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Sample records for boosting cholinergic activity

  1. Orexin receptor activation generates gamma band input to cholinergic and serotonergic arousal system neurons and drives an intrinsic Ca2+-dependent resonance in LDT and PPT cholinergic neurons.

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    Masaru eIshibashi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of the waking state is a shift in EEG power to higher frequencies with epochs of synchronized intracortical gamma activity (30-60 Hz - a process associated with high-level cognitive functions. The ascending arousal system, including cholinergic laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculopontine (PPT tegmental neurons and serotonergic dorsal raphe (DR neurons, promotes this state. Recently, this system has been proposed as a gamma wave generator, in part, because some neurons produce high-threshold, Ca2+-dependent oscillations at gamma frequencies. However, it is not known whether arousal-related inputs to these neurons generate such oscillations, or whether such oscillations are ever transmitted to neuronal targets. Since key arousal input arises from hypothalamic orexin (hypocretin neurons, we investigated whether the unusually noisy, depolarizing orexin current could provide significant gamma input to cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and whether such input could drive Ca2+-dependent oscillations. Whole-cell recordings in brain slices were obtained from mice expressing Cre-induced fluorescence in cholinergic LDT and PPT, and serotonergic DR neurons. After first quantifying reporter expression accuracy in cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, we found that the orexin current produced significant high frequency, including gamma, input to both cholinergic and serotonergic neurons. Then, by using a dynamic clamp, we found that adding a noisy orexin conductance to cholinergic neurons induced a Ca2+-dependent resonance that peaked in the theta and alpha frequency range (4 - 14 Hz and extended up to 100 Hz. We propose that this orexin current noise and the Ca2+ dependent resonance work synergistically to boost the encoding of high-frequency synaptic inputs into action potentials and to help ensure cholinergic neurons fire during EEG activation. This activity could reinforce thalamocortical states supporting arousal, REM sleep and intracortical

  2. Regulation of drugs affecting striatal cholinergic activity by corticostriatal projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladinsky, H.

    1986-01-01

    Research demonstrates that the chronic degeneration of the corticostriatal excitatory pathway makes the cholinergic neurons of the striatum insensitive to the neuropharmacological action of a number of different drugs. Female rats were used; they were killed and after the i.v. infusion of tritium-choline precursor, choline acetyltransferase activity was measured. Striatal noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin content was measured by electrochemical detection coupled with high pressure liquid chromatography. Uptake of tritium-glutamic acid was estimated. The data were analyzed statistically. It is shown that there is evidence that the effects of a number of drugs capable of depressing cholinergic activity through receptor-mediated responses are operative only if the corticostriatal pathway is integral. Neuropharmacological responses in the brain appear to be the result of an interaction between several major neurotransmitter systems

  3. Selective Activation of Cholinergic Interneurons Enhances Accumbal Phasic Dopamine Release: Setting the Tone for Reward Processing

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    Roger Cachope

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine plays a critical role in motor control, addiction, and reward-seeking behaviors, and its release dynamics have traditionally been linked to changes in midbrain dopamine neuron activity. Here, we report that selective endogenous cholinergic activation achieved via in vitro optogenetic stimulation of nucleus accumbens, a terminal field of dopaminergic neurons, elicits real-time dopamine release. This mechanism occurs via direct actions on dopamine terminals, does not require changes in neuron firing within the midbrain, and is dependent on glutamatergic receptor activity. More importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo selective activation of cholinergic interneurons is sufficient to elicit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Therefore, the control of accumbal extracellular dopamine levels by endogenous cholinergic activity results from a complex convergence of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator systems that may ultimately synergize to drive motivated behavior.

  4. Upregulating Nonneuronal Cholinergic Activity Decreases TNF Release from Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

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    Yi Lv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonneuronal cholinergic system plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis. It has been proved that endogenous neuronal acetylcholine (ACh could play an anti-inflammatory role, and exogenous cholinergic agonists could weaken macrophages inflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation through activation of α7 subunit-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR. We assumed that nonneuronal cholinergic system existing in macrophages could modulate inflammation through autocrine ACh and expressed α7nAChR on the cells. Therefore, we explored whether LPS continuous stimulation could upregulate the nonneuronal cholinergic activity in macrophages and whether increasing autocrine ACh could decrease TNF release from the macrophages. The results showed that, in RAW264.7 cells incubated with LPS for 20 hours, the secretion of ACh was significantly decreased at 4 h and then gradually increased, accompanied with the enhancement of α7nAChR expression level. The release of TNF was greatly increased from RAW264.7 cells at 4 h and 8 h exposure to LPS; however, it was suppressed at 20 h. Upregulating choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression through ChAT gene transfection could enhance ACh secretion and reduce TNF release from the infected RAW264. 7cells. The results indicated that LPS stimulation could modulate the activity of nonneuronal cholinergic system of RAW264.7 cells. Enhancing autocrine ACh production could attenuate TNF release from RAW264.7 cells.

  5. Urotensin II modulates rapid eye movement sleep through activation of brainstem cholinergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Sánchez-Alavez, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a cyclic neuropeptide with strong vasoconstrictive activity in the peripheral vasculature. UII receptor mRNA is also expressed in the CNS, in particular in cholinergic neurons located in the mesopontine tegmental area, including the pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) and later...... brainstem neurons....

  6. Activation of the reticulothalamic cholinergic pathway by the major metabolites of aniracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Shirane, M

    1999-09-10

    The aim of the study was to further investigate the effects of aniracetam, a cognition enhancer, and its metabolites on the brain cholinergic system. We measured choline acetyltransferase activity and acetylcholine release using in vivo brain microdialysis in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). The enzyme activity in the pons-midbrain and hippocampus, and basal acetylcholine release in the nucleus reticularis thalami were lower in SHRSP than in age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats, indicating central cholinergic deficits in SHRSP. Repeated treatment of aniracetam (50 mg/kg p.o. x 11 for 6 days) preferentially increased the enzyme activity in the thalamus, whereas decreased it in the striatum. Among the metabolites of aniracetam, local perfusion of N-anisoyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0.1 and/or 1 microM) and p-anisic acid (1 microM) into the nucleus reticularis thalami, dorsal hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of SHRSP produced a significant but delayed increase of acetylcholine release. We failed, however, to find any effect of aniracetam itself. A direct injection of N-anisoyl-GABA (1 nmol) into the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus of SHRSP enhanced the release in the nucleus reticularis thalami. Thus, these data prove that aniracetam can facilitate central cholinergic neurotransmission via both metabolites. Based on its pharmacokinetic profile, N-anisoyl-GABA may contribute to the clinical effects of aniracetam, mainly by acting on the reticulothalamic cholinergic pathway.

  7. Active pre-filters for dc/dc Boost regulators

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    Carlos Andrés Ramos-Paja

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an active pre-filter to mitigate the current harmonics generated by classical dc/dc Boost regulators, which generate current ripples proportional to the duty cycle. Therefore, high output voltage conditions, i.e., high voltage conversion ratios, produce high current harmonics that must be filtered to avoid damage or source losses. Traditionally, these current components are filtered using electrolytic capacitors, which introduce reliability problems because of their high failure rate. The solution introduced in this paper instead uses a dc/dc converter based on the parallel connection of the Boost canonical cells to filter the current ripples generated by the Boost regulator, improving the system reliability. This solution provides the additional benefits of improving the overall efficiency and the voltage conversion ratio. Finally, the solution is validated with simulations and experimental results.

  8. 5-Desmethylnobiletin augments synaptic ACh levels and nicotinic ACh receptor activity: A potential candidate for alleviation of cholinergic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Shalini; Maurya, Priyanka; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-09-14

    Cholinergic function is compromised in plethora of neurodegenerative disorders especially Alzheimer's disease. Increasing acetylcholine (ACh) levels has been the mainstay in majority of the therapeutic regimens, accepted for management of disease. The present study investigates the efficacy of 5-Desmethylnobiletin (DN), a polymethoxyflavone in augmenting cholinergic function using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. The studies revealed significant elevation in cholinergic transmission mediated through increased levels of ACh and activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Further investigation into the mechanistic aspects indicated that DN enhanced cholinergic function through down modulation of acetylcholinesterase activity at enzyme and transcript level along with upregulation of non alpha subunit, unc-29 which could be linked with enhanced nAChR activity as evident from levamisole assay. Additionally, studies on antioxidant properties, implicated significant potential of DN in curtailing ROS, both in vivo and in vitro. Our studies present DN as a phytomolecule with novel biological activities which could be exploited and researched upon for therapeutic avenues in terms of cholinergic function and antioxidant potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased dopamine D1 receptor binding in the human mesocortical system following central cholinergic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedi, M.; Berkovic, S.F.; Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Reutens, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The interaction between the cholinergic and dopaminergic system has been implicated in many pathological processes including, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction. Little is known about the control of dopamine (DA) release following central cholinergic activation in humans, but experimental studies suggest that endogenously released Acetylcholine (ACh) achieved by the administration of cholinesterase inhibitors, can increase dopamine efflux in different regions of the brain. This leads to the activation of different types of post-synaptic dopaminergic receptors which belong to the family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). A common paradigm of the GPCRs desensitization is that agonist-induced receptor signaling is rapidly attenuated by receptor internalisation. Several experiments have shown that the activation of Dl receptors in acute conditions leads, within minutes, to translocation of the receptor from the surface of the neurons to the endosomal compartment in the cytoplasm and increased receptor turnover. To assess changes in Dl receptor density following an intravenous infusion of the selective cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine salicylate (PHY), we studied eleven normal subjects (10 male and 1 female, mean age 36.1 and 61617; 9.9) using [11C]-SCH23390 and PET The binding potential (BP) for SCH23390 was significantly (p 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between baseline and physostigmine Kl ratio (p>0.05) suggesting that BP changes observed were not secondary to regional blood flow changes or to an order effect of the scans. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  10. Cholinergic pairing with visual activation results in long-term enhancement of visual evoked potentials.

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    Jun Il Kang

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh contributes to learning processes by modulating cortical plasticity in terms of intensity of neuronal activity and selectivity properties of cortical neurons. However, it is not known if ACh induces long term effects within the primary visual cortex (V1 that could sustain visual learning mechanisms. In the present study we analyzed visual evoked potentials (VEPs in V1 of rats during a 4-8 h period after coupling visual stimulation to an intracortical injection of ACh analog carbachol or stimulation of basal forebrain. To clarify the action of ACh on VEP activity in V1, we individually pre-injected muscarinic (scopolamine, nicotinic (mecamylamine, alpha7 (methyllycaconitine, and NMDA (CPP receptor antagonists before carbachol infusion. Stimulation of the cholinergic system paired with visual stimulation significantly increased VEP amplitude (56% during a 6 h period. Pre-treatment with scopolamine, mecamylamine and CPP completely abolished this long-term enhancement, while alpha7 inhibition induced an instant increase of VEP amplitude. This suggests a role of ACh in facilitating visual stimuli responsiveness through mechanisms comparable to LTP which involve nicotinic and muscarinic receptors with an interaction of NMDA transmission in the visual cortex.

  11. Direction-selective circuitry in rat retina develops independently of GABAergic, cholinergic and action potential activity.

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    Le Sun

    Full Text Available The ON-OFF direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs in the mammalian retina code image motion by responding much more strongly to movement in one direction. They do so by receiving inhibitory inputs selectively from a particular sector of processes of the overlapping starburst amacrine cells, a type of retinal interneuron. The mechanisms of establishment and regulation of this selective connection are unknown. Here, we report that in the rat retina, the morphology, physiology of the ON-OFF DSGCs and the circuitry for coding motion directions develop normally with pharmacological blockade of GABAergic, cholinergic activity and/or action potentials for over two weeks from birth. With recent results demonstrating light independent formation of the retinal DS circuitry, our results strongly suggest the formation of the circuitry, i.e., the connections between the second and third order neurons in the visual system, can be genetically programmed, although emergence of direction selectivity in the visual cortex appears to require visual experience.

  12. Cholinergic Enhancement of Brain Activation in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI during Episodic Memory Encoding

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    Shannon L Risacher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the physiological impact of treatment with donepezil (Aricept on neural circuitry supporting episodic memory encoding in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI using functional MRI (fMRI. Methods: 18 patients with MCI and 20 age-matched healthy controls (HC were scanned twice while performing an event-related verbal episodic encoding task. MCI participants were scanned before treatment and after approximately 3 months on donepezil; HC were untreated but rescanned at the same interval. Voxel-level analyses assessed treatment effects in activation profile relative to retest changes in non-treated HC. Changes in task-related connectivity in medial temporal circuitry were also evaluated, as were associations between brain activation pattern, task-related functional connectivity, task performance, and clinical measures of cognition.Results: At baseline, the MCI group showed reduced activation during encoding relative to HC in the right medial temporal lobe (MTL; hippocampal/parahippocampal and additional regions, as well as attenuated task-related deactivation, relative to rest, in a medial parietal lobe cluster. After treatment, the MCI group showed normalized MTL activation and improved parietal deactivation. These changes were associated with cognitive performance. After treatment, the MCI group also demonstrated increased task-related functional connectivity from the right MTL cluster seed region to a network of other sites including the basal nucleus/caudate and bilateral frontal lobes. Increased functional connectivity was associated with improved task performance.Conclusions: Pharmacologic enhancement of cholinergic function in amnestic MCI is associated with changes in brain activation pattern and functional connectivity during episodic memory processing which are in turn related to increased cognitive performance. fMRI is a promising biomarker for assessing treatment related changes in brain function.

  13. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

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    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis.The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined.McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy.Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  14. Hypo Activity of Cholinergic System in Patients with Early Stage of Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidescu, L.; Codorean, I.; Matei, C.; Barret, O.; Mazere, J.; Guyot, M.; Rimbu, A.; Allard, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Objective A cholinergic dysfunction was documented in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease. In order to specify the cholinergic involvement in early stages, we performed a presynaptic imaging study of the cholinergic system using a vesicular Acetylcholine transporter ligand labelled with iodine 123 ( 123 I-IBVM - Iodobenzovesamicol) Materials And Methods Eight patients (5 women and 3 men, 74-89 years, MMS>23) and 8 controls (6 women and 2 men, 72-80 years, MMS>30) have been evaluated using the neuropsychological tests; cerebral SPECT was performed 6 hours after intravenous injection of 218±19 MBq of 123 I - IBVM (30 min, 3 volume, 128x128) and the 3D MRI (T1 weighted images). Acquisition data were processed by filtered retroprojection (Butterworth 5.35) and analysed with SPM software. Each examination was co-registered with the MRI of the patient, normalised in the MNI template and smoothed (10mm). Results The analyse of the group (two sample T-test, p 123 I-IBVM has been detected in the patients group, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results indicate that cholinergic dysfunctions appear very early in the development of Alzheimer's disease and affect the cortical structures involved in the attention process. Some studies are in progress to analyze imaging data with cognitive impairments of each patient. (author)

  15. Modulation of cholinergic airway reactivity and nitric oxide production by endogenous arginase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Hamer, M.A M; Pethe, S; Vadon-Le Goff, S; Boucher, J.-L; Zaagsma, Hans

    1 Cholinergic airway constriction is functionally antagonized by agonist-induced constitutive nitric oxide synthase (cNOS)-derived nitric oxide (NO). Since cNOS and arginase, which hydrolyzes L-arginine to L-ornithine and urea, use L-arginine as a common substrate, competition between both enzymes

  16. Cholinergic signaling in the gut: a novel mechanism of barrier protection through activation of enteric glia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Gerald A; Costantini, Todd W; Bansal, Vishal; Eliceiri, Brian P; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Enteric glia cells (EGCs) play an important role in maintaining proper intestinal barrier function. We have shown that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) increases EGC activation, which is associated with better gut barrier integrity. Enteric neurons communicate with EGCs through nicotinic cholinergic signaling, which may represent a pathway by which VNS activates EGCs. This study sought to define further the mechanism by which VNS prevents intestinal barrier failure using an in vitro model. We hypothesized that a nicotinic cholinergic agonist would increase EGC activation, prevent intestinal nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, and result in better intestinal barrier function. Cultured EGCs were exposed to the nicotinic cholinergic agonist nicotine. Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured by immunoblot to determine changes in EGC activation. Caco-2 cells were grown to confluence and incubated alone or in co-culture with EGCs. Cells were then stimulated with Cytomix for 24 h in the presence or absence of nicotine, and barrier integrity was assessed by permeability to 4-kDa FITC-dextran. Changes in phosphorylated inhibitor of NF-κb (P-IκBα) and phosphorylated NF-κB (P-NF-κB) were assessed by immunoblot. Stimulation with nicotine resulted in EGC activation, as demonstrated by an increase in GFAP expression. Cytomix stimulation increased permeability in Caco-2 cells cultured alone or with EGCs. Treatment of stimulated Caco-2/EGC co-cultures with nicotine reduced permeability similar to control. Nicotine failed to prevent barrier permeability in Caco-2 cells alone. Co-culture of stimulated Caco-2 cells with nicotine-activated EGCs prevented Cytomix-induced increases in P-IκBα and P-NF-κB expression. A pharmacologic nicotinic cholinergic agonist increased EGC activation and improved intestinal epithelial barrier function in an in vitro model of intestinal injury. Nicotine-activated EGCs appear to modulate barrier function by

  17. Passive vs Active Knowledge Transfer: boosting grant proposal impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Murphy, David; Thøgersen, Thomas; Mariani, Patrizio

    2017-04-01

    Research funders are increasingly concerned with measurable socio-economic impact of investment in research, and on increasingly shorter timescales. Innovation, and "open innovation" are the policy priorities of the moment and optimising the flow of ideas along the lab-2-market spectrum is essential for re-use of results, fuelling open innovation, and boosting socio-economic impact or public funded research. The presentation showcases two complimentary strategies that Project Managers can employ pre- and/or post-award in order to optimise the exploitation and impact of research project: passive and active knowledge transfer. Passive Knowledge Transfer relies on maximum disclosure of research output (other than commercially exploitable research via patents and other IPR) in the interest of optimal reproducibility, independent validation and re-use by both academic and non-academic users, without necessarily targeting specific users. Tools of the trade include standard public & academic dissemination means (research articles, online media publications, newsletters, generic policy briefs). Additional transparency of the research workflow can be achieved by integrating "open science" (open notebooks, open data, open research software and open access to research publications) as well as Virtual Research Environments (VREs) in the methodology of the proposed work. Ensuring that the proposal partners are suitably trained in best practices of open science, makes proposal grant more competitive at evaluation and the resulting maximum access to research outputs does contribute to better return on investment for funders (Beagrie 2016) and economic growth objectives of public s e.g. Blue Growth (Houghton & Swan 2011, Marine Knowledge 2020 Roadmap). Active Knowledge Transfer, or the pro-active translation of research into policy or commercial context, is the more classical and better known approach (also referred to as extension services, or researchers providing advice e.g. to

  18. Cassia tora Linn.: A boon to Alzheimer's disease for its anti-amyloidogenic and cholinergic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethana, K R; Senol, Fatma Sezer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Anilakumar, K R; Keri, Rangappa S

    2017-09-15

    Drug discovery from natural products as alternatives for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a current trend. For which plant is an alternative for searching potential molecule for treating AD. Availability of Cassia tora as weed and abundance in nature makes it as potential source. Many plants group under Leguminosae family has potential medicinal property of which Cassia tora is an appropriate choice, to know potency against AD. Etiology of AD is described by senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The Aβ 42 has key major role in forming plaques by forming structures like protobirils, oligomers and final fibrilar like structures. Even at in vitro conditions, the peptides have a fibrilar like structure, which was exploited to preliminary screening of natural sources that may be effective in treating AD. The design of the study was to unravel the potential medicinal property of Cassia tora for its antioxidant, cholinergic and aggregation inhibition activity. We evidenced that the methanol (MeOH), n-hexane (n-hex), petroleum ether (PE) and aqueous (aq) extracts from the leaves of Cassia tora (C. tora) were investigated for their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and anti-amyloidogenic assays. The antioxidant effect using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the extracts were determined using Folin-Ciocaltaeu's and aluminum chloride (AlCl 3 ) reagents, respectively. The methanol extract of C. tora exerted the highest inhibition against AChE (55.38 ± 2.28%) and BChE inhibition (50.02 ± 0.79%) at 100µg/ml concentration. The methanol extract was also found more active in the antioxidant test. The aggregation kinetics was monitored using thioflavin-T (ThT) assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique. The results showed that C. tora methanol extract is able to inhibit the Aβ 42 aggregation from monomers and oligomers and also able to

  19. Serotonin-dependent maintenance of spatial performance and electroencephalography activation after cholinergic blockade: effects of serotonergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dringenberg, H C; Zalan, R M

    1999-08-07

    The interaction between acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the control of behavior such as spatial navigation has received considerable attention over the last years. Previous research indicates that while a selective reduction in cholinergic transmission often produces only mild impairments in spatial and other behavioral tests, additional serotonergic blockade results in the appearance of severe behavioral deficits. Consequently, it has been argued that 5-HT plays a role in the maintenance of behavioral capacities in the face of reduced cholinergic transmission. Here, we examined the effects of 5-HT depletion and receptor blockade, alone and in combination with cholinergic-muscarinic antagonism, on spatial navigation of rats in the Morris water maze. Further, electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were taken to test the hypothesis that a loss of neocortical activation is related to the behavioral deficits apparent after cholinergic-serotonergic blockade. The muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine (1 mg/kg) produced a moderate impairment in navigational performance. The 5-HT depletor, p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA; 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1)x2) did not impair performance when given alone but strongly potentiated the scopolamine-induced deficit and completely blocked the acquisition of an escape response in the water maze. This effect was mimicked by the non-selective serotonin(1-2) receptor antagonist, methiothepin (0.3 mg/kg), but not by the selective serotonin(1A) antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.1-0.5 mg/kg) or the serotonin(2) antagonist, ketanserin (2-4 mg/kg). None of the 5-HT antagonists impaired performance when given alone. Electrocorticographic recordings in rats treated with scopolamine and serotonergic receptor antagonists showed that during behavioral immobility, scopolamine (1 mg/kg) increased spectral power in all frequency bands between 0.5 and 20 Hz without significantly affecting cortical activity during movement. None of the 5-HT

  20. Passive vs Active Knowledge Transfer: boosting grant proposal impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigorov, Ivo; Bayliss-Brown, Georgia; Murphy, David

    2017-01-01

    Research funders are increasingly concerned with measurable socio-economic impact of investment in research, and on increasingly shorter timescales. Innovation, and “open innovation” are the policy priorities of the moment and optimising the flow of ideas along the lab-2-market spectrum is essent......Research funders are increasingly concerned with measurable socio-economic impact of investment in research, and on increasingly shorter timescales. Innovation, and “open innovation” are the policy priorities of the moment and optimising the flow of ideas along the lab-2-market spectrum...... is essential for re-use of results, fuelling open innovation, and boosting socio-economic impact or public funded research....

  1. A novel M1 PAM VU0486846 exerts efficacy in cognition models without displaying agonist activity or cholinergic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Jerri M; Bertron, Jeanette L; Cho, Hyekyung P; Garcia-Barrantes, Pedro M; Moran, Sean P; Maksymetz, James T; Nance, Kellie D; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Remke, Daniel H; Chang, Sichen; Harp, Joel; Blobaum, Anna L; Niswender, Colleen M; Jones, Carrie K; Stauffer, Shaun R; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2018-04-27

    Selective activation of the M1 subtype of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, via positive allosteric modulation (PAM), is an exciting strategy to improve cognition in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease patients. However, highly potent M1 ago-PAMs, such as MK-7622, PF-06764427, and PF-06827443, can engender excessive activation of M1, leading to agonist actions in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) that impairs cognitive function, induces behavioral convulsions, and results in other classic cholinergic adverse events (AEs). Here, we report a fundamentally new and highly selective M1 PAM, VU0486846. VU0486846 possesses only weak agonist activity in M1-expressing cell lines with high receptor reserve and is devoid of agonist actions in the PFC, unlike previously reported ago-PAMs MK-7622, PF-06764427 and PF-06827443. Moreover, VU0486846 shows no interaction with antagonist binding at the orthosteric acetylcholine (ACh) site (e.g., neither bitopic nor displaying negative cooperativity with [3H]-NMS binding at theorthosteric site), no seizure liability at high brain exposures, and no cholinergic AEs. However, as opposed to ago-PAMs, VU0486846 produces robust efficacy in the novel object recognition model of cognitive function. Importantly, we show for the first time that an M1 PAM can reverse the cognitive deficits induced by atypical antipsychotics, such as risperidone. These findings further strengthen the argument that compounds with modest in vitro M1 PAM activity (EC50s > 100 nM) and pure-PAM activity in native tissues display robust pro-cognitive efficacy without AEs mediated by excessive activation of M1. Overall, the combination of compound assessment with recombinant in vitro assays (mindful of receptor reserve), native tissue systems (PFC), and phenotypic screens (behavioral convulsions) is essential to fully understand and evaluate lead compounds and enhance success in clinical development.

  2. Evidence for activation of both adrenergic and cholinergic nervous pathways by yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, H; Chale, J J; Guyen, L N; Tran, M A; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L

    1995-01-01

    Adrenoceptors are involved in the control of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and especially the sympathetic nervous system. Activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors decreases sympathetic tone whereas their blockade has an opposite effect. However, previous investigations have shown that yohimbine (a potent alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist) increases salivary secretion through activation of cholinergic pathways. The aim of the present experiment was to investigate the involvement of both the sympathetic and the parasympathetic system in several pharmacological effects of yohimbine. For this purpose, salivary secretion and various endocrino-metabolic parameters (noradrenaline and insulin secretions, lipomobilization) were evaluated in conscious fasting dogs before and after blockade of either the sympathetic (with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist agent nadolol) or the parasympathetic (with the anticholinergic agent atropine) systems. Yohimbine alone (0.4 mg.kg-1, i.v.) increased within 5-15 minutes, plasma noradrenaline (600%), insulin levels (300%), free-fatty acids (79%) and salivary secretion (143%). Atropine (0.2 mg.kg-1, i.v.) suppressed yohimbine-induced salivary secretion (90%) but did not significantly modify the yohimbine induced changes in noradrenaline (312%), insulin (277%) and free-fatty acids (102%) plasma levels. Administration of nadolol (1 mg.kg-1, i.v.) did not change the magnitude of the increase in both noradrenaline plasma levels (550%) and salivary secretion (300%) induced by yohimbine. However, nadolol totally blunted the increase in insulin (15%) and free-fatty acids (4%) plasma levels. These results show that yohimbine-induced increase in salivary secretion is a cholinergic effect whereas the increase in insulin and free fatty acids can be explained by an increase in sympathetic tone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F [Federal State Agency ' 27 Scientific Centre of Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation' (Russian Federation); Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K [Department of Physics, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-19

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  4. Cholinergic modulation of cognition: Insights from human pharmacological functional neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence from lesion and cortical-slice studies implicate the neocortical cholinergic system in the modulation of sensory, attentional and memory processing. In this review we consider findings from sixty-three healthy human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies that probe interactions of cholinergic drugs with brain activation profiles, and relate these to contemporary neurobiological models. Consistent patterns that emerge are: (1) the direction of cholinergic modulation of sensory cortex activations depends upon top-down influences; (2) cholinergic hyperstimulation reduces top-down selective modulation of sensory cortices; (3) cholinergic hyperstimulation interacts with task-specific frontoparietal activations according to one of several patterns, including: suppression of parietal-mediated reorienting; decreasing ‘effort’-associated activations in prefrontal regions; and deactivation of a ‘resting-state network’ in medial cortex, with reciprocal recruitment of dorsolateral frontoparietal regions during performance-challenging conditions; (4) encoding-related activations in both neocortical and hippocampal regions are disrupted by cholinergic blockade, or enhanced with cholinergic stimulation, while the opposite profile is observed during retrieval; (5) many examples exist of an ‘inverted-U shaped’ pattern of cholinergic influences by which the direction of functional neural activation (and performance) depends upon both task (e.g. relative difficulty) and subject (e.g. age) factors. Overall, human cholinergic functional neuroimaging studies both corroborate and extend physiological accounts of cholinergic function arising from other experimental contexts, while providing mechanistic insights into cholinergic-acting drugs and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21708219

  5. Negative emotions boost user activity at BBC forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmiel, Anna; Sobkowicz, Pawel; Sienkiewicz, Julian; Paltoglou, Georgios; Buckley, Kevan; Thelwall, Mike; Hołyst, Janusz A.

    2011-08-01

    We present an empirical study of user activity in online BBC discussion forums, measured by the number of posts written by individual debaters and the average sentiment of these posts. Nearly 2.5 million posts from over 18 thousand users were investigated. Scale-free distributions were observed for activity in individual discussion threads as well as for overall activity. The number of unique users in a thread normalized by the thread length decays with thread length, suggesting that thread life is sustained by mutual discussions rather than by independent comments. Automatic sentiment analysis shows that most posts contain negative emotions and the most active users in individual threads express predominantly negative sentiments. It follows that the average emotion of longer threads is more negative and that threads can be sustained by negative comments. An agent-based computer simulation model has been used to reproduce several essential characteristics of the analyzed system. The model stresses the role of discussions between users, especially emotionally laden quarrels between supporters of opposite opinions, and represents many observed statistics of the forum.

  6. Cholinergic innervation of human mesenteric lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Bianchi, E; Taurone, S; Mignini, F; Cavallotti, C; Artico, M

    2013-11-01

    The cholinergic neurotransmission within the human mesenteric lymphatic vessels has been poorly studied. Therefore, our aim is to analyse the cholinergic nerve fibres of lymphatic vessels using the traditional enzymatic techniques of staining, plus the biochemical modifications of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Specimens obtained from human mesenteric lymphatic vessels were subjected to the following experimental procedures: 1) drawing, cutting and staining of tissues; 2) staining of total nerve fibres; 3) enzymatic staining of cholinergic nerve fibres; 4) homogenisation of tissues; 5) biochemical amount of proteins; 6) biochemical amount of AChE activity; 6) quantitative analysis of images; 7) statistical analysis of data. The mesenteric lymphatic vessels show many AChE positive nerve fibres around their wall with an almost plexiform distribution. The incubation time was performed at 1 h (partial activity) and 6 h (total activity). Moreover, biochemical dosage of the same enzymatic activity confirms the results obtained with morphological methods. The homogenates of the studied tissues contain strong AChE activity. In our study, the lymphatic vessels appeared to contain few cholinergic nerve fibres. Therefore, it is expected that perivascular nerve stimulation stimulates cholinergic nerves innervating the mesenteric arteries to release the neurotransmitter AChE, which activates muscarinic or nicotinic receptors to modulate adrenergic neurotransmission. These results strongly suggest, that perivascular cholinergic nerves have little or no effect on the adrenergic nerve function in mesenteric arteries. The cholinergic nerves innervating mesenteric arteries do not mediate direct vascular responses.

  7. Elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the striatum reveals regulation of behaviour by cholinergic-glutamatergic co-transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica S Guzman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic neurons in the striatum are thought to play major regulatory functions in motor behaviour and reward. These neurons express two vesicular transporters that can load either acetylcholine or glutamate into synaptic vesicles. Consequently cholinergic neurons can release both neurotransmitters, making it difficult to discern their individual contributions for the regulation of striatal functions. Here we have dissected the specific roles of acetylcholine release for striatal-dependent behaviour in mice by selective elimination of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT from striatal cholinergic neurons. Analysis of several behavioural parameters indicates that elimination of VAChT had only marginal consequences in striatum-related tasks and did not affect spontaneous locomotion, cocaine-induced hyperactivity, or its reward properties. However, dopaminergic sensitivity of medium spiny neurons (MSN and the behavioural outputs in response to direct dopaminergic agonists were enhanced, likely due to increased expression/function of dopamine receptors in the striatum. These observations indicate that previous functions attributed to striatal cholinergic neurons in spontaneous locomotor activity and in the rewarding responses to cocaine are mediated by glutamate and not by acetylcholine release. Our experiments demonstrate how one population of neurons can use two distinct neurotransmitters to differentially regulate a given circuitry. The data also raise the possibility of using VAChT as a target to boost dopaminergic function and decrease high striatal cholinergic activity, common neurochemical alterations in individuals affected with Parkinson's disease.

  8. Activation of the mouse primary visual cortex by medial prefrontal subregion stimulation is not mediated by cholinergic basalo-cortical projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoang Nam eNguyen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC exerts top-down control of primary visual cortex (V1 activity. As there is no direct neuronal projection from mPFC to V1, this functional connection may use an indirect route, i.e., via basalo-cortical cholinergic projections. The cholinergic projections to V1 originate from neurons in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB, which receive neuronal projections from the ventral part of the mPFC, composed of prelimbic (PrL and infralimbic cortices (IL. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether electrical stimulation of mice mPFC subregions activate 1 V1 neurons and 2 HDB cholinergic neurons, suggesting that the HDB serves as a relay point in the mPFC-V1 interaction. Neuronal activation was quantified using c-Fos immunocytochemistry or thallium autometallography for each V1 layer using automated particle analysis tools and optical density measurement. Stimulation of IL and PrL induced significantly higher c-Fos expression or thallium labelling in layers II/III and V of V1 in the stimulated hemisphere only. A HDB cholinergic neuron-specific lesion by saporin administration reduced IL-induced c-Fos expression in layers II/III of V1 but not in layer V. However, there was no c-Fos expression or thallium labelling in the HDB neurons, suggesting that this area was not activated by IL stimulation. Stimulation of another mPFC subarea, the anterior cingulate cortex (AC, which is involved in attention and receives input from V1, activated neither V1 nor HDB. The present results indicate that IL and PrL, but not AC, stimulation activates V1 with the minor involvement of the HDB cholinergic projections. These results suggest a functional link between the ventral mPFC and V1, but this function is only marginally supported by HDB cholinergic neurons and may involve other brain regions.

  9. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli Prevents Severe Scalds-Induced Gut Ischemia and Paralysis by Activating the Cholinergic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn injuries may result in gastrointestinal paralysis, and barrier dysfunction due to gut ischemia and lowered vagus excitability. In this study we investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA at Zusanli (ST36 could prevent severe scalds-induced gut ischemia, paralysis, and barrier dysfunction and whether the protective role of EA at ST36 is related to the vagus nerve. 35% burn area rats were divided into six groups: (a EAN: EA nonchannel acupoints followed by scald injury; (b EA: EA at ST36 after scald injury; (c VGX/EA: vagotomy (VGX before EA at ST36 and scald injury; (d VGX/EAN: VGX before EAN and scald injury; (e atropine/EA: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at ST36; (f atropine/EAN: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at nonchannel acupoints. EA at the Zusanli point significantly promoted the intestinal impelling ratio and increased the amount of mucosal blood flow after scald injury. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal permeability decreased significantly after scald injury in the EA group compared with others. However, EA after atropine injection or cervical vagotomy failed to improve intestinal motility and mucosa blood flow suggesting that the mechanism of EA may be related to the activation of the cholinergic nerve pathway.

  10. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated...

  11. Concave Pd-Ru nanocubes bounded with high active area for boosting ethylene glycol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhiping; Xu, Hui; Li, Shumin; Gu, Zhulan; Yan, Bo; Guo, Jun; Du, Yukou

    2018-01-01

    This paper reported our extensive efforts in the design of concave PdRu nanocubes via a facile wet-chemical strategy. Different from the previously reported PdRu nanostructures, the as-prepared concave PdRu nanocubes combined the advantages of fascinating nanocube structure, synergistic and electronic effect as well as high surface area. All of these beneficial terms endow them to exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability towards ethylene glycol oxidation as compared with commercial Pd/C. Our work highlights the significance of shape-controlled of PdRu nanostructures over the electrocatalytic performances towards the electrooxidation of ethylene glycol (EG), which will pave up a new strategy for boosting the development of renewable and clean energy technology.

  12. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  13. Social defeat, a paradigm of depression in rats that elicits 22-kHz vocalizations, preferentially activates the cholinergic signaling pathway in the periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Roger A; Burgdorf, Jeffrey; Otto, Nigel J; Panksepp, Jaak; Moskal, Joseph R

    2007-09-04

    Gene expression profiles in the periaqueductal gray (PAG) of adult Long-Evans rats as a function of a stressful social defeat in inter-male fighting encounters were examined. This social subordination model mimics prototypical behavioral changes that parallel aspects of clinical depression, has been postulated to simulate early changes in the onset of depression in the losers, and has been successfully utilized for the evaluation of antidepressant activity. The 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) have been shown to reflect negative emotional states akin to anxiety and depression. Social defeat is the most robust and reliable method of eliciting these calls. The PAG has been shown to be a key brain region for the generation of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations, and 22-kHz USVs have been shown to be controlled by the mesolimbic cholinergic system. In this present study, we examined gene expression changes in the PAG of social subordinate rats compared to dominant rats that do not Exhibit 22-kHz USVs. We found that social defeat significantly altered the genes associated with cholinergic synaptic transmission in the PAG. The most robust of these were the increased expression of the beta2 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNB2) and the T subunit of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) in the subordinate animals. These changes were corroborated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and found to be exclusive to the PAG compared to seven other brain regions examined. These data suggest that cholinergic transmission in the PAG is involved in the generation of 22-kHz USVs and provide potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of affective disorders.

  14. Pedunculopontine nucleus cholinergic deficiency in cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Karin; Edwards, Nancy A; Urbano, Demelio; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Iacono, Diego; Alho, Ana Tereza Di Lorenzo; Alho, Eduardo Joaquim Lopes; Amaro, Edson; Horovitz, Silvina G; Hallett, Mark

    2018-03-06

    The etiology of cervical dystonia is unknown. Cholinergic abnormalities have been identified in dystonia animal models and human imaging studies. Some animal models have cholinergic neuronal loss in the striatum and increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the pedunculopontine nucleus. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of cholinergic abnormalities in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus in cervical dystonia human brain donors. Formalin-fixed brain tissues were obtained from 8 cervical dystonia and 7 age-matched control brains (controls). Pedunculopontine nucleus was available in only 6 cervical dystonia and 5 controls. Neurodegeneration was evaluated pathologically in the putamen, pedunculopontine nucleus, and other regions. Cholinergic neurons were detected using choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry in the putamen and pedunculopontine nucleus. Putaminal cholinergic neurons were quantified. A total of 6 cervical dystonia patients and 6 age-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging to determine if there were white matter microstructural abnormalities around the pedunculopontine nucleus. Decreased or absent choline acetyltransferase staining was identified in all 6 pedunculopontine nucleus samples in cervical dystonia. In contrast, strong choline acetyltransferase staining was present in 4 of 5 pedunculopontine nucleus controls. There were no differences in pedunculopontine nucleus diffusion tensor imaging between cervical dystonia and healthy controls. There was no difference in numbers of putaminal cholinergic neurons between cervical dystonia and controls. Our findings suggest that pedunculopontine nucleus choline acetyltransferase deficiency represents a functional cholinergic deficit in cervical dystonia. Structural lesions and confounding neurodegenerative processes were excluded by absence of neuronal loss, gliosis, diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities, and beta-amyloid, tau, and alpha

  15. Effect of galantamine on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and spontaneous cholinergic synaptic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texidó, Laura; Ros, Esteve; Martín-Satué, Mireia; López, Susana; Aleu, Jordi; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2005-01-01

    Various types of anticholinesterasic agents have been used to improve the daily activities of Alzheimer's disease patients. It was recently demonstrated that Galantamine, described as a molecule with anticholinesterasic properties, is also an allosteric enhancer of human α4β2 neuronal nicotinic receptor activity. We explored its effect on the human α7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Galantamine, at a concentration of 0.1 μM, increased the amplitude of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced ion currents in the human α7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes, but caused inhibition at higher concentrations. The maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 22% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, was observed at a concentration of 250 μM Ach. The same enhancing effect was obtained in oocytes transplanted with Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) isolated from the electric organ, but in this case the optimal concentration of galantamine was 1 μM. In this case, the maximum effect of galantamine, an increase of 35% in the amplitude of ACh-induced currents, occurred at a concentration of 50 μM ACh. Galantamine affects not only the activity of post-synaptic receptors but also the activity of nerve terminals. At a concentration of 1 μM, quantal spontaneous events, recorded in a cholinergic synapse, increased their amplitude, an effect which was independent of the anticholinesterasic activity associated with this compound. The anticholinesterasic effect was recorded in preparations treated with a galantamine concentration of 10 μM. In conclusion, our results show that galantamine enhances human α7 neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor activity. It also enhances muscular AChRs and the size of spontaneous cholinergic synaptic events. However, only a very narrow range of galantamine concentrations can be used for enhancing effects. PMID:15834443

  16. Streptococcus thermophilus urease activity boosts Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus homolactic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioli, Stefania; Della Scala, Giulia; Remagni, Maria Chiara; Stuknyte, Milda; Colombo, Stefano; Guglielmetti, Simone; De Noni, Ivano; Ragg, Enzio; Mora, Diego

    2017-04-17

    The proto-cooperation between Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in the yogurt consortium enhances the growth rate and size of each population. In contrast, the independent growth of the two species in milk leads to a slower growth rate and a smaller population size. In this study, we report the first evidence that the urease activity of S. thermophilus increases the intracellular pH of L. delbrueckii in the absence of carbon source. However, in milk, in the presence of lactose the alkalizing effect of urea-derived ammonia was not detectable. Nevertheless, based on glucose consumption and lactic acid production at different pH in , L. delbrueckii showed an optimum of glycolysis and homolactic fermentation at alkaline pH values. In milk, we observed that ammonia provided by urea hydrolysis boosted lactic acid production in S. thermophilus and in L. delbrueckii when the species were grown alone or in combination. Therefore, we propose that urease activity acts as an altruistic cooperative trait, which is costly for urease-positive individuals but provides a local benefit because other individuals can take advantage of urease-dependent ammonia release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to NASH and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Fuqiang; Tang, Cuilan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. A mouse model of NASH was established by feeding a high-fat and high-sugar diet.Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway was achieved by nicotine administration to the NASH modeled mice and normal controls. Liver biopsies were taken and the concentrations of cytokines were measured. Isolated liver primary Kupffer cells and RAw264.7 cells were cultured, pre-treated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and exposed to nicotine, after which the supernatant concentrations of IL-6 and TNFa were determined by ELISA. The protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p)-NF-kB and I k B were detected in primary cultured Kupffer cells by western blotting. The mouse model of NASH was successfully established, as evidenced by findings from liver biopsy and serum liver function tests. The degree of liver inflammation in the NASH mice decreased after nicotine administration, and the level of serum TNFa also significantly decreased. The levels of serum TNFa were 21.95+/-0.8 pg/mL in nicotine-treated mice and 38.07+/-1.7 pg/mL in the non-nicotine-treated NASH mice (P less than 0.05). The nicotine treatment also significantly reduced the concentration of TNFa in the culture supernatants of Kupffer cells after LPS stimulation; moreover, the supernatant level of TNFa decreased significantly after the nicotine treatment (Pless than 0.05). LPS stimulation of the RAw264.7 cells led to an increased level ofp-NF-kB and a reduced level ofI-kB, suggesting that the NF-kB pathway had been activated; different doses of nicotine pre-treatment led to down-regulation of the p-NF-kB level and up-regulation of the I-kB level, both in dose-dependent manners. Activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway inhibits the NASH-related inflammatory reaction, and the mechanism for this inhibition

  18. Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway by nicotine ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jinying; Bao, Junjie; Li, Xiaolan; Ye, Aihua; Zhang, Guozheng; Liu, Huishu

    2017-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) exerts a more intense systemic inflammatory response than normal pregnancy. Recently, the role of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) in regulating inflammation has been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine, a selective cholinergic agonist, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats and to determine the molecular mechanism underlying it. Rats were administered LPS (1.0 μg/kg) via tail vein injection on gestational day 14 to induce preeclampsia-like symptoms. Nicotine (1.0 mg/kg/d) and α-bungarotoxin (1.0 μg/kg/d) were injected subcutaneously into the rats from gestational day 14-19. Clinical symptoms were recorded. Serum and placentas were collected to determine cytokine levels using Luminex. The mRNA and protein expression levels of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR) were determined using Real time-PCR and Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the level of activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in placentas. Nicotine significantly ameliorated LPS-induced preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats (P preeclampsia (P preeclampsia rats. Our findings suggest that the activation of α7nAChR by nicotine attenuates preeclampsia-like symptoms, and this protective effect is likely the result of the inhibition of inflammation via the NF-κB p65 pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitosan boosts the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare essential oil in modified atmosphere packaged pork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, Antonello; Mazzarrino, Giovanni; Chaves-López, Clemencia; Rossi, Chiara; Sacchetti, Giampiero; Guerrieri, Oana; Serio, Annalisa

    2016-10-01

    The potential of chitosan as a possible booster of the antimicrobial activity of Origanum vulgare EO (OEO) against spoilage bacteria and Listeria monocytogenes was investigated in fresh pork meat. Pork fillets were inoculated with 3 L. monocytogenes strains, dipped either in Origanum vulgare (oregano) Essential Oil (OEO) at 2 and 4%, or in chitosan 1% alone or added with 2 and 4% OEO, then packed under modified atmosphere (70% O2, 20% CO2, 10% N2) and stored at 4 °C for 15 days. OEO did not reduce L. monocytogenes growth, while 2 Log decrease was obtained after 2 days of storage in treatments with chitosan alone or with OEO, with growth inhibition up to day 15 in samples with chitosan and OEO 4%. When OEO was combined with chitosan, total viable counts and spoilage bacteria were reduced and contained over time, particularly Pseudomonas (2.0 Log CFU/g at day 15) and Brochothrix thermosphacta (undetectable). All the treatments applied extended meat shelf-life with respect to control, whose commercial shelf-life was 10 days. Chitosan treatments enhanced L* and maintained a* values almost stable during storage. Chitosan and OEO singly applied reduced lipid oxidation (0.62-0.75 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat) compared to control (0.99 mg malondialdehyde/Kg meat). Finally, chitosan treated samples were not recognized with respect to the control, whereas OEO gave bitter taste; chitosan with OEO instead mitigated the effect of OEO addition to meat. Chitosan combined with OEO boosts its antimicrobial activity and shows a potential for application in industrial production of fresh pork in MAP, to achieve shelf-life extension, control of L. monocytogenes growth, stability of color and protective effect from oxidation, with low sensory impact. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nematode cholinergic pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segerberg, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Nematode acetylcholine (ACh) receptors were characterized using both biochemical and electrophysiological techniques, including: (1) receptor binding studies in crude homogenates of the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the parasitic nematode Ascaris lumbricoides with the high-affinity probe ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) which binds to muscarinic receptors in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues (2) measurement of depolarization and contraction induced by a variety of cholinergic agents, including N-methylscopolamine (NMS), in an innervated dorsal muscle strip preparation of Ascaris; (3) examination of the antagonistic actions of d-tubocurarine (dTC) and NMS at dorsal neuromuscular junction; (4) measurement of input resistance changes in Ascaris commissural motorneurons induced by ACh, dTC, NMS, pilocarpine and other cholinergic drugs.

  1. Cholinergic depletion and basal forebrain volume in primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolien Schaeverbeke

    2017-01-01

    In the PPA group, only LV cases showed decreases in AChE activity levels compared to controls. Surprisingly, a substantial number of SV cases showed significant AChE activity increases compared to controls. BF volume did not correlate with AChE activity levels in PPA. To conclude, in our sample of PPA patients, LV but not SV was associated with cholinergic depletion. BF atrophy in PPA does not imply cholinergic depletion.

  2. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Deficits Reduce Glucose Metabolism and Function of Cholinergic and GABAergic Systems in the Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da Un; Oh, Jin Hwan; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyeon; Cho, Zang Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Chang, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Reduced brain glucose metabolism and basal forebrain cholinergic neuron degeneration are common features of Alzheimer's disease and have been correlated with memory function. Although regions representing glucose hypometabolism in patients with Alzheimer's disease are targets of cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, the interaction between cholinergic denervation and glucose hypometabolism is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate glucose metabolism changes caused by cholinergic deficits. We lesioned basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in rats using 192 immunoglobulin G-saporin. After 3 weeks, lesioned animals underwent water maze testing or were analyzed by ¹⁸F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography. During water maze probe testing, performance of the lesioned group decreased with respect to time spent in the target quadrant and platform zone. Cingulate cortex glucose metabolism in the lesioned group decreased, compared with the normal group. Additionally, acetylcholinesterase activity and glutamate decarboxylase 65/67 expression declined in the cingulate cortex. Our results reveal that spatial memory impairment in animals with selective basal forebrain cholinergic neuron damage is associated with a functional decline in the GABAergic and cholinergic system associated with cingulate cortex glucose hypometabolism.

  3. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion-potential target for rehabilitation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Larry M; McVagh, J R; Noga, B R; Cabaj, A M; Majczyński, H; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J; Leblond, H; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a "hyper-cholinergic" state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our experiments.

  4. Endogenous cholinergic tone modulates spontaneous network level neuronal activity in primary cortical cultures grown on multi-electrode arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, Mark W; Xydas, Dimitris; Downes, Julia H; Bucci, Giovanna; Becerra, Victor; Warwick, Kevin; Constanti, Andrew; Nasuto, Slawomir J; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud Cortical cultures grown long-term on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) are frequently and extensively used as models of cortical networks in studies of neuronal firing activity, neuropharmacology, toxicology and mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. However, in contrast to the predominantly asynchronous neuronal firing activity exhibited by intact cortex, electrophysiological activity of mature cortical cultures is dominated by spontaneous epileptiform-like global burst events ...

  5. A capacitor-free CMOS LDO regulator with AC-boosting and active-feedback frequency compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qianneng; Wang Yongsheng; Lai Fengchang

    2009-01-01

    A capacitor-free CMOS low-dropout (LDO) regulator for system-on-chip (SoC) applications is presented. By adopting AC-boosting and active-feedback frequency compensation (ACB-AFFC), the proposed LDO regulator, which is independent of an off-chip capacitor, provides high closed-loop stability. Moreover, a slew rate enhancement circuit is adopted to increase the slew rate and decrease the output voltage dips when the load current is suddenly switched from low to high. The LDO regulator is designed and fabricated in a 0.6 μm CMOS process. The active silicon area is only 770 x 472 μm 2 . Experimental results show that the total error of the output voltage due to line variation is less than ±0.197%. The load regulation is only 0.35 mV/mA when the load current changes from 0 to 100 mA.

