders. While finasteride remains the prototypical drug that displays a prominent nocebo effect in dermatologic therapeutics, other drugs such as isotretinoin are also likely inducers. This peculiar phenomenon has recently been appreciated in the modulation of itch perception and in controlled drug provocation tests in patients with a history of adverse drug reactions. Considering the conflict between patients′ right to information about treatment related adverse effects and the likelihood of nocebo effect stemming from information disclosure, the prospect of ethically minimizing nocebo effect remains daunting. In this article, we review the concept of nocebo effect, its postulated mechanism, relevance in clinical dermatology and techniques to prevent it from becoming a barrier to effective patient management.

  7. Effective Transport Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Roberto

    In this chapter we study a particular case of multiphase systems, namely two-phase materials in which one of the phases is randomly dispersed in the other, so that the composite can be viewed on a macroscale as an effective continuum, with well defined properties. In general, the theoretical determination of the parameter for an effective medium requires, as a rule, the solution of a corresponding transport problem at the microscale, which takes into account the morphology of the system and its evolution. As the mathematical problem is well-posed on a microscale, this can be accomplished using, for example, the multiple scale approach shown in Chap. 11 ; however, the task requires massive computations and is therefore difficult to implement from the practical standpoint. Here, instead, we focus on a deterministic approach to the problem, where the geometry and spatial configuration of the particles comprising the included phase are given and the solution to the microscale problem is therefore sought analytically. As examples, we study the effective thermal conductivity of solid reinforced materials (Sect. 10.1), the effective viscosity of non-colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.2), the effective permeability of porous materials (10.3) and the effective self- and gradient diffusivities of colloidal suspensions (Sect. 10.4). Then, in Sect. 10.5, an alternative dynamic definition of the transport coefficients is considered, which can also serve as a basis to determine the effective properties of complex systems.

  8. Nonlocal Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Steven S.-L.; Vignale, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The anomalous Hall (AH) effect is deemed to be a unique transport property of ferromagnetic metals, caused by the concerted action of spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling. Nevertheless, recent experiments have shown that the effect also occurs in a nonmagnetic metal (Pt) in contact with a magnetic insulator [yttrium iron garnet (YIG)], even when precautions are taken to ensure that there is no induced magnetization in the metal. We propose a theory of this effect based on the combined action of spin-dependent scattering from the magnetic interface and the spin-Hall effect in the bulk of the metal. At variance with previous theories, we predict the effect to be of first order in the spin-orbit coupling, just as the conventional anomalous Hall effect—the only difference being the spatial separation of the spin-orbit interaction and the magnetization. For this reason we name this effect the nonlocal anomalous Hall effect and predict that its sign will be determined by the sign of the spin-Hall angle in the metal. The AH conductivity that we calculate from our theory is in order of magnitude agreement with the measured values in Pt /YIG structures.

  9. Managing for operational effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In today's environment, management matters are the key drivers of plant performance and cost. By managing for operational effectiveness, utilities address questions regarding nuclear power plant operations and maintenance of importance to senior management. These issues include program safety, reliability, and cost-effectiveness. Responsibility for these vital nuclear issues is moved up in the organization, yet all functional areas of the organization are involved. A four-step approach to managing for operational effectiveness is recommended. It includes the implementation of management policies through suitable processes involving people and appropriate corporate programs

  10. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  11. Deforestation Hydrological Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deforestation causes strong disturbances in ecosystems and in hydrological cycle, increasing or reducing wealths. Particularly in this work, effects of feed back between interface processes land - atmosphere are discussed and is demonstrated that losses of water by evaporation-transpiration are thoroughly indispensable to maintain the balance of hydrological regime. It's concluded that as a rule the effect of deforestation is to reduce wealth middle and to increase extreme wealth with consequent stronger and more frequent droughts or flood effects. Other deforestation effects as increase in superficial temperature, increase in atmospherical pressure, decrease in soil moisture, decrease in evaporation-transpiration, decrease of soil ruggedness, decrease of thickness of atmospherical cap limit, decrease of clouds, decrease of rain in both medium and long term and the consequent decrease of rivers wealth middle are explained. Of other side, the basins with greater deforestation affectation in Colombia are indicated. Finally, it's demonstrated the need of implementing reforestation programs

  12. Noncommutative Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kokado, Akira; OKAMURA, TAKASHI; Saito, Takesi

    2002-01-01

    When coordinates are noncommutative, the Hall effect is reinvestigated. The Hall conductivity is expressed with noncommutative parameters, so that in the commutative limit it tends to the conventional result.

  13. Conditions for Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jeannette T.

    1988-01-01

    The most effective college presidents are those whose leadership styles are dominant, decisive, and when appropriate, autocratic. The president has to believe profoundly in the intrinsic value of the college. (Author/MSE)

  14. Frost Effects Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Full-scale study in controlled conditions The Frost Effects Research Facility (FERF) is the largest refrigerated warehouse in the United States that can be used for...

  15. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  16. Developing Effective Working Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two workshops are described in detail. One explores ways to increase the effectiveness of work groups and includes the workshop leader's personal observations. The second involves training transformational leaders, whose characteristics include idealized influence, individualized consideration, intellectual stimulation, and inspirational…

  17. Effects of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social and Labour Bulletin, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Transnational implications of technological change and innovation in telecommunications are discussed, including impact on jobs and industrial relations, computer security, access to information, and effects of technological innovation on international economic systems. (SK)

  18. Vaccine herd effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  19. Strategies for Effective Outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneta, Larry; Dillon, William L.

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes strategies that can be employed for effective outsourcing in higher education settings. Several models of outsourcing are identified and described, and examples of institutions using each model are provided. (GCP)

  20. The Vampire Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erfgen, Carsten; Zenker, Sebastian; Sattler, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Although many brand managers favor the use of celebrities in advertisements, others worry that celebrities overshadow the brand and thus impair brand recall. Practitioners refer to this overshadowing as the vampire effect, defined as a decrease in brand recall for an advertising stimulus...... that features a celebrity endorser versus the same stimulus with an unknown but equally attractive endorser. Because there is no agreement about whether this overshadowing really exists, this research analyzes the existence of the vampire effect and its moderators in a series of experiments with a total of 4......,970 respondents. The results provide important insights into how to avoid the vampire effect by creating appropriate conditions, such as high endorser–brand congruence or a strong cognitive link between the celebrity and the brand. Surprisingly, brand familiarity does not significantly moderate the effect....

  1. Challenges to effective protection

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Kimotho

    2007-01-01

    With sexual violence now recognised as a weapon of war and a punishable violation of human rights, it is incumbent upon the international community, national governments and humanitarian organisations to provide more effective protection of women and girls.

  2. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    OpenAIRE

    Todd McElroy; Keith Dowd

    2007-01-01

    Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously p...

  3. The quantum hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport phenomena in two dimensional semiconductors have revealed unusual properties. In this thesis these systems are considered and discussed. The theories explain the Integral Quantum Hall Effect (IQHE) and the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE). The thesis is composed of five chapters. The first and the second chapters lay down the theory of the IQHE, the third and fourth consider the theory of the FQHE. Chapter five deals with the statistics of particles in two dimension. (author). Refs

  4. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People's Bank of China,the country's central bank,published an article concerning China's managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank's website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China's macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.

  5. Advertising Effectiveness In Events

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Sushilkumar

    2012-01-01

    Confronted with decreasing effectiveness of the classic marketing communications, events have become an increasingly popular alternative for marketers. Events constitute one of the most exciting and fastest growing forms of leisure and business. With time, the decreasing effectiveness of classical marketing communications boosted the use of events for marketing and making brand awareness. Event marketing is seen as the unique opportunity to integrate the firm’s communication activities like p...

  6. Rethinking Development Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    M.G. Quibria

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews some recent research on aid effectiveness. An important finding of this research is that foreign aid has been much more effective than is generally presumed. It also suggests that the current aid allocation policy of development agencies, based on selectivity, has a fragile empirical foundation and discriminates against capacity-constrained/geographically disadvantaged countries. To achieve international development objectives, the fundamental basis for foreign aid alloca...

  7. Empowerment effects across cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Michael K; Kevin Au; Henry Fock

    2004-01-01

    Three studies examined cross-cultural variations in empowerment effects. Study 1 investigated whether Hofstede's power distance scores moderated the effect of job autonomy on job satisfaction using World Values Survey data on 33 nations. Study 2 surveyed frontline hotel employees from Canada and PRC to investigate the moderating role of power distance at the individual level. In Study 3, hotel management students from Canada and PRC were asked to play the role of a frontline employee, who had...

  8. Supergravity for Effective Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Baumann; Daniel Green(Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, U.S.A.)

    2011-01-01

    Higher-derivative operators are central elements of any effective field theory. In supersymmetric theories, these operators include terms with derivatives in the K\\"ahler potential. We develop a toolkit for coupling such supersymmetric effective field theories to supergravity. We explain how to write the action for minimal supergravity coupled to chiral superfields with arbitrary numbers of derivatives and curvature couplings. We discuss two examples in detail, showing how the component actio...

  9. Immune effects of probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, Agnes E.

    2001-01-01

    Twenty papers concerning the effects on the immune system of ingestion of probiotic bacteria in humans have been reviewed. Several studies report that intake of probiotics stimulate cell-mediated immune effector functions. Thus, enhanced production of interferon-y by blood cells, enhanced phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and to a lesser extent monocytes, and enhanced expression of complement receptors on PMNs are effects quite consistently seen in subjects consuming probioti...

  10. Photonic flame effect

    OpenAIRE

    Tcherniega, N. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.

    2006-01-01

    We observed new effect which we called photonic flame effect (PFE). Several 3-dimensional photonic crystals (artificial opals) were posed on Cu plate at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (77K). Typical distance between them was 1-5 centimeters. Long-continued optical luminescence was excited in one of them by the ruby laser pulse. Analogous visible luminescence manifesting time delay appeared in other samples of the crystals. Experiments were realized for opal crystals and for nanocomposites...

  11. The Corkscrew Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Ralston, J P; Nodland, B; Ralston, John P.; Jain, Pankaj; Nodland, Borge

    1998-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism which could cause a rotation of polarization of electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fields on cosmological scales. The effect is due to the geometrical phase of Pancharatnam and Berry, and causes a corkscrew twisting of the plane of polarization. The new effect represents an additional tool that allows possible intergalactic and cosmological magnetic fields to be studied using radio propagation.

  12. The Corkscrew Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Ralston, John P.; Jain, Pankaj; Nodland, Borge

    1997-01-01

    We discuss a new mechanism which could cause a rotation of polarization of electromagnetic waves due to magnetic fields on cosmological scales. The effect is due to the geometrical phase of Pancharatnam and Berry, and causes a corkscrew twisting of the plane of polarization. The new effect represents an additional tool that allows possible intergalactic and cosmological magnetic fields to be studied using radio propagation.

  13. Effects on plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiments with plants on the effects of low-dose and low-dose rates of low LET radiation are reported. Experiments were conducted on the effects of x and gamma radiation on the production of yellow-green sectors in maize leaves, growth inhibition in germinating seeds of barley, survival and bud production in Saintpaulia, tumor formation in Nicotiana, and pink mutations in Tradescantia stamen hair cells

  14. Pharmacological Effects of Mangiferin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Zhi-quan; DENG Jia-gang; YAN Li

    2011-01-01

    Mango leaves have been widely used in the clinical practice for thousands of years in traditional Chinese medicine.Mangiferin,an effective constituent in the mango leaves,has multiple pharmacological actions involved in some basic pathological processes,such as inflammation,oxidative injury,tumor growth,micro-organism infections,metabolic regulations,and immunological regulations.The pharmacological effects of mangiferin from some published data are reviewed in this article.

  15. Secondary pool boiling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  16. Habituation of reinforcer effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose an integrative model of habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE that links behavioral and neural based explanations of reinforcement. We argue that habituation of reinforcer effectiveness (HRE is a fundamental property of reinforcing stimuli. Most reinforcement models implicitly suggest that the effectiveness of a reinforcer is stable across repeated presentations. In contrast, an HRE approach predicts decreased effectiveness due to repeated presentation. We argue that repeated presentation of reinforcing stimuli decreases their effectiveness and that these decreases are described by the behavioral characteristics of habituation (McSweeney and Murphy, 2009;Rankin et al., 2009. We describe a neural model that postulates a positive association between dopamine neurotransmission and HRE. We present evidence that stimulant drugs, which artificially increase dopamine neurotransmission, disrupt (slow normally occurring HRE and also provide evidence that stimulant drugs have differential effects on operant responding maintained by reinforcers with rapid vs. slow HRE rates. We hypothesize that abnormal HRE due to genetic and/or environmental factors may underlie some behavioral disorders. For example, recent research indicates that slow-HRE is predictive of obesity. In contrast ADHD may reflect ‘accelerated-HRE’. Consideration of HRE is important for the development of effective reinforcement based treatments. Finally, we point out that most of the reinforcing stimuli that regulate daily behavior are non-consumable environmental/social reinforcers which have rapid-HRE. The almost exclusive use of consumable reinforcers with slow-HRE in pre-clinical studies with animals may have caused the importance of HRE to be overlooked. Further study of reinforcing stimuli with rapid-HRE is needed in order to understand how habituation and reinforcement interact and regulate behavior.

  17. Beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.

    1994-12-01

    The term beam-beam effects is usually used to designate different phenomena associated with interactions of counter-rotating beams in storage rings. Typically, the authors speak about beam-beam effects when such interactions lead to an increase of the beam core size or to a reduction of the beam lifetime or to a growth of particle`s population in the beam halo and a correspondent increase of the background. Although observations of beam-beam effects are very similar in most storage rings, it is very likely that every particular case is largely unique and machine-dependent. This constitutes one of the problems in studying the beam-beam effects, because the experimental results are often obtained without characterizing a machine at the time of the experiment. Such machine parameters as a dynamic aperture, tune dependencies on amplitude of particle oscillations and energy, betatron phase advance between the interaction points and some others are not well known, thus making later analysis uncertain. The authors begin their discussion with demonstrations that beam-beam effects are closely related to non linear resonances. Then, they will show that a non linearity of the space charge field is responsible for the excitation of these resonances. After that, they will consider how beam-beam effects could be intensified by machine imperfections. Then, they will discuss a leading mechanism for the formation of the beam halo and will describe a new technique for beam tails and lifetime simulations. They will finish with a brief discussion of the coherent beam-beam effects.

  18. System Effectiveness Model Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, Cameron W [ORNL; Jackson, Denise F [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of system effectiveness has numerous pitfalls. System objectives may be poorly defined, may shift during the system life or may be hard to quantify. Further, individual perceptions of the quantifications may differ. Whatever the cause, system effectiveness has been an elusive term to quantitatively define. The proposed model presents a quantitative system effectiveness model and establishes a utilitarian approach for its use with the illustrative application to a nuclear safeguards system. The model uses the Type I and Type II statistical error rates as input to the component or subsystem effectiveness calculation which, when combined using a utilitarian methodology, quantify the overall system effectiveness. The methodology will use a survey of expert judgment to determine the relative importance of the individual subsystems through a statistically designed web survey. The web based survey will be available to nuclear material protection, control, and accounting experts attending the 2008 INMM conference. This model and methodology will provide a repeatable quantifiable measure for any system but in this case a simple safeguards system is used as an example.

  19. Radiosensitizing effects of perfluorochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Takeo; Harima, Keizo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa

    1988-10-01

    Malignant neoplasms are often refractory to radiotherapy because they contain areas of hypoxic cells that tolerate irradiation, reducing the effect of the treatment. If these areas of hypoxic cells can be oxygenated, the effect of radiotherapy is expected to be enhanced. Hyperbaric oxygen theray was devised in the 1950s, and the radiosensitizing agent Misonidazole was developed in 1970. However, neither produced satisfactory clinical effects in radiotherapy of tumors. In this study, hypoxic cells in a solid tumor were efficiency oxygenated by the use of perfluorochemicals (PFC) developed as artificial blood with carbogen gas (CG), and the anti-tumor effect of irradiation was enhanced. In C3H mice bearing RIF-1 tumor, the mean oxygen pressure increased to 79.8 mmHg in those treated with PFC and CG as compared with 12.9 mmHg in the controls, and the does modification factor in irradiation of these mice was TCD/sub 50/ 1.47. PFC is currently under clinical trials, and we also noted effective oxygenation of tumors. These findings indicate the usefulness of PFC as a radiosensitizing agent.

  20. The quantum sweeper effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  1. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  2. Stereoelectronic Substituent Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bols, Mikael; Jensen, Henrik Helligsø

    2006-01-01

    An investigation was carried Out on the influence of the stereo-chemistry of substituents, particularly hydroxyl groups, on their electronic effects in piperidines, carbohydrates (pyranosides), and related compounds. Polar groups, such as OH, OR, and F, were found in the 3 and 4 position to be much...... more electron-withdrawing when positioned equatorially rather than axially. In contrast, little difference in electronic effects was observed from apolar groups as a result of epimerization. These observations were believed to be caused by differences in charge-dipole interactions and were used to...... explain why stereoisomeric glycosides hydrolyze with different rates. The conformational changes of hydroxylated piperidines and related compounds as a function of pH were likewise explained from the different substituent effects of axial and equatorial OH groups....

  3. Quantum Hamlet Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Panković, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, by use of a formalism similar to formalism of the quantum Zeno effect (decrease of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (increase of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements), we introduce so-called quantum Hamlet effect. It represents a complete destruction of the quantum predictions on the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurement. Precisely, by means of some especial, correctly defined, frequent measurements, decay probability of an unstable quantum system can behave as a divergent series without any definite value. In this way there is quantum mechanically completely unsolvable ``Hamlet dilemma'', to decay or not to decay.

  4. Biological effects of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiu, Toshiaki; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Ishida, Yuka [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (JP)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    Although the occasion to be exposed to neutrons is rare in our life, except for nuclear accidents like in the critical accident at Tokai-mura in 1999, countermeasures against accident should be always prepared. In the Tokai-mura accident, residents received less than 21 mSv of neutrons and gamma rays. The cancer risks and fetal effects of low doses of neutrons were matters of concern among residents. The purpose of this program is to investigate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for leukemias, and thereby to assess risks of neutrons. Animal experiments are planed to obtain the following RBEs: (1) RBE for the induction of leukemias in mice and (2) RBE for effects on fetuses. Cyclotron fast neutrons (10 MeV) and electrostatic accelerator-derived neutrons (2 MeV) are used for exposure in this program. Furthermore, cytological and cytogenetic analyses will be performed. (author)

  5. The Cosmological Memory Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tolish, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The "memory effect" is the permanent change in the relative separation of test particles resulting from the passage of gravitational radiation. We investigate the memory effect for a general, spatially flat FLRW cosmology by considering the radiation associated with emission events involving particle-like sources. We find that if the resulting perturbation is decomposed into scalar, vector, and tensor parts, only the tensor part contributes to memory. Furthermore, the tensor contribution to memory depends only on the cosmological scale factor at the source and observation events, not on the detailed expansion history of the universe. In particular, for sources at the same luminosity distance, the memory effect in a spatially flat FLRW spacetime is enhanced over the Minkowski case by a factor of $(1 + z)$.

  6. Giving effective presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englehart, Nadine

    2004-03-01

    Apprehension about oral communication, or public speaking is rated as the number one fear among most individuals. Developing skill in, and comfort with, public speaking is important whether we are presenting oral reports and proposals, responding to questions, or training co-workers. Effective speakers are able to communicate information in a way that stimulates interest, helps the audience to understand and remember, and influences attitudes and behaviours. Many of us think that effective speakers are born rather than made. In truth most successful speakers work hard and invest a great deal of time and effort in to improving their speaking capabilities. Effective public speaking is a learned skill and activity that requires lots of practice. Like other learned skills, having a strategy with clear action steps can help you achieve your goal. PMID:15116467

  7. Conditional Aid Effectiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) studies the effect of development aid using econometrics on macro data. It contains about 100 papers of which a third analyzes conditional models where aid effectiveness depends upon z, so that aid only works for a certain range of the variable. The key term...... in this family of AEL models is thus an interaction term of z times aid. The leading candidates for z are a good policy index and aid itself. In this paper, meta-analysis techniques are used (i) to determine whether the AEL has established the said interaction terms, and (ii) to identify some of the determinants...... of the differences in results between studies. Taking all available studies in consideration, we find no support for conditionality with respect to policy, while conditionality regarding aid itself is dubious. However, the results differ depending on the authors’ institutional affiliation....

  8. Security effectiveness review (SER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouprianova, I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Ek, D.; Showalter, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    As part of the on-going DOE/Russian MPC and A activities at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) and in order to provide a basis for planning MPC and A enhancements, an expedient method to review the effectiveness of the MPC and A system has been adopted. These reviews involve the identification of appropriate and cost-effective enhancements of facilities at IPPE. This effort requires a process that is thorough but far less intensive than a traditional vulnerability assessment. The SER results in a quick assessment of current and needed enhancements. The process requires preparation and coordination between US and Russian analysts before, during, and after information gathering at the facilities in order that the analysis is accurate, effective, and mutually agreeable. The goal of this paper is to discuss the SER process, including the objectives, time scale, and lessons learned at IPPE.

  9. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  10. Climate, greenhouse effect, energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book has sections on the sun as energy source, the earth climate and it's changes and factors influencing this, the greenhouse effect on earth and other planets, greenhouse gases and aerosols and their properties and importance, historic climate and paleoclimate, climatic models and their uses and limitations, future climate, consequences of climatic changes, uncertainties regarding the climate and measures for reducing the greenhouse effect. Finally there are sections on energy and energy resources, the use, sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear power, renewable resources, heat pumps, energy storage and environmental aspects and the earth magnetic field is briefly surveyed

  11. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton.

  12. Solvent effects in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Buncel, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces the concepts, theory and experimental knowledge concerning solvent effects on the rate and equilibrium of chemical reactions of all kinds.  It begins with basic thermodynamics and kinetics, building on this foundation to demonstrate how a more detailed understanding of these effects may be used to aid in determination of reaction mechanisms, and to aid in planning syntheses. Consideration is given to theoretical calculations (quantum chemistry, molecular dynamics, etc.), to statistical methods (chemometrics), and to modern day concerns such as ""green"" chemistry, where ut

  13. Monetary Policy Proving Effective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Hu Xiaolian,Vice Governor of the People’s Bank of China,the country’s central bank, published an article concerning China’s managed floating exchange rate regime and the effectiveness of the monetary policy on the bank’s website on July 26.She pointed out monetary policy,as an important instrument of China’s macroeconomic control,has faced many challenges in recent years.A more flexible exchange rate regime will help improve the effectiveness of the policy.Edited excerpts follow

  14. Level Width Broaden Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Shang

    2004-01-01

    In fitting the double-differential measurements thelevelwidth broadening effect should be taken into account properly due to Heisenberg uncertainty.Besides level width broadening effect the energy resolution in the measurements is also needed in this procedure.In general,the traditional normal Gaussian expansion is employed.However,the research indicates that to do so in this way the energy balance could not hold.For this reason,the deformed Gaussian expansion functions with exponential form for both the single energy point and continuous spectrum are introduced,with which the normalization and energy balance conditions could hold exactly in the analytical form.

  15. Skeletal Effects of Smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusano, Natalie E

    2015-10-01

    Smoking is a leading cause of preventable death and disability. Smoking has long been identified as a risk factor for osteoporosis, with data showing that older smokers have decreased bone mineral density and increased fracture risk compared to nonsmokers, particularly at the hip. The increase in fracture risk in smokers is out of proportion to the effects on bone density, indicating deficits in bone quality. Advanced imaging techniques have demonstrated microarchitectural deterioration in smokers, particularly in the trabecular compartment. The mechanisms by which smoking affects skeletal health remain unclear, although multiple pathways have been proposed. Smoking cessation may at least partially reverse the adverse effects of smoking on the skeleton. PMID:26205852

  16. Nuclear medium effects in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    We study the nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ in the deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in nuclei. We use a theoretical model for the nuclear spectral functions which incorporates the conventional nuclear effects, such as Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. The calculations have been performed using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Our results are compared with the experimental data of NuTeV and CDHSW.

  17. Modeling Hofmeister Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Vlachy, Vojko; Dill, Ken A

    2009-03-11

    A two dimensional model of water, so-called Mercedes-Benz model, was used to study effects of the size of hydrophobic solute on the insertion thermodynamics in electrolyte solutions. The model was examined by the constant pressure Monte Carlo computer simulation. The results were compared with the experimental data for noble gasses and methane in water and electrolyte solution. The influence of different ions at infinite dilution on the free energy of transfer was explored. Qualitative agreement with the experimental results was obtained. The mechanism of Hofmeister effects was proposed. PMID:20161468

  18. [Cytoprotective effects of bilirubin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vítek, L

    2005-01-01

    Bilirubin, a major product of heme catabolism, belongs to compounds with pleiotropic biologic effects. For a long time bilirubin was considered as a metabolite dangerous for human health, neonatologists know well serious clinical complication of neonatal jaundice called bilirubin encephalopathy. Nevertheless, recent data has demonstrated that bilirubin exhibits potent antioxidant and even anti-inflammatory effects with substantial clinical impacts. The aim of the present study was to summarize present knowledge in this rapidly evolving field and suggest further possible clinical consequences. PMID:15981989

  19. Effects of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The midday depression of CO2 assimilation in leaves of two cultivars of hazelnut. Effect of UV-B radiation on decay kinetics of long-term delayed luminiscence of green algae Scenedesmus quadricuda. Effects of irradiance on biomass allocation and needle photosynthetic capacity in silver fir seedlings originating from different localities. Chlorophyll fluorescence of UV-B irradiated bean leaves subjected to chilling in light. Preliminary studies on susceptibility of selected varieties of oats to high UV-B radiation dose. Influence of light conditions on oxidative stress in maize callus

  20. Magnetic Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechet, Sylvain D.; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2015-09-01

    The thermodynamics of irreversible processes in continuous media predicts the existence of a magnetic Nernst effect that results from a magnetic analog to the Seebeck effect in a ferromagnet and magnetophoresis occurring in a paramagnetic electrode in contact with the ferromagnet. Thus, a voltage that has DC and AC components is expected across a Pt electrode as a response to the inhomogeneous magnetic induction field generated by magnetostatic waves of an adjacent YIG slab subject to a temperature gradient. The voltage frequency and dependence on the orientation of the applied magnetic induction field are quite distinct from that of spin pumping.

  1. Aaru's Awakening special effects

    OpenAIRE

    Marinó Vilhjálmsson 1986

    2013-01-01

    The project is a set of three computer graphic special effects for the 2D platformer video game Aaru’s Awakening, currently being developed by the video game developers at Lumenox. This product will be used by the developers and art director at Lumenox. This can only be run inside the environment it was developed for, which is the Unity3D game development engine. Of those three effects, only two were researched and implemented and though some research was put into the third, there was not ...

  2. Enhancing board effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Connie R; Totten, Mary K

    2010-01-01

    Like any other job, board work is associated with specific competencies. Competencies are the combination of knowledge, skills, personal characteristics, and behaviors needed to perform a job or task effectively. Boards are only as strong as their weakest member. Board education should focus on improving the knowledge and skills of the board and individual members and on overall board performance. Assessment of individual board member performance is designed to evaluate the trustee's knowledge of board roles and responsibilities and the expectations of board members. Board effectiveness is built through competency-based board member recruitment and selection; board member education and development; and evaluation of board, board member, and meeting performance. PMID:21291066

  3. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2015-01-01

    effect in which the creative thinking of a team of design theorist(s) inherent in DT invokes a creative mind of a team of artifact instance designer(s) in creating an IDA. In this study, the authors empirically investigate the creativity passdown effect through an action case in which a DT (DT nexus...... designer team introducing a previously published DT as a basis for creating an IDA. Findings – The experience in the action case suggests that using a DT in creating an IDA may encourage design thinking, and in certain way increase its power and practical relevance by fostering the creative mind...

  4. The effect of Ad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小艳

    2010-01-01

    There is the trend that now people appreciate those who are slim and regard slim even thin people beautiful. The thinner a person is, the more beautiful. Women, born to pursuit beauty, try various means to follow the trend. We all watch TV, and find a lot of advertisements on diet. The effect of them is tremendous. We all know the fact that it is not at all the better mouse trap will catch mouse. The sales methods are more important. If an advertisement is very interesting and seemingly effective, people will be lured by the ad and then try some of the products.

  5. The Lazarus effect

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    Members of the RD39 collaboration stage a demonstration of the Lazarus effect in the CERN cryolab. At the LHC experiments, the front-line inner detectors - trackers - will be traversed by a mammoth thousand million million passing particles per square centimetre over the lifetimes of the experiments. After long exposure to passing particles, defects appear in the silicon and the signal is destroyed. A group of physicists at Bern University have found that at temperatures below 100 K, dead detectors apparently come back to life. They're calling their discovery the Lazarus effect after the Biblical character raised from the dead by Jesus after he had been entombed for four days.

  6. The quantized Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantized Hall effect is theoretically explained in detail as are its basic properties. The explanation is completed with the pertinent mathematical relations and illustrative figures. Experimental data are critically assessed obtained by quantum transport measurement in a magnetic field on two-dimensional systems. The results are reported for a MOSFET silicon transistor and for GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures. The application is discussed of the quantized Hall effect in determining the fine structure constant or in implementing the resistance standard. (M.D.). 27 figs., 57 refs

  7. Teaching Effective Interviewing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemons, Frankie

    Through careful preparation and followup, students can insure successful job interviews. If they evaluate their own skills and expectations and assess employer characteristics before interviews, they can increase their credibility with interviewers and make more effective job decisions. If they anticipate irrelevant or illegal questions on such…

  8. Cost-Effective Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Gottlieb, S

    2001-01-01

    Small Beowulf clusters can effectively serve as personal or group supercomputers. In such an environment, a cluster can be optimally designed for a specific problem (or a small set of codes). We discuss how theoretical analysis of the code and benchmarking on similar hardware lead to optimal systems.

  9. Radioprotective effect of interferon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.

    1984-12-18

    A cycle of experiments performed jointly with associations of the Moscow Engineering Physics Institute reportedly demonstrated that interferons protect human cells cultivated in a test tube against the action of fast neutrons and gamma radiation. Cells treated in advance with interferon not only survived irradiation but were almost totally protected against harmful effects of fast neutrons on the structure of chromosomes, according to the author. She mentions that the laboratory has also been studying effects produced on cells by compounds of heavy metals and other chemical compounds, including ones which cause breaks in the DNA molecule. Interferon's ability to protect cells against effects of chemical compounds has been studied in this connection. Another direction of the laboratory's work is research on interferon's effects on blood cells of persons suffering from certain hereditary diseases in which restorative processes of cells are impaired. The purpose of this is to develop courses of treatment which will not cause irreversible damages to chromosomes, the author explains. Interferon has been found to stimulate the reparation systems of cells in cases of Marfan's syndrome, for example.

  10. Effective Monitor Display Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William

    1999-01-01

    Describes some of the factors that affect computer monitor display design and provides suggestions and insights into how screen displays can be designed more effectively. Topics include color, font choices, organizational structure of text, space outline, and general principles. (Author/LRW)

  11. The Faraday effect revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Nenciu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series revisiting the (effect of) Faraday rotation. We formulate and prove the thermodynamic limit for the transverse electric conductivity of Bloch electrons, as well as for the Verdet constant. The main mathematical tool is a regularized magnetic and geometric...

  12. Pleiotropic effects of incretins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs that augment the incretin system [glucagon like peptide (GLP agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors] represent a novel class of anti-hyperglycemic agents that have shown to improve the health and survival of beta-cells (improvement in postprandial hyperglycemia and suppress glucagon (improvement in fasting hyperglycemia. The incretins represent a large family of molecules referred to as the "glucagon superfamily of peptide hormones" of which more than 90% of the physiological effects of incretins are accomplished by GLP-1 7-37 and GLP1 7-36 amide and gastric insulinotropic peptide (GIP. GLP-1 mediates its effects via the GLP-1 receptor, which has a wide tissue distribution [pancreas, lung, heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, macrophages and monocytes, kidney, gastrointestinal tract (stomach and intestine, central nervous system (neoortex, cerebellum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius and peripheral nervous system]. This would imply that the incretin system has effects outside the pancreas. Over time data has accumulated to suggest that therapies that augment the incretin system has beneficial pleiotrophic effects. The incretins have shown to possess a cardiac-friendly profile, preserve neuronal cells and safeguard from neuronal degeneration, improve hepatic inflammation and hepatosteatosis, improve insulin resistance, promote weight loss and induce satiety. There is growing evidence that they may also be renoprotective promoting wound healing and bone health.

  13. Increasing Managerial Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Norman C.

    1977-01-01

    According to the author, effective management training programs bridge the gap between what is taught in the classroom and what is applied on the job. Five design criteria for transfer of training are described: Managerial philosophy, feedback from others, the why as well as the how of management, problem solving, and time for reflection on the…

  14. Imagineering the butterfly effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, Diane Elza Lea Winie

    2014-01-01

    Het is een ‘inconvenient truth’ zowel in de wetenschap als in de praktijk dat conventioneel verandermanagement dat gericht is op gedragsverandering slechts beperkt effectief is. Slechts 1 op de 3 verander-inspanningen zou enig positief effect hebben. Mensen laten zich namelijk niet veranderen. Als m

  15. Logistic effectiveness evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Олександрівна Крюкова

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problems of measuring and evaluating the performance of logistics in different countries of the world. The elements and factors influencing the efficiency of logistic operations were considered on the example of Logistics Performance Index (LPI. The indicator of logistic effectiveness in Ukraine is analyzed compared to other countries in 2010-2014

  16. Challenges to effective protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Kimotho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available With sexual violence now recognised as a weapon of war and a punishable violation of human rights, it is incumbent upon the international community, national governments and humanitarian organisations to provide more effective protection of women and girls.

  17. Access to effective healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Access to effective healthcare is in particular challenging for vulnerable and socially disadvantaged patients. Patients with chronic conditions are over-represented in these lower socioeconomic (LSES) groups. No generic review integrating the evidence on Self-Management support interventions in ...

  18. EFFECTIVE TEACHING PRACTICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    Before the cognitive shift in educational psychology research on teaching practices that bring about the desired learning outcomes on the part of the students was dominated by the process-product research program. The findings of this confirmative research approach show that an effective lesson may

  19. Antioxidant effects of carotenoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bast, A.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Berg, R. van den; Berg, H. van den

    1998-01-01

    Surprisingly, neither the precise pharmacological effect nor the toxicological profile is usually established for food components. Carotenoids are no exception in this regard. Only limited insight into the pharmacology and toxicology of carotenoids exists. It is known that the antioxidant action of

  20. Camp's "Disneyland" Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renville, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the positive mental, physical, and social growth impacts that the camping experience had on the author, and urges camp program evaluation to plan and implement such changes. Sidebar lists steps of effective evaluation: program goals and objectives, goals of evaluation, implementation of evaluation, data analysis, and findings and…

  1. Effective Nonverbal Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratt, Smitty

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the importance of understanding nonverbal communication in enhancing the personal and work relationships of interpreters and increasing their effectiveness in meeting the needs of customers. Discusses the mystique of body language, cultural variation in the use of gestures, the stages of an encounter, interpreting gesture clusters, and…

  2. The Binggeli effect

    CERN Document Server

    Biernacka, Monika; Godlowski, Wlodzimierz; Bajan, Katarzyna; Flin, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We found the alignement of elongated clusters of BM type I and III (the excess of small values of the \\Delta\\theta angles is observed), having range till about 60Mpc/h. The first one is probably connected with the origin of supergiant galaxy, while the second one with environmental effects in clusters, originated on the long filament or plane.

  3. The Kaye effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  4. Unconscious advertising effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Moorman

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional advertising effect models are based on the premise that advertising is attended to and processed consciously. However, recent neuroscientific research shows that most information is unconsciously attended to, processed, and stored in memory. The concept of unconscious processing is

  5. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  6. Cardiovascular effects of gliptins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, André J

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (commonly referred to as gliptins) are a novel class of oral antihyperglycaemic agents with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Preclinical data and mechanistic studies have indicated a possible beneficial action on blood vessels and the heart, via both glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)-dependent and GLP-1-independent effects. DPP-4 inhibition increases the concentration of many peptides with potential vasoactive and cardioprotective effects. Clinically, DPP-4 inhibitors improve several risk factors in patients with T2DM. They improve blood glucose control (mainly by reducing postprandial glycaemia), are weight neutral (or even induce modest weight loss), lower blood pressure, improve postprandial lipaemia, reduce inflammatory markers, diminish oxidative stress, and improve endothelial function. Some positive effects on the heart have also been described in patients with ischaemic heart disease or congestive heart failure, although their clinical relevance requires further investigation. Post-hoc analyses of phase II-III, controlled trials suggest a possible cardioprotective effect with a trend for a lower incidence of major cardiovascular events with gliptins than with placebo or active agents. However, the actual relationship between DPP-4 inhibition and cardiovascular outcomes remains to be proven. Major prospective clinical trials with predefined cardiovascular outcomes and involving various DPP-4 inhibitors are now underway in patients with T2DM and a high-risk cardiovascular profile.

  7. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    annoyances and the objective measurements were analysed. Persons suffering from tinnitus behaved differently than person without tinnitus. The latter group showed significant relations between the measured occlusion effect, hearing loss and the personal of occlusion. The actual sensation level is also...

  8. Holding Effective Board Meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    Advice and tested methods for management of meetings from superintendents and board members are combined in this reference book on conducting effective school board meetings. Intended for a wide readership, it contains three chapters and an exhibit section comprising over one-third of the document. Following a brief introduction, chapter 1,…

  9. Effectively Communicating Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponterotto, Joseph G.; Grieger, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    This article is a guide for counseling researchers wishing to communicate the methods and results of their qualitative research to varied audiences. The authors posit that the first step in effectively communicating qualitative research is the development of strong qualitative research skills. To this end, the authors review a process model for…

  10. Effective Intervention for Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Randie; Kellner, Millicent H.; Green, Stuart; Elias, Maurice J.

    2012-01-01

    Most professional educators are aware that every school should have an effective approach to harassment, intimidation, and bullying (HIB) prevention in which every member of the school community participates. Regardless of the approach a school takes, all students and all staff members should be knowledgeable participants who have been trained to…

  11. The Kaye effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, J M; Landig, A J [Student Research Center Suedwuerttemberg, Gutenbergstrasse 18, 88348 Bad Saulgau (Germany)], E-mail: jan.binder@sfz-bw.de, E-mail: andreas.landig@sfz-bw.de

    2009-11-15

    The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT) is a worldwide, annual competition for secondary school students. This is our solution to problem number 10, The Kaye effect, as presented in the final round of the 21st IYPT in Trogir, Croatia. The Kaye effect occurs when a thin stream of shampoo or a different adequate non-Newtonian liquid is poured onto a surface. Suddenly, a jet leaves the heap that is formed by the shampoo and begins to 'dance' around the primary jet like a lasso. The phenomenon ends when the 'dancing' jet hits the primary jet and subsequently collapses. We started our investigations based on available literature (Kaye 1963 Nature 197 1001, Versluis et al 2006 J. Stat. Mech., Collyer and Fischer 1976 Nature 261 682). We made experiments with a similar experimental set-up in which we could determine the velocities of both shampoo streams as well as the angle of the 'dancing' stream. From there on, we developed a theoretical model for the energy loss of the jet in the heap. We discovered that the air layer between the jet and the heap is a necessity for the Kaye effect to occur. At this point, our observations differ from the aforementioned literature. This also accounts for the shampoo beam acting as a light guide. Further experiments concerning the viscoelasticity of the shampoo revealed that the elastic property of the shampoo is necessary for the effect to occur.

  12. The Last Line Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beller, M.; Zaidman, A.E.; Karpov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Micro-clones are tiny duplicated pieces of code; they typically comprise only a few statements or lines. In this paper, we expose the “last line effect,” the phenomenon that the last line or statement in a micro-clone is much more likely to contain an error than the previous lines or statements. We

  13. Aristotle and Double Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    There are some interesting similarities between Aristotle’s ‘mixed actions’ in Book III of the Nicomachean Ethics and the actions often thought to be justifiable with the Doctrine of Double Effect. Here I analyse these similarities by comparing Aristotle’s examples of mixed actions with standard ...

  14. Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Herr, W

    2014-01-01

    One of the most severe limitations in high-intensity particle colliders is the beam-beam interaction, i.e. the perturbation of the beams as they cross the opposing beams. This introduction to beam-beam effects concentrates on a description of the phenomena that are present in modern colliding beam facilities.

  15. Side effects of ergotamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyler, WJ

    1996-01-01

    Ergotamine has been used for many years in the treatment of migraine, although there is Little formal clinical evidence that it is significantly more efficacious than placebo. A number of side effects associated with ergotamine have been reported in the literature, including myocardial infarction, i

  16. Effective Labor Market Policies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; van Ours, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical and empirical analysis of different types of active labor market policies (ALMP).In our empirical analysis we use data on 20 OECD countries covering the time period 1985-1999.We find that labor market training is the most effective program to bring down unemployment.Public e

  17. Regional Healthcare Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kudelina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of healthcare systems effectiveness of the regions of the Russian Federation (federal districts was conducted using the Minmax method based on the data available at the United Interdepartmental Statistical Information System. Four groups of components (i.e. availability of resources; use of resources; access to resources and medical effectiveness decomposed into 17 items were analyzed. The resource availability was measured by four indicators, including the provision of doctors, nurses, hospital beds; agencies providing health care to the population. Use of resources was measured by seven indicators: the average hospital stay, days; the average bed occupancy, days; the number of operations per 1 physician surgical; the cost per unit volume of medical care: in outpatient clinics, day hospitals, inpatient and emergency care. Access to the resources was measured by three indicators: the satisfaction of the population by medical care; the capacity of outpatient clinics; the average number of visits to health facility. The medical effectiveness was also measured by three indicators: incidence with the "first-ever diagnosis of malignancy"; life expectancy at birth, years; the number of days of temporary disability. The study of the dynamics of the components and indexes for 2008–2012 allows to indicate a multidirectional influence on the regional healthcare system. In some federal districts (e.g. North Caucasian, the effectiveness decreases due to resource availability, in others (South, North Caucasian — due to the use of resources, in others (Far Eastern, Ural — due to access to resources. It is found that the effectiveness of the healthcare systems of the federal districts differs significantly. In addition, the built matrix proves the variability the of effectiveness (comparison of expenditures and results of healthcare systems of the federal districts of the Russian Federation: the high results can be obtained at high costs

  18. The Malthus Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies and elucidates what it calls the Malthus Effect from two perspectives: a genealogical-theoretical one and an empirical-diagnostic one. The first concerns its implications for Michel Foucault's genealogy and conceptions of modern governmentality. The second suggests that Malt......This paper identifies and elucidates what it calls the Malthus Effect from two perspectives: a genealogical-theoretical one and an empirical-diagnostic one. The first concerns its implications for Michel Foucault's genealogy and conceptions of modern governmentality. The second suggests...... that Malthusian concerns have an enduring presence in recent and contemporary politics. In them we find a government of life that tethers the question of poverty to that of population, as both a national and international concern, links biopolitics to questions of national security and is a key source...

  19. Ozone health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozone is a principal component of photochemical air pollution endogenous to numerous metropolitan areas. It is primarily formed by the oxidation of NOx in the presence of sunlight and reactive organic compounds. Ozone is a highly active oxidizing agent capable of causing injury to the lung. Lung injury may take the form of irritant effects on the respiratory tract that impair pulmonary function and result in subjective symptoms of respiratory discomfort. These symptoms include, but are not limited to, cough and shortness of breath, and they can limit exercise performance. The effects of ozone observed in humans have been primarily limited to alterations in respiratory function, and a range of respiratory physiological parameters have been measured as a function of ozone exposure in adults and children. These affects have been observed under widely varying (clinical experimental and environmental settings) conditions

  20. Safety Intervention Effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZIMMERMAN, R.O.

    2001-10-16

    Judging safety intervention effectiveness is often left up to the eye of the beholder. Safety and Health Professionals must increase skills and increase their body of knowledge, based on scientific evidence, that can be applied confidently in the workplace. Evidence must be collected and analyzed to separate the interventions of the month with those that stand the test of time. The book Guide to Evaluating the Effectiveness of Strategies for Preventing Work injuries DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 2001-119, April 2001, serves as a primary reference. An example study related to biorhythms, popular in the late 1970s, is used to illustrate the separating of scientific evidence and pseudo-science hype. The cited biorhythm study focuses on the relationship of the accident dates and the three biorhythmic cycles (physical, emotional, and intelligence).

  1. Leptophilic Effective WIMPs

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Spencer; Hutchinson, Jeffrey; Luty, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Effective WIMP models are minimal extensions of the standard model that explain the relic density of dark matter by the ``WIMP miracle.'' In this paper we consider the phenomenology of effective WIMPs with trilinear couplings to leptons and a new ``lepton partner'' particle. The observed relic abundance fixes the strength of the cubic coupling, so the parameters of the models are defined by the masses of the WIMP and lepton partner particles. This gives a simple parameter space where collider and direct detection experiments can be compared under well-defined physical minimality assumptions. The most sensitive collider probe is the search for leptons + MET, while the most sensitive direct detection channel is scattering from nuclei arising from loop diagrams. Collider and direct detection searches are highly complementary: colliders give the only meaningful constraint when dark matter is its own antiparticle, while direct detection is generally more sensitive if the dark matter is not its own antiparticle.

  2. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  3. Relativistic Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2011-01-01

    We consider the relativistic deformation of quantum waves and mechanical bodies carrying intrinsic angular momentum (AM). When observed in a moving reference frame, the centroid of the object undergoes an AM-dependent transverse shift. This is the relativistic analogue of the spin Hall effect, which occurs in free space without any external fields. Remarkably, the shifts of the geometric and energy centroids differ by a factor of 2, and both centroids are crucial for the correct Lorentz transformations of the AM tensor. We examine manifestations of the relativistic Hall effect in quantum vortices, mechanical flywheel, and discuss various fundamental aspects of the phenomenon. The perfect agreement of quantum and relativistic approaches allows applications at strikingly different scales: from elementary spinning particles, through classical light, to rotating black-holes.

  4. Susceptibility to anchoring effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd McElroy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on anchoring has shown this heuristic to be a very robust psychological phenomenon ubiquitous across many domains of human judgment and decision-making. Despite the prevalence of anchoring effects, researchers have only recently begun to investigate the underlying factors responsible for how and in what ways a person is susceptible to them. This paper examines how one such factor, the Big-Five personality trait of openness-to-experience, influences the effect of previously presented anchors on participants' judgments. Our findings indicate that participants high in openness-to-experience were significantly more influenced by anchoring cues relative to participants low in this trait. These findings were consistent across two different types of anchoring tasks providing convergent evidence for our hypothesis.

  5. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency

  6. Establishing effective working relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-02-24

    This article, the second in a series of 11, provides support and offers advice to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence. In particular, the article discusses how to establish effective working relationships and emphasises the importance of the student-mentor or student-practice teacher relationship. It examines the essential qualities, attributes and characteristics of an effective mentor or practice teacher. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements for these roles as stipulated by the Nursing and Midwifery Council.

  7. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J;

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid µ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...... may reduce anxiety, which leads to lower levels of pain. In this paper, we review the current evidence regarding the analgesic properties of melatonin in animals and humans with chronic pain....

  8. Analgesic effects of melatonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Amirian, Ilda; Reiter, Russel J;

    2011-01-01

    studies, melatonin shows potent analgesic effects in a dose-dependent manner. In clinical studies, melatonin has been shown to have analgesic benefits in patients with chronic pain (fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine). The physiologic mechanism underlying the analgesic actions of melatonin...... has not been clarified. The effects may be linked to G(i) -coupled melatonin receptors, to G(i) -coupled opioid μ-receptors or GABA-B receptors with unknown downstream changes with a consequential reduction in anxiety and pain. Also, the repeated administration of melatonin improves sleep and thereby...... may reduce anxiety, which leads to lower levels of pain. In this paper, we review the current evidence regarding the analgesic properties of melatonin in animals and humans with chronic pain....

  9. Electricity Distribution Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Szpyra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the basic concepts of cost accounting in the power industry and selected ways of assessing the effectiveness of electricity distribution. The results of effectiveness analysis of MV/LV distribution transformer replacement are presented, and unit costs of energy transmission through various medium-voltage line types are compared. The calculation results confirm the viability of replacing transformers manufactured before 1975. Replacing transformers manufactured after 1975 – only to reduce energy losses – is not economically justified. Increasing use of a PAS type line for energy transmission in local distribution networks is reasonable. Cabling these networks under the current calculation rules of discounts for excessive power outages is not viable, even in areas particularly exposed to catastrophic wire icing.

  10. Aid Effectiveness on Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Paldam, Martin

    The AEL (aid effectiveness literature) is econo¬metric studies of the macroeconomic effects of development aid. It contains about 100 papers of which 68 are reduced form estimates of theeffect of aid on growth in the recipient country. The raw data show that growth is unconnected to aid......, but the AEL has put so much structure on the data that all results possible have emerged. The present meta study considers both the best-set of the 68 papers and the all-set of 543 regressions published. Both sets have a positive average aid-growth elasticity, but it is small and insignificant: The AEL has...... not established that aid works. Using meta-regression analysis it is shown that about 20 factors influence the results. Much of the variation between studies is an artifact and can be attributed to publication outlet, institu¬tional affiliation, and specification differences. However, some of the difference...

  11. Developing Effective Clinical Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Khamarko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education and training provides a means to improve performance among health care professionals (HCP. Research shows, however, that continuing professional education activities have inconsistent effects on HCP competence, performance, and patient health outcomes. Furthermore, the trainer’s role as a facilitator of knowledge translation (KT has been understudied. To understand how clinical trainers support their trainees in translating what they learned into practice, we conducted 16 in-depth interviews with expert trainers. These interviews yielded a variety of KT-enhancing strategies, including tailoring training activities to their trainees’ needs. In addition, participants recommended trainers familiarize themselves with their trainees’ work environments, be able to identify their knowledge deficits, and devote time to provide trainees with post-training support. Creating an effective training, one that leads to transfer, requires active planning, communication, and command of the training topic by skilled trainers.

  12. Effectively managing wound exudate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamanga, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The management of wound exudate remains a clinical challenge despite technological advances in products with better exudate-handling capacities. This clinical challenge is occasionally encountered when thick exudate (viscous exudate) is present, and when most modern dressings do not possess the capabilities to manage the viscosity while enabling exudate absorption. Maceration to the peri-wound area poses another challenge, irrespective of the number of topical barrier application products on the market and the innovation of dressing products that lock exudate away or those that encourage vertical wicking. In addition to all the above, in clinical practice, the assessment and documentation of wound exudate remains sporadic, leading to the challenges of effective wound exudate dressing selection and cost-effective dressings. PMID:26322408

  13. Coulomb Effects in Femtoscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Maj, Radoslaw

    2009-01-01

    The correlation function of two identical particles - pions or kaons - interacting via Coulomb potential is computed. The particles are emitted from an anisotropic particle's source of finite lifetime. In the case of pions, the effect of halo is taken into account as an additional particle's source of large spatial extension. The relativistic effects are discussed in detail. The Bowler-Sinyukov procedure to remove the Coulomb interaction is carefully tested. In the absence of halo the procedure is shown to work very well even for an extremely anisotropic source. When the halo is taken into account the free correlation function, which is extracted by means of the Bowler-Sinyukov procedure, is distorted at small relative momenta but the source parameters are still correctly reproduced.

  14. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last day of March 1978 marked the completion of the first 3 years of operation of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. RERF was established on 1 April 1975 as successor to the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission which had been in continuous operation since 1947. This record of the first 3 years of operation consists of selected reports and other documents prepared in the course of conducting the business of RERF and includes a brief history, a late radiation effects that might be conducted at RERF. The wisdom and thought given to the research program and its operation by the Scientific Council and the Board of Directors is reflected in the minutes of their meetings which are included in the Appendix. (Mori, K.)

  15. The Creativity Passdown Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Lee, Jong Seok; Baskerville, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Design theory lies at the heart of information systems design science research. One concern in this area is the potential to limit the designer’s creativity by over-specifying the meta-design or the design process. This paper explains how design research encapsulates a two-person design team...... consisting of the design theorist and the artifact instance designer. Design theory embodies a creativity passdown effect in which the creative design thinking is partly executed by the design theorist and the completion of this thinking is deferred to the artifact instance designer. In fact, rather than...... to achieve an innovative design by merging theoretical knowledge with experiential knowledge of a design artifact that is being built. The creativity passdown effect was examined through a case that involved developing a tool for multi-outsourcing decision making. The case provides empirical support...

  16. Magnetoviscous effects in ferrofluids

    CERN Document Server

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles or ferrofluids can be effectively controlled by magnetic fields, which opens up a fascinating field for basic research into fluid dynamics as well as a host of applications in engineering and medicine. The introductory chapter provides the reader with basic information on the structure, and magnetic and viscous properties of ferrofluids. The bulk of this monograph is based on the author's own research activity and deals with ferrohydrodynamics, especially with the magnetoviscous effects. In particular, the author studies in detail the interparticle interactions so far often neglected but of great importance in concentrated ferrofluids. The basic theory and the most recent experimental findings are presented, making the book interesting reading for physicists or engineers interested in smart materials.

  17. Quantum Hall Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Goerbig, M. O.

    2009-01-01

    These lecture notes yield an introduction to quantum Hall effects both for non-relativistic electrons in conventional 2D electron gases (such as in semiconductor heterostructures) and relativistic electrons in graphene. After a brief historical overview in chapter 1, we discuss in detail the kinetic-energy quantisation of non-relativistic and the relativistic electrons in a strong magnetic field (chapter 2). Chapter 3 is devoted to the transport characteristics of the integer quantum Hall eff...

  18. Stochastic Overall Equipment Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Zammori, Francesco Aldo; Braglia, Marcello; Frosolini, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on the Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), a key performance indicator typically adopted to support Lean Manufacturing and Total Productive Maintenance. Unfortunately, being a deterministic metric, the OEE only provides a static representation of a process, but fails to capture the real variability of manufacturing performances. To take into account the stochastic nature of the OEE, an approximated procedure based on the application of the Central Lim...

  19. Dark Matter Effective Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Sannino, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    We organize the effective (self)interaction terms for complex scalar dark matter candidates which are either an isosinglet, isodoublet or an isotriplet with respect to the weak interactions. The classification has been performed ordering the operators in inverse powers of the dark matter cutoff s...... scale. We assume Lorentz invariance, color and charge neutrality. We also introduce potentially interesting dark matter induced flavor-changing operators. Our general framework allows for model independent investigations of dark matter properties....

  20. Effectively Measuring Student Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Barry Z. Posner

    2012-01-01

    With a worldwide sample of students (N = 77, 387), this paper reviews and analyses the psychometric properties of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory [1]. Modest to strong internal reliability coefficients are found across a number of different dimensions. Predictive validity of the instrument is supported, with the instrument being able to differentiate between effective and ineffective leaders using both self-reported and observer (constituent) data. Few significant differences are f...

  1. Fiscal effects of aid

    OpenAIRE

    Timmis, Emilija

    2015-01-01

    This thesis analyses fiscal effects of aid, first of health aid on health spending for a sample of developing countries and then broadly for Ethiopia and Tanzania. Particular attention is paid to data quality and the severe difficulties in achieving a reliable disaggregation of aid into its on-budget and off-budget components. The first essay assesses the sensitivity of estimated health aid fungibility to how the missing data (often considerable) are treated and explores a novel (at least in...

  2. Universality in Effective Strings

    OpenAIRE

    Jaimungal, S.; Semenoff, G. W.; Zarembo, K.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate that, due to the finite thickness of domain walls, and the consequent ambiguity in defining their locations, the effective string description obtained by integrating out bulk degrees of freedom contains ambiguities in the coefficients of the various geometric terms. The only term with unambiguous coefficient is the zeroth order Nambu-Goto term. We argue that fermionic ghost fields which implement gauge-fixing act to balance these ambiguities. The renormalized string tension, ob...

  3. Effects of low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actually, even though it is comfortable for the risk management, the hypothesis of the dose-effect relationship linearity is not confirmed for any model. In particular, in the area of low dose rate delivered by low let emitters. this hypothesis is debated at the light of recent observations, notably these ones relative to the mechanisms leading to genetic instability and induction eventuality of DNA repair. The problem of strong let emitters is still to solve. (N.C.)

  4. Developing effective marketing brochure

    OpenAIRE

    Semenenko, Vitalii

    2013-01-01

    Following report is produced with a goal of developing effective marketing communication channel (brochure) for a case company. Report covers findings in the areas of − model of communication − influences during communication process − target audience identification − decision-making process − types of decision-making process − role of marketing communication in decision-making − channels of marketing communication − practical recommendations from field expert Rep...

  5. Evaluating Grandmother Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkes, Kristen; Smith, Ken R.

    2009-01-01

    Women who have outlived child-bearing have long been described as post-reproductive. But contributions they make to the survival or fertility of their descendants enhance the reproduction of their genes. Consequently natural selection affects this characteristic stage of human life history. Grandmother effects can be measured in data sets that include births and deaths over several generations, but unmeasured covariates complicate the task. Here we focus on two complications: cohort shifts in...