  6. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onar, Omer C [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL; Miller (JNJ), John M. [JNJ-Miller PLC

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  7. The nicotinic cholinergic system function in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Frauke

    2015-09-01

    Research on the nicotinic cholinergic system function in the brain was previously mainly derived from animal studies, yet, research in humans is growing. Up to date, findings allow significant advances on the understanding of nicotinic cholinergic effects on human cognition, emotion and behavior using a range of functional brain imaging approaches such as pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Studies provided insights across various mechanistic psychological domains using different tasks as well as at rest in both healthy individuals and patient populations, with so far partly mixed results reporting both enhancements and decrements of neural activity related to the nicotinic cholinergic system. Moreover, studies on the relation between brain structure and the nicotinic cholinergic system add important information in this context. The present review summarizes the current status of human brain imaging studies and presents the findings within a theoretical and clinical perspective as they may be useful not only for an advancement of the understanding of basic nicotinic cholinergic-related mechanisms, but also for the development and integration of psychological and pharmacological treatment approaches. Patterns of functional neuroanatomy and neural circuitry across various cognitive and emotional domains may be used as neuropsychological markers of mental disorders such as addiction, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease or schizophrenia, where nicotinic cholinergic system changes are characteristic. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Beta-amyloid-induced cholinergic denervation correlates with enhanced nitric oxide synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex: Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade : Reversal by NMDA receptor blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O’Mahony, S.; Harkany, T.; Ábrahám, I.; Jong, G.I. de; Varga, J.L.; Zarándi, M.; Penke, B.; Nyakas, C.; Luiten, P.G.M.; Leonard, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Ample experimental evidence indicates that acute beta-amyloid infusion into the nucleus basalis of rats elicits abrupt degeneration of the magnocellular cholinergic neurons projecting to the cerebral cortex, In fact, involvement of a permanent Ca2+ overload, partially via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)

  9. Analysis and Design of an Active Stabilizer for a Boost Power Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yigeng Huangfu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In electrical power converter systems, the presence of an LC input filter can efficiently reduce the Electromagnetic Interference (EMI effect, and at the same time protect the converter and the load from being impacted by sharp input impulse voltages. However, for transportation applications, the weight and size limitations of input LC filters for power converters have to be taken into consideration. The reduction of LC filter size may impair the system stability margin and dynamic response. In serve cases, the system may even become unstable. Thus, in order to ensure the system stability while minimizing the input LC filter size, the implementation of a stabilizer for the system control is needed. In this paper, a novel digital stabilizer design method is proposed for a boost power converter with a small input LC filter. The proposed method is based on input filter inductance current measurements and DSP (Digital Signal Processor -based digital stabilizer design. Simulation and experimentation confirm the validity of the proposed approach.

  10. Glucocorticoid programming of the mesopontine cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia eBorges

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress perception, response, adaptation and coping strategies are individually distinct, and the sequel of stress and/or glucocorticoids is also distinct between subjects. In the last years, it has become clear that early life stress is a powerful modulator of neuroendocrine stress-responsive circuits, programming intrinsic susceptibility to stress, and potentiating the appearance of stress-related disorders such as depression, anxiety and addiction. Herein we were interested in understanding how early life experiences reset the normal processing of negative stimuli, leading to emotional dysfunction. Animals prenatally exposed to glucocorticoids (iuGC present hyperanxiety, increased fear behaviour and hyper-reactivity to negative stimuli. In parallel, we found a remarkable increase in the number of aversive 22kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in response to an aversive cue. Considering the suggested role of the mesopontine tegmentum cholinergic pathway, arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT, in the initiation of 22kHz vocalizations and hypothetically in the control of emotional arousal and tone, we decided to evaluate the condition of this circuit in iuGC animals. Notably, in a basal situation, iuGC animals present increased choline acetyltransferase (ChAT expression in the LDT and PPT, but not in other cholinergic nuclei, namely in the nucleus basalis of Meynert. In addition, and in accordance with the amplified response to an adverse stimulus of iuGC animals, we found marked changes in the cholinergic activation pattern of LDT and PPT regions. Altogether, our results suggest a specific cholinergic pathway programing by prenatal GC, and hint that this may be of relevance in setting individuals stress vulnerability threshold.

  11. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal locomotion—potential target for rehabilitation approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Larry M.; McVagh, J. R.; Noga, B. R.; Cabaj, A. M.; Majczyński, H.; Sławińska, Urszula; Provencher, J.; Leblond, H.; Rossignol, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments implicate cholinergic brainstem and spinal systems in the control of locomotion. Our results demonstrate that the endogenous cholinergic propriospinal system, acting via M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors, is capable of consistently producing well-coordinated locomotor activity in the in vitro neonatal preparation, placing it in a position to contribute to normal locomotion and to provide a basis for recovery of locomotor capability in the absence of descending pathways. Tests of these suggestions, however, reveal that the spinal cholinergic system plays little if any role in the induction of locomotion, because MLR-evoked locomotion in decerebrate cats is not prevented by cholinergic antagonists. Furthermore, it is not required for the development of stepping movements after spinal cord injury, because cholinergic agonists do not facilitate the appearance of locomotion after spinal cord injury, unlike the dramatic locomotion-promoting effects of clonidine, a noradrenergic α-2 agonist. Furthermore, cholinergic antagonists actually improve locomotor activity after spinal cord injury, suggesting that plastic changes in the spinal cholinergic system interfere with locomotion rather than facilitating it. Changes that have been observed in the cholinergic innervation of motoneurons after spinal cord injury do not decrease motoneuron excitability, as expected. Instead, the development of a “hyper-cholinergic” state after spinal cord injury appears to enhance motoneuron output and suppress locomotion. A cholinergic suppression of afferent input from the limb after spinal cord injury is also evident from our data, and this may contribute to the ability of cholinergic antagonists to improve locomotion. Not only is a role for the spinal cholinergic system in suppressing locomotion after SCI suggested by our results, but an obligatory contribution of a brainstem cholinergic relay to reticulospinal locomotor command systems is not confirmed by our

  12. Cholinergic neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate mouse brown adipose tissue metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hoon Jeong

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: DMH cholinergic neurons directly send efferent signals to sympathetic premotor neurons in the Rpa. Elevated cholinergic input to this area reduces BAT activity through activation of M2 mAChRs on serotonergic neurons. Therefore, the direct DMHACh–Rpa5-HT pathway may mediate physiological heat-defense responses to elevated environmental temperature.

  13. Phenolic Constituents and Inhibitory Effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Sorrel) Calyx on Cholinergic, Monoaminergic, and Purinergic Enzyme Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Adewuni, Taiwo M; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Ademosun, Ayokunle O

    2018-01-17

    This study revealed the effect of phenolic extract from Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (sorrel) calyx on acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), monoamine oxidase (MAO), and ecto-5' nucleotidase (E-NTDase) activities as well as pro-oxidant-induced oxidative damage in rat brain in vitro. Sorrel extract inhibited AChE (EC 50 = 46.96 µg/mL), BChE (EC 50 = 40.38 µg/mL), MAO (EC 50 = 43.69 µg/mL), and E-NTDase (EC 50 = 40.52 µg/mL) and stimulated Na + /K + -ATPase (EC 50 = 22.01 µg/mL) activities. The phenolic extract also reduced Fe 2+ - (EC 50 = 22.37 µg/mL) and sodium nitroprusside- (SNP-) (21.46 µg/mL) induced malondialdehyde (MDA) production in rat brain homogenates. Catechin (53.12 mg/g), chlorogenic (67.12 mg/g), rutin (16.25 mg/g), and caffeic acid (15.38 mg/g) were the most abundant phenolic compounds in the extract. The synergistic effects of the phenolic compounds may contribute to the enzyme inhibitory and stimulatory activities of the extract. Our findings suggest that sorrel extract shows promising potential for the treatment and/or management of some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Synthesis of [14C]ABT-418, a cholinergic channel activator labeled at two sites on the isoxazole ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surber, B.W.; Thomas, S.B.; Elliott, R.L.; Kopecka, Hana

    1996-01-01

    [ 14 C]ABT-418, (S)-3-[ 14 C]methyl-5-[N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl] [4- 14 C]isoxazole hydrochloride, was labeled in two positions at maximum specific activity. Starting with 100 mCi of sodium [2- 14 C]acetate, 14.6 mCi at 105 mCi/mmol was obtained in 8 steps including the formation of [1,3- 14 C]acetone in the pyrolysis of barium [2- 14 C]acetate. The key step was the formation of the dianion of [1,3- 14 C]acetone oxime and its condensation with L-proline methyl ester. (author)

  15. Synthesis of [{sup 14}C]ABT-418, a cholinergic channel activator labeled at two sites on the isoxazole ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surber, B.W.; Thomas, S.B. [Abbott Labs., Drug Metabolism, Abbott Park, IL (United States); Elliott, R.L.; Kopecka, Hana [Abbott Labs., Neuroscience Research, Abbott Park, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    [{sup 14}C]ABT-418, (S)-3-[{sup 14}C]methyl-5-[N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl] [4-{sup 14}C]isoxazole hydrochloride, was labeled in two positions at maximum specific activity. Starting with 100 mCi of sodium [2-{sup 14}C]acetate, 14.6 mCi at 105 mCi/mmol was obtained in 8 steps including the formation of [1,3-{sup 14}C]acetone in the pyrolysis of barium [2-{sup 14}C]acetate. The key step was the formation of the dianion of [1,3-{sup 14}C]acetone oxime and its condensation with L-proline methyl ester. (author).

  16. Incorporating nitrogen atoms into cobalt nanosheets as a strategy to boost catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Zheng, Xusheng; Chen, Yizhen; Wu, Wenlong; Qiu, Jianxiang; Zhao, Xiangchen; Zhao, Xiao; Dai, Yizhou; Zeng, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenation of CO2 into fuels and useful chemicals could help to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Although great progress has been made over the past decades to improve the activity of catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, more efficient catalysts, especially those based on non-noble metals, are desired. Here we incorporate N atoms into Co nanosheets to boost the catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation. For the hydrogenation of CO2, Co4N nanosheets exhibited a turnover frequency of 25.6 h-1 in a slurry reactor under 32 bar pressure at 150 °C, which was 64 times that of Co nanosheets. The activation energy for Co4N nanosheets was 43.3 kJ mol-1, less than half of that for Co nanosheets. Mechanistic studies revealed that Co4N nanosheets were reconstructed into Co4NHx, wherein the amido-hydrogen atoms directly interacted with the CO2 to form HCOO* intermediates. In addition, the adsorbed H2O* activated amido-hydrogen atoms via the interaction of hydrogen bonds.

  17. Linking Cholinergic Interneurons, Synaptic Plasticity, and Behavior during the Extinction of a Cocaine-Context Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junuk; Finkelstein, Joel; Choi, Jung Yoon; Witten, Ilana B

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that cholinergic interneurons are a key cell type within the nucleus accumbens, a relationship between synaptic plasticity and the in vivo activity of cholinergic interneurons remains to be established. Here, we identify a three-way link between the activity of cholinergic interneurons, synaptic plasticity, and learning in mice undergoing the extinction of a cocaine-context association. We found that activity of cholinergic interneurons regulates extinction learning for a cocaine-context association and generates a sustained reduction in glutamatergic presynaptic strength onto medium spiny neurons. Interestingly, activation of cholinergic interneurons does not support reinforcement learning or plasticity by itself, suggesting that these neurons have a modulatory rather than a reinforcing function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-lasting protection of activity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (PIs by boosted PI containing regimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra U Scherrer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of mutations after long-lasting exposure to a failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART is problematic and severely reduces the options for further successful treatments. METHODS: We studied patients from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study who failed cART with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and either a ritonavir-boosted PI (PI/r or a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI. The loss of genotypic activity 6 months after virological failure was analyzed with Stanford algorithm. Risk factors associated with early emergence of drug resistance mutations (6 months after failure: 8.8% vs. 38.2% (p = 0.009, 7.1% vs. 46.9% (p6 months after failure compared to 41.2%, 49.0% and 63.0% of those who have lost NNRTI activity (all p<0.001. The risk to accumulate an early NRTI mutation was strongly associated with NNRTI-containing cART (adjusted odds ratio: 13.3 (95% CI: 4.1-42.8, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The loss of activity of PIs and NRTIs was low among patients treated with PI/r, even after long-lasting exposure to a failing cART. Thus, more options remain for second-line therapy. This finding is potentially of high relevance, in particular for settings with poor or lacking virological monitoring.

  19. Cortical cholinergic innervation: Distribution and source in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, R.G.; Cork, L.C.; Coyle, J.T.; Lehmann, J.; Mitchell, S.J.; Price, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its late-life variant, senile dementia of the Alzheimer's type (SDAT), the predominant neurochemical abnormalities are marked decrements in the activities of ChAT and AChE, the high affinity uptake of tritium-choline, and synthesis of acetylcholine. Two studies are undertaken to delineate more clearly the variability of cortical cholinergic innervation and the contribution of the Ch system, particularly the Ch4, to this cholinergic innervation. In the first study, ChAT activity was assessed in multiple samples of neocortex from seven normal cynomolgus monkeys. In the second study, the nbM was lesioned in order to determine the contribution of the Ch system to cortical cholinergic innervation

  20. Boosting Cortical Activity at Beta-Band Frequencies Slows Movement in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogosyan, Alek; Gaynor, Louise Doyle; Eusebio, Alexandre; Brown, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Summary Neurons have a striking tendency to engage in oscillatory activities. One important type of oscillatory activity prevalent in the motor system occurs in the beta frequency band, at about 20 Hz. It is manifest during the maintenance of tonic contractions and is suppressed prior to and during voluntary movement [1–7]. This and other correlative evidence suggests that beta activity might promote tonic contraction, while impairing motor processing related to new movements [3, 8, 9]. Hence, bursts of beta activity in the cortex are associated with a strengthening of the motor effects of sensory feedback during tonic contraction and with reductions in the velocity of voluntary movements [9–11]. Moreover, beta activity is increased when movement has to be resisted or voluntarily suppressed [7, 12, 13]. Here we use imperceptible transcranial alternating-current stimulation to entrain cortical activity at 20 Hz in healthy subjects and show that this slows voluntary movement. The present findings are the first direct evidence of causality between any physiological oscillatory brain activity and concurrent motor behavior in the healthy human and help explain how the exaggerated beta activity found in Parkinson's disease can lead to motor slowing in this illness [14]. PMID:19800236

  1. Long-term Relationships between Cholinergic Tone, Synchronous Bursting and Synaptic Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Maya; Corner, Michael A.; Ziv, Noam E.

    2012-01-01

    Cholinergic neuromodulation plays key roles in the regulation of neuronal excitability, network activity, arousal, and behavior. On longer time scales, cholinergic systems play essential roles in cortical development, maturation, and plasticity. Presumably, these processes are associated with substantial synaptic remodeling, yet to date, long-term relationships between cholinergic tone and synaptic remodeling remain largely unknown. Here we used automated microscopy combined with multielectrode array recordings to study long-term relationships between cholinergic tone, excitatory synapse remodeling, and network activity characteristics in networks of cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array substrates. Experimental elevations of cholinergic tone led to the abrupt suppression of episodic synchronous bursting activity (but not of general activity), followed by a gradual growth of excitatory synapses over hours. Subsequent blockage of cholinergic receptors led to an immediate restoration of synchronous bursting and the gradual reversal of synaptic growth. Neither synaptic growth nor downsizing was governed by multiplicative scaling rules. Instead, these occurred in a subset of synapses, irrespective of initial synaptic size. Synaptic growth seemed to depend on intrinsic network activity, but not on the degree to which bursting was suppressed. Intriguingly, sustained elevations of cholinergic tone were associated with a gradual recovery of synchronous bursting but not with a reversal of synaptic growth. These findings show that cholinergic tone can strongly affect synaptic remodeling and synchronous bursting activity, but do not support a strict coupling between the two. Finally, the reemergence of synchronous bursting in the presence of elevated cholinergic tone indicates that the capacity of cholinergic neuromodulation to indefinitely suppress synchronous bursting might be inherently limited. PMID:22911726

  2. Blocking of irrelevant memories by posterior alpha activity boosts memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojin; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Eunjoo; Kang, Hyejin; Hahm, Jarang; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Jensen, Ole

    2014-08-01

    In our daily lives, we are confronted with a large amount of information. Because only a small fraction can be encoded in long-term memory, the brain must rely on powerful mechanisms to filter out irrelevant information. To understand the neuronal mechanisms underlying the gating of information into long-term memory, we employed a paradigm where the encoding was directed by a "Remember" or a "No-Remember" cue. We found that posterior alpha activity increased prior to the "No-Remember" stimuli, whereas it decreased prior to the "Remember" stimuli. The sources were localized in the parietal cortex included in the dorsal attention network. Subjects with a larger cue-modulation of the alpha activity had better memory for the to-be-remembered items. Interestingly, alpha activity reflecting successful inhibition following the "No-Remember" cue was observed in the frontal midline structures suggesting preparatory inhibition was mediated by anterior parts of the dorsal attention network. During the presentation of the memory items, there was more gamma activity for the "Remember" compared to the "No-Remember" items in the same regions. Importantly, the anticipatory alpha power during cue predicted the gamma power during item. Our findings suggest that top-down controlled alpha activity reflects attentional inhibition of sensory processing in the dorsal attention network, which then finally gates information to long-term memory. This gating is achieved by inhibiting the processing of visual information reflected by neuronal synchronization in the gamma band. In conclusion, the functional architecture revealed by region-specific changes in the alpha activity reflects attentional modulation which has consequences for long-term memory encoding. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Tapped-Inductor Buck-Boost Converter for a Dielectric ElectroActive Polymer Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Emmanouil; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Energy harvesting applications based on Dielectric ElectroActive Polymer (DEAP) generators have been in the spotlight in recent years after the latter ones’ documented advantages against competing electromagnetic and field-activated technologies. Yet, the need for bidirectional energy flow under...... generators. The high-side switch of the converter is replaced by a string of three non-matched, non-thermally-coupled, off-the-shelf MOSFETs, extending its effective operational range. Experiments conducted on a standalone DEAP generator validate the applicability of the proposed converter by demonstrating...

  4. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1oxidizing agent. Photocatalytic water oxidation in the presence of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) as a sensitizer and peroxodisulfate as an electron acceptor was carried out for all three manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. REAL-LIFE ACTIVITIES: BOOSTING MY STUDENTS’ AWARENESS OF HONESTY IN CREATING GENRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr. Dewi Wahyu Mustikasari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available My students was strugled to write genre without copypasting sentences or texts from the internet. On the other hand, it was a huge challange for me to teach five big writing classes. Each class consisted of 25-30 students who tended (mostly collecting unoriginal writing works. This paper discusses the real-life activities that can be used to enhance my students’ aweareness of honesty in creating genre. My students must write some genres namely recount, descriptive (optional, spoof (optional, procedure, hortatory (optional and analytical exposition (optional text. I also took some benefits of ICT to equip the learning process. Browsing and experiencing the menu of premierskills.britishcouncil.org were the real-life activities that explore their personal memories to be told as the recount text. Then they defined the feature of one of the menu of the previous website to be informed as the descriptive text. Furthermore, they wrote their personal funny experiences which were related to the Indonesian culture as the spoof text. The procedure text can be produced by exploring the daily activities in the pictures such as how to make a cup of tea/coffee, cook a sunny side-up egg, insert sim card into mobile phone, etc. Next, my students visited the tourism and public places in Salatiga, and they observed the strength and weekness of those places as the production of hortatory or analytical exposition text. The real-life activities were able to foster my students’ awareness of honesty. It was fantastic that my students were able to create the genre honestly.

  6. Boosting the Performance of the Nickel Anode in the Oxygen Evolution Reaction by Simple Electrochemical Activation

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2017-03-27

    The development of cost-effective and active water-splitting electrocatalysts that work at mild pH is an essential step towards the realization of sustainable energy and material circulation in our society. Its success requires a drastic improvement in the kinetics of the anodic half-reaction of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which determines the overall system efficiency to a large extent. A simple electrochemical protocol has been developed to activate Ni electrodes, by which a stable NiOOH phase was formed, which could weakly bind to alkali-metal cations. The electrochemically activated (ECA) Ni electrode reached a current of 10 mA at <1.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE) at practical operation temperatures (>75 °C) and a mild pH of ca. 10 with excellent stability (>24 h), greatly surpassing that of the state-of-the-art NiFeOx electrodes under analogous conditions. Water electrolysis was demonstrated with ECA-Ni and NiMo, which required an iR-free overall voltage of only 1.44 V to reach 10 mA cmgeo(-2) .

  7. Removing undesirable color and boosting biological activity in red beet extracts using gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Byung Yeoup [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Chul [Youngdong University, Youngdong (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a traditional and popular vegetable distributed in many part of the world and has been used as a natural colorant in many dairy products, beverages, candies and cattle products. Red beet roots contain two groups of betalain pigments, redviolet betacyanins and yellow betaxanthins. Betalains possess several biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, and anticancer properities. Recent trend of using natural products in industries tends toward multifunctional, high quality, and highpriced value foods and cosmetics. To meet the needs of consumers, cosmetics, medicine, and foods should contain the proper amount of natural products. Although the color removal processes such as filtration and absorption by clay are still useful, these procedures are difficult, time-consuming and costly. To overcome this problem, the radiation technology has emerged as a new way. Radiation technology has been applied to the decomposition and decoloration of pigment and is an efficient technique for inactivating pathogens, removing undesirable color in biomaterial extracts and improving or maintaining biological activities. Gamma-irradiation and electron beamirradiation techniques in previous reports were applied in order to remove any undesirable color and to improve or maintain biological activities of various extracts such as green tea leaves, licorice root, and S. chinensis fruits. Latorre et al. reported that betacyanin concentration decreased with the irradiation dose and significantly, in 35%, after 2.0 kGy of gamma-ray, whereas betaxathin concentration increased (about 11%-ratio with respect to control) after 1 kGy but decreased (about 19%) after 2 kGy. However, they did not try to analysis for completed removal of red beet pigments. Therefore, it is necessary to find the optimum irradiation dose for entirely removing red pigments in red beet. The aim of this work was to address the effects of the color removal and

  8. Removing undesirable color and boosting biological activity in red beet extracts using gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, In Chul

    2011-01-01

    Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is a traditional and popular vegetable distributed in many part of the world and has been used as a natural colorant in many dairy products, beverages, candies and cattle products. Red beet roots contain two groups of betalain pigments, redviolet betacyanins and yellow betaxanthins. Betalains possess several biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, and anticancer properities. Recent trend of using natural products in industries tends toward multifunctional, high quality, and highpriced value foods and cosmetics. To meet the needs of consumers, cosmetics, medicine, and foods should contain the proper amount of natural products. Although the color removal processes such as filtration and absorption by clay are still useful, these procedures are difficult, time-consuming and costly. To overcome this problem, the radiation technology has emerged as a new way. Radiation technology has been applied to the decomposition and decoloration of pigment and is an efficient technique for inactivating pathogens, removing undesirable color in biomaterial extracts and improving or maintaining biological activities. Gamma-irradiation and electron beamirradiation techniques in previous reports were applied in order to remove any undesirable color and to improve or maintain biological activities of various extracts such as green tea leaves, licorice root, and S. chinensis fruits. Latorre et al. reported that betacyanin concentration decreased with the irradiation dose and significantly, in 35%, after 2.0 kGy of gamma-ray, whereas betaxathin concentration increased (about 11%-ratio with respect to control) after 1 kGy but decreased (about 19%) after 2 kGy. However, they did not try to analysis for completed removal of red beet pigments. Therefore, it is necessary to find the optimum irradiation dose for entirely removing red pigments in red beet. The aim of this work was to address the effects of the color removal and

  9. Boosting lithium storage in covalent organic framework via activation of 14-electron redox chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhendong; Yang, Qinsi; Xu, Yi; Guo, Siyu; Sun, Weiwei; Liu, Hao; Lv, Li-Ping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Yong

    2018-02-08

    Conjugated polymeric molecules have been heralded as promising electrode materials for the next-generation energy-storage technologies owing to their chemical flexibility at the molecular level, environmental benefit, and cost advantage. However, before any practical implementation takes place, the low capacity, poor structural stability, and sluggish ion/electron diffusion kinetics remain the obstacles that have to be overcome. Here, we report the synthesis of a few-layered two-dimensional covalent organic framework trapped by carbon nanotubes as the anode of lithium-ion batteries. Remarkably, upon activation, this organic electrode delivers a large reversible capacity of 1536 mAh g -1 and can sustain 500 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Aided by theoretical calculations and electrochemical probing of the electrochemical behavior at different stages of cycling, the storage mechanism is revealed to be governed by 14-electron redox chemistry for a covalent organic framework monomer with one lithium ion per C=N group and six lithium ions per benzene ring. This work may pave the way to the development of high-capacity electrodes for organic rechargeable batteries.

  10. Boosting foundations and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Schapire, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Boosting is an approach to machine learning based on the idea of creating a highly accurate predictor by combining many weak and inaccurate "rules of thumb." A remarkably rich theory has evolved around boosting, with connections to a range of topics, including statistics, game theory, convex optimization, and information geometry. Boosting algorithms have also enjoyed practical success in such fields as biology, vision, and speech processing. At various times in its history, boosting has been perceived as mysterious, controversial, even paradoxical.

  11. A viral vectored prime-boost immunization regime targeting the malaria Pfs25 antigen induces transmission-blocking activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Goodman

    Full Text Available The ookinete surface protein Pfs25 is a macrogamete-to-ookinete/ookinete stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, capable of exerting high-level anti-malarial transmission-blocking activity following immunization with recombinant protein-in-adjuvant formulations. Here, this antigen was expressed in recombinant chimpanzee adenovirus 63 (ChAd63, human adenovirus serotype 5 (AdHu5 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA viral vectored vaccines. Two immunizations were administered to mice in a heterologous prime-boost regime. Immunization of mice with AdHu5 Pfs25 at week 0 and MVA Pfs25 at week 10 (Ad-MVA Pfs25 resulted in high anti-Pfs25 IgG titers, consisting of predominantly isotypes IgG1 and IgG2a. A single priming immunization with ChAd63 Pfs25 was as effective as AdHu5 Pfs25 with respect to ELISA titers at 8 weeks post-immunization. Sera from Ad-MVA Pfs25 immunized mice inhibited the transmission of P. falciparum to the mosquito both ex vivo and in vivo. In a standard membrane-feeding assay using NF54 strain P. falciparum, oocyst intensity in Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes was significantly reduced in an IgG concentration-dependent manner when compared to control feeds (96% reduction of intensity, 78% reduction in prevalence at a 1 in 5 dilution of sera. In addition, an in vivo transmission-blocking effect was also demonstrated by direct feeding of immunized mice infected with Pfs25DR3, a chimeric P. berghei line expressing Pfs25 in place of endogenous Pbs25. In this assay the density of Pfs25DR3 oocysts was significantly reduced when mosquitoes were fed on vaccinated as compared to control mice (67% reduction of intensity, 28% reduction in prevalence and specific IgG titer correlated with efficacy. These data confirm the utility of the adenovirus-MVA vaccine platform for the induction of antibodies with transmission-blocking activity, and support the continued development of this alternative approach to transmission-blocking malaria subunit

  12. Cholinergic markers in elderly patients with early signs of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K L; Mohs, R C; Marin, D; Purohit, D P; Perl, D P; Lantz, M; Austin, G; Haroutunian, V

    1999-04-21

    A central tenet of Alzheimer disease (AD) is the loss of cortical cholinergic function and cholinergic markers in postmortem brain specimens. Whether these profound deficits in cholinergic markers found in end-stage patients are also found in patients with much earlier disease is not known. To determine whether cholinergic deficits in AD precede, follow, or occur in synchrony with the earliest signs of cognitive deterioration. Postmortem study of nursing home residents with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale scores of 0.0 to 2.0 and 4.0 to 5.0 who underwent autopsy between 1986 and 1997, comparing the activity of the cholinergic marker enzymes in the cortices of 66 elderly subjects with no (CDR score = 0.0; n = 18), questionable (CDR score = 0.5; n = 11), mild (CDR score = 1.0; n = 22), or moderate (CDR score = 2.0; n = 15) dementia vs subjects with severe dementia (CDR score = 4.0-5.0; n = 15). Activity of the cholinergic marker enzymes choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase in 9 neocortical brain regions. The activity of choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase in 9 neocortical brain regions did not differ significantly in subjects with CDR scores of 0.0 to 2.0, but was significantly lower in subjects with severe dementia (CDR score = 4.0-5.0). Choline acetyltransferase levels were significantly correlated with severity of neuropathological lesions of AD, as measured by density of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Although neocortical cholinergic deficits are characteristic of severely demented AD patients, in this study, cholinergic deficits were not apparent in individuals with mild AD and were not present until relatively late in the course of the disease. These results suggest that patients with more severe disease should be a target for cholinergic treatment.

  13. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research. PMID:25107282

  14. TLR1/2 activation during heterologous prime-boost vaccination (DNA-MVA enhances CD8+ T Cell responses providing protection against Leishmania (Viannia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Jayakumar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania (Viannia parasites present particular challenges, as human and murine immune responses to infection are distinct from other Leishmania species, indicating a unique interaction with the host. Further, vaccination studies utilizing small animal models indicate that modalities and antigens that prevent infection by other Leishmania species are generally not protective.Using a newly developed mouse model of chronic L. (Viannia panamensis infection and the heterologous DNA prime - modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA boost vaccination modality, we examined whether the conserved vaccine candidate antigen tryparedoxin peroxidase (TRYP could provide protection against infection/disease.Heterologous prime - boost (DNA/MVA vaccination utilizing TRYP antigen can provide protection against disease caused by L. (V. panamensis. However, protection is dependent on modulating the innate immune response using the TLR1/2 agonist Pam3CSK4 during DNA priming. Prime-boost vaccination using DNA alone fails to protect. Prior to infection protectively vaccinated mice exhibit augmented CD4 and CD8 IFNγ and memory responses as well as decreased IL-10 and IL-13 responses. IL-13 and IL-10 have been shown to be independently critical for disease in this model. CD8 T cells have an essential role in mediating host defense, as CD8 depletion reversed protection in the vaccinated mice; vaccinated mice depleted of CD4 T cells remained protected. Hence, vaccine-induced protection is dependent upon TLR1/2 activation instructing the generation of antigen specific CD8 cells and restricting IL-13 and IL-10 responses.Given the general effectiveness of prime-boost vaccination, the recalcitrance of Leishmania (Viannia to vaccine approaches effective against other species of Leishmania is again evident. However, prime-boost vaccination modality can with modulation induce protective responses, indicating that the delivery system is critical. Moreover, these results suggest that

  15. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T.; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K+ (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K+ current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30–50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30–50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASKf/f mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity

  16. TASK Channels on Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Modulate Electrocortical Signatures of Arousal by Histamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Michael T; Du, Guizhi; Bayliss, Douglas A; Horner, Richard L

    2015-10-07

    Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons are the main source of cortical acetylcholine, and their activation by histamine elicits cortical arousal. TWIK-like acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels modulate neuronal excitability and are expressed on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, but the role of TASK channels in the histamine-basal forebrain cholinergic arousal circuit is unknown. We first expressed TASK channel subunits and histamine Type 1 receptors in HEK cells. Application of histamine in vitro inhibited the acid-sensitive K(+) current, indicating a functionally coupled signaling mechanism. We then studied the role of TASK channels in modulating electrocortical activity in vivo using freely behaving wild-type (n = 12) and ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice (n = 12), the latter lacking TASK-1/3 channels on cholinergic neurons. TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly altered endogenous electroencephalogram oscillations in multiple frequency bands. We then identified the effect of TASK channel deletion during microperfusion of histamine into the basal forebrain. In non-rapid eye movement sleep, TASK channel deletion on cholinergic neurons significantly attenuated the histamine-induced increase in 30-50 Hz activity, consistent with TASK channels contributing to histamine action on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. In contrast, during active wakefulness, histamine significantly increased 30-50 Hz activity in ChAT-Cre:TASK(f/f) mice but not wild-type mice, showing that the histamine response depended upon the prevailing cortical arousal state. In summary, we identify TASK channel modulation in response to histamine receptor activation in vitro, as well as a role of TASK channels on cholinergic neurons in modulating endogenous oscillations in the electroencephalogram and the electrocortical response to histamine at the basal forebrain in vivo. Attentive states and cognitive function are associated with the generation of γ EEG activity. Basal forebrain

  17. [Establishing indicators for diagnosis of cholinergic crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyone, Kazuko; Shimatani, Yoshimi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Nagao, Takehiko; Fujita, Yoshika; Uesugi, Masayoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cholinergic crisis is an adverse effect of an anticholinesterase agent, which is one of the cholinergic agents. Cholinergic crisis may induce serious conditions such as breathing difficulties. Cholinergic crisis is often diagnosed by an abnormally low level of serum cholinesterase (ChE). However, ChE value is not an appropriate indicator of cholinergic crisis since it has a high inter-individual variation, even though its intra-individual variation is low. Therefore, an indicator with less inter-individual variation capable of preventing the risk of cholinergic crisis was investigated. The results of correlation test between ChE and serum albumin (Alb) showed a strong positive correlation; r = 0.778 in BCG method(Bromo cresol green method) and r = 0.766 in the BCP-improved method for Alb. In addition, the variations of Alb values are much lower than the drastic depression of ChE values in cholinergic crisis. Thus, it is considered that the ratio of ChE and Alb (ChE/Alb) can be a useful indicator of cholinergic crisis. As a result of ROC (Receiver operating characteristic) analysis, the ratios of ChE and Alb values using the BCG method (ChE/Alb (BCG)) were 20.7, 87.0, 156.8 for the Cutoff value, Likelihood ratio and Odds ratio respectively. When using the BCP-improved method for Alb, the ratios of ChE and Alb (ChE/Alb(BCP improved)) were 25.0, 93.7, 180.1 for the Cutoff value, Likelihood ratio and Odds ratio respectively. The ChE/Alb ratio appears to be an excellent indicator of cholinergic crisis diagnosis since it shows a high likelihood ratio as well as a high odds ratio.

  18. Optimizing cholinergic tone through lynx modulators of nicotinic receptors: implications for plasticity and nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Julie M; Lester, Henry A; Walz, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The cholinergic system underlies both adaptive (learning and memory) and nonadaptive (addiction and dependency) behavioral changes through its ability to shape and regulate plasticity. Protein modulators such as lynx family members can fine tune the activity of the cholinergic system and contribute to the graded response of the cholinergic system, stabilizing neural circuitry through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Release of this molecular brake can unmask cholinergic-dependent mechanisms in the brain. Lynx proteins have the potential to provide top-down control over plasticity mechanisms, including addictive propensity. If this is indeed the case, then, what regulates the regulator? Transcriptional changes of lynx genes in response to pharmacological, physiological, and pathological alterations are explored in this review.

  19. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ''k 3'' as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer's disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson's disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  20. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ``k 3`` as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  1. Learning Boost C++ libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    If you are a C++ programmer who has never used Boost libraries before, this book will get you up-to-speed with using them. Whether you are developing new C++ software or maintaining existing code written using Boost libraries, this hands-on introduction will help you decide on the right library and techniques to solve your practical programming problems.

  2. Evaluating the evidence surrounding pontine cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Grace

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid eye movement (REM sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of rapid eye movement (REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the ‘pontine REM sleep generator’ by cholinergic inputs. Here we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PFT is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv Cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  3. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  4. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  5. Role of cholinergic receptors in melanophore responses of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A S; Peter, J; Ali, S A

    1995-01-01

    Responses of isolated skin melanophores of Rana tigerina and Bufo melanostictus to cholinergic drugs were studied using the Mean Melanophore Size Index assay to explore the nature and role of cellular receptors in melanophore regulation activity. Acetylcholine (Ach) in a concentration of 10(-7) to 6.4 x 10(-6) g/ml caused dispersion of the skin melanophores of R. tigerina and B. melanostictus. These effects were blocked by both atropine and hyoscine in a concentration of 8 x 10(-6) g/ml each. Eserine augmented the melanophore dispersal effects of Ach. This potentiation of the dispersal effect of Ach by eserine was also antagonised by hyoscine. Carbachol another specific cholinergic agonist significantly caused dispersion of the melanophores of both the amphibian species. The effects were also blocked by atropine and hyoscine. These data indicate that cholinergic receptors of muscarinic type are present on the melanophores of R. tigerina and B. melanostictus which mediate dispersion of integumental melanophores leading to darkening of the skin.

  6. Deep Incremental Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosca, Alan; Magoulas, George D

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces Deep Incremental Boosting, a new technique derived from AdaBoost, specifically adapted to work with Deep Learning methods, that reduces the required training time and improves generalisation. We draw inspiration from Transfer of Learning approaches to reduce the start-up time to training each incremental Ensemble member. We show a set of experiments that outlines some preliminary results on some common Deep Learning datasets and discuss the potential improvements Deep In...

  7. Cholinergic transmission in cat parasympathetic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, J P; Griffith, W H; Shinnick-Gallagher, P

    1982-11-01

    1. Intracellular electrical recording techniques were used to study the ionic mechanisms of cholinergic synaptic transmission in cat vesical pelvic ganglia (v.p.g.). 2. Orthodromic nerve stimulation as well as ionophoretic application of acetylcholine (ACh) resulted in, first, a fast excitatory post-synaptic potential (f.e.p.s.p.) and secondly, a slow inhibitory post-synaptic potential (s.i.p.s.p). These distinct post-synaptic responses were direct actions of ACh and not mediated through an interneurone. In addition, a slow excitatory post-synaptic potential (s.e.p.s.p.) was observed in 44% of the cells. 3. The f.e.p.s.p., mediated via nicotinic receptors, had a reversal potential of -10 mV and resembled the conventional rapid depolarization in other ganglia. The s.i.p.s.p., mediated by muscarinic receptors, had a reversal potential of about -100 mV and resulted from an increase in potassium conductance. 4. The slow muscarinic hyperpolarization could be observed in the absence of antagonists and it was elicited at stimulus frequencies in the physiological range (2-10 Hz). the s.i.p.s.p. induced orthodromically or ionophoretically inhibited firing in spontaneously active neurones. These observations suggest that the muscarinic hyperpolarization may occur under physiological conditions and has sufficient magnitude to be inhibitory to neuronal activity.

  8. Asynchronous Cholinergic Drive Correlates with Excitation-Inhibition Imbalance via a Neuronal Ca2+ Sensor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Zhou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-inhibition imbalance in neural networks is widely linked to neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, how genetic factors alter neuronal activity, leading to excitation-inhibition imbalance, remains unclear. Here, using the C. elegans locomotor circuit, we examine how altering neuronal activity for varying time periods affects synaptic release pattern and animal behavior. We show that while short-duration activation of excitatory cholinergic neurons elicits a reversible enhancement of presynaptic strength, persistent activation results to asynchronous and reduced cholinergic drive, inducing imbalance between endogenous excitation and inhibition. We find that the neuronal calcium sensor protein NCS-2 is required for asynchronous cholinergic release in an activity-dependent manner and dampens excitability of inhibitory neurons non-cell autonomously. The function of NCS-2 requires its Ca2+ binding and membrane association domains. These results reveal a synaptic mechanism implicating asynchronous release in regulation of excitation-inhibition balance.

  9. ATLAS Boosted Objects tagging performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira de Lima, D E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    In the session on the performance of jet substructure reconstruction and boosted object tagging. This first contribution focuses on boosted object tagging performance. Material includes the shower deconstruction CONF note (missed BOOST2013, public), the Boosted boson tagging note (ATL-PHYS-PUB-2014-004, public since April). New papers on W/Z dsicrimination or top tagging are unlikely.

  10. Cholinergic Hypofunction in Presbycusis-Related Tinnitus With Cognitive Function Impairment: Emerging Hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwei Ruan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss is a potential risk factor for tinnitus and cognitive deterioration, which result in poor life quality. Presbycusis-related tinnitus with cognitive impairment is a common phenotype in the elderly population. In these individuals, the central auditory system shows similar pathophysiological alterations as those observed in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, including cholinergic hypofunction, epileptiform-like network synchronization, chronic inflammation, and reduced GABAergic inhibition and neural plasticity. Observations from experimental rodent models indicate that recovery of cholinergic function can improve memory and other cognitive functions via acetylcholine-mediated GABAergic inhibition enhancement, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation, glial activation inhibition and neurovascular protection. The loss of cholinergic innervation of various brain structures may provide a common link between tinnitus seen in presbycusis-related tinnitus and age-related cognitive impairment. We hypothesize a key component of the condition is the withdrawal of cholinergic input to a subtype of GABAergic inhibitory interneuron, neuropeptide Y (NPY neurogliaform cells. Cholinergic denervation might not only cause the degeneration of NPY neurogliaform cells, but may also result in decreased AChR activation in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. This, in turn, would lead to reduced GABA release and inhibitory regulation of neural networks. Reduced nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation due to the loss of nicotinic innervation might lead to the transformation of glial cells and release of inflammatory mediators, lowering the buffering of extracellular potassium and glutamate metabolism. Further research will provide evidence for the recovery of cholinergic function with the use of cholinergic input enhancement alone or in combination with other rehabilitative interventions to reestablish inhibitory regulation

  11. Cholinergic Hypofunction in Presbycusis-Related Tinnitus With Cognitive Function Impairment: Emerging Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qingwei; Yu, Zhuowei; Zhang, Weibin; Ruan, Jian; Liu, Chunhui; Zhang, Ruxin

    2018-01-01

    Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a potential risk factor for tinnitus and cognitive deterioration, which result in poor life quality. Presbycusis-related tinnitus with cognitive impairment is a common phenotype in the elderly population. In these individuals, the central auditory system shows similar pathophysiological alterations as those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including cholinergic hypofunction, epileptiform-like network synchronization, chronic inflammation, and reduced GABAergic inhibition and neural plasticity. Observations from experimental rodent models indicate that recovery of cholinergic function can improve memory and other cognitive functions via acetylcholine-mediated GABAergic inhibition enhancement, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated anti-inflammation, glial activation inhibition and neurovascular protection. The loss of cholinergic innervation of various brain structures may provide a common link between tinnitus seen in presbycusis-related tinnitus and age-related cognitive impairment. We hypothesize a key component of the condition is the withdrawal of cholinergic input to a subtype of GABAergic inhibitory interneuron, neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurogliaform cells. Cholinergic denervation might not only cause the degeneration of NPY neurogliaform cells, but may also result in decreased AChR activation in GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. This, in turn, would lead to reduced GABA release and inhibitory regulation of neural networks. Reduced nAChR-mediated anti-inflammation due to the loss of nicotinic innervation might lead to the transformation of glial cells and release of inflammatory mediators, lowering the buffering of extracellular potassium and glutamate metabolism. Further research will provide evidence for the recovery of cholinergic function with the use of cholinergic input enhancement alone or in combination with other rehabilitative interventions to reestablish inhibitory regulation mechanisms of

  12. Cholinergic markers in the cortex and hippocampus of some animal species and their correlation to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta-Salazar, E; Cuellar-Lemus, C A; Díaz-Cintra, S; Feria-Velasco, A I

    2014-10-01

    The cholinergic system includes neurons located in the basal forebrain and their long axons that reach the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus. This system modulates cognitive function. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and ageing, cognitive impairment is associated with progressive damage to cholinergic fibres, which leads us to the cholinergic hypothesis for AD. The AD produces alterations in the expression and activity of acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetyl cholinesterase (AChE), enzymes specifically related to cholinergic system function. Both proteins play a role in cholinergic transmission, which is altered in both the cerebral cortex and the hippocampus due to ageing and AD. Dementia disorders are associated with the severe destruction and disorganisation of the cholinergic projections extending to both structures. Specific markers, such as anti-ChAT and anti-AChE antibodies, have been used in light immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy assays to study this system in adult members of certain animal species. This paper reviews the main immunomorphological studies of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus in some animal species with particular emphasis on the cholinergic system and its relationship with the AD. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Cholinergic Modulation of Type 2 Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goele Bosmans

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the bidirectional relationship between the nervous and immune system has become increasingly clear, and its role in both homeostasis and inflammation has been well documented over the years. Since the introduction of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, there has been an increased interest in parasympathetic regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses, including T helper 2 responses. Increasing evidence has been emerging suggesting a role for the parasympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology of allergic diseases, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, food allergy, and atopic dermatitis. In this review, we will highlight the role of cholinergic modulation by both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in several key aspects of the allergic inflammatory response, including barrier function, innate and adaptive immune responses, and effector cells responses. A better understanding of these cholinergic processes mediating key aspects of type 2 immune disorders might lead to novel therapeutic approaches to treat allergic diseases.

  14. Illuminating the role of cholinergic signaling in circuits of attention and emotionally salient behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eLuchicchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh signaling underlies specific aspects of cognitive functions and behaviors, including attention, learning, memory and motivation. Alterations in ACh signaling are involved in the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders. In the central nervous system, ACh transmission is mainly guaranteed by dense innervation of select cortical and subcortical regions from disperse groups of cholinergic neurons within the basal forebrain (e.g. diagonal band, medial septal, nucleus basalis and the pontine-mesencephalic nuclei, respectively. Despite the fundamental role of cholinergic signaling in the CNS and the long standing knowledge of the organization of cholinergic circuitry, remarkably little is known about precisely how ACh release modulates cortical and subcortical neural activity and the behaviors these circuits subserve. Growing interest in cholinergic signaling in the CNS focuses on the mechanism(s of action by which endogenously released ACh regulates cognitive functions, acting as a neuromodulator and /or as a direct transmitter via nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. The development of optogenetic techniques has provided a valuable toolbox with which we can address these questions, as it allows the selective manipulation of the excitability of cholinergic inputs to the diverse array of cholinergic target fields within cortical and subcortical domains. Here, we review recent papers that use the light-sensitive opsins in the cholinergic system to elucidate the role of ACh in circuits related to attention and emotionally salient behaviors. In particular, we highlight recent optogenetic studies which have tried to disentangle the precise role of ACh in the modulation of cortical-, hippocampal- and striatal-dependent functions.

  15. Neuroinflammation not associated with cholinergic degeneration in aged-impaired brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuail, Joseph A; Riddle, David R; Nicolle, Michelle M

    2011-12-01

    Degeneration of the cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and elevation of inflammatory markers are well-established hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease; however, the interplay of these processes in normal aging is not extensively studied. Consequently, we conducted a neuroanatomical investigation to quantify cholinergic neurons and activated microglia in the medial septum/vertical diagonal band (MS/VDB) of young (6 months) and aged (28 months) Fisher 344 × Brown Norway F(1) rats. Aged rats in this study were impaired relative to the young animals in spatial learning ability as assessed in the Morris water maze. Stereological analysis revealed no difference between aged and young rats in the total numbers of cholinergic neurons, demonstrating that loss of cholinergic neurons is not a necessary condition to observe impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In this same region, the total number of activated microglia was substantially greater in aged rats relative to young rats. Jointly, these data demonstrate that aging is characterized by an increase in the basal inflammatory state within the MS/VDB, but this inflammation is not associated with cholinergic neuron death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cognitive performance as a zeitgeber: cognitive oscillators and cholinergic modulation of the SCN entrain circadian rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard J Gritton

    Full Text Available The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals that can synchronize or entrain to environmental cues. Although light exerts powerful influences on SCN output, other non-photic stimuli can modulate the SCN as well. We recently demonstrated that daily performance of a cognitive task requiring sustained periods of attentional effort that relies upon basal forebrain (BF cholinergic activity dramatically alters circadian rhythms in rats. In particular, normally nocturnal rats adopt a robust diurnal activity pattern that persists for several days in the absence of cognitive training. Although anatomical and pharmacological data from non-performing animals support a relationship between cholinergic signaling and circadian rhythms, little is known about how endogenous cholinergic signaling influences SCN function in behaving animals. Here we report that BF cholinergic projections to the SCN provide the principal signal allowing for the expression of cognitive entrainment in light-phase trained animals. We also reveal that oscillator(s outside of the SCN drive cognitive entrainment as daily timed cognitive training robustly entrains SCN-lesioned arrhythmic animals. Ablation of the SCN, however, resulted in significant impairments in task acquisition, indicating that SCN-mediated timekeeping benefits new learning and cognitive performance. Taken together, we conclude that cognition entrains non-photic oscillators, and cholinergic signaling to the SCN serves as a temporal timestamp attenuating SCN photic-driven rhythms, thereby permitting cognitive demands to modulate behavior.

  17. A self-sacrifice template route to iodine modified BiOIO3: band gap engineering and highly boosted visible-light active photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jingwen; Huang, Hongwei; Yu, Shixin; Dong, Fan; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-03-21

    The development of high-performance visible-light photocatalysts with a tunable band gap has great significance for enabling wide-band-gap (WBG) semiconductors visible-light sensitive activity and precisely tailoring their optical properties and photocatalytic performance. In this work we demonstrate the continuously adjustable band gap and visible-light photocatalysis activation of WBG BiOIO3via iodine surface modification. The iodine modified BiOIO3 was developed through a facile in situ reduction route by applying BiOIO3 as the self-sacrifice template and glucose as the reducing agent. By manipulating the glucose concentration, the band gap of the as-prepared modified BiOIO3 could be orderly narrowed by generation of the impurity or defect energy level close to the conduction band, thus endowing it with a visible light activity. The photocatalytic assessments uncovered that, in contrast to pristine BiOIO3, the modified BiOIO3 presents significantly boosted photocatalytic properties for the degradation of both liquid and gaseous contaminants, including Rhodamine B (RhB), methyl orange (MO), and ppb-level NO under visible light. Additionally, the band structure evolution as well as photocatalysis mechanism triggered by the iodine surface modification is investigated in detail. This study not only provides a novel iodine surface-modified BiOIO3 for environmental application, but also provides a facile and general way to develop highly efficient visible-light photocatalysts.

  18. A reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Lansdell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs, whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability.

  19. Internal cholinergic regulation of learning and recall in a model of olfactory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licurgo Benemann Almeida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the olfactory system, cholinergic modulation has been associated with contrast modulation and changes in receptive fields in the olfactory bulb, as well the learning of odor associations in olfactory cortex. Computational modeling and behavioral studies suggest that cholinergic modulation could improve sensory processing and learning while preventing pro-active interference when task demands are high. However, how sensory inputs and/or learning regulate incoming modulation has not yet been elucidated. We here use a computational model of the olfactory bulb, piriform cortex (PC and horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB to explore how olfactory learning could regulate cholinergic inputs to the system in a closed feedback loop. In our model, the novelty of an odor is reflected in firing rates and sparseness of cortical neurons in response to that odor and these firing rates can directly regulate learning in the system by modifying cholinergic inputs to the system. In the model, cholinergic neurons reduce their firing in response to familiar odors – reducing plasticity in the PC, but increase their firing in response to novel odor – increasing PC plasticity. Recordings from HDB neurons in awake behaving rats reflect predictions from the model by showing that a subset of neurons decrease their firing as an odor becomes familiar.

  20. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedia Fgaier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD.

  1. severe organophosphate poisoning with delayed cholinergic crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-01-06

    Jan 6, 2011 ... In the. Neuromuscular Junction Acetylcholine is released when a nerve impulse reaches terminal axonal end and it diffuses across the Synaptic Cleft and binds to Cholinergic Nicotinic receptors on the muscle fibers, causing them to contract. The enzyme,. Cholinesterase splits Acetylcholine into Acetic.