  6. Transgenerational effects of NMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Anna; Colafarina, Sabrina; Fontecchio, Gabriella; Chichiriccò, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are present in a number of commercially available products but there are uncertainties as to whether the unique properties that support their commercial use may also pose potential health risks. Information is missing concerning the influence of nanomaterials on the overall reproductive outcome and transgenerational effects in animals and plants. To obtain this information, long-term studies would be required using animal models phylogenetically close to humans and exposure conditions that reflect realistic scenarios with regard to dosages and admission. The nanoreprotoxicology literature published to date is largely descriptive in nature regarding the effects of nanoparticles. The mechanisms, which determine particle reproduction compatibility, are mostly elusive at the moment. Thus, it is recommended that future research explore the interactions between nanomaterials and transgenerational matter on a molecular level. It would, for instance, be of major importance to understand the behaviour of nanoparticles inside the cells but also their genotoxic and epigenetic effects. Recent studies have shown that intravenous and/or intra-abdominal administration of nanoparticles to mice results in their accumulation in the cells of many tissues, including the brain and the testis, suggesting that they easily pass through the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers. In parallel embryo development after exposure to nanoparticles should be comparatively investigated. The majority of studies on embryo toxicology have concentrated on piscine embryos, mostly derived from zebrafish. Plants for human food as an important component of the ecosystem need also to be taken into account when evaluating transgenerational effects of engineered nanomaterials in crops.

  7. Tasting edge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, L

    2006-01-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  8. Developmental effects of corruption

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, typical measures of corruption have been broad, composite indices which are often meant to measure overall corruption level in a country. In this thesis I study how different types of corruption can have different effects on development, measured by GDP growth, GDP per capita growth and GDP per capita. Thereby, I wanted to see if some types of corruption could be concluded as more damaging than others. I have discussed and empirically tested the consequences of corruption in pu...

  9. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  10. Commodities Inventory Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Carpantier, Jean-Francois; DUFAYS, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Does commodity price volatility increase when inventories are low? We are the first ones to document this relationship. To that aim, we estimate asym- metric volatility models for a large set of commodities over 1994-2011. Since inventories are hard to measure, especially for high frequency data, we use positive return shocks as a new original proxy for inventories and find that asymmetric GARCH models reveal a significant inventory effect for many commodities. The results look robust. They h...

  11. Lightning effects on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Direct and indirect effects of lightning on aircraft were examined in relation to aircraft design. Specific trends in design leading to more frequent lightning strikes were individually investigated. These trends included the increasing use of miniaturized, solid state components in aircraft electronics and electric power systems. A second trend studied was the increasing use of reinforced plastics and other nonconducting materials in place of aluminum skins, a practice that reduces the electromagnetic shielding furnished by a conductive skin.

  12. Effect of Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    D. Baswaraj; Vasanthi; Sareddy Deepthi; Mohammad Zainuddin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we will put forward the vast effect on nanotechnology in various fields. A basic definition of Nanotechnology is the study manipulation and manufacture of extremely minute machines or devices. The future of technology at times becomes easier to predict. Computers will compute faster, materials will become stronger and medicine will cure more diseases .the technology that works at the nanometer scale of molecules and atoms will be a large part of this future, enabling great impr...

  13. Effective interpersonal communication

    OpenAIRE

    Darja Holátová

    2003-01-01

    Effective interpersonal communication is fundamental process. Accurate interpersonal communication between people takes place only if the idea, facts, opinions, attitudes or feelings that the sender intended to transmit are the same those understood and interpreted by the receiver. Personal feedback used by managers help personnel and managers to look at their behavior. An interpersonal communication network, the communication style aids managers to implement the objectives of the organizations.

  14. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Lucía; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A

    2016-01-01

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of this particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width.

  15. Effective quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain dimensional parameters play a crucial role in the understanding of weak and strong interactions based on SU(2) x U(1) and SU(3) symmetry group theories and of grand unified theories (GUT's) based on SU(5). These parameters are the confinement scale of quantum chromodynamics and the breaking scales of SU(2) x U(1) and SU(5). The concepts of effective quantum field theories and renormalisability are discussed with reference to the economics and ethics of research. (U.K.)

  16. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng-Yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Liu, Shui-Bing; An, Jia-Ze

    2014-07-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca(2+) influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection.

  17. SAD effects on grantmanship

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, George A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a state of depression induced by a lack of sufficient sunlight that occurs at high latitudes during the fall and winter. One effect of SAD is that causes people to be more risk-adverse, an effect that should be considered by granting agencies of high latitude countries. Funding agencies often have programmes aimed at high-risk, innovative research. However, the time of the year during which these purposefully high-risk proposals are evaluated usually does not take into consideration the effects of SAD. In high-latitude countries (e.g., Canada, UK, Nordic and Baltic countries), evaluating proposals for high-risk programmes during the late fall might significantly detract from the very purpose of such programmes. At this time of the year, grant evaluators might be in a darkness-induced state of mild depression. As such, evaluators might be more likely to opt for safe investments, more of the same, the well established, which is the antithesis of innovative research.

  18. Effectiveness of smokeless ashtrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, D A; Miller-Leiden, S; Nazaroff, W W; Gadgil, A J; Litvak, A; Mahanama, K R; Nematollahi, M

    1995-06-01

    Most environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) issues from the tips of smoldering cigarettes between puffs. Smokeless ashtrays are designed to reduce ETS exposure by removing particulate and/or gas-phase contaminants from this plume. This paper describes an experimental investigation of the effectiveness of four smokeless ashtrays: two commercial devices and two prototypes constructed by the authors. In the basic experimental protocol, one or more cigarettes was permitted to smolder in a room. Particulate or gas-phase pollutant concentrations were measured in the room air over time. Device effectiveness was determined by comparing pollutant concentrations with the device in use to those obtained with no control device. A lung deposition model was applied to further interpret device effectiveness for particle removal. The commercial ashtrays were found to be substantially ineffective in removing ETS particles because of the use of low-quality filter media and/or the failure to draw the smoke through the filter. A prototype ashtray using HEPA filter material achieved better than 90% particle removal efficiency. Gas-phase pollutant removal was tested for only one prototype smokeless ashtray, which employed filters containing activated carbon and activated alumina. Removal efficiencies for the 18 gas-phase compounds measured (above the detection limit) were in the range of 70 to 95%. PMID:7788509

  19. Neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng-yan; Yang, Le; Tian, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-gao; Liu, Shui-bing; An, Jia-ze

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. In vivo studies demonstrated that Asiaticoside could attenuate neurobehavioral, neurochemical and histological changes in transient focal middle cerebral artery occlusion animals. In addition, Asiaticoside showed anxiolytic effects in acute and chronic stress animals. However, its potential neuroprotective properties in glutamate-induced excitotoxicity have not been fully studied. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity invoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Pretreatment with Asiaticoside decreased neuronal cell loss in a concentration-dependent manner and restored changes in expression of apoptotic-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax. Asiaticoside pretreatment also attenuated the upregulation of NR2B expression, a subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, but did not affect expression of NR2A subunits. Additionally, in cultured neurons, Asiaticoside significantly inhibited Ca2+ influx induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate. These experimental findings provide preliminary evidence that during excitotoxicity induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate exposure in cultured cortical neurons, the neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside are mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Aside from its anti-oxidant activity, down-regulation of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors may be one of the underlying mechanisms in Asiaticoside neuroprotection. PMID:25221579

  20. Amifostine and hematologic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriswasdi, C; Jootar, S; Giles, F J

    2000-04-01

    Amifostine is a protective agent of normal tissue from adverse effects of radiochemotherapy. It is the prodrug that is dephosphorylated by alkaline phosphatase on plasma membrane into the active form named WR-1065. More than 90 per cent of the drug is cleared from plasma in 6 minutes and the peak tissue concentration is 10-30 minutes after intravenous administration. Amifostine has the selective property to protect normal tissue but not cancer cells by mainly scavenging free radicals induced by radiation and chemocytotoxic agents. Both preclinical and clinical studies of this drug provide the significant protection of hematopoietic progentitors from a broad range of cytotoxic agents such as cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, vinblastine, carboplatin, mitomycin-C, fotemustine, doxorubicin, daunorubicin and radiation as well. Moreover, this drug can protect other normal organs or tissues including kidney, salivary gland, liver, heart, lung and small intestine. Amifostine is quite safe, the two major side effects are vomiting and hypotension, and the minor effects are flushing, sneezing, dizziness, chills, metallic taste etc. The drug was approved by the FDA of U.S.A. for use as a cytoprotectant in cyclophosphamide and cisplatin treatment for advanced ovarian cancer and non small cell lung cancer. PMID:10808697

  1. Stringy effects in scrambling

    CERN Document Server

    Shenker, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    In [1] we gave a precise holographic calculation of chaos at the scrambling time scale--the butterfly effect. We studied the influence of a small perturbation, long in the past, on a two-sided correlation function in the thermofield double state. A similar analysis applies to commutators and other out-of-time-order one-sided correlators [2,3]. The essential bulk physics is a high energy scattering problem near the horizon of an AdS black hole. These papers used Einstein gravity to study this problem; in the present paper we consider stringy and Planckian corrections. Elastic stringy corrections play an important role, effectively weakening and smearing out the development of chaos. We discuss their signature in the boundary field theory, commenting on the extension to weak coupling. Inelastic effects, although important for the evolution of the state, leave a parametrically small imprint on the correlators that we study. We briefly discuss ways to diagnose these small corrections, and we propose another corre...

  2. Paradoxical Effect of Aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Doutremepuich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-dose aspirin is an important therapeutic option in the secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI and ischemic stroke, basedon its unique cost-effectiveness and widespread availability. In addition, based on the results of a number of large studies, aspirin is also widely used in the primary prevention of MI. This paper provides an update of the available data to offer greater clarity regarding the risks of aspirin with respect to hemorrhagic stroke. In the secondary prevention of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and ischemic events, the evidence supports that the benefits of aspirin treatment significantly outweigh the risk of a major hemorrhage. When considering whether aspirin is appropriate, the absolute therapeutic cardiovascular benefits of aspirin must be balanced with the possible risks associated with its use, being hemorrhagic stroke. Regarding these clinical facts, normal, COX 1 −/−, and COX 2 −/− mice were treated with a wide range of doses of aspirin and studied by induced hemorrhagic time. The results outlined three major conclusions: high doses of aspirin induce hemorrhage, while low doses of aspirin do not. In the absence of COX 1, ultra low doses of aspirin produce an antihemorrhagic effect not observed with intermediate doses. The absence of COX 2 induced a hemorrhagic effect that needs further research, probably originated in compensatory phenomena.

  3. Estimation of morbidity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many researchers have related exposure to ambient air pollution to respiratory morbidity. To be included in this review and analysis, however, several criteria had to be met. First, a careful study design and a methodology that generated quantitative dose-response estimates were required. Therefore, there was a focus on time-series regression analyses relating daily incidence of morbidity to air pollution in a single city or metropolitan area. Studies that used weekly or monthly average concentrations or that involved particulate measurements in poorly characterized metropolitan areas (e.g., one monitor representing a large region) were not included in this review. Second, studies that minimized confounding ad omitted variables were included. For example, research that compared two cities or regions and characterized them as 'high' and 'low' pollution area were not included because of potential confounding by other factors in the respective areas. Third, concern for the effects of seasonality and weather had to be demonstrated. This could be accomplished by either stratifying and analyzing the data by season, by examining the independent effects of temperature and humidity, and/or by correcting the model for possible autocorrelation. A fourth criterion for study inclusion was that the study had to include a reasonably complete analysis of the data. Such analysis would include an careful exploration of the primary hypothesis as well as possible examination of te robustness and sensitivity of the results to alternative functional forms, specifications, and influential data points. When studies reported the results of these alternative analyses, the quantitative estimates that were judged as most representative of the overall findings were those that were summarized in this paper. Finally, for inclusion in the review of particulate matter, the study had to provide a measure of particle concentration that could be converted into PM10, particulate matter below 10

  4. Developing Effective Border Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Great progress that has been made in nuclear security measures for counter-proliferation capacity building for effective border controls. However, there is evidence that illicit transfers of military and dual-use items as well as the illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials persist. Consequently, there remains an urgent need for continuing and enhancing effective border controls responsive to this threat. Developing and sustaining effective border controls for global defence to combat nuclear security threats is a complex challenge. Following a defence-in-depth approach, border control measures at official ports of entry and green and blue borders form one layer of a national nuclear detection architecture. It is important that the border control measures are both fully integrated into a comprehensive national strategy with achievable nuclear security program objectives and fully sustainable within the national infrastructure. The operations, maintenance and management of effective border control measures rely on a cyclic process of establishing objectives, design, implementation, training and evaluation. All relevant authorities and competencies engage in the process. The design is based on a full assessment of the nuclear security capabilities and associated infrastructure within the context of specific objectives within the national nuclear security strategy. A poor design or badly executed implementation can prevent the effective operation of the system in the short and long run. International cooperation and assistance play an important role in all aspects of developing effective border controls. Donor-recipient relations provide not only the requisite funds, but also the experience and technical expertise that promote effective and sustainable border controls. As the global detection architecture matures, many international organizations, such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), DOE, European Commission- Joint Research Centre

  5. SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Research Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    A REPORT OF A PROGRAM HELD AS PART OF THE BUILDING RESEARCH INSTITUTE 1962 SPRING CONFERENCE ON THE SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING DESIGN. TOPICS DISCUSSED ARE--(1) SOLAR ENERGY DATA APPLICABLE TO BUILDING DESIGN, (2) THERMAL EFFECTS OF SOLAR RADIATION ON MAN, (3) SOLAR EFFECTS ON ARCHITECTURE, (4) SOLAR EFFECTS ON BUILDING COSTS, (5) SELECTION OF…

  6. A Study on Effective Teachers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦淑玲

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, effective teaching has become an important phrase in English language teaching, and causes great attention. As a result of the emergence of teacher-led initiatives, the need of teacher effectiveness has been given renewed focus. This essay outlines what roles teachers play in effective teaching, and what personal qualities teachers maintain that qualify them as effective teachers.

  7. Domestic and international border effects

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Kazunobu; 早川, 和伸

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in the border-effect literature surprisingly found that domestic border effects are larger than international border effects (e.g., in the United States or Brazil). One interpretation of this result is that these estimates include the effects of producer agglomeration. Therefore, in this study, we estimate those border effects exclusively for transactions for final consumption, in which such agglomeration forces will be weak, in China and Japan. As a result, we found larger i...

  8. Telepsychiatry: effectiveness and feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajaria A

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Amy Gajaria,1 David K Conn,1,2 Robert Madan1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Baycrest Health Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Providing psychiatric services by real-time videoconferencing has been increasingly adopted as a method of reaching hard-to-serve populations since the early 1990s. As the field has expanded, a growing body of research has developed investigating both how telepsychiatry compares to in-person psychiatric care and how effectively telepsychiatry can be implemented in routine clinical care. A narrative review was performed to consider the evidence that telepsychiatry is feasible and effective across a variety of patient populations and clinical settings. There is a growing body of evidence investigating the efficacy of telepsychiatry when used for psychiatric assessment and treatment in the adult, child, and geriatric populations. Though studies vary in quality, they generally demonstrate that telepsychiatry is effective across multiple age groups and clinical settings. Telepsychiatry is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians and is feasible to implement, with the suggestion that some patients may actually prefer telepsychiatry to in-person treatment. Issues to consider in the implementation of telepsychiatry services include funding and reimbursement, medico-legal issues when provision crosses legislative boundaries, incorporation into existing health systems, and crosscultural considerations. Future directions for research and practice include a need for higher-quality efficacy studies, consideration of data security, increased attention to low- and middle-income countries, and the introduction of novel technological approaches. Keywords: efficacy, service delivery, telemental health, videoconferencing 

  9. Effectiveness of peritonaeal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In the last few years, an increasing number of patients suffering from terminal renal disease of various leading causes was treated with renal replacement therapy. Peritonaeal dialysis involves an exchange of water and solutes between blood in the peritonaeal capillaries and dialysate in the peritonaeal cavum throughout the peritonaeum. Effective dialysis treatment should provide good quality of life, decrease the number of physical complaints, and bring the incidence of morbidity and mortality closer to the incidence of morbidity and mortality in the healthy population. Aim. The aim of this study was the evaluation of peritonaeal transport characteristics and dialysis effectiveness in 58 patients affected by terminal renal disease who underwent peritonaeal dialysis treatment during August 2003 at the Clinic of Nephrology of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. Method. We examined 30 male and 28 female patients, with an average age of 52 years (range 26 to 78 years. The average duration of peritoneal dialysis treatment was 20 months (ranging from 2 to 66 months, and the end-stage renal failure was caused by different leading disease in our patients. We applied different dialysis modalities: continuous ambulatory peritonaeal dialysis (CAPD with three to five 2- or 3-litre exchanges daily, cyclic peritonaeal dialysis (CCPD, intermittent peritonaeal dialysis (IPD, or automatic peritonaeal dialysis (APD, according to the transport characteristics of the peritonaeal membrane, the residual renal function (RRF, and the clinical status of the patients, in order to perform adequate depuration as suggested by the new international criteria. A peritonaeal equilibrium test (PET was performed according to the new international advice; urea and creatinine clearances (Kt/V and Ccr as well as RRF were calculated using the internationally suggested formulas. Results. Most of our patients received effective dialysis treatment, thanks to the modulation of

  10. The Music Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    into music physiology. We have already seen them working together in 2001 in Berger’s book Music Therapy, Sensory Integration and the Autistic Child published by Jessica Kingsley, and this time their collaboration results in a book that is about the attributes of scientific reality (physics) as embedded......http://www.njmt.no/bookreview_2006071.html "The music effect is not about a particular composer, musical style, geographic location, language, or performance group. It is, at once, about all of these" (p. 249). This book is written by two people with very different educational backgrounds. Dr...

  11. Environmental Effects of BPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Canesi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Research on bisphenol A (BPA as an environmental contaminant has now major regulatory implications toward the ecosystem health, and hence it is incumbent on scientists to do their research to the highest standards possible, in order that the most appropriate decisions are made to mitigate the impacts to aquatic wildlife. However, the contribution given so far appears rather fragmented. The present overview aims to collect available information on the effects of BPA on aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates to provide a general scenario and to suggest future developments toward more comprehensive approaches useful for aquatic species protection.

  12. Environmental Effects of BPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Research on bisphenol A (BPA) as an environmental contaminant has now major regulatory implications toward the ecosystem health, and hence it is incumbent on scientists to do their research to the highest standards possible, in order that the most appropriate decisions are made to mitigate the impacts to aquatic wildlife. However, the contribution given so far appears rather fragmented. The present overview aims to collect available information on the effects of BPA on aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates to provide a general scenario and to suggest future developments toward more comprehensive approaches useful for aquatic species protection. PMID:26674307

  13. 2013 Development Effectiveness Review

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Development Effectiveness Review (DEfR) is the seventh annual performance review of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the first to apply the revised corporate results framework. The DEfR uses the 89 performance indicators of the revised framework to assess progress in implementing Strategy 2020, ADB’s long-term strategic framework. It evaluates ADB’s strengths and identifies areas where performance needs to be improved. The findings of the 2013 DEfR will inform actions to improve ...

  14. Higgs Effective Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this meeting is to present new theoretical advancements related to effective field theories, evaluate the impact of initial results from the LHC Run2, and discuss proposals for data interpretation/presentation during Run2. A crucial role of the meeting is to bring together theorists from different backgrounds and with different viewpoints and to extend bridges towards the experimental community. To this end, we would like to achieve a good balance between senior and junior speakers, enhancing the visibility of younger scientists while keeping some overview talks.

  15. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  16. Effectively Measuring Student Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Z. Posner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available With a worldwide sample of students (N = 77, 387, this paper reviews and analyses the psychometric properties of the Student Leadership Practices Inventory [1]. Modest to strong internal reliability coefficients are found across a number of different dimensions. Predictive validity of the instrument is supported, with the instrument being able to differentiate between effective and ineffective leaders using both self-reported and observer (constituent data. Few significant differences are found on the basis of respondent gender, ethnicity, nationality, or institutional level (high school versus college. Implications for developing student leaders and future research are offered.

  17. Damping Effect of Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    system and change its dynamic behavior and its dynamic characteristics. When predicting structural vibrations it is not common to account for the passive crowd, but the paper will illustrate effects of the presence of a passive croud on structural behavior. Numerical and experimental results......Passive humans (sitting or standing) might well be present on flooring-systems, footbridges or other structures that carry humans. An active croud of people might generate structural vibrations, and these might be problematic. The passive crowd of people, however, will interact with the structural...

  18. The greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the effect of the increase of the temperature of the earth's atmosphere as a consequence of the increase in the CO2 and other trace gas content has been reviewed. The results of various model studies have been included. There is the frightening prediction that global mean temperature will rise by several degrees with the consequent rise of mean sea level. Model computations also show that in the tropics rainfall will increase whereas in the subtropics and southern mid latitude, rainfall will decrease. If this happens, mankind will be faced with a major disaster in history. Agreement between theory and observations has been discussed. (author). 16 refs, 8 tabs

  19. Space Charge Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M; Palumbo, L

    2014-01-01

    The space charge forces are those generated directly by the charge distribution, with the inclusion of the image charges and currents due to the interaction of the beam with a perfectly conducting smooth pipe. Space charge forces are responsible for several unwanted phenomena related to beam dynamics, such as energy loss, shift of the synchronous phase and frequency , shift of the betatron frequencies, and instabilities. We will discuss in this lecture the main feature of space charge effects in high-energy storage rings as well as in low-energy linacs and transport lines.

  20. Effective String Theory Simplified

    CERN Document Server

    Hellerman, Simeon; Maltz, Jonathan; Swanson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    In this set of notes we simplify the formulation of the Poincar\\'e invariant effective string theory in D dimensions by adding an intrinsic metric and embedding its dynamics into the Polyakov formalism. We apply this formalism to classify operators order by order in the inverse physical length of the string, in a fully gauge-invariant framework. We use this classification to discuss universality and nonuniversalty of observables up to and including next-to-next-to-leading order in the long string expansion.

  1. EFFECTIVE DIVERSITY MANAGEMENT INITIATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suat Begec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity characteristics defines into four areas; personality, internal and external characteristics, and organizational characteristics. Today it is hard to find individuals, organizational and management styles all similar to each other. Twenty-first century leaders face diversity challenges in many arenas and it is a fact that leaders have to live with these diversities. Values affects on the management and organization systems. The global values gain importance and remove the sources of diversities. The leaders believe that the values should be mostly protected. This article focuses on effective diversity management initiatives.

  2. Holographic effective field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Luca; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  3. REDD: The Copenhagen Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feja Lesniewska

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available An agreement on reducing emissions from avoided deforestation and degradation at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties 15 (COP 15 in Copenhagen December 2010 was not forthcoming. For a number of reasons this is a welcome outcome as several important outstanding legal and technical issues remain unresolved. This article examines the results from COP 15 including the Copenhagen Accord. It focuses on the key issues of principles, finance models, and environmental and social safeguards. It concludes with an assessment of the potential effect that the COP 15 will have on REDD negotiations this coming year prior to the UNFCCC COP 16 in Mexico December 2010.

  4. Effective mechanic training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for the training of mechanics is discussed, and the increased interest within the utility industry of placing a similar importance on this training as it has traditionally placed on operator training, is expressed. Effective approaches and techniques are described. Fundamental mechanical maintenance concepts and their practical application are discussed, including the use of supporting video programs. The importance of follow-up practical shop exercise which reinforces classroom instruction is stressed, drawing from practical utility experience. Utilizing success in training as a measure of eligibility for advancement is discussed as well as the interface between training and the company bargaining unit

  5. Events and Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing the period of ‘intensive transnationalism’ among Pakistani migrants in Denmark precipitated by the 2005 earthquake in Kashmir, this article explores the relationship between events and effects on a global scale. One significant initiative after the disaster was the founding of an ad hoc......, and national identity politics in Denmark. Despite the medical doctors’ efforts and intentions, the out- come was framed by 9/11, which has become the major critical event of the decade—one that has supported a developing cleavage between the Danish majority and Denmark’s Muslim immigrant minority....

  6. Hall Effect in Quasicrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang; HU Cheng-zheng; GONG Ping; WANG Ai-jun

    2005-01-01

    The relations between Hall effect and symmetry are discussed for all 2- and 3 dimensional quasicrystals with crystallographically forbidden symmetries. The results show that the numbers of independent components of the Hall coefficient (RH) are one for 3-dimensional quasicrystals, two for those 2 dimensional quasicrystals whose symmetry group is non-Abelian, and three for those 2-dimensional quasicrystals whose symmetry group is Abelian, respectively. The quasicrystals with the same number of independent components have the same form of the components of RH.

  7. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-03

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2–80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  8. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  9. Quantum Zeno Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We present the physics of the quantum Zeno effect, whose gist is often expressed by invoking the adage "a watched pot never boils". We review aspects of the theoretical and experimental work done on the effect since its inception in 1977, and mention some applications. We dedicate the article - with our very best wishes - to Rudolf Zahradnik at the occasion of his great jubilee. Perhaps Rudolf's lasting youthfulness and freshness are due to that he himself had been frequently observed throughout his life: until the political turn-around in 1989 by those who wished, by their surveillance, to prevent Rudolf from spoiling the youth by his personal culture and his passion for science and things beautiful and useful in general. This attempt had failed. Out of gratitude, the youth has infected Rudolf with its youthfulness. Chronically. Since 1989, Rudolf has been closely watched by the public at large. For the same traits of his as before, but with the opposite goal and for the benefit of all generations. We relish...

  10. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Dumas

    Full Text Available Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  11. Cumulative radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In five previous papers, the concept of Cumulative Radiation Effect (CRE) has been presented as a scale of accumulative sub-tolerance radiation damage, with a unique value of the CRE describing a specific level of radiation effect. Simple nomographic and tabular methods for the solution of practical problems in radiotherapy are now described. An essential feature of solving a CRE problem is firstly to present it in a concise and readily appreciated form, and, to do this, nomenclature has been introduced to describe schedules and regimes as compactly as possible. Simple algebraic equations have been derived to describe the CRE achieved by multi-schedule regimes. In these equations, the equivalence conditions existing at the junctions between schedules are not explicit and the equations are based on the CREs of the constituent schedules assessed individually without reference to their context in the regime as a whole. This independent evaluation of CREs for each schedule has resulted in a considerable simplification in the calculation of complex problems. The calculations are further simplified by the use of suitable tables and nomograms, so that the mathematics involved is reduced to simple arithmetical operations which require at the most the use of a slide rule but can be done by hand. The order of procedure in the presentation and calculation of CRE problems can be summarised in an evaluation procedure sheet. The resulting simple methods for solving practical problems of any complexity on the CRE-system are demonstrated by a number of examples. (author)

  12. Photoprotective effects of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L

    2010-04-01

    Sun protective measures can reduce numbers of both precancerous actinic keratoses and cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas within relatively short periods of time even in high-risk populations. Sunscreens, which tend to provide greater protection against shortwave UVB than against longer wavelength UVA radiation, can however provide only partial protection from the mutagenic and immune suppressive effects of sunlight. In large part, this reflects poor compliance with proper sunscreen application and reapplication. Skin cancer is by far the most common malignancy in Caucasian populations, and additional strategies to reduce the morbidity and economic burden of this disease are now urgently needed. Nicotinamide, the amide form of vitamin B3, is an inexpensive agent which is used for a variety of dermatological applications with little or no toxicity even at high doses. Nicotinamide has photoprotective effects against carcinogenesis and immune suppression in mice, and is photoimmunoprotective in humans when used as a lotion or orally. UV irradiation depletes keratinocytes of cellular energy and nicotinamide, which is a precursor of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, may act at least in part by providing energy repletion to irradiated cells.

  13. The Creative Stereotype Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Denis; Dunbar, Kevin N

    2016-01-01

    Because of its fundamental relevance to scientific innovation, artistic expression, and human ingenuity, creativity has long been the subject of systematic psychological investigation. Concomitantly, the far-reaching effects of stereotypes on various cognitive and social processes have been widely researched. Bridging these two literatures, we show in a series of two studies that stereotypes related to creativity can both enhance and diminish individuals' performance on a divergent thinking task. Specifically, Study 1 demonstrated that participants asked to take on a stereotypically uninhibited perspective performed significantly better on a divergent thinking task than those participants who took on a stereotypically inhibited perspective, and a control group. Relatedly, Study 2 showed that the same effect is found within-subjects, with divergent thinking significantly improving when participants invoke an uninhibited stereotype. Moreover, we demonstrate the efficacy of Latent Semantic Analysis as an objective measure of the originality of ideas, and discuss implications of our findings for the nature of creativity. Namely, that creativity may not be best described as a stable individual trait, but as a malleable product of context and perspective.

  14. Meditation: Process and effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Meditation has become popular in many Western nations, especially the USA. An increasing body of research shows various health benefits associated with meditation and these findings have sparked interest in the field of medicine. The practice of meditation originated in the ancient Vedic times of India and is described in the ancient Vedic texts. Meditation is one of the modalities used in Ayurveda (Science of Life), the comprehensive, natural health care system that originated in the ancient Vedic times of India. The term "meditation" is now loosely used to refer to a large number of diverse techniques. According to Vedic science, the true purpose of meditation is to connect oneself to one's deep inner Self. Techniques which achieve that goal serve the true purpose of meditation. Neurological and physiological correlates of meditation have been investigated previously. This article describes the process of meditation at a more fundamental level and aims to shed light on the deeper underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects associated with meditation. Research on the effects of meditation is summarized. PMID:27313408

  15. Effects of Block Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Veal

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of a tri-schedule on the academic achievement of students in a high school. The tri-schedule consists of traditional, 4x4 block, and hybrid schedules running at the same time in the same high school. Effectiveness of the schedules was determined from the state mandated test of basic skills in reading, language, and mathematics. Students who were in a particular schedule their freshman year were tested at the beginning of their sophomore year. A statistical ANCOVA test was performed using the schedule types as independent variables and cognitive skill index and GPA as covariates. For reading and language, there was no statistically significant difference in test results. There was a statistical difference mathematics-computation. Block mathematics is an ideal format for obtaining more credits in mathematics, but the block format does little for mathematics achievement and conceptual understanding. The results have content specific implications for schools, administrations, and school boards who are considering block scheduling adoption.

  16. The Effective MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Kobakhidze, Archil

    2015-01-01

    We suggest an effective field theory framework to discuss deviations from the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) which is based on an alternative arrangement of the gauge-Higgs sector. In this effective MSSM (EffMSSM) nonlinearly realised $SU(2)\\times U(1)$ gauge sector is described by an $SU(2)\\times U(1)$-valued massive vector superfield, which contains a neutral CP-even and charged Higgs fields, while another neutral CP-even Higgs and the neutral CP-odd Higgs fields are residing in an $SU(2)\\times U(1)$-singlet chiral superfield. Although the new theory contains the same particle content as the conventional MSSM, the unconventional representation of superfields allows for new type of interactions, which may lead to a significant modification of the phenomenology. As an illustrative example we consider EffMSSM with modified Higgs and electroweak gauge sector augmented by gaugino soft supersymmetry breaking masses, $M_i~ (i=1,2,3)$ and the Standard Higgs soft-breaking masses, $m_{H_u}=m_{H_d}$ and ...

  17. Oblique effect in stereopsis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth T.; King, Robert A.; Anoskey, Alana M.

    1992-08-01

    Contrast thresholds are lower for detection of a vertical pattern than for an obliquely-oriented pattern. Is there an analogous oblique effect for the depth threshold of a stereoscopic luminance pattern? If so, why? Are the causes different from those for an oblique effect with monocular vision? To explore these issues, we used stereoscopic blurry bar (D6) luminance patterns with a peak spatial frequency of 2 or 4 cycles/degree (cpd) and either a vertical or an oblique orientation. We obtained psychometric functions for data obtained from a method of constant stimuli procedure, using 100 forced-choice trials for each datum. For each of three observers we estimated stereoacuity with a maximum-likelihood curve-fitting procedure. Subjects showed better stereoacuity for the vertical spatial patterns than for the oblique patterns. Some possible causes are that for oblique patterns (unlike vertical patterns) (1) the total vertical extent of the pattern is shrunk by a factor of sin((theta) ), where (theta) equals 90 degree(s) for vertical; (2) the pattern is 'stretched out' in the horizontal direction by a factor of csc((theta) ); (3) there are vertical as well as horizontal retinal disparities. Perhaps the resulting sparseness of horizontal disparity information or the potential vertical disparities in the oblique patterns reduce stereoacuity. To disentangle these causes, we used several different experimental conditions (e.g., elongation of oblique patterns) run in randomized blocks of trials. We will discuss these results and implications for stereopsis.

  18. Nanoscale effects in interdiffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Diffusion on the nano/atomic scales in multilayers, thin films has many challenging features even if the role of structural defects can be neglected and 'only' the effects related to the nano/atomic scale raise. The most basic equations to describe the diffusion are Fick's equations. It is important to emphasize that the diffusion coefficient in Fick's equations is in general composition independent and Fick's classical equations do not include the stress effects, which can have important influence onto the diffusion especially on the nano/atomic scale. We illustrate that the continuum descriptions of the diffusion cannot be applied automatically on such short distances, the classical continuum approximations (Fick's laws) cannot describe correctly the atomic movements. They predict faster kinetics than the atomistic models and the interface shift is always proportional to the square root of the time. However, the kinetics can be even linear on the nano/atomic scale. We have shown from computer simulations that Fick's laws violate on the nanoscale either in completely or restricted miscible systems. This is strongly related to the discrete character of the system on the nanoscale and to the highly neglected fact in the literature that the diffusion coefficients depend on the composition. As will be seen the composition dependence of D is very important and has very significant influence on the diffusion kinetics on the nano/atomic scales. It originates from the fact that usually the diffusion coefficients are different in an A and in a B matrix. Consequently in case of a real interface, which is not atomically sharp, i.e. there is a more or less intermixed region between the pure A and B matrixes, the diffusion coefficient changes continuously while e.g. an A atom diffuses from the pure A matrix into the pure B. This feature can be also called diffusion asymmetry. We have also illustrated that in this case not only the

  19. Some effects on molybdenite. [Photovoltaic and field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrenaudie, J.

    1983-10-01

    Natural molybdenite, well crystallized, presents interesting semi-conducting properties like silicon, and a foliated structure producing an important anisotropy. Photovoltaic effect on the edge and field effect are briefly studied. Preparation of crystals is also examined.

  20. Effective elastic moduli and interface effects of nano- crystalline materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Many properties of nanocrystalline materials are associated with interface effects. Based on their microstructural features, the influence of interfaces on the effective elastic property of nanocrystalline materials is investigated. First, the Mori-Tanaka method is employed to determine the overall effective elastic moduli by considering a nanocrystalline material as a binary composite solid consisting of a crystal or inclusion phase with regular lattice connected by an amorphous-like interface or matrix phase. The effects of strain gradients are then examined on the effective elastic property by using the strain gradient theory to analyze a representative unit cell. Two interface mechanisms are elucidated that influence the effective stiffness and other mechanical properties of materials. One is the softening effect due to the distorted atomic structures and the increased atomic spacings in interface regions, and the other is the baffling effect due to the existence of boundary layers near interfaces.

  1. Effects of Therapist's Nonverbal Communication on Rated Skill and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Mark; Rogers, Ronald W.

    1980-01-01

    Nonverbal cues of immediacy significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. A therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuineness, and effectiveness. (Author)

  2. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  3. Symmetry Effects in Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Andrew Chi-Chih

    2008-12-01

    The concept of symmetry has played a key role in the development of modern physics. For example, using symmetry, C.N. Yang and other physicists have greatly advanced our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. Meanwhile, computer scientists have been pondering why some computational problems seem intractable, while others are easy. Just as in physics, the laws of computation sometimes can only be inferred indirectly by considerations of general principles such as symmetry. The symmetry properties of a function can indeed have a profound effect on how fast the function can be computed. In this talk, we present several elegant and surprising discoveries along this line, made by computer scientists using symmetry as their primary tool. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  4. Unparticle phase effects

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Hung

    2007-01-01

    Unparticles proposed by Georgi carry CP conserving phases in their propagators. We demonstrate that these peculiar phases have an important impact on CP violation. Without including the strong QCD phases, we study the unparticle phase effects on the direct CP asymmetries in the exclusive decays of $\\bar B_d\\to \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B\\to \\pi K$, in which the flavor changing neutral currents are forbidden at tree level but induced by one-loop diagrams. Interesting and consistent results comparing to the data are obtained. In addition, we find that unparticles will significantly enhance the differential branching ratio of $b\\to s \\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$ at the small invariant mass of $\\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$. The forward-backward asymmetries for $b\\to s \\ell^{+} \\ell^{-}$ due to unparticles are also explored.

  5. Trichoderma volatiles effecting Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramadan, Metwaly; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian;

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma species are present in many ecosystems and some strains have the ability to reduce the severity of plant diseases by activating various defense pathways via specific biologically active signaling molecules. Hence we investigated the effects of low molecular weight volatile compounds...... of Trichoderma asperellum IsmT5 on Arabidopsis thaliana. During co-cultivation of T. asperellum IsmT5 without physical contact to A. thaliana we observed smaller but vital and robust plants. The exposed plants exhibit increased trichome numbers, accumulation of defense-related compounds such as H2O2, anthocyanin......, camalexin, and increased expression of defense-related genes. We conclude that A. thaliana perceives the Trichoderma volatiles as stress compounds and subsequently initiates multilayered adaptations including activation of signaling cascades to withstand this environmental influence. The prominent headspace...

  6. The Effective Ambidextrous Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben Juul; Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    . Results of structural equation analyses indicate that superior performance in the ambidextrous organizations is associated with efficiencies derived from adherence to centralized strategic planning and effectiveness generated by decentralized innovative behavior through participation and autonomous...... the essence of organizational ambidexterity as the means to sustain performance over time when environmental conditions change. This paper incorporates strategic management and organization theoretical rationales in a model that combines elements of integration and experimentation in the strategy making...... process and thereby extends the evolving literature on the ambidextrous organization. The performance relationships of the ambidextrous integrative strategy making model are investigated on the basis of a cross-sectional sample of 185 business entities operating in different manufacturing industries...

  7. Quenched effective population size

    CERN Document Server

    Sagitov, Serik; Vatutin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    We study the genealogy of a geographically - or otherwise - structured version of the Wright-Fisher population model with fast migration. The new feature is that migration probabilities may change in a random fashion. Applying Takahashi's results on Markov chains with random transition matrices, we establish convergence to the Kingman coalescent, as the population size goes to infinity. This brings a novel formula for the coalescent effective population size (EPS). We call it a quenched EPS to emphasize the key feature of our model - random environment. The quenched EPS is compared with an annealed (mean-field) EPS which describes the case of constant migration probabilities obtained by averaging the random migration probabilities over possible environments.

  8. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  9. Cumulative environmental effects. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a compilation of knowledge about the state of the environment and human activity in the Norwegian part of the North Sea and Skagerrak. The report gives an overview of pressures and impacts on the environment from normal activity and in the event of accidents. This is used to assess the cumulative environmental effects, which factors have most impact and where the impacts are greatest, and to indicate which problems are expected to be most serious in the future. The report is intended to provide relevant information that can be used in the management of the marine area in the future. It also provides input for the identification of environmental targets and management measures for the North Sea and Skagerrak.(Author)

  10. Ground motion effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground motion caused by natural earthquakes or by nuclear explosion causes buildings and other structures to respond in such manner as possibly to have high unit stresses and to be subject to damage or-in some cases-collapse. Even minor damage may constitute a hazard to persons within or adjacent to buildings. The risk of damage may well be the governing restraint on the uses of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Theory is advanced regarding structural-dynamic response but real buildings and structures are complex, highly variable, and often difficult to model realistically. This paper discusses the state of knowledge, the art of damage prediction and safety precautions, and shows ground motion effects from explosions of underground nuclear devices in the continental United States including events Salmon, Gasbuggy, Boxcar, Faultless and Benham. (author)

  11. Nuclear medium effects in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_3(x,Q^2)$ have been studied for deep inelastic neutrino/antineutrino reactions in iron nucleus by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions, target mass correction, shadowing and anti-shadowing corrections. The calculations have been performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. Using these structure functions we have obtained the ratio $R_{F2,F3}^A(x,Q^2)= \\frac{2F_{2,3}^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2,3}^D(x,Q^2)}$, the differential scattering cross section $\\frac{1}{E}\\frac{d^2\\sigma}{dxdy}$ and the total scattering cross section $\\sigma$. The results of our numerical calculations in $^{56}Fe$ are compared with the experimental results of NuTeV and CDHSW collaborations.

  12. Space-Charge Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Chauvin, N

    2013-01-01

    First, this chapter introduces the expressions for the electric and magnetic space-charge internal fields and forces induced by high-intensity beams. Then, the root-mean-square equation with space charge is derived and discussed. In the third section, the one-dimensional Child-Langmuir law, which gives the maximum current density that can be extracted from an ion source, is exposed. Space-charge compensation can occur in the low-energy beam transport lines (located after the ion source). This phenomenon, which counteracts the spacecharge defocusing effect, is explained and its main parameters are presented. The fifth section presents an overview of the principal methods to perform beam dynamics numerical simulations. An example of a particles-in-cells code, SolMaxP, which takes into account space-charge compensation, is given. Finally, beam dynamics simulation results obtained with this code in the case of the IFMIF injector are presented.

  13. MEDIA EFFECTS THEORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena MAFTEI-GOLOPENȚIA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the world and the various existing points of view play sometimes the role of barriers to understanding the events that take place around us or in which we are directly involved, that we may find overwhelming sometimes. In this context, we have no choice but to find instruments that can help us find a meaning beyond ”raw” information. Frames and other media effects theories can be this instrument, that can help us understand ”the stories” about the surrounding world. Frames are useful to us because our mind can’t simply process each new situation from scratch. This paper aims mainly at analysing frames, their function, their types, their roles and the levels at which they manifest themselves. It also represents the theoretical background of a future case study about the way in which the academic world is symbolically seen by the press.

  14. Hepatoprotective Effects of Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Marina Peralta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The particular characteristics of growth and development of mushrooms in nature result in the accumulation of a variety of secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds, terpenes and steroids and essential cell wall components such as polysaccharides, b-glucans and proteins, several of them with biological activities. The present article outlines and discusses the available information about the protective effects of mushroom extracts against liver damage induced by exogenous compounds. Among mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum is indubitably the most widely studied species. In this review, however, emphasis was given to studies using other mushrooms, especially those presenting efforts of attributing hepatoprotective activities to specific chemical components usually present in the mushroom extracts.

  15. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  16. COSYMA: Health effects models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the main objectives of the MARIA project (''Methods for Assessing the Radiological Impact of Accidents'') initiated by the Commission of the European Communities the program package COSYMA (''COde SYstem from MARIA'') for assessing the radiological and economic off-site consequences of accidental releases of radioactive material to the atmosphere has been jointly developed by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), FRG, and the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), UK. COSYMA includes models and data for assessing a broad spectrum of accident consequences, and they are implemented in independent modules. The subject of this report are those modules, which incorporate models and data for assessing individual and collective risks for deterministic and stochastic health effects. It describes the models implemented, the mathematical algorithms and the required data. Examples are given and explained for the input and output part of the modules. (orig.)

  17. The Effective Bootstrap

    CERN Document Server

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; Serone, Marco

    2016-01-01

    We study the numerical bounds obtained using a conformal-bootstrap method - advocated in ref. [1] but never implemented so far - where different points in the plane of conformal cross ratios $z$ and $\\bar z$ are sampled. In contrast to the most used method based on derivatives evaluated at the symmetric point $z=\\bar z =1/2$, we can consistently "integrate out" higher-dimensional operators and get a reduced simpler, and faster to solve, set of bootstrap equations. We test this "effective" bootstrap by studying the 3D Ising and $O(n)$ vector models and bounds on generic 4D CFTs, for which extensive results are already available in the literature. We also determine the scaling dimensions of certain scalar operators in the $O(n)$ vector models, with $n=2,3,4$, which have not yet been computed using bootstrap techniques.

  18. Managing intercultural conflict effectively

    CERN Document Server

    Ting-Toomey, Stella

    2001-01-01

    In this volume, Ting-Toomey and Oetzel accomplish two objectives: to explain the culture-based situational conflict model, including the relationship among conflict, ethnicity, and culture; and, second, integrate theory and practice in the discussion of interpersonal conflict in culture, ethnic, and gender contexts. While the book is theoretically directed, it is also a down-to-earth practical book that contains ample examples, conflict dialogues, and critical incidents. Managing Intercultural Conflict Effectively helps to illustrate the complexity of intercultural conflict interactions and readers will gain a broad yet integrative perspective in assessing intercultural conflict situations. The book is a multidisciplinary text that draws from the research work of a variety of disciplines such as cross-cultural psychology, social psychology, sociology, marital and family studies, international management, and communication.

  19. Quantum Magellan Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work we consider remarkable experiment of the quantum dynamical interaction between a photon and fixed beam splitter with additional two optical fibers. Given fibers, having "circular", almost completely closed loop forms, admit that both superposition terms, corresponding to reflecting and passing photon, interact unlimitedly periodically with splitter. For increasing number of given interactions final state of the photon tends to superposition of reflecting and passing photon with equivalent superposition coefficients quite independently of their initial values. So, many time repeated unitary quantum dynamical evolution implies an unexpected degeneration. Feynman ingeniously observed that a time of the degeneration of the ideas will come, known to any great geographer-explorer (e.g. Magellan that first circumnavigate Earth), when he thinks about the army of the tourists that will come after him. For this reason mentioned dynamical degeneration will be called quantum Magellan effect. Also, we conside...

  20. The effective bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverri, Alejandro Castedo; von Harling, Benedict; Serone, Marco

    2016-09-01

    We study the numerical bounds obtained using a conformal-bootstrap method — advocated in ref. [1] but never implemented so far — where different points in the plane of conformal cross ratios z and overline{z} are sampled. In contrast to the most used method based on derivatives evaluated at the symmetric point z=overline{z}=1/2 , we can consistently "integrate out" higher-dimensional operators and get a reduced simpler, and faster to solve, set of bootstrap equations. We test this "effective" bootstrap by studying the 3D Ising and O( n) vector models and bounds on generic 4D CFTs, for which extensive results are already available in the literature. We also determine the scaling dimensions of certain scalar operators in the O( n) vector models, with n = 2, 3, 4, which have not yet been computed using bootstrap techniques.

  1. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  2. Piezotronic and Piezophototronic Effects

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhong Lin

    2010-05-06

    Owing to the polarization of ions in a crystal that has noncentral symmetry, a piezoelectric potential (piezopotential) is created in the material by applying a stress. The creation of piezopotential together with the presence of Schottky contacts are the fundamental physics responsible for a few important nanotechnologies. The nanogenerator is based on the piezopotential-driven transient flow of electrons in the external load. On the basis of nanomaterials in the wurtzite semiconductors, such as ZnO and GaN, electronics fabricated by using a piezopotential as a gate voltage are called piezotronics, with applications in strain/force/pressure-triggered/controlled electronic devices, sensors, and logic gates. The piezophototronic effect is a result of three-way coupling among piezoelectricity, photonic excitation, and semiconductor transport, which allows tuning and controlling of electro-optical processes by a strain-induced piezopotential. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Radiation Effects In Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  4. CARDIOPROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF PHYTOSTEROLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Dhankhar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Foods and nutrients play a vital role in normal functioning of the body. They are helpful in maintaining the health of the individual and in reducing the risk of various diseases. Worldwide acceptance of this fact formed a recognition link between "nutrition" and "health" and the concept of "nutraceuticals" has evolved. More than any other disease, the etiology of cardiovascular disease reveals many risk factors that are amenable to nutraceutical intervention. The scientific literature shows that there are several bioactive ingredients that are present in small amounts in plants that can affect mammalian biological processes relevant to cardiovascular disease and other common human diseases. The ability of bioactive ingredients to positively influence cardiovascular risk factors should be recognized as an enormous opportunity in the treatment of a highly prevalent disease. Nutraceuticals hold promise in clinical therapy as they have the potential to significantly reduce the risk of side effects associated with drugs and pills along with reducing the global health care cost. Common ingredients that have been studied include soluble fiber (from oats and psyllium; long-chain omega-3 fatty acids; plant sterols or phytosterols; polyphenols (from dark chocolate, red wine, green tea, or extravirgin olive oil; isoflavones from soy; Chinese red-yeast rice; and probiotics from dairy products. Amongst this vast array of bioactives, there is emerging evidence indicating role of phytosterols in mitigating risk of cardiovascular disease and promoting general health and well-being. Phytosterols are cholesterol-like molecules found in all plant foods. They are absorbed only in trace amounts but inhibit the absorption of intestinal cholesterol including recirculating endogenous biliary cholesterol, a key step in cholesterol elimination. In this review, an attempt has been made to summarize some of the recent research findings on phytosterols that have beneficial

  5. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work examines ionizing radiations: what they are, where they come from, their actions and consequences, finally the norms and preventive measures necessary to avoid serious contamination, whether the individual or the population in general is involved. Man has always been exposed to natural irradiation, but owing to the growing use of ionizing radiations both in medicine and in industry, not to mention nuclear tests and their use as an argument of dissuasion, the irradiation of human beings is increasing daily. Radioactive contamination does remain latent, apart from acute cases, but this is where the danger lies since the consequences may not appear until long after the irradiation. Of all biological effects due to the action of radioelements the genetic risk is one of the most important, affecting the entire population and especially the generations to come. The risk of cancer and leukemia induction plays a substantial part also since a large number of people may be concerned, depending on the mode of contamination involved. All these long-term dangers do not of course exclude the various general or local effects to which the individual alone may be exposed and which sometimes constitute a threat to life. As a result the use of ionizing radiations must be limited and should only be involved if no other process can serve instead. The regulations governing radioelements must be stringent and their application strictly supervised for the better protection of man. This protection must be not only individual but also collective since pollution exists in air, water and land passes to plants and animals and finally reaches the last link in the food chain, man

  6. Effective monitoring of agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David B; Likens, Gene E

    2011-06-01

    An opinion piece published in Nature proposed a global network for agricultural monitoring [J. Sachs, R. Remans, S. Smukler, L. Winowiecki, S. J. Andelman, K. G. Cassman, D. Castle, R. DeFries, G. Denning, J. Fanzo, L. E. Jackson, R. Leemans, J. Leemans, J. C. Milder, S. Naeem, G. Nziguheba, C. A. Palm, J. P. Reganold, D. D. Richter, S. J. Scherr, J. Sircely, C. Sullivan, T. P. Tomich and P. A. Sanchez, Nature, 2010, 466, 558-560.]. Whilst we agree with Sachs et al. that monitoring of agricultural systems is a critically important activity of global significance, especially given increasing problems with global food security and the potential impacts of agriculture on the environment [J. Cribb, The Coming Famine. The Global Food Crisis and What We Can Do to Avoid It, CSIRO Publishing and University of California Press, Melbourne and Oakland, 2010.], we argue in this paper that their generic, mandated monitoring framework has a high probability of failure or at best will be highly inefficient. We base this conclusion on our recently published examination of the factors influencing the success or failure of monitoring programs worldwide [D. B. Lindenmayer and G. E. Likens, Effective Ecological Monitoring, CSIRO Publishing and Earthscan, Melbourne and London, 2010.]. We briefly outline what we believe are three serious flaws in the monitoring framework proposed by Sachs et al. We then suggest an alternative approach that we argue would be more effective, more efficient, and have a greater chance of successfully addressing key issues in sustainable agriculture. PMID:21479312

  7. Probiotics: Safety and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Probiotics Safety and Side Effects Past Issues / Winter 2016 ... Says About the Safety and Side Effects of Probiotics Whether probiotics are likely to be safe for ...

  8. The effectiveness of monetary policy

    OpenAIRE

    Robert H. Rasche; Marcela M. Williams

    2007-01-01

    This analysis addresses changing views of the role and effectiveness of monetary policy, inflation targeting as an "effective monetary policy," monetary policy and short-run (output) stabilization, and problems in implementing a short-run stabilization policy.

  9. Hall Effect in a Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an apparatus and procedure for conducting an undergraduate laboratory experiment to quantitatively study the Hall effect in a plasma. Includes background information on the Hall effect and rationale for conducting the experiment. (JN)

  10. The quantum anomalous Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, CHAO-XING; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Qi, Xiao-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is defined as a quantized Hall effect realized in a system without external magnetic field. Quantum anomalous Hall effect is a novel manifestation of topological structure in many-electron systems, and may have potential applications in future electronic devices. In recent years, quantum anomalous Hall effect has been proposed theoretically and realized experimentally. In this review article, we provide a systematic overview of the theoretical and experimenta...

  11. Relativistic Effect in Galaxy Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2014-01-01

    The general relativistic description of galaxy clustering provides a complete and unified treatment of all the effects in galaxy clustering such as the redshift-space distortion, gravitational lensing, Sachs-Wolfe effects, and their relativistic effects. In particular, the relativistic description resolves the gauge issues in the standard Newtonian description of galaxy clustering by providing the gauge-invariant expression for the observed galaxy number density. The relativistic effect in ga...

  12. Assimilation: central and peripheral effects

    OpenAIRE

    Weert, C.M.M. de; Kruysbergen, N.A.W.H. van

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation and contrast have opposite effects: Contrast leads to an increase of perceived differences between neighbouring fields, whereas assimilation leads to a reduction. It is relatively easy to demonstrate these effects, but the precise localisation of these effects in the perceptual system is not yet possible. In an experiment the strength of assimilation effects was modified by adding spatial noise. By varying the localisation in perceived space of the added noise (by presentation of...

  13. Hall Effect in spinor condensates

    OpenAIRE

    Taillefumier, Mathieu; Dahl, Eskil K.; Brataas, Arne; Hofstetter, Walter

    2009-01-01

    We consider a neutral spinor condensate moving in a periodic magnetic field. The spatially dependent magnetic field induces an effective spin dependent Lorentz force which in turn gives rise to a spin dependent Hall effect. Simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation quantify the Hall effect. We discuss possible experimental realizations.

  14. The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Sumathi

    1999-01-01

    We give a brief introduction to the phenomenon of the Fractional Quantum Hall effect, whose discovery was awarded the Nobel prize in 1998. We also explain the composite fermion picture which describes the fractional quantum Hall effect as the integer quantum Hall effect of composite fermions.

  15. HIV Medicines and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Side Effects of HIV Medicines HIV Medicines and Side Effects (Last updated 1/7/2016; last reviewed 1/7/2016) Key Points HIV medicines help people with ... will depend on a person’s individual needs. Can HIV medicines cause side effects? HIV medicines help people ...

  16. Attention and the Testing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Picklesimer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Memory retrieval often enhances still later memory as evidenced by the testing effect. Divided attention (DA) is known to produce different effects on encoding and retrieval, substantially disrupting the former and often producing little effect on the latter. The present experiments examine whether the mnemonic consequences of retrieval are…

  17. Effects of Security actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Ramona; Andersson-Sköld, Yvonne; Nyberg, Lars; Johansson, Magnus

    2010-05-01

    In a project funded by the Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, the effort and work to reduce different kinds of accidents are being evaluated. The project wants to illuminate the links between actions and outcome, so we can learn from today's performance and in the future select more effective measures and overall deal with accidents more efficiently. The project ESS covers the field of frequent accidents such as sliding accidents at home, in house fires and less common accidents such as chemical and land fill accidents up to even more rare accidents such as natural accidents and hazards. In the ESS project SGI (Swedish geotechnical institute) will evaluate the work and effort concerning various natural hazards limited to landslides, erosion and flooding. The aim is to investigate how municipalities handle, especially prevention, of such natural disasters today. The project includes several aspects such as: • which are the driving forces for risk analysis in a municipality • do one use risk mapping (and what type) in municipal risk analysis • which aspects are most important when selecting preventive measures • in which way do one learn from past accidents • and from previous accidents elsewhere, by for example use existing databases • etc There are many aspects that play a role in a well-functioning safety promotion work. The overall goal is to examine present work and activities, highlight what is well functioning and identify weak points. The aim is to find out where more resources are needed and give suggestions for a more efficient security work. This includes identification of the most efficient "tools" in use or needed. Such tools can be education, directives, funding, more easily available maps and information regarding previous accidents and preventive measures etc. The project will result in recommendations for more effective ways to deal with landslides, erosion and flooding. Since different kinds of problems can occur depending on level of

  18. Avalanche effects near nanojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandigana, Vishal V. R.; Aluru, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we perform a computational investigation of a nanopore connected to external fluidic reservoirs of asymmetric geometries. The asymmetry between the reservoirs is achieved by changing the cross-sectional areas, and the reservoirs are designated as the micropore reservoir and macropore reservoir. When an electric field is applied, which is directed from the macropore towards the micropore reservoir, we observe local nonequilibrium chaotic current oscillations. The current oscillations originate at the micropore-nanopore interface owing to the local cascade of ions; we refer to this phenomenon as the "avalanche effects." We mathematically quantify chaos in terms of the maximum Lyapunov exponent. The maximum Lyapunov exponent exhibits a monotonic increase with the applied voltage and the macropore reservoir diameter. The temporal power spectra maps of the chaotic currents depict a low-frequency "1 /f "-type dynamics for the voltage chaos and "1 /f2 "-type dynamics for the macropore reservoir chaos. The results presented here offer avenues to manipulate ionic diodes and fluidic pumps.