  2. Cholinergic Modulation of Restraint Stress Induced Neurobehavioral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The involvement of the cholinergic system in restraint stress induced neurobehavioral alterations was investigated in rodents using the hole board, elevated plus maze, the open field and the light and dark box tests. Restraint stress (3h) reduced significantly (p<0.05) the number of entries and time spent in the open arm, ...

  3. Contribution of muscarinic M1 receptors to the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer II of the entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Shawnna G; Chapman, C Andrew

    2013-10-25

    The entorhinal cortex is thought to play roles in sensory and mnemonic function, and the cholinergic suppression of the strength of synaptic inputs is likely to have important impacts on these processes. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the medial entorhinal cortex evoked by stimulation of the piriform cortex are suppressed during theta EEG activity in behaving animals, and cholinergic receptor activation suppresses synaptic responses both in vivo, and in layer II entorhinal neurons in vitro. Here, we have used in vitro field potential recordings to investigate the transmitter receptors that mediate the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in layer I inputs to layer II of the medial entorhinal cortex. Bath-application of the cholinergic agonist carbachol suppressed the amplitude of fEPSPs with an EC50 of 5.3μM, and enhanced paired-pulse ratio. The M2/M4 preferring receptor blocker methoctramine, or the M4 receptor blocker PD102807, did not prevent the cholinergic suppression. However, the M1/M4 receptor blocker pirenzepine and the M1 receptor blocker VU0255035 reduced the suppression, suggesting that the cholinergic suppression of synaptic responses in the entorhinal cortex is dependent in large part on activation of M1 receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [ 11 C]MP4A and [ 11 C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [ 123 I]5IA SPECT for the α 4 β 2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [ 123 I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  5. Cholinergic imaging in dementia spectrum disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Roman; Niccolini, Flavia; Pagano, Gennaro; Politis, Marios [Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King' s College London, Neurodegeneration Imaging Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-15

    The multifaceted nature of the pathology of dementia spectrum disorders has complicated their management and the development of effective treatments. This is despite the fact that they are far from uncommon, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) alone affecting 35 million people worldwide. The cholinergic system has been found to be crucially involved in cognitive function, with cholinergic dysfunction playing a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of dementia. The use of molecular imaging such as SPECT and PET for tagging targets within the cholinergic system has shown promise for elucidating key aspects of underlying pathology in dementia spectrum disorders, including AD or parkinsonian dementias. SPECT and PET studies using selective radioligands for cholinergic markers, such as [{sup 11}C]MP4A and [{sup 11}C]PMP PET for acetylcholinesterase (AChE), [{sup 123}I]5IA SPECT for the α{sub 4}β{sub 2} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and [{sup 123}I]IBVM SPECT for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, have been developed in an attempt to clarify those aspects of the diseases that remain unclear. This has led to a variety of findings, such as cortical AChE being significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD), PD with dementia (PDD) and AD, as well as correlating with certain aspects of cognitive function such as attention and working memory. Thalamic AChE is significantly reduced in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and multiple system atrophy, whilst it is not affected in PD. Some of these findings have brought about suggestions for the improvement of clinical practice, such as the use of a thalamic/cortical AChE ratio to differentiate between PD and PSP, two diseases that could overlap in terms of initial clinical presentation. Here, we review the findings from molecular imaging studies that have investigated the role of the cholinergic system in dementia spectrum disorders. (orig.)

  6. Outcomes of different protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anti-cholinergics in women with wet over-active bladder: A 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuri, Joseph; Kafri, Rachel; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Stav, Kobi

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the 4-year outcomes of three protocols of pelvic floor physical therapy and anticholinergic drug in women with wet over-active bladder (OAB). One hundred and sixty-four women were randomly allocated to one of four interventions: drug therapy (DT), bladder training (BT), pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), or combined pelvic floor rehabilitation (CPFR) that includes BT, PFMT, and behavioral advice. The active treatment in each group lasted 3 months. Of the 132 women who completed a 1-year follow-up, 120 women (90%) responded to our questionnaires and therefore were included in this study. Outcome measures were the number of voids per day, number of urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) episodes per week, completely dry rate and Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire (I-QOL) at 4 years. After 4 years of follow-up, the outcome measures improved significantly and equally in all four groups. The median number of UUI episodes/week dropped by 3, 1, 2, and 2 in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). The dry rates were 25%, 31%, 44%, 34% in the DT, BT, PFMT, and CPFR groups, respectively (P = ns). I-QOL scores improved significantly in all four groups. Women who suffer from wet-OAB may experience the same degree of long-term improvement following various pelvic floor physical therapy protocols as they would from drug therapy. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:755-758, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Boosting catalytic activity of metal nanoparticles for 4-nitrophenol reduction: Modification of metal naoparticles with poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Jyun-Guo; Shanmugam, Chandirasekar [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yao-Wen; Yu, Cheng-Ju [Department of Applied Physics and Chemistry, University of Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Lung, E-mail: tsengwl@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China); School of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China); Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The choice of capping ligand determines catalytic activity of metal nanocatalysts. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles electrostatically interact with 4-NP and BH4{sup −}. • PDDA-capped metal nanoparticles have good recyclability and large scalability. • PDDA-capped Pd nanoparticles show the highest rate constant and activity parameter. - Abstract: Most of the previously reported studies have focused on the change in the size, morphology, and composition of metal nanocatalysts for improving their catalytic activity. Herein, we report poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) [PDDA]-stabilized nanoparticles (NPs) of platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) as highly active and efficient catalysts for hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the presence of NaBH4. PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs possessed similar particle size and same facet with citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, making this study to investigate the inter-relationship between catalytic activity and surface ligand without the consideration of the effects of particle size and facet. Compared to citrate-capped Pt and Pd NPs, PDDA-stabilized Pt and Pd NPs exhibited excellent pH and salt stability. PDDA could serve as an electron acceptor for metal NPs to produce the net positive charges on the metal surface, which provide strong electrostatic attraction with negatively charged nitrophenolate and borohydride ions. The activity parameter and rate constant of PDDA-stabilized metal NPs were higher than those of citrate-capped metal NPs. Compared to the previously reported Pd nanomaterials for the catalysis of NaBH4-mediated reduction of 4-NP, PDDA-stabilized Pd NPs exhibited the extremely high activity parameter (195 s{sup −1} g{sup −1}) and provided excellent scalability and reusability.

  8. Neuro-immune interactions via the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallowitsch-Puerta, Margot; Pavlov, Valentin A.

    2010-01-01

    The overproduction of TNF and other cytokines can cause the pathophysiology of numerous diseases. Controlling cytokine synthesis and release is critical for preventing unrestrained inflammation and maintaining health. Recent studies identified an efferent vagus nerve-based mechanism termed “the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” that controls cytokine production and inflammation. Here we review current advances related to the role of this pathway in neuro-immune interactions that prevent excessive inflammation. Experimental evidence indicates that vagus nerve cholinergic anti-inflammatory signaling requires alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on non-neuronal cytokine producing cells. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists inhibit cytokine release and protect animals in a variety of experimental lethal inflammatory models. Knowledge related to the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway can be exploited in therapeutic approaches directed towards counteracting abnormal chronic and hyper-activated inflammatory responses. PMID:17289087

  9. Roundup® exposure promotes gills and liver impairments, DNA damage and inhibition of brain cholinergic activity in the Amazon teleost fish Colossoma macropomum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz-Mota, Susana; Sadauskas-Henrique, Helen; Duarte, Rafael M; Val, Adalberto L; Almeida-Val, Vera M F

    2015-09-01

    Roundup Original® (RD) is a glyphosate-based herbicide used to control weeds in agriculture. Contamination of Amazon waters has increased as a consequence of anthropogenic pressure, including the use of herbicides as RD. The central goal of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of RD on juveniles of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum). Our findings show that biomarkers in tambaqui are organ specific and dependent on RD concentration. Alterations in gills structural and respiratory epithelium were followed by changes in hematological parameters such as concentration of hemoglobin, particularly in fish exposed to the higher concentration tested (75% of RD LC50 96 h). In addition, both RD concentrations affected the biotransformation process in gills of tambaqui negatively. Instead, liver responses suggest that a production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurred in fish exposed to RD, particularly in the animals exposed to 75% RD, as seen by imbalances in biotransformation and antioxidant systems. The increased DNA damage observed in red blood cells of tambaqui exposed to RD is in agreement with this hypothesis. Finally, both tested sub-lethal concentrations of RD markedly inhibited the cholinesterase activity in fish brain. Thus, we can suggest that RD is potentially toxic to tambaqui and possibly to other tropical fish species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leptin Boosts Cellular Metabolism by Activating AMPK and the Sirtuins to Reduce Tau Phosphorylation and β-Amyloid in Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Steven J.; Hamzelou, Ashkan; Johnston, Jane M.; Smith, Mark A.; Ashford, J. Wesson; Tezapsidis, Nikolaos

    2011-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone primarily secreted by adipocytes. A high density of functional Leptin receptors has been reported to be expressed in the hippocampus and other cortical regions of the brain, the physiological significance of which has not been explored extensively. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is marked by impaired brain metabolism with decreased glucose utilization in those regions which often precede pathological changes. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that plasma Leptin is protective against AD. Specifically, elderly with plasma Leptin levels in the lowest quartile were found to be four times more likely to develop AD than those in the highest quartile. We have previously reported that Leptin modulates AD pathological pathways in vitro through a mechanism involving the energy sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). To this end, we investigated the extent to which activation of AMPK as well as another class of sensors linking energy availability to cellular metabolism, the sirtuins (SIRT), mediate Leptin’s biological activity. Leptin directly activated neuronal AMPK and SIRT in cell lines. Additionally, the ability of Leptin to reduce tau phosphorylation and β-amyloid production was sensitive to the AMPK and sirtuin inhibitors, compound C and nicotinamide, respectively. These findings implicate that Leptin normally acts as a signal for energy homeostasis in neurons. Perhaps Leptin deficiency in AD contributes to a neuronal imbalance in handling energy requirements, leading to higher Aβ and phospho-tau, which can be restored by replenishing low Leptin levels. This may also be a legitimate strategy for therapy. PMID:21945934

  11. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Vinstrup

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors.

  12. Powerful partnering: engaging the best to do the most in courting new realms to boost physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Maria Dennison

    2011-09-01

    The central thesis of the commentary is that expanding engagement between the public and private sector, especially in the area of physical activity, is needed and important. Powerful partnering offers the perspective that business is reframing its priorities, moving from short-term gain to long-term sustainability; and that business leaders are regarding the term 'survival of the fittest' not in terms of who is the most competitive and strongest, but who is the most collaborative and adaptable. The commentary stakes a position that global problems in the 21(st) century need both a left and right brain approach, where leadership and the worldview must be connected and collaborative rather than sharply delineated and disconnected. Through a series of examples, the commentary seeks to share how and why business is currently involved in physical activity partnering; and approaches and guidelines public health can consider to build the collaboration bridge.

  13. Stress during puberty boosts metabolic activation associated with fear-extinction learning in hippocampus, basal amygdala and cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; Pitiot, Alain; Paus, Tomáš; Sandi, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by major developmental changes that may render the individual vulnerable to stress and the development of psychopathologies in a sex-specific manner. Earlier we reported lower anxiety-like behavior and higher risk-taking and novelty seeking in rats previously exposed to peri-pubertal stress. Here we studied whether peri-pubertal stress affected the acquisition and extinction of fear memories and/or the associated functional engagement of various brain regions, as assessed with 2-deoxyglucose. We showed that while peri-pubertal stress reduced freezing during the acquisition of fear memories (training) in both sexes, it had a sex-specific effect on extinction of these memories. Moreover hippocampus, basal amygdala and cingulate and motor cortices showed higher metabolic rates during extinction in rats exposed to peri-pubertal stress. Interestingly, activation of the infralimbic cortex was negatively correlated with freezing during extinction only in control males, while only males stressed during puberty showed a significant correlation between behavior during extinction and metabolic activation of hippocampus, amygdala and paraventricular nucleus. No correlations between brain activation and behavior during extinction were observed in females (control or stress). These results indicate that exposure to peri-pubertal stress affects behavior and brain metabolism when the individual is exposed to an additional stressful challenge. Some of these effects are sex-specific. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced activity of nitrate reductase and aldehyde oxidase, and boosted mosaic virus resistance in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhou

    Full Text Available Molybdenum cofactor (Moco is required for the activities of Moco-dependant enzymes. Cofactor for nitrate reductase and xanthine dehydrogenase (Cnx1 is known to be involved in the biosynthesis of Moco in plants. In this work, a soybean (Glycine max L. Cnx1 gene (GmCnx1 was transferred into soybean using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. Twenty seven positive transgenic soybean plants were identified by coating leaves with phosphinothricin, bar protein quick dip stick and PCR analysis. Moreover, Southern blot analysis was carried out to confirm the insertion of GmCnx1 gene. Furthermore, expression of GmCnx1 gene in leaf and root of all transgenic lines increased 1.04-2.12 and 1.55-3.89 folds, respectively, as compared to wild type with GmCnx1 gene and in line 10 , 22 showing the highest expression. The activities of Moco-related enzymes viz nitrate reductase (NR and aldehydeoxidase (AO of T1 generation plants revealed that the best line among the GmCnx1 transgenic plants accumulated 4.25 μg g(-1 h(-1 and 30 pmol L(-1, respectively (approximately 2.6-fold and 3.9-fold higher than non-transgenic control plants.In addition, overexpression ofGmCnx1boosted the resistance to various strains of soybean mosaic virus (SMV. DAS-ELISA analysis further revealed that infection rate of GmCnx1 transgenic plants were generally lower than those of non-transgenic plants among two different virus strains tested. Taken together, this study showed that overexpression of a GmCnx1 gene enhanced NR and AO activities and SMV resistance, suggesting its important role in soybean genetic improvement.

  15. The combination of IL-21 and IFN-alpha boosts STAT3 activation, cytotoxicity and experimental tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Karsten W; Søndergaard, Henrik; Woetmann, Anders

    2008-01-01

    such as IFN-alpha and IL-2 have multiple and severe side effects. Accordingly, they are generally used at sub-optimal doses, which limit their clinical efficacy. Here we hypothesized that a combination of IFN-alpha and IL-21, a novel cytokine of the IL-2 family with anti-cancer effects, will increase the anti......-cancer efficacy at sub-optimal cytokine doses. We show that the combined stimulation of target-cells with IFN-alpha and IL-21 triggers an increased STAT3 activation whereas the activation of other STATs including STAT1/2 is unaffected. In parallel, the combined stimulation with IFN-alpha and IL-21 triggers...... a selective increase in MHC class I expression and NK- and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In an experimental in vivo model of renal carcinoma, the combined treatment of IFN-alpha and IL-21 also produces a significant anti-cancer effect as judged by an inhibition of tumor growth and an increased survival...

  16. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  17. Expression of the cholinergic signal-transduction pathway components during embryonic rat heart development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, D.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is present in the downstream (arterial) part of the embryonic chick and rat heart, but its functional significance was unclear. To establish whether other components of a cholinergic signal-transduction pathway are present

  18. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  19. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. The Alpha-Tocopherol Form of Vitamin E Boosts Elastase Activity of Human PMNs and Their Ability to Kill Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa N. Bou Ghanem

    2017-05-01

    with increased activity of neutrophil elastase, a serine protease that is required to kill pneumococci. Notably, incubation with α-Toc increased PMN elastase activity from young donors and boosted their ability to kill complement-opsonized pneumococci. These findings demonstrate that α-Toc is a potent modulator of PMN responses and is a potential nutritional intervention to combat pneumococcal infection.

  1. Distribution-Specific Agnostic Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Vitaly

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of boosting the accuracy of weak learning algorithms in the agnostic learning framework of Haussler (1992) and Kearns et al. (1992). Known algorithms for this problem (Ben-David et al., 2001; Gavinsky, 2002; Kalai et al., 2008) follow the same strategy as boosting algorithms in the PAC model: the weak learner is executed on the same target function but over different distributions on the domain. We demonstrate boosting algorithms for the agnostic learning framework tha...

  2. Keap1 silencing boosts lipopolysaccharide-induced transcription of interleukin 6 via activation of nuclear factor κB in macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Peng [Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Xue, Peng; Dong, Jian [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Peng, Hui [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences (China); Clewell, Rebecca [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wang, Aiping [Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Wang, Yue [Institute for Medical Device Standardization Administration, National Institutes for Food and Drug Control, Beijing (China); Peng, Shuangqing [Evaluation and Research Center for Toxicology, Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences (China); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jpi@thehamner.org [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL6) is a multifunctional cytokine that regulates immune and inflammatory responses. Multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), regulate IL6 transcription. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) is a substrate adaptor protein for the Cullin 3-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which regulates the degradation of many proteins, including Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ). Here, we found that stable knockdown of Keap1 (Keap1-KD) in RAW 264.7 (RAW) mouse macrophages and human monocyte THP-1 cells significantly increased expression of Il6, and Nrf2-target genes, under basal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.001–0.1 μg/ml)-challenged conditions. However, Nrf2 activation alone, by tert-butylhydroquinone treatment of RAW cells, did not increase expression of Il6. Compared to cells transduced with scrambled non-target negative control shRNA, Keap1-KD RAW cells showed enhanced protein levels of IKKβ and increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 under non-stressed and LPS-treated conditions. Because the expression of Il6 in Keap1-KD RAW cells was significantly attenuated by silencing of Ikkβ, but not Nrf2, it appears that stabilized IKKβ is responsible for the enhanced transactivation of Il6 in Keap1-KD cells. This study demonstrated that silencing of Keap1 in macrophages boosts LPS-induced transcription of Il6 via NF-κB activation. Given the importance of IL6 in the inflammatory response, the Keap1–IKKβ–NF-κB pathway may be a novel target for treatment and prevention of inflammation and associated disorders. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Keap1 increases expression of Il6 in macrophages. • Silencing of Keap1 results in protein accumulation of IKKβ and NF-κB p65. • Induction of Il6 resulting from Keap1 silencing is attributed to NF-κB activation.

  3. Boost C++ application development cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Polukhin, Antony

    2013-01-01

    This book follows a cookbook approach, with detailed and practical recipes that use Boost libraries.This book is great for developers new to Boost, and who are looking to improve their knowledge of Boost and see some undocumented details or tricks. It's assumed that you will have some experience in C++ already, as well being familiar with the basics of STL. A few chapters will require some previous knowledge of multithreading and networking. You are expected to have at least one good C++ compiler and compiled version of Boost (1.53.0 or later is recommended), which will be used during the exer

  4. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  5. Histaminergic modulation of cholinergic release from the nucleus basalis magnocellularis into insular cortex during taste aversive memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Purón-Sierra

    Full Text Available The ability of acetylcholine (ACh to alter specific functional properties of the cortex endows the cholinergic system with an important modulatory role in memory formation. For example, an increase in ACh release occurs during novel stimulus processing, indicating that ACh activity is critical during early stages of memory processing. During novel taste presentation, there is an increase in ACh release in the insular cortex (IC, a major structure for taste memory recognition. There is extensive evidence implicating the cholinergic efferents of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM in cortical activity changes during learning processes, and new evidence suggests that the histaminergic system may interact with the cholinergic system in important ways. However, there is little information as to whether changes in cholinergic activity in the IC are modulated during taste memory formation. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated the influence of two histamine receptor subtypes, H1 in the NBM and H3 in the IC, on ACh release in the IC during conditioned taste aversion (CTA. Injection of the H3 receptor agonist R-α-methylhistamine (RAMH into the IC or of the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine into the NBM during CTA training impaired subsequent CTA memory, and simultaneously resulted in a reduction of ACh release in the IC. This study demonstrated that basal and cortical cholinergic pathways are finely tuned by histaminergic activity during CTA, since dual actions of histamine receptor subtypes on ACh modulation release each have a significant impact during taste memory formation.

  6. Boosted Higgs Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Schlaffer, Matthias; Takeuchi, Michihisa; Weiler, Andreas; Wymant, Chris

    2014-01-01

    The inclusive Higgs production rate through gluon fusion has been measured to be in agreement with the Standard Model (SM). We show that even if the inclusive Higgs production rate is very SM-like, a precise determination of the boosted Higgs transverse momentum shape offers the opportunity to see effects of natural new physics. These measurements are generically motivated by effective field theory arguments and specifically in extensions of the SM with a natural weak scale, like composite Higgs models and natural supersymmetry. We show in detail how a measurement at high transverse momentum of $H\\to 2\\ell+\\mathbf{p}\\!\\!/_T$ via $H\\to \\tau\\tau$ and $H\\to WW^*$ could be performed and demonstrate that it offers a compelling alternative to the $t\\bar t H$ channel. We discuss the sensitivity to new physics in the most challenging scenario of an exactly SM-like inclusive Higgs cross-section.

  7. Brain cholinergic involvement during the rapid development of tolerance to morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Z. Z.; Oriaku, E. T.; Soliman, S. F. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of repeated administration of morphine on the activities of the cholinergic enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), in specific brain regions were studied in rats treated with 10 mg/kg morphine for one or two days. Repeated administration of morphine was associated with a decline in the degree of analgesia produced and with a significant increase of AChE activity of the medulla oblongata. A single injection of morphine resulted in a significant decline in ChAT activity in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata regions. After two consecutive injections, no decline in ChAT was observed in these regions, while in the cerebral cortex the second administration elicited a significant decline. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine may be mediated through changes in ChAT activity and lend support to the involvement of the central cholinergic system in narcotic tolerance.

  8. Cholinergic circuitry functioning in patients with vascular cognitive impairment--no dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Rita; Cantone, Mariagiovanna; Lanza, Giuseppe; Ferri, Raffaele; Vinciguerra, Luisa; Puglisi, Valentina; Pennisi, Manuela; Ricceri, Riccardo; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Pennisi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    An impairment of central cholinergic activity, as evaluated non-invasively by the short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) of motor responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), was observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment. Conversely, the involvement of central cholinergic neurotransmission in vascular dementia (VaD) is still under debate and data on Vascular Cognitive Impairment--No Dementia (VCI-ND) at risk for future VaD are lacking. To test for the first time SAI in patients with VCI-ND. Single-pulse TMS measures of cortical excitability and SAI were evaluated in 25 VCI-ND patients with subcortical ischemic lesions and 20 age-matched healthy controls. Functional status, neuropsychological tests evaluating frontal lobe abilities, and white matter lesions (WMLs) load were assessed. A significant difference was found between patients and controls for the mean SAI, although this result did not resist after the Bonferroni correction. In the whole group of patients and controls, SAI showed a correlation with worse scores at the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (r = 0.376, p r = 0.345, p < 0.05) but not with the WML severity. Central cholinergic pathway does not seem to be involved in VCI-ND, and the current results differ from those reported in primary cholinergic forms of dementia, such as AD. SAI might represent a valuable additional tool in the differential diagnosis of the dementing processes and in identifying potential responders to cholinergic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Estrogen-Cholinergic Interactions: Implications for Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Paul; Dumas, Julie

    2015-01-01

    While many studies in humans have investigated the effects of estrogen and hormone therapy on cognition, potential neurobiological correlates of these effects have been less well studied. An important site of action for estrogen in the brain is the cholinergic system. Several decades of research support the critical role of CNS cholinergic systems in cognition in humans, particularly in learning and memory formation and attention. In humans, the cholinergic system has been implicated in many aspects of cognition including the partitioning of attentional resources, working memory, inhibition of irrelevant information, and improved performance on effort-demanding tasks. Studies support the hypothesis that estradiol helps to maintain aspects of attention and verbal and visual memory. Such cognitive domains are exactly those modulated by cholinergic systems and extensive basic and preclinical work over the past several decades has clearly shown that basal forebrain cholinergic systems are dependent on estradiol support for adequate functioning. This paper will review recent human studies from our laboratories and others that have extended preclinical research examining estrogen-cholinergic interactions to humans. Studies examined include estradiol and cholinergic antagonist reversal studies in normal older women, examinations of the neural representations of estrogen-cholinergic interactions using functional brain imaging, and studies of the ability of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as tamoxifen to interact with cholinergic-mediated cognitive performance. We also discuss the implications of these studies for the underlying hypotheses of cholinergic-estrogen interactions and cognitive aging, and indications for prophylactic and therapeutic potential that may exploit these effects. PMID:26187712

  10. Cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in human fingers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffman, J.D.; Cohen, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of a cholinergic agonist and antagonist on finger blood flow (FBF) was studied in 10 normal subjects. Total finger blood flow was measured by venous occlusion, air plethysmography, and capillary blood flow (FCF) by the disappearance rate of a radio-isotope from a fingertip injection. Methacholine in doses of 10-80 ..mu..g/min was given by constant infusion via a brachial artery catheter. Average FBF and vascular resistance were not significantly affected. However, the half time (t/sub 1/2/) of the disappearance rate decreased from 50.8 +/- 13.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.5 min; a decrease occurred in all subjects. In seven subjects, atropine (0.2 mg) had no affect alone but inhibited the effect of methacholine on FCF and prevented the redness and sweating of the forearm and hand that occurs with this agent. This study demonstrates a muscarinic cholinergic vasodilator mechanism in the fingertip that uniquely increase capillary blood flow.

  11. Project BOOST implementation: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark V; Li, Jing; Hansen, Luke O; Forth, Victoria; Budnitz, Tina; Greenwald, Jeffrey L; Howell, Eric; Halasyamani, Lakshmi; Vidyarthi, Arpana; Coleman, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Enhancing care coordination and reducing hospital readmissions have been a focus of multiple quality improvement (QI) initiatives. Project BOOST (Better Outcomes by Optimizing Safe Transitions) aims to enhance the discharge transition from hospital to home. Previous research indicates that QI initiatives originating externally often face difficulties gaining momentum or effecting lasting change in a hospital. We performed a qualitative evaluation of Project BOOST implementation by examining the successes and failures experienced by six pilot sites. We also evaluated the unique physician mentoring component of this program. Finally, we examined the impact of intensification of the physician mentoring model on adoption of BOOST interventions in two later Illinois cohorts (27 hospitals). Qualitative analysis of six pilot hospitals used a process of methodological triangulation and analysis of the BOOST enrollment applications, the listserv, and content from telephone interviews. Evaluation of BOOST implementation at Illinois hospitals occurred via mid-year and year-end surveys. The identified common barriers included inadequate understanding of the current discharge process, insufficient administrative support, lack of protected time or dedicated resources, and lack of frontline staff buy-in. Facilitators of implementation included the mentor, a small beginning, teamwork, and proactive engagement of the patient. Notably, hospitals viewed their mentors as essential facilitators of change. Sites consistently commented that the individualized mentoring was extremely helpful and provided significant accountability and stimulated creativity. In the Illinois cohorts, the improved mentoring model showed more complete implementation of BOOST interventions. The implementation of Project BOOST was well received by hospitals, although sites faced substantial barriers consistent with other QI research reports. The unique mentorship element of Project BOOST proved extremely

  12. Component-Minimized Buck-Boost Voltage Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, F.; Loh, P.C.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2007-01-01

    . In order to form a distinct neutral potential in the corresponding voltage boost circuitry for correct B4 inverter operation, necessary modifications are derived step by step. The resulted dc networks with symmetrical placement of passive components allow complete charging and equal energy distribution...... semiconductors. Besides the advantage of reduced active components, buck-boost B4 inverters use a little more passive components when compared with buck-boost B6 inverters, which would allow a selectable tradeoff in practice. Moreover, analysis for discontinuous conduction mode of inductor current reveals...

  13. AveBoost2: Boosting for Noisy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oza, Nikunj C.

    2004-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the pre- vious base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. In previous work, we developed an algorithm, AveBoost, that constructed distributions orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous models, and then averaged them to create the next base model s distribution. Our experiments demonstrated the superior accuracy of our approach. In this paper, we slightly revise our algorithm to allow us to obtain non-trivial theoretical results: bounds on the training error and generalization error (difference between training and test error). Our averaging process has a regularizing effect which, as expected, leads us to a worse training error bound for our algorithm than for AdaBoost but a superior generalization error bound. For this paper, we experimented with the data that we used in both as originally supplied and with added label noise-a small fraction of the data has its original label changed. Noisy data are notoriously difficult for AdaBoost to learn. Our algorithm's performance improvement over AdaBoost is even greater on the noisy data than the original data.

  14. The role of the intrinsic cholinergic system of the striatum: What have we learned from TAN recordings in behaving animals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicella, Paul

    2017-09-30

    Cholinergic interneurons provide rich local innervation of the striatum and play an important role in controlling behavior, as evidenced by the variety of movement and psychiatric disorders linked to disrupted striatal cholinergic transmission. Much progress has been made in recent years regarding our understanding of how these interneurons contribute to the processing of information in the striatum. In particular, investigation of the activity of presumed striatal cholinergic interneurons, identified as tonically active neurons or TANs in behaving animals, has pointed to their role in the signaling and learning of the motivational relevance of environmental stimuli. Although the bulk of this work has been conducted in monkeys, several studies have also been carried out in behaving rats, but information remains rather disparate across studies and it is still questionable whether rodent TANs correspond to TANs described in monkeys. Consequently, our current understanding of the function of cholinergic transmission in the striatum is challenged by the rapidly growing, but often confusing literature on the relationship between TAN activity and specific behaviors. As regards the precise nature of the information conveyed by the cholinergic TANs, a recent influential view emphasized that these local circuit neurons may play a special role in the processing of contextual information that is important for reinforcement learning and selection of appropriate actions. This review provides a summary of recent progress in TAN physiology from which it is proposed that striatal cholinergic interneurons are crucial elements for flexible switching of behaviors under changing environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Basic and modern concepts on cholinergic receptor: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Tiwari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cholinergic system is an important system and a branch of the autonomic nervous system which plays an important role in memory, digestion, control of heart beat, blood pressure, movement and many other functions. This article serves as both structural and functional sources of information regarding cholinergic receptors and provides a detailed understanding of the determinants governing specificity of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor to researchers. The study helps to give overall information about the fundamentals of the cholinergic system, its receptors and ongoing research in this field.

  16. Cholinergic mechanisms in spinal cord and muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquilonius, S.M.; Askmark, H.; Gilberg, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Current knowledge regarding the distribution of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cholineacetyltranferase (ChAT) and cholinergic receptors in the spinal cord is presented as well as changes in these markers coupled to the degenerations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The principal changes in ChAT and nicotonic receptors in rat hindleg muscles during denervation and reinnervation is discussed as a background for quantitative studies in human muscle biopsies. It is noted that thefirst published autoradiograph on spinal cord muscarinic receptors was from the rat, depicting an intense binding of radiolabeled quinuclikiny benzilate (tritium-QNB) in the ventral horn, and expecially in an apical part of the dorsal horn claimed to correspond to correspond to sustantia gelatinosa

  17. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Yaakov A; Koopman, Frieda A; Faltys, Michael; Caravaca, April; Bendele, Alison; Zitnik, Ralph; Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J; Tak, Paul Peter

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model. Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed. Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02), a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02) and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01) with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02), accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01). The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  18. Neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway ameliorates disease in rat collagen-induced arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaakov A Levine

    Full Text Available The inflammatory reflex is a physiological mechanism through which the nervous system maintains immunologic homeostasis by modulating innate and adaptive immunity. We postulated that the reflex might be harnessed therapeutically to reduce pathological levels of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis by activating its prototypical efferent arm, termed the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. To explore this, we determined whether electrical neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway reduced disease severity in the collagen-induced arthritis model.Rats implanted with vagus nerve cuff electrodes had collagen-induced arthritis induced and were followed for 15 days. Animals underwent active or sham electrical stimulation once daily from day 9 through the conclusion of the study. Joint swelling, histology, and levels of cytokines and bone metabolism mediators were assessed.Compared with sham treatment, active neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway resulted in a 52% reduction in ankle diameter (p = 0.02, a 57% reduction in ankle diameter (area under curve; p = 0.02 and 46% reduction overall histological arthritis score (p = 0.01 with significant improvements in inflammation, pannus formation, cartilage destruction, and bone erosion (p = 0.02, accompanied by numerical reductions in systemic cytokine levels, not reaching statistical significance. Bone erosion improvement was associated with a decrease in serum levels of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL from 132±13 to 6±2 pg/mL (mean±SEM, p = 0.01.The severity of collagen-induced arthritis is reduced by neurostimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway delivered using an implanted electrical vagus nerve stimulation cuff electrode, and supports the rationale for testing this approach in human inflammatory disorders.

  19. Cholinergic interactions between donepezil and prucalopride in human colon: potential to treat severe intestinal dysmotility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad, J; Kung, V W S; Boundouki, G; Aziz, Q; De Maeyer, J H; Knowles, C H; Sanger, G J

    2013-11-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors such as neostigmine are used for acute colonic pseudo-obstruction, but cardio-bronchial side-effects limit use. To minimize side-effects, lower doses could be combined with a 5-HT4 receptor agonist, which also facilitates intestinal cholinergic activity. However, safety concerns, especially in the elderly, require drugs with good selectivity of action. These include the AChE inhibitor donepezil (used for Alzheimer's disease, with reduced cardio-bronchial liability) and prucalopride, the first selective, clinically available 5-HT4 receptor agonist. This study examined their individual and potential synergistic activities in human colon. Neuronally mediated muscle contractions and relaxations of human colon were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and defined phenotypically as cholinergic, nitrergic or tachykinergic using pharmacological tools; the effects of drugs were determined as changes in 'area under the curve'. Prucalopride increased cholinergically mediated contractions (EC50 855 nM; 33% maximum increase), consistent with its ability to stimulate intestinal motility; donepezil (477%) and neostigmine (2326%) had greater efficacy. Concentrations of donepezil (30-100 nM) found in venous plasma after therapeutic doses had minimal ability to enhance cholinergic activity. However, donepezil (30 nM) together with prucalopride (3, 10 μM) markedly increased EFS-evoked contractions compared with prucalopride alone (P = 0.04). For example, the increases observed with donepezil and prucalopride 10 μM together or alone were, respectively, 105 ± 35%, 4 ± 6% and 35 ± 21% (n = 3-7, each concentration). Potential synergy between prucalopride and donepezil activity calls for exploration of this combination as a safer, more effective treatment of colonic pseudo-obstruction. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Modulation of Cholinergic Pathways and Inflammatory Mediators in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    the expression of cholinergic ( muscarinic and nicotinic) and gammaaminobutyric acid and glutamate receptors in the midbrain region along with...value)** Mid brain NM_203491 Chrm2 Cholinergic receptor muscarinic 2 2.01 0.032 NM_007390 Chrna7 Cholinergic receptor nicotinic alpha 7 1.53 0.015...multiple genes involved in cholinergic transmission (Table 1). The expres- sion profiles of cholinergic receptors muscarinic 2 and nicotinic al- pha

  1. A novel polysaccharide from Ganoderma atrum exerts antitumor activity by activating mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway and boosting the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenshen; Nie, Shaoping; Huang, Danfei; Feng, Yanling; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-02-19

    Ganoderma is a precious health-care edible medicinal fungus in China. A novel Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) is the main bioactive component. We investigated the antitumor effect and molecular mechanisms of PSG-1. It exhibited no significant effect on cell proliferation directly. In contrast, administration of PSG-1 markedly suppressed tumor growth in CT26 tumor-bearing mice. It was observed that PSG-1 caused apoptosis in CT26 cells. Apoptosis was associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, enhancement of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and intracellular ROS production, elevation of p53 and Bax expression, downregulation of Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-9 and -3. Moreover, PSG-1 enhanced immune organ index and promoted lymphocyte proliferation as well as cytokine levels in serum. Taken together, our data indicate that PSG-1 has potential antitumor activity in vivo by inducing apoptosis via mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway and enhances host immune system function. Therefore, PSG-1 could be a safe and effective antitumor, bioactive agent or functional food.

  2. Role of cholinergic markers on memory function of rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuraju, Sangu; Maiti, Panchanan; Pati, Soumya; Solanki, Preeti; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Singh, Shashi Bala; Prasad, Dipti; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2011-12-15

    Hypobaric hypoxia is encountered at high altitude. It has a deleterious effect on cognitive functions. An important cause of memory impairment at high altitude is the impairment of neurotransmission. The present study investigates the role of cholinergic markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia at 6,100 m for 7 days in a simulated-decompression chamber. Memory performance was assessed using the Morris water maze task. Cholinergic markers such as acetylcholine, acetylcholinesterase, choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor were also evaluated along with neuronal morphology and DNA fragmentation. We found impairment in memory function along with a decrease in acetylcholine levels, increase in acetylcholinesterase activity, down regulation of choline acetyltransferase, α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. We also found that cellular damage is associated with a significant increase in DNA fragmentation. However, administration of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as physostigmine and galantamine, resulted in amelioration of the hypobaric hypoxia induced deleterious effects. It improved acetylcholine level, decreased acetylcholinesterase activity and increased the synthesis of acetylcholine by increasing choline acetyltransferase activity. Also, the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors improved neuronal morphology, perhaps by increasing the expression of α-7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and by reducing the acetylcholinesterase level in the cortex and the hippocampus. Therefore, our results suggest cholinergic dysfunction is one of the mechanisms involved in hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment and that acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were able to restore cholinergic function and thus improve memory function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional role of acetylcholine and the expression of cholinergic receptors and components in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tsuyoshi; Abe, Takahiro; Chida, Dai; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Hori, Naoko; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Iwata, Takanori; Usui, Michihiko; Aiko, Katsuya; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2010-02-19

    Recent studies have indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) plays a vital role in various tissues, while the role of ACh in bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we demonstrated that ACh induced cell proliferation and reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity via nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in osteoblasts. We detected mRNA expression of several nAChRs and mAChRs. Furthermore, we showed that cholinergic components were up-regulated and subunits/subtypes of acetylcholine receptors altered during osteoblast differentiation. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that osteoblasts express specific acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic components and that ACh plays a possible role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Centrality of striatal cholinergic transmission in basal ganglia function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eBonsi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Work over the past two decades revealed a previously unexpected role for striatal cholinergic interneurons in the context of basal ganglia function. The recognition that these interneurons are essential in synaptic plasticity and motor learning represents a significant step ahead in deciphering how the striatum processes cortical inputs, and why pathological circumstances cause motor dysfunction.Loss of the reciprocal modulation between dopaminergic inputs and the intrinsic cholinergic innervation within the striatum appears to be the trigger for pathophysiological changes occurring in basal ganglia disorders. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence showing profound changes in cholinergic markers in these disorders, in particular Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.Based on converging experimental and clinical evidence, we provide an overview of the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in physiological and pathological conditions, in the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  5. A ten fold reduction of nicotine yield in tobacco smoke does not spare the central cholinergic system in adolescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu-Villaça, Yael; Correa-Santos, Monique; Dutra-Tavares, Ana C; Paes-Branco, Danielle; Nunes-Freitas, Andre; Manhães, Alex C; Filgueiras, Cláudio C; Ribeiro-Carvalho, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The tobacco industry has gradually decreased nicotine content in cigarette smoke but the impact of this reduction on health is still controversial. Since the central cholinergic system is the primary site of action of nicotine, here, we investigated the effects of exposure of adolescent mice to tobacco smoke containing either high or low levels of nicotine on the central cholinergic system and the effects associated with cessation of exposure. From postnatal day (PN) 30 to 45, male and female Swiss mice were exposed to tobacco smoke (whole body exposure, 8h/day, 7 days/week) generated from 2R1F (HighNic group: 1.74mg nicotine/cigarette) or 4A1 (LowNic group: 0.14mg nicotine/cigarette) research cigarettes, whereas control mice were exposed to ambient air. Cholinergic biomarkers were assessed in the cerebral cortex and midbrain by the end of exposure (PN45), at short- (PN50) and long-term (PN75) deprivation. In the cortex, nicotinic cholinergic receptor upregulation was observed with either type of cigarette. In the midbrain, upregulation was detected only in HighNic mice and remained significant in females at short-term deprivation. The high-affinity choline transporter was reduced in the cortex: of HighNic mice by the end of exposure; of both HighNic and LowNic females at short-term deprivation; of LowNic mice at long-term deprivation. These decrements were separable from effects on choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities, suggesting cholinergic synaptic impairment. Here, we demonstrated central cholinergic alterations in an animal model of tobacco smoke exposure during adolescence. This system was sensitive even to tobacco smoke with very low nicotine content. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Cholinergic Signaling on Neuronal Cell Bioenergetics

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jianghua; Lezi, E; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Selfridge, Eva; Funk, Eric; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients have reduced brain acetylcholine and reversing this deficit yields clinical benefits. In this study we explored how increased cholinergic tone impacts cell bioenergetics, which are also perturbed in AD. We treated SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells with carbachol, a cholinergic agonist, and tested for bioenergetic flux and bioenergetic infrastructure changes. Carbachol rapidly increased both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis fluxes. ATP levels rose slightly, a...

  7. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Pranay [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Yadav, Rajesh S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Department of Crimnology and Forensic Science, Harisingh Gour University, Sagar 470 003 (India); Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Dwivedi, Hari N. [Babu Banarasi Das University, BBD City, Faizabad Road, Lucknow 227 015 (India); Pant, Aditiya B. [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Khanna, Vinay K., E-mail: vkkhanna1@gmail.com [CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, MG Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  8. Unraveling the mechanism of neuroprotection of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic dysfunctions in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Pranay; Yadav, Rajesh S.; Chandravanshi, Lalit P.; Shukla, Rajendra K.; Dhuriya, Yogesh K.; Chauhan, Lalit K.S.; Dwivedi, Hari N.; Pant, Aditiya B.; Khanna, Vinay K.

    2014-01-01

    Earlier, we found that arsenic induced cholinergic deficits in rat brain could be protected by curcumin. In continuation to this, the present study is focused to unravel the molecular mechanisms associated with the protective efficacy of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits. Exposure to arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats resulted to decrease the expression of CHRM2 receptor gene associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions as evident by decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of mitochondrial complexes and enhanced apoptosis both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in comparison to controls. The ultrastructural images of arsenic exposed rats, assessed by transmission electron microscope, exhibited loss of myelin sheath and distorted cristae in the mitochondria both in the frontal cortex and hippocampus as compared to controls. Simultaneous treatment with arsenic (20 mg/kg body weight, p.o) and curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight, p.o) for 28 days in rats was found to protect arsenic induced changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of mitochondrial complexes both in frontal cortex and hippocampus. Alterations in the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and ultrastructural damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus following arsenic exposure were also protected in rats simultaneously treated with arsenic and curcumin. The data of the present study reveal that curcumin could protect arsenic induced cholinergic deficits by modulating the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins in the brain. More interestingly, arsenic induced functional and ultrastructural changes in the brain mitochondria were also protected by curcumin. - Highlights: • Neuroprotective mechanism of curcumin in arsenic induced cholinergic deficits studied • Curcumin protected arsenic induced enhanced expression of stress markers in rat brain • Arsenic compromised mitochondrial electron transport chain protected

  9. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Thukham-Mee, Wipawee; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok; Wittaya-Areekul, Sakchai

    2014-01-01

    To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv). At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism. PMID:24672632

  10. Mangifera indica Fruit Extract Improves Memory Impairment, Cholinergic Dysfunction, and Oxidative Stress Damage in Animal Model of Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the effective preventive paradigm against mild cognitive impairment (MCI is required. Therefore, we aimed to determine whether Mangifera indica fruit extract, a substance possessing antioxidant and cognitive enhancing effects, could improve memory impairment, cholinergic dysfunction, and oxidative stress damage in animal model of mild cognitive impairment. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180–200 g, were orally given the extract at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 mg·kg−1 BW for 2 weeks before and 1 week after the bilateral injection of AF64A (icv. At the end of study, spatial memory, cholinergic neurons density, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px enzymes in hippocampus were determined. The results showed that all doses of extract could improve memory together with the decreased MDA level and the increased SOD and GSH-Px enzymes activities. The increased cholinergic neurons density in CA1 and CA3 of hippocampus was also observed in rats treated with the extract at doses of 50 and 200 mg·kg−1 BW. Therefore, our results suggested that M. indica, the potential protective agent against MCI, increased cholinergic function and the decreased oxidative stress which in turn enhanced memory. However, further researches are essential to elucidate the possible active ingredients and detail mechanism.

  11. Discharge profiles across the sleep-waking cycle of identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Cissé, Youssouf; Mainville, Lynda; Morales, Marisela; Jones, Barbara E

    2014-03-26

    Distributed within the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT), cholinergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum have long been thought to play a critical role in stimulating cortical activation during waking (W) and paradoxical sleep (PS, also called REM sleep), yet also in promoting PS with muscle atonia. However, the discharge profile and thus precise roles of the cholinergic neurons have remained uncertain because they lie intermingled with GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which might also assume these roles. By applying juxtacellular recording and labeling in naturally sleeping-waking, head-fixed rats, we investigated the discharge profiles of histochemically identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the LDT, SubLDT, and adjoining medial part of the PPT (MPPT) in relation to sleep-wake states, cortical activity, and muscle tone. We found that all cholinergic neurons were maximally active during W and PS in positive correlation with fast (γ) cortical activity, as "W/PS-max active neurons." Like cholinergic neurons, many GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were also "W/PS-max active." Other GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were "PS-max active," being minimally active during W and maximally active during PS in negative correlation with muscle tone. Conversely, some glutamatergic neurons were "W-max active," being maximally active during W and minimally active during PS in positive correlation with muscle tone. Through different discharge profiles, the cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons of the LDT, SubLDT, and MPPT thus appear to play distinct roles in promoting W and PS with cortical activation, PS with muscle atonia, or W with muscle tone.

  12. Discharge Profiles across the Sleep–Waking Cycle of Identified Cholinergic, GABAergic, and Glutamatergic Neurons in the Pontomesencephalic Tegmentum of the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucetta, Soufiane; Cissé, Youssouf; Mainville, Lynda; Morales, Marisela

    2014-01-01

    Distributed within the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT and PPT), cholinergic neurons in the pontomesencephalic tegmentum have long been thought to play a critical role in stimulating cortical activation during waking (W) and paradoxical sleep (PS, also called REM sleep), yet also in promoting PS with muscle atonia. However, the discharge profile and thus precise roles of the cholinergic neurons have remained uncertain because they lie intermingled with GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, which might also assume these roles. By applying juxtacellular recording and labeling in naturally sleeping–waking, head-fixed rats, we investigated the discharge profiles of histochemically identified cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons in the LDT, SubLDT, and adjoining medial part of the PPT (MPPT) in relation to sleep–wake states, cortical activity, and muscle tone. We found that all cholinergic neurons were maximally active during W and PS in positive correlation with fast (γ) cortical activity, as “W/PS-max active neurons.” Like cholinergic neurons, many GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were also “W/PS-max active.” Other GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons were “PS-max active,” being minimally active during W and maximally active during PS in negative correlation with muscle tone. Conversely, some glutamatergic neurons were “W-max active,” being maximally active during W and minimally active during PS in positive correlation with muscle tone. Through different discharge profiles, the cholinergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons of the LDT, SubLDT, and MPPT thus appear to play distinct roles in promoting W and PS with cortical activation, PS with muscle atonia, or W with muscle tone. PMID:24672016

  13. Boosted top: experimental tools overview

    CERN Document Server

    Usai, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    An overview of tools and methods for the reconstruction of high-boost top quark decays at the LHC is given in this report. The focus is on hadronic decays, in particular an overview of the current status of top quark taggers in physics analyses is presented. The most widely used jet substructure techniques, normally used in combination with top quark taggers, are reviewed. Special techniques to treat pileup in large cone jets are described, along with a comparison of the performance of several boosted top quark reconstruction techniques.

  14. Urtica dioica leaves modulates muscarinic cholinergic system in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder and has been associated with cognitive dysfunction. In our earlier study, chronic Urtica dioica (UD) treatment significantly ameliorated diabetes induced associative and spatial memory deficit in mice. The present study was designed to explore the effect of UD leaves extract on muscarinic cholinergic system, which has long been known to be involved in cognition. Streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.p., consecutively for 5 days) was used to induce diabetes followed by treatment with UD extract (50 mg/kg, oral) or rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, oral) for 8 weeks. STZ-induced diabetic mice showed significant reduction in hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-1 and choline acetyltransferase expressions. Chronic diabetes significantly up-regulated the protein expression of acetylcholinesterase associated with oxidative stress in hippocampus. Besides, STZ-induced diabetic mice showed hypolocomotion with up-regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. Chronic UD treatment significantly attenuated the cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative stress in the hippocampus of diabetic mice. UD had no effect on locomotor activity and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-4 expression in striatum. In conclusion, UD leaves extract has potential to reverse diabetes mediated alteration in muscarinic cholinergic system in hippocampus and thereby improve memory functions.

  15. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  16. Topographic Organization of Cholinergic Innervation From the Basal Forebrain to the Visual Cortex in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Huppé-Gourgues

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is an important neurotransmitter for the regulation of visual attention, plasticity, and perceptual learning. It is released in the visual cortex predominantly by cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain, where stimulation may produce potentiation of visual processes. However, little is known about the fine organization of these corticopetal projections, such as whether basal forebrain neurons projecting to the primary and secondary visual cortical areas (V1 and V2, respectively are organized retinotopically. The aim of this study was to map these basal forebrain-V1/V2 projections. Microinjections of the fluorescent retrograde tracer cholera toxin b fragment in different sites within V1 and V2 in Long–Evans rats were performed. Retrogradely labeled cell bodies in the horizontal and vertical limbs of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB and VDB, respectively, nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and substantia innominata (SI, were mapped ex vivo with a computer-assisted microscope stage controlled by stereological software. Choline acetyltranferase immunohistochemistry was used to identify cholinergic cells. Our results showed a predominance of cholinergic projections coming from the HDB. These projections were not retinotopically organized but projections to V1 arised from neurons located in the anterior HDB/SI whereas projections to V2 arised from neurons located throughout the whole extent of HDB/SI. The absence of a clear topography of these projections suggests that BF activation can stimulate visual cortices broadly.

  17. SemiBoost: boosting for semi-supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallapragada, Pavan Kumar; Jin, Rong; Jain, Anil K; Liu, Yi

    2009-11-01

    Semi-supervised learning has attracted a significant amount of attention in pattern recognition and machine learning. Most previous studies have focused on designing special algorithms to effectively exploit the unlabeled data in conjunction with labeled data. Our goal is to improve the classification accuracy of any given supervised learning algorithm by using the available unlabeled examples. We call this as the Semi-supervised improvement problem, to distinguish the proposed approach from the existing approaches. We design a metasemi-supervised learning algorithm that wraps around the underlying supervised algorithm and improves its performance using unlabeled data. This problem is particularly important when we need to train a supervised learning algorithm with a limited number of labeled examples and a multitude of unlabeled examples. We present a boosting framework for semi-supervised learning, termed as SemiBoost. The key advantages of the proposed semi-supervised learning approach are: 1) performance improvement of any supervised learning algorithm with a multitude of unlabeled data, 2) efficient computation by the iterative boosting algorithm, and 3) exploiting both manifold and cluster assumption in training classification models. An empirical study on 16 different data sets and text categorization demonstrates that the proposed framework improves the performance of several commonly used supervised learning algorithms, given a large number of unlabeled examples. We also show that the performance of the proposed algorithm, SemiBoost, is comparable to the state-of-the-art semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  18. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Austin Lim

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh. Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI, which comprises only about 1-2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction.