  19. Effective Physics Study Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2011-04-01

    We discuss the methods of efficient study habits and how they can be used by students to help them improve learning physics. In particular, we deal with ideas pertaining to the most effective techniques needed to help students improve their physics study skills. These ideas were developed as part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), an outreach grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. In the presentation, focus on topics such as the skills of how to develop long term memory, how to improve concentration power, how to take class notes, how to prepare for and take exams, how to study scientific subjects such as physics. We argue that the student who conscientiously uses the methods of efficient study habits will be able to achieve higher results than the student who does not; moreover, a student equipped with the proper study skills will spend much less time to learn a subject than a student who has no good study habits. The underlying issue here is not the quantity of time allocated to the study efforts by the student, but the efficiency and quality of actions. This work is supported by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education as part of IMPACTSEED grant.

  20. The nonsense math effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics is a fundamental tool of research. Although potentially applicable in every discipline, the amount of training in mathematics that students typically receive varies greatly between different disciplines. In those disciplines where most researchers do not master mathematics, the use of mathematics may be held in too much awe. To demonstrate this I conducted an online experiment with 200 participants, all of which had experience of reading research reports and a postgraduate degree (in any subject. Participants were presented with the abstracts from two published papers (one in evolutionary anthropology and one in sociology. Based on these abstracts, participants were asked to judge the quality of the research. Either one or the other of the two abstracts was manipulated through the inclusion of an extra sentence taken from a completely unrelated paper and presenting an equation that made no sense in the context. The abstract that included the meaningless mathematics tended to be judged of higher quality. However, this "nonsense math effect" was not found among participants with degrees in mathematics, science, technology or medicine.

  1. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  2. Cost effective solar Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarathna M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy the most efficient, eco-friendly and abundantly available energy source in the nature. It can be converted into electrical energy in cost effective manner. In recent years, the interest in solar energy has risen due to surging oil prices and environmental concern. In many remote or underdeveloped areas, direct access to an electric grid is impossible and a photovoltaic inverter system would make life much simpler and more convenient. With this in mind, it is aimed to design, build, and test a solar panel inverter. This inverter system could be used as backup power during outages, battery charging, or for typical household applications. The main components of this solar system are solar cell, dc to dc boost converters, and inverter. Sine wave push pull inverter topology is used for inverter. In this topology only two MOSFETs are used and isolation requirement between control circuit and power circuit is also less which helps to decrease the cost of solar inverter.

  3. The alpha channeling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  4. Effectively Rebutting Climate Misinformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate science faces one of the best funded misinformation campaigns in history. The challenge for climate communicators is that misinformation is extremely difficult to dislodge, even after people understand that it's incorrect. Understanding how the human brain processes information is crucial to successful rebuttal. To avoid the danger of reinforcing misinformation (known as the 'backfire effect'), emphasis should be on positive facts, not the myth. Another key to dislodging myths is replacing them with an alternate narrative. In order to provide a narrative about arguments that misrepresent climate science, a broader understanding of how these arguments mislead is required. Movements that deny a scientific consensus have 5 characteristics in common and these also apply to climate denial. The arguments against the scientific consensus involve conspiracy theories, fake experts, cherry picking, logical fallacies and misrepresentation or impossible expectations. Learning to identify these rhetorical techniques is an important tool in the climate communication toolbox. I discuss examples of misrepresentations of climate science and the rhetorical techniques employed. I demonstrate how to respond to these arguments by explaining the facts of climate science while in the process, providing an alternate narrative.

  5. Extraaural effects of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marth, E.; Gruber, M.; Koeck, M.; Moese, J.R.; Gallasch, E.; Fueger, G.F.

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term exposition (15 sec) to an indifferent, broad spectrum of noise. Noise levels were set at 85 dB(A) and 110 dB(A). Stress mediators and compensatory mechanisms were studied in 30 test persons. The study was particularly concerned with the metabolic processes providing energy for fight or flight reactions. Most importantly triglycerides are hydrolysed in order to be able to produce the fatty acids that are released. This catabolism is a function of an ACTH-activated lipase. In 93% of the person tested, triglycerides decreased by 7 to 40% of the initial concentration. Blood sugar reaction can be described in two phases: Initially, there was a slight increase in the blood sugar concentration; at higher noise levels, it was followed by a slight decrease. This behaviour was even more characteristic of the insulin concentration. At 85 dB(A), no significant difference concentration was found compared with the levels previous to noise exposition. At 110 dB(A), there was a significant decrease in the insulin level. Vaso constriction of the peripheral blood vessels is a useful parameter for the stress caused by noise. This was shown by registering the finger pulse during the test.

  6. Melatonin Anticancer Effects: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Di Bella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, MLT, the main hormone produced by the pineal gland, not only regulates circadian rhythm, but also has antioxidant, anti-ageing and immunomodulatory properties. MLT plays an important role in blood composition, medullary dynamics, platelet genesis, vessel endothelia, and in platelet aggregation, leukocyte formula regulation and hemoglobin synthesis. Its significant atoxic, apoptotic, oncostatic, angiogenetic, differentiating and antiproliferative properties against all solid and liquid tumors have also been documented. Thanks, in fact, to its considerable functional versatility, MLT can exert both direct and indirect anticancer effects in factorial synergy with other differentiating, antiproliferative, immunomodulating and trophic molecules that form part of the anticancer treatment formulated by Luigi Di Bella (Di Bella Method, DBM: somatostatin, retinoids, ascorbic acid, vitamin D3, prolactin inhibitors, chondroitin-sulfate. The interaction between MLT and the DBM molecules counters the multiple processes that characterize the neoplastic phenotype (induction, promotion, progression and/or dissemination, tumoral mutation. All these particular characteristics suggest the use of MLT in oncological diseases.

  7. Effective quality auditing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivertsen, Terje

    2004-01-15

    The present report focuses on how to improve the effectiveness of quality audits and organization-wide quality management. It discusses several concepts related to internal quality auditing, includes guidelines on how to establish auditing as a key process of the organization, and exemplifies its application in the management of quality, strategy, and change. The report follows a line of research documented previously in the reports 'Continuous Improvement of Software Quality' (HWR-584) and 'ISO 9000 Quality Systems for Software Development' (HWR-629). In particular, the concepts of measurement programmes and process improvement cycles, discussed in HWR-584, form the basis for the approach advocated in the present report to the continual improvement of the internal quality audit process. Internal auditing is an important ingredient in ISO 9000 quality systems, and continual improvement of this process is consistent with the process-oriented view of the 2000 revision of the ISO 9000 family (HWR-629). The overall aim of the research is to provide utilities and their system vendors with better tools for quality management in digital I and C projects. The research results are expected to provide guidance to the choice of software engineering practices to obtain a system fulfilling safety requirements at an acceptable cost. For licensing authorities, the results are intended to make the review process more efficient through the use of appropriate measures (metrics), and to be of help in establishing requirements to software quality assurance in digital I and C projects. (Author)

  8. Effective quality auditing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report focuses on how to improve the effectiveness of quality audits and organization-wide quality management. It discusses several concepts related to internal quality auditing, includes guidelines on how to establish auditing as a key process of the organization, and exemplifies its application in the management of quality, strategy, and change. The report follows a line of research documented previously in the reports 'Continuous Improvement of Software Quality' (HWR-584) and 'ISO 9000 Quality Systems for Software Development' (HWR-629). In particular, the concepts of measurement programmes and process improvement cycles, discussed in HWR-584, form the basis for the approach advocated in the present report to the continual improvement of the internal quality audit process. Internal auditing is an important ingredient in ISO 9000 quality systems, and continual improvement of this process is consistent with the process-oriented view of the 2000 revision of the ISO 9000 family (HWR-629). The overall aim of the research is to provide utilities and their system vendors with better tools for quality management in digital I and C projects. The research results are expected to provide guidance to the choice of software engineering practices to obtain a system fulfilling safety requirements at an acceptable cost. For licensing authorities, the results are intended to make the review process more efficient through the use of appropriate measures (metrics), and to be of help in establishing requirements to software quality assurance in digital I and C projects. (Author)

  9. Harmful effects of nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of nicotine replacement therapy, the consumption of the nicotine is on the rise. Nicotine is considered to be a safer alternative of tobacco. The IARC monograph has not included nicotine as a carcinogen. However there are various studies which show otherwise. We undertook this review to specifically evaluate the effects of nicotine on the various organ systems. A computer aided search of the Medline and PubMed database was done using a combination of the keywords. All the animal and human studies investigating only the role of nicotine were included. Nicotine poses several health hazards. There is an increased risk of cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal disorders. There is decreased immune response and it also poses ill impacts on the reproductive health. It affects the cell proliferation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, DNA mutation by various mechanisms which leads to cancer. It also affects the tumor proliferation and metastasis and causes resistance to chemo and radio therapeutic agents. The use of nicotine needs regulation. The sale of nicotine should be under supervision of trained medical personnel.

  10. Greenhouse effect: analysis, incertitudes, consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general presentation of climatic changes due to greenhouse effect with their consequences is analysed. After a schematic description of this effect a simplified atmospheric model (box model) is proposed. This model integrates the main feedback effects and quantifies them. The effects of astronomic and atmospheric factors on climatic changes are analyzed and compared with classical paleoclimatic results. This study shows the need of good global modelization to evaluate long term quantification of climatic greenhouse effects according to the main time lag of the several biospheric boxes. An overview of biologic and agronomic consequences is given to promote new research subjects and to orientate protecting and conservative biospheric actions

  11. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    and organizational implementation. The focus is on the effects to be achieved by users through their adoption and use of a system. The overall idea is to (a) specify the purpose of a system as effects that are both measurable and meaningful to the users, and (b) evaluate the absence or presence of these effects...... during real use of the system. Effects are formulated in a user-oriented terminology, and they can be evaluated and revised with users in an iterative and incremental systems-development process that involves pilot implementations. In this paper we investigate the design, pilot implementation......, and effects assessment of an electronic patient record. Effects concerning, among other things, clinicians’ mental workload were specified and measured, but apart from the planned changes associated with these effects the pilot implementation also gave rise to emergent, opportunity-based, and curtailed...

  12. Gravitomagnetic effects in conformal gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Said, Jackson Levi; Adami, Kristian Zarb

    2014-01-01

    Gravitomagnetic effects are characterized by two phenomena: first, the geodetic effect which describes the precession of the spin of a gyroscope in a free orbit around a massive object, second, the Lense-Thirring effect which describes the precession of the orbital plane about a rotating source mass. We calculate both these effects in the fourth-order theory of conformal Weyl gravity for the test case of circular orbits. We show that for the geodetic effect a linear term arises which may be interesting for high radial orbits, whereas for the Lense-Thirring effect the additional term has a diminishing effect for most orbits. Circular orbits are also considered in general leading up to a generalization of Kepler's third law.

  13. The placebo effect and nothingness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tine

    In this paper I shall discuss the placebo effect from a posthuman angle. The placebo effect is a medical conundrum, as it is a medical effect that is produced by “nothing”. Placebo literally means, ”I please”, and the placebo has, among other things, been defined as an inert substance, often a...... calcium pill. Placebos are being used in medical trials to determine how much of the medical effect is caused by other factors than medical. There is a vast amount of literature on the placebo effect and it has been studied since the late 1940’ies, mainly for the purpose of pre-elimination from medical......, applying Karen Barad’s concept of agential realism to the problem. I argue that the placebo effect is a cuttingtogether- apart that produces specific agencies in the placebo phenomenon – that is, both the subject under treatment and the placebo emerge in the placebo effect. Through quantum physics, Barad...

  14. Review: Airblast effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Range Airblast Propagation On February 2, 1951, the Atomic Energy Commission discovered that airblast from an 8-kt explosion could break many windows in Las Vegas at 60 miles range from Frenchman's Flat. Yet later, on February 6, only minor effects resulted from three times as large a yield. Atmospheric conditions were found to be responsible for this apparent anomaly. A weather watch was initiated under the direction of Everett Cox to help prevent recurrences during further atmospheric nuclear testing. Our atmosphere with its stratifications of temperature and winds acts as an acoustic lens which may trap, duct, or even focus blast waves from explosions. The basic refraction mechanism is described. Sound speed is proportional to the square root of absolute temperature, as shown in Newton's Principia, so as temperature decreases with altitude, so does sound speed. The proper coefficient was found by Laplace, using adiabatic rather than Newton's isothermal compression. Sound or blast waves propagate through moving air with this wind added or subtracted from the sound speed. This affects an initially vertical plane wave to make it increasingly distorted with time. Wave normals, or rays, are bent upward, away from ground, in layers where net sound velocity decreases with altitude and are bent downward where sound velocity increases with altitude. This bending, applied to a point sound source or explosion, gives ray paths typified. Where dueling is caused by a velocity inversion high above the ground, there is a zone of silence beyond the immediate range of the strong explosion wave, and a sound ring at some distance determined by the height and strength of the dueling layer. Calculation of ray paths has evolved with the growth in needs and computer capabilities

  15. Electro-optic effect and photoelastic effect of feroelectric relaxors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kotaro; Hoshina, Takuya; Takeda, Hiroaki; Tsurumi, Takaaki

    2016-10-01

    To understand the origin of the electro-optic effect (EO-effect) of ferroelectric relaxors, the relationships among the quadratic EO-coefficient, photoelastic coefficient, and electron density were elucidated. The quadratic EO-coefficient is given by the product of the photoelastic and electrostrictive coefficients. Materials consisting of heavy elements normally exhibit high refractive indices and large photoelastic effects, indicating that the photoelastic coefficient increases with electron density of materials. The photoelastic coefficient was calculated as a function of the electron density of materials. The equations derived in this study were experimentally confirmed using lanthanum-added lead-zirconate-titanate (PLZT) transparent ceramics. It was found that the origin of the EO-effect in ferroelectric relaxors was the photoelastic effect coupled with electric-field-induced strain via the piezoelectric and electrostrictive effects.

  16. Edge Effects and Coupling Effects in Atomic Force Microscope Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiang-jun; MENGYong-gang; WENShi-zhu

    2004-01-01

    The AFM images were obtained by an atomic force microscope (AFM) and transformed from the deformation of AFM micro cantilever probe. However, due to the surface topography and surface forces applied on the AFM tip of sample, the deformation of AFM probe results in obvious edge effects and coupling effects in the AFM images. The deformation of AFM probe was analyzed,the mechanism of the edge effects and the coupling effects was investigated, and their results in the AFM images were studied. It is demanstrated by the theoretical analysis and AFM experiments that the edge effects make lateral force images more clear than the topography images, also make extraction of frictional force force from lateral force images mare complex and difficult. While the coupling effects make the comparison between topography images and lateral force images mare advantage to acquire precise topography information by AFM.

  17. Cultural diversity, cities and innovation: firm effects or city effects?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Growing cultural diversity is seen as important for innovation. Research has focused on two potential mechanisms: a firm effect, with diversity at the firm level improving knowledge sourcing or ideas generation, and a city effect, where diverse cities helping firms innovate. This paper uses a dataset of over 2,000 UK SMEs to test between these two. Controlling for firm characteristics, city characteristics and firm and city diversity, there is strong evidence for the firm effect. Firms with a...

  18. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  19. Mechanism of Warburg Effect and Its Effect on Tumor Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun WEI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism characterized by a preference for aerobic glycolysis even when the oxygen content is normal, a phenomenon termed “Warburg effect”. However the definite molecular mechanisms of Warburg effect remains unclear, recent works indicated that it might be related to the abnormal activity of the oncogene and tumor suppressor genes, also the change of tumor microenvironment, the abnormal expression of glucose metabolic enzyme and so on. Warburg effect has a relationship with tumor progression and provide suitable conditions for tumor metastasis. This review will summarizes the mechanism of Warburg effect and its effect on tumor metastasis.

  20. [Longterm effects of steroid therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, P

    1998-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways play. Anti-inflammatory drugs the fundamental role in the treatment of asthma and among them steroids are the most important. However, oral steroids may cause many serious side effects. A major breakthrough in the treatment of asthma was introducing inhaled steroids. Inhaled steroids have much less side effects than oral steroids, although they have the same anti-inflammatory activity. Long term effect of inhaled steroids can be divided into wanted and unwanted outcome. The desirable anti-inflammatory effect of steroids is reflected by lowering of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and a better control of asthma symptoms. Inhaled corticosteroid may have systemic side effects similar to those observed with oral steroids such as 1) adrenal suppression, 2) effect on bone metabolism, 3) growth suppression in children, 4) impaired skin collagen synthesis, 5) cataract, 6) metabolic disturbances, 7) effect on central nervous system. Topical side effects of inhaled corticosteroid such as oral candidiasis, dysphonia and cough effect about 10 to 30% of patients taking those drugs. Summing up it is advisable to use inhaled corticosteroid in the lower effective dose. PMID:9610231

  1. Geologic effects of hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Nicholas K.

    1994-08-01

    Hurricanes are intense low pressure systems of tropical origin. Hurricane damage results from storm surge, wind, and inland flooding from heavy rainfall. Field observations and remote sensing of recent major hurricanes such as Hugo (1989), Andrew (1992) and Iniki (1992) are providing new insights into the mechanisms producing damage in these major storms. Velocities associated with hurricanes include the counterclockwise vortex winds flowing around the eye and the much slower regional winds that steer hurricane and move it forward. Vectorial addition of theseof these two winds on the higher effective wind speed than on the left side. Coast-parallel hurricane tracks keep the weaker left side of the storm against the coast, whereas coast-normal tracks produce a wide swath of destruction as the more powerful right side of the storm cuts a swath of destruction hundreds of kilometers inland. Storm surge is a function of the wind speed, central pressure, shelf slope, shoreline configuration, and anthropogenic alterations to the shoreline. Maximum surge heights are not under the eye of the hurricane, where the pressure is lowest, but on the right side of the eye at the radius of maximum winds, where the winds are strongest. Flood surge occurs as the hurricane approaches land and drives coastal waters, and superimposed waves, across the shore. Ebb surge occurs when impounded surface water flows seaward as the storm moves inland. Flood and ebb surge damage have been greatly increased in recent hurricanes as a result of anthropogenic changes along the shoreline. Hurricane wind damage occurs on three scales — megascale, mesoscale and microscale. Local wind damage is a function of wind speed, exposure and structural resistance to velocity pressure, wind drag and flying debris. Localized extreme damage is caused by gusts that can locally exceed sustained winds by a factor of two in areas where there is strong convective activity. Geologic changes occuring in hurricanes

  2. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  3. Effective sizes for subdivided populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesser, R K; Rhodes, O E; Sugg, D W; Schnabel, A

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional, single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective sizes, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal

  4. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present effects-driven IT development as an instrument for pursuing and reinforcing Participatory Design (PD) when it is applied in commercial information technology (IT) projects. Effects-driven IT development supports the management of a sustained PD process throughout design and...... organizational implementation. The focus is on the effects to be achieved by users through their adoption and use of a system. The overall idea is to (a) specify the purpose of a system as effects that are both measurable and meaningful to the users, and (b) evaluate the absence or presence of these effects...... during real use of the system. Effects are formulated in a user-oriented terminology, and they can be evaluated and revised with users in an iterative and incremental systems-development process that involves pilot implementations. In this paper we investigate the design, pilot implementation, and...

  5. Screening Effect in Charge Qubit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Ming; XIAO Xiao; GAO Yi-Bo

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of screening effect on quantum decoherence for charge qubit and the process of quantum information storage. When the flux produced by the circulating current in SQUID loop is considered, screening effect is formally characterized by a LC resonator. Using large-detuning condition and Fr(o)hlich transformation in the qubit-cavity-resonator system, we calculate the decoherence factor for charge qubit and the effective qubit-cavity Hamiltonian. The decoherence factor owns a factorized structure, it shows that screening effect is a resource of decoherence for charge qubit. The effective Hamiltonian shows that the screening effect results in a frequency shift for charge qubit and a modified qubit-cavity coupling constant induced by a LC resonator.

  6. Maternal effects in the magpie

    OpenAIRE

    Pihlaja, Marjo

    2006-01-01

    Maternal effects are suggested to be an efficient way to adapt offspring to variable and changing environments with consequent effects on variation in offspring fitness. In birds, mothers are able to affect the quality of their offspring through egg quality and through their incubation and parental care behaviour. Maternal effects via egg quality and hatching asynchrony, caused by incubation behaviour, may incur costs for both the mother and her offspring. For my thesis, I investigated the ad...

  7. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård;

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  8. The dynamics of system effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modern control theory has been applied to study the dynamics of system effectiveness of a nuclear reactor power system. The various contributory functions towards system effectiveness are formulated in terms of state variables with weightage functions chosen to satisfy asymptotic stability criteria. The sensitivity of system effectiveness to the variations of weighting function is investigated. The transient response and root locus are also furnished. (M.G.B.)

  9. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  10. Peer Effects in the Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Thomas; Dustmann, Christian; Schönberg, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Existing evidence on peer effects in a work environment stems from either laboratory experiments or from real-word studies referring to a specific firm or specific occupation. Yet, it is unclear to what extent these findings apply to the labor market in general. In this paper, therefore, we investigate peer effects in the workplace for a representative set of workers, firms, and occupations with a focus on peer effects in wages rather than productivity. Our estimation strategy – which links t...

  11. Additive decompositions with interaction effects

    OpenAIRE

    Biewen, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a comprehensive, path-independent decomposition formula of changes into ceteris paribus effects and interaction effects. The formula implies a reassessment of sequential decomposition methods that are widely used in the literature and that are restrictive in how they treat interaction effects. If counterfactual outcomes are correctly specified, it may also be viewed as a description of certain aspects of causality in the situation where more than one causal influence is pr...

  12. Semiotics and the placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G; Colloca, Luana

    2010-01-01

    Despite substantial progress in elucidating its neurobiological mechanisms, theoretical understanding of the placebo effect is poorly developed. Application of the semiotic theory developed by the American philosopher Charles Peirce offers a promising account of placebo effects as involving the apprehension and response to signs. The semiotic approach dovetails with the various psychological mechanisms invoked to account for placebo effects, such as conditioning and expectation, and bridges the biological and cultural dimensions of this fascinating phenomenon.

  13. Pharmacological Effects of Rosa Damascena

    OpenAIRE

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Saberi, Zahra; Amini, Somayeh

    2011-01-01

    Rosa damascena mill L., known as Gole Mohammadi in is one of the most important species of Rosaceae family flowers. R. damascena is an ornamental plant and beside perfuming effect, several pharmacological properties including anti-HIV, antibacterial, antioxidant, antitussive, hypnotic, antidiabetic, and relaxant effect on tracheal chains have been reported for this plant. This article is a comprehensive review on pharmacological effects of R. damascena. Online literature searches were perform...

  14. Adverse effects of antihypertensive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, F E; Messerli, F H

    1981-09-01

    Early essential hypertension is asymptomatic and should remain so throughout treatment. In view of the increasing number of available antihypertensive agents, clinicians need to become familiar with the potential side effects of these drugs. By placing more emphasis on non-pharmacological treatment (sodium restriction, weight loss, exercise) and thoroughly evaluating each case in particular, the pharmacological regimen can be optimally tailored to the patient's needs. Potential side effects should be predicted and can often be avoided; if they become clinically significant they should be rapidly recognised and corrected. These side effects can be easily remembered in most instances, as they fall into 3 broad categories: (a) those caused by an exaggerated therapeutic effect; (b) those due to a non-therapeutic pharmacological effect; and (c) those caused by a non-therapeutic, non-pharmacological effect probably representing idiosyncratic reactions. This review focuses mainly on adverse effects of the second and third kind. Each group of drugs in general shares the common side effects of the first two categories, while each individual drug has its own idiosyncratic side effects.

  15. Partial order of quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Pekka J.; Ma̧czynski, Maciej J.

    1995-04-01

    The set of effects is not a lattice with respect to its natural order. Projection operators do have the greatest lower bounds (and the least upper bounds) in that set, but there are also other (incomparable) effects which share this property. However, the coexistence, the commutativity, and the regularity of a pair of effects are not sufficient for the existence of their infima and suprema. The structure of the range of an observable (as a normalized POV measure) can vary from that of a commutative Boolean to a noncommutative non-Boolean subset of effects.

  16. Isotope Effects in ESR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to present the relationship between ESR spectroscopy and isotope effects three levels are considered: (i ESR spectroscopy is described on a general level up to the models for interpretation of the experimental spectra, which go beyond the usually used time and mass independent spin-Hamilton operator, (ii the main characteristics of the generalized isotope effects are worked out, and finally (iii the basic, mainly quantum mechanical effects are used to describe the coupling of electron spins with the degrees of freedom, which are accessible under the selected conditions, of the respective paramagnetic object under investigation. The ESR parameters and the respective models are formalized so far, that they include the time and mass depending influences and reflect the specific isotope effects. Relations will be established between the effects in ESR spectra to spin relaxation, to spin exchange, to the magnetic isotope effect, to the Jahn-Teller effects, as well as to the influence of zero-point vibrations. Examples will be presented which demonstrate the influence of isotopes as well as the kind of accessible information. It will be differentiated with respect to isotope effects in paramagnetic centres itself and in the respective matrices up to the technique of ESR imaging. It is shown that the use of isotope effects is indispensable in ESR spectroscopy.

  17. EFFECTIVE POROSITY IMPLIES EFFECTIVE BULK DENSITY IN SORBING SOLUTE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flach, G.

    2012-02-27

    The concept of an effective porosity is widely used in solute transport modeling to account for the presence of a fraction of the medium that effectively does not influence solute migration, apart from taking up space. This non-participating volume or ineffective porosity plays the same role as the gas phase in single-phase liquid unsaturated transport: it increases pore velocity, which is useful towards reproducing observed solute travel times. The prevalent use of the effective porosity concept is reflected by its prominent inclusion in popular texts, e.g., de Marsily (1986), Fetter (1988, 1993) and Zheng and Bennett (2002). The purpose of this commentary is to point out that proper application of the concept for sorbing solutes requires more than simply reducing porosity while leaving other material properties unchanged. More specifically, effective porosity implies the corresponding need for an effective bulk density in a conventional single-porosity model. The reason is that the designated non-participating volume is composed of both solid and fluid phases, both of which must be neglected for consistency. Said another way, if solute does not enter the ineffective porosity then it also cannot contact the adjoining solid. Conceptually neglecting the fluid portion of the non-participating volume leads to a lower (effective) porosity. Likewise, discarding the solid portion of the non-participating volume inherently leads to a lower or effective bulk density. In the author's experience, practitioners virtually never adjust bulk density when adopting the effective porosity approach.

  18. The Estimated Effects of Service Learning on Students' Intercultural Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgo, Cindy A.

    2015-01-01

    As the higher education landscape continues to diversify, intercultural effectiveness comes to the forefront among important outcomes for students. Service learning is one programmatic tool that institutions of higher education can use to foster the development of intercultural effectiveness. This study provides evidence that service learning is…

  19. Nanoconfinement Effects in Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, Harold [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-19

    The objective of this study is to improve our understanding of the effect of active site environment in heterogeneous catalysis by synthesizing and probing the properties of nanostructures that would define the environment around an active site and could be modified according to design. In this investigation, the unique properties that stem from the constrained environment and enforced proximity of functional groups at the active site were demonstrated for a number of systems. The first system is a nanocage structure with silicon-based, atom-thick shells and molecular-size cavities. The shell imparts the expected size exclusion for access to the interior cavity, and the confined space together with the hydrophobic shell strongly influences the stability of charged groups. One consequence is that the interior amine groups in a siloxane nanocage exhibit a shift in their protonation ability that is equivalent to about 4 pH units. In another nanocage structure designed to possess a core-shell structure in which the core periphery is decorated with carboxylic acid groups and the shell interior is populated with silanol groups, the restricted motion of the core results in limiting the stoichiometry of reaction between carboxylic acid and a Co2CO8 complex, which leads to formation and stabilization of Co(I) ions in the nanocage. The second designed catalytic structure is a supported, isolated, Lewis acid Sn-oxide unit derived from a (POSS)-Sn-(POSS) molecular complex (POSS = incompletely condensed silsesquioxane). The Sn center in the (POSS)-Sn-(POSS) complex is present in a tetrahedral coordination, as confirmed by single crystal x-ray crystallography and Sn NMR, and its Lewis acid character is demonstrated with its binding to amines. The retention of the tetrahedral coordination of Sn after heterogenization and mild oxidative treatment is confirmed by characterization using EXAFS, NMR, UV-vis, and DRIFT, and its Lewis acid character is confirmed by stoichiometric

  20. A side effect resource to capture phenotypic effects of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Monica; Letunic, Ivica;

    2010-01-01

    The molecular understanding of phenotypes caused by drugs in humans is essential for elucidating mechanisms of action and for developing personalized medicines. Side effects of drugs (also known as adverse drug reactions) are an important source of human phenotypic information, but so far research...... on this topic has been hampered by insufficient accessibility of data. Consequently, we have developed a public, computer-readable side effect resource (SIDER) that connects 888 drugs to 1450 side effect terms. It contains information on frequency in patients for one-third of the drug-side effect pairs. For 199...... drugs, the side effect frequency of placebo administration could also be extracted. We illustrate the potential of SIDER with a number of analyses. The resource is freely available for academic research at http://sideeffects.embl.de....

  1. Quark and pion effective couplings from polarization effects

    CERN Document Server

    Braghin, Fabio L

    2016-01-01

    A flavor SU(2) effective model for pions and quarks is derived by considering polarization effects departing from the usual quark-quark effective interaction induced by dressed gluon exchange, i.e. a global color model for QCD. For that, the quark field is decomposed into a component that yields light mesons and the quark-antiquark condensate, being integrated out by means of the auxiliary field method, and another component which yields constituent quarks. Within a longwavelength and weak quark field expansion (or large quark effective mass expansion) of a quark determinant, the leading terms are found up to the second order in a zero order derivative expansion, by neglecting vector mesons that are considerably heavier than the pion. Pions are considered in the structureless limit and, besides the chiral invariant pion self interaction terms that reproduce previously derived expressions, symmetry breaking terms are also presented. The leading chiral quark-quark effective couplings are also found correspondin...

  2. Effects of Small Oscillations on the Effective Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the effective area of the Simbol-X mirrors as a function of the off-axis angle for small oscillations. A reduction is expected due to: 1) geometrical effects, because some of the photons miss the secondary mirror surface; 2) reflectivity effects, caused by the variation of the coating reflectivity with the incidence angle. The former are related to the length of the two mirror surfaces, and can be reduced by making the secondary mirror longer. The second ones are energy-dependent, and strongly related to the characteristics of the reflecting coating. These effects are analyzed by means of ray-tracing simulations in order to optimize the mirror and coating design, aiming to improve the effective area stability.

  3. Teacher Evaluation: Archiving Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lance D.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation is a current hot topic within music education. This article offers strategies for K-12 music educators on how to promote their effectiveness as teachers through archival documentation in a teacher portfolio. Using the Danielson evaluation model (based on four domains of effective teaching practices), examples of music teaching…

  4. Kriging with mixed effects models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Pollice

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effectiveness of the use of mixed effects models for estimation and prediction purposes in spatial statistics for continuous data is reviewed in the classical and Bayesian frameworks. A case study on agricultural data is also provided.

  5. Effective Implementation of Urban Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xun-guo

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the factors that affect the efficiency and function of city planning in practical implementation,especially those of detailed planning. Two key principles and three strategies for plan to reach effective implementation are discussed so that the inflexibility and non- effectiveness of plans can be lessened.

  6. Topological effects on string vacua

    CERN Document Server

    Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    We review some topological effects on the construction of string flux-vacua. Specifically we study the effects of brane-flux transitions on the stability of D-branes on a generalized tori compactificaction, the transition that a black hole suffers in a background threaded with fluxes and the connections among some Minkowsky vacua solutions.

  7. Maturity effects in energy futures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serletis, Apostolos (Calgary Univ., AB (CA). Dept. of Economics)

    1992-04-01

    This paper examines the effects of maturity on future price volatility and trading volume for 129 energy futures contracts recently traded in the NYMEX. The results provide support for the maturity effect hypothesis, that is, energy futures prices to become more volatile and trading volume increases as futures contracts approach maturity. (author).

  8. Teaching the Photoelectric Effect Inductively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that students have difficulty understanding the underlying process of the photoelectric effect. Thus, this study sought to utilize an inductively situated lesson for teaching the photoelectric effect, hypothesizing that this type of enquiry would help learners delve deeper into the principles of the phenomenon and provide a…

  9. Effective securing of a drain.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Flynn, P; Akhtar, S

    1999-01-01

    The importance of effective anchoring of drains cannot be over emphasized. In this paper, we describe a safe and effective method of drain fixation used in 118 cases between January 1998-99 in our department. This useful technique has the advantage of minimizing inadvertent drain displacement with its consequent complications.

  10. Effects of Ritalin on Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooter, Robert B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This article describes the use of "Ritalin" to calm overactive children. The drug's side effects are reported, and research on the effect of "Ritalin" on reading performance in the classroom is reviewed. It is concluded that use of stimulant drugs to help reading underachievers is not supported by research. (Author/JDD)

  11. Multigenerational effects of maternal undernutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Francine H.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine exposure to reduced nutrient availability can have major effects in determining susceptibility to chronic disease later in life. Martínez et al. (2014) demonstrate multigenerational effects of poor maternal nutrition and evidence of germ-line transmission through alterations in DNA methylation. PMID:24896533

  12. Evolution of maternal effect senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorad, Jacob A; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-12

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton's evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton's age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species.

  13. [Between Werther and Papageno effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, S; Steinleitner, A

    2015-05-01

    Research on the impact of suicide depictions in the media is traditionally focussed on two possible outcomes: on the one hand, there is ample evidence for additional copycat effects after media coverage of suicides referred to as the Werther effect but on the other hand, suicide rates decrease after appropriate media depictions of suicides referred to as the Papageno effect. It is still uncertain what exactly qualifies studies that only limitedly support an imitative or preventive media effect, i.e. studies with ambiguous findings, as they are often disregarded. The present literature review focuses on equivocal studies (n = 25) on copycat suicides that were systematically analyzed based on theoretically derived criteria. The results of the systematic analysis of all identified studies imply that media effects on suicidality are better understood and discussed as a continuum between the two extremes that were introduced as either a damaging Werther effect or a beneficial Papageno effect. Future studies must clarify what factors contribute to a shift from ambiguous findings to harmful media effects on individual suicidality. PMID:25700723

  14. Memory Processes in Media Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Explores the role of memory in mediating mass communication effects. Examines (1) the nature of memory, (2) issues in retention and recall of media messages, (3) methods of promoting retention and recall of media messages, and (4) implications of memory processes for mass media effects. (PD)

  15. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  16. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Cory D. Cress; McMorrow, Julian J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Landi, Brian J.; Seth M. Hubbard; Messenger, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  17. Writing an Effective Anticorruption Law

    OpenAIRE

    Richard E. Messick; Kleinfeld, Rachel

    2001-01-01

    The note looks at effective anticorruption legal instruments. However, law enforcement measures are not the first or necessarily the preferred method of defense. An informed citizenry, a government imbued with a service ethic, and other measures can be more effective in combating corruption. But tailoring the law to improve enforcement capacity generally encompasses a variety of statutes t...

  18. Counselor Effectiveness Through Radio Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    This study determined the effectiveness of the use of radio as a means of providing immediate feedback on student counselors in a practicum setting. Using a non-equivalent group experimental design, 10 experimental subjects were compared to 10 control subjects with respect to counselor effectiveness. The experimental subjects were given immediate…

  19. How Principals Support Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The current standards and accountability regime describes effective teaching as the ability to increase student achievement on standardized tests. This narrow definition of effectiveness can lead principals to create school cultures myopically focused on student achievement data. A "laser-like focus on academic achievement," if employed too…

  20. Classroom Composition and Peer Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattie, John A. C.

    2002-01-01

    This chapter examines the extent to which the composition of classes affects learning outcomes. The aim is to explore peer effects when students are organized into classes on the basis of ability, ethnicity, or gender, as well as the effects of multigrade and multi-age classes and class size. The argument is defended that these composition factors…

  1. Octupole correlation effects in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Octupole correlation effects in nuclei are discussed from the point of view of many-body wavefunctions as well as mean-field methods. The light actinides, where octupole effects are largest, are considered in detail. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made for energy splittings of parity doublets; E1 transition matrix elements and one-nucleon transfer reactions

  2. Gestalt Effect of Self Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    Defining self assessment as the involvement of students in identifying standards and/or criteria to apply to their work and making judgements about the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards, this paper seeks to highlight the gestalt effect of self assessment. The total effect of self assessment on the learner is greater than…

  3. Lighting effects for mobile games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Christensen, Niels Jørgen; Falster, Peter

    2005-01-01

    lighting. Textures are merely plastered onto the tiles. A recent game release has, however, shown that effects such as dynamic light sources can spice up a mobile game of this type quite a bit. In this paper we carry the idea of dynamic lighting effects for tile-based 2D games even further. In particular...

  4. Health Effects of Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... air pollution How to protect yourself from air pollution Chemicals Noise Quizzes Links to more information girlshealth glossary girlshealth.gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home The environment and your health Air Health effects of air pollution ... Health effects of air pollution Breathing air that ...

  5. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research.

  6. Summarizing primary and secondary effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2013-01-01

    Current methods for decomposing class differentials in educational decisions into primary and secondary effects produce many parameters, rendering them ill-equipped for parsimonious comparisons across countries or birth cohorts. This paper develops a parametric method that provides an optimal...... summary of primary and secondary effects across discrete class origins. Under the testable assumption that the pattern of effects of class origins on academic ability is proportional to the pattern of effects of class origins on educational choice net of academic ability, the method returns a single...... summary measure. Applying the method to two cohorts born in the UK in 1958 and 1970 suggests that––even with increasing overall inequality of educational opportunity––the relative contribution of secondary effects to class differentials in A-level completion has changed little between the two cohorts....

  7. Media Effects: Theory and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen; Walther, Joseph B

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes trends and commonalities among prominent theories of media effects. On the basis of exemplary meta-analyses of media effects and bibliometric studies of well-cited theories, we identify and discuss five features of media effects theories as well as their empirical support. Each of these features specifies the conditions under which media may produce effects on certain types of individuals. Our review ends with a discussion of media effects in newer media environments. This includes theories of computer-mediated communication, the development of which appears to share a similar pattern of reformulation from unidirectional, receiver-oriented views, to theories that recognize the transactional nature of communication. We conclude by outlining challenges and promising avenues for future research. PMID:26331344

  8. ORGANIZATIONAL ASSESSMENT: EFFECTIVENESS VS. EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Bartuševičienė

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Organizational assessment has always been the key element of the discussion among scientists as well as business people. While managers are striving for better performance results, scientists are reaching for best ways to evaluate the organization. One of the most common ways to assess the performance of the entity is to measure the effectiveness or the efficiency of the organization. Those two concepts might look synonymous, yet as the findings revealed they have a distinct meaning. The purpose of this article is to reveal those differences and explore organizational assessment within effectiveness and efficiency plane. Design/methodology/approach – Scientific literature analysis, comparative and summarization methods will be used during the research to better understand the challenges of the issue. Findings – Effectiveness and efficiency are exclusive performance measures, which entities can use to assess their performance. Efficiency is oriented towards successful input transformation into outputs, where effectiveness measures how outputs interact with the economic and social environment. Research limitations/implications –In some cases effectiveness concept is being used to reflect overall performance of the organization, since it is a broader concept compared to the efficiency. It gets challenging to explore the efficiency factor if it is included under effectiveness assessment. Practical implications – The assessment of the organizational performance helps companies to improve their reports, assures smoother competition in the global market and creates a sustainable competitive advantage. Originality/Value – The paper revealed that organization can be assessed either within effectiveness or efficiency perspective. Organization striving for excellent performance should be effective and efficient, yet as the findings revealed, inefficient, yet effective organization can still survive yet at a high cost. Keywords

  9. Discrete solvent effects on the effective interaction between charged colloids

    CERN Document Server

    Allahyarov, E

    2000-01-01

    Using computer simulations of two charged colloidal spheres with their counterions in a hard sphere solvent, we show that the granular nature of the solvent significantly influences the effective colloidal interaction. For divalent counterions, the total effective force can become attractive generated by counterion hydration, while for monovalent counterions the forces are repulsive and well-described by a solvent-induced colloidal charge renormalization. Both effects are not contained in the traditional "primitive" approaches but can be accounted for in a solvent-averaged primitive model.

  10. Features which separate least effective from most effective science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Robert E.; Hidayat, Eddy M.; Penick, John E.

    Sixty-one science supervisors identified 321 teachers, 162 most effective and 159 least effective, in their respective districts. Information was then sought concerning age, gender, teaching field(s), number of preparations, amount of preparation, time, semester hours of undergraduate science preparation, quantity of graduate science preparation, type of teacher education programs, number of weeks of NSF workshop experience, and number of workshops elected for participation. Comparisons of the information gathered between least and most effective teachers were made. There were no differences in any categories except for gender, quantity of NSF institute experiences, and elected in-service experiences in excess of a single day's duration. Many of the factors frequently used to differentiate among teachers do not provide any explanation of the differences between least and most effective teachers of science.

  11. Context Effects in Western Herbal Medicine: Fundamental to Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, James

    2016-01-01

    Western herbal medicine (WHM) is a complex healthcare system that uses traditional plant-based medicines in patient care. Typical preparations are individualized polyherbal formulae that, unlike herbal pills, retain the odor and taste of whole herbs. Qualitative studies in WHM show patient-practitioner relationships to be collaborative. Health narratives are co-constructed, leading to assessments, and treatments with personal significance for participants. It is hypothesized that the distinct characteristics of traditional herbal preparations and patient-herbalist interactions, in conjunction with the WHM physical healthcare environment, evoke context (placebo) effects that are fundamental to the overall effectiveness of herbal treatment. These context effects may need to be minimized to demonstrate pharmacological efficacy of herbal formulae in randomized, placebo-controlled trials, optimized to demonstrate effectiveness of WHM in pragmatic trials, and consciously harnessed to enhance outcomes in clinical practice. PMID:26613625

  12. Effects of therapists nonverbal communication on rated skill and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, M; Rogers, R W

    1980-07-01

    A therapist's nonverbal behavior may communicate emotion and feelings toward a client. Thus, skilled utilization of appropriate nonverbal cues should facilitate many nonbehavioral therapies. A 2 X 2 X 2 factorial experiment investigated the therapy-facilitating effects of three theoretical dimensions of nonverbal communication: Immediacy, potency or status, and responsivity. A reenacted client-centered therapy session was videotaped. Verbal content was held constant, but all combinations of the three nonverbal dimensions were portrayed. A total of 118 male and female nonparticipant observers rated the therapist's interpersonal skills (empathy, warmth, and genuineness) and effectiveness. The results disclosed that the nonverbal cues of immediacy (close therapist-client distance and eye contact) significantly improved ratings of the therapist's interpersonal skills and effectiveness. Thus, the study demonstrated that a therapist's nonverbal behavior is a basis for interpretations of empathy, warmth, genuiness, and effectiveness. These findings were interpreted in terms of the therapist's nonverbal cues communicating liking and acceptance of the client. PMID:7410567

  13. Late effects from hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  14. A generalized gravitomagnetic clock effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hackmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    In General Relativity the rotation of a gravitating body like the Earth influences the motion of orbiting test particles or satellites in a non-Newtonian way. This causes e.g. a precession of the orbital plane, known as the Lense-Thirring effect, and a precession of the spin of a gyroscope, known as the Schiff effect. Here we discuss a third effect, first introduced by Cohen and Mashhoon, called the gravitomagnetic clock effect. It describes the difference in proper time of counter revolving clocks after a revolution of $2\\pi$. For two clocks on counter rotating equatorial circular orbits around the Earth the effect is about $10^{-7}$ seconds per revolution, which is quite large. We introduce a general relativistic definition of the gravitomagnetic clock effect which is valid for arbitrary pairs of orbits. This includes rotations in the same direction and different initial conditions, which is crucial if the effect can be detected with existing satellites or with payloads on non-dedicated missions. We also de...

  15. Pancreatic effects of GLP-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    inhibits glucagon secretion in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Besides these acute effects on the endocrine pancreas, GLP-1 also appears to have a positive effect on β-cell mass. In the following we will review GLP-1’s pancreatic effects with particular focus on its effects on pancreatic islets......-dependent manner. But perhaps equally importantly, GLP-1’s glucose lowering effects are attributable to a strong inhibition of glucagon secretion, and, thereby, a reduction of hepatic glucose output. The effects of GLP-1 on insulin secretion are mediated by binding of the hormone to the receptor (GLP-1r......) on the pancreatic β-cell, which increases intracellular cAMP levels and sets in motion a plethora of events that lead to secretion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on the α-cell may be indirect, involving paracrine intra-islet regulation by somatostatin and possibly also insulin, although GLP-1 also...

  16. Side Effects in Steering Fragments

    CERN Document Server

    Wortel, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis I will give a formal definition of side effects. I will do so by modifying a system for modelling program instructions and program states, Quantified Dynamic Logic, to a system called DLAf (for Dynamic Logic with Assignments as Formulas), which in contrast to QDL allows assignments in formulas and makes use of short-circuit evaluation. I will show the underlying logic in those formulas to be a variant of short-circuit logic called repetition-proof short-circuit logic. Using DLAf I will define the actual and the expected evaluation of a single instruction. The side effects are then defined to be the difference between the two. I will give rules for composing those side effects in single instructions, thus scaling up our definition of side effects to a definition of side effects in deterministic \\dlaf-programs. Using this definition I will give a classification of side effects, introducing as most important class that of marginal side effects. Finally, I will show how to use our system for calcul...

  17. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been emphasised the importance of DNA as the main target for ionizing radiation, that can induce damage by its direct action on this molecule or by an indirect effect mediated by free-radicals generated by water radiolysis. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are influenced not only by the dose but also by the dose-rate and the radiation quality. Radiation induced damage, mainly DNA single and double strand breaks, is detected by molecular sensors which in turn trigger signalling cascades leading to cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair or programmed cell death (apoptosis). Those effects related with cell death, named deterministic, exhibits a dose-threshold below which they are not observed. Acute radiation syndrome and radiological burns are examples of this kind of effects. Other radiation induced effects, called stochastic, are the consequence of cell transformation and do not exhibit a dose-threshold. This is the case of cancer induction and hereditary effects. The aim of this presentation is briefly describe the main aspects of deterministic and stochastic effects from the point of view of radiobiology and radio pathology. (author)

  18. The effect of the tortoise coordinates on the tunnel effect

    CERN Document Server

    Gui-hua, T; Wang, S; Gui-hua, Tian; Zheng, Zhao; Wang, Shi-kun

    2006-01-01

    The tunnel process of the quantum wave from the light cone is carefully discussed. They are applied in the massive quantum particles from the Schwarzschild black hole in the Kruskal metric. The tortoise coordinates prevent one from understanding the tunnel process, and are investigated with care. Furthermore, the massive particles could come out of the black hole either by the Hawking radiation or by the tunnel effect; the tunnel effect might give more information about the black hole.

  19. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers...

  20. Quark and pion effective couplings from polarization effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braghin, Fabio L. [Federal University of Goias, Instituto de Fisica, Goiania, GO (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    A flavor SU(2) effective model for pions and quarks is derived by considering polarization effects departing from the usual quark-quark effective interaction induced by dressed gluon exchange, i.e. a global color model for QCD. For that, the quark field is decomposed into a component that yields light mesons and the quark-antiquark condensate, being integrated out by means of the auxiliary field method, and another component which yields constituent quarks, which is basically a background quark field. Within a long-wavelength and weak quark field expansion (or large quark effective mass expansion) of a quark determinant, the leading terms are found up to the second order in a zero-order derivative expansion, by neglecting vector mesons that are considerably heavier than the pion. Pions are considered in the structureless limit and, besides the chiral invariant terms that reproduce previously derived expressions, symmetry breaking terms are also presented. The leading chiral quark-quark effective couplings are also found corresponding to a NJL and a vector-NJL couplings. All the resulting effective coupling constants and parameters are expressed in terms of the current and constituent quark masses and of the coupling g. (orig.)

  1. Effect of Effective Refractive Index of Grating in FBG Splitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINESH ARORA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fiber Bragg Gratings have been used extensively in the communication industry. Fiber Bragg grating is written directly into the core of the optical fiber and it is quite an attractive technique for wavelength splitter since it provides high reflectivity at a certain wavelength, with negligible transmission losses for others, providing a wavelength-channel selection with low crosstalk between adjacent channels.In this paper we propose a Fiber Bragg Grating base splitter with alteration of effective refractive index of grating for Ethernet passive optical network. With the increase in the effective refractive index the reflectivity of grating is increased. We analysed the effect of effective refractive index on reflectivity of grating. In our work the Bragg wavelength has been fixed at 1550 nm,length of the grating as 10mm and with effective refractive index as 4.0 it has been found that the reflectivity of the grating or the effectiveness of the grating in extracting the wavelength is 92-93%.

  2. Helioseismic Effects of Energetic Transients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    Photospheric and chromospheric signatures related to large, energetic transients such as flares and CMEs, have been extensively reported during the last several years. In addition, energetic solar transients are expected to cause helioseismic effects. Some of the recent results are reviewed here; in particular, the helioseismic effects of the powerful flares in superactive region, NOAA 10486, including the 4B/X17 superflare of October 28, 2003. We also examine the temporal variations of power in low- modes during the period May 1995–October 2005, and compare with daily, disk-integrated flare- and CME-indices to infer the effect of transients on the scale of whole solar disk.

  3. Study of axial magnetic effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, Victor [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 Russia ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Chernodub, M. N. [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Université François-Rabelais Tours, Fédération Denis Poisson, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Goy, V. A. [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Sukhanova street 8, Vladivostok, 690950 (Russian Federation); Landsteiner, K. [Instituto de Física Teórica UAM/CSIC, C/ Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Molochkov, A. V. [School of Biomedicine, Far Eastern Federal University, Ajax 10 Building 25, Russian island, Vladivostok, 690922 (Russian Federation); Ulybyshev, M. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya street 25, Moscow, 117218 Russia Institute for Theoretical Problems of Microphysics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119899 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-22

    The Axial Magnetic Effect manifests itself as an equilibrium energy flow of massless fermions induced by the axial (chiral) magnetic field. Here we study the Axial Magnetic Effect in the quenched SU(2) lattice gauge theory with massless overlap fermions at finite temperature. We numerically observe that in the low-temperature hadron phase the effect is absent due to the quark confinement. In the high-temperature deconfinement phase the energy flow is an increasing function of the temperature which reaches the predicted asymptotic T{sup 2} behavior at high temperatures. We find, however, that energy flow is about one order of magnitude lower compared to a theoretical prediction.

  4. Calibration effects on orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, G. A.; Winn, F. B.; Zielenbach, J. W.; Yip, K. B.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of charged particle and tropospheric calibrations on the orbit determination (OD) process are analyzed. The calibration process consisted of correcting the Doppler observables for the media effects. Calibrated and uncalibrated Doppler data sets were used to obtain OD results for past missions as well as Mariner Mars 1971. Comparisons of these Doppler reductions show the significance of the calibrations. For the MM'71 mission, the media calibrations proved themselves effective in diminishing the overall B-plane error and reducing the Doppler residual signatures.

  5. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  6. Diffraction effects in freeform optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Melissa N.; Winston, Roland; Oliker, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Freeform optics is a relatively new field; it uses the methods necessary to describe surfaces lacking symmetry, and/or surfaces that create non-symmetrical irradiance distributions. The Supporting Quadrics Method (SQM) developed by Oliker is a superb for generating any desired irradiance distribution. The SQM uses an envelope of quadrics to create prescribed irradiance distributions. These optical systems are tested in ray trace software, where diffraction effects are not taken into account. It is important to understand the diffraction effects present in an optic, when moving from the ray trace stage to the prototype stage. Here we study the diffraction effects of Supporting Quadrics Method.

  7. Effective field theories from QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for extracting effective Lagrangians from QCD. The resulting effective Lagrangians are based on exact rewrites of cut-off QCD in terms of these new collective field degrees of freedom. These cut-off Lagrangians are thus 'effective' in the sense that they explicitly contain some of the physical long-distance degrees of freedom from the outset. As an example we discuss the introduction of a new collective field carrying the quantum numbers of the η'-meson. (orig.)

  8. Size effects in crystal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    of plastic flow in a single crystal, grain boundary effects in a bicrystal, and grain size effects in a polycrystal are studied. Single crystals containing micro-scale voids have also been analyzed at different loading conditions with focus on the stress and deformation fields around the voids, on void......Numerical analyses of plasticity size effects have been carried out for different problems using a developed strain gradient crystal plasticiy theory. The theory employs higher order stresses as work conjugates to slip gradients and uses higher order boundary conditions. Problems on localization...

  9. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  10. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  11. Employment effects of foreign acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger; Karpaty, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    that the employment of skilled labor increasesmore than that of less-skilled labor. Our results indicate that the positive employment effects are more pronounced in acquired non-MNEs than in Swedish MNEs. Furthermore, we observe shifts in skill intensities toward higher shares of skilled labor in non-MNEs taken over......This paper investigates the employment effects of foreign acquisitions in acquired firms in Swedish manufacturing during the 1990s; a period characterized by a dramatic increase in foreign ownership. We find some evidence of positive employment effects in acquired firms and it seems...

  12. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  13. Timely and Effective Care - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - national data. This data set includes national-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia...

  14. Timely and Effective Care - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - state data. This data set includes state-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia care,...

  15. Timely and Effective Care - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Timely and Effective Care measures - provider data. This data set includes provider-level data for measures of heart attack care, heart failure care, pneumonia...

  16. Radiological Effects of Nuclear War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Charles S.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the global effects of nuclear war. Discussed are radiation dosages, limited nuclear attacks, strategic arms reductions, and other results reported at the workshop on nuclear war issues in Moscow in March 1988. (CW)

  17. Radiation effects on structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support

  18. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  19. The Effectiveness of Pharmaceutical Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.R. Kappe

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPharmaceutical marketing effectiveness comprises the measurement of marketing efforts of pharmaceutical firms towards doctors and patients. These firms spend billions of dollars yearly to promote their prescription drugs. This dissertation provides empirical analyses and methods to contr

  20. Health effects of smokeless tobacco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-02-28

    Pharmacologic and physiologic effects of snuff and chewing tobacco include the gamut of cardiovascular, endocrinologic, neurologic, and psychological effects that are associated with nicotine. A review of studies appearing in the scientific literature involving various populations and approaches indicates that the use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with a variety of serious adverse effects and especially with oral cancer. The studies suggest that snuff and chewing tobacco also may affect reproduction, longevity, the cardiovascular system, and oral health. The Council on Scientific Affairs concludes there is evidence demonstrating that use of snuff or chewing tobacco is associated with adverse health effects such as oral cancer, urges the implementation of well-planned and long-term studies that will further define the risks of using snuff and chewing tobacco, and recommends that the restrictions applying to the advertising of cigarettes also be applied to the advertising of snuff and chewing tobacco.

  1. Modeling the effects of labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn; Fjord, Thomas Ahle; Poulsen, Carsten Stig

    A new approach to evaluate the consequences of labeling is presented and applied to test the potential effect of a label on fresh fish. Labeling effects on quality perceptions and overall quality are studied. The empirical study is based on an experimental design and nearly 500 respondents partic...... participated in an in home test. The results indicate that catch time alone is not enough to work as an efficient predictor of actual perceived quality.......A new approach to evaluate the consequences of labeling is presented and applied to test the potential effect of a label on fresh fish. Labeling effects on quality perceptions and overall quality are studied. The empirical study is based on an experimental design and nearly 500 respondents...

  2. Effects of Curvature on Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    In this article we discuss the effect of curvature on dynamics when a physical system moves adiabatically in a curved space. These effects give a way to measure the curvature of the space intrinsically without referring to higher dimensional space. Two interesting examples, the Foucault Pendulum and the perihelion shift of planetary orbits, are presented in a simple geometric way. A paper model is presented to see the perihelion shift.

  3. Effective Sizes for Subdivided Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Chesser, R. K.; Rhodes-Jr., O. E.; Sugg, D. W.; Schnabel, A.(Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin, D-10587, Germany)

    1993-01-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined b...

  4. Temperature effects during Ostwald ripening

    OpenAIRE

    Madras, Giridhar; McCoy, Benjamin J

    2003-01-01

    Temperature influences Ostwald ripening through its effect on interfacial energy, growth rate coefficients, and equilibrium solubility. We have applied a distribution kinetics model to examine such temperature effects. The model accounts for the Gibbs–Thomson influence that favors growth of larger particles, and the dissolution of unstable particles smaller than critical nucleus size. Scaled equations for the particle size distribution and solution concentration as functions of time are solve...

  5. Measures of effectiveness in logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Schrady, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This report examines measures of effectiveness in naval logistics. Logistics is a warfare support function and it is most desirable to be able to relate resources committed for logistics capabilities to warfare outcomes. In general this cannot be done. Examples of the sorts of measures of effectiveness used in acquisition logistics and in in-service support are given. Battle group logistics, a part of operational logistics, is examine...

  6. Binding effects and nuclear shadowing

    OpenAIRE

    Indumathi, D.; Wei ZHU

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear binding on nuclear structure functions have so far been studied mainly at fixed target experiments, and there is currently much interest in obtaining a clearer understanding of this phenomenon. We use an existing dynamical model of nuclear structure functions, that gives good agreement with current data, to study this effect in a kinematical regime (low $x$, high $Q^2$) that can possibly be probed by an upgrade of {\\sc hera} at {\\sc desy} into a nuclear accelerator.