  19. Boost.Asio C++ network programming

    CERN Document Server

    Torjo, John

    2013-01-01

    What you want is an easy level of abstraction, which is just what this book provides in conjunction with Boost.Asio. Switching to Boost.Asio is just a few extra #include directives away, with the help of this practical and engaging guide.This book is great for developers that need to do network programming, who don't want to delve into the complicated issues of a raw networking API. You should be familiar with core Boost concepts, such as smart pointers and shared_from_this, resource classes (noncopyable), functors and boost::bind, boost mutexes, and the boost date/time library. Readers should

  20. Young Human Cholinergic Neurons Respond to Physiological Regulators and Improve Cognitive Symptoms in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Annamaria; Sarchielli, Erica; Guarnieri, Giulia; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pantano, Daniela; Comeglio, Paolo; Nardiello, Pamela; Pugliese, Anna M.; Ballerini, Lara; Matucci, Rosanna; Ambrosini, Stefano; Castronovo, Giuseppe; Valente, Rosa; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Bucciantini, Sandra; Maggi, Mario; Casamenti, Fiorella; Gallina, Pasquale; Vannelli, Gabriella B.

    2017-01-01

    The degeneration of cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM) in the basal forebrain (BF) is associated to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. To date no resolutive therapies exist. Cell-based replacement therapy is a strategy currently under consideration, although the mechanisms underlying the generation of stem cell-derived NBM cholinergic neurons able of functional integration remain to be clarified. Since fetal brain is an optimal source of neuronal cells committed towards a specific phenotype, this study is aimed at isolating cholinergic neurons from the human fetal NBM (hfNBMs) in order to study their phenotypic, maturational and functional properties. Extensive characterization confirmed the cholinergic identity of hfNBMs, including positivity for specific markers (such as choline acetyltransferase) and acetylcholine (Ach) release. Electrophysiological measurements provided the functional validation of hfNBM cells, which exhibited the activation of peculiar sodium (INa) and potassium (IK) currents, as well as the presence of functional cholinergic receptors. Accordingly, hfNBMs express both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, which were activated by Ach. The hfNBMs cholinergic phenotype was regulated by the nerve growth factor (NGF), through the activation of the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, as well as by 17-β-estradiol through a peculiar recruitment of its own receptors. When intravenously administered in NBM-lesioned rats, hfNBMs determined a significant improvement in memory functions. Histological examination of brain sections showed that hfNBMs (labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye prior to administration) reached the damaged brain areas. The study provides a useful model to study the ontogenetic mechanisms regulating the development and maintenance of the human brain cholinergic system and to assess new lines of research, including disease modeling, drug discovery and cell-based therapy for AD. PMID

  1. Young Human Cholinergic Neurons Respond to Physiological Regulators and Improve Cognitive Symptoms in an Animal Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Morelli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The degeneration of cholinergic neurons of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM in the basal forebrain (BF is associated to the cognitive decline of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. To date no resolutive therapies exist. Cell-based replacement therapy is a strategy currently under consideration, although the mechanisms underlying the generation of stem cell-derived NBM cholinergic neurons able of functional integration remain to be clarified. Since fetal brain is an optimal source of neuronal cells committed towards a specific phenotype, this study is aimed at isolating cholinergic neurons from the human fetal NBM (hfNBMs in order to study their phenotypic, maturational and functional properties. Extensive characterization confirmed the cholinergic identity of hfNBMs, including positivity for specific markers (such as choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholine (Ach release. Electrophysiological measurements provided the functional validation of hfNBM cells, which exhibited the activation of peculiar sodium (INa and potassium (IK currents, as well as the presence of functional cholinergic receptors. Accordingly, hfNBMs express both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, which were activated by Ach. The hfNBMs cholinergic phenotype was regulated by the nerve growth factor (NGF, through the activation of the high-affinity NGF receptor TrkA, as well as by 17-β-estradiol through a peculiar recruitment of its own receptors. When intravenously administered in NBM-lesioned rats, hfNBMs determined a significant improvement in memory functions. Histological examination of brain sections showed that hfNBMs (labeled with PKH26 fluorescent dye prior to administration reached the damaged brain areas. The study provides a useful model to study the ontogenetic mechanisms regulating the development and maintenance of the human brain cholinergic system and to assess new lines of research, including disease modeling, drug discovery and cell-based therapy for AD.

  2. Q-Boosted Optomechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-18

    proposing team in 2004 [6], and apparently copied now by some in the optomechanical world, who seem to be calling it a spoke-supported toroid . Beyond merely...FA9550-10-1-0293 “Q-Boosted Optomechanical Resonators” CTN 9/18/15 24 [20] D. Armani, T. Kippenberg, S. Spillane and K. Vahala, "Ultra-high-Q toroid

  3. BIM-Boost in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlo, L.A.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Onlangs sloot TNO een samenwerkingsovereenkomst met brancheorganisaties in de bouwkolom waaromder Bouwend Nederland en BNA. Doel van de overeenkomst: een BIM-boost in Nederland bewerkstelligen. Een gesprek met Leon van Berlo van TNO over deze en andere BIM-actualiteiten

  4. Topological Design and Modulation Strategy for Buck-Boost Three-Level Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang; Teodorescu, Remus

    2009-01-01

    To date, designed topologies for dc-ac inversion with both voltage buck and boost capabilities are mainly focused on two-level circuitries with extensions to three-level possibilities left nearly unexplored. Contributing to this area of research, this paper presents the design of a number of viable...... can perform distinct five-level line voltage and three-level phase voltage switching by simply controlling the active switches located in the designed voltage boost section of the circuits. As a cost saving option, one active switch can further be removed from the voltage boost section of the circuits...... buck-boost threelevel inverters that can also support bidirectional power conversion. The proposed front-end circuitry is developed from the C´ ukderived buck-boost two-level inverter, and by using the "alternative phase opposition disposition" modulation scheme, the buck-boost three-level inverters...

  5. Heavy metal uranium affects the brain cholinergic system in rat following sub-chronic and chronic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, Helene; Grancolas, Line; Dhieux-Lestaevel, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Vacher, Claire-Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Voisin, Philippe; Gourmelon, Patrick; Taouis, Mohammed; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Uranium is a heavy metal naturally present in the environment that may be chronically ingested by the population. Previous studies have shown that uranium is present in the brain and alters behaviour, notably locomotor activity, sensorimotor ability, sleep/wake cycle and the memory process, but also metabolism of neurotransmitters. The cholinergic system mediates many cognitive systems, including those disturbed after chronic exposure to uranium i.e., spatial memory, sleep/wake cycle and locomotor activity. The objective of this study was to assess whether these disorders follow uranium-induced alteration of the cholinergic system. In comparison with 40 control rats, 40 rats drank 40 mg/L uranyl nitrate for 1.5 or 9 months. Cortex and hippocampus were removed and gene expression and protein level were analysed to determine potential changes in cholinergic receptors and acetylcholine levels. The expression of genes showed various alterations in the two brain areas after short- and long-term exposure. Nevertheless, protein levels of the choline acetyltransferase enzyme (ChAT), the vesicular transporter of acetylcholine (VAChT) and the nicotinic receptor β2 sub-unit (nAChRβ2) were unmodified in all cases of the experiment and muscarinic receptor type 1 (m1AChR) protein level was disturbed only after 9 months of exposure in the cortex (-30%). Acetylcholine levels were unchanged in the hippocampus after 1.5 and 9 months, but were decreased in the cortex after 1.5 months only (-22%). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was also unchanged in the hippocampus but decreased in the cortex after 1.5 and 9 months (-16% and -18%, respectively). Taken together, these data indicate that the cholinergic system is a target of uranium exposure in a structure-dependent and time-dependent manner. These cholinergic alterations could participate in behavioural impairments.

  6. Biflorin Ameliorates Memory Impairments Induced by Cholinergic Blockade in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Se Jin; Kim, Boseong; Ryu, Byeol; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Sunhee; Jang, Dae Sik; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effect of biflorin, a component of Syzygium aromaticum, on memory deficit, we introduced a scopolamine-induced cognitive deficit mouse model. A single administration of biflorin increased latency time in the passive avoidance task, ameliorated alternation behavior in the Y-maze, and increased exploration time in the Morris water maze task, indicating the improvement of cognitive behaviors against cholinergic dysfunction. The biflorin-induced reverse of latency in the scopolamine-treated group was attenuated by MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist. Biflorin also enhanced cognitive function in a naïve mouse model. To understand the mechanism of biflorin for memory amelioration, we performed Western blot. Biflorin increased the activation of protein kinase C-ζ and its downstream signaling molecules in the hippocampus. These results suggest that biflorin ameliorates drug-induced memory impairment by modulation of protein kinase C-ζ signaling in mice, implying that biflorin could function as a possible therapeutic agent for the treatment of cognitive problems. PMID:27829270

  7. Angiotensin II inhibits cortical cholinergic function: Implications for cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.M.; Barnes, N.M.; Costall, B.; Horovitz, Z.P.; Ironside, J.W.; Naylor, R.J.; Williams, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    In the present studies we have shown that angiotensin II (AT II), in a concentration-dependent manner in rat tissue (10(-9)-10(-5) M) or at a single concentration in human tissue (10(-6) M), can inhibit potassium-stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine ( [3H]Ach) from slices of rat entorhinal cortex and human temporal cortex preloaded with [3H]choline for the biochemical analyses. The inhibitory effects of AT II (10(-6) M) were antagonised by the specific AT II receptor antagonist [1-sarcosine, 8-threonine]AT II in a concentration-dependent manner in rat tissue (10(-11)-10(-8) M) and at the single concentration employed in the human studies (10(-7) M). Also demonstrated were other components of the angiotensin system in the human temporal cortex; ACE activity was present (1.03 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein), as were AT II recognition sites (Bmax = 8.6 fmol mg-1 protein). It is hypothesised that the potential cognitive enhancing properties of ACE inhibitors may reflect their action to prevent the formation of AT II and so remove an inhibitory modulator of cholinergic function

  8. Cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haycock, J.W.; Browning, M.D.; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Chromaffin cells were isolated from bovine adrenal medullae and maintained in primary culture. After prelabeling with 32 PO 4 , exposure of the chromaffin cells to acetylcholine increased the phosphorylation of a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein and a M/sub r/ ≅ 60,000 protein (tyrosine hydroxylase), visualized after separation of total cellular proteins in NaDodSO 4 /polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies to three known phosphoproteins (100-kDa, 87-kDa, and protein III) revealed an acetylcholine-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. These three proteins were also shown to be present in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by immunolabeling techniques. 100-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 100,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, 87-kDa is a M/sub r/ ≅ 87,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, and protein III is a phosphoprotein doublet of M/sub r/ ≅ 74,000 (IIIa) and M/sub r/ ≅ 55,000 (IIIb) phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I. The data demonstrate that cholinergic activation of chromaffin cells increases the phosphorylation of several proteins and that several protein kinase systems may be involved in these effects

  9. Cholinergic modulation of cognitive processing: insights drawn from computational models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehren L Newman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine plays an important role in cognitive function, as shown by pharmacological manipulations that impact working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory function. Acetylcholine also shows striking modulatory influences on the cellular physiology of hippocampal and cortical neurons. Modeling of neural circuits provides a framework for understanding how the cognitive functions may arise from the influence of acetylcholine on neural and network dynamics. We review the influences of cholinergic manipulations on behavioral performance in working memory, attention, episodic memory and spatial memory tasks, the physiological effects of acetylcholine on neural and circuit dynamics, and the computational models that provide insight into the functional relationships between the physiology and behavior. Specifically, we discuss the important role of acetylcholine in governing mechanisms of active maintenance in working memory tasks and in regulating network dynamics important for effective processing of stimuli in attention and episodic memory tasks. We also propose that theta rhythm play a crucial role as an intermediary between the physiological influences of acetylcholine and behavior in episodic and spatial memory tasks. We conclude with a synthesis of the existing modeling work and highlight future directions that are likely to be rewarding given the existing state of the literature for both empiricists and modelers.

  10. ATLAS measurements of boosted object production

    CERN Document Server

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This talk reviews ATLAS Standard Model measurements performed with boosted objects, i.e. boosted top quarks and W and Z bosons, which decay hadronically and are reconstructed as a single large radius jet.

  11. Endogenous cholinergic neurotransmission contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica Bajic

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system is critical for behavioral adaptations associated with opioid reward and addiction. These processes may be influenced by cholinergic transmission arising from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg, a main source of acetylcholine to mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To examine this possibility we asked if chronic systemic morphine administration affects expression of genes in ventral and ventrolateral periaqueductal gray at the level of the LDTg using rtPCR. Specifically, we examined gene expression changes in the area of interest using Neurotransmitters and Receptors PCR array between chronic morphine and saline control groups. Analysis suggested that chronic morphine administration led to changes in expression of genes associated, in part, with cholinergic neurotransmission. Furthermore, using a quantitative immunofluorescent technique, we found that chronic morphine treatment produced a significant increase in immunolabeling of the cholinergic marker (vesicular acetylcholine transporter in neurons of the LDTg. Finally, systemic administration of the nonselective and noncompetitive neuronal nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (0.5 or 2 mg/kg dose-dependently blocked the expression, and to a lesser extent the development, of locomotor sensitization. The same treatment had no effect on acute morphine antinociception, antinociceptive tolerance or dependence to chronic morphine. Taken together, the results suggest that endogenous nicotinic cholinergic neurotransmission selectively contributes to behavioral sensitization to morphine and this process may, in part, involve cholinergic neurons within the LDTg.

  12. Beyond the usual suspects: a cholinergic route for panic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco

    2002-01-01

    For unknown reasons and through poorly understood mechanisms, people at risk of panic attacks are hypersensitive to suffocative stimuli and experience hyperventilation and anxiety after exposure to heightened concentrations of carbon dioxide. Similarly to the physiological reflex response to hypercapnia in animals and man, the anxious response to carbon dioxide in people with panic disorder is at least partially controlled by the central muscarinic receptors. It is suggested here that some modifications of the cholinergic functions could underlie human individual differences in carbon dioxide sensitivity and proneness to experience panic attacks. The hypothesis is based upon experimental evidence that stressful and potentially harmful stimuli prime relatively long-lasting changes in cholinergic genes expression and cholinergic receptors' regulation. The adaptive sequels of these modifications include protection of the brain from overstimulation, and, at the level of the corticolimbic circuitries, promotion of passive avoidance and learning after stress. The extension of the same modifications to the cholinergic receptors involved in chemoception, however, could lower the threshold for reaction to suffocative stimuli, including carbon dioxide. The exaggerated sensitivity to carbon dioxide observed in humans suffering from panic attacks could then be thought of as an evolutionary cost of the involvement of the cholinergic system in shaping otherwise adaptive responses to stress and threatening stimuli.

  13. Satureja bachtiarica ameliorate beta-amyloid induced memory impairment, oxidative stress and cholinergic deficit in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodi, Maliheh; Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Hajimehdipoor, Homa; Dashti, Abolfazl; Sepand, Mohammad Reza; Moradi, Shahla

    2016-04-01

    Extracellular deposition of Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is the main finding in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which damages cholinergic neurons through oxidative stress and reduces the cholinergic neurotransmission. Satureja bachtiarica is a medicinal plant from the Lamiaceae family which was widely used in Iranian traditional medicine. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible protective effects of S. bachtiarica methanolic extract on Aβ induced spatial memory impairment in Morris Water Maze (MWM), oxidative stress and cholinergic neuron degeneration. Pre- aggregated Aβ was injected into the hippocampus of each rat bilaterally (10 μg/rat) and MWM task was performed 14 days later to evaluate learning and memory function. Methanolic extract of S.bachtiarica (10, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) was injected intraperitoneally for 19 consecutive days, after Aβ injection. After the probe test the brain tissue were collected and lipid peroxidation, Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and Cholin Acetyl Transferees (ChAT) immunorectivity were measured in the hippocampus. Intrahipocampal injection of Aβ impaired learning and memory in MWM in training days and probe trail. Methanolic extract of S. bachtiarica (50 and 100 mg/Kg) could attenuate Aβ-induced memory deficit. ChAT immunostaining revealed that cholinergic neurons were loss in Aβ- injected group and S. bachtiarica (100 mg/Kg) could ameliorate Aβ- induced ChAT reduction in the hippocampus. Also S. bachtiarica could ameliorate Aβ-induced lipid peroxidation and AChE activity increase in the hippocampus. In conclusion our study represent that S.bachtiarica methanolic extract can improve Aβ-induced memory impairment and cholinergic loss then we recommended this extract as a candidate for further investigation in treatment of AD.

  14. Milne boost from Galilean gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Mukherjee, Pradip

    2018-03-01

    Physical origin of Milne boost invariance of the Newton Cartan spacetime is traced to the effect of local Galilean boosts in its metric structure, using Galilean gauge theory. Specifically, we do not require any gauge field to understand Milne boost invariance.

  15. Dopamine-galanin receptor heteromers modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in the rat ventral hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Vaz, Sandra H.; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Ferrada, Carla; Quiroz, César; Barodia, Sandeep; Kabbani, Nadine; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine and galanin modulate cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus, but little is known about the mechanisms involved and their possible interactions. By using resonance energy transfer techniques in transfected mammalian cells we demonstrated the existence of heteromers between the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) and galanin Gal1, but not Gal2 receptors. Within the D1-Gal1 and D5-Gal1 receptor heteromers, dopamine receptor activation potentiated and dopamine receptor blockade counteracted MAPK activation induced by stimulation of Gal1 receptors, while Gal1 receptor activation or blockade did not modify D1-like receptor-mediated MAPK activation. Ability of a D1-like receptor antagonist to block galanin-induced MAPK activation (cross-antagonism) was used as a “biochemical fingerprint” of D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers, allowing their identification in the rat ventral hippocampus. The functional role of D1-like-Gal receptor heteromers was demonstrated in synaptosomes from rat ventral hippocampus, where galanin facilitated acetylcholine release, but only with co-stimulation of D1-like receptors. Electrophysiological experiments in rat ventral hippocampal slices showed that these receptor interactions modulate hippocampal synaptic transmission. Thus, a D1-like receptor agonist, that was ineffective when administered alone, turned an inhibitory effect of galanin into an excitatory effect, an interaction that required cholinergic neurotransmission. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers act as processors that integrate signals of two different neurotransmitters, dopamine and acetylcholine, to modulate hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:21593325

  16. Cholinergic neurotransmission in human corpus cavernosum. II. Acetylcholine synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.; De Tejada, S.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Physiological and histochemical evidence indicates that cholinergic nerves may participate in mediating penile erection. Acetylcholine synthesis and release was studied in isolated human corporal tissue. Human corpus cavernosum incubated with [ 3 H]choline accumulated [ 3 H]choline and synthesized [ 3 H]acethylcholine in an concentration-dependent manner. [ 3 H]Acetylcholine accumulation by the tissue was inhibited by hemicholinium-3, a specific antagonist of the high-affinity choline transport in cholinergic nerves. Transmural electrical field stimulation caused release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine which was significantly diminished by inhibiting neurotransmission with calcium-free physiological salt solution or tetrodotoxin. These observations provide biochemical and physiological evidence for the existence of cholinergic innervation in human corpus cavernosum

  17. Re-emergence of striatal cholinergic interneurons in movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Ding, Jun; Surmeier, D James

    2007-10-01

    Twenty years ago, striatal cholinergic neurons were central figures in models of basal ganglia function. But since then, they have receded in importance. Recent studies are likely to lead to their re-emergence in our thinking. Cholinergic interneurons have been implicated as key players in the induction of synaptic plasticity and motor learning, as well as in motor dysfunction. In Parkinson's disease and dystonia, diminished striatal dopaminergic signalling leads to increased release of acetylcholine by interneurons, distorting network function and inducing structural changes that undoubtedly contribute to the symptoms. By contrast, in Huntington's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy, there is a fall in striatal cholinergic markers. This review gives an overview of these recent experimental and clinical studies, placing them within the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  18. ada: An R Package for Stochastic Boosting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Culp

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Boosting is an iterative algorithm that combines simple classification rules with ‘mediocre’ performance in terms of misclassification error rate to produce a highly accurate classification rule. Stochastic gradient boosting provides an enhancement which incorporates a random mechanism at each boosting step showing an improvement in performance and speed in generating the ensemble. ada is an R package that implements three popular variants of boosting, together with a version of stochastic gradient boosting. In addition, useful plots for data analytic purposes are provided along with an extension to the multi-class case. The algorithms are illustrated with synthetic and real data sets.

  19. ada: An R Package for Stochastic Boosting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Culp

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Boosting is an iterative algorithm that combines simple classification rules with "mediocre" performance in terms of misclassification error rate to produce a highly accurate classification rule. Stochastic gradient boosting provides an enhancement which incorporates a random mechanism at each boosting step showing an improvement in performance and speed in generating the ensemble. ada is an R package that implements three popular variants of boosting, together with a version of stochastic gradient boosting. In addition, useful plots for data analytic purposes are provided along with an extension to the multi-class case. The algorithms are illustrated with synthetic and real data sets.

  20. DL0410 Ameliorates Memory and Cognitive Impairments Induced by Scopolamine via Increasing Cholinergic Neurotransmission in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwen Lian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of the cholinergic system is thought to play a vital role in cognitive impairment of dementia. DL0410 was discovered as a dual inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinestease (BuChE, with potent efficiency in in-vitro experiments, but its in vivo effect on the cholinergic model has not been evaluated, and its action mechanism has also not been illustrated. In the present study, the capability of DL0410 in ameliorating the amnesia induced by scopolamine was investigated, and its effect on the cholinergic system in the hippocampus and its binding mode in the active site of AChE was also explored. Mice were administrated DL0410 (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, and 30 mg/kg, and mice treated with donepezil were used as a positive control. The Morris water maze, escape learning task, and passive avoidance task were used as behavioral tests. The test results indicated that DL0410 could significantly improve the learning and memory impairments induced by scopolamine, with 10 mg/kg performing best. Further, DL0410 inhibited the AChE activity and increased acetylcholine (ACh levels in a dose-dependent manner, and interacted with the active site of AChE in a similar manner as donepezil. However, no difference in the activity of BuChE was found in this study. All of the evidence indicated that its AChE inhibition is an important mechanism in the anti-amnesia effect. In conclusion, DL0410 could be an effective therapeutic drug for the treatment of dementia, especially Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP 1 synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported [ 3 H]acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more [ 3 H]AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP 1 vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP 2 synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of [ 3 H]vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP 1 vesicles the VP 2 vesicles had a ratio of [ 3 H]AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients α/sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP 1 and VP 2 vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP 1 and VP 2 synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena

  2. A Novel Single Switch Transformerless Quadratic DC/DC Buck-Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mostaan, Ali; A. Gorji, Saman; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    A novel quadratic buck-boost DC/DC converter is presented in this study. The proposed converter utilizes only one active switch and can step-up/down the input voltage, while the existing single switch quadratic buck/boost converters can only work in step-up or step-down mode. First, the proposed ...

  3. Pulse width modulated buck-boost five-level current source inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Gao, F.; Loh, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    -level buck-boost CSIs. Next by observing the hidden current charging path during inductive charging interval under APOD modulation, it is noted that the buck-boost five-level CSI can then be further modified with lesser active component without degrading output performance. To verify the theoretical findings...

  4. Dose-dependent effect of donepezil administration on long-term enhancement of visually evoked potentials and cholinergic receptor overexpression in rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Mira; Groleau, Marianne; Bhat, Menakshi; Vaucher, Elvire

    2016-09-01

    Stimulation of the cholinergic system tightly coupled with periods of visual stimulation boosts the processing of specific visual stimuli via muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in terms of intensity, priority and long-term effect. However, it is not known whether more diffuse pharmacological stimulation with donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is an efficient tool for enhancing visual processing and perception. The goal of the present study was to potentiate cholinergic transmission with donepezil treatment (0.5 and 1mg/kg) during a 2-week visual training to examine the effect on visually evoked potentials and to profile the expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes. The visual training was performed daily, 10min a day, for 2weeks. One week after the last training session, visual evoked potentials were recorded, or the mRNA expression level of muscarinic (M1-5) and nicotinic (α/β) receptors subunits was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The visual stimulation coupled with any of the two doses of donepezil produced significant amplitude enhancement of cortical evoked potentials compared to pre-training values. The enhancement induced by the 1mg/kg dose of donepezil was spread to neighboring spatial frequencies, suggesting a better sensitivity near the visual detection threshold. The M3, M4, M5 and α7 receptors mRNA were upregulated in the visual cortex for the higher dose of donepezil but not the lower one, and the receptors expression was stable in the somatosensory (non-visual control) cortex. Therefore, higher levels of acetylcholine within the cortex sustain the increased intensity of the cortical response and trigger the upregulation of cholinergic receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cypermethrin Poisoning and Anti-cholinergic Medication- A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 30 years old male was brought to emergency department of Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal with alleged history of consumption of pyrethroid compound 'cypermethrin'. It was found to be newer insecticide poisoning reported in Nepal. We reported this case to show effectiveness of anti-cholinergic like ...

  6. The cholinergic system, sigma-1 receptors and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, Aren; Ramakrishnan, Nisha K.; Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Nijholt, Ingrid M.; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of present knowledge regarding the relationship between the cholinergic system and sigma-1 receptors, and discusses potential applications of sigma-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of memory deficits and cognitive disorders. Sigma-1 receptors, initially

  7. Subcutaneous injection of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes in tumor-bearing mice boosts the host immune activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Yang, Man; Jia, Fumin; Kong, Hua; Zhang, Weiqi; Wang, Chaoying; Xing, Jianmin; Xie, Sishen; Xu, Haiyan

    2010-04-01

    The immunological responses induced by oxidized water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a hepatocarcinoma tumor-bearing mice model via a local administration of subcutaneous injection were investigated. Experimental results show that the subcutaneously injected carbon nanotubes induced significant activation of the complement system, promoted inflammatory cytokines' production and stimulated macrophages' phagocytosis and activation. All of these responses increased the general activity of the host immune system and inhibited the progression of tumor growth.

  8. Subcutaneous injection of water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes in tumor-bearing mice boosts the host immune activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng Jie; Yang Man; Jia Fumin; Kong Hua; Zhang Weiqi; Xu Haiyan [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences and School of Basic Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 5 Dong Dan San Tiao, Beijing 100005 (China); Wang Chaoying; Xie Sishen [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 8 Nan San Jie, Zhongguancun, Beijing100080 (China); Xing Jianmin, E-mail: xuhy@pumc.edu.cn [Centre for Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Bei San Huan Dong Lu, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2010-04-09

    The immunological responses induced by oxidized water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a hepatocarcinoma tumor-bearing mice model via a local administration of subcutaneous injection were investigated. Experimental results show that the subcutaneously injected carbon nanotubes induced significant activation of the complement system, promoted inflammatory cytokines' production and stimulated macrophages' phagocytosis and activation. All of these responses increased the general activity of the host immune system and inhibited the progression of tumor growth.

  9. Cholinergic modulation of visual and attentional brain responses in Alzheimer's disease and in health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, P.; Driver, J.; Dolan, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Visuo-attentional deficits occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are considered more responsive to pro-cholinergic therapy than characteristic memory disturbances. We hypothesised that neural responses in AD during visual attentional processing would be impaired relative to controls, yet partially susceptible to improvement with cholinesterase inhibition. We studied 16 mild AD patients and 17 age-matched healthy controls, using fMRI-scanning to enable within-subject placebo-controlled comparisons of the effects of physostigmine on stimulus- and attention-related brain activations, and to allow between-group comparisons for these. Subjects viewed stimuli comprising faces or buildings while performing a shallow judgement (colour of image) or a deep judgement (young/old age of depicted face or building). Behaviourally, AD subjects performed poorer than controls in both tasks, while physostigmine benefited AD patients for the more demanding age-judgement task. Stimulus-selective (face minus building, and vice versa) BOLD signals in precuneus and posterior parahippocampal cortex were attenuated in AD relative to controls but increased following physostigmine. By contrast, face-selective responses in fusiform cortex were not impaired in AD and showed decreases following physostigmine for both groups. Task-dependent responses in right parietal and prefrontal cortices were diminished in AD but improved following physostigmine. A similar pattern of group and treatment effects was observed in two extrastriate cortical regions that showed enhanced stimulus-selectivity for the deep versus shallow task. Finally, for the healthy group, physostigmine decreased task-dependent effects, partly due to an exaggeration of selectivity during the shallow relative to deep task. Our results demonstrate cholinergic-mediated improvements for both stimulus- and attention-dependent responses in functionally affected extrastriate and frontoparietal regions for AD. We also show that normal

  10. Effects of septal cholinergic lesion on rat exploratory behavior in an open-field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Lamprea

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The medial septum participates in the modulation of exploratory behavior triggered by novelty. Also, selective lesions of the cholinergic component of the septohippocampal system alter the habituation of rats to an elevated plus-maze without modifying anxiety indices. We investigated the effects of the intraseptal injection of the cholinergic immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin (SAP on the behavior of rats in an open-field. Thirty-nine male Wistar rats (weight: 194-230 g were divided into three groups, non-injected controls and rats injected with either saline (0.5 µl or SAP (237.5 ng/0.5 µl. Twelve days after surgery, the animals were placed in a square open-field (120 cm and allowed to freely explore for 5 min. After the test, the rats were killed by decapitation and the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex were removed and assayed for acetylcholinesterase activity. SAP increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the septum, hippocampus and frontal cortex and decreased the total distance run (9.15 ± 1.51 m in comparison to controls (13.49 ± 0.91 m. The time spent in the center and at the periphery was not altered by SAP but the distance run was reduced during the first and second minutes (2.43 ± 0.36 and 1.75 ± 0.34 m compared to controls (4.18 ± 0.26 and 3.14 ± 0.25 m. SAP-treated rats showed decreased but persistent exploration throughout the session. These results suggest that septohippocampal cholinergic mechanisms contribute to at least two critical processes, one related to the motivation to explore new environments and the other to the acquisition and storage of spatial information (i.e., spatial memory.

  11. Reduced cholinergic olfactory centrifugal inputs in patients with neurodegenerative disorders and MPTP-treated monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundiñano, Iñaki-Carril; Hernandez, Maria; Dicaudo, Carla; Ordoñez, Cristina; Marcilla, Irene; Tuñon, Maria-Teresa; Luquin, Maria-Rosario

    2013-09-01

    Olfactory impairment is a common feature of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Olfactory bulb (OB) pathology in these diseases shows an increased number of olfactory dopaminergic cells, protein aggregates and dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems. Since cholinergic denervation might be a common underlying pathophysiological feature, the objective of this study was to determine cholinergic innervation of the OB in 27 patients with histological diagnosis of PD (n = 5), AD (n = 14), DLB (n = 8) and 8 healthy control subjects. Cholinergic centrifugal inputs to the OB were clearly reduced in all patients, the most significant decrease being in the DLB group. We also studied cholinergic innervation of the OB in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated monkeys (n = 7) and 7 intact animals. In MPTP-monkeys, we found that cholinergic innervation of the OB was reduced compared to control animals (n = 7). Interestingly, in MPTP-monkeys, we also detected a loss of cholinergic neurons and decreased dopaminergic innervation in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band, which is the origin of the centrifugal cholinergic input to the OB. All these data suggest that cholinergic damage in the OB might contribute, at least in part, to the olfactory dysfunction usually exhibited by these patients. Moreover, decreased cholinergic input to the OB found in MPTP-monkeys suggests that dopamine depletion in itself might reduce the cholinergic tone of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons.

  12. Cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the central amygdala induces antinociception in the guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite-Panissi C.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA in the modulation of defensive behavior and in antinociceptive regulation. In a previous study, we demonstrated the existence of a cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the CEA, modulating the defensive response of tonic immobility in guinea pigs. In the present study, we investigated a similar interaction in the CEA, but now involved in the regulation of the nociceptive response. Microinjection of carbachol (2.7 nmol and morphine (2.2 nmol into the CEA promoted antinociception up to 45 min after microinjection in guinea pigs as determined by a decrease in the vocalization index in the vocalization test. This test consists of the application of a peripheral noxious stimulus (electric shock into the subcutaneous region of the thigh that provokes the emission of a vocalization response by the animal. Furthermore, the present results demonstrated that the antinociceptive effect of carbachol (2.7 nmol; N = 10 was blocked by previous administration of atropine (0.7 nmol; N = 7 or naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 7 into the same site. In addition, the decrease in the vocalization index induced by the microinjection of morphine (2.2 nmol; N = 9 into the CEA was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 11. All sites of injection were confirmed by histology. These results indicate the involvement of the cholinergic and opioidergic systems of the CEA in the modulation of antinociception in guinea pigs. In addition, the present study suggests that cholinergic transmission may activate the release of endorphins/enkephalins from interneurons of the CEA, resulting in antinociception.

  13. Combination of poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 enhances activation of B cells in vitro and boosts antibody responses to protein vaccines in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve M Weir

    Full Text Available Vaccines that can rapidly induce strong and robust antibody-mediated immunity could improve protection from certain infectious diseases for which current vaccine formulations are inefficient. For indications such as anthrax and influenza, antibody production in vivo is a correlate of efficacy. Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists are frequently studied for their role as vaccine adjuvants, largely because of their ability to enhance initiation of immune responses to antigens by activating dendritic cells. However, TLRs are also expressed on B cells and may contribute to effective B cell activation and promote differentiation into antigen-specific antibody producing plasma cells in vivo. We sought to discover an adjuvant system that could be used to augment antibody responses to influenza and anthrax vaccines. We first characterized an adjuvant system in vitro which consisted of two TLR ligands, poly I:C (TLR3 and Pam3CSK4 (TLR2, by evaluating its effects on B cell activation. Each agonist enhanced B cell activation through increased expression of surface receptors, cytokine secretion and proliferation. However, when B cells were stimulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in combination, further enhancement to cell activation was observed. Using B cells isolated from knockout mice we confirmed that poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 were signaling through TLR3 and TLR2, respectively. B cells activated with Poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 displayed enhanced capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation and differentiate into antibody-producing plasma cells in vitro. Mice vaccinated with influenza or anthrax antigens formulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in DepoVax™ vaccine platform developed a rapid and strong antigen-specific serum antibody titer that persisted for at least 12 weeks after a single immunization. These results demonstrate that combinations of TLR adjuvants promote more effective B cell activation in vitro and can be used to augment antibody responses

  14. Recursive bias estimation and L2 boosting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengartner, Nicolas W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre [INRA, FRANCE; Matzner - Lober, Eric [RENNE, FRANCE

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general iterative bias correction procedure for regression smoothers. This bias reduction schema is shown to correspond operationally to the L{sub 2} Boosting algorithm and provides a new statistical interpretation for L{sub 2} Boosting. We analyze the behavior of the Boosting algorithm applied to common smoothers S which we show depend on the spectrum of I - S. We present examples of common smoother for which Boosting generates a divergent sequence. The statistical interpretation suggest combining algorithm with an appropriate stopping rule for the iterative procedure. Finally we illustrate the practical finite sample performances of the iterative smoother via a simulation study.

  15. Boosting Slow Oscillatory Activity Using tDCS during Early Nocturnal Slow Wave Sleep Does Not Improve Memory Consolidation in Healthy Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paßmann, Sven; Külzow, Nadine; Ladenbauer, Julia; Antonenko, Daria; Grittner, Ulrike; Tamm, Sascha; Flöel, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an enhancement of hippocampal-dependent declarative memory consolidation, associated slow wave sleep (SWS) and slow wave activity (SWA) after weak slow oscillatory stimulation (so-tDCS) during early non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREM) in young adults. Recent studies in older individuals could not confirm these findings. However, it remained unclear if this difference was due to variations in study protocol or to the age group under study. Here, we asked if so-tDCS promotes neurophysiological events and associated sleep-dependent memory in the visuo-spatial domain in older adults, using a stimulation protocol that closely resembled the one employed in young adults. In a randomized, placebo-controlled single-blind (participant) crossover study so-tDCS (0.75 Hz; max. current density 0.522 mA/cm(2)) vs. sham stimulation was applied over the frontal cortex of 21 healthy older subjects. Impact of stimulation on frequency band activity (linear mixed models), two declarative and one procedural memory tasks (repeated measures ANOVA) and percentage of sleep stages (comparison of means) was assessed. so-tDCS, as compared to sham, increased SWA and spindle activity immediately following stimulation, accompanied by significantly impaired visuo-spatial memory consolidation. Furthermore, verbal and procedural memory remained unchanged, while percentage of NREM sleep stage 4 was decreased over the entire night (uncorrected). so-tDCS increased SWA and spindle activity in older adults, events previously associated with stimulation-induced improved consolidation of declarative memories in young subjects. However, consolidation of visuo-spatial (primary outcome) and verbal memories was not beneficially modulated, possibly due to decline in SWS over the entire night that may have prevented and even reversed immediate beneficial effects of so-tDCS on SWA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cholinergic Potentiation of Restoration of Visual Function after Optic Nerve Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Chamoun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing cortical plasticity and brain connectivity may improve residual vision following a visual impairment. Since acetylcholine plays an important role in attention and neuronal plasticity, we explored whether potentiation of the cholinergic transmission has an effect on the visual function restoration. To this end, we evaluated for 4 weeks the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on brightness discrimination, visually evoked potentials, and visual cortex reactivity after a bilateral and partial optic nerve crush in adult rats. Donepezil administration enhanced brightness discrimination capacity after optic nerve crush compared to nontreated animals. The visually evoked activation of the primary visual cortex was not restored, as measured by evoked potentials, but the cortical neuronal activity measured by thallium autometallography was not significantly affected four weeks after the optic nerve crush. Altogether, the results suggest a role of the cholinergic system in postlesion cortical plasticity. This finding agrees with the view that restoration of visual function may involve mechanisms beyond the area of primary damage and opens a new perspective for improving visual rehabilitation in humans.

  17. Cholinergic receptors: functional role of nicotinic ACh receptors in brain circuits and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakel, Jerrel L

    2013-04-01

    The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) can regulate neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system by acting on both the cys-loop ligand-gated nicotinic ACh receptor channels (nAChRs) and the G protein-coupled muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs). The hippocampus is an important area in the brain for learning and memory, where both nAChRs and mAChRs are expressed. The primary cholinergic input to the hippocampus arises from the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca, the activation of which can activate both nAChRs and mAChRs in the hippocampus and regulate synaptic communication and induce oscillations that are thought to be important for cognitive function. Dysfunction in the hippocampal cholinergic system has been linked with cognitive deficits and a variety of neurological disorders and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. My lab has focused on the role of the nAChRs in regulating hippocampal function, from understanding the expression and functional properties of the various subtypes of nAChRs, and what role these receptors may be playing in regulating synaptic plasticity. Here, I will briefly review this work, and where we are going in our attempts to further understand the role of these receptors in learning and memory, as well as in disease and neuroprotection.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane on cholinergic neurons in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Jingzhu; Fang, Lingduo; Li, Xi; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Wanying; An, Li

    2014-08-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disease in elderly individuals, and effective therapies are unavailable. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of sulforaphane (an activator of NF-E2-related factor 2) on mice with AD-like lesions induced by combined administration of aluminum and D-galactose. Step-down-type passive avoidance tests showed sulforaphane ameliorated cognitive impairment in AD-like mice. Immunohistochemistry results indicated sulforaphane attenuated cholinergic neuron loss in the medial septal and hippocampal CA1 regions in AD-like mice. However, spectrophotometry revealed no significant difference in acetylcholine level or the activity of choline acetyltransferase or acetylcholinesterase in the cerebral cortex among groups of control and AD-like mice with and without sulforaphane treatment. Sulforaphane significantly increased the numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive neurons in the subventricular and subgranular zones in AD-like mice which were significantly augmented compared with controls. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed significantly lower aluminum levels in the brains of sulforaphane-treated AD-like mice than in those that did not receive sulforaphane treatment. In conclusion, sulforaphane ameliorates neurobehavioral deficits by reducing cholinergic neuron loss in the brains of AD-like mice, and the mechanism may be associated with neurogenesis and aluminum load reduction. These findings suggest that phytochemical sulforaphane has potential application in AD therapeutics.

  19. Cholinergic Potentiation of Restoration of Visual Function after Optic Nerve Damage in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Mira; Sergeeva, Elena G.; Henrich-Noack, Petra; Jia, Shaobo; Grigartzik, Lisa; Ma, Jing; You, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Enhancing cortical plasticity and brain connectivity may improve residual vision following a visual impairment. Since acetylcholine plays an important role in attention and neuronal plasticity, we explored whether potentiation of the cholinergic transmission has an effect on the visual function restoration. To this end, we evaluated for 4 weeks the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on brightness discrimination, visually evoked potentials, and visual cortex reactivity after a bilateral and partial optic nerve crush in adult rats. Donepezil administration enhanced brightness discrimination capacity after optic nerve crush compared to nontreated animals. The visually evoked activation of the primary visual cortex was not restored, as measured by evoked potentials, but the cortical neuronal activity measured by thallium autometallography was not significantly affected four weeks after the optic nerve crush. Altogether, the results suggest a role of the cholinergic system in postlesion cortical plasticity. This finding agrees with the view that restoration of visual function may involve mechanisms beyond the area of primary damage and opens a new perspective for improving visual rehabilitation in humans. PMID:28928986

  20. Characterization of the cellulolytic secretome of Trichoderma harzianum during growth on sugarcane bagasse and analysis of the activity boosting effects of swollenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A L Rocha, Vanessa; N Maeda, Roberto; Pereira, Nei; F Kern, Marcelo; Elias, Luisa; Simister, Rachael; Steele-King, Clare; Gómez, Leonardo D; McQueen-Mason, Simon J

    2016-03-01

    This study demonstrates the production of an active enzyme cocktail produced by growing Trichoderma harzianum on sugarcane bagasse. The component enzymes were identified by LCMS-MS. Glycosyl hydrolases were the most abundant class of proteins, representing 67% of total secreted protein. Other carbohydrate active enzymes involved in cell wall deconstruction included lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (AA9), carbohydrate-binding modules, carbohydrate esterases and swollenin, all present at levels of 1%. In total, proteases and lipases represented 5 and 1% of the total secretome, respectively, with the rest of the secretome being made up of proteins of unknown or putative function. This enzyme cocktail was efficient in catalysing the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse cellulolignin to fermentable sugars for potential use in ethanol production. Apart from mapping the secretome of T. harzianum, which is a very important tool to understand the catalytic performance of enzyme cocktails, the gene coding for T. harzianum swollenin was expressed in Aspergillus niger. This novel aspect in this work, allowed increasing the swollenin concentration by 95 fold. This is the first report about the heterologous expression of swollenin from T. harzianum, and the findings are of interest in enriching enzyme cocktail with this important accessory protein which takes part in the cellulose amorphogenesis. Despite lacking detectable glycoside activity, the addition of swollenin of T. harzianum increased by two-fold the hydrolysis efficiency of a commercial cellulase cocktail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:327-336, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  1. Protective Role of Quercetin in Cadmium-Induced Cholinergic Dysfunctions in Rat Brain by Modulating Mitochondrial Integrity and MAP Kinase Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Richa; Shukla, Rajendra K; Chandravanshi, Lalit P; Srivastava, Pranay; Dhuriya, Yogesh K; Shanker, Jai; Singh, Manjul P; Pant, Aditya B; Khanna, Vinay K

    2017-08-01

    With the increasing evidences of cadmium-induced cognitive deficits associated with brain cholinergic dysfunctions, the present study aimed to decipher molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective efficacy of quercetin in rats. A decrease in the binding of cholinergic-muscarinic receptors and mRNA expression of cholinergic receptor genes (M1, M2, and M4) was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus on exposure of rats to cadmium (5.0 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) for 28 days compared to controls. Cadmium exposure resulted to decrease mRNA and protein expressions of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and enhance reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions, ultrastructural changes, and learning deficits. Enhanced apoptosis, as evidenced by alterations in key proteins involved in the pro- and anti-apoptotic pathway and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling, was evident on cadmium exposure. Simultaneous treatment with quercetin (25 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) resulted to protect cadmium-induced alterations in cholinergic-muscarinic receptors, mRNA expression of genes (M1, M2, and M4), and expression of ChAT and AChE. The protective effect on brain cholinergic targets was attributed to the antioxidant potential of quercetin, which reduced ROS generation and protected mitochondrial integrity by modulating proteins involved in apoptosis and MAP kinase signaling. The results exhibit that quercetin may modulate molecular targets involved in brain cholinergic signaling and attenuate cadmium neurotoxicity.

  2. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the cluster Hα active galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  3. Pilot of the BOOST-A™: An online transition planning program for adolescents with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Megan; Murray, Nina; Ciccarelli, Marina; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Falkmer, Marita

    2017-12-01

    Many adolescents with autism face difficulties with the transition from high school into post-school activities. The Better OutcOmes & Successful Transitions for Autism (BOOST-A™) is an online transition planning program which supports adolescents on the autism spectrum to prepare for leaving school. This study describes the development of the BOOST-A™ and aimed to determine the feasibility and viability of the program. Two pilot studies were conducted. In Pilot A, the BOOST-A™ was trialled by six adolescents on the autism spectrum, their parents, and the professionals who worked with them, to determine its feasibility. In Pilot B, 88 allied health professionals (occupational therapists, speech pathologists, and psychologists) reviewed the BOOST-A™ to determine its viability. Participants rated the BOOST-A™ as a feasible tool for transition planning. The majority of allied health professionals agreed that it was a viable program. Based on participant feedback, the BOOST-A™ was modified to improve usability and feasibility. The BOOST-A™ is a viable and feasible program that has the potential to assist adolescents with autism in preparing for transitioning out of high school. Future research will determine the effectiveness of the BOOST-A™ with adolescents across Australia. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  4. Advanced Airfoils Boost Helicopter Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Carson Helicopters Inc. licensed the Langley RC4 series of airfoils in 1993 to develop a replacement main rotor blade for their Sikorsky S-61 helicopters. The company's fleet of S-61 helicopters has been rebuilt to include Langley's patented airfoil design, and the helicopters are now able to carry heavier loads and fly faster and farther, and the main rotor blades have twice the previous service life. In aerial firefighting, the performance-boosting airfoils have helped the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service control the spread of wildfires. In 2003, Carson Helicopters signed a contract with Ducommun AeroStructures Inc., to manufacture the composite blades for Carson Helicopters to sell

  5. ATLAS boosted object tagging 2

    CERN Document Server

    Caudron, Julien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study into the optimal techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. Various algorithms for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets are compared for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 8 TeV data and 8 TeV and 13 TeV MC simulations. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons. The modeling of the tagging variables used in this technique is studied using 8 TeV pp collision data and systematic uncertainties for the tagger efficiency and fake rates are evaluated.

  6. Cholinergic receptor binding in the frontal cortex of suicide victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.

    1986-01-01

    Because there is a high incidence of individuals diagnosed as having an affective disorder who subsequently commit suicide, the author thought it would be of interest to determine QNB binding in the brains of a large sample of suicide victims, and to compare the findings with a well-matched control group. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from 22 suicide victims and 22 controls. Frontal cortex samples were diseected, frozen, and stored until assayed. Samples of tissue homogenate were incubated in duplicate with 10 concentrations of tritium-QNB. Specific binding was determined with and without atropine. The results confirmed previous studies in which no changes were noted in suicide versus control brains. While the findings neither disprove nor support the cholinergic hypothesis of depression, they do suggest that the neurochemical basis for the in vivo observations of increased responsivity of depressed individuals to muscarinic cholinergic agents might not involve changes in receptors estimated by QNB binding

  7. Cholinergic modulation of the hippocampal region and memory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haam, Juhee; Yakel, Jerrel L

    2017-08-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in memory function and has been implicated in aging-related dementia, in which the impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning strongly manifests. Cholinergic neurons densely innervate the hippocampus, mediating the formation of episodic as well as semantic memory. Here, we will review recent findings on acetylcholine's modulation of memory function, with a particular focus on hippocampus-dependent learning, and the circuits involved. In addition, we will discuss the complexity of ACh actions in memory function to better understand the physiological role of ACh in memory. This is an article for the special issue XVth International Symposium on Cholinergic Mechanisms. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Preparation of modulators of cholinesterases and cholinergic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Röder, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Title: Preparation of modulators of cholinesterases and cholinergic receptors Author: Jan Röder Organophosphorus compounds are widely used as pesticides and were also misused as chemical warfare agents. Up to date, the pre-exposure treatment of organophosphorus compounds intoxication consists in use of carbamate cholinesterase inhibitors. Carbamates act as reversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and thus protect it against irreversible inhibition with organophosphorus compounds. ...

  9. Facile synthesis of prickly platinum-palladium core-shell nanocrystals and their boosted electrocatalytic activity towards polyhydric alcohols oxidation and hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong-Ning; He, Ya-Mei; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Zhang, Qian-Li; Zhang, Lu; Wu, Liang; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2018-04-15

    Herein, prickly platinum-palladium core-shell nanocrystals (Pt@Pd NCs) were prepared by a facile one-pot aqueous method, only taking sodium pyrrolidone carboxylate (PCA-Na) as the structure director and stabilizing agent. The products were mainly characterized by microscopic analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), followed by discussing the formation mechanism in details. The electrochemical characterizations were examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The results revealed that the prepared architectures had the biggest current density (58.4 mA cm -2 ) for ethylene glycol oxidation, which is 3.5-fold, 1.2-fold, 2.3-fold and 2.4-flod enhancement relative to those of home-made single Pt nanoparticles (NPs) and Pd NPs, commercial Pt black and Pd black catalysts, respectively. Also, the obtained Pt@Pd NCs showed improved catalytic activity and stability towards glycerol oxidation and hydrogen evolution reactions compared to the references. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Delirium Accompanied by Cholinergic Deficiency and Organ Failure in a 73-Year-Old Critically Ill Patient: Physostigmine as a Therapeutic Option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Zujalovic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a common problem in ICU patients, resulting in prolonged ICU stay and increased mortality. A cholinergic deficiency in the central nervous system is supposed to be a relevant pathophysiologic process in delirium. Acetylcholine is a major transmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system influencing several organs (e.g., heart and kidneys and the inflammatory response too. This perception might explain that delirium is not an individual symptom, but rather a part of a symptom complex with various disorders of the whole organism. The cholinergic deficiency could not be quantified up to now. Using the possibility of bedside determination of the acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE activity, we assumed to objectify the cholinergic homeostasis within minutes. As reported here, the postoperative delirium was accompanied by a massive hemodynamic and renal deterioration of unclear genesis. We identified the altered AChE activity as a plausible pathophysiological mechanism. The pharmacological intervention with the indirect parasympathomimetic physostigmine led to a quick and lasting improvement of the patient’s cognitive, hemodynamic, and renal status. In summary, severe delirium is not always an attendant phenomenon of critical illness. It might be causal for multiple organ deterioration if it is based on cholinergic deficiency and has to be treated at his pathophysiological roots whenever possible.