  7. The Effectiveness of IMF Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Biagio Bossone

    2008-01-01

    IMF surveillance of the international monetary and financial system is a global public good. Its effectiveness depends critically on the dynamics that underpin the mechanisms governing the IMF and global finance. These dynamics, in turn, reflect the interests and power of influence of countries (especially the largest), their cooperative attitude and international relations. Assessing the effectiveness of IMF surveillance, therefore, demands a clear understanding of the IMF and global financi...

  8. Isospin effects on fragment production

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Anupriya

    2011-01-01

    To understand the isospin effects in nearly symmetric nuclear matter we performed a complete systematical theoretical study within an Isospin dependent Quantum Molecular Dynamical Model (IQMD) and using Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) algorithm. Simulations are carried out for the reactions $_{124}Sn^{50}+_{124}Sn^{50}$ and $_{107}Sn^{50}+_{124}Sn^{50}$. The collision geometry is varied from central to peripheral. We find that neutron rich colliding nuclei are better candidate to study the isospin effects

  9. Holographic impurities and Kondo effect

    CERN Document Server

    Erdmenger, J; Hoyos, C; Newrzella, M-N; O'Bannon, A; Wu, J

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic impurities are responsible for many interesting phenomena in condensed matter systems, notably the Kondo effect and quantum phase transitions. Here we present a holographic model of a magnetic impurity that captures the main physical properties of the large-spin Kondo effect. We estimate the screening length of the Kondo cloud that forms around the impurity from a calculation of entanglement entropy and show that our results are consistent with the g-theorem.

  10. Collocation Impact on Team Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Eccles, M.; J. Smith; Tanner, M; JP van Belle; Watt, S

    2010-01-01

    The collocation of software development teams is common, specially in agile software development environments. However little is known about the impact of collocation on the team’s effectiveness. This paper explores the impact of collocating agile software development teams on a number of team effectiveness factors. The study focused on South African software development teams and gathered data through the use of questionnaires and interviews. The key finding was that collocation has a p...

  11. Parity violation effects in superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Nikolay A. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Harman, Zoltan [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute (EMMI), Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Parity violation effects in a circular superconducting Josephson junction has been investigated in the eighties. That time it appeared that this phenomenon was not significant enough to be experimentally observable. In our work we show, that this rate can be increased in the case of a circular Josephson junction of an unconventional superconductor. Furthermore, this phenomenon can be more significant in the case of the ferromagnetic p-wave unconventional superconductor, since the effect is stronger for polarized pairs.

  12. Sanitary effects of fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this compilation are studied the sanitary effects of fossil fuels, behavioral and environmental sanitary risks. The risks in connection with the production, the transport and the distribution(casting) are also approached for the oil(petroleum), the gas and the coal. Accidents in the home are evoked. The risks due to the atmospheric pollution are seen through the components of the atmospheric pollution as well as the sanitary effects of this pollution. (N.C.)

  13. Challenges in sharing information effectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. The goal of information sharing is to change a person's image of the world and to develop a shared working understanding. It is an essential component of collaboration. This paper examines barriers to sharing information effectively in dynamic group work situations. Method. Three ty...... to other high stress, unique and complex situations, such as natural disasters. Recommendations for more effective information behaviour techniques in dynamic group work situations are presented....

  14. Space charge effects of CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooler Storage Ring (CSR), and upgrading program planned at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), will supply beams with higher quality and intensity. Space charge effects should be considered due to this magnitude of intensity in CSR. The concept and some phenomena of space charge effects are discussed. Space charge intensity limit and space charge tune shift of normal CSR operation are given. It is of significance for the construction and operation of the future facility

  15. Unobservable Effects and Business Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Jacobson

    1990-01-01

    While “unobservable” factors such as corporate culture, access to scarce resources, management skill, and luck can be postulated to be principal determinants of business success, their effects are all but ignored in studies of business performance. This study, making use of the PIMS data base, reports empirical evidence indicating that failure to control for unobservable factors influencing profitability both biases and exaggerates the effect of strategic factors. Indeed, the influence of uno...

  16. Vietnam stock market liberalisation's effect

    OpenAIRE

    Khuc, Minh Hieu

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation examine the effect of stock market liberalisation upon the Vietnam economy and shows the changes during liberalisation period. The stock return and stock return volatility were tested using a generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity model. The stock return was found to be increased after market was liberalised. The stock return volatility, however show no sign of increasing. The effect upon economic growth, inflation and private investment growth was also d...

  17. Classical and quantum effective theories

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, Janos

    2014-01-01

    A generalization of the action principle of classical mechanics, motivated by the Closed Time Path (CTP) scheme of quantum field theory, is presented to deal with initial condition problems and dissipative forces. The similarities of the classical and the quantum cases are underlined. In particular, effective interactions which describe classical dissipative forces represent the system-environment entanglement. The relation between the traditional effective theories and their CTP extension is briefly discussed and few qualitative examples are mentioned.

  18. Energy-absorbing effectiveness factor

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Norman

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A study is reported on the energy-absorbing effectiveness factor which was introduced recently. The factor is defined as the quotient of the total energy, which can be absorbed in a system, to the maximum energy up to failure in a normal tensile specimen, which is made from the same volume of material. This dimensionless parameter allows comparisons to be made of the effectiveness of various geometrical shapes and of energy-absorbers made from different materials. The infl...

  19. Neuroprotective Effects of Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Se-Kwon Kim; Ratih Pangestuti

    2011-01-01

    The marine environment is known as a rich source of chemical structures with numerous beneficial health effects. Among marine organisms, marine algae have been identified as an under-exploited plant resource, although they have long been recognized as valuable sources of structurally diverse bioactive compounds. Presently, several lines of studies have provided insight into biological activities and neuroprotective effects of marine algae including antioxidant, anti-neuroinflammatory, choline...

  20. Bilinear effect in complex systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Lui; Han, Xiao-Pu; Liu, Chih-Hui Alston; Shu, Chang-Qing; Wei, Zhengjin; Zhou, Tao; Zhu, Jichen

    2010-01-01

    A new, generic type of Zipf-plot behavior in complex systems has been discovered. This Zipf plot does not obey the power law or stretched-exponent distribution but appears as two monotonically decreasing straight lines intersecting each other. This is called the Bilinear Effect. Examples from real systems (including lifetime distributions of Chinese dynasties) are presented. A 3-layer network model that leads to the bilinear effect is given.

  1. Emotional effects of dynamic textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toet, Alexander; Henselmans, Menno; Lucassen, Marcel P; Gevers, Theo

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effects of various spatiotemporal dynamic texture characteristics on human emotions. The emotional experience of auditory (eg, music) and haptic repetitive patterns has been studied extensively. In contrast, the emotional experience of visual dynamic textures is still largely unknown, despite their natural ubiquity and increasing use in digital media. Participants watched a set of dynamic textures, representing either water or various different media, and self-reported their emotional experience. Motion complexity was found to have mildly relaxing and nondominant effects. In contrast, motion change complexity was found to be arousing and dominant. The speed of dynamics had arousing, dominant, and unpleasant effects. The amplitude of dynamics was also regarded as unpleasant. The regularity of the dynamics over the textures' area was found to be uninteresting, nondominant, mildly relaxing, and mildly pleasant. The spatial scale of the dynamics had an unpleasant, arousing, and dominant effect, which was larger for textures with diverse content than for water textures. For water textures, the effects of spatial contrast were arousing, dominant, interesting, and mildly unpleasant. None of these effects were observed for textures of diverse content. The current findings are relevant for the design and synthesis of affective multimedia content and for affective scene indexing and retrieval. PMID:23145257

  2. [The effects of breastfeeding II: effects on lifestyle illnesses, mother's health and negative effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schack-Nielsen, Lene; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer

    2007-03-12

    Growth during infancy is slightly lower among breastfed infants, but the difference seems to disappear later during childhood. Breastfeeding seems to have a beneficial effect on blood pressure, lipid profile and possible insulin resistance/type-2 diabetes and obesity, but there is no evidence for effects on clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases. Potential negative effects include transfer of environmental pollutants and viruses, especially HIV, and the risk of hypernatraemic dehydration during the first weeks after delivery. For the mother, breastfeeding seems to reduce the risk of developing breast cancer.

  3. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  4. Effective healthcare teams require effective team members: defining teamwork competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leggat Sandra G

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although effective teamwork has been consistently identified as a requirement for enhanced clinical outcomes in the provision of healthcare, there is limited knowledge of what makes health professionals effective team members, and even less information on how to develop skills for teamwork. This study identified critical teamwork competencies for health service managers. Methods Members of a state branch of the professional association of Australian health service managers participated in a teamwork survey. Results The 37% response rate enabled identification of a management teamwork competency set comprising leadership, knowledge of organizational goals and strategies and organizational commitment, respect for others, commitment to working collaboratively and to achieving a quality outcome. Conclusion Although not part of the research question the data suggested that the competencies for effective teamwork are perceived to be different for management and clinical teams, and there are differences in the perceptions of effective teamwork competencies between male and female health service managers. This study adds to the growing evidence that the focus on individual skill development and individual accountability and achievement that results from existing models of health professional training, and which is continually reinforced by human resource management practices within healthcare systems, is not consistent with the competencies required for effective teamwork.

  5. A fan effect in anaphor processing: effects of multiple distractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autry, Kevin S.; Levine, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that the presence of a non-referent from the same category as the referent interferes with anaphor resolution. In five experiments, the hypothesis that multiple non-referents would produce a cumulative interference effect (i.e., a fan effect) was examined. This hypothesis was supported in Experiments 1A and 1B, with subjects being less accurate and slower to recognize referents (1A) and non-referents (1B) as the number of potential referents increased from two to five. Surprisingly, the number of potential referents led to a decrease in anaphor reading times. The results of Experiments 2A and 2B replicated the probe-recognition results in a completely within-subjects design and ruled out the possibility that a speeded-reading strategy led to the fan-effect findings. The results of Experiment 3 provided evidence that subjects were resolving the anaphors. These results suggest that multiple non-referents do produce a cumulative interference effect; however, additional research is necessary to explore the effect on anaphor reading times. PMID:25120519

  6. Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si. Mohamed Bouzzine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polythiophene (PTh and its derivatives are polymer-based materials with a π-conjugation framework. PTh is a useful photoelectric material and can be used in organic semiconductor devices, such as PLED, OLED, and solar cells. Their properties are based on molecular structure; the derivatives contain different substitutes in the 3 and 5 positions, such as electron-donating or electron-withdrawing groups. All molecular geometries were optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory. The energy gap (Egap between the HOMO and LUMO levels is related to the π-conjugation in the PTh polymer backbone. In this study, the DFT calculations were performed for the nonsubstituted and 3,5-substituted variants to investigate the stability geometries and electrical properties. The theoretical calculations show that the substituted forms are stable, have low Egap, and are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  7. Modulation of effective damping constant using spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Shinya, E-mail: KASAI.Shinya@nims.go.jp; Kondou, Kouta [Magnetic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji [Magnetic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Otani, Yoshichika [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We have investigated modulation of the effective damping constant α{sub eff} via spin currents through the spin Hall effect for Permalloy/Pt bilayer films with various thicknesses. The observed linear and sinusoidal dependences of current density and field direction on α{sub eff} are in agreement with the analytical model. By comparing the thickness dependence of spin Hall angle obtained from the damping modulation with that previously obtained by spin-torque-induced ferromagnetic resonance, we show that there is no clear extrinsic contribution in the present method. We also show the large modulation of the effective damping constant (down to ∼20%) in the high-current-density region.

  8. The birthdate effect: an extension of the Mere Ownership Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Gary; Pederson, Katie; Rossow, Cassie

    2003-02-01

    Studies have shown that attributes or variables associated with oneself are liked or preferred more compared to similar attributes unrelated to the self. Nuttin found in 1985 that people tend to prefer the letters that occur in their own names more than the letters that do not occur in their names. This name-letter-effect was later explained as a more general "mere ownership effect." The present purpose was to test whether the Mere Ownership Effect generalizes to a person's evaluation of their birthdate (month and year). 83 participants evaluated a variety of dates and objects. As expected, participants showed a significantly more positive evaluation of their own birth month and year than to their nonbirth months and years.

  9. Dissipative effects in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Nacir, Diana Lopez; Senatore, Leonardo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the effective field theory of single clock inflation to include dissipative effects. Working in unitary gauge we couple a set of composite operators in the effective action which is constrained solely by invariance under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms. We restrict ourselves to situations where the degrees of freedom responsible for dissipation do no contribute to the density perturbations at late time, and moreover they are predominately sensitive to the field whose fluctuations control the end of inflation. The dynamics of the perturbations is then modified by the appearance of `friction' and noise terms, and assuming certain locality properties for the Green's functions of these composite operators, we show that there is a regime characterized by a large friction term \\gamma >> H in which the \\zeta-correlators are dominated by the noise and the power spectrum can be significantly enhanced. We also compute the three point function for a wide class of models and discuss under which circ...

  10. Comparative nuclear effects of biomedical interest. Civil effects study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, C.S.; Bowen, I.G.; Richmond, D.R.; Corsbie, R.L.

    1961-01-12

    Selected physical and biological data bearing upon the environmental variations created by nuclear explosions are presented in simplified form. Emphasis is placed upon the ``early`` consequences of exposure to blast, thermal radiation, and ionizing radiation to elucidate the comparative ranges of the major effects as they vary with explosive yield and as they contribute to the total hazard to man. A section containing brief definitions of the terminology employed is followed by a section that utilizes text and tabular material to set forth events that follow nuclear explosions and the varied responses of exposed physical and biological materials. Finally, selected quantitative weapons-effects data in graphic and tabular form are presented over a wide range of explosive yields to show the relative distances from Ground Zero affected by significant levels of blast overpressures, thermal fluxes, and initial and residual penetrating ionizing radiations. However, only the ``early`` rather than the ``late`` effects of the latter are considered.

  11. Potential neuroprotective effects of cinnamon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Crews Stavinoha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases involves complex interactions between multiple mechanisms, including but not limited to oxidative stress, inflammation, and proteotoxicity, which have yet to be ameliorated by pharmaceutical drugs with single targets. Natural products have been recognized for their health promoting effects for thousands of years. Plants produce a vast collection of secondary products, such as alkaloids, phenolic compounds, and terpenes that have shown health benefits in a variety of conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative diseases. In the search for more effective and safe treatment options for neurodegenerative diseases, several dietary sources of phytochemicals have been investigated. Historical usage in traditional medicine, along with modern research has identified several key products with potential benefits in neurodegenerative diseases. Among the dietary sources, cinnamon shows particular merit as a therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases. Accumulating evidence suggesting neuroprotective effects via modulation of various risk factors relevant to neurodegeneration has been reviewed here. Industrial relevance. Cinnamon has been cherished for its health-promoting effects for thousands of years. Today, while modern medicine provides critical pharmaceutical agents that have assisted in ameliorating many diseases and extended the average lifespan significantly in the past century, these agents are associated with many side effects and expenses. As such, the search for efficient therapies with limited side effects is a significant target of research. Cinnamon, as a rich source of phytochemicals and long history in traditional medicine, has been a popular spice in recent decades for investigations elucidating its health-promoting effects. This review evaluates the therapeutic potential of cinnamon in ameliorating the risk factors responsible for the development

  12. Medical exposure and effective dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of radiological diagnosis in Japan and individual population effective dose are reported. Questionnaire on radiological practice was delivered to selected medical facilities. The total number of X-ray diagnosis performed in 1991 was 180,000,000, being age-dependent in both men and women. The chest was the most common site to be examined. The number of X-ray films per examination was the highest for the stomach. The spread of ultrasound has decreased radiological practice in the obstetric field (approximately one sixth between 1979 and 1986). There was an 8-fold increase in the number of X-ray CT as of 1989 during the past decade. The total number of CT scanning in 1989 reached nearly 14,850,000 (about 16 times as much as that of 1979). The number of stomach X-ray screening increased to 7,800,000 which is twice as much as that in 1975. In the dental field, panoramic method brought about a 7-fold increase between 1974 and 1985. The frequency of nuclear medicine diagnosis has slightly increased, reaching 1,400,000 cases in 1992, and 99mTc was the most common nuclide. The total population effective dose of radiography and fluoroscopy was 179,000 mSv. The highest effective dose was associated with gastric X-ray. The effective dose equivalent per diagnosis was estimated to be 1.02 mSv (the total population/total number of radiological diagnosis). The population effective dose per person was 2.3 mSv (population effective dose equivalent/national population), which was equal to the world average of yearly effective dose equivalent of natural radiation. (S.Y.)

  13. Training effectiveness vs. cost effectiveness: The next millennium challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the advent of the new millennium and energy deregulation, organizations will be challenged to be cost competitive and profitable. Deregulation in the US energy industry will force utilities and, more specifically, commercial nuclear power production to unprecedented cost control measures. It will also renew the fires of debate about costs vs. safety. With personnel costs being the single largest expenditure for most organizations management will be faced with constant dilemmas of competition for scarce resources. Salaries, benefits and training costs will be under greater scrutiny. Training resources and programs will face increased pressure to be job related, based on conservative requirements and more cost effective than in the past. For nearly two decades the US National Academy for Nuclear Training (NANT) has developed and used industry-wide accreditation and evaluation standards based on the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT). This process assures that existing and emerging technical training is constantly reviewed and evaluated against standardized criteria to assure job relatedness and enhanced job performance. The process also requires management to approve, actively participate in and support the training of NPP personnel. Instructors must be highly skilled and well trained in the SAT process and various instructional strategies. The SAT process is grounded in five interlocking keystone steps; Analysis - Design - Development - Implementation - Evaluation (ADDIE). Evaluation of training is often said to be the most crucial and most difficult step. Here is where an organization determines if the training is effective and meeting the legitimate needs of all of the stakeholders. This QA/QC aspect of training must be an ongoing process involving management, instructors and the students. It is only through the discipline of an SAT based evaluation process that an organization can truly determine if the training is efficient, effective, cost effective and

  14. Effect of carnosine on the immunosuppressive effect of histamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharpan, Yu. V.

    1985-04-01

    This paper studies the ability of carnosine (beta-imidazole-lactate) to affect histamine-induced immunosuppression of proliferative activity of various lymphocyte subpopulations and the realization of this effect through surface histamine receptors of the cells. The experiments were carried out on mice; lymphocytes were incubated with tritium-labeled thymidine for 4 h, after which their radioactivity was determined on a scintillation counter. The results show that histamine has an inhibitory action on antigen-induced proliferation of T suppressor lymphocytes through H-2 histamine receptors, for this effect was considerably inhibited by the H-2 histamine blockers metiamide, but not by the H-1 histamine blocker mepyramine.

  15. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  16. Collocation Impact on Team Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eccles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The collocation of software development teams is common, specially in agile software development environments. However little is known about the impact of collocation on the team’s effectiveness. This paper explores the impact of collocating agile software development teams on a number of team effectiveness factors. The study focused on South African software development teams and gathered data through the use of questionnaires and interviews. The key finding was that collocation has a positive impact on a number of team effectiveness factors which can be categorised under team composition, team support, team management and structure and team communication. Some of the negative impact collocation had on team effectiveness relate to the fact that team members perceived that less emphasis was placed on roles, that morale of the group was influenced by individuals, and that collocation was invasive, reduced level of privacy and increased frequency of interruptions. Overall through it is proposed that companies should consider collocating their agile software development teams, as collocation might leverage overall team effectiveness.

  17. Radiative effects of tropospheric ionisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Aplin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing evidence that cosmic ray variations may influence clouds and climate, there has been little discussion of the direct radiative effects of atmospheric ionisation. Laboratory experiments show that hydrated molecular cluster-ions, formed in the atmosphere by cosmic rays, absorb in the infra-red continuum at wavelengths of 9–12 μm. The tropospheric magnitude of this effect is estimated: transmittance anomalies from clear sky ion concentrations peak at ~2% at 10 km in the mid-latitudes. A simple isothermal clear sky atmospheric model suggests the integrated effect of the absorption is ~2 Wm−2. The effect appears detectable in existing surface data sets; surface micrometeorological data shows a significant anticorrelation between downwelling infra-red radiation and atmospheric cosmic ray ionisation. This is consistent with the infra-red attenuation observed in laboratory studies of cluster-ion absorption. If atmospheric ionisation from cosmic rays has universally direct radiative effects, then reinterpretation of satellite cloud data may be necessary.

  18. Side Effects of Side Effects Information in Drug Information Leaflets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maat, H. Pander; Klaassen, R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study in which drug information leaflets given to patients were improved in two ways, first by adding a short introductory paragraph on the nature of side effects generally, and second by adjusting frequency descriptors to more accurately reflect pretesting of the drug. Explains that participants in the study were less likely to…

  19. Mozart Effect-Shmozart Effect: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietschnig, Jakob; Voracek, Martin; Formann, Anton K.

    2010-01-01

    The transient enhancement of performance on spatial tasks in standardized tests after exposure to the first movement "allegro con spirito" of the Mozart sonata for two pianos in D major (KV 448) is referred to as the Mozart effect since its first observation by Rauscher, Shaw, and Ky (1993). These findings turned out to be amazingly hard to…

  20. Effectiveness of Blog Response Strategies to Minimize Crisis Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Louis P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of four post-crisis responses on five different variables using a blog tool. The four post-crisis responses are information only, compensation, apology, and sympathy. The five dependent variables are reputation, anger (negative emotion), negative word-of-mouth, account acceptance and state of the publics based on…

  1. Isotope effects in lattice dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large number of available stable isotopes and well developed isotope separation technology have enabled growing crystals of C, LiH, ZnO, CuCl, CuBr, Cu2O, CdS, α-Sn, Ge, Si, etc. with a controlled isotope composition. Experimental and theoretical studies provide evidence that the isotope effect has an influence on the thermal, elastic, and vibrational properties of crystals. In this paper it is shown that in Ge and C crystals isotope effect causes only weak phonon scattering whereas in LiH the scattering potential changes are so strong that they lead to experimentally observable phonon localization. It is emphasized that a systematic description of isotope effects requires that anharmonicity be taken into account. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Adverse effects of antioxidative vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Maciej; Grzegorczyk, Krzysztof

    2012-06-01

    High doses of synthetic antioxidative vitamins: A, E, C and β-carotene are often used on long-term basis in numerous preventive and therapeutic medical applications. Instead of expected health effects, the use of those vitamins may however lead to cases of hypervitaminosis and even to intoxication. The article points out main principles of safety which are to be observed during supplementation with antioxidative vitamins. Toxic effects resulting from erroneous administration of high doses of those substances on organs and systems of the organism are also discussed. Attention is drawn to interactions of antioxidative vitamins with concomitantly used drugs, as well as intensification of adverse effects caused by various exogenous chemical factors. Moreover, the article presents the evaluation of supplementation with these vitamins, which was performed in large studies. PMID:22528540

  3. SYNERGY EFFECTS IN WORK TEAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca C. ZOLTAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Today’s organization increasingly utilizes all kind of teams in order to surpass their competitors through flexibility, adaptability and innovation, features which are seen to characterize the teams. For this purpose, the concept of synergy in teams’ activity is often mentioned as the prime reason for which collective work is considered to be superior comparative with individual work. But what exactly does it mean? The present paper aims to shed some light on the concept of synergy in work teams and its positive effects, namely, the social consequences of collective work such as social compensation, social indispensability, social comparison, social identity, but also its negative effects, such as free-riding, social loafing and sucker effect. These are important group phenomena that managers should be aware of because they have a major impact on team performance, and consequently, on organization performance.

  4. Biological effects of mutagenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing body of evidence that mutagenic agents (biological, chemical and physical) play an important role in the etiology of human diseases. Mutations may occur in the germinal as well as in the somatic cells. Mutations of the germ cells may result on infertility or fertilization of damaged cells, the later leading to abortion or birth of a malformed fetus. Somatic-cells mutations may have various biological effects, depending on the period of the human life at which the mutation occurs. If it occurs during the prenatal life, a teratogenic or carcinogenic effect will be observed. If the somatic cell is damaged during the postnatal life, this will lead to neoplastic transformation. Therefore it is extremely important to know the mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic effects of various biological, chemical and physical agents in order to eliminate them from our environment. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  5. Modeling Incoherent Electron Cloud Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incoherent electron effects could seriously limit the beam lifetime in proton or ion storage rings, such as LHC, SPS, or RHIC, or blow up the vertical emittance of positron beams, e.g., at the B factories or in linear-collider damping rings. Different approaches to modeling these effects each have their own merits and drawbacks. We describe several simulation codes which simplify the descriptions of the beam-electron interaction and of the accelerator structure in various different ways, and present results for a toy model of the SPS. In addition, we present evidence that for positron beams the interplay of incoherent electron-cloud effects and synchrotron radiation can lead to a significant increase in vertical equilibrium emittance. The magnitude of a few incoherent e+e- scattering processes is also estimated. Options for future code development are reviewed

  6. Multi-shell effective interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Tsunoda, Naofumi; Hjorth-Jensen, Morten; Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective interactions, either derived from microscopic theories or based on fitting selected properties of nuclei in specific mass regions, are widely used inputs to shell-model studies of nuclei. Until recently, most shell-model calculations have been confined to a single oscillator shell. Recent interest in nuclei away from the stability line, requires however larger shell-model spaces. Since the derivation of microscopic effective interactions has been limited to degenerate model spaces, there are both conceptual and practical limits to present shell-model calculations that utilize such interactions. Purpose: The aim of this work is to present a novel microscopic method to calculate effective interactions for the nuclear shell model. Its main difference from existing theories is that it can be applied not only to degenerate model spaces but also to non-degenerate model spaces. Methods: The formalism is presented in the form of many-body perturbation theory based on the recently developed Exten...

  7. Running away from side effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casla, S; Hojman, P; Márquez-Rodas, I;

    2015-01-01

    The number of breast cancer survivors increases every year, thanks to the development of new treatments and screening techniques. However, patients present with numerous side effects that may affect their quality of life. Exercise has been demonstrated to reduce some of these side effects...... be an integrative complementary intervention to improve physiological, physical and psychological factors that affect survival and quality of life of these patients. For that reason, the main objective of this review is to provide a general overview of exercise benefits in breast cancer patients and recommendations......, but in spite of this, few breast cancer patients know and follow the exercise recommendations needed to remain healthy. In this review, we describe the different breast cancer treatments and the related side effects and implications of exercise in relation to these. We propose that exercise could...

  8. Photo-spin-voltaic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, David; Lu, Lei; Lan, Jin; Chang, Houchen; Li, Peng; Wang, Zhe; Hu, Jun; Johnson, Bryan; Bian, Yuqi; Xiao, Jiang; Wu, Ruqian; Wu, Mingzhong

    2016-09-01

    The photo-voltaic effect typically occurs in semiconductors and involves photon-driven excitation of electrons from a valence band to a conduction band. In a region such as a p-n junction that has a built-in electric field, the excited electrons and holes diffuse in opposite directions, resulting in an electric voltage. This letter reports that a spin voltage can be created by photons in a non-magnetic metal that is in close proximity to a magnetic insulator: a photo-spin-voltaic effect. The experiments use platinum/magnetic insulator bilayer structures. On exposure to light, there occurs photon-driven, spin-dependent excitation of electrons in several platinum atomic layers near the platinum/magnetic insulator interface. The excited electrons and holes diffuse in different manners, and this gives rise to an effective spin voltage at the interface and a corresponding pure spin current that flows across the platinum.

  9. Distance effects in electrochemical micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhong; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Chuanjun

    2016-09-01

    Considering exponential dependence of currents on double-layer voltage and the feedback effect of the electrolyte resistance, a distance effect in electrochemical micromachining is found, namely that both time constant and double-layer voltage depend on the separation of electrodes. The double-layer voltage is the real voltage used in processing. Under DC voltage, the apparent voltages between two electrodes are constant for different separations, but the real voltages change with the separations. Small separations exert substantial effects on the real voltages. Accordingly, a DC-voltage small-separation electrochemical micromachining technique was proposed. The double-layer voltage drops sharply as the small separation increases. Thus, the electrochemical reactions are confined to electrode regions in very close proximity even under DC voltage. The machining precision can be significantly enhanced by reducing the voltage and separation between electrodes. With this technique, the machining of conducting materials with submicrometre precision was achieved.

  10. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    1964-02-01

    This book is a revision of "The Effects of Nuclear Weapons" which was issued in 1957. It was prepared by the Defense Atomic Support Agency of the Department of Defense in coordination with other cognizant governmental agencies and was published by the U.S. Atomc Energy Commission. Although the complex nature of nuclear weapons effects does not always allow exact evaluation, the conclusions reached herein represent the combined judgment of a number of the most competent scientists working the problem. There is a need for widespread public understanding of the best information available on the effects of nuclear weapons. The purpose of this book is to present as accurately as possible, within the limits of national security, a comprehensive summary of this information.

  11. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions. (topical review)

  12. Polar molecule dominated electrorheological effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Kun-Quan; Shen Rong; Wang Xue-Zhao; Sun Gang; Wen Wei-Jia; Liu Ji-Xing

    2006-01-01

    The yield stress of our newly developed electrorheological (ER) fluids consisting of dielectric nano-particles suspended in silicone oil reaches hundreds of kPa, which is orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional ones. We found that the polar molecules adsorbed on the particles play a decisive role in such new ER fluids. To explain this polar molecule dominated ER (PM-ER) effect a model is proposed based on the interaction of polar molecule-charge between the particles, where the local electric field is significantly enhanced and results in the polar molecules aligning in the direction of the electric field. The model can well explain the giant ER effect and a near-linear dependence of the yield stress on the electric field. The main effective factors for achieving high-performance PM-ER fluids are discussed. The PM-ER fluids with the yield stress higher than one MPa can be expected.

  13. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron–phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  14. Space Weather- Physics and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bothmer, Volker

    2007-01-01

    This book is a state-of-the-art review on the physics of space weather and on space weather impacts on human technology, including manned spaceflight. With contributions from a team of international experts, this comprehensive work covers all aspects of space weather physical processes, and all known aspects of space hazards from humans, both in space and on Earth. Space Weather - Physics and Effects provides the first comprehensive, scientific background of space storms caused by the sun and its impact on geospace focuses on weather issues that have become vital for the development of nationwide technological infrastructures explains magnetic storms on Earth, including the effects of EUV radiation on the atmosphere is an invaluable aid in establishing real-time weather forecasts details the threat that solar effects might have on modern telecommunication systems, including national power grid systems, aircraft and manned spaceflight.

  15. Mirage effects on the brane

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolopoulos, P S; Saridakis, E N; Tetradis, N; Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.; Brouzakis, Nikolaos; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Tetradis, Nikolaos

    2005-01-01

    We discuss features of the brane cosmological evolution that arise through the presence of matter in the bulk. As these deviations from the conventional evolution are not associated with some observable matter component on the brane, we characterize them as mirage effects. We review an example of expansion that can be attributed to mirage non-relativistic matter (mirage cold dark matter) on the brane. The real source of the evolution is an anisotropic bulk fluid with negative pressure along the extra dimension. We also study the general problem of exchange of real non-relativistic matter between the brane and the bulk, and discuss the related mirage effects. Finally, we derive the brane cosmological evolution within a bulk that contains a global monopole (hedgehog) configuration. This background induces a mirage curvature term in the effective Friedmann equation, which can cause a brane Universe with positive spatial curvature to expand forever.

  16. Glucose effectiveness in nondiabetic relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egede, M B; Henriksen, J-E; Durck, T T;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Reduced glucose effectiveness is a predictor of future glucose tolerance in individuals with a family history of type 2 diabetes. We examined retrospectively at 10 years in normoglycemic relatives of diabetic subjects (RELs) the pathophysiological role of glucose effectiveness...... in the development of isolated impaired fasting glucose, glucose intolerance, and acute insulin release. METHODS: At 0 years, 19 RELs and 18 matched control subjects had glucose effectiveness (GE), insulin sensitivity, acute insulin release (AIR)IVGTT, and disposition index measured during an iv glucose tolerance...... test (IVGTT), using the minimal model analysis. At 0 and 10 years, oral glucose tolerance (OGTT) and AIROGTT were determined. RESULTS: At 0 years, fasting glucose (FG) and GE were raised in RELs, but insulin sensitivity and AIROGTT were reduced (P ≤ .05) compared with controls. At 10 years, RELs...

  17. Quantum effects near future singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Dito, Giuseppe; Fabris, Julio C; Houndjo, Mahouton J S

    2012-01-01

    General relativity allows a variety of future singularities to occur in the evolution of the universe. At these future singularities, the universe will end in a singular state after a finite proper time and geometrical invariants of the space time will diverge. One question that naturally arises with respect to these cosmological scenarios is the following: can quantum effects lead to the avoidance of these future singularities? We analyze this problem considering massless and conformally coupled scalar fields in an isotropic and homogeneous background leading to future singularities. It is shown that near strong, big rip-type singularities, with violation of the energy conditions, the quantum effects are very important, while near some milder classes of singularity like the sudden singularity, which preserve the energy conditions, quantum effects are irrelevant.

  18. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback about relative performance....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner takes-all tournament. We find that the principal should not provide any information on relative  performance, regardless of the pay scheme used, since feedback does not improve performance. Indeed, we do not find evidence of positive peer...... effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...

  19. Multipolar interference effects in nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves by an arbitrary nanoscale object can be characterized by a multipole decomposition of the electromagnetic field that allows to describe the scattering intensity and radiation pattern through interferences of dominating excited multipole modes. In modern nanophotonics, both generation and interference of multipole modes start to play an indispensable role, and they enable nanoscale manipulation of light with many related applications. Here we review the multipolar interference effects in metallic, metal-dielectric, and dielectric nanostructures, and suggest a comprehensive view on many phenomena involving the interferences of electric, magnetic and toroidal multipoles, which drive a number of recently discussed effects in nanophotonics such as unidirectional scattering, effective optical antiferromagnetism, generalized Kerker scattering with controlled angular patterns, generalized Brewster angle, and nonradiating optical anapoles. We further discuss other types of possible ...

  20. Potent health effects of pomegranate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarfeshany, Aida; Asgary, Sedigheh; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjoo

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data clearly claimed that Punica granatum L. (pomegranate) has several health benefits. Pomegranates can help prevent or treat various disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and inflammatory activities. It is demonstrated that certain components of pomegranate such as polyphenols have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects. The antioxidant potential of pomegranate juice is more than that of red wine and green tea, which is induced through ellagitannins and hydrosable tannins. Pomegranate juice can reduce macrophage oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, pomegranate fruit extract prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis, which can lead to its anticarcinogenic effects. In addition, promoter inhibition of some inflammatory markers and their production are blocked via ellagitannins. In this article, we highlight different studies on the therapeutic effects of pomegranate and their suggested mechanisms of actions. PMID:24800189

  1. Potent health effects of pomegranate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Zarfeshany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating data clearly claimed that Punica granatum L. (pomegranate has several health benefits. Pomegranates can help prevent or treat various disease risk factors including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and inflammatory activities. It is demonstrated that certain components of pomegranate such as polyphenols have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic effects. The antioxidant potential of pomegranate juice is more than that of red wine and green tea, which is induced through ellagitannins and hydrosable tannins. Pomegranate juice can reduce macrophage oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, pomegranate fruit extract prevents cell growth and induces apoptosis, which can lead to its anticarcinogenic effects. In addition, promoter inhibition of some inflammatory markers and their production are blocked via ellagitannins. In this article, we highlight different studies on the therapeutic effects of pomegranate and their suggested mechanisms of actions.

  2. Overhauser effects in insulating solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, T. V.; Corzilius, B.; Walish, J. J.; Griffin, R. G. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Caporini, M. A.; Rosay, M.; Maas, W. E. [Bruker BioSpin, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States); Mentink-Vigier, F.; Vega, S. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel); Baldus, M. [NMR Spectroscopy, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Swager, T. M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    We report magic angle spinning, dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at magnetic fields of 9.4 T, 14.1 T, and 18.8 T using the narrow line polarizing agents 1,3-bisdiphenylene-2-phenylallyl (BDPA) dispersed in polystyrene, and sulfonated-BDPA (SA-BDPA) and trityl OX063 in glassy glycerol/water matrices. The {sup 1}H DNP enhancement field profiles of the BDPA radicals exhibit a significant DNP Overhauser effect (OE) as well as a solid effect (SE) despite the fact that these samples are insulating solids. In contrast, trityl exhibits only a SE enhancement. Data suggest that the appearance of the OE is due to rather strong electron-nuclear hyperfine couplings present in BDPA and SA-BDPA, which are absent in trityl and perdeuterated BDPA (d{sub 21}-BDPA). In addition, and in contrast to other DNP mechanisms such as the solid effect or cross effect, the experimental data suggest that the OE in non-conducting solids scales favorably with magnetic field, increasing in magnitude in going from 5 T, to 9.4 T, to 14.1 T, and to 18.8 T. Simulations using a model two spin system consisting of an electron hyperfine coupled to a {sup 1}H reproduce the essential features of the field profiles and indicate that the OE in these samples originates from the zero and double quantum cross relaxation induced by fluctuating hyperfine interactions between the intramolecular delocalized unpaired electrons and their neighboring nuclei, and that the size of these hyperfine couplings is crucial to the magnitude of the enhancements. Microwave power dependent studies show that the OE saturates at considerably lower power levels than the solid effect in the same samples. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of the Overhauser effect, and also provide a new approach to perform DNP experiments in chemical, biophysical, and physical systems at high magnetic fields.

  3. Adobe After Effects CS5 Digital Classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Smith , Jerron

    2011-01-01

    This video and full-color book combo has quite an effect for learning After Effects CS5! Adobe After Effects is a leading motion graphics and visual effects program that allows you to create and deliver compelling motion graphics and visual effects. This full-color book-and-video training package gets you quickly up to speed using the capabilities of the newest release of After Effects and deciphers even the most complex After Effects tasks. Sixteen self-paced lessons explain how to edit and apply effects for stellar visual and special effects. The supplementary video lessons included with the

  4. Dissipative Effects in the Effective Field Theory of Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Nacir, Diana; /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Buenos Aires U.; Porto, Rafael A.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /ISCAP, New York /Columbia U.; Senatore, Leonardo; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Zaldarriaga, Matias; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2012-09-14

    We generalize the effective field theory of single clock inflation to include dissipative effects. Working in unitary gauge we couple a set of composite operators, {Omicron}{sub {mu}{nu}}..., in the effective action which is constrained solely by invariance under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms. We restrict ourselves to situations where the degrees of freedom responsible for dissipation do not contribute to the density perturbations at late time. The dynamics of the perturbations is then modified by the appearance of 'friction' and noise terms, and assuming certain locality properties for the Green's functions of these composite operators, we show that there is a regime characterized by a large friction term {gamma} >> H in which the {zeta}-correlators are dominated by the noise and the power spectrum can be significantly enhanced. We also compute the three point function <{zeta}{zeta}{zeta}> for a wide class of models and discuss under which circumstances large friction leads to an increased level of non-Gaussianities. In particular, under our assumptions, we show that strong dissipation together with the required non-linear realization of the symmetries implies |f{sub NL}| {approx} {gamma}/c{sub s}{sup 2} H >> 1. As a paradigmatic example we work out a variation of the 'trapped inflation' scenario with local response functions and perform the matching with our effective theory. A detection of the generic type of signatures that result from incorporating dissipative effects during inflation, as we describe here, would teach us about the dynamics of the early universe and also extend the parameter space of inflationary models.

  5. Size effects of effective Young's modulus for periodic cellular materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI GaoMing; ZHANG WeiHong

    2009-01-01

    With the wide demands of cellular materials applications in aerospace and civil engineering, research effort sacrificed for this type of materials attains nowadays a higher level than ever before. This paper is focused on the prediction methods of effective Young's modulus for periodical cellular materials. Based on comprehensive studies of the existing homogenization method (HM), the G-A meso-me-chanice method (G-A MMM) and the stretching energy method (SEM) that are unable to reflect the size effect, we propose the bending energy method (BEM) for the first time, and a comparative study of these four methods is further made to show the generality and the capability of capturing the size effect of the BEM method. Meanwhile, the underlying characteristics of each method and their relations are clarified. To do this, the detailed finite element computing and existing experimental results of hex-agonal honeycombs from the literature are adopted as the standard of comparison for the above four methods. Stretch and bending models of periodical cellular materials are taken into account, respec-tively for the comparison of stretch and flexural displacements resulting from the above methods. We conclude that the BEM has the strong ability of both predicting the effective Young's modulus and re- vealing the size effect. Such a method is also able to predict well the variations of structural displace-ments in terms of the cell size under stretching and bending loads including the non-monotonous variations for the hexagonal cell. On the contrary, other three methods can only predict the limited re- sults whenever the cell size tends to be infinitely small.

  6. Managerial delegation under network effects

    OpenAIRE

    Trishita Bhattacharjee; Rupayan Pal

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows that network effects do not have any implication to the nature of the equilibrium strategic managerial delegation under Cournot type quantity competition, unlike as in the case of Bertrand type price competition a la Hoernig (2012). It also shows that delegation of output/price decision to the manager is optimal for the owner even in the case of monopoly in the product market, due to the existence of network effects. The monopolist offers sales-oriented incentive scheme to he...

  7. Adaptability Responding Effectively to Change

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Calarco, Allan

    2011-01-01

    In today's business world, the complexity and pace of change can be daunting. Adaptability has become recognized as a necessary skill for leaders to develop to be effective in this environment. Even so, leaders rarely know what they can do to become more adaptable and foster adaptability in others. This guidebook contributes to a greater understanding of adaptability and the cognitive, emotional, and dispositional flexibility it requires. Leaders will learn how to develop their adaptability and to become more effective for themselves, the people they lead, and their organizations.

  8. Relational Parametricity for Computational Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Møgelberg, Rasmus Ejlers

    2009-01-01

    According to Strachey, a polymorphic program is parametric if it applies a uniform algorithm independently of the type instantiations at which it is applied. The notion of relational parametricity, introduced by Reynolds, is one possible mathematical formulation of this idea. Relational parametricity provides a powerful tool for establishing data abstraction properties, proving equivalences of datatypes, and establishing equalities of programs. Such properties have been well studied in a pure functional setting. Many programs, however, exhibit computational effects, and are not accounted for by the standard theory of relational parametricity. In this paper, we develop a foundational framework for extending the notion of relational parametricity to programming languages with effects.

  9. Effects of Microglia on Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru

    2015-08-01

    This review summarizes and organizes the literature concerning the effects of microglia on neurogenesis, particularly focusing on the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles, in which the neurogenic potential is progressively restricted during the life of the organism. A comparison of microglial roles in neurogenesis in these two regions indicates that microglia regulate neurogenesis in a temporally and spatially specific manner. Microglia may also sense signals from the surrounding environment and have regulatory effects on neurogenesis. We speculate microglia function as a hub for the information obtained from the inner and outer brain regions for regulating neurogenesis.

  10. Ecological Effects of Allelopathic Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, M.; Strandberg, M.; Strandberg, B.

    with the environment through spread of GM-plants or transgenes outside agricultural areas. The last chapter discuss GM-allelopathic plants in relation to the ecological risk assessment. Preface: This report is based on a literature review on allelopathy from an ecological impact point of view carried out in 1999...... on allelopathy in these crops. It discusses the ecological effects of allelopathic plants in natural ecosystems and factors of importance for the effects of these plants are pointed out. Finally the report presents suggestions for an ecological risk assessment of crops with an enhanced release of allelochemicals...

  11. The Effects of Nuclear Weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glasstone, Samuel

    1957-06-01

    This handbook prepared by the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project of the Department of Defense in coordination with other cognizant government agencies and published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission, is a comprehensive summary of current knowledge on the effects of nuclear weapons. The effects information contained herein is calculated for yields up to 20 megatons and the scaling laws for hypothetically extending the calculations beyond this limit are given. The figure of 20 megatons however is not be taken as an indication of capabilities or developments.

  12. Confirmation of shutdown cooling effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Kotaro, E-mail: ksato@nelted.co.jp; Tabuchi, Masato; Sugimura, Naoki; Tatsumi, Masahiro [Nuclear Engineering, Limited, 1-3-7 Tosabori Nishi-ku, Osaka-shi, Osaka 550-0001 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    After the Fukushima accidents, all nuclear power plants in Japan have gradually stopped their operations and have long periods of shutdown. During those periods, reactivity of fuels continues to change significantly especially for high-burnup UO{sub 2} fuels and MOX fuels due to radioactive decays. It is necessary to consider these isotopic changes precisely, to predict neutronics characteristics accurately. In this paper, shutdown cooling (SDC) effects of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels that have unusual operation histories are confirmed by the advanced lattice code, AEGIS. The calculation results show that the effects need to be considered even after nuclear power plants come back to normal operation.

  13. Gaussian effective potential: Quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, P. M.

    1984-10-01

    We advertise the virtues of the Gaussian effective potential (GEP) as a guide to the behavior of quantum field theories. Much superior to the usual one-loop effective potential, the GEP is a natural extension of intuitive notions familiar from quantum mechanics. A variety of quantum-mechanical examples are studied here, with an eye to field-theoretic analogies. Quantum restoration of symmetry, dynamical mass generation, and "quantum-mechanical resuscitation" are among the phenomena discussed. We suggest how the GEP could become the basis of a systematic approximation procedure. A companion paper will deal with scalar field theory.

  14. Who discovered the magnetocaloric effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anders

    2013-01-01

    A magnetic body changes its thermal state when subjected to a changing magnetic field. In particular, if done under adiabatic conditions, its temperature changes. For the past 15 years the magnetocaloric effect has been the focus of significant research due to its possible application for efficient...... refrigeration near room temperature. At the same time, it has become common knowledge within the magnetic refrigeration research community that the magnetocaloric effect was discovered by the German physicist E. Warburg in 1881. We re-examine the original literature and show that this is a misleading reading...

  15. Dual effect free stochastic controls

    OpenAIRE

    Barty, Kengy; Carpentier, P.; Chancelier, J.-P.; Cohen, G.; Lara, M; Guilbaud, T.

    2003-01-01

    In stochastic optimal control, a key issue is the fact that "solutions" are searched for in terms of "feedback" over available information and, as a consequence, a major potential difficulty is the fact that present control may affect future available information. This is known as the "dual effect" of control. Given a minimal framework (that is, an observation mapping from the product of a control set and of a random set towards an observation set), we define open-loop lack of dual effect as...

  16. Antituberculous effect of silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreytsberg, G N; Gracheva, I E [Limited Liability Company ' Scientific and Production Association (NPO)' Likom' , 150049, Yaroslavl, Magistralnaya str., 32 (Russian Federation); Kibrik, B S [Yaroslavl State Medical Academy Russia, 150000, Yaroslavl, Revolutsionnaya str., 5 (Russian Federation); Golikov, I V, E-mail: likomm@yaroslavl.ru [Yaroslavl State Technical University Russia, 150023, Yaroslavl, Moskovskiy avenue, 88 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The in vitro experiment, involving 1164 strains of the tuberculosis mycobacteria, exhibited a potentiating effect of silver nanoparticles on known antituberculous preparations in respect of overcoming drug-resistance of the causative agent. The in vitro experiment, based on the model of resistant tuberculosis, was performed on 65 white mice. An evident antituberculous effect of the nanocomposite on the basis of silver nanoparticles and isoniazid was proved. Toxicological assessment of the of nanopreparations was carried out. The performed research scientifically establishes efficacy and safety of the nanocomposite application in combination therapy of patients suffering from drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  17. Marijuana effects on associative processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, R I; Wittenborn, J R

    1985-01-01

    Acute marijuana effects on associative processes involved in long-term memory retrieval were studied. Results were partially consistent with expectations based on previous subjective reports that marijuana promotes more uncommon associations. Marijuana altered responses when people gave as many examples of a specified category (e.g., CLOTHING) as they could for 2 min, and when they gave an example of a specified category beginning with a specified letter (e.g., WEAPON - G). Reaction time in the latter task and in prior studies was not altered in the expected manner, a finding problematic for some theoretic interpretations of marijuana's effects on associative processes.

  18. Nonlinear effects in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Mario F

    2011-01-01

    Cutting-edge coverage of nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers Nonlinear fiber optics is a specialized part of fiber optics dealing with optical nonlinearities and their applications. As fiber-optic communication systems have become more advanced and complex, the nonlinear effects in optical fibers have increased in importance, as they adversely affect system performance. Paradoxically, the same nonlinear phenomena also offer the promise of addressing the bandwidth bottleneck for signal processing for future ultra-high speed optical networks. Nonlinear Effects in Optical Fiber

  19. Effective theory of the triton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply the effective field theory approach to the three-nucleon system. In particular, we consider S=1/2 neutron-deuteron scattering and the triton. We show that in this channel a unique nonperturbative renormalization takes place which requires the introduction of a single three-body force at leading order. With one fitted parameter we find a good description of low-energy data. Invariance under the renormalization group explains some universal features of the three-nucleon system -- such as the Thomas and Efimov effects and the Phillips line -- and the origin of SU(4) symmetry in nuclei

  20. Pre-Seismic Electromagnetic Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yahong

    2007-01-01

    Along with intense rock strain and rock bursting processes at the late stage of earthquake preparation, mechanical-electrical energy conversion appears in the seismogenic region and its nearby rock formations, which correspondingly stimulate certain electromagnetic effects. The paper mainly analyzes the pre-seismic electromagnetic effect of the ionosphere and proposes a method of monitoring VLF radio waves over the additional ionized region and so on. It is deemed that the method is of significance for short and imminent term prediction of strong earthquakes.

  1. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  2. The Bauschinger Effect in Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Bøcker; Brown, L .M.; Stobbs, W. M.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the Bauschinger effect in pure copper shows that by comparison with dispersion hardened copper the effect is very small and independent of temperature. This suggests that the obstacles to flow are deformable. A simple composite model based on this principle accounts for the data semi......-quantitatively and also accounts for the stored energy of cold-work. An interesting feature of the model is that it shows very clearly that, although dislocation pile-ups may exist, the flow stress of the composite is entirely due to the resistance to dislocation motion in the tangles of forest dislocations....

  3. Hydrogen effects in aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of six commercial aluminum alloys to deuterium and tritium was determined by several techniques. Surface films inhibited permeation under most conditions; however, contact with lithium deuteride during the tests minimized the surface effects. Under these conditions phi/sub D2/ = 1.9 x 10-2 exp (--22,400/RT) cc (NTP)atm/sup --1/2/ s-1cm-1. The six alloys were also tested before, during, and after exposure to high pressure hydrogen, and no hydrogen-induced effects on the tensile properties were observed

  4. Photoionization effects in ionization fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, Manuel [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Fontelos, Marco A [Departamento de Matematicas, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, C/Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Trueba, Jose L [Departamento de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-12-21

    In this paper we study the effects of photoionization processes on the propagation of both negative and positive ionization fronts in streamer discharge. We show that negative fronts accelerate in the presence of photoionization events. The appearance and propagation of positive ionization fronts travelling with constant velocity is explained as the result of the combined effects of photoionization and electron diffusion. The photoionization range plays an important role in the selection of the velocity of the ionization front as we show in this work.

  5. Cusp effects in meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in the pi0 pi0 invariant mass distribution of K+ --> pi0 pi0 pi+ decays. As originally pointed out by Cabibbo, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths to high precision. We present the non-relativistic effective field theory framework that permits to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner, including the effects of radiative corrections. Applications of the same formalism to other decay channels, in particular eta and eta' decays, are also discussed.

  6. Fixed effects analysis of variance

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Lloyd; Birnbaum, Z W; Lukacs, E

    1978-01-01

    Fixed Effects Analysis of Variance covers the mathematical theory of the fixed effects analysis of variance. The book discusses the theoretical ideas and some applications of the analysis of variance. The text then describes topics such as the t-test; two-sample t-test; the k-sample comparison of means (one-way analysis of variance); the balanced two-way factorial design without interaction; estimation and factorial designs; and the Latin square. Confidence sets, simultaneous confidence intervals, and multiple comparisons; orthogonal and nonorthologonal designs; and multiple regression analysi

  7. Primakoff effect at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors calculate the process π± γ → π± γ= and π± γ → ρ± γ=, using a model based on QCD. From the first one, they derive the cross section of the Compton effect π± γ → π± γ. Considering an experiment where the above processes can be measured via the Primakoff effect, the authors notice that an appreciable yield may be obtained, at least for the reaction π± N → π± γN

  8. Order effects in dynamic semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graben, Peter Beim

    2014-01-01

    In their target article, Wang and Busemeyer (2013) discuss question order effects in terms of incompatible projectors on a Hilbert space. In a similar vein, Blutner recently presented an orthoalgebraic query language essentially relying on dynamic update semantics. Here, I shall comment on some interesting analogies between the different variants of dynamic semantics and generalized quantum theory to illustrate other kinds of order effects in human cognition, such as belief revision, the resolution of anaphors, and default reasoning that result from the crucial non-commutativity of mental operations upon the belief state of a cognitive agent.

  9. Adverse Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan; Arumugham, Shyam Sundar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2016-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment commonly used for depression and other major psychiatric disorders. We discuss potential adverse effects (AEs) associated with ECT and strategies for their prevention and management. Common acute AEs include headache, nausea, myalgia, and confusion; these are self-limiting and are managed symptomatically. Serious but uncommon AEs include cardiovascular, pulmonary, and cerebrovascular events; these may be minimized with screening for risk factors and by physiologic monitoring. Although most cognitive AEs of ECT are short-lasting, troublesome retrograde amnesia may rarely persist. Modifications of and improvements in treatment techniques minimize cognitive and other AEs. PMID:27514303

  10. Advertising, Intended vs. unintended effects of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of television advertising on children and adolescents can be divided into two general types: intended and unintended. Intended effects are the effects that advertisers wish to achieve with their advertisements, and unintended effects include the often-undesired side effects of advertisin

  11. The Flynn Effect: So What?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The Flynn effect probably has multiple causes, and the target essays in this issue have expanded the number of possible causes behind it. This essay deals primarily with a different question: How important is IQ in the current world and should it perhaps be understood also in conjunction with a consideration of some kind of ethical intelligence?

  12. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  13. Indirect effects of recovery strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Rice, Jake

    in isolation,but the expected consequences for the rest of the ecosystem must be analyzed. We use ageneral size- and trait-based model to calculate the ecosystem effects of fishing andrecovery. We present a general analysis of a recovery strategies targeting either large fishes(consumer fishery), small fishes...

  14. Security force effectiveness and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No one would propose ineffective security forces. Applied technology always has, as its purpose, to increase effectiveness. Evidence exists, however, that poorly conceived or executed technological solutions can actually do more harm than good. The author argues for improved human factor considerations in physical security applied technology -- especially in the area of security console operations

  15. Governance Strategies and Welfare Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trifkovic, Neda

    on processor-owned estate farms is estimated using a maximum simulated likelihood estimator. Our results show positive welfare effects from participating in contract farming, but not from employment on processor-owned estate farms. The results imply that contract farming presents opportunities for economic...

  16. Trade Effects of Geographical Indications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmers, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution addresses the effects of geographical indications on intra-EU and international trade. Trade is hampered by the exclusiveness of indications like “Protected Designations of Origin or Protected Geographical Indications”, which at the same time is necessary to protect their value. As

  17. Possible Pressure Effect for Superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, A. Kwang-Hua

    2004-01-01

    We make an estimate of the possible range of $\\Delta T_c$ induced by high-pressure effects in post-metallic superconductors by using the theory of {\\it extended irreversible/reversible thermodynamics} and Pippard's length scale. The relationship between the increment of the superconducting temperature and the increase of the pressure is parabolic.

  18. Teaching Environmental Consumer Education Effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cude, Brenda J.

    1993-01-01

    Effective strategies include (1) helping consumers see how lifestyles and consumer behavior are related; (2) limiting amount of new terminology used; (3) dispelling myths and misperceptions; (4) doing product life-cycle analysis; and (5) emphasizing long-term goals for behavior change. (JOW)

  19. Plantar Fasciitis: Prescribing Effective Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Michael; Fields, Karl B.

    2002-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is an extremely common, painful injury seen among people in running and jumping sports. While prognosis for recovery with conservative care is excellent, prolonged duration of symptoms affects sports participation. Studies on treatment options show mixed results, so finding effective treatments can be challenging. A logical…

  20. Magnetically induced QCD Kondo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Sho; Itakura, Kazunori; Kuramoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-01

    The "QCD Kondo effect" stems from the color exchange interaction in QCD with non-Abelian property, and can be realized in a high-density quark matter containing heavy-quark impurities. We propose a novel type of the QCD Kondo effect induced by a strong magnetic field. In addition to the fact that the magnetic field does not affect the color degrees of freedom, two properties caused by the Landau quantization in a strong magnetic field are essential for the "magnetically induced QCD Kondo effect"; (1) dimensional reduction to 1 +1 -dimensions, and (2) finiteness of the density of states for lowest energy quarks. We demonstrate that, in a strong magnetic field B , the scattering amplitude of a massless quark off a heavy quark impurity indeed shows a characteristic behavior of the Kondo effect. The resulting Kondo scale is estimated as ΛK≃√{eqB }αs1 /3exp {-4 π /Ncαslog (4 π /αs)} where αs and Nc are the fine structure constant of strong interaction and the number of colors in QCD, and eq is the electric charge of light quarks.