  11. Electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost in the conservative treatment of stage I-II breast cancer. First results of the randomized Budapest boost trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Fodor, J.; Orosz, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Background and Aims: To evaluate the effect of electron and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) boost on local tumor control (LTC), side effects and cosmesis after breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in a prospective randomized study. Patients and Methods: 207 women with stage I-II breast cancer who underwent BCS were treated by 50 Gy irradiation to the whole breast and then randomly assigned to receive either a boost to the tumor bed (n=104) or no further radiotherapy (n=103). Boost treatments consisted of either 16 Gy electron irradiation (n=52) or 12-14.25 Gy HDR BT (n=52). Breast cancer-related events, side effects, and cosmetic results were assessed. Results: At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the crude rate of local recurrence was 6.7% (7/104) with and 15.5% (16/103) without boost. The 5-year probability of LTC, relapse-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 92.7% vs 84.9% (p=0.049), 76.6% vs 66.2% (p=0.044), and 90.4% vs. 82.1% (p=0.053), respectively. There was no significant difference in LTC between patients treated with electron or HDR BT boost (94.2% vs 91.4%; p=0.74). On multivariate analysis, patient age <40 years (RR: 4.53), positive margin status (RR: 4.17), and high mitotic activity index (RR: 3.60) were found to be significant risk factors for local recurrence. The incidence of grade 2-3 side effects was higher in the boost arm (17.3% vs 7.8%; p=0.03). However, the rate of excellent/good cosmetic results was similar for the two arms (85.6% vs 91.3%; p=0.14). Cosmesis was rated as excellent/good in 88.5% of patients treated with HDR BT and 82.7% of patients with electron boost (p=0.29). Conclusions: Boost dose significantly improves LTC and RFS in patients treated with BCS and radiotherapy. In spite of the higher incidence of late side effects in the boost arm, boost dose is strongly recommended for patients at high risk for local recurrence. Positive or close margin status, high mitotic activity index, and young patient age

  12. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  13. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction

  14. Alterations in alpha-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding in rat brain following nonionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, V.C.; Ross, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    Microwave radiation produces hyperthermia. The mammalian thermoregulatory system defends against changes in temperature by mobilizing diverse control mechanisms. Neurotransmitters play a major role in eliciting thermoregulatory responses. The involvement of adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors was investigated in radiation-induced hyperthermia. Rats were subjected to radiation at 700 MHz frequency and 15 mW/cm/sup 2/ power density and the body temperature was raised by 2.5 degrees C. Of six brain regions investigated only the hypothalamus showed significant changes in receptor states, confirming its pivotal role in thermoregulation. Adrenergic receptors, studied by (/sup 3/H)clonidine binding, showed a 36% decrease in binding following radiation after a 2.5 degrees C increase in body temperature, suggesting a mechanism to facilitate norepinephrine release. Norepinephrine may be speculated to maintain thermal homeostasis by activating heat dissipation. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors, studied by (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, showed a 65% increase in binding at the onset of radiation. This may be attributed to the release of acetylcholine in the hypothalamus in response to heat cumulation. The continued elevated binding during the period of cooling after radiation was shut off may suggest the existence of an extra-hypothalamic heat-loss pathway.

  15. Opposing Cholinergic and Serotonergic Modulation of Layer 6 in Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Daniel W; Tian, Michael K; Sargin, Derya; Venkatesan, Sridevi; Intson, Katheron; Lambe, Evelyn K

    2017-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex is a hub for attention processing and receives abundant innervation from cholinergic and serotonergic afferents. A growing body of evidence suggests that acetylcholine (ACh) and serotonin (5-HT) have opposing influences on tasks requiring attention, but the underlying neurophysiology of their opposition is unclear. One candidate target population is medial prefrontal layer 6 pyramidal neurons, which provide feedback modulation of the thalamus, as well as feed-forward excitation of cortical interneurons. Here, we assess the response of these neurons to ACh and 5-HT using whole cell recordings in acute brain slices from mouse cortex. With application of exogenous agonists, we show that individual layer 6 pyramidal neurons are bidirectionally-modulated, with ACh and 5-HT exerting opposite effects on excitability across a number of concentrations. Next, we tested the responses of layer 6 pyramidal neurons to optogenetic release of endogenous ACh or 5-HT. These experiments were performed in brain slices from transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin in either ChAT-expressing cholinergic neurons or Pet1-expressing serotonergic neurons. Light-evoked endogenous neuromodulation recapitulated the effects of exogenous neurotransmitters, showing opposing modulation of layer 6 pyramidal neurons by ACh and 5-HT. Lastly, the addition of 5-HT to either endogenous or exogenous ACh significantly suppressed the excitation of pyramidal neurons in prefrontal layer 6. Taken together, this work suggests that the major corticothalamic layer of prefrontal cortex is a substrate for opposing modulatory influences on neuronal activity that could have implications for regulation of attention.

  16. Elements of molecular machinery of GABAergic signaling in the vertebrate cholinergic neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurullin, Leniz F; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Malomouzh, Artem I

    2018-04-01

    It is generally accepted that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a signaling molecule abundant in central synapses. In a number of studies though, it has been shown that GABA signaling functions in the peripheral nervous system as well, in particular, in the synapses of sympathetic ganglia. However, there exists no firm evidence on the presence of GABAergic signaling cascade in the intercellular junctions of the somatic nerve system. By the use of immunohistochemistry methods, in the synaptic area of cholinergic neuromuscular contact in rat diaphragm, we have detected glutamate decarboxylase, the enzyme involved in synthesis of GABA, molecules of GABA, and also GAT-2, a protein responsible for transmembrane transport of GABA. Earlier we have also shown that metabotropic GABA B receptors have overlapping localization in the same compartment. Moreover, activation of GABA B receptors affects the intensity of acetylcholine release. These data taken together, allows us to suggest that in the mammalian cholinergic neuromuscular junction, GABA is synthesized and performs certain synaptic signaling function. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  17. The cholinergic agonist carbachol increases the frequency of spontaneous GABAergic synaptic currents in dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Brown, R E

    2014-01-31

    Dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) serotonin (5-HT) neurons play an important role in feeding, mood control and stress responses. One important feature of their activity across the sleep-wake cycle is their reduced firing during rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep which stands in stark contrast to the wake/REM-on discharge pattern of brainstem cholinergic neurons. A prominent model of REM sleep control posits a reciprocal interaction between these cell groups. 5-HT inhibits cholinergic neurons, and activation of nicotinic receptors can excite DRN 5-HT neurons but the cholinergic effect on inhibitory inputs is incompletely understood. Here, in vitro, in DRN brain slices prepared from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, a brief (3 min) bath application of carbachol (50 μM) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in GFP-negative, putative 5-HT neurons but did not affect miniature (tetrodotoxin-insensitive) IPSCs. Carbachol had no direct postsynaptic effect. Thus, carbachol likely increases the activity of local GABAergic neurons which synapse on 5-HT neurons. Removal of dorsal regions of the slice including the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG) region where GABAergic neurons projecting to the DRN have been identified, abolished the effect of carbachol on sIPSCs whereas the removal of ventral regions containing the oral region of the pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) did not. In addition, carbachol directly excited GFP-positive, GABAergic vlPAG neurons. Antagonism of both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors completely abolished the effects of carbachol. We suggest cholinergic neurons inhibit DRN 5-HT neurons when acetylcholine levels are lower i.e. during quiet wakefulness and the beginning of REM sleep periods, in part via excitation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors located on local vlPAG and DRN GABAergic neurons. Higher firing rates or burst firing of cholinergic neurons associated with attentive wakefulness or phasic REM sleep periods

  18. [Properties of cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on type I vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Kong, Wei-Jia; Xia, Jiao; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Hua-Mao; Guo, Chang-Kai

    2008-06-25

    To confirm the existence of cholinergic receptors on type I vestibular hair cells (VHCs I) of guinea pigs and to study the properties of the cholinergic receptor-mediated ion channels on VHCs I, electrophysiological responses of isolated VHCs I to external ACh were examined by means of whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. The results showed that 7.5% (21/279) VHCs I were found to be sensitive to ACh (10-1000 μmol/L). ACh generated an outward current in a steady, slow, dose-dependent [EC(50) was (63.78±2.31) μmol/L] and voltage-independent manner. In standard extracellular solution, ACh at the concentration of 100 μmol/L triggered a calcium-dependent current of (170±15) pA at holding potential of -50 mV, and the current amplitude could be depressed by extracellularly added calcium-dependent potassium channel antagonist TEA. The time interval for the next complete activation of ACh-sensitive current was no less than 1 min. The ion channels did not shut off even when they were exposed to ACh for an extended period of time (8 min). The results suggest that dose-dependent, calcium-dependent and voltage-independent cholinergic receptors were located on a few of the VHCs I investibular epithelium of guinea pigs. The cholinergic receptors did not show desensitization to ACh. This work reveals the existence of efferent neurotransmitter receptors on VHCs I and helps in understanding the function of vestibular efferent nervous system, and may provide some useful information on guiding the clinical rehabilitative treatment of vertigo.

  19. Quantitative Imaging of Cholinergic Interneurons Reveals a Distinctive Spatial Organization and a Functional Gradient across the Mouse Striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Matamales

    Full Text Available Information processing in the striatum requires the postsynaptic integration of glutamatergic and dopaminergic signals, which are then relayed to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia to influence behavior. Although cellularly homogeneous in appearance, the striatum contains several rare interneuron populations which tightly modulate striatal function. Of these, cholinergic interneurons (CINs have been recently shown to play a critical role in the control of reward-related learning; however how the striatal cholinergic network is functionally organized at the mesoscopic level and the way this organization influences striatal function remains poorly understood. Here, we systematically mapped and digitally reconstructed the entire ensemble of CINs in the mouse striatum and quantitatively assessed differences in densities, spatial arrangement and neuropil content across striatal functional territories. This approach demonstrated that the rostral portion of the striatum contained a higher concentration of CINs than the caudal striatum and that the cholinergic content in the core of the ventral striatum was significantly lower than in the rest of the regions. Additionally, statistical comparison of spatial point patterns in the striatal cholinergic ensemble revealed that only a minor portion of CINs (17% aggregated into cluster and that they were predominantly organized in a random fashion. Furthermore, we used a fluorescence reporter to estimate the activity of over two thousand CINs in naïve mice and found that there was a decreasing gradient of CIN overall function along the dorsomedial-to-ventrolateral axis, which appeared to be independent of their propensity to aggregate within the striatum. Altogether this work suggests that the regulation of striatal function by acetylcholine across the striatum is highly heterogeneous, and that signals originating in external afferent systems may be principally determining the function of CINs in the

  20. The development of the cholinergic system in rat hippocampus following postnatal X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Barak, J.

    1981-01-01

    Postnatal X-irradiation of the rat hippocampus results in a marked reduction in the number of the postnatally developing granular neurons in the dentate gyrus and also caused a marked increase in the specific activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) and a slight but consistent increase in the activity per whole hippocampus of AChE. The effect of irradiation on the granular neurons and on the cholinergic enzymes was found to be dose and age dependent. Drastic increase in specific enzymatic activities is also observed in the irradiated cerebellum whose granular neurons differentiate postnatally and to a lesser extent in the cerebral cortex in which cell formation is accomplished prior to birth. (Auth.)

  1. Metabolic changes in deafferented central neurons of an insect, Acheta domesticus. II. Effects on cholinergic binding sites and acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M R; Reddy, G R; Edwards, J S

    1986-06-01

    Following the finding that cercal deafferentation of developing giant interneurons in the terminal abdominal ganglion (TG) of the cricket Acheta domesticus reduces TG protein metabolism within target interneuron dendrites and somata (Meyer and Edwards, 1982), it is now shown that deafferentation alters the turnover of three macromolecules associated with cholinergic transmission in the cercal sensory-giant interneuron pathway. The labeled specific ligands 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin were used to assay populations of putative TG muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors, respectively, in control and deafferented groups of ganglia. The AChE activity of TG was also determined by assay and histochemical methods. Long-term deafferentation sustained throughout postembryonic development markedly reduces the densities of both muscarinic and nicotinic binding sites in the TG; short-term deafferentation of adult TG also leads to characteristic alterations in the properties of all three cholinergic markers within several days. Rapid changes seen in adults thus correlate with ultrastructural data demonstrating loss of afferent terminals within hours of sensory appendage removal. We propose that peripheral innervation-dependent regulatory mechanisms operate in both the developing and adult insect nervous system. Such mechanisms may influence transsynaptically the synthesis and turnover of specific macromolecules, some of which may reside on the cell surface of insect central neurons that are part of the cercal sensory-giant interneuron system.

  2. Effects of Pyridostigmine in Flinders Line Rats Differing in Cholinergic Sensitivity (AIBS GWI 0055)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Overstreet, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The second aim was to determine whether pyridostigmine had prophylactic effects against the organophosphates chlorpyrifos and diisopropylfluorophosphate regardless of innate cholinergic sensitivity...

  3. Development of myenteric cholinergic neurons in ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Marlene M; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2013-10-01

    Cholinergic neurons are the major excitatory neurons of the enteric nervous system (ENS), and include intrinsic sensory neurons, interneurons, and excitatory motor neurons. Cholinergic neurons have been detected in the embryonic ENS; however, the development of these neurons has been difficult to study as they are difficult to detect prior to birth using conventional immunohistochemistry. In this study we used ChAT-Cre;R26R-YFP mice to examine the development of cholinergic neurons in the gut of embryonic and postnatal mice. Cholinergic (YFP+) neurons were first detected at embryonic day (E)11.5, and the proportion of cholinergic neurons gradually increased during pre- and postnatal development. At birth, myenteric cholinergic neurons comprised less than half of their adult proportions in the small intestine (25% of myenteric neurons were YFP+ at P0 compared to 62% in adults). The earliest cholinergic neurons appear to mainly project anally. Projections into the presumptive circular muscle were first observed at E14.5. A subpopulation of cholinergic neurons coexpress calbindin through embryonic and postnatal development, but only a small proportion coexpressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Our study shows that cholinergic neurons in the ENS develop over a protracted period of time. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self-Esteem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... desktop! more... Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem Article Chapters Orthodontics Align Crooked Teeth and Boost Self- esteem print full article print this chapter email this ...

  5. Boost-phase discrimination research activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David M.; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical research in two areas was performed. The aerothermodynamics research focused on the hard-body and rocket plume flows. Analytical real gas models to describe finite rate chemistry were developed and incorporated into the three-dimensional flow codes. New numerical algorithms capable of treating multi-species reacting gas equations and treating flows with large gradients were also developed. The computational chemistry research focused on the determination of spectral radiative intensity factors, transport properties and reaction rates. Ab initio solutions to the Schrodinger equation provided potential energy curves transition moments (radiative probabilities and strengths) and potential energy surfaces. These surfaces were then coupled with classical particle reactive trajectories to compute reaction cross-sections and rates.

  6. Speak, Move, Play and Learn with Children on the Autism Spectrum: Activities to Boost Communication Skills, Sensory Integration and Coordination Using Simple Ideas from Speech and Language Pathology and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Lois Jean; Gonzalez, America X.; Zawadzki, Maciej; Presley, Corinda

    2012-01-01

    This practical resource is brimming with ideas and guidance for using simple ideas from speech and language pathology and occupational therapy to boost communication, sensory integration, and coordination skills in children on the autism spectrum. Suitable for use in the classroom, at home, and in community settings, it is packed with…

  7. Modeling of asymmetrical boost converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Isabel Arango Zuluaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrical interleaved dual boost (AIDB is a fifth-order DC/DC converter designed to interface photovoltaic (PV panels. The AIDB produces small current harmonics to the PV panels, reducing the power losses caused by the converter operation. Moreover, the AIDB provides a large voltage conversion ratio, which is required to step-up the PV voltage to the large dc-link voltage used in grid-connected inverters. To reject irradiance and load disturbances, the AIDB must be operated in a closed-loop and a dynamic model is required. Given that the AIDB converter operates in Discontinuous Conduction Mode (DCM, classical modeling approaches based on Continuous Conduction Mode (CCM are not valid. Moreover, classical DCM modeling techniques are not suitable for the AIDB converter. Therefore, this paper develops a novel mathematical model for the AIDB converter, which is suitable for control-pur-poses. The proposed model is based on the calculation of a diode current that is typically disregarded. Moreover, because the traditional correction to the second duty cycle reported in literature is not effective, a new equation is designed. The model accuracy is contrasted with circuital simulations in time and frequency domains, obtaining satisfactory results. Finally, the usefulness of the model in control applications is illustrated with an application example.

  8. Nicotine increases impulsivity and decreases willingness to exert cognitive effort despite improving attention in "slacker" rats: insights into cholinergic regulation of cost/benefit decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay G Hosking

    Full Text Available Successful decision making in our daily lives requires weighing an option's costs against its associated benefits. The neuromodulator acetylcholine underlies both the etiology and treatment of a number of illnesses in which decision making is perturbed, including Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and schizophrenia. Nicotine acts on the cholinergic system and has been touted as a cognitive enhancer by both smokers and some researchers for its attention-boosting effects; however, it is unclear whether treatments that have a beneficial effect on attention would also have a beneficial effect on decision making. Here we utilize the rodent Cognitive Effort Task (rCET, wherein animals can choose to allocate greater visuospatial attention for a greater reward, to examine cholinergic contributions to both attentional performance and choice based on attentional demand. Following the establishment of baseline behavior, four drug challenges were administered: nicotine, mecamylamine, scopolamine, and oxotremorine (saline plus three doses for each. As per previous rCET studies, animals were divided by their baseline preferences, with "worker" rats choosing high-effort/high-reward options more than their "slacker" counterparts. Nicotine caused slackers to choose even fewer high-effort trials than at baseline, but had no effect on workers' choice. Despite slackers' decreased willingness to expend effort, nicotine improved their attentional performance on the task. Nicotine also increased measures of motor impulsivity in all animals. In contrast, scopolamine decreased animals' choice of high-effort trials, especially for workers, while oxotremorine decreased motor impulsivity for all animals. In sum, the cholinergic system appears to contribute to decision making, and in part these contributions can be understood as a function of individual differences. While nicotine has been considered as a cognitive enhancer, these data suggest

  9. CANCER Escape from senescence boosts tumour growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Jan Paul

    2018-01-01

    Some chemotherapies block cancer growth by driving tumour cells into a state of cell-division arrest termed senescence. It emerges that such cells have a boosted capacity to drive tumour growth if they exit senescence

  10. Boosting Learning Algorithm for Stock Price Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengzhang; Bai, Xiaoming

    2018-03-01

    To tackle complexity and uncertainty of stock market behavior, more studies have introduced machine learning algorithms to forecast stock price. ANN (artificial neural network) is one of the most successful and promising applications. We propose a boosting-ANN model in this paper to predict the stock close price. On the basis of boosting theory, multiple weak predicting machines, i.e. ANNs, are assembled to build a stronger predictor, i.e. boosting-ANN model. New error criteria of the weak studying machine and rules of weights updating are adopted in this study. We select technical factors from financial markets as forecasting input variables. Final results demonstrate the boosting-ANN model works better than other ones for stock price forecasting.

  11. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  12. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, Nis Pedersen; Hoegsberg Schleimann, Mariane; Alstrup, Aage K.O.; Knudsen, Karoline; Jakobsen, Steen; Bender, Dirk; Gormsen, Lars C.; Borghammer, Per; Mortensen, Frank V.; Madsen, Line Bille; Breining, Peter; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik

    2017-01-01

    Immune cells utilize acetylcholine as a paracrine-signaling molecule. Many white blood cells express components of the cholinergic signaling pathway, and these are up-regulated when immune cells are activated. However, in vivo molecular imaging of cholinergic signaling in the context of inflammation has not previously been investigated. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analogue 18F-FDG, and 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV, markers of acetylcholinesterase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, respectively. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h and remained stable. The 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV uptake displayed progressive increase, and at 120-144 h was nearly at the FDG level. Moderate 11C-donepezil and slightly lower 18F-FEOBV uptake were seen in pig abscesses. PCR analyses suggested that the 11C-donepezil signal in inflammatory cells is derived from both acetylcholinesterase and sigma-1 receptors. In humans, very high 11C-donepezil uptake was seen in a lobar pneumonia and in peri-tumoral inflammation surrounding a non-small cell lung carcinoma, markedly superseding the 18F-FDG uptake in the inflammation. In a renal clear cell carcinoma no 11C-donepezil uptake was seen. The time course of cholinergic tracer accumulation in murine abscesses was considerably different from 18F-FDG, demonstrating in the 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV image distinct aspects of immune modulation. Preliminary data in humans strongly suggest that 11C-donepezil can exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic

  13. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using {sup 11}C-donepezil and {sup 18}F-FEOBV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Nis Pedersen; Hoegsberg Schleimann, Mariane [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Aarhus (Denmark); Alstrup, Aage K.O.; Knudsen, Karoline; Jakobsen, Steen; Bender, Dirk; Gormsen, Lars C.; Borghammer, Per [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus C (Denmark); Mortensen, Frank V. [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Aarhus (Denmark); Madsen, Line Bille [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Histopathology, Aarhus (Denmark); Breining, Peter [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Aarhus (Denmark); Petersen, Mikkel Steen [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus (Denmark); Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederik [Aarhus University, Department of Biomedicine, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Immune cells utilize acetylcholine as a paracrine-signaling molecule. Many white blood cells express components of the cholinergic signaling pathway, and these are up-regulated when immune cells are activated. However, in vivo molecular imaging of cholinergic signaling in the context of inflammation has not previously been investigated. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) using the glucose analogue 18F-FDG, and 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV, markers of acetylcholinesterase and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter, respectively. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h and remained stable. The 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV uptake displayed progressive increase, and at 120-144 h was nearly at the FDG level. Moderate 11C-donepezil and slightly lower 18F-FEOBV uptake were seen in pig abscesses. PCR analyses suggested that the 11C-donepezil signal in inflammatory cells is derived from both acetylcholinesterase and sigma-1 receptors. In humans, very high 11C-donepezil uptake was seen in a lobar pneumonia and in peri-tumoral inflammation surrounding a non-small cell lung carcinoma, markedly superseding the 18F-FDG uptake in the inflammation. In a renal clear cell carcinoma no 11C-donepezil uptake was seen. The time course of cholinergic tracer accumulation in murine abscesses was considerably different from 18F-FDG, demonstrating in the 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV image distinct aspects of immune modulation. Preliminary data in humans strongly suggest that 11C-donepezil can exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic

  14. Top reconstruction and boosted top experimental overview

    CERN Document Server

    Skinnari, Louise

    2015-01-01

    An overview of techniques used to reconstruct resolved and boosted top quarks is presented. Techniques for resolved top quark reconstruction include kinematic likelihood fitters and pseudo- top reconstruction. Many tools and methods are available for the reconstruction of boosted top quarks, such as jet grooming techniques, jet substructure variables, and dedicated top taggers. Different techniques as used by ATLAS and CMS analyses are described and the performance of different variables and top taggers are shown.

  15. Immunocytochemical localization of cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Bee; Gu, Ya-Nan; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to localize the cholinergic amacrine cells, one of the key elements of a functional retina, in the retina of a microbat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum. The presence and localization of choline acetyltransferase-immunoreactive (ChAT-IR) cells in the microbat retina were investigated using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, and quantitative analysis. These ChAT-IR cells were present in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner part of the inner nuclear layer (INL), as previously reported in various animals. However, the bat retina also contained some ChAT-IR cells in the outer part of the INL. The dendrites of these cells extended into the outer plexiform layer, and those of the cells in the inner INL extended within the outer part of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). The dendrites of the ChAT-IR cells in the GCL extended into the middle of the IPL and some fibers ramified up to the outer IPL. The average densities of ChAT-IR cells in the GCL, inner INL, and outer INL were 259±31cells/mm 2 , 469±48cells/mm 2 , and 59±8cells/mm 2 , respectively. The average total density of the ChAT-IR cells was 788±58cells/mm 2 (mean±S.D.; n=3; 2799±182 cells/retina). We also found that the cholinergic amacrine cells in the bat retina contained calbindin, one of the calcium-binding proteins, but not calretinin or parvalbumin. As the cholinergic amacrine cells play key roles in the direction selectivity and optokinetic eye reflex in the other mammalian retinas, the present study might provide better information of the cytoarchitecture of bat retina and the basic sources for further physiological studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Cholinergic interneurons are differentially distributed in the human striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernácer, Javier; Prensa, Lucía; Giménez-Amaya, José Manuel

    2007-11-14

    The striatum (caudate nucleus, CN, and putamen, Put) is a group of subcortical nuclei involved in planning and executing voluntary movements as well as in cognitive processes. Its neuronal composition includes projection neurons, which connect the striatum with other structures, and interneurons, whose main roles are maintaining the striatal organization and the regulation of the projection neurons. The unique electrophysiological and functional properties of the cholinergic interneurons give them a crucial modulating function on the overall striatal response. This study was carried out using stereological methods to examine the volume and density (cells/mm(3)) of these interneurons, as visualized by choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity, in the following territories of the CN and Put of nine normal human brains: 1) precommissural head; 2) postcommissural head; 3) body; 4) gyrus and 5) tail of the CN; 6) precommissural and 7) postcommissural Put. The distribution of ChAT interneurons was analyzed with respect to the topographical, functional and chemical territories of the dorsal striatum. The CN was more densely populated by cholinergic neurons than the Put, and their density increased along the anteroposterior axis of the striatum with the CN body having the highest neuronal density. The associative territory of the dorsal striatum was by far the most densely populated. The striosomes of the CN precommissural head and the postcommissural Put contained the greatest number of ChAT-ir interneurons. The intrastriosomal ChAT-ir neurons were abundant on the periphery of the striosomes throughout the striatum. All these data reveal that cholinergic interneurons are differentially distributed in the distinct topographical and functional territories of the human dorsal striatum, as well as in its chemical compartments. This heterogeneity may indicate that the posterior aspects of the CN require a special integration of information by interneurons

  17. Water vapour loss threshold and induction of cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupker, R A; Doeglas, H M

    1990-01-01

    A patient is described with cholinergic urticaria (CU) in whom the symptoms could be provoked by gustatory stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a threshold of sweating (monitored by skin water vapour loss (SVL) measurements) at which CU can be provoked. Provocations with lemon and sal-ammoniac liquorice induced transient sweating differing both in degree and duration. Only 'doubly salted' liquorice, which caused the most intense sweat response, resulted in urticarial lesions. This findings suggest a threshold dependency for the induction of CU. SVL measurement may be a useful method for the evaluation of sweating tests in CU patients.

  18. Cholinergic and anticholinesterase activities of total protein extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional herbal medicines such as Morinda morindoïdes are used for treatment of intestinal disorders including constipation in Ivory Coast. The aim of present study was to investigate the effect of total protein of Morinda morindoïdes extract (PT-Mm) on rabbit duodenum contractility and the involved possible ...

  19. Basal forebrain cholinergic system: a functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olton, D; Markowska, A; Voytko, M L; Givens, B; Gorman, L; Wenk, G

    1991-01-01

    This chapter has been organized empirically, focusing on the types of approaches that have been taken to understand BFCS function. This approach reflects the state of our knowledge about the behavioral and psychological functions of the BFCS. Considerable information has been gathered in the very short time that the BFCS has been the object of intense investigation. The results from the neurotoxic lesions and from the HACU studies provide some points of consistency and some puzzling differences. Both approaches to the study of basal forebrain function suggest that the MSA is involved in tasks that require spatial working memory; MSA lesions impaired choice accuracy, and HACU in the HIP was increased after performance. The pattern of results in simpler tasks is more difficult to interpret. In a left-right reference memory discrimination in a T-maze, MSA lesions did not impair acquisition or performance, whereas HACU in the HIP was activated during performance. This pattern of results suggests that although the MSA is engaged during this type of task, its activity is not necessary for normal performance. These, and other comparisons indicate the need for a systematic analysis of task demand (Olton, 1989b). Parametric manipulations of different task demands in a systematic fashion can indicate the extent to which the BFCS is involved in the function associated with each parametric manipulation. Ultimately, of course, the organization of this material should focus on particular psychological functions, rather than the techniques and procedures used to gather the information. Achieving this goal is going to require careful attention to the design of behavioral experiments so that definitive conclusions can be made about the extent to which the BFCS is involved in a given psychological function. A systematic application of task analysis can achieve this goal (Olton, 1986, 1989a, 1989b). For example, BFCS lesions in rats impair choice accuracy in spatial working memory

  20. Monitoring the Right Collection: The Central Cholinergic Neurons as an Instructive Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Hangya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Some neurons are more equal than others: neuroscience relies heavily on the notion that there is a division of labor among different subtypes of brain cells. Therefore, it is important to recognize groups of neurons that participate in the same computation or share similar tasks. However, what the best ways are to identify such collections is not yet clear. Here, we argue that monitoring the activity of genetically defined cell types will lead to new insights about neural mechanisms and improve our understanding of disease vulnerability. Through highlighting how central cholinergic neurons encode reward and punishment that can be captured by a unified framework of reinforcement surprise, we hope to provide an instructive example of how studying a genetically defined cell type may further our understanding of neural function.

  1. A review study on medicinal plants affecting amnesia through cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baradaran Azar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter modification is an important method for the treatment of memory loss or amnesia. Cholinomimetic drugs, particularly, acetylcholine esterase inhibitors are the mainstream in pharmacotherapy of amnesia. Donepezil, tacrine, galantamine, and rivastigmine are cholinesterase inhibitors which are widely used in the treatment of amnesia, however, their therapeutic effects are not significant. Therefore, other possibilities including herbal medicine sources have been considered for memory loss therapy. There are some Medicinal plants with cholinomimetic property which mostly possess antioxidant activity, too. These plants may not only ameliorate amnesia but also can be a good source for drug discovery. In this paper other than introducing the medicinal plants and their components affective on cholinergic system and effective on memory loss, their probable advantages over synthetic drugs are discussed.

  2. SMART STRATEGY TO BOOST STUDENTS’ READING COMPREHENSION

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    Muhammad Lukman Syafi’i

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reading as one of language skills plays significant roles in the teaching English as a foreign language. Since the teacher still uses the conventional way to teach reading, students‘ ability in reading comprehension seems still unsatisfactory yet. So, teacher should explore and develop new strategies. One of strategies in reading comprehension that can trigger our students to attain that purpose is SMART (Self Monitoring Approach for Reading and Thinking strategy. This study is developing SMART strategy to boost the reading comprehension achievement of the ninth grade students. The research applies a collaborative classroom action research design in which the researcher and the collaborative teacher work together in preparing a suitable procedure of SMART strategy, designing the lesson plan, determining the criteria of success, implementing the action, observing, and doing reflection. The finding indicated that SMART strategy was successful to enhance students‘ motivation to be actively involved in the instructional process. The improvement on the students‘ participation was 75% in Cycle 1 and 87% in Cycle 2.

  3. Pauses in Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons: What is Revealed by Their Common Themes and Variations?

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    Yan-Feng Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Striatal cholinergic interneurons, the so-called tonically active neurons (TANs, pause their firing in response to sensory cues and rewards during classical conditioning and instrumental tasks. The respective pause responses observed can demonstrate many commonalities, such as constant latency and duration, synchronous occurrence in a population of cells, and coincidence with phasic activities of midbrain dopamine neurons (DANs that signal reward predictions and errors. Pauses can however also show divergent properties. Pause latencies and durations can differ in a given TAN between appetitive vs. aversive outcomes in classical conditioning, initial excitation can be present or absent, and a second pause can variably follow a rebound. Despite more than 20 years of study, the functions of these pause responses are still elusive. Our understanding of pause function is hindered by an incomplete understanding of how pauses are generated. In this mini-review article, we compare pause types, as well as current key hypotheses for inputs underlying pauses that include dopamine-induced inhibition through D2-receptors, a GABA input from ventral tegmental area, and a prolonged afterhyperpolarization induced by excitatory input from the cortex or from the thalamus. We review how each of these mechanisms alone explains some but not all aspects of pause responses. These mechanisms might need to operate in specific but variable sets of sequences to generate a full range of pause responses. Alternatively, these mechanisms might operate in conjunction with an underlying control mechanism within cholinergic interneurons which could potentially provide a framework to generate the common themes and variations seen amongst pause responses.

  4. Somatostatin modulates cholinergic neurotransmission in canine antral muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelbel, C.B.; van Deventer, G.; Khawaja, S.; Mogard, M.; Walsh, J.H.; Mayer, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin has been shown to inhibit antral motility in vivo. To examine the effect of somatostatin on cholinergic neurotransmission in the canine antrum, we studied the mechanical response of and the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine from canine longitudinal antral muscle in response to substance P, gastrin 17, and electrical stimulation. In unstimulated tissues, somatostatin had a positive inotropic effect on spontaneous phasic contractions. In tissues stimulated with substance P and gastrin 17, but not with electrical stimulation, somatostatin inhibited the phasic inotropic response dose dependently. This inhibitory effect was abolished by indomethacin. Somatostatin stimulated the release of prostaglandin E 2 radioimmunoreactivity, and prostaglandin E 2 inhibited the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. Somatostatin increased the release of [ 3 H]acetylcholine from unstimulated tissues by a tetrodotoxin-sensitive mechanism but inhibited the release induced by substance P and electrical stimulation. These results suggest that somatostatin has a dual modulatory effect on cholinergic neutrotransmission in canine longitudinal antral muscle. This effect is excitatory in unstimulated tissues and inhibitory in stimulated tissues. The inhibitory effect is partially mediated by prostaglandins

  5. Cholinergic transmission underlies modulation of frustration by open field exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psyrdellis, Mariana; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Mustaca, Alba; Justel, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Frustration can be defined as an emotional state generated by the omission or devaluation in the quantity or quality of an expected appetitive reward. Thus, reactivity to a reward is affected by prior experience with the different reinforcer values of that reward. This phenomenon is known as incentive relativity, and can be studied by different paradigms. Although methodologically simple, the exploration of a novel open field (OF) is a complex situation that involves several behavioral processes, including stress induction and novelty detection. OF exposure can enhance or block the acquisition of associative and non-associative memories. These experiments evaluated the effect of OF exploration on frustration and the role played by the cholinergic system in this phenomenon. OF exploration before first or second trial of incentive downshift modulated the expression of frustration. This effect of OF was blocked by the administration of scopolamine either before or after OF exploration. These results indicate that the cholinergic system is involved in the acquisition and consolidation of OF information.

  6. Starburst cholinergic amacrine cells in the tree shrew retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, D; Engelmann, R; Peichl, L

    1997-12-08

    In all mammalian retinae studied to date, starburst cholinergic amacrine cells are a consistently occurring cell type. Here, we show that the cone-dominated retina of the tree shrew also has starburst cells with the characteristic radially symmetric branching pattern known from other species. Dendritic field sizes increase from 150 microm in the central retina to 300 microm in the retinal periphery. The characteristic morphology is established early during postnatal development. Labelling the starburst cholinergic cells with an antibody against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) reveals two dendritic strata in the inner plexiform layer and two corresponding soma populations in the inner nuclear layer (orthotopic) and ganglion cell layer (displaced). These features are present in the adult and in early postnatal stages. In the adult, the density of the orthotopic population as well as the displaced population peaks in the central retina at about 2,200 cells/mm2 and has a peripheral minimum of 400 cells/mm2. These properties are qualitatively similar to those of starburst cells in rod-dominated retinae. In contrast to findings in other mammals, we did not see gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 kDa (GAD65) immunoreactivity in tree shrew starburst cells. These cells also appear to lack synaptophysin, a ubiquitous synaptic vesicle protein detected in the starburst cells of some other mammals. However, synaptoporin, a homologous synaptic vesicle protein, appears to be present in tree shrew starburst cells.

  7. Cholinergic Transactivation of the EGFR in HaCaT Keratinocytes Stimulates a Flotillin-1 Dependent MAPK-Mediated Transcriptional Response

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    Sina Kühne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine and its receptors regulate numerous cellular processes in keratinocytes and other non-neuronal cells. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are capable of transactivating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and, downstream thereof, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade, which in turn regulates transcription of genes involved in cell proliferation and migration. We here show that cholinergic stimulation of human HaCaT keratinocytes results in increased transcription of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-3 as well as several ligands of the epidermal growth factor family. Since both metalloproteinases and the said ligands are involved in the transactivation of the EGFR, this transcriptional upregulation may provide a positive feed-forward loop for EGFR/MAPK activation. We here also show that the cholinergic EGFR and MAPK activation and the upregulation of MMP-3 and EGF-like ligands are dependent on the expression of flotillin-1 which we have previously shown to be a regulator of MAPK signaling.

  8. Asia-Pacific Region Water Boosted Rocket Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, K.-I.; Hidayat, A.; Sofyan, E.; Sinha, H. S. S.; Herudi, K.; Kubota, T.; Sukkarieh, S.; Arban, J. L.; Chung, D. M.; Medagangoda, I.; Mohd, Z. B.; Pitan, S.; Chin, C.; Sarkar, F. R.

    2010-05-01

    Space Education and Awareness Working Group, which is one of four working groups of Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum, had organized water boosted rocket competition in Japan in 2005, in Indonesia in 2006, and in 2007 in India. One junior high school student (12-15 years old) and one leader from 9 and 13 Asian/Pacific countries attended the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd water rocket events, respectively. The 4th event is planned in Vietnam, in December 2008. The manuscript introduces the structure and activities of Space Education and Awareness Working Group, which is working under Asia-Pacific Regional Space Agency Forum sponsored by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, and Technology of Japan; and application of water-boosted rocket to other field is described. Details of the water boosted rocket events, such as the purpose, competition rules, and the schedules are provided. Finally we discuss the issues to be taken into account for the future event.

  9. Global Dirac bispinor entanglement under Lorentz boosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Victor A. S. V.; Bernardini, Alex E.; Blasone, Massimo

    2018-03-01

    The effects of Lorentz boosts on the quantum entanglement encoded by a pair of massive spin-1/2 particles are described according to the Lorentz covariant structure described by Dirac bispinors. The quantum system considered incorporates four degrees of freedom: two of them related to the bispinor intrinsic parity and the other two related to the bispinor spin projection, i.e., the Dirac particle helicity. Because of the natural multipartite structure involved, the Meyer-Wallach global measure of entanglement is preliminarily used for computing global quantum correlations, while the entanglement separately encoded by spin degrees of freedom is measured through the negativity of the reduced two-particle spin-spin state. A general framework to compute the changes on quantum entanglement induced by a boost is developed and then specialized to describe three particular antisymmetric two-particle states. According to the results obtained, two-particle spin-spin entanglement cannot be created by the action of a Lorentz boost in a spin-spin separable antisymmetric state. On the other hand, the maximal spin-spin entanglement encoded by antisymmetric superpositions is degraded by Lorentz boosts driven by high-speed frame transformations. Finally, the effects of boosts on chiral states are shown to exhibit interesting invariance properties, which can only be obtained through such a Lorentz covariant formulation of the problem.

  10. Neonicotinoid insecticides inhibit cholinergic neurotransmission in a molluscan (Lymnaea stagnalis) nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehovszky, Á; Farkas, A; Ács, A; Stoliar, O; Székács, A; Mörtl, M; Győri, J

    2015-10-01

    Neonicotinoids are highly potent and selective systemic insecticides, but their widespread use also has a growing impact on non-target animals and contaminates the environment, including surface waters. We tested the neonicotinoid insecticides commercially available in Hungary (acetamiprid, Mospilan; imidacloprid, Kohinor; thiamethoxam, Actara; clothianidin, Apacs; thiacloprid, Calypso) on cholinergic synapses that exist between the VD4 and RPeD1 neurons in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. In the concentration range used (0.01-1 mg/ml), neither chemical acted as an acetylcholine (ACh) agonist; instead, both displayed antagonist activity, inhibiting the cholinergic excitatory components of the VD4-RPeD1 connection. Thiacloprid (0.01 mg/ml) blocked almost 90% of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), while the less effective thiamethoxam (0.1 mg/ml) reduced the synaptic responses by about 15%. The ACh-evoked membrane responses of the RPeD1 neuron were similarly inhibited by the neonicotinoids, confirming that the same ACh receptor (AChR) target was involved. We conclude that neonicotinoids act on nicotinergic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the snail CNS. This has been established previously in the insect CNS; however, our data indicate differences in the background mechanism or the nAChR binding site in the snail. Here, we provide the first results concerning neonicotinoid-related toxic effects on the neuronal connections in the molluscan nervous system. Aquatic animals, including molluscs, are at direct risk while facing contaminated surface waters, and snails may provide a suitable model for further studies of the behavioral/neuronal consequences of intoxication by neonicotinoids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ginkgo biloba L. extract protects against chronic cerebral hypoperfusion by modulating neuroinflammation and the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bang, Ji Hye; Lee, Jun; Han, Jung-Soo; Baik, Tae Gon; Jeon, Won Kyung

    2016-11-15

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE)-a widely used nutraceutical-is reported to have diverse functions, including positive effects on memory and vasodilatory properties. Although numerous studies have assessed the neuroprotective properties of GBE in ischemia, only a few studies have investigated the neuro-pharmacological mechanisms of action of GBE in chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH). In the present study, we sought to determine the effects of GBE on CCH-induced neuroinflammation and cholinergic dysfunction in a rat model of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAo). Chronic BCCAo was induced in adult male Wistar rats to reflect the CCH conditions. On day 21 after BCCAo, the animals were treated orally with saline or GBE (5, 10, 20, and 40mg/kg) daily for 42 days. After the final treatment, brain tissues were isolated for the immunohistochemical analysis of glial markers and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as well as for the western blot analysis of proinflammatory cytokines, toll-like receptor (TLR)-related pathway, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), angiotensin-II (Ang-II), and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). BCCAo increased glial proliferation in the hippocampus and white matter, whereas proliferation was significantly attenuated by GBE treatment. GBE also attenuated the BCCAo-related increases in the hippocampal expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6), TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88, RAGE, Ang-II, and phosphorylated MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK). Furthermore, GBE treatment restored the ChAT expression in the basal forebrain following BCCAo. These findings suggest that GBE has specific neuroprotective effects that may be useful for the treatment of CCH. The pharmacological mechanism of GBE partly involves the modulation of inflammatory mediators and the cholinergic system. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  12. VTA GABA neurons modulate specific learning behaviours through the control of dopamine and cholinergic systems

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    Meaghan C Creed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesolimbic reward system is primarily comprised of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the nucleus accumbens (NAc as well as their afferent and efferent connections. This circuitry is essential for learning about stimuli associated with motivationally-relevant outcomes. Moreover, addictive drugs affect and remodel this system, which may underlie their addictive properties. In addition to DA neurons, the VTA also contains approximately 30% ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons. The task of signalling both rewarding and aversive events from the VTA to the NAc has mostly been ascribed to DA neurons and the role of GABA neurons has been largely neglected until recently. GABA neurons provide local inhibition of DA neurons and also long-range inhibition of projection regions, including the NAc. Here we review studies using a combination of in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, pharmacogenetic and optogenetic manipulations that have characterized the functional neuroanatomy of inhibitory circuits in the mesolimbic system, and describe how GABA neurons of the VTA regulate reward and aversion-related learning. We also discuss pharmacogenetic manipulation of this system with benzodiazepines (BDZs, a class of addictive drugs, which act directly on GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons of the VTA. The results gathered with each of these approaches suggest that VTA GABA neurons bi-directionally modulate activity of local DA neurons, underlying reward or aversion at the behavioural level. Conversely, long-range GABA projections from the VTA to the NAc selectively target cholinergic interneurons (CINs to pause their firing and temporarily reduce cholinergic tone in the NAc, which modulates associative learning. Further characterization of inhibitory circuit function within and beyond the VTA is needed in order to fully understand the function of the mesolimbic system under normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Nicotine-Induced Modulation of the Cholinergic Twitch Response in the Ileum of Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the direct drug effects of nicotine and its effects on the cholinergic twitch responses of the electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strip from the ileum of guinea pig were investigated. Nicotine dose-dependently (0.3-10 µmol/l) evoked the well-known contractile responses on its own. Whereas the interposed twitch responses remained present without a change in height at 1 µmol/l nicotine, a nicotine concentration of 3 µmol/l slightly and a concentration of 10 µmol/l markedly diminished the twitch during their presence. After the washout of 1-10 µmol/l nicotine, the height of the twitch response was also temporarily and significantly reduced by 30-77%. The P2X purinoceptor agonist αβ-methylene ATP (1-10 µmol/l) dose-dependently induced contractions on its own and reduced the twitch response during its presence in the organ bath; however, it did not diminish the twitch responses after washout of the drug as nicotine did. The P2X antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2'-4'-disulphonic acid, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 and the inhibitor of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels apamin reduced the contractile effect of 1 µmol/l nicotine. Apamin also significantly prevented the 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' following the washout of 1-3 µmol/l nicotine. As a conclusion, we provide evidence for a functional interaction between nicotinic receptors and the P2X receptors in the ileum of the guinea pig. The 'post-nicotine inhibition of the twitch' is not due to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization or transmitter depletion, but most probably the secondary effects of nicotine on SK channels determine the reduced cholinergic motor neuron excitability. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Local cholinergic interneurons modulate GABAergic inhibition in the chicken optic tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Stefan; Luksch, Harald

    2014-03-01

    The chicken optic tectum (TeO) and its mammalian counterpart, the superior colliculus, are important sensory integration centers. Multimodal information is represented in a topographic map, which plays a role in spatial attention and orientation movements. The TeO is organised in 15 layers with clear input and output regions, and further interconnected with the isthmic nuclei (NI), which modulate the response in a winner-takes-all fashion. While many studies have analysed tectal cell types and their modulation from the isthmic system physiologically, little is known about local network activity and its modulation in the tectum. We have recently shown with voltage-sensitive dye imaging that electrical stimulation of the retinorecipient layers results in a stereotypic response, which is under inhibitory control [S. Weigel & H. Luksch (2012) J. Neurophysiol., 107, 640-648]. Here, we analysed the contribution of acetylcholine (ACh) and the NI to evoked tectal responses using a pharmacological approach in a midbrain slice preparation. Application of the nicotinic ACh receptor (AChR) antagonist curarine increased the tectal response in amplitude, duration and lateral extent. This effect was similar but less pronounced when γ-aminobutyric acid(A) receptors were blocked, indicating interaction of inhibitory and cholinergic neurons. The muscarinic AChR antagonist atropine did not change the response pattern. Removal of the NI, which are thought to be the major source of cholinergic input to the TeO, reduced the response only slightly and did not result in a disinhibition. Based on the data presented here and the neuroanatomical literature of the avian TeO, we propose a model of the underlying local circuitry. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cholinergic Submucosal Neurons Display Increased Excitability Following in Vivo Cholera Toxin Exposure in Mouse Ileum

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    Candice Fung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cholera-induced hypersecretion causes dehydration and death if untreated. Cholera toxin (CT partly acts via the enteric nervous system (ENS and induces long-lasting changes to enteric neuronal excitability following initial exposure, but the specific circuitry involved remains unclear. We examined this by first incubating CT or saline (control in mouse ileal loops in vivo for 3.5 h and then assessed neuronal excitability in vitro using Ca2+ imaging and immunolabeling for the activity-dependent markers cFos and pCREB. Mice from a C57BL6 background, including Wnt1-Cre;R26R-GCaMP3 mice which express the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator GCaMP3 in its ENS, were used. Ca2+-imaging using this mouse model is a robust, high-throughput method which allowed us to examine the activity of numerous enteric neurons simultaneously and post-hoc immunohistochemistry enabled the neurochemical identification of the active neurons. Together, this provided novel insight into the CT-affected circuitry that was previously impossible to attain at such an accelerated pace. Ussing chamber measurements of electrogenic ion secretion showed that CT-treated preparations had higher basal secretion than controls. Recordings of Ca2+ activity from the submucous plexus showed that increased numbers of neurons were spontaneously active in CT-incubated tissue (control: 4/149; CT: 32/160; Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001 and that cholinergic neurons were more responsive to electrical (single pulse and train of 20 pulses or nicotinic (1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP; 10 μM stimulation. Expression of the neuronal activity marker, pCREB, was also increased in the CT-treated submucous plexus neurons. c-Fos expression and spontaneous fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs, recorded by intracellular electrodes, were increased by CT exposure in a small subset of myenteric neurons. However, the effect of CT on the myenteric plexus is less clear as spontaneous Ca2+ activity and

  16. Cholinergic Submucosal Neurons Display Increased Excitability Following in Vivo Cholera Toxin Exposure in Mouse Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Candice; Koussoulas, Katerina; Unterweger, Petra; Allen, Andrew M; Bornstein, Joel C; Foong, Jaime P P

    2018-01-01

    Cholera-induced hypersecretion causes dehydration and death if untreated. Cholera toxin (CT) partly acts via the enteric nervous system (ENS) and induces long-lasting changes to enteric neuronal excitability following initial exposure, but the specific circuitry involved remains unclear. We examined this by first incubating CT or saline (control) in mouse ileal loops in vivo for 3.5 h and then assessed neuronal excitability in vitro using Ca 2+ imaging and immunolabeling for the activity-dependent markers cFos and pCREB. Mice from a C57BL6 background, including Wnt1 -Cre;R26R- GCaMP3 mice which express the fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator GCaMP3 in its ENS, were used. Ca 2+ -imaging using this mouse model is a robust, high-throughput method which allowed us to examine the activity of numerous enteric neurons simultaneously and post-hoc immunohistochemistry enabled the neurochemical identification of the active neurons. Together, this provided novel insight into the CT-affected circuitry that was previously impossible to attain at such an accelerated pace. Ussing chamber measurements of electrogenic ion secretion showed that CT-treated preparations had higher basal secretion than controls. Recordings of Ca 2+ activity from the submucous plexus showed that increased numbers of neurons were spontaneously active in CT-incubated tissue (control: 4/149; CT: 32/160; Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001) and that cholinergic neurons were more responsive to electrical (single pulse and train of 20 pulses) or nicotinic (1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP; 10 μM) stimulation. Expression of the neuronal activity marker, pCREB, was also increased in the CT-treated submucous plexus neurons. c-Fos expression and spontaneous fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), recorded by intracellular electrodes, were increased by CT exposure in a small subset of myenteric neurons. However, the effect of CT on the myenteric plexus is less clear as spontaneous Ca 2+ activity and

  17. Centrifugal compressor design for electrically assisted boost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Yang, M.; Martinez-Botas, R. F.; Zhuge, W. L.; Qureshi, U.; Richards, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrically assisted boost is a prominent method to solve the issues of transient lag in turbocharger and remains an optimized operation condition for a compressor due to decoupling from turbine. Usually a centrifugal compressor for gasoline engine boosting is operated at high rotational speed which is beyond the ability of an electric motor in market. In this paper a centrifugal compressor with rotational speed as 120k RPM and pressure ratio as 2.0 is specially developed for electrically assisted boost. A centrifugal compressor including the impeller, vaneless diffuser and the volute is designed by meanline method followed by 3D detailed design. Then CFD method is employed to predict as well as analyse the performance of the design compressor. The results show that the pressure ratio and efficiency at design point is 2.07 and 78% specifically.

  18. An Update on Statistical Boosting in Biomedicine

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    Andreas Mayr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical boosting algorithms have triggered a lot of research during the last decade. They combine a powerful machine learning approach with classical statistical modelling, offering various practical advantages like automated variable selection and implicit regularization of effect estimates. They are extremely flexible, as the underlying base-learners (regression functions defining the type of effect for the explanatory variables can be combined with any kind of loss function (target function to be optimized, defining the type of regression setting. In this review article, we highlight the most recent methodological developments on statistical boosting regarding variable selection, functional regression, and advanced time-to-event modelling. Additionally, we provide a short overview on relevant applications of statistical boosting in biomedicine.

  19. Improved Stereo Matching With Boosting Method

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    Shiny B

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents an approach based on classification for improving the accuracy of stereo matching methods. We propose this method for occlusion handling. This work employs classification of pixels for finding the erroneous disparity values. Due to the wide applications of disparity map in 3D television medical imaging etc the accuracy of disparity map has high significance. An initial disparity map is obtained using local or global stereo matching methods from the input stereo image pair. The various features for classification are computed from the input stereo image pair and the obtained disparity map. Then the computed feature vector is used for classification of pixels by using GentleBoost as the classification method. The erroneous disparity values in the disparity map found by classification are corrected through a completion stage or filling stage. A performance evaluation of stereo matching using AdaBoostM1 RUSBoost Neural networks and GentleBoost is performed.

  20. Transformer Isolated Buck-Boost Converters

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    Barry W. Williams

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Of the single-switch dc-to-dc converters, those with the buck-boost voltage transfer function offer most potential for transformer coupling, hence isolation, at the kilowatt level. This paper highlights the limitations of the traditional magnetic coupled, buck-boost topology. Then four split-capacitor transformer-coupled topologies (specifically the Cuk, sepic, zeta, and a new, converters with a common ac equivalent circuit are explored, that do not temporarily store core magnetic energy as does the traditional isolated buck-boost converter nor have a core dc magnetizing current bias, as with the sepic and zeta transformer coupled topologies. Core dc bias capacitive voltage compensation is a practical design constraint in three of the four topologies, while all four must cater for stray and leakage inductance effects. Simulations and experimental results for the new converter at 408W support the transformer-coupled, single-switch dc-to-dc converter concepts investigated.

  1. Effect of voluntary running on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cholinergic lesioned mice

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    Dawe Gavin S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholinergic neuronal dysfunction of the basal forebrain is observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease and dementia, and has been linked to decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory. Running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. This study aims to address the effect of running on hippocampal neurogenesis in lesioned mice, where septohippocampal cholinergic neurones have been selectively eliminated in the medial septum and diagonal band of Broca of the basal forebrain by infusion of mu-p75-saporin immunotoxin. Results Running increased the number of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cholinergic denervated mice compared to non-lesioned mice 24 hours after injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU. Although similar levels of surviving cells were present in cholinergic depleted animals and their respective controls four weeks after injection of BrdU, the majority of progenitors that proliferate in response to the initial period of running were not able to survive beyond one month without cholinergic input. Despite this, the running-induced increase in the number of surviving neurones was not affected by cholinergic depletion. Conclusion The lesion paradigm used here models aspects of the cholinergic deficits associated with Alzheimer's Disease and aging. We showed that running still increased the number of newborn cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus in this model of neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Single-Cell Gene Expression Analysis of Cholinergic Neurons in the Arcuate Nucleus of the Hypothalamus.

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    Jae Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available The cholinoceptive system in the hypothalamus, in particular in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, plays a role in regulating food intake. Neurons in the ARC contain multiple neuropeptides, amines, and neurotransmitters. To study molecular and neurochemical heterogeneity of ARC neurons, we combine single-cell qRT-PCR and single-cell whole transcriptome amplification methods to analyze expression patterns of our hand-picked 60 genes in individual neurons in the ARC. Immunohistochemical and single-cell qRT-PCR analyses show choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-expressing neurons in the ARC. Gene expression patterns are remarkably distinct in each individual cholinergic neuron. Two-thirds of cholinergic neurons express tyrosine hydroxylase (Th mRNA. A large subset of these Th-positive cholinergic neurons is GABAergic as they express the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter transcripts. Some cholinergic neurons also express the vesicular glutamate transporter transcript gene. POMC and POMC-processing enzyme transcripts are found in a subpopulation of cholinergic neurons. Despite this heterogeneity, gene expression patterns in individual cholinergic cells appear to be highly regulated in a cell-specific manner. In fact, membrane receptor transcripts are clustered with their respective intracellular signaling and downstream targets. This novel population of cholinergic neurons may be part of the neural circuitries that detect homeostatic need for food and control the drive to eat.

  3. Prostaglandins compromise basal forebrain cholinergic neuron differentiation and survival: action at EP1/3 receptors results in AIF-induced death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonakait, G Miller; Ni, Li

    2009-08-18

    Activated microglia produce a factor or cocktail of factors that promotes cholinergic neuronal differentiation of undifferentiated precursors in the embryonic basal forebrain (BF) in vitro. To determine whether microglial prostaglandins mediate this action, microglia were stimulated in the presence of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor ibuprofen, and microglial conditioned medium (CM) was used to culture rat BF precursors at embryonic day 15. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity served as a measure of cholinergic differentiation. While inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis did not affect the ability of microglial CM to promote ChAT activity, treatment of microglia with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) inhibited it. Agonists of E prostanoid receptors EP2 (butaprost) and EP1/3 (sulprostone) mimicked PGE2, while misoprostol (E1-4) actually enhanced the action of CM. PGE2 added directly to BF cultures together with microglial CM also inhibited ChAT activity. While BF cultures expressed all four prostanoid receptors, direct addition of sulprostone but not butaprost mimicked PGE2, suggesting that PGE2 engaged EP1/3 receptors in the BF. Neither PKA inhibition by H89 nor cAMP induction by forskolin or dibutyrl-cAMP altered the action of sulprostone. Sulprostone severely compromised ChAT activity, dendrite number, axonal length and axonal branching, but caspase inhibition did not restore these. However, sulprostone resulted in increased staining intensity and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) suggesting caspase-independent cell death. We have found that PGE2 action at microglial EP2 receptors inhibits the microglial production of the cholinergic differentiating cocktail, while action at neuronal EP3 receptors has a deleterious effect on cholinergic neurons causing neurite retraction and cell death.

  4. Quadratic Boost A-Source Impedance Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwakoti, Yam Prasad; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chub, Andrii

    2016-01-01

    A novel quadratic boost A-source impedance network is proposed to realize converters that demand very high voltage gain. To satisfy the requirement, the network uses an autotransformer where the obtained gain is quadratically dependent on the duty ratio and is unmatched by any existing impedance...... source networks and normal dc-dc converters with coupled magnetics at the same duty ratio and turns ratio. The term “Quadratic Boost A-Source” indicates its quadratic varying gain in the operating principle of the converter. The proposed converter draws a continuous current from the source and suits...

  5. The muscarinic stimulation of phospholipid labeling in hippocampus is independent of its cholinergic input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Boast, C.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The authors have examined the role of cholinergic innervation on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced 'phospholipid labeling effect' (PLE) in synaptosomes derived from the hippocampus. The hippocampus supports a robust PLE and its sole cholinergic input from the septal nuclei can be readily disrupted by the placement of lesions in the fornix. The lesion is expected to cause degeneration of cholinergic presynaptic fibers, but should have little effect on the integrity of postsynaptic structures, and thus provide a means of further localizing the synaptosomal PLE. (Auth.)

  6. The involvement of cholinergic neurons in the spreading of tau pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eSimon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Long time ago, it was described the selective loss of cholinergic neurons during the development of Alzheimer disease. Recently, it has been suggested that tau protein may play a role in that loss of cholinergic neurons through a mechanism involving the interaction of extracellular tau with M1/M3 muscarinic receptors present in the cholinergic neurons. This interaction between tau and muscarinic receptors may be a way, although not the only one, to explain the spreading of tau pathology occurring in Alzheimer disease.

  7. Cholinergic symptoms and QTc prolongation following donepezil overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmand, A; Shay, C; Redha, W; Aalam, A; Mazer-Amirshahi, M

    2017-09-01

    Donepezil is the most commonly prescribed acetylcholinesterase inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, an ailment that affects millions of older adult patients. By inhibiting the breakdown of acetylcholine in the central nervous system, donepezil has been shown to slow cognitive decline and improve patients' functional status. While donepezil is well-tolerated and generally considered safe at therapeutic doses, taking more than the prescribed dose could result in adverse cholinergic effects that range from mild gastrointestinal distress to serious cardiac dysrhythmias. We present a case of an 84-year-old man who developed gastrointestinal and cardiac disturbances after ingesting seven-times his daily dose of donepezil. As no specific antidote is available for donepezil overdose, this case highlights the importance of supportive care with particular attention to the management of cardiac dysrhythmias in patients displaying signs of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Yokukansan and Yokukansankachimpihange Ameliorate Aggressive Behaviors in Rats with Cholinergic Degeneration in the Nucleus Basalis of Meynert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Tabuchi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yokukansan (YKS and yokukansankachimpihange (YKSCH are traditional Japanese Kampo medicines. The latter comprises YKS along with the medicinal herbs Citrus unshiu peel and Pinellia tuber. Both of these Kampo medicines are indicated for the treatment of night crying and irritability in children and for neurosis and insomnia in adults. In recent clinical trials, YKS exhibited ameliorative effects on the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, such as aggressiveness, excitement, and irritability. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the involvement of cholinergic degeneration in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NBM in the development of aggressiveness in rats. Subsequently, using this animal model, the effects of YKS and YKSCH on aggressiveness were compared and the mechanisms underlying these effects were investigated. L-Glutamic acid (Glu was injected into the right NBM of rats to induce deterioration of cholinergic neurons. On day 8 after Glu injection, aggressive behaviors were evaluated using resident–intruder tests. After the evaluation, YKS or YKSCH was administered to rats with aggressive behaviors daily for 7 days. In some groups, the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100635 was coadministered with YKS or YKSCH over the same period. In other groups, locomotor activity was measured on days 12–14 after Glu injection. On day 15, immunohistochemistry was then performed to examine choline acetyltransferase (ChAT activities in the NBM. Aggressive behaviors had developed on day 8 after Glu injection and were maintained until day 15. YKS and YKSCH significantly ameliorated the aggressive behaviors. These suppressive effects were entirely abolished following coadministration of WAY-100635. Finally, the number of ChAT-positive cells in the right NBM was significantly reduced on day 15 after Glu injection, and treatment with YKS or YKSCH did not ameliorate these reduced cell numbers. Our results show that unilateral Glu injections

  9. Involvement of Cholinergic Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in the Effects of Simulated Weightlessness on Learning and Memory in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine how the learning and memory gradually change with the prolonged hindlimb unloading (HU treatment in rats. Different HU durations (7 d, 14 d, 21 d, and 28 d in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were implemented. Cognitive function was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM and the shuttle box test. Additionally, parameters about cholinergic activity and oxidative stress were tested. Results showed that longer-than-14 d HU led to the inferior performances in the behavioral tasks. Besides, acetylcholine esterase (AChE activity, malondialdehyde (MDA level in brain, reactive oxygen species (ROS, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG concentrations of HU rats were significantly increased. Furthermore, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT activity in brain were notably attenuated. Most of these effects were more pronounced after longer exposure (21 d and 28 d to HU, although some indicators had their own characteristics of change. These results indicate that cholinergic dysfunction and oxidative damage were involved in the learning and memory impairments induced by longer-than-14 d HU. Moreover, the negative effects of HU tend to be augmented as the HU duration becomes longer. The results may be helpful to present possible biochemical targets for countermeasures development regarding the memory deficits under extreme environmental conditions.

  10. Cholinergic urethral brush cells are widespread throughout placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckmann, Klaus; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Rafiq, Amir; Herden, Christine; Wichmann, Judy; Knauf, Sascha; Nassenstein, Christina; Grevelding, Christoph G; Dorresteijn, Adriaan; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Bschleipfer, Thomas; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    We previously identified a population of cholinergic epithelial cells in murine, human and rat urethrae that exhibits a structural marker of brush cells (villin) and expresses components of the canonical taste transduction signaling cascade (α-gustducin, phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2), transient receptor potential cation channel melanostatin 5 (TRPM5)). These cells serve as sentinels, monitoring the chemical composition of the luminal content for potentially hazardous compounds such as bacteria, and initiate protective reflexes counteracting further ingression. In order to elucidate cross-species conservation of the urethral chemosensory pathway we investigated the occurrence and molecular make-up of urethral brush cells in placental mammals. We screened 11 additional species, at least one in each of the five mammalian taxonomic units primates, carnivora, perissodactyla, artiodactyla and rodentia, for immunohistochemical labeling of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), villin, and taste cascade components (α-gustducin, PLCβ2, TRPM5). Corresponding to findings in previously investigated species, urethral epithelial cells with brush cell shape were immunolabeled in all 11 mammals. In 8 species, immunoreactivities against all marker proteins and ChAT were observed, and double-labeling immunofluorescence confirmed the cholinergic nature of villin-positive and chemosensory (TRPM5-positive) cells. In cat and horse, these cells were not labeled by the ChAT antiserum used in this study, and unspecific reactions of the secondary antiserum precluded conclusions about ChAT-expression in the bovine epithelium. These data indicate that urethral brush cells are widespread throughout the mammalian kingdom and evolved not later than about 64.5millionyears ago. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dual nitrergic/cholinergic control of short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs to striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Peter Blomeley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of nitric oxide and acetylcholine to modulate the short-term plasticity of corticostriatal inputs was investigated using current-clamp recordings in BAC mouse brain slices. Glutamatergic responses were evoked by stimulation of corpus callosum in D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-MSNs and D2-MSN, respectively. Paired-pulse stimulation (50 ms intervals evoked depressing or facilitating responses in subgroups of both D1-MSNs and D2 MSNs. In both neuronal types, glutamatergic responses of cells that displayed paired-pulse depression were not significantly affected by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 100 µM. Conversely, in D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs that displayed paired-pulse facilitation, SNAP did not affect the first evoked response, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the second evoked EPSP, converting paired-pulse facilitation into paired-pulse depression. SNAP also strongly excited cholinergic interneurons and increased their cortical glutamatergic responses acting through a presynaptic mechanism. The effects of SNAP on glutamatergic response of D1-MSNs and D2-MSN were mediated by acetylcholine. The broad-spectrum muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (25 µM did not affect paired-pulse ratios and did not prevent the effects of SNAP. Conversely, the broad-spectrum nicotinic receptor antagonist tubocurarine (10 µM fully mimicked and occluded the effects of SNAP. We concluded that phasic acetylcholine release mediates feedforward facilitation in MSNs through activation of nicotinic receptors on glutamatergic terminals and that nitric oxide, while increasing cholinergic interneurons’ firing, functionally impairs their ability to modulate glutamatergic inputs of MSNs. These results show that nitrergic and cholinergic transmission control the short-term plasticity of glutamatergic inputs in the striatum and reveal a novel cellular mechanism underlying paired

  12. Cholinergic and non-cholinergic projections from the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei to the medial geniculate body in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan D Motts

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The midbrain tegmentum is the source of cholinergic innervation of the thalamus and has been associated with arousal and control of the sleep/wake cycle. In general, the innervation arises bilaterally from the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT. While this pattern has been observed for many thalamic nuclei, a projection from the LDT to the medial geniculate body (MG has been questioned in some species. We combined retrograde tracing with immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT to identify cholinergic projections from the brainstem to the MG in guinea pigs. Double-labeled cells (retrograde and immunoreactive for ChAT were found in both the PPT (74% and the LDT (26%. In both nuclei, double-labeled cells were more numerous on the ipsilateral side. About half of the retrogradely labeled cells were immunonegative, suggesting they are non-cholinergic. The distribution of these immunonegative cells was similar to that of the immunopositive ones: more were in the PPT than the LDT and more were on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side. The results indicate that both the PPT and the LDT project to the MG, and suggest that both cholinergic and non-cholinergic cells contribute substantially to these projections.

  13. Chemical and radiological effects of chronic ingestion of uranium in the rat brain: biochemical impairment of dopaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic neuro-transmissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, C.

    2005-09-01

    Uranium is an environmental ubiquitous metal-trace element. It has both chemical and radiological toxicity. After chronic ingestion, uranium can distribute in any part of the body and accumulate in the brain. The aims of this study was 1) to determine and estimate the effects of uranium on dopaminergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems and 2) to measure the uranium amount in the brain, after chronic exposure by ingestion of depleted (D.U.) or enriched (E.U.) uranium during 1.5 to 18 months at 40 mg.L -1 (40 ppm) in different rat brain areas. At any time of exposure, the results show that both the neurotransmission alterations and the uranium brain accumulation were moderate, area specific, time-evolutive and depended on uranium specific activity. After D.U. exposure, monoamine perturbations are chronic and progressive. On the contrary, monoamine alterations occurred only after long term of E.U. exposure. These mono-aminergic modifications are not always dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas. Moreover, although the cholinergic system was not affected at both 1.5 and 9 months of D.U. exposure, the alteration of ChE activity after E.U. exposure are both dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas and on uranium specific activity. After E.U. exposure, cholinergic modification and uranium accumulation in hippocampus could partially explain the short-term memory disturbances which have been previously reported. (author)

  14. Niacin to Boost Your HDL "Good" Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niacin can boost 'good' cholesterol Niacin is a B vitamin that may raise your HDL ("good") cholesterol. But side effects might outweigh benefits for most ... been used to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol — the "good" cholesterol that helps remove low-density ...

  15. Detection of Illegitimate Emails using Boosting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nizamani, Sarwat; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we report on experiments to detect illegitimate emails using boosting algorithm. We call an email illegitimate if it is not useful for the receiver or for the society. We have divided the problem into two major areas of illegitimate email detection: suspicious email detection and s...

  16. Boosting China's research collaboration | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Boosting China's research collaboration. Rong Li presenting. Rong Li. Research Awards ... “China's cooperation to date has also largely ignored the role of research collaboration,” he says. Li focused on what China's foreign ... It was my first time formally working abroad,” he says. “It will definitely benefit my future career.”.

  17. Schools Enlisting Defense Industry to Boost STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Defense contractors Northrop Grumman Corp. and Lockheed Martin Corp. are joining forces in an innovative partnership to develop high-tech simulations to boost STEM--or science, technology, engineering, and mathematics--education in the Baltimore County schools. The Baltimore County partnership includes the local operations of two major military…

  18. The Attentional Boost Effect with Verbal Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Spataro, Pietro; Picklesimer, Milton

    2014-01-01

    Study stimuli presented at the same time as unrelated targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli presented with distractors. This attentional boost effect (ABE) has been found with pictorial (Swallow & Jiang, 2010) and more recently verbal materials (Spataro, Mulligan, & Rossi-Arnaud, 2013). The present experiments…

  19. Boosting youth employment prospects in Tanzania | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-12-16

    Dec 16, 2015 ... Read the brief, Boosting youth employment prospects: Tanzania, (PDF, 999 KB); Read full report, Youth employment in Tanzania: Taking stock of the evidence and knowledge gaps, (1.14 MB); For a visual representation of the key findings see the infographic poster (PDF, 296 KB). Return to main page, ...

  20. The Attentional Boost Effect and Context Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Smith, S. Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors--the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is…

  1. C. elegans dopaminergic D2-like receptors delimit recurrent cholinergic-mediated motor programs during a goal-oriented behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Correa

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans male copulation requires coordinated temporal-spatial execution of different motor outputs. During mating, a cloacal circuit consisting of cholinergic sensory-motor neurons and sex muscles maintains the male's position and executes copulatory spicule thrusts at his mate's vulva. However, distinct signaling mechanisms that delimit these behaviors to their proper context are unclear. We found that dopamine (DA signaling directs copulatory spicule insertion attempts to the hermaphrodite vulva by dampening spurious stimulus-independent sex muscle contractions. From pharmacology and genetic analyses, DA antagonizes stimulatory ACh signaling via the D2-like receptors, DOP-2 and DOP-3, and Gα(o/i proteins, GOA-1 and GPA-7. Calcium imaging and optogenetics suggest that heightened DA-expressing ray neuron activities coincide with the cholinergic cloacal ganglia function during spicule insertion attempts. D2-like receptor signaling also attenuates the excitability of additional mating circuits to reduce the duration of mating attempts with unproductive and/or inappropriate partners. This suggests that, during wild-type mating, simultaneous DA-ACh signaling modulates the activity threshold of repetitive motor programs, thus confining the behavior to the proper situational context.

  2. Extending statistical boosting. An overview of recent methodological developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, A; Binder, H; Gefeller, O; Schmid, M

    2014-01-01

    Boosting algorithms to simultaneously estimate and select predictor effects in statistical models have gained substantial interest during the last decade. This review highlights recent methodological developments regarding boosting algorithms for statistical modelling especially focusing on topics relevant for biomedical research. We suggest a unified framework for gradient boosting and likelihood-based boosting (statistical boosting) which have been addressed separately in the literature up to now. The methodological developments on statistical boosting during the last ten years can be grouped into three different lines of research: i) efforts to ensure variable selection leading to sparser models, ii) developments regarding different types of predictor effects and how to choose them, iii) approaches to extend the statistical boosting framework to new regression settings. Statistical boosting algorithms have been adapted to carry out unbiased variable selection and automated model choice during the fitting process and can nowadays be applied in almost any regression setting in combination with a large amount of different types of predictor effects.

  3. Regulation of Prostate Development and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia by Autocrine Cholinergic Signaling via Maintaining the Epithelial Progenitor Cells in Proliferating Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naitao Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells is important in prostate development and prostate diseases. Our previous study demonstrated a function of autocrine cholinergic signaling (ACS in promoting prostate cancer growth and castration resistance. However, whether or not such ACS also plays a role in prostate development is unknown. Here, we report that ACS promoted the proliferation and inhibited the differentiation of prostate epithelial progenitor cells in organotypic cultures. These results were confirmed by ex vivo lineage tracing assays and in vivo renal capsule recombination assays. Moreover, we found that M3 cholinergic receptor (CHRM3 was upregulated in a large subset of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH tissues compared with normal tissues. Activation of CHRM3 also promoted the proliferation of BPH cells. Together, our findings identify a role of ACS in maintaining prostate epithelial progenitor cells in the proliferating state, and blockade of ACS may have clinical implications for the management of BPH.

  4. The association of cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria: diagnosis and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Bahar; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe

    2015-01-01

    Physical urticaria is often challenging to diagnose and manage. We present a case of both cholinergic and cold-induced urticaria and discuss the diagnosis and management strategies of these two important conditions. PMID:25694628

  5. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B; Posey, James E; Sable, Suraj B

    2016-05-13

    Heterologous prime-boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32-52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime-BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime-Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime-boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime-boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans.

  6. Boosting BCG-primed responses with a subunit Apa vaccine during the waning phase improves immunity and imparts protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Subhadra; Kannanganat, Sunil; Dobos, Karen M.; Lucas, Megan; Spencer, John S.; Amara, Rama Rao; Plikaytis, Bonnie B.; Posey, James E.; Sable, Suraj B.

    2016-01-01

    Heterologous prime–boosting has emerged as a powerful vaccination approach against tuberculosis. However, optimal timing to boost BCG-immunity using subunit vaccines remains unclear in clinical trials. Here, we followed the adhesin Apa-specific T-cell responses in BCG-primed mice and investigated its BCG-booster potential. The Apa-specific T-cell response peaked 32–52 weeks after parenteral or mucosal BCG-priming but waned significantly by 78 weeks. A subunit-Apa-boost during the contraction-phase of BCG-response had a greater effect on the magnitude and functional quality of specific cellular and humoral responses compared to a boost at the peak of BCG-response. The cellular response increased following mucosal BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost strategy compared to Apa-subunit-prime–BCG-boost approach. However, parenteral BCG-prime–Apa-subunit-boost by a homologous route was the most effective strategy in-terms of enhancing specific T-cell responses during waning in the lung and spleen. Two Apa-boosters markedly improved waning BCG-immunity and significantly reduced Mycobacterium tuberculosis burdens post-challenge. Our results highlight the challenges of optimization of prime–boost regimens in mice where BCG drives persistent immune-activation and suggest that boosting with a heterologous vaccine may be ideal once the specific persisting effector responses are contracted. Our results have important implications for design of prime–boost regimens against tuberculosis in humans. PMID:27173443

  7. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pino, Javier; Zeballos, Garbriela; Anadon, María José; Capo, Miguel Andrés; Díaz, María Jesús; García, Jimena; Frejo, María Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  8. EEG sleep and the cholinergic REM induction test in anorexic and bulimic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lauer, C.; Zulley, Jürgen; Krieg, J. C.; Riemann, D.; Berger, M.

    1988-01-01

    The electroencephalographic (EEG) sleep of 20 anorexic patients, 10 bulimic patients, and 10 age-matched healthy controls was studied. In addition, six anorexic patients and six bulimic patients had a cholinergic rapid eye movement (REM) sleep induction test (RIT) performed with the cholinergic agent RS 86. The three samples showed no major differences in sleep patterns. The same held true when attention was focused on patients who additionally met DSM-III criteria for major depression. The R...

  9. Cholinergic axon length reduced by 300 meters in the brain of an Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Gitte; Jensen, Morten Skovgaard; West, Mark J.

    2011-01-01

    Modern stereological techniques have been used to show that the total length of the cholinergic fibers in the cerebral cortex of the APPswe/PS1deltaE9 mouse is reduced by almost 300 meters at 18 months of age and has a nonlinear relationship to the amount of transgenetically-induced amyloidosis. ....... These data provide rigorous quantitative morphological evidence that Alzheimer's-like amyloidosis affects the axons of the cholinergic enervation of the cerebral cortex....

  10. Primary Paralleled Isolated Boost Converter with Extended Operating Voltage Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Sen, Gökhan; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Applications requiring wide input and output voltage range cannot often be satisfied by using buck or boost derived topologies. Primary paralleled isolated boost converter (PPIBC) [1]-[2] is a high efficiency boost derived topology. This paper proposes a new operation mode for extending the input...

  11. The boost transistor: a field plate controlled LDMOST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrara, A.; Schmitz, Jurriaan; Boksteen, B.K.; Hueting, Raymond Josephus Engelbart; Steeneken, P.G.; Heringa, A.; Claes, J.; van der Wel, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a new device: the boost transistor. The boost transistor is an LDMOS transistor that is controlled by a separate field plate boost electrode that reduces the specific on-resistance RonA. By applying a positive voltage Vboost, this electrode creates an accumulation layer in

  12. Cholinergic receptor alterations in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chinthu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Many areas of the cerebral cortex process sensory information or coordinate motor output necessary for control of movement. Disturbances in cortical cholinergic system can affect locomotor coordination. Spinal cord injury causes severe motor impairment and disturbances in cholinergic signalling can aggravate the situation. Considering the impact of cortical cholinergic firing in locomotion, we focussed the study in understanding the cholinergic alterations in cerebral cortex during spinal cord injury. The gene expression of key enzymes in cholinergic pathway - acetylcholine esterase and choline acetyl transferase showed significant upregulation in the cerebral cortex of spinal cord injured group compared to control with the fold increase in expression of acetylcholine esterase prominently higher than cholineacetyl transferase. The decreased muscarinic receptor density and reduced immunostaining of muscarinic receptor subtypes along with down regulated gene expression of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptor subtypes accounts for dysfunction of metabotropic acetylcholine receptors in spinal cord injury group. Ionotropic acetylcholine receptor alterations were evident from the decreased gene expression of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors and reduced immunostaining of alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in confocal imaging. Our data pin points the disturbances in cortical cholinergic function due to spinal cord injury; which can augment the locomotor deficits. This can be taken into account while devising a proper therapeutic approach to manage spinal cord injury.

  13. Cholinergic Depletion in Alzheimer’s Disease Shown by [18F]FEOBV Autoradiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Parent

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. Alzheimer’s Disease (AD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized in part by deficits in cholinergic basalocortical and septohippocampal pathways. [18F]Fluoroethoxybenzovesamicol ([18F]FEOBV, a Positron Emission Tomography ligand for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT, is a potential molecular agent to investigate brain diseases associated with presynaptic cholinergic losses. Purpose. To demonstrate this potential, we carried out an [18F]FEOBV autoradiography study to compare postmortem brain tissues from AD patients to those of age-matched controls. Methods. [18F]FEOBV autoradiography binding, defined as the ratio between regional grey and white matter, was estimated in the hippocampus (13 controls, 8 AD and prefrontal cortex (13 controls, 11 AD. Results. [18F]FEOBV binding was decreased by 33% in prefrontal cortex, 25% in CA3, and 20% in CA1. No changes were detected in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, possibly because of sprouting or upregulation toward the resilient glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus. Conclusion. This is the first demonstration of [18F]FEOBV focal binding changes in cholinergic projections to the cortex and hippocampus in AD. Such cholinergic synaptic (and more specifically VAChT alterations, in line with the selective basalocortical and septohippocampal cholinergic losses documented in AD, indicate that [18F]FEOBV is indeed a promising ligand to explore cholinergic abnormalities in vivo.

  14. Different correlation patterns of cholinergic and GABAergic interneurons with striatal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital eAdler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is populated by a single projection neuron group, the medium spiny neurons (MSNs, and several groups of interneurons. Two of the electrophysiologically well-characterized striatal interneuron groups are the tonically active neurons (TANs, which are presumably cholinergic interneurons, and the fast spiking interneurons (FSIs, presumably parvalbumin (PV expressing GABAergic interneurons. To better understand striatal processing it is thus crucial to define the functional relationship between MSNs and these interneurons in the awake and behaving animal. We used multiple electrodes and standard physiological methods to simultaneously record MSN spiking activity and the activity of TANs or FSIs from monkeys engaged in a classical conditioning paradigm. All three cell populations were highly responsive to the behavioral task. However, they displayed different average response profiles and a different degree of response synchronization (signal correlation. TANs displayed the most transient and synchronized response, MSNs the most diverse and sustained response and FSIs were in between on both parameters. We did not find evidence for direct monosynaptic connectivity between the MSNs and either the TANs or the FSIs. However, while the cross correlation histograms of TAN to MSN pairs were flat, those of FSI to MSN displayed positive asymmetrical broad peaks. The FSI-MSN correlogram profile implies that the spikes of MSNs follow those of FSIs and both are driven by a common, most likely cortical, input. Thus, the two populations of striatal interneurons are probably driven by different afferents and play complementary functional roles in the physiology of the striatal microcircuit.

  15. Free chelatable zinc modulates the cholinergic function during hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal damage: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayabanu, M; Kumaran, D; Katyal, A

    2012-01-27

    The deregulation of cholinergic system and associated neuronal damage is thought to be a major contributor to the pathophysiologic sequelae of hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Uniquely, the muscarinic receptors also play a role in zinc uptake. Despite the potential role of muscarinic receptors in the development of post hypoxia cognitive deficits, no studies to date have evaluated the mechanistic relationship between memory dysfunction and zinc homeostasis in brain. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Ca(2)EDTA, a specific zinc chelator in the spatial working and associative memory deficits following hypobaric hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that accumulation of intracellular free chelatable zinc in the hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons is accompanied with neuronal loss and memory impairment in hypobaric hypoxic condition. Chelation of this free zinc with Ca(2)EDTA (1.25 mM/kg) ameliorated the hippocampus-dependent spatial as well as associative memory dysfunction and neuronal damage observed on exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The zinc chelator significantly alleviated the downregulation in expression of choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic receptor 1 and 4, and acetylcholinesterase activity due to hypobaric hypoxia. Our data suggest that the free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia might play a critical role in the neuronal damage and the alteration in cholinergic function associated with hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. We speculate that zinc chelation might be a potential therapy for hypobaric hypoxia-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interaction of αβ-Methylene ATP with the Cholinergic Twitch Response in the Guinea-Pig Ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, direct effects of the P2X purinoceptor agonist αβ-methylene ATP (αβ-meATP) and effects on the cholinergic twitch response of the electrically stimulated longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus (LMMP) strip of the guinea-pig ileum, were investigated. αβ-meATP (1, 3, and 10 µmol/l) induced short-lasting contractions on its own, followed by an inhibition of the twitch response during its presence in the organ bath. The inhibitor of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels, apamin (100 nmol/l), prevented the inhibitory effect of αβ-meATP on the twitch response, whereas tetraethylammonium (300 µmol/l), a blocker of voltage-gated K+ channels and an inhibitor at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, augmented the inhibitory effect of αβ-meATP on the twitch response. It is concluded, that there is a functional interaction between P2X receptors and nicotinic receptors in the LMMP strip, and that a major part of the excitatory input to the cholinergic motor neuron evoking the twitch response is purinergic and not nicotinergic. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boosted Fast Flux Loop Project Staff

    2009-09-01

    The Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) project was initiated to determine basic feasibility of designing, constructing, and installing in a host irradiation facility, an experimental vehicle that can replicate with reasonable fidelity the fast-flux test environment needed for fuels and materials irradiation testing for advanced reactor concepts. Originally called the Gas Test Loop (GTL) project, the activity included (1) determination of requirements that must be met for the GTL to be responsive to potential users, (2) a survey of nuclear facilities that may successfully host the GTL, (3) conceptualizing designs for hardware that can support the needed environments for neutron flux intensity and energy spectrum, atmosphere, flow, etc. needed by the experimenters, and (4) examining other aspects of such a system, such as waste generation and disposal, environmental concerns, needs for additional infrastructure, and requirements for interfacing with the host facility. A revised project plan included requesting an interim decision, termed CD-1A, that had objectives of' establishing the site for the project at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), deferring the CD 1 application, and authorizing a research program that would resolve the most pressing technical questions regarding GTL feasibility, including issues relating to the use of booster fuel in the ATR. Major research tasks were (1) hydraulic testing to establish flow conditions through the booster fuel, (2) mini-plate irradiation tests and post-irradiation examination to alleviate concerns over corrosion at the high heat fluxes planned, (3) development and demonstration of booster fuel fabrication techniques, and (4) a review of the impact of the GTL on the ATR safety basis. A revised cooling concept for the apparatus was conceptualized, which resulted in renaming the project to the BFFL. Before the subsequent CD-1 approval request could be made, a decision was made in April

  18. Substructure of Highly Boosted Massive Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alon, Raz [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2012-10-01

    Modern particle accelerators enable researchers to study new high energy frontiers which have never been explored before. This realm opens possibilities to further examine known fields such as Quantum Chromodynamics. In addition, it allows searching for new physics and setting new limits on the existence of such. This study examined the substructure of highly boosted massive jets measured by the CDF II detector. Events from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider were collected out of a total integrated luminosity of 5.95 fb$^{-1}$. They were selected to have at least one jet with transverse momentum above 400 GeV/c. The jet mass, angularity, and planar flow were measured and compared with predictions of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics, and were found to be consistent with the theory. A search for boosted top quarks was conducted and resulted in an upper limit on the production cross section of such top quarks.

  19. Long-term basal forebrain cholinergic-rich grafts derived from trisomy 16 mice do not develop beta-amyloid pathology and neurodegeneration but demonstrate neuroinflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T; Goldammer, A; Luschekina, E; Beck, M; Schliebs, R; Bigl, V

    1998-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (human trisomy 21) develop neuropathological and cholinergic functional defects characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, which has been attributed to the location of the Alzheimer beta-amyloid precursor protein on chromosome 21. Due to the partial genetic homology between mouse chromosome 16 and human chromosome 21, murine trisomy 16 was used as a model to study functional links between increased expression of the amyloid precursor protein, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammatory responses. Basal forebrain cholinergic-rich tissue derived from trisomy 16 mice at embryonic age of day 16 was transplanted into the lateral ventricle of adult normal mice. At 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after transplantation, the grafts were characterized by immunocytochemistry, molecular biological analysis, and stereological methods. Grafts survived up to one year and still demonstrated immunoreactivity for cholinergic, GABAergic and astroglial cells. Though a 1.5-fold neuronal over-expression of amyloid precursor protein was detected in brains from trisomy 16 embryos by Northern analysis, beta-amyloid deposits were found neither in control nor trisomic grafts. Detailed stereological analysis of trisomic grafts did not reveal any neurodegeneration or morphological changes of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons during the course of graft maturation up to one year, as compared to grafts derived from euploid tissue. However, both euploid and trisomic grafts demonstrated a strong infiltration with T- and B-lymphocytes and a significant micro- and astroglial activation (hypertrophic astrocytes) within and around the grafts. These observations further suggest that the trisomy 16-induced neurodegeneration is seemingly due to a lack of neuron supporting factors which are provided by either the metabolic interaction of trisomic graft with surrounding healthy host tissue or by cells of the immune system infiltrating the graft.

  20. Alpha7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Play a Predominant Role in the Cholinergic Potentiation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Evoked Firing Responses of Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt K. Bali

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify in vivo electrophysiological correlates of the interaction between cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission underlying memory. Extracellular spike recordings were performed in the hippocampal CA1 region of anesthetized rats in combination with local microiontophoretic administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and acetylcholine (ACh. Both NMDA and ACh increased the firing rate of the neurons. Furthermore, the simultaneous delivery of NMDA and ACh resulted in a more pronounced excitatory effect that was superadditive over the sum of the two mono-treatment effects and that was explained by cholinergic potentiation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. Next, animals were systemically treated with scopolamine or methyllycaconitine (MLA to assess the contribution of muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR or α7 nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR receptor-mediated mechanisms to the observed effects. Scopolamine totally inhibited ACh-evoked firing, and attenuated the firing rate increase evoked by simultaneous application of NMDA and ACh. However, the superadditive nature of the combined effect was preserved. The α7 nAChR antagonist MLA robustly decreased the firing response to simultaneous application of NMDA and ACh, suspending their superadditive effect, without modifying the tonic firing rate increasing effect of ACh. These results provide the first in vivo electrophysiological evidence that, in the hippocampal CA1 region, α7 nAChRs contribute to pyramidal cell activity mainly through potentiation of glutamatergic signaling, while the direct cholinergic modulation of tonic firing is notably mediated by mAChRs. Furthermore, the present findings also reveal cellular physiological correlates of the interplay between cholinergic and glutamatergic agents in behavioral pharmacological models of cognitive decline.

  1. Boosting Nonlinear Additive Autoregressive Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Shafik, Nivien; Tutz, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Within the last years several methods for the analysis of nonlinear autoregressive time series have been proposed. As in linear autoregressive models main problems are model identification, estimation and prediction. A boosting method is proposed that performs model identification and estimation simultaneously within the framework of nonlinear autoregressive time series. The method allows to select influential terms from a large numbers of potential lags and exogenous variables. The influence...

  2. Cash boost to Great British science unveiled

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "Trade and Industry Secretary, Patricia Hewitt today unveiled new plans for the DTI's record science budget over the next three years, to keep Britain at the forefront of world science. The plans include funding to develop life saving new health techniques, to seek alternative energy sources, to help our rural economy, to develop the computers of tomorrow and boost business with the next generation of leading edge technologies" (1 page).

  3. Effect of morphine-induced antinociception is altered by AF64A-induced lesions on cholinergic neurons in rat nucleus raphe magnus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kenji; Ishida, Kota; Kato, Masatoshi; Shigenaga, Toshiro; Taguchi, Kyoji; Miyatake, Tadashi

    2002-11-01

    To examine the role of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM) in noxious heat stimulation and in the effects of morphine-induced antinociception by rats. After the cholinergic neuron selective toxin, AF64A, was microinjected into the NRM, we examined changes in the antinociceptive threshold and effects of morphine (5 mg/kg, ip) using the hot-plate (HP) and tail-flick (TF) tests. Systemic administration of morphine inhibited HP and TF responses in control rats. Microinjection of AF64A (2 nmol/site) into the NRM significantly decreased the threshold of HP response after 14 d, whereas the TF response was not affected. Morphine-induced antinociception was significantly attenuated in rats administered AF64A. Extracellular acetylcholine was attenuated after 14 d to below detectable levels in rats given AF64A. Naloxone (1 microg/site) microinjected into control rat NRM also antagonized the antinociceptive effect of systemic morphine. These findings suggest that cholinergic neuron activation in the NRM modulates the antinociceptive effect of morphine simultaneously with the opiate system.

  4. Substitution of natural sensory input by artificial neurostimulation of an amputated trigeminal nerve does not prevent the degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic circuits projecting to the somatosensory cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Rincon, Celia; Panetsos, Fivos

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral deafferentation downregulates acetylcholine (ACh) synthesis in sensory cortices. However, the responsible neural circuits and processes are not known. We irreversibly transected the rat infraorbital nerve and implanted neuroprosthetic microdevices for proximal stump stimulation, and assessed cytochrome-oxidase and choline- acetyl-transferase (ChAT) in somatosensory, auditory and visual cortices; estimated the number and density of ACh-neurons in the magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN); and localized down-regulated ACh-neurons in basal forebrain using retrograde labeling from deafferented cortices. Here we show that nerve transection, causes down regulation of MBN cholinergic neurons. Stimulation of the cut nerve reverses the metabolic decline but does not affect the decrease in cholinergic fibers in cortex or cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain. Artifical stimulation of the nerve also has no affect of ACh-innervation of other cortices. Cortical ChAT depletion is due to loss of corticopetal MBN ChAT-expressing neurons. MBN ChAT downregulation is not due to a decrease of afferent activity or to a failure of trophic support. Basalocortical ACh circuits are sensory specific, ACh is provided to each sensory cortex “on demand” by dedicated circuits. Our data support the existence of a modality-specific cortex-MBN-cortex circuit for cognitive information processing. PMID:25452715

  5. The LIM and POU homeobox genes ttx-3 and unc-86 act as terminal selectors in distinct cholinergic and serotonergic neuron types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feifan; Bhattacharya, Abhishek; Nelson, Jessica C; Abe, Namiko; Gordon, Patricia; Lloret-Fernandez, Carla; Maicas, Miren; Flames, Nuria; Mann, Richard S; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A; Hobert, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive neuron type-specific terminal differentiation programs in the developing nervous system are often expressed in several distinct neuronal cell types, but to what extent they have similar or distinct activities in individual neuronal cell types is generally not well explored. We investigate this problem using, as a starting point, the C. elegans LIM homeodomain transcription factor ttx-3, which acts as a terminal selector to drive the terminal differentiation program of the cholinergic AIY interneuron class. Using a panel of different terminal differentiation markers, including neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and neuropeptides, we show that ttx-3 also controls the terminal differentiation program of two additional, distinct neuron types, namely the cholinergic AIA interneurons and the serotonergic NSM neurons. We show that the type of differentiation program that is controlled by ttx-3 in different neuron types is specified by a distinct set of collaborating transcription factors. One of the collaborating transcription factors is the POU homeobox gene unc-86, which collaborates with ttx-3 to determine the identity of the serotonergic NSM neurons. unc-86 in turn operates independently of ttx-3 in the anterior ganglion where it collaborates with the ARID-type transcription factor cfi-1 to determine the cholinergic identity of the IL2 sensory and URA motor neurons. In conclusion, transcription factors operate as terminal selectors in distinct combinations in different neuron types, defining neuron type-specific identity features.

  6. M4 muscarinic receptors regulate the dynamics of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission: relevance to the pathophysiology and treatment of related CNS pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzavara, Eleni T; Bymaster, Frank P; Davis, Richard J; Wade, Mark R; Perry, Kenneth W; Wess, Jurgen; McKinzie, David L; Felder, Chris; Nomikos, George G

    2004-09-01

    Dopaminergic dysfunction is an important pathogenetic factor for brain pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, ADHD, schizophrenia, and addiction as well as for metabolic disorders and anorexia. Dopaminergic neurons projecting from the midbrain to forebrain regions, such as the nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex, regulate motor and cognitive functions and coordinate the patterned response of the organism to sensory, affective, and rewarding stimuli. In this study, we showed that dopaminergic neurotransmission is highly dependent on M4 cholinergic muscarinic receptor function. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found elevated dopamine (DA) basal values and enhanced DA response to psychostimulants in the nucleus accumbens of M4 knockout mice. We also demonstrated impaired homeostatic control of cholinergic activity that leads to increased basal acetylcholine efflux in the midbrain of these animals. Thus, loss of M4 muscarinic receptor control of cholinergic function effectuates a state of dopaminergic hyperexcitability. This may be responsible for pathological conditions, in which appetitive motivation as well as affective and cognitive processing is impaired. We propose that M4 receptor agonists could represent an innovative strategy for the treatment of pathologies associated with hyperdopaminergia.

  7. Involvement of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of yawning and genital grooming by the aqueous extract of Saccharum officinarum L. (sugarcane) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria T; Gamberini, Maria C; Nasello, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    Yawning, associated with genital grooming, is a physiological response that may be used for elucidating the mechanism of action of drugs. Preliminary analysis showed that aqueous extract (AE) of Saccharum induced yawns in rats. So, we aimed to quantify these behavioral responses and investigate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in these actions. During 120 min, after AE administration, the yawns and the genital grooming were quantified at 10 min intervals. Since dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are implied in these responses, AE were evaluated in the presence of haloperidol 0.5 mg/kg and atropine 2 mg/kg. AE 0.5 g/kg increased the yawns, effect that was blocked both by haloperidol and atropine. Genital grooming could only be stimulated by AE 0.5 g/kg when dopaminergic receptors were blocked by haloperidol. However, it was inhibited when atropine was previously administered. So, we demonstrated a central action of Saccharum and it was postulated that neural circuits with the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are involved. The fact that AE is comprised of innumerous compounds could justify the extract's distinct responses. Also, we cannot disregard the presence of different neural circuits that count on the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways and could be activated by the same induction agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Co-expression of Cholinergic and Noradrenergic Phenotypes in Human and Non-Human Autonomic Nervous System

    OpenAIRE

    Weihe, Eberhard; Schütz, Burkhard; Hartschuh, Wolfgang; Anlauf, Martin; Schäfer, Martin K.; Eiden, Lee E.

    2005-01-01

    It has long been known that the sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands is cholinergic in most mammalian species, and that during development, rodent sympathetic cholinergic sweat gland innervation transiently expresses noradrenergic traits. We show here that some noradrenergic traits persist in cholinergic sympathetic innervation of the sweat glands in rodents, but that lack of expression of the vesicular monoamine transporter renders these cells functionally non-noradrenergic. Adult hum...

  9. Central cholinergic pathways in the rat: an overview based on an alternative nomenclature (Ch1-Ch6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesulam, M M; Mufson, E J; Wainer, B H; Levey, A I

    1983-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and a histochemical method for the concurrent demonstration of acetylcholinesterase and horseradish peroxidase were used to investigate the organization of ascending cholinergic pathways in the central nervous system of the rat. The cortical mantle, the amygdaloid complex, the hippocampal formation, the olfactory bulb and the thalamic nuclei receive their cholinergic innervation principally, from cholinergic projection neurons of the basal forebrain and upper brainstem. On the basis of connectivity patterns, we subdivided these cholinergic neurons into six major sectors. The Ch1 and Ch2 sectors are contained within the medial septal nucleus and the vertical limb nucleus of the diagonal band, respectively. They provide the major cholinergic projections of the hippocampus. The Ch3 sector is contained mostly within the lateral portion of the horizontal limb nucleus of the diagonal band and provides the major cholinergic innervation to the olfactory bulb. The Ch4 sector includes cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis, and also within parts of the diagonal band nuclei. Neurons of the Ch4 sector provide the major cholinergic innervation of the cortical mantle and the amygdala. The Ch5-Ch6 sectors are contained mostly within the pedunculopontine nucleus of the pontomesencephalic reticular formation (Ch5) and within the laterodorsal tegmental gray of the periventricular area (Ch6). These sectors provide the major cholinergic innervation of the thalamus. The Ch5-Ch6 neurons also provide a minor component of the corticopetal cholinergic innervation. These central cholinergic pathways have been implicated in a variety of behaviors and especially in memory function. It appears that the age-related changes of memory function as well as some of the behavioral disturbances seen in the dementia of Alzheimer's Disease may be related to pathological alterations along central cholinergic pathways.

  10. Variable expression of GFP in different populations of peripheral cholinergic neurons of ChATBAC-eGFP transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, T Christopher; Bond, Cherie E; Hoover, Donald B

    2018-03-01

    Immunohistochemistry is used widely to identify cholinergic neurons, but this approach has some limitations. To address these problems, investigators developed transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) directed by the promoter for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the acetylcholine synthetic enzyme. Although, it was reported that these mice express GFP in all cholinergic neurons and non-neuronal cholinergic cells, we could not detect GFP in cardiac cholinergic nerves in preliminary experiments. Our goals for this study were to confirm our initial observation and perform a qualitative screen of other representative autonomic structures for the presences of GFP in cholinergic innervation of effector tissues. We evaluated GFP fluorescence of intact, unfixed tissues and the cellular localization of GFP and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), a specific cholinergic marker, in tissue sections and intestinal whole mounts. Our experiments identified two major tissues where cholinergic neurons and/or nerve fibers lacked GFP: 1) most cholinergic neurons of the intrinsic cardiac ganglia and all cholinergic nerve fibers in the heart and 2) most cholinergic nerve fibers innervating airway smooth muscle. Most cholinergic neurons in airway ganglia stained for GFP. Cholinergic systems in the bladder and intestines were fully delineated by GFP staining. GFP labeling of input to ganglia with long preganglionic projections (vagal) was sparse or weak, while that to ganglia with short preganglionic projections (spinal) was strong. Total absence of GFP might be due to splicing out of the GFP gene. Lack of GFP in nerve projections from GFP-positive cell bodies might reflect a transport deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Boosted Random Ferns for Object Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergel, Michael Villamizar; Andrade-Cetto, Juan; Sanfeliu, Alberto; Moreno-Noguer, Francesc

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we introduce the Boosted Random Ferns (BRFs) to rapidly build discriminative classifiers for learning and detecting object categories. At the core of our approach we use standard random ferns, but we introduce four main innovations that let us bring ferns from an instance to a category level, and still retain efficiency. First, we define binary features on the histogram of oriented gradients-domain (as opposed to intensity-), allowing for a better representation of intra-class variability. Second, both the positions where ferns are evaluated within the sliding window, and the location of the binary features for each fern are not chosen completely at random, but instead we use a boosting strategy to pick the most discriminative combination of them. This is further enhanced by our third contribution, that is to adapt the boosting strategy to enable sharing of binary features among different ferns, yielding high recognition rates at a low computational cost. And finally, we show that training can be performed online, for sequentially arriving images. Overall, the resulting classifier can be very efficiently trained, densely evaluated for all image locations in about 0.1 seconds, and provides detection rates similar to competing approaches that require expensive and significantly slower processing times. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by thorough experimentation in publicly available datasets in which we compare against state-of-the-art, and for tasks of both 2D detection and 3D multi-view estimation.

  12. Cholinergic Interneurons Amplify Corticostriatal Synaptic Responses in the Q175 Model of Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Tanimura

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by deficits in movement control that are widely viewed as stemming from pathophysiological changes in the striatum. Giant, aspiny cholinergic interneurons (ChIs are key elements in the striatal circuitry controlling movement, but whether their physiological properties are intact in the HD brain is unclear. To address this issue, the synaptic properties of ChIs were examined using optogenetic approaches in the Q175 mouse model of HD. In ex vivo brain slices, synaptic facilitation at thalamostriatal synapses onto ChIs was reduced in Q175 mice. The alteration in thalamostriatal transmission was paralleled by an increased response to optogenetic stimulation of cortical axons, enabling these inputs to more readily induce burst-pause patterns of activity in ChIs. This adaptation was dependent upon amplification of cortically evoked responses by a post-synaptic upregulation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels. This upregulation also led to an increased ability of somatic spikes to invade ChI dendrites. However, there was not an alteration in the basal pacemaking rate of ChIs, possibly due to increased availability of Kv4 channels. Thus, there is a functional ‘re-wiring’ of the striatal networks in Q175 mice, which results in greater cortical control of phasic ChI activity, which is widely thought to shape the impact of salient stimuli on striatal action selection.

  13. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  14. Cholinergic function and dysfunction in the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelke, M; Sannita, W G

    2002-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) function is thought not only to play a significant role in memory, learning and other cognitive processes, but studies at a cellular level and in vivo indicate an important role for ACh in vision as well, especially for visual information processing. A suitable experimental model of geriatric memory impairment and Alzheimer dementia that pharmacologically blocks the brain muscarinic transmission has been proposed. This model has been extensively used also as an attempt to test cholinergic drugs in the absence of detailed knowledge of sites and mechanisms of ACh action and as test condition in the investigation of the role of ACh in visual information processing. Alzheimer's dementia results from complex neuron alterations, rather than simply reflecting ACh impoverishment, also involving the visual system, with substantial loss of retinal ganglion cells and alterations in visual information processing. Viewing all these data as a whole, nonspecific ACh actions on cognition, such as arousal or attention, contribute in modulating the function-specific action of ACh in information processing, both at cognitive and visual level.

  15. Fast neutron boost for the treatment of grade IV astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breteau, N.; Destembert, B.; Favre, A.; Pheline, C.; Schlienger, M.

    1989-01-01

    A previous study, on grade IV astrocytomas, compared a combination of photons and fast neutron boost to photons only, both treatments being delivered following a concentrated irradiation schedule. A slight improvement in survival was observed after neutron boost for non operated patients, but not for operated patients. Since death was always related to local recurrence and since no complication occurred after neutron boost, the neutron dose was increased from 6 to 7 Gy in January 1985. No improvement in survival was observed for patients treated with neutron boost after complete resection. After subtotal resection, the group that was treated with the higher neutron boost (7 Gy) showed a significant benefit in survival at twelve months. When patients had only a biopsy before irradiation, there was a benefit in survival after neutron boost, but no additional benefit was gained when the size of the neutron boost was increased from 6 to 7 Gy. (orig.) [de

  16. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  17. Application of Boosting Regression Trees to Preliminary Cost Estimation in Building Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonseok Shin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the recent data mining techniques available, the boosting approach has attracted a great deal of attention because of its effective learning algorithm and strong boundaries in terms of its generalization performance. However, the boosting approach has yet to be used in regression problems within the construction domain, including cost estimations, but has been actively utilized in other domains. Therefore, a boosting regression tree (BRT is applied to cost estimations at the early stage of a construction project to examine the applicability of the boosting approach to a regression problem within the construction domain. To evaluate the performance of the BRT model, its performance was compared with that of a neural network (NN model, which has been proven to have a high performance in cost estimation domains. The BRT model has shown results similar to those of NN model using 234 actual cost datasets of a building construction project. In addition, the BRT model can provide additional information such as the importance plot and structure model, which can support estimators in comprehending the decision making process. Consequently, the boosting approach has potential applicability in preliminary cost estimations in a building construction project.

  18. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  19. Heterologous Prime/Boost Immunization with p53-based Vaccines Combined with Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Enhances Tumor Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Ishizaki, Hidenobu; Song, Guang-Yun; Srivastava, Tumul; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Shahabi, Vafa; Manuel, Edwin R.; Diamond, Don J.; Ellenhorn, Joshua D.I.

    2010-01-01

    The p53 gene product is overexpressed in ~50% of cancers, making it an ideal target for cancer immunotherapy. We previously demonstrated that a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing human p53 (MVA-p53) was moderately active when given as a homologous prime/boost in a human p53 knock in (Hupki) mouse model. We needed to improve upon the inefficient homologous boosting approach, because development of neutralizing immunity to the vaccine viral vector backbone suppresses its immunoge...

  20. Development of a standardized pulse-controlled ergometry test for diagnosing and investigating cholinergic urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altrichter, Sabine; Salow, Julia; Ardelean, Elena; Church, Martin K; Werner, Andreas; Maurer, Marcus

    2014-08-01

    Cholinergic urticaria (CholU) is a common condition in which active or passive warming leads to development of pinpoint wheals, flares and itch. To develop a standardized protocol for diagnosing CholU and measuring trigger thresholds, independent of patients' fitness levels. Ten CholU patients and matched healthy controls underwent pulse-controlled incremental ergometry for 30 min (stationary bicycle) increasing their pulse rate by 15 beats every 5 min. Non-invasive, heat-flux double-sensor and conventional electronic thermometers measured core and skin surface temperatures from which mean body temperature (MBT) was calculated. The time of onset of sweating (starch-iodine test) and symptoms (whealing) were recorded. All individuals completed the ergometry protocol without difficulty. All CholU patients but no controls developed wheals. The time to whealing correlated inversely with disease severity. In four patients MBT increased <0.5°C and in two whealing occurred at a temperature lower than at the start of exercise. Onset of symptoms correlated with the time of sweating. Pulse-controlled ergometry is sensitive and specific for diagnosing CholU and investigating trigger thresholds and disease mechanisms. Our results refute the hypothesis that a rise in MBT is the critical trigger for CholU while sweating appears to have the central role. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cholinergic and dopaminergic mechanisms involved in the recovery of circadian anticipation by aniracetam in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yushiro; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Nakamura, Kazuo

    2002-05-01

    We have reported that repeated administration of aniracetam (100 mg/kg p.o.) for 7 consecutive days recovers mealtime-associated circadian anticipatory behavior diminished in aged rats. The present study examines the mode of action underlying the restoration by aniracetam with various types of receptor antagonists. Coadministration of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) or haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg i.p.) for the last 3 days significantly reduced the restorative effects of aniracetam without affecting the timed feeding-induced anticipatory behavior by each receptor antagonist itself. The other receptor antagonists, mecamylamine (3 mg/kg i.p.), 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(F)quinoxaline (NBQX, 1 microg/rat i.c.v.) had no effect on either the basal or aniracetam-elicited circadian anticipation. In contrast, ketanserin (1 mg/kg i.p.) itself recovered the diminished anticipatory behavior as aniracetam did, but it did not alter the restorative effects of aniracetam. Among the receptor antagonists tested, NBQX reduced appetite and haloperidol induced circadian hypoactivity. These results suggest that the food-entrainable circadian oscillations or the temporal regulatory system of behavior is modulated by cholinergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. Furthermore, aniracetam may restore the aging-diminished behavioral anticipation by activating muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) and/or dopamine (DA) D2 receptors through the enhanced release of ACh and/or DA in the brain.

  2. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Hu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum (LS, central amygdala (CeA, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVH, dorsal raphe (DRN and parabrachial nucleus (PBN. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal-hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function.

  3. Role of central angiotensin receptors in scopolamine-induced impairment in memory, cerebral blood flow, and cholinergic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tota, Santoshkumar; Hanif, Kashif; Kamat, Pradeep Kumar; Najmi, Abul Kalam; Nath, Chandishwar

    2012-07-01

    Inhibition of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) improves cognitive functions in hypertensive patients. However, role of AT1 and AT2 receptors in memory impairment due to cholinergic hypofunction is unexplored. This study investigated the role of AT1 and AT2 receptors in cerebral blood flow (CBF), cholinergic neurotransmission, and cerebral energy metabolism in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice. Scopolamine was given to male Swiss albino mice to induce memory impairment tested in passive avoidance and Morris water maze tests after a week long administration of blocker of AT1 receptor, candesartan, and AT2 receptor, PD123, 319. CBF was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Biochemical and molecular studies were done in cortex and hippocampus of mice brain. Scopolamine caused memory impairment, reduced CBF, acetylcholine (ACh) level, elevated acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA). Administration of vehicle had no significant effect on any parameter in comparison to control. Candesartan prevented scopolamine-induced amnesia, restored CBF and ACh level, and decreased AChE activity and MDA level. In contrast, PD123, 319 was not effective. However, the effect of AT1 receptor blocker on memory, CBF, ACh level, and oxidative stress was blunted by concomitant blockade of AT2 receptor. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, ATP level, and mRNA expression of AT1, AT2, and ACE remained unaltered. The study suggests that activation of AT1 receptors appears to be involved in the scopolamine-induced amnesia and that AT2 receptors contribute to the beneficial effects of candesartan. Theses finding corroborated the number of clinical studies that RAS inhibition in hypertensive patients could be neuroprotective.

  4. Two distinct populations of projection neurons in the rat lateral parafascicular thalamic nucleus and their cholinergic responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, J A; Sylwestrak, E L; Cox, C L

    2009-08-04

    The lateral parafascicular nucleus (lPf) is a member of the intralaminar thalamic nuclei, a collection of nuclei that characteristically provides widespread projections to the neocortex and basal ganglia and is associated with arousal, sensory, and motor functions. Recently, lPf neurons have been shown to possess different characteristics than other cortical-projecting thalamic relay neurons. We performed whole cell recordings from lPf neurons using an in vitro rat slice preparation and found two distinct neuronal subtypes that were differentiated by distinct morphological and physiological characteristics: diffuse and bushy. Diffuse neurons, which had been previously described, were the predominant neuronal subtype (66%). These neurons had few, poorly-branching, extended dendrites, and rarely displayed burst-like action potential discharge, a ubiquitous feature of thalamocortical relay neurons. Interestingly, we discovered a smaller population of bushy neurons (34%) that shared similar morphological and physiological characteristics with thalamocortical relay neurons of primary sensory thalamic nuclei. In contrast to other thalamocortical relay neurons, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors produced a membrane hyperpolarization via activation of M(2) receptors in most lPf neurons (60%). In a minority of lPf neurons (33%), muscarinic agonists produced a membrane depolarization via activation of predominantly M(3) receptors. The muscarinic receptor-mediated actions were independent of lPf neuronal subtype (i.e. diffuse or bushy neurons); however the cholinergic actions were correlated with lPf neurons with different efferent targets. Retrogradely-labeled lPf neurons from frontal cortical fluorescent bead injections primarily consisted of bushy type lPf neurons (78%), but more importantly, all of these neurons were depolarized by muscarinic agonists. On the other hand, lPf neurons labeled by striatal injections were predominantly hyperpolarized by muscarinic

  5. Cholinergic microvillous cells in the mouse main olfactory epithelium and effect of acetylcholine on olfactory sensory neurons and supporting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Tatsuya; Szebenyi, Steven A; Krosnowski, Kurt; Sathyanesan, Aaron; Jackson, Jacqueline; Lin, Weihong

    2011-09-01

    The mammalian olfactory epithelium is made up of ciliated olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), supporting cells, basal cells, and microvillous cells. Previously, we reported that a population of nonneuronal microvillous cells expresses transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5). Using transgenic mice and immunocytochemical labeling, we identify that these cells are cholinergic, expressing the signature markers of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter. This result suggests that acetylcholine (ACh) can be synthesized and released locally to modulate activities of neighboring supporting cells and OSNs. In Ca(2+) imaging experiments, ACh induced increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels in 78% of isolated supporting cells tested in a concentration-dependent manner. Atropine, a muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChR) antagonist suppressed the ACh responses. In contrast, ACh did not induce or potentiate Ca(2+) increases in OSNs. Instead ACh suppressed the Ca(2+) increases induced by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in some OSNs. Supporting these results, we found differential expression of mAChR subtypes in supporting cells and OSNs using subtype-specific antibodies against M(1) through M(5) mAChRs. Furthermore, we found that various chemicals, bacterial lysate, and cold saline induced Ca(2+) increases in TRPM5/ChAT-expressing microvillous cells. Taken together, our data suggest that TRPM5/ChAT-expressing microvillous cells react to certain chemical or thermal stimuli and release ACh to modulate activities of neighboring supporting cells and OSNs via mAChRs. Our studies reveal an intrinsic and potentially potent mechanism linking external stimulation to cholinergic modulation of activities in the olfactory epithelium.

  6. Chronic Cerebral Ischaemia Forms New Cholinergic Mechanisms of Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Zakharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was a comparative analysis of cholinergic synaptic organization following learning and memory in normal and chronic cerebral ischaemic rats in the Morris water maze model. Choline acetyltransferase and protein content were determined in subpopulations of presynapses of “light” and “heavy” synaptosomal fractions of the cortex and the hippocampus, and the cholinergic projective and intrinsic systems of the brain structures were taken into consideration. We found a strong involvement of cholinergic systems, both projective and intrinsic, in all forms of cognition. Each form of cognition had an individual cholinergic molecular profile and the cholinergic synaptic compositions in the ischaemic rat brains differed significantly from normal ones. Our data demonstrated that under ischaemic conditions, instead of damaged connections new key synaptic relationships, which were stable against pathological influences and able to restore damaged cognitive functions, arose. The plasticity of neurochemical links in the individual organization of certain types of cognition gave a new input into brain pathology and can be used in the future for alternative corrections of vascular and other degenerative dementias.

  7. Boosted cylindrical magnetized Kaluza-Klein wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S. Sedigheh; Riazi, Nematollah

    2018-02-01

    In this work, we consider a vacuum solution of Kaluza-Klein theory with cylindrical symmetry. We investigate the physical properties of the solution as viewed in four dimensional spacetime, which turns out to be a stationary, cylindrical wormhole supported by a scalar field and a magnetic field oriented along the wormhole. We then apply a boost to the five dimensional solution along the extra dimension, and perform the Kaluza-Klein reduction. As a result, we show that the new solution is still a wormhole with a radial electric field and a magnetic field stretched along the wormhole throat.

  8. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects of ...

  9. Protective role of rosmarinic acid on amyloid beta 42-induced echoic memory decline: Implication of oxidative stress and cholinergic impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantar Gok, Deniz; Hidisoglu, Enis; Ocak, Guzide Ayse; Er, Hakan; Acun, Alev Duygu; Yargıcoglu, Piraye

    2018-04-13

    In the present study, we examined whether rosmarinic acid (RA) reverses amyloid β (Aβ) induced reductions in antioxidant defense, lipid peroxidation, cholinergic damage as well as the central auditory deficits. For this purpose, Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups; Sham(S), Sham + RA (SR), Aβ42 peptide (Aβ) and Aβ42 peptide + RA (AβR) groups. Rat model of Alzheimer was established by bilateral injection of Aβ42 peptide (2,2 nmol/10 μl) into the lateral ventricles. RA (50 mg/kg, daily) was administered orally by gavage for 14 days after intracerebroventricular injection. At the end of the experimental period, we recorded the auditory event related potentials (AERPs) and mismatch negativity (MMN) response to assess auditory functions followed by histological and biochemical analysis. Aβ42 injection led to a significant increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) but decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px) and glutathione levels. Moreover, Aβ42 injection resulted in a reduction in the acetylcholine content and acetylcholine esterase activity. RA treatment prevented the observed alterations in the AβR group. Furthermore, RA attenuated the increased Aβ staining and astrocyte activation. We also found that Aβ42 injection decreased the MMN response and theta power/coherence of AERPs, suggesting an impairing effect on auditory discrimination and echoic memory processes. RA treatment reversed the Aβ42 related alterations in AERP parameters. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that RA prevented Aβ-induced antioxidant-oxidant imbalance and cholinergic damage, which may contribute to the improvement of neural network dynamics of auditory processes in this rat model. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cholinergic Neurons - Keeping Check on Amyloid beta in the Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saak V. Ovsepian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological relevance of the uptake of ligands with no apparent trophic functions via the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR remains unclear. Herein, we propose a homeostatic role for this in clearance of amyloid β (Aβ in the brain. We hypothesize that uptake of Aβ in conjunction with p75NTR followed by its degradation in lysosomes endows cholinergic basalo-cortical projections enriched in this receptor a facility for maintaining physiological levels of Aβ in target areas. Thus, in addition to the diffuse modulator influence and channeling of extra-thalamic signals, cholinergic innervations could supply the cerebral cortex with an elaborate system for Aβ drainage. Interpreting the emerging relationship of new molecular data with established role of cholinergic modulator system in regulating cortical network dynamics should provide new insights into the brain physiology and mechanisms of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  11. A cholinergic contribution to the circulatory responses evoked at the onset of handgrip exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vianna, Lauro C; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2015-01-01

    A cholinergic (muscarinic) contribution to the initial circulatory response to exercise in humans remains controversial. Herein, we posit that this may be due to exercise mode with a cholinergic contribution being important during isometric handgrip exercise, where the hyperemic response......-induced fall in SVR and, thereby, augmented the pressor response (+13 ± 3 mmHg at 10 s; P exercise. These findings suggest that a cholinergic mechanism is important for the BP...... resistance (SVR) in young healthy males, while performing either 20 s of isometric handgrip contraction at 40% maximum voluntary contraction (protocol 1; n = 9) or 20 s of low-intensity leg cycling exercise (protocol 2; n = 8, 42 ± 8 W). Exercise trials were conducted under control (no drug) conditions...

  12. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  13. Selective retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons with [3H]choline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnoli, P.; Beaudet, A.; Stella, M.; Cuenod, M.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented which is consistent with a specific retrograde labeling of cholinergic neurons following [ 3 H]choline application in their zone of termination. [ 3 H]Choline injection in the rat hippocampus leads to perikaryal retrograde labeling in the ipsilateral medial septal nuclease and nucleus of the diagonal band, thus delineating an established cholinergic pathway, while only diffuse presumably anterograde labeling was observed in the lateral septum, the entorhinal cortex, and the opposite hippocampus. After [ 3 H]choline injection in the pigeon visual Wulst, only the ipsilateral thalamic relay, of all inputs, showed similar perikaryal retrograde labeling, an observation supporting the suggestion that at least some thalamo-Wulst neurons are cholinergic

  14. single-phase dc phase dc-ac boost converter ac boost converter

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    supply (UPS) AC motor drives and other power sup systems, need to step-up the DC input voltage. increase the output voltage level in order requirements, DC-DC boost converter is used provide DC bus voltage for PWM inverters. Hence, conventional design always cascades DC and a separate DC-AC converter.

  15. Aichelburg-Sexl boost of domain walls and cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrabes, C.; Hogan, P.A.; Israel, W.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the application of the Aichelburg-Sexl boost to plane and line distributions of matter. Our analysis shows that for a domain wall the space-time after the boost is flat except on a null hypersurface which is the history of a null shell. For a cosmic string we study the influence of the boost on the conical singularity and give the new value of the conical deficit

  16. Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter at direct detection experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Giudice, Gian F.; Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul; Shin, Seodong

    2018-01-01

    We explore a novel class of multi-particle dark sectors, called Inelastic Boosted Dark Matter (iBDM). These models are constructed by combining properties of particles that scatter off matter by making transitions to heavier states (Inelastic Dark Matter) with properties of particles that are produced with a large Lorentz boost in annihilation processes in the galactic halo (Boosted Dark Matter). This combination leads to new signals that can be observed at ordinary direct detection experimen...

  17. Pedunculopontine cholinergic cell loss in hallucinating Parkinson disease patients but not in dementia with Lewy bodies patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepp, D.H.; Ruiter, A.M.; Galis, Y.; van der Voorn, J.P.; Rozemuller, A.J.M.; Berendse, H.W.; Foncke, E.M.J.; van de Berg, W.D.J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a cholinergic deficit in Parkinson disease (PD) and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) that plays a role in a variety of clinical symptoms, including visual hallucinations (VH). The aim of this study was to assess cholinergic neuronal loss and PD and Alzheimer disease pathology in the

  18. Using cholinergic M1 receptor positive allosteric modulators to improve memory via enhancement of brain cholinergic communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Caroline; Jatzke, Claudia; Wegener, Nico; Gravius, Andreas; Danysz, Wojciech

    2012-12-15

    Benzylquinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is a recently described cholinergic muscarinic M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator having potential as cognitive enhancer in dementia. The present study focused on the characterisation of BQCA's mode of action in relation to positive effects on memory and side-effects in an animal model. To get insight into this mode of action, in vitro receptor potency/left shift experiments in cells stably expressing the rat's M(1) receptor were performed. They revealed an inflection point value of BQCA corresponding to 306nM, and potentiation of the agonist response up to 47-fold in presence of 10μM of BQCA. In vivo, brain microdialysis showed a maximal brain level of 270nM, 40min after i.p. administration at 10mg/kg. Based on in vitro data obtained with this dose, it can be concluded that BQCA reaches brain levels which should potentiate the agonist response about 4-fold. Behavioural data confirmed that BQCA used at 10mg/kg attenuated scopolamine-induced memory deficit in a spontaneous alternation task. Moreover, BQCA showed no side effect at 10mg/kg and above in spontaneous locomotion and salivation tests. The profile of BQCA observed in the present study displays a clear advantage over the M(1)-M(3) agonist cevimeline. The present data show the therapeutic potential of the M(1) receptor positive allosteric modulator BQCA for the treatment of memory deficits observed in Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Participation of the cholinergic system in the ethanol-induced suppression of paradoxical sleep in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Papale

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbance is among the many consequences of ethanol abuse in both humans and rodents. Ethanol consumption can reduce REM or paradoxical sleep (PS in humans and rats, respectively. The first aim of this study was to develop an animal model of ethanol-induced PS suppression. This model administered intragastrically (by gavage to male Wistar rats (3 months old, 200-250 g 0.5 to 3.5 g/kg ethanol. The 3.5 g/kg dose of ethanol suppressed the PS stage compared with the vehicle group (distilled water during the first 2-h interval (0-2 h; 1.3 vs 10.2; P < 0.001. The second aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which ethanol suppresses PS. We examined the effects of cholinergic drug pretreatment. The cholinergic system was chosen because of the involvement of cholinergic neurotransmitters in regulating the sleep-wake cycle. A second set of animals was pretreated with 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/kg pilocarpine (cholinergic agonist or atropine (cholinergic antagonist. These drugs were administered 1 h prior to ethanol (3.5 g/kg or vehicle. Treatment with atropine prior to vehicle or ethanol produced a statistically significant decrease in PS, whereas pilocarpine had no effect on minutes of PS. Although the mechanism by which ethanol induces PS suppression is not fully understood, these data suggest that the cholinergic system is not the only system involved in this interaction.

  20. Cholinergic intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D J; cowles, R A; Segura, B J; Romanchuk, G; Barnhart, D C; Mulholland, M W

    2000-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine function has been demonstrated to be under neuronal regulation. The pathways responsible for this effect, and the long-term consequences of such interactions, are incompletely described. The effects of neuronal depolarization on pancreatic acinar cells were studied to determine whether calcium signaling and c-fos expression were activated. In pancreatic lobules, which contain both neurons and acinar cells, agonists that selectively stimulated neurons increased intracellular calcium in acinar cells. Depolarization also led to the expression of c-fos protein in 24% +/- 4% of the acinar cells. In AR42J pancreatic acinar cells, cholinergic stimulation demonstrated an average increase of 398 +/- 19 nmol/L in intracellular calcium levels, and induced c-fos expression that was time and dose dependent. The data indicate that intrapancreatic neurons induce Ca²+ signaling and early-response gene expression in pancreatic acinar cells.

  1. Impaired hippocampal acetylcholine release parallels spatial memory deficits in Tg2576 mice subjected to basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    (BFCD) in 3 months old male Tg2576 mice to co-express cholinergic degeneration with Aβ overexpression as these characteristics constitutes key hallmarks of AD. At 9 months, SAP lesioned Tg2576 mice were cognitively impaired in two spatial paradigms addressing working memory and mid to long-term memory......, respectively. Conversely, there was no deterioration of cognitive functioning in sham lesioned Tg2576 mice or wild type littermates (wt) receiving the immunotoxin. At 10 months of age, release of acetylcholine (ACh) was addressed by microdialysis in conscious mice. Scopolamine-induced increases in hippocampal...... ACh efflux was significantly reduced in SAP lesioned Tg2576 mice compared to sham lesioned Tg2576 mice. Intriguingly, there was no significant difference in ACh efflux between wt treatment groups. Following SAP treatment, choline acetyltransferase activity was reduced in the hippocampus and frontal...

  2. Boosted Higgs boson tagging using jet substructures

    CERN Document Server

    Shvydkin, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Searching BSM particles via the Higgs boson final state has now become common. The mass of desired BSM particle is more than 1 TeV, thereby its decay products are highly Lorentz-boosted. Hence the jets from b quark-antiquark pair - which the Higgs boson mostly decays into - are very closed to each other, and merged into one jet, that is typically reconstructed using large jet sizes (∆R = 0.8). In this work regression technique is applied to AK8 jets (which defined by anti-kT algorithm, using ΔR = 0.8). The regression makes use of boosted jets with substructure information, coupled with the pecularities of a b quark decay, like the presence of a soft lepton (SL) inside the jet. It has allowed to improve the resolution of the mass reconstruction and transverse momentum of the Higgs boson. This application results in improvement of the mass reconstruction by 3-4 percent. These result may be improved firstly by making more careful pileup rejection. Then it is possible to combine base regression train for dif...

  3. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Albin, Roger L; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinson's disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinson's disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 ± 7.4 years old; 6.0 ± 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 ± 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 ± 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and (11)C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 1-3 and 5, respectively. Regression

  4. Effects of mercuric chloride and methyl mercury on cholinergic neuromuscular transmission in the guinea-pig ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messori, E.; Liuzzi, M.; Tonini, M.; Candura, S.M.; D'Agostino, G.; Castoldi, A.F.; Manzo, L.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl 2 ) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were examined on basal mechanical activity and electrically-induced neurogenic cholinergic contractions (twitch contractions) in longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strips from guinea-pig distal ileum. Both compounds at 0.3-3 μM slightly enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions in ∼50% preparations. This effect was probably due to facilitation of acetylcholine (ACh) release since 0.1 and 1 μM mercurials increased electrically-evoked tritium outflow from [ 3 H]choline preloaded muscle layer with attached myenteric plexus. Conversely, higher mercury concentrations inhibited twitch contractions (HgCl 2 IC 50 = 21.3±6.4 μM; MeHg IC 50 = 45.1±5.5 μM), as well as contractions to exogenous ACh (0.1 μM) in resting preparations, and concomitantly increased the basal tone. The former effects possibly reflected an anti muscarinic activity of mercury, while the latter was related to alterations of calcium homeostasis in the effector cells. Indeed, the effect of HgCl 2 on basal tone was antagonized by the Ca 2+ entry blocker nifedipine (3, 10, 30 nM), indicating Hg-induced facilitation of Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent channels. On the whole, our results suggest that cholinergic neuromuscular transmission and Ca 2+ -dependent mechanisms underlying smooth muscle contractility are targets for mercury toxicity in the intestine. (au) 51 refs

  5. Effects of Ginkgo biloba Extract EGb 761, Donepezil and their Combination on Central Cholinergic Function in Aged Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Christoph; Hopfeld, Julia; Lau, Helene; Klein, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Ginkgo extract EGb 761 and cholinesterase inhibitors have been shown to be effective in the treatment of dementia patients. In addition to neuroprotective effects, Ginkgo extract EGb 761 has been reported to elevate brain levels of certain neurotransmitters such as dopamine, noradrenaline, and acetylcholine. In the present study, we investigated the impact of EGb 761, donepezil and the combination of both drugs on the central cholinergic system in aged rats. 24 month old rats received EGb 761 (100 mg/kg/day), donepezil (1.5 mg/kg/day), the combination of both drugs or vehicle control by oral gavage for 14 days. We used microdialysis in rat hippocampus to monitor extracellular concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh), choline, glucose and lactate. Brain homogenates were prepared to measure activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and high affinity choline uptake (HACU). While EGb 761 alone had no effect, donepezil and the combination of donepezil and EGb 761 increased basal ACh levels by 2- to 3-fold. Concomitantly, significant reductions of AChE and HACU were measured in both groups. No differences were seen between donepezil and the combination in these parameters. Treatment with EGb 761 decreased extracellular choline release and showed a tendency to moderately elevate ChAT activity. We found that donepezil and EGb 761 do not display a pharmacological interaction when given together. Adding EGb 761 did not modify the effects of donepezil on the hippocampal cholinergic system. Reduced choline levels indicate neuroprotective properties of EGb 761. Therefore, the combination of EGb 761 and donepezil may be beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  6. Effects of mercuric chloride and methyl mercury on cholinergic neuromuscular transmission in the guinea-pig ileum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messori, E.; Liuzzi, M.; Tonini, M. [Univ. of Pavia, Dept. of Internal Medicine and Therapeutics, Div. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Pavia (Italy); Candura, S.M. [Univ. of Pavia, Dept. of Preventive, Occupational and Community Medicine, Pavia (Italy); D`Agostino, G. [Univ. of Pavia, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Pavia (Italy); Castoldi, A.F.; Manzo, L. [Pavia Medical Centre, Inst. of Care and Scientific Research, Toxicology Unit, Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    1997-05-01

    The effects of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) and methyl mercury (MeHg) were examined on basal mechanical activity and electrically-induced neurogenic cholinergic contractions (twitch contractions) in longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus strips from guinea-pig distal ileum. Both compounds at 0.3-3 {mu}M slightly enhanced the amplitude of twitch contractions in {approx}50% preparations. This effect was probably due to facilitation of acetylcholine (ACh) release since 0.1 and 1 {mu}M mercurials increased electrically-evoked tritium outflow from [{sup 3}H]choline preloaded muscle layer with attached myenteric plexus. Conversely, higher mercury concentrations inhibited twitch contractions (HgCl{sub 2} IC{sub 50} = 21.3{+-}6.4 {mu}M; MeHg IC{sub 50} = 45.1{+-}5.5 {mu}M), as well as contractions to exogenous ACh (0.1 {mu}M) in resting preparations, and concomitantly increased the basal tone. The former effects possibly reflected an anti muscarinic activity of mercury, while the latter was related to alterations of calcium homeostasis in the effector cells. Indeed, the effect of HgCl{sub 2} on basal tone was antagonized by the Ca{sup 2+} entry blocker nifedipine (3, 10, 30 nM), indicating Hg-induced facilitation of Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent channels. On the whole, our results suggest that cholinergic neuromuscular transmission and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms underlying smooth muscle contractility are targets for mercury toxicity in the intestine. (au) 51 refs.

  7. An update on Shankhpushpi, a cognition-boosting Ayurvedic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethiya, Neeraj Kumar; Nahata, Alok; Mishra, Sri Hari; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2009-11-01

    Shankhpushpi is an Ayurvedic drug used for its action on the central nervous system, especially for boosting memory and improving intellect. Quantum of information gained from Ayurvedic and other Sanskrit literature revealed the existence of four different plant species under the name of Shankhpushpi, which is used in various Ayurvedic prescriptions described in ancient texts, singly or in combination with other herbs. The sources comprise of entire herbs with following botanicals viz., Convulvulus pluricaulis Choisy. (Convulvulaceae), Evolvulus alsinoides Linn. (Convulvulaceae), Clitoria ternatea Linn. (Papilionaceae) and Canscora decussata Schult. (Gentianaceae). A review on the available scientific information in terms of pharmacognostical characteristics, chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, preclinical and clinical applications of controversial sources of Shankhpushpi is prepared with a view to review scientific work undertaken on Shankhpushpi. It may provide parameters of differentiation and permit appreciation of variability of drug action by use of different botanical sources.

  8. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Holm; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael Linnemann

    2014-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved...... in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7–P15), nicotine induced larger...... intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15–P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells...

  9. Boost Converters for Gas Electric and Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, JW

    2005-06-16

    of the switch mode boost converter is its simplicity. Its inductor must handle the entire current, which is responsible for its main cost. The new Z-source inverter technology [2,3] boosts voltage directly by actively using the zero state time to boost the voltage. In the traditional pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter, this time is used only to control the average voltage by disconnecting the supply voltage from the motor. The purpose of this study is to examine the Z-source's potential for reducing the cost and improving the reliability of HEVs.

  10. Grid Connected Solar PV System with SEPIC Converter Compared with Parallel Boost Converter Based MPPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ajith Bosco Raj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to study the behaviour of the solar PV systems and model the efficient Grid-connected solar power system. The DC-DC MPPT circuit using chaotic pulse width modulation has been designed to track maximum power from solar PV module. The conversion efficiency of the proposed MPPT system is increased when CPWM is used as a control scheme. This paper also proposes a simplified multilevel (seven level inverter for a grid-connected photovoltaic system. The primary goal of these systems is to increase the energy injected to the grid by keeping track of the maximum power point of the panel, by reducing the switching frequency, and by providing high reliability. The maximum power has been tracked experimentally. It is compared with parallel boost converter. Also this model is based on mathematical equations and is described through an equivalent circuit including a PV source with MPPT, a diode, a series resistor, a shunt resistor, and dual boost converter with active snubber circuit. This model can extract PV power and boost by using dual boost converter with active snubber. By using this method the overall system efficiency is improved thereby reducing the switching losses and cost.

  11. Very boosted Higgs in gluon fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Grojean, Christophe; Schlaffer, Matthias; Weiler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The Higgs production and decay rates offer a new way to probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. While dynamics aiming at alleviating the hierarchy problem generically predict deviations in the Higgs rates, the current experimental analyses cannot resolve the long- and short-distance contributions to the gluon fusion process and thus cannot access directly the coupling between the Higgs and the top quark. We investigate the production of a boosted Higgs in association with a high-transverse momentum jet as an alternative to the $t\\bar{t}h$ channel to pin down this crucial coupling. Presented first in the context of an effective field theory, our analysis is then applied to models of partial compositeness at the TeV scale and of natural supersymmetry.

  12. Boosting jet power in black hole spacetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, David; Lehner, Luis; Palenzuela, Carlos; Hirschmann, Eric W; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Garrett, Travis

    2011-08-02

    The extraction of rotational energy from a spinning black hole via the Blandford-Znajek mechanism has long been understood as an important component in models to explain energetic jets from compact astrophysical sources. Here we show more generally that the kinetic energy of the black hole, both rotational and translational, can be tapped, thereby producing even more luminous jets powered by the interaction of the black hole with its surrounding plasma. We study the resulting Poynting jet that arises from single boosted black holes and binary black hole systems. In the latter case, we find that increasing the orbital angular momenta of the system and/or the spins of the individual black holes results in an enhanced Poynting flux.

  13. Giving top quark effective operators a boost

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the prospects to systematically improve generic effective field theory-based searches for new physics in the top sector during LHC run 2 as well as the high luminosity phase. In particular, we assess the benefits of high momentum transfer final states on top EFT-fit as a function of systematic uncertainties in comparison with sensitivity expected from fully-resolved analyses focusing on $t\\bar t$ production. We find that constraints are typically driven by fully-resolved selections, while boosted top quarks can serve to break degeneracies in the global fit. This demystifies and clarifies the importance of high momentum transfer final states for global fits to new interactions in the top sector from direct measurements.

  14. Very boosted Higgs in gluon fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grojean, C. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain). ICREA at IFAE; Salvioni, E. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Padova Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica e Astronomica; INFN, Sezione di Padova (Italy); Schlaffer, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Weiler, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    The Higgs production and decay rates offer a new way to probe new physics beyond the Standard Model. While dynamics aiming at alleviating the hierarchy problem generically predict deviations in the Higgs rates, the current experimental analyses cannot resolve the long- and short-distance contributions to the gluon fusion process and thus cannot access directly the coupling between the Higgs and the top quark. We investigate the production of a boosted Higgs in association with a high-transverse momentum jet as an alternative to the t anti th channel to pin down this crucial coupling. Presented rst in the context of an effective field theory, our analysis is then applied to models of partial compositeness at the TeV scale and of natural supersymmetry.

  15. Boosted W/Z Tagging at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Aparajita; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A detailed study of the techniques for identifying boosted hadronically decaying W or Z bosons is presented. The best performing algorithm for reconstructing, grooming and tagging bosonic jets as seen in studies using 8 TeV data and simulation is validated for W bosons with a wide range of transverse momenta using 13 TeV data and MC simulations. The same is studied for Z bosons in 13 TeV MC simulation. Improvement in tagger performance using detector tracking information is also studied. In addition, given that a hadronic jet has been identified as resulting from the hadronic decay of a W or Z, a technique is developed to discriminate between W and Z bosons using 8 TeV data. The alternative of using variable-R jets for capturing the hadronic decay products compared to standard techniques is also discussed.

  16. Boosted objects: a probe of beyond the standard model physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdesselam, A.; Belyaev, A.; Kuutmann, E. B.

    2011-01-01

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools...

  17. Higher-order Gaussian kernel in bootstrap boosting algorithm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bootstrap boosting algorithm is a bias reduction scheme. The adoption of higher-order Gaussian kernel in a bootstrap boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation was investigated. The algorithm used the higher-order. Gaussian kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. A comparison of the scheme with existing ...

  18. Boosting aquaculture production systems in Osun state: Role of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This scenario leaves a high percentage of the population who depend on fish and fish products food insecure, and thus, the need to boost aquaculture production to argument the supply from the wild. The study therefore looks into the possibility of boosting the production systems through the use of micro-credit and ...

  19. Diode-Assisted Buck-Boost Current Source Inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, F.; Cai, Liang; Loh, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a couple of novel current source inverters (CSIs) with the enhanced current buckboost capability. With the unique diode-inductor network added between current source inverter circuitry and current boost elements, the proposed buck-boost current source inverters demonstrate...

  20. The attentional boost effect and context memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W; Smith, S Adam; Spataro, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Stimuli co-occurring with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli co-occurring with distractors-the attentional boost effect (ABE). The ABE is of interest because it is an exception to the usual finding that divided attention during encoding impairs memory. The effect has been demonstrated in tests of item memory but it is unclear if context memory is likewise affected. Some accounts suggest enhanced perceptual encoding or associative binding, predicting an ABE on context memory, whereas other evidence suggests a more abstract, amodal basis of the effect. In Experiment 1, context memory was assessed in terms of an intramodal perceptual detail, the font and color of the study word. Experiment 2 examined context memory cross-modally, assessing memory for the modality (visual or auditory) of the study word. Experiments 3 and 4 assessed context memory with list discrimination, in which 2 study lists are presented and participants must later remember which list (if either) a test word came from. In all experiments, item (recognition) memory was also assessed and consistently displayed a robust ABE. In contrast, the attentional-boost manipulation did not enhance context memory, whether defined in terms of visual details, study modality, or list membership. There was some evidence that the mode of responding on the detection task (motoric response as opposed to covert counting of targets) may impact context memory but there was no evidence of an effect of target detection, per se. In sum, the ABE did not occur in context memory with verbal materials. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Tovy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS. The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP, a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1 which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5, two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon.

  2. Hippocampal cholinergic interneurons visualized with the choline acetyltransferase promoter: anatomical distribution, intrinsic membrane properties, neurochemical characteristics, and capacity for cholinergic modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eYi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Release of acetylcholine (ACh in the hippocampus (HC occurs during exploration, arousal, and learning. Although the medial septum-diagonal band of Broca (MS-DBB is the major extrinsic source of cholinergic input to the HC, cholinergic neurons intrinsic to the HC also exist but remain poorly understood. Here, ChAT-tauGFP and ChAT-CRE/Rosa26YFP (ChAT-Rosa mice were examined in HC. The HC of ChAT-tauGFP mice was densely innervated with GFP-positive axons, often accompanied by large GFP-positive structures, some of which were Neurotrace/DAPI-negative and likely represent large axon terminals. In the HC of ChAT-Rosa mice, ChAT-YFP cells were Neurotrace-positive and more abundant in CA3 and dentate gyrus than CA1 with partial overlapping with calretinin/VIP. Moreover, an anti-ChAT antibody consistently showed ChAT immunoreactivity in ChAT-YFP cells from MS-DBB but rarely from HC. Furthermore, ChAT-YFP cells from CA1 stratum radiatum/stratum lacunosum moleculare (SR/SLM exhibited a stuttering firing phenotype but a delayed firing phenotype in stratum pyramidale (SP of CA3. Input resistance and capacitance were also different between CA1 SR/LM and CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells. Bath application of ACh increased firing frequency in all ChAT-YFP cells; however, cholinergic modulation was larger in CA1 SR/SLM than CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells. Finally, CA3 SP ChAT-YFP cells exhibited a wider AP half-width and weaker cholinergic modulation than YFP-negative CA3 pyramidal cells. Consistent with CRE expression in a subpopulation of principal cells, optogenetic stimulation evoked glutamatergic postsynaptic currents in CA1 SR/SLM interneurons. In conclusion, the presence of fluorescently labeled hippocampal cells common to both ChAT-Rosa and ChAT-tauGFP mice are in good agreement with previous reports on the existence of cholinergic interneurons, but both transgenic mouse lines exhibited unexpected anatomical features that departed considerably from earlier observations.

  3. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-[3H]nicotine or alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin; [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by [3H]nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-[125I]bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment

  4. Cholinergic Modulation during Acquisition of Olfactory Fear Conditioning Alters Learning and Stimulus Generalization in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Gooch, Allison; Lee, Elizabeth; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of cholinergic neurotransmission in olfactory fear learning. Mice receiving pairings of odor and foot shock displayed fear to the trained odor the following day. Pretraining injections of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine had no effect on subsequent freezing, while the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine significantly…

  5. Cognitive impairment as a central cholinergic deficit in patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Kaltsatou

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: VCmax and ACmax are governed mainly by the action of the Parasympathetic Nervous System, through acetylcholine. The results of this study demonstrate that the CNS may be affected in MG and support the hypothesis that MG has central cholinergic effects manifested by cognitive dysfunction.

  6. FER-1/Dysferlin promotes cholinergic signaling at the neuromuscular junction in C. elegans and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Predrag Krajacic

    2013-10-01

    Dysferlin is a member of the evolutionarily conserved ferlin gene family. Mutations in Dysferlin lead to Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy 2B (LGMD2B, an inherited, progressive and incurable muscle disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. We found that both loss-of-function mutations and muscle-specific overexpression of C. elegans fer-1, the founding member of the Dysferlin gene family, caused defects in muscle cholinergic signaling. To determine if Dysferlin-dependent regulation of cholinergic signaling is evolutionarily conserved, we examined the in vivo physiological properties of skeletal muscle synaptic signaling in a mouse model of Dysferlin-deficiency. In addition to a loss in muscle strength, Dysferlin −/− mice also exhibited a cholinergic deficit manifested by a progressive, frequency-dependent decrement in their compound muscle action potentials following repetitive nerve stimulation, which was observed in another Dysferlin mouse model but not in a Dysferlin-independent mouse model of muscular dystrophy. Oral administration of Pyridostigmine bromide, a clinically used acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AchE.I known to increase synaptic efficacy, reversed the action potential defect and restored in vivo muscle strength to Dysferlin −/− mice without altering muscle pathophysiology. Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Dysferlin in the regulation of cholinergic signaling and suggest that such regulation may play a significant pathophysiological role in LGMD2B disease.

  7. Deficiency of alpha7 cholinergic receptors facilitates bacterial clearance in Escherichia coli peritonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giebelen, Ilona A. J.; Le Moine, Alain; van den Pangaart, Petra S.; Sadis, Claude; Goldman, Michel; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efferent vagus nerve can inhibit inflammation via interaction between acetylcholine and alpha7 cholinergic receptors. METHODS: To determine the role played by alpha7 receptors in antibacterial defense, peritonitis was induced in alpha7 receptor-deficient (alpha7(-/-)) and wild-type

  8. The effect of the augmentation of cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine on EEG indices of visuospatial attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.A.; Bocker, K.B.E.; Deschamps, P.K.H.; Kemner, C.; Kenemans, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The cholinergic system has been implicated in visuospatial attention but the exact role remains unclear. In visuospatial attention, bias refers to neuronal signals that modulate the sensitivity of sensory cortex, while disengagement refers to the decoupling of attention making reorienting possible.

  9. Enhanced flexibility of place discrimination learning by targeting striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kana; Nishizawa, Kayo; Fukabori, Ryoji; Kai, Nobuyuki; Shiota, Akira; Ueda, Masatsugu; Tsutsui, Yuji; Sakata, Shogo; Matsushita, Natsuki; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2014-05-06

    Behavioural flexibility is mediated through the neural circuitry linking the prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia. Here we conduct selective elimination of striatal cholinergic interneurons in transgenic rats by immunotoxin-mediated cell targeting. Elimination of cholinergic interneurons from the dorsomedial striatum (DMS), but not from the dorsolateral striatum, results in enhanced reversal and extinction learning, sparing the acquisition of place discrimination. This enhancement is prevented by infusion of a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist into the DMS either in the acquisition, reversal or extinction phase. In addition, gene-specific silencing of M4 muscarinic receptor by lentiviral expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) mimics the place reversal learning promoted by cholinergic elimination, whereas shRNA-mediated gene silencing of M1 muscarinic receptor shows the normal performance of reversal learning. Our data indicate that DMS cholinergic interneurons inhibit behavioural flexibility, mainly through the M4 muscarinic receptor, suggesting that this role is engaged to the stabilization of acquired reward contingency and the suppression of response switch to changed contingency.

  10. Cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons relay striatal information to the optic tectum in amphibians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin, O.; Smeets, W.J.A.J.; Munoz, M.; Sanchez-Camacho, C.; Pena, A.S.; Lopez, J.M.; Gonzalez, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the amphibians Rana perezi and Xenopus laevis, the involvement of cholinergic and catecholaminergic neurons in the relay of basal ganglia inputs to the tectum was investigated. Tract-tracing experiments, in which anterograde tracers were applied to the basal ganglia and retrograde tracers to the

  11. Prolonged Expression of Puma in Cholinergic Amacrine Cells During the Development of Rat Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Jun; Mori, Tetsuji; Yamada, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    During development of the nervous system, large numbers of neurons are overproduced and then eliminated by programmed cell death. Puma is a BH3-only protein that is reported to be involved in the initiation of developmental programmed cell death in rodent retinal neurons. The expression and cellular localization of Puma in retinal tissues during development are not, however, well known. Here the authors report the expression pattern of Puma during retinal development in the rat. During the period of programmed cell death in the retina, Puma was expressed in some members of each retinal neuron, including retinal ganglion cells, amacrine cells, bipolar cells, horizontal cells, and photoreceptor cells. Although the developmental programmed cell death of cholinergic amacrine cells is known to be independent of Puma, this protein was expressed in almost all their dendrites and somata of cholinergic amacrine cells at postnatal age 2 to 3 weeks, and it continued to be detected in cholinergic dendrites in the inner plexiform layer for up to 8 weeks after birth. These results suggest that Puma has some significant roles in retinal neurons after eye opening, especially that of cholinergic amacrine cells, in addition to programmed cell death of retinal neurons before eye opening. PMID:22736709

  12. GABAERGIC MODULATION OF STRIATAL CHOLINERGIC INTERNEURONS - AN IN-VIVO MICRODIALYSIS STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, P; WESTERINK, BHC

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons have been shown to receive input from striatal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing cell elements. GABA is known to act on two different types of receptors, the GABA(A) and the GABA(B) receptor. Using in vivo microdialysis, we have studied the effect of

  13. BEHAVIORAL AND BIOCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF EARLY POSTNATAL CHOLINERGIC LESION IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GASPAR, E; HEERINGA, M; MARKEL, E; LUITEN, PGM; NYAKAS, C

    The effects of early postnatal (PD 8) intracerebroventricular injection of ethylcholine mustard aziridinium ion (AF64A) on development of open-field and cognitive behaviors and cholinergic markers in several brain areas were examined in the rat. The cholinotoxin was bilaterally administered in a

  14. Cholinergic Septo-Hippocampal Innervation Is Required for Trace Eyeblink Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontan-Lozano, Angela; Troncoso, Julieta; Munera, Alejandro; Carrion, Angel Manuel; Delgado-Garcia, Jose Maria

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of a selective lesion in rats, with 192-IgG-saporin, of the cholinergic neurons located in the medial septum/diagonal band (MSDB) complex on the acquisition of classical and instrumental conditioning paradigms. The MSDB lesion induced a marked deficit in the acquisition, but not in the retrieval, of eyeblink classical…

  15. Dysautonomia due to reduced cholinergic neurotransmission causes cardiac remodeling and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Aline; Damasceno, Denis D; Pires, Rita; Gros, Robert; Gomes, Enéas R; Gavioli, Mariana; Lima, Ricardo F; Guimarães, Diogo; Lima, Patricia; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Vasconcelos, Anilton; Roman-Campos, Danilo; Menezes, Cristiane A S; Sirvente, Raquel A; Salemi, Vera M; Mady, Charles; Caron, Marc G; Ferreira, Anderson J; Brum, Patricia C; Resende, Rodrigo R; Cruz, Jader S; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius; Prado, Vania F; de Almeida, Alvair P; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2010-04-01

    Overwhelming evidence supports the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in heart failure. In contrast, much less is known about the role of failing cholinergic neurotransmission in cardiac disease. By using a unique genetically modified mouse line with reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and consequently decreased release of acetylcholine, we investigated the consequences of altered cholinergic tone for cardiac function. M-mode echocardiography, hemodynamic experiments, analysis of isolated perfused hearts, and measurements of cardiomyocyte contraction indicated that VAChT mutant mice have decreased left ventricle function associated with altered calcium handling. Gene expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting, and the results indicated that VAChT mutant mice have profound cardiac remodeling and reactivation of the fetal gene program. This phenotype was attributable to reduced cholinergic tone, since administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine for 2 weeks reversed the cardiac phenotype in mutant mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that decreased cholinergic neurotransmission and underlying autonomic imbalance cause plastic alterations that contribute to heart dysfunction.

  16. Boosted one dimensional fermionic superfluids on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sayonee; Mukerjee, Subroto; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the effect of a boost (Fermi sea displaced by a finite momentum) on one dimensional systems of lattice fermions with short-ranged interactions. In the absence of a boost such systems with attractive interactions possess algebraic superconducting order. Motivated by physics in higher dimensions, one might naively expect a boost to weaken and ultimately destroy superconductivity. However, we show that for one dimensional systems the effect of the boost can be to strengthen the algebraic superconducting order by making correlation functions fall off more slowly with distance. This phenomenon can manifest in interesting ways, for example, a boost can produce a Luther-Emery phase in a system with both charge and spin gaps by engendering the destruction of the former.

  17. Modulation of Specific Sensory Cortical Areas by Segregated Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons Demonstrated by Neuronal Tracing and Optogenetic Stimulation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves-Coira, Irene; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Núñez, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF) projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-Gold (FlGo) and Fast Blue (FB) fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1) and primary auditory (A1) cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B) nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP) under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT). Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  18. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  19. Modulation of specific sensory cortical areas by segregated basal forebrain cholinergic neurons demonstrated by neuronal tracing and optogenetic stimulation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eChaves-Coira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Neocortical cholinergic activity plays a fundamental role in sensory processing and cognitive functions. Previous results have suggested a refined anatomical and functional topographical organization of basal forebrain (BF projections that may control cortical sensory processing in a specific manner. We have used retrograde anatomical procedures to demonstrate the existence of specific neuronal groups in the BF involved in the control of specific sensory cortices. Fluoro-gold and Fast Blue fluorescent retrograde tracers were deposited into the primary somatosensory (S1 and primary auditory (A1 cortices in mice. Our results revealed that the BF is a heterogeneous area in which neurons projecting to different cortical areas are segregated into different neuronal groups. Most of the neurons located in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB projected to the S1 cortex, indicating that this area is specialized in the sensory processing of tactile stimuli. However, the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (B nucleus shows a similar number of cells projecting to the S1 as to the A1 cortices. In addition, we analyzed the cholinergic effects on the S1 and A1 cortical sensory responses by optogenetic stimulation of the BF neurons in urethane-anesthetized transgenic mice. We used transgenic mice expressing the light-activated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, tagged with a fluorescent protein (ChR2-YFP under the control of the choline-acetyl transferase promoter (ChAT. Cortical evoked potentials were induced by whisker deflections or by auditory clicks. According to the anatomical results, optogenetic HDB stimulation induced more extensive facilitation of tactile evoked potentials in S1 than auditory evoked potentials in A1, while optogenetic stimulation of the B nucleus facilitated either tactile or auditory evoked potentials equally. Consequently, our results suggest that cholinergic projections to the cortex are organized into segregated

  20. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [{sup 18}F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A. [Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd., NC 27157, Winston-Salem (United States); Calles-Escandon, J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Mach, R.H. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  1. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [18F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A.; Calles-Escandon, J.; Mach, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  2. A cholinergic modulatory interneuron in the feeding system of the snail, Lymnaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoman, M S; Parish, D C; Benjamin, P R

    1993-07-01

    1. Pharmacological and physiological methods were used to examine the role of acetylcholine (ACh) in modulation of the Lymnaea feeding central pattern generator (CPG) by the slow oscillator (SO) interneuron. 2. Extracts of dissected SO cell bodies inhibited spontaneous ventricular contractions of the clam Mya arenaria, indicating the presence of ACh. These effects were blocked by the specific antagonist benzoquinonium chloride (10(-7) M). 3. Isolated SO cells grown in culture synthesized ACh from tritiated choline. 4. High [K+] saline induced release of synthesized ACh from cultured SO cells into the medium. 5. The specific ACh antagonist phenyltrimethylammonium (10(-4) M) blocked both excitatory, biphasic (inhibitory-excitatory) and inhibitory monosynaptic connections from the SO to feeding CPG interneurons and motor neurons. Less specific cholinergic antagonists blocked either excitatory (hexamethonium, 10(-4) M) or both excitatory and inhibitory connections (d-tubo-curarine, 10(-4) M). 6. The synaptic responses of the SO could be mimicked by brief (20 ms) pressure-pulsed application of ACh onto the cell bodies of the postsynaptic cells in high-Mg2+ saline. In normal saline, ACh elicited bursts of spikes in the N1 cells, indicating that a fictive feeding pattern had been induced in the CPG. This mimics the main mechanism by which the SO activates the CPG, which is by exciting the N1s. 7. The frequency of SO-induced fictive feeding rhythm was reduced by bath application of hexamethonium chloride to the buccal ganglia. This reduced the amplitude of the SO-->N1 excitatory synaptic response (30% of controls) and is probably the main mechanism for the reduction in the frequency of the rhythm. 8. The evidence suggests that ACh is the main neurochemical involved in allowing the SO to initiate and control the frequency of the Lymnaea feeding CPG.

  3. The placental cholinergic system: localization to the cytotrophoblast and modulation of nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fant Michael E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta, a non-neuronal tissue, contains an active cholinergic system comprised of acetylcholine (ACh, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, and high affinity muscarinic receptors. The cell(s of origin of placental ACh and its role in trophoblast function has not been defined. These studies were performed to define the cellular location of ACh synthesis (ChAT in the human placenta and to begin studying its functional role. Results Using immunohistochemical techniques, ChAT was observed primarily within the cytotrophoblasts of preterm placentae as well as some mesenchymal elements. Similar intense immunostaining of the cytotrophoblast was observed for endothelium-derived nitric oxide synthase (eNOS suggesting that ACh may interact with nitric oxide (NO-dependent signaling pathways. The ability of carbamylcholine (CCh, an ACh analogue, to stimulate a rise in intracellular Ca++ and NO production in trophoblasts was therefore tested using the BeWob30 choriocarcinoma cell as a model system. First, CCh significantly increased intracellular calcium as assessed by fluorescence microscopy. We then examined the ability of CCh to stimulate NO production by measuring total nitrite/nitrate production in conditioned media using chemiluminescence-based analysis. CCh, alone, had no effect on NO production. However, CCh increased measurable NO approximately 100% in the presence of 10 nM estradiol. This stimulatory effect was inhibited by 1 (microM scopolamine suggesting mediation via muscarinic receptors. Estradiol, alone, had no effect on total NO or eNOS protein or mRNA. Conclusion These data demonstrate that placental ChAT localizes to the cytotrophoblast and some mesenchymal cells in human placenta. It further suggests that ACh acts via muscarinic receptors on the trophoblast cell membrane to modulate NO in an estrogen-dependent manner.

  4. Introducing state-trajectory control for the synchronous interleaved boost converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña-Alzola, Rafael; Ksiazek, Peter; Ordonez, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous interleaved boost converters (SIBCs) result in lower ripple currents and bidirectional power flow. The boost topology has a non-minimum phase characteristic, producing instability problems when a large bandwidth is required. Linear controllers inherently limit the boost controller...

  5. Impact of the Educational Boost Your Brain and Memory Program Among Senior Living Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Roscoe; O'Brien, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    This random assignment waitlist control intervention study examined an implementation of the educational Boost Your Brain and Memory cognitive fitness intervention in 12 senior living organizations. Older adult participants ( n = 166) completed measures of brain health knowledge, use of memory techniques, physical and intellectual activity, and mindfulness, at baseline and after the intervention group's completion of the course. Changes in knowledge scores and in self-reported physical and intellectual activity increased significantly more for intervention participants than for waitlist controls at the conclusion of the course. There were no significant changes between the groups in mindfulness or use of memory techniques. This suggests that in senior living settings Boost Your Brain and Memory is effective in educating participants about brain healthy behaviors and in motivating behavioral change in the areas of physical and intellectual activity.

  6. The Cholinergic and Adrenergic Autocrine Signaling Pathway Mediates Immunomodulation in Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoqun Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming increasingly clear that neurotransmitters impose direct influence on regulation of the immune process. Recently, a simple but sophisticated neuroendocrine–immune (NEI system was identified in oyster, which modulated neural immune response via a “nervous-hemocyte”-mediated neuroendocrine immunomodulatory axis (NIA-like pathway. In the present study, the de novo synthesis of neurotransmitters and their immunomodulation in the hemocytes of oyster Crassostrea gigas were investigated to understand the autocrine/paracrine pathway independent of the nervous system. After hemocytes were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation, acetylcholine (ACh, and norepinephrine (NE in the cell supernatants, both increased to a significantly higher level (2.71- and 2.40-fold, p < 0.05 comparing with that in the control group. The mRNA expression levels and protein activities of choline O-acetyltransferase and dopamine β-hydroxylase in hemocytes which were involved in the synthesis of ACh and NE were significantly elevated at 1 h after LPS stimulation, while the activities of acetylcholinesterase and monoamine oxidase, two enzymes essential in the metabolic inactivation of ACh and NE, were inhibited. These results demonstrated the existence of the sophisticated intracellular machinery for the generation, release and inactivation of ACh and NE in oyster hemocytes. Moreover, the hemocyte-derived neurotransmitters could in turn regulate the mRNA expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF genes, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and lysosome, and hemocyte phagocytosis. The phagocytic activities of hemocytes, the mRNA expressions of TNF and the activities of key immune-related enzymes were significantly changed after the block of ACh and NE receptors with different kinds of antagonists, suggesting that autocrine/paracrine self-regulation was mediated by transmembrane receptors on hemocyte. The present study proved that

  7. ResBoost: characterizing and predicting catalytic residues in enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Yoav

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying the catalytic residues in enzymes can aid in understanding the molecular basis of an enzyme's function and has significant implications for designing new drugs, identifying genetic disorders, and engineering proteins with novel functions. Since experimentally determining catalytic sites is expensive, better computational methods for identifying catalytic residues are needed. Results We propose ResBoost, a new computational method to learn characteristics of catalytic residues. The method effectively selects and combines rules of thumb into a simple, easily interpretable logical expression that can be used for prediction. We formally define the rules of thumb that are often used to narrow the list of candidate residues, including residue evolutionary conservation, 3D clustering, solvent accessibility, and hydrophilicity. ResBoost builds on two methods from machine learning, the AdaBoost algorithm and Alternating Decision Trees, and provides precise control over the inherent trade-off between sensitivity and specificity. We evaluated ResBoost using cross-validation on a dataset of 100 enzymes from the hand-curated Catalytic Site Atlas (CSA. Conclusion ResBoost achieved 85% sensitivity for a 9.8% false positive rate and 73% sensitivity for a 5.7% false positive rate. ResBoost reduces the number of false positives by up to 56% compared to the use of evolutionary conservation scoring alone. We also illustrate the ability of ResBoost to identify recently validated catalytic residues not listed in the CSA.

  8. Designing boosting ensemble of relational fuzzy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Rafał

    2010-10-01

    A method frequently used in classification systems for improving classification accuracy is to combine outputs of several classifiers. Among various types of classifiers, fuzzy ones are tempting because of using intelligible fuzzy if-then rules. In the paper we build an AdaBoost ensemble of relational neuro-fuzzy classifiers. Relational fuzzy systems bond input and output fuzzy linguistic values by a binary relation; thus, fuzzy rules have additional, comparing to traditional fuzzy systems, weights - elements of a fuzzy relation matrix. Thanks to this the system is better adjustable to data during learning. In the paper an ensemble of relational fuzzy systems is proposed. The problem is that such an ensemble contains separate rule bases which cannot be directly merged. As systems are separate, we cannot treat fuzzy rules coming from different systems as rules from the same (single) system. In the paper, the problem is addressed by a novel design of fuzzy systems constituting the ensemble, resulting in normalization of individual rule bases during learning. The method described in the paper is tested on several known benchmarks and compared with other machine learning solutions from the literature.

  9. Subcellular localization prediction through boosting association rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yongwook; Lee, Gary Geunbae

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods for predicting protein subcellular localization have used various types of features, including N-terminal sorting signals, amino acid compositions, and text annotations from protein databases. Our approach does not use biological knowledge such as the sorting signals or homologues, but use just protein sequence information. The method divides a protein sequence into short $k$-mer sequence fragments which can be mapped to word features in document classification. A large number of class association rules are mined from the protein sequence examples that range from the N-terminus to the C-terminus. Then, a boosting algorithm is applied to those rules to build up a final classifier. Experimental results using benchmark datasets show our method is excellent in terms of both the classification performance and the test coverage. The result also implies that the $k$-mer sequence features which determine subcellular locations do not necessarily exist in specific positions of a protein sequence. Online prediction service implementing our method is available at http://isoft.postech.ac.kr/research/BCAR/subcell.

  10. RAMOBoost: Ranked Minority Oversampling in Boosting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; He, Haibo; Garcia, Edwardo A

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, learning from imbalanced data has attracted growing attention from both academia and industry due to the explosive growth of applications that use and produce imbalanced data. However, because of the complex characteristics of imbalanced data, many real-world solutions struggle to provide robust efficiency in learning-based applications. In an effort to address this problem, this paper presents Ranked Minority Oversampling in Boosting (RAMOBoost), which is a RAMO technique based on the idea of adaptive synthetic data generation in an ensemble learning system. Briefly, RAMOBoost adaptively ranks minority class instances at each learning iteration according to a sampling probability distribution that is based on the underlying data distribution, and can adaptively shift the decision boundary toward difficult-to-learn minority and majority class instances by using a hypothesis assessment procedure. Simulation analysis on 19 real-world datasets assessed over various metrics-including overall accuracy, precision, recall, F-measure, G-mean, and receiver operation characteristic analysis-is used to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  11. Distinctiveness and the Attentional Boost Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S Adam; Mulligan, Neil W

    2018-02-01

    The typical pattern of results in divided attention experiments is that subjects in a full attention (FA) condition perform markedly better on tests of memory than subjects in a divided attention (DA) condition which forces subjects to split their attention between studying to-be-remembered stimuli and completing some peripheral task. Nevertheless, recent research has revealed an exception wherein stimuli presented concurrently with targets in a detection task are better remembered than stimuli which co-occur with distractors. Research on this phenomenon-the Attentional Boost Effect (ABE)-has demonstrated that the ABE is reduced or eliminated for words made distinct by their word frequency or orthographic properties-forms of secondary distinctiveness. However, it is unclear how primary distinctiveness effects may interact with the ABE. The current study observed how perceptual and semantic manipulations of primary distinctiveness via the isolation paradigm interact with the ABE, and revealed these interactions to be fundamentally different than those of secondary distinctiveness. Specifically, whereas the effects of secondary distinctiveness in earlier studies were found to be redundant with the ABE, the current study demonstrated that items characterized by primary distinctiveness enhanced memory performance independently of the ABE. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. A boost for the ISOLDE beams

    CERN Multimedia

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2015-01-01

    The first HIE-ISOLDE cryomodule was commissioned at the end of October. The radioactive ion beams can now be accelerated to 4.3 MeV per nucleon.   The ISOLDE beamline that supplies the Miniball array. The first HIE-ISOLDE cryomodule can be seen in the background, in its light-grey cryostat. ISOLDE is getting an energy boost. The first cryomodule of the new superconducting linear accelerator HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE), located downstream of the REX-ISOLDE accelerator, increases the energy of the radioactive ion beams from 3 to 4.3 MeV per nucleon. It supplies the Miniball array, where an experiment using radioactive zinc ions (see box) began at the end of October. This is the first stage in the commissioning of HIE-ISOLDE. The facility will ultimately be equipped with four cryomodules that will accelerate the beams to 10 MeV per nucleon. Each cryomodule has five accelerating cavities and a solenoid, which focuses the beam. All of these components are superconducting. This first ...

  13. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark H.; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L.; Leonard, Christopher S.; Kohlmeier, Kristi A.

    2015-01-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on several parameters affecting LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine was found to induce larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. PMID:24863041

  14. Age-related changes in nicotine response of cholinergic and non-cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons: implications for the heightened adolescent susceptibility to nicotine addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mark H; Ishibashi, Masaru; Nielsen, Michael L; Leonard, Christopher S; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2014-10-01

    The younger an individual starts smoking, the greater the likelihood that addiction to nicotine will develop, suggesting that neurobiological responses vary across age to the addictive component of cigarettes. Cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) are importantly involved in the development of addiction, however, the effects of nicotine on LDT neuronal excitability across ontogeny are unknown. Nicotinic effects on LDT cells across different age groups were examined using calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamping. Within the youngest age group (P7-P15), nicotine induced larger intracellular calcium transients and inward currents. Nicotine induced a greater number of excitatory synaptic currents in the youngest animals, whereas larger amplitude inhibitory synaptic events were induced in cells from the oldest animals (P15-P34). Nicotine increased neuronal firing of cholinergic cells to a greater degree in younger animals, possibly linked to development associated differences found in nicotinic effects on action potential shape and afterhyperpolarization. We conclude that in addition to age-associated alterations of several properties expected to affect resting cell excitability, parameters affecting cell excitability are altered by nicotine differentially across ontogeny. Taken together, our data suggest that nicotine induces a larger excitatory response in cholinergic LDT neurons from the youngest animals, which could result in a greater excitatory output from these cells to target regions involved in development of addiction. Such output would be expected to be promotive of addiction; therefore, ontogenetic differences in nicotine-mediated increases in the excitability of the LDT could contribute to the differential susceptibility to nicotine addiction seen across age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prime-boost strategies in mucosal immunization affect local IgA production and the type of Th response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eFiorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Combinations of different delivery routes for priming and boosting represent vaccination strategies that can modulate magnitude, quality, and localization of the immune response. A murine model was used to study T cell clonal expansion following nasal or subcutaneous priming, and secondary immune responses after boosting by either homologous or heterologous routes. T cell primary activation was studied by using the adoptive transfer model of ovalbumin-specific transgenic CD4+ T cells. Both nasal and subcutaneous immunization efficiently elicited, in the respective draining lymph nodes, primary clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that disseminated towards distal lymph nodes (mesenteric and iliac and the spleen. After boosting, a very high serum IgG response was induced in all groups independent of the combination of immunization routes used, while significant levels of local IgA were detected only in mice boosted by the nasal route. Mucosal priming drove a stronger Th1 polarization than the systemic route, as shown by serum IgG subclass analysis. IFN-gamma production was observed in splenocytes of all groups, while prime-boost vaccine combinations that included the mucosal route, yielded higher levels of IL-17. Memory lymphocytes were identified in both spleen and draining lymph nodes in all immunized mice, with the highest number of IL-2 producing cells detected in mice primed and boosted by the nasal route. This work shows the critical role of immunization routes in modulating quality and localization of immune responses, in prime-boost vaccine strategies.

  16. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  17. Visualization of ATP release in pancreatic acini in response to cholinergic stimulus. Use of fluorescent probes and confocal microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Christiane Elisabeth; Novak, Ivana

    2001-01-01

    overlapping with those marked by acridine orange and LysoTracker Red. In functional studies we show that native pancreatic acini release ATP in response to various stimuli but most importantly to cholinergic stimulation, a very likely physiological stimulus in this epithelium. In a close vicinity of acini we...... detect about 9 microm ATP after cholinergic stimulation. Thus, ATP is poised as the paracrine mediator between pancreatic acini and ducts....

  18. Industry poised to boost production on Angola/Cabinda acreage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that development spending off Angola will peak at $750 million/year in 1993 and 1994 as operators start to implement plans to boost oil to 680,000 b/d in 1996 from 505,000 b/d last year. And during the next 9 years, upstream spending will jump to $4.7 billion at 1992 prices, compared with $3.3 billion spent in the past 9 years, says County NatWest WoodMac. Angolan exploration and appraisal drilling this year will slip from the 1991 record level of 36 wells to about 33 wells. The decline will be eased by first wells drilled on newly awarded Blocks 4, 6, and 7 operated by units of Ranger Oil Ltd., Conoco Inc., and Ste. Nationale Elf Aquitaine. As exploration drops in more mature areas, activity will shift to frontier regions. As a result, drilling activity in the mid-1990s will be at least as high as the record levels of 1991, WoodMac predicts

  19. Boosting the Kerr geometry in an arbitrary direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasin, Herbert; Nachbagauer, Herbert

    1996-04-01

    We construct ultrarelativistic Kerr geometries from their distributional energy - momentum tensors. The latter are obtained by boosting Kerr's distributional energy - momentum tensor in arbitrary directions, thereby generalizing previous work by the authors.

  20. Superconducting Electric Boost Pump for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Design, fabrication, assembly and test of the Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) concept for a submersible, superconducting electric boost pump during Phase II...

  1. TOPOLOGICAL REVIEW AND ANALYSIS OF DC-DC BOOST CONVERTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. INDRA GANDHI

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available DC voltage boost up is essential in numerous applications; especially considering Photovoltaic (PV based renewable power generation system. The conventional DC-DC boost converter is the most admired configuration for this scheme, even if the converter efficiency is restricted at duty cycle near to maximum value. In order to find solution to the problem and improve its conversion capability, many converter configurations have been implemented so far. With this circumstance, this research work proposes to give overview of a few most imperative research works related to DC-DC boost converters. Some configurations are covered and classified basically based on the application. The major benefits and disadvantages related to the available techniques are also briefly conveyed. At last, a proper evaluation is recognized among the important types of DC-DC boost converters in terms of efficiency, number of components, and stability.

  2. Superconducting Electric Boost Pump for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A submersible, superconducting electric boost pump sized to meet the needs of future Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems in the 25,000 lbf thrust range is proposed....

  3. The Synergy Between PAV and AdaBoost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, W John; Yeganova, Lana; Kim, Won

    2005-11-01

    Schapire and Singer's improved version of AdaBoost for handling weak hypotheses with confidence rated predictions represents an important advance in the theory and practice of boosting. Its success results from a more efficient use of information in weak hypotheses during updating. Instead of simple binary voting a weak hypothesis is allowed to vote for or against a classification with a variable strength or confidence. The Pool Adjacent Violators (PAV) algorithm is a method for converting a score into a probability. We show how PAV may be applied to a weak hypothesis to yield a new weak hypothesis which is in a sense an ideal confidence rated prediction and that this leads to an optimal updating for AdaBoost. The result is a new algorithm which we term PAV-AdaBoost. We give several examples illustrating problems for which this new algorithm provides advantages in performance.

  4. Severe scene learning impairment, but intact recognition memory, after cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex followed by fornix transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Philip G F; Gaffan, David; Croxson, Paula L; Baxter, Mark G

    2010-02-01

    To examine the generality of cholinergic involvement in visual memory in primates, we trained macaque monkeys either on an object-in-place scene learning task or in delayed nonmatching-to-sample (DNMS). Each monkey received either selective cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex (including the entorhinal cortex and perirhinal cortex) with injections of the immunotoxin ME20.4-saporin or saline injections as a control and was postoperatively retested. Cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex was without effect on either task. Each monkey then received fornix transection because previous studies have shown that multiple disconnections of temporal cortex can produce synergistic impairments in memory. Fornix transection mildly impaired scene learning in monkeys that had received saline injections but severely impaired scene learning in monkeys that had received cholinergic lesions of inferotemporal cortex. This synergistic effect was not seen in monkeys performing DNMS. These findings confirm a synergistic interaction in a macaque monkey model of episodic memory between connections carried by the fornix and cholinergic input to the inferotemporal cortex. They support the notion that the mnemonic functions tapped by scene learning and DNMS have dissociable neural substrates. Finally, cholinergic depletion of inferotemporal cortex, in this study, appears insufficient to impair memory functions dependent on an intact inferotemporal cortex.

  5. 2001 BUDGET: Research Gets Hefty Boost in 2001 Defense Budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakoff, D

    2000-09-08

    Next year's $289 billion defense budget, which President Bill Clinton signed last month, includes big boosts for a host of science programs, from endangered species research to developing laser weapons. And with the two major presidential candidates pledging further boosts, the Pentagon's portfolio is attracting increasing attention from the life sciences community as well. But some analysts worry that Congress and the Pentagon may be shortchanging long-term, high-risk research in favor of projects with a more certain payoff.

  6. Searches with Boosted Objects at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents an overview of searches for new physics in boosted final states conducted by the ATLAS and CMS experiments during Run-I of the LHC. An emphasis is put on techniques for the reconstruction and identification of both hadronic and leptonic decays of objects with large transverse momenta: Various substructure and grooming techniques as well as modified lepton isolation criteria are reviewed and their use in the most common algorithms for boosted top and boson tagging is discussed.

  7. Uranium chronic contamination effects on the cholinergic system: in vivo and in vitro approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, H.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal which occurs naturally in the environment. It is both a chemical and a radiological toxicant. The aim of this work was: (i) to assess the effects of U chronic exposure on the cholinergic system (biosynthesis and breakdown enzymes, receptors and on behaviour of adult, young or predisposed to neuro-degenerative illness (ApoE KO) rodents; (ii) to grasp the neurotoxic effects of U on human neuronal cells. In vivo, this work shows a structure- (cortex more sensitive than hippocampus), rodent model- (young more sensitive than adults), time- (sub-chronic exposure more harmful than chronic exposure), exposure level- and isotope-dependent effect of U. In vitro, the study underlined the neuro-cytotoxic U potential and the presence of uranium precipitates in cells. These results show the deleterious impact of U on neuronal cells, and demonstrate that U induces impairments on the cholinergic system and the behaviour of rodents. (author)

  8. The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on rat's cerebral neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yan; Xue Yilong; Luo Yun; Tian Lei; Pan Jingkun; Cui Xin

    2004-01-01

    The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on isolated and cultivated rat's cerebral neural stem cells (NSC) was examined. NSC isolated from two months old rat's brain region like hippocampus and striatum was cultivated in a DMEM/F12 medium containing EGF and bFGF, and was identified with morphological character and nestin immunocytochemistry test. After 24 hours, cultivating the NSC with the BMP4-added medium for 7-8 days, then the microscopical change were observed, ChAT and nestin double-labelling immunocytochemistry test was done. Results showed that about 34% NSC of neuron-like character was observed by microscope in the paper. That ChAT-positive cells coexist with nestin-positive cells was found by immunocytochemistry test. There were 28% ChAT-positive cells and 38% nestin-positive cells in the study. Cholinergic neurons differentiated from NSC could be induced by adding BMP4 to the medium

  9. Cholinergic alterations by exposure to pesticides used in control vector: Guppies fish (Poecilia reticulta) as biological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Ibarra, G A; Rodríguez-Sánchez, E J; Ventura-Ramón, H G; Díaz-Resendiz, K J G; Girón-Pérez, M I

    2018-02-01

    Spinosad and temephos are two of the most used pesticides in Mexico for the control of vector causing disease such as dengue, chikungunya and Zika. The aim of this study was to compare the neurotoxic effects of these two pesticides using guppy fish (Poecilia reticulata) as a model organism. Guppies were exposed for 7 and 21 days to technical grade temephos and spinosad at 1.0 and 0.07 g/L, respectively, (10 and 0.5 mg/L of active substance; concentrations recommended by the Ministery of Health of the State (Secretaría de Salud de Nayarit (SSN) Mexico)). Subsequently, acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and acetylcholine concentrations (ACh) in muscle tissue were determined. Temephos exposure decreased AChE activity and increased ACh concentration, whereas exposure to spinosad only increased ACh concentration. Though cholinergic alterations were more severe in fish exposed to temephos, both pesticides were equally lethal during the first seven days after exposure. Nonetheless, temephos was more lethal after 21 days.

  10. The Cholinergic Synapse International Symposium Held in Berlin, Germany on 23-27 September 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-27

    THE NICOTINIC CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR SYSTEM OF DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER E.D. Gundelfinger, A. Baumann, N. Hess, P. Jonas , B. Merz, P. Schloss, C. Schrbdar...of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94141-0444, USA. HEINEMANN. Stephen F., The Salk Institute, Molecular Neurobiology, P.O. Box 85800...Biophysik, Freie Universit~t Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D - 1000 Berlin 33. LINDSTROM, Jon, The Salk Institute - Molecular Neurobiology, P.O. Box 85800

  11. Neither Cholinergic Nor Dopaminergic Enhancement Improve Spatial Working Memory Precision in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harewood Smith, Adeola N; Challa, Jnana Aditya; Silver, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Acetylcholine and dopamine are neurotransmitters that play multiple important roles in perception and cognition. Pharmacological cholinergic enhancement reduces excitatory receptive field size of neurons in marmoset primary visual cortex and sharpens the spatial tuning of visual perception and visual cortical fMRI responses in humans. Moreover, previous studies show that manipulation of cholinergic or dopaminergic signaling alters the spatial tuning of macaque prefrontal cortical neurons during the delay period of a spatial working memory (SWM) task and can improve SWM performance in macaque monkeys and human subjects. Here, we investigated the effects of systemic cholinergic and dopaminergic enhancement on the precision of SWM, as measured behaviorally in human subjects. Cholinergic transmission was increased by oral administration of 5 mg of the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, and dopaminergic signaling was enhanced with 100 mg levodopa/10 mg carbidopa. Each neurotransmitter system was separately investigated in double-blind placebo-controlled studies. On each trial of the SWM task, a square was presented for 150 ms at a random location along an invisible circle with a radius of 12 degrees of visual angle, followed by a 900 ms delay period with no stimulus shown on the screen. Then, the square was presented at new location, displaced in either a clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) direction along the circle. Subjects used their memory of the location of the original square to report the direction of displacement. SWM precision was defined as the amount of displacement corresponding to 75% correct performance. We observed no significant effect on SWM precision for either donepezil or levodopa/carbidopa. There was also no significant effect on performance on the SWM task (percent correct across all trials) for either donepezil or levodopa/carbidopa. Thus, despite evidence that acetylcholine and dopamine regulate spatial tuning of individual neurons and can

  12. Endothelin-1 increases cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction of human bronchi via tachykinin synthesis induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Bruno; Advenier, Charles; Falciani, Maddalena; Gallelli, Luca; Marrocco, Giuseppina; Piegari, Elena; Filippelli, Amelia; Rossi, Francesco

    2001-01-01

    In some asthmatics, muscarinic receptor antagonists are effective in limiting bronchoconstrictor response, suggesting an abnormal cholinergic drive in these subjects. There is a growing body of evidences indicating that cholinergic neurotransmission is also enhanced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) in rabbit bronchi, mouse trachea and in human isolated airway preparations.We investigated the role of secondary mediators in ET-1 induced potentiation of cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction in human bronchi, in particular the possible role of neuropeptides in this phenomenon.Bronchial tissues after endothelin treatment were exposed to a standard electrical field stimulation (EFS) (30% of EFS 30Hz)-induced contraction. In addition, in some experiments, preparations were treated with a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist and subsequently exposed to the same protocol. HPLC and RIA were performed on organ bath fluid samples. Moreover, the human bronchi were used for the β-PPT (preprotachykinin) mRNA extraction and semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT – PCR), prior to and 30 – 40 min following ET-1 challenge.The selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, SR48968, was effective to reduce ET-1 potentiation of EFS mediated contraction. HPLC or RIA showed significant increased quantities of NKA in organ bath effluents after EFS stimulation in bronchi pretreated with ET-1. Finally, β-PPT mRNA level after stimulation of bronchi with ET-1 was increased about 2 fold respect to control untreated bronchi.In conclusion, this study demonstrated that, at least in part, the ET-1 potentiation of cholinergic nerve-mediated contraction is mediated by tachykinin release, suggesting that in addition to nerves, several type of cells, such as airway smooth muscle cell, may participate to neuropeptide production. PMID:11724750

  13. Central cholinergic dysfunction could be associated with oropharyngeal dysphagia in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Duck; Koo, Jung Hoi; Song, Sun Hong; Jo, Kwang Deog; Lee, Moon Kyu; Jang, Wooyoung

    2015-11-01

    Dysphagia is an important issue in the prognosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several studies have reported that oropharyngeal dysphagia may be associated with cognitive dysfunction, the exact relationship between cortical function and swallowing function in PD patients is unclear. Therefore, we investigated the association between an electrophysiological marker of central cholinergic function, which reflected cognitive function, and swallowing function, as measured by videofluoroscopic studies (VFSS). We enrolled 29 early PD patients. Using the Swallowing Disturbance Questionnaire (SDQ), we divided the enrolled patients into two groups: PD with dysphagia and PD without dysphagia. The videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) was applied to explore the nature of the dysphagia. To assess central cholinergic dysfunction, short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was evaluated. We analyzed the relationship between central cholinergic dysfunction and oropharyngeal dysphagia and investigated the characteristics of the dysphagia. The SAI values were significantly different between the two groups. The comparison of each VFSS component between the PD with dysphagia group and the PD without dysphagia group showed statistical significance for most of the oral phase components and for a single pharyngeal phase component. The total score on the VDS was higher in the PD with dysphagia group than in the PD without dysphagia group. The Mini-Mental State Examination and SAI values showed significant correlations with the total score of the oral phase components. According to binary logistic regression analysis, SAI value independently contributed to the presence of dysphagia in PD patients. Our findings suggest that cholinergic dysfunction is associated with dysphagia in early PD and that an abnormal SAI value is a good biomarker for predicting the risk of dysphagia in PD patients.

  14. IL-21 enhances the activity of the TLR-MyD88-STAT3 pathway but not the classical TLR-MyD88-NF-κB pathway in human B cells to boost antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bi-Sheng; Stoop, Jeroen N; Huizinga, Tom W; Toes, Rene E M

    2013-10-15

    Both IL-21 and TLR agonists are important regulators of B cell responses, and the combination of IL-21 and TLR stimulation results in increased Ab production. However, it is not clear yet how IL-21 interacts with TLR signaling in B cells. In this study, we show that IL-21 enhances TLR-induced IgG production, whereas it has no effect on TLR-induced IL-6 production by human B cell cultures. These observations are explained by the finding that IL-21 augments TLR-induced IgG production via the TLR-MyD88-STAT3 pathway but not the classical TLR-MyD88-NF-κB pathway. We further demonstrate that stimulation of human B cells with IL-21 and TLR7/8 or TLR9 agonists increases the phosphorylation of STAT3, whereas the activation of NF-κB is not affected. Interestingly, like IL-21, IL-10 in combination with TLR signaling also enhances phosphorylation of STAT3, resulting in an increase of IgG production. Hence, IL-21 and IL-10 increase the activity of the TLR-MyD88-STAT3 pathway in human B cells via enhancing the phosphorylation of STAT3 for Ab production.

  15. Effects of Pro-Cholinergic Treatment in Patients Suffering from Spatial Neglect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, N.; Saj, A.; Schwartz, S.; Ptak, R.; Thomas, C.; Conne, P.; Leroy, R.; Pavin, S.; Diserens, K.; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Spatial neglect is a neurological condition characterized by a breakdown of spatial cognition contralateral to hemispheric damage. Deficits in spatial attention toward the contralesional side are considered to be central to this syndrome. Brain lesions typically involve right fronto-parietal cortices mediating attentional functions and subcortical connections in underlying white matter. Convergent findings from neuroimaging and behavioral studies in both animals and humans suggest that the cholinergic system might also be critically implicated in selective attention by modulating cortical function via widespread projections from the basal forebrain. Here we asked whether deficits in spatial attention associated with neglect could partly result from a cholinergic deafferentation of cortical areas subserving attentional functions, and whether such disturbances could be alleviated by pro-cholinergic therapy. We examined the effect of a single-dose transdermal nicotine treatment on spatial neglect in 10 stroke patients in a double-blind placebo-controlled protocol, using a standardized battery of neglect tests. Nicotine-induced systematic improvement on cancellation tasks and facilitated orienting to single visual targets, but had no significant effect on other tests. These results support a global effect of nicotine on attention and arousal, but no effect on other spatial mechanisms impaired in neglect. PMID:24062674

  16. Spontaneous Vesicle Fusion Is Differentially Regulated at Cholinergic and GABAergic Synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowen Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The locomotion of C. elegans is balanced by excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter release at neuromuscular junctions. However, the molecular mechanisms that maintain the balance of synaptic transmission remain enigmatic. Here, we investigated the function of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in triggering spontaneous release at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Recordings of the miniature excitatory/inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs, respectively showed that UNC-2/CaV2 and EGL-19/CaV1 channels are the two major triggers for spontaneous release. Notably, however, Ca2+-independent spontaneous release was observed at GABAergic but not cholinergic synapses. Functional screening led to the identification of hypomorphic unc-64/Syntaxin-1A and snb-1/VAMP2 mutants in which mEPSCs are severely impaired, whereas mIPSCs remain unaltered, indicating differential regulation of these currents at cholinergic and GABAergic synapses. Moreover, Ca2+-independent spontaneous GABA release was nearly abolished in the hypomorphic unc-64 and snb-1 mutants, suggesting distinct mechanisms for Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent spontaneous release.

  17. Naltrexone pretreatment blocks microwave-induced changes in central cholinergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Wen, Y.F.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rats to pulsed, circularly polarized microwaves (2,450-MHz, 2-microseconds pulses at 500 pps, power density 1 mW/cm2, at an averaged, whole-body SAR of 0.6 W/kg) induced biphasic changes in the concentration of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. An increase in receptor concentration occurred in the hippocampus of rats subjected to ten 45-min sessions of microwave exposure, whereas a decrease in concentration was observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to ten 20-min sessions. These findings, which confirm earlier work in the authors' laboratory, were extended to include pretreatment of rats with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone (1 mg/kg, IP) before each session of exposure. The drug treatment blocked the microwave-induced changes in cholinergic receptors in the brain. These data further support the authors' hypothesis that endogenous opioids play a role in the effects of microwaves on central cholinergic systems.

  18. The basal ganglia cholinergic neurochemistry of progressive supranuclear palsy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, N M; Piggott, M A; Lees, A J; Burn, D J

    2007-06-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving motor and cognitive dysfunction. Currently, there is no effective treatment either for symptomatic relief or disease modification. This relates, in part, to a lack of knowledge of the underlying neurochemical abnormalities, including cholinergic receptor status in the basal ganglia. To measure muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors in the basal ganglia in PSP. The muscarinic M2 (presynaptic) and M4 (postsynaptic) receptors in the striatum, pallidum and adjacent insular cortex were autoradiographically measured in pathologically confirmed cases of PSP (n = 18), and compared with cases of Lewy body dementias (LBDs; n = 45), Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 39) and controls (n = 50). In cases of PSP, there was a reduction in M2 and M4 receptors in the posterior caudate and putamen compared to controls, but no significant changes in the pallidum. Cases with AD showed lower M2 receptors in the posterior striatum. Groups with LBD and AD showed higher M2 binding in the insular cortex compared with controls. The results suggest loss of posterior striatal cholinergic interneurones in PSP, and reduction in medium spiny projection neurones bearing M4 receptors. These results should be taken in the context of more widespread pathology in PSP, but may have implications for future trials of cholinergic treatments.

  19. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Jennifer J; Disney, Anita A

    2018-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function-a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  20. Is There a Canonical Cortical Circuit for the Cholinergic System? Anatomical Differences Across Common Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Coppola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is believed to act as a neuromodulator in cortical circuits that support cognition, specifically in processes including learning, memory consolidation, vigilance, arousal and attention. The cholinergic modulation of cortical processes is studied in many model systems including rodents, cats and primates. Further, these studies are performed in cortical areas ranging from the primary visual cortex to the prefrontal cortex and using diverse methodologies. The results of these studies have been combined into singular models of function—a practice based on an implicit assumption that the various model systems are equivalent and interchangeable. However, comparative anatomy both within and across species reveals important differences in the structure of the cholinergic system. Here, we will review anatomical data including innervation patterns, receptor expression, synthesis and release compared across species and cortical area with a focus on rodents and primates. We argue that these data suggest no canonical cortical model system exists for the cholinergic system. Further, we will argue that as a result, care must be taken both in combining data from studies across cortical areas and species, and in choosing the best model systems to improve our understanding and support of human health.

  1. Impairment of the nerve growth factor pathway driving amyloid accumulation in cholinergic neurons: the incipit of the Alzheimer′s disease story?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Triaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current idea behind brain pathology is that disease is initiated by mild disturbances of common physiological processes. Overtime, the disruption of the neuronal homeostasis will determine irreversible degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. This could be also true in the case of nerve growth factor (NGF alterations in sporadic Alzheimer′s disease (AD, an age-related pathology characterized by cholinergic loss, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In fact, the pathway activated by NGF, a key neurotrophin for the metabolism of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN, is one of the first homeostatic systems affected in prodromal AD. NGF signaling dysfunctions have been thought for decades to occur in AD late stages, as a mere consequence of amyloid-driven disruption of the retrograde axonal transport of neurotrophins to BFCN. Nowadays, a wealth of knowledge is potentially opening a new scenario: NGF signaling impairment occurs at the onset of AD and correlates better than amyloid load with cognitive decline. The recent acceleration in the characterization of anatomical, functional and molecular profiles of early AD is aimed at maximizing the efficacy of existing treatments and setting novel therapies. Accordingly, the elucidation of the molecular events underlying APP metabolism regulation by the NGF pathway in the septo-hippocampal system is crucial for the identification of new target molecules to slow and eventually halt mild cognitive impairment (MCI and its progression toward AD.

  2. The Regulatory Role of Rolipram on Inflammatory Mediators and Cholinergic/Adrenergic Stimulation-Induced Signals in Isolated Primary Mouse Submandibular Gland Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Un Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS induces inflammatory signals in salivary glands. We investigated the regulatory role of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4 inhibitor rolipram on inflammatory mediators and cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation-induced intracellular Ca2+ signaling in salivary acinar and ductal cells. Submandibular gland (SMG expressed PDE4A through 4D mRNA and PDE4 was localized in the luminal membrane of SMG. LPS induced Ca2+ signaling and ROS production in SMG. Treatment with rolipram blocked LPS-induced Ca2+ increase and ROS production. The application of histamine evoked Ca2+ signals and ROS production, which were attenuated by rolipram in SMG cells. Moreover, LPS-induced NLRP3 inflammasome and cleaved caspase-1 were inhibited by rolipram. The inhibitory role of rolipram in ROS-induced Ca2+ signaling was mainly observed in acinar cells and not in ductal cells. Rolipram also protected SMG acinar but not ductal cells from LPS-induced cell membrane damage. In the case of cholinergic/adrenergic stimulation, carbachol/isoproterenol-induced Ca2+ signals were upregulated by the treatment of rolipram in SMG. In the case of cAMP-dependent ductal bicarbonate secretion by rolipram, no effect was observed on the modulation of ductal chloride/bicarbonate exchange activity. Rolipram could suppress the inflammatory signals and could be a potential therapeutic strategy against LPS-induced inflammation to protect the salivary gland cells.

  3. Buck-Boost Current-Source Inverters With Diode-Inductor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Feng; Liang, Chao; Loh, Poh Chiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a number of novel currentsource inverters (CSIs) with enhanced current buck-boost capability. By adding a unique diode-inductor network between the inverter circuitry and current-boost elements, the proposed buck-boost CSIs demonstrate a doubling of current-boost capability...

  4. Endogenous Cholinergic Inputs and Local Circuit Mechanisms Govern the Phasic Mesolimbic Dopamine Response to Nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graupner, Michael; Maex, Reinoud; Gutkin, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine exerts its reinforcing action by stimulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and boosting dopamine (DA) output from the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Recent data have led to a debate about the principal pathway of nicotine action: direct stimulation of the DAergic cells through nAChR activation, or disinhibition mediated through desensitization of nAChRs on GABAergic interneurons. We use a computational model of the VTA circuitry and nAChR function to shed light on this issue. Our model illustrates that the α4β2-containing nAChRs either on DA or GABA cells can mediate the acute effects of nicotine. We account for in vitro as well as in vivo data, and predict the conditions necessary for either direct stimulation or disinhibition to be at the origin of DA activity increases. We propose key experiments to disentangle the contribution of both mechanisms. We show that the rate of endogenous acetylcholine input crucially determines the evoked DA response for both mechanisms. Together our results delineate the mechanisms by which the VTA mediates the acute rewarding properties of nicotine and suggest an acetylcholine dependence hypothesis for nicotine reinforcement. PMID:23966848

  5. Design of a high efficiency 30 kW boost composite converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeokjin [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, Hua [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Maksimovic, Dragan [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Erickson, Robert W. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-20

    An experimental 30 kW boost composite converter is described in this paper. The composite converter architecture, which consists of a buck module, a boost module, and a dual active bridge module that operates as a DC transformer (DCX), leads to substantial reductions in losses at partial power points, and to significant improvements in weighted efficiency in applications that require wide variations in power and conversion ratio. A comprehensive loss model is developed, accounting for semiconductor conduction and switching losses, capacitor losses, as well as dc and ac losses in magnetic components. Based on the developed loss model, the module and system designs are optimized to maximize efficiency at a 50% power point. Experimental results for the 30 kW prototype demonstrate 98.5%peak efficiency, very high efficiency over wide ranges of power and voltage conversion ratios, as well as excellent agreements between model predictions and measured efficiency curves.

  6. Novel information on the non-neuronal cholinergic system in orthopedics provides new possible treatment strategies for inflammatory and degenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Forsgren

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cholinergic agents are used in the treatment of several pathological conditions. Therapy regimens aimed at up-regulating cholinergic functions, such as treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, are also currently prescribed. It is now known that not only is there a neuronal cholinergic system but also a non-neuronal cholinergic system in various parts of the body. Therefore, interference with the effects of acetylcholine (ACh brought about by the local production and release of ACh should also be considered. Locally produced ACh may have proliferative, angiogenic, wound-healing, and immunomodulatory functions. Interestingly, cholinergic stimulation may lead to anti-inflammatory effects. Within this review, new findings for the locomotor system of a more widespread non-neuronal cholinergic system than previously expected will be discussed in relation to possible new treatment strategies. The conditions discussed are painful and degenerative tendon disease (tendinopathy/tendinosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis.

  7. Lesions of cholinergic pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus neurons fail to affect cocaine or heroin self-administration or conditioned place preference in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Steidl

    Full Text Available Cholinergic input to the ventral tegmental area (VTA is known to contribute to reward. Although it is known that the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg provides an important source of excitatory input to the dopamine system, the specific role of PPTg cholinergic input to the VTA in cocaine reward has not been previously determined. We used a diphtheria toxin conjugated to urotensin-II (Dtx::UII, the endogenous ligand for urotensin-II receptors expressed by PPTg cholinergic but not glutamatergic or GABAergic cells, to lesion cholinergic PPTg neurons. Dtx::UII toxin infusion resulted in the loss of 95.78 (±0.65% of PPTg cholinergic cells but did not significantly alter either cocaine or heroin self-administration or the development of cocaine or heroin conditioned place preferences. Thus, cholinergic cells originating in PPTg do not appear to be critical for the rewarding effects of cocaine or of heroin.

  8. Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway inhibits neointimal hyperplasia by suppressing inflammation and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jie Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Neointimal hyperplasia as a consequence of vascular injury is aggravated by inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress. The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR is a orchestrator of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP, which refers to a physiological neuro-immune mechanism that restricts inflammation. Here, we investigated the potential role of CAP in neointimal hyperplasia using α7nAChR knockout (KO mice. Male α7nAChR-KO mice and their wild-type control mice (WT were subjected to wire injury in left common carotid artery. At 4 weeks post injury, the injured aortae were isolated for examination. The neointimal hyperplasia after wire injury was significantly aggravated in α7nAChR-KO mice compared with WT mice. The α7nAChR-KO mice had increased collagen contents and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs amount. Moreover, the inflammation was significantly enhanced in the neointima of α7nAChR-KO mice relative to WT mice, evidenced by the increased expression of tumor necrosis factor-α/interleukin-1β, and macrophage infiltration. Meanwhile, the chemokines chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 and chemokine (CXC motif ligand 2 expression was also augmented in the neointima of α7nAChR-KO mice compared with WT mice. Additionally, the depletion of superoxide dismutase (SOD and reduced glutathione (GSH, and the upregulation of 3-nitrotyrosine, malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase were more pronounced in neointima of α7nAChR-KO mice compared with WT mice. Accordingly, the protein expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1, Nox2 and Nox4, was also higher in neointima of α7nAChR-KO mice compared with WT mice. Finally, pharmacologically activation of CAP with a selective α7nAChR agonist PNU-282987, significantly reduced neointima formation, arterial inflammation and oxidative stress after vascular injury in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that α7nAChR-mediated CAP is a neuro-physiological mechanism that inhibits neointima

  9. Sweets, sex, or self-esteem? Comparing the value of self-esteem boosts with other pleasant rewards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bushman, B.J.; Moeller, S.J.; Crocker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Many people ascribe great value to self-esteem, but how much value? Do people value self-esteem more than other pleasant activities, such as eating sweets and having sex? Two studies of college students (Study 1: N=130; Study 2: N=152) showed that people valued boosts to their self-esteem more than

  10. Poly-Alizarin red S/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode for the boost up of electrocatalytic activity towards the investigation of dopamine and simultaneous resolution in the presence of 5-HT: A voltammetric study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddaiah, K. [Electrochemical Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, S.V.U. College of Sciences, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, Andhra Pradesh (India); Madhusudana Reddy, T., E-mail: tmsreddysvu@gmail.com [Electrochemical Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, S.V.U. College of Sciences, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, Andhra Pradesh (India); Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 207 Pleasant Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Venkata Ramana, D.K. [Department of Safety Engineering, Dongguk University, 123 Dongdae-ro, Gyeongju, Gyeongbuk 780 714 (Korea, Republic of); Subba Rao, Y. [DST-PURSE Centre, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2016-05-01

    Poly-Alizarin red S/multiwalled carbon nanotube film on the surface of glassy carbon electrode (poly-AzrS/MWCNT/GCE) was synthesized by electrochemical process and was used for the sensitive and selective determination of dopamine (DA) by employing voltammetric techniques. The electrocatalytic response of the modified electrode was found to exhibit admirable activity. The simultaneous determination of dopamine in the presence of serotonin (5-HT) was found to exhibit very good response at poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE. The effect of pH, scan rate, accumulation time and concentration of dopamine was studied at the developed poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE. The poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE exhibited an efficient electron mediating behavior together with well resolved peaks for dopamine, in 0.1 mol/dm{sup 3} phosphate buffer (PBS) solution of pH 7.0. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were found to be as 1.89 × 10{sup −7} mol/dm{sup 3} and 6.312 × 10{sup −7} mol/dm{sup 3} respectively with a dynamic range from 1 × 10{sup −6} to 1.8 × 10{sup −5} mol/dm{sup 3}. The interfacial electron transfer behavior of DA was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); the studies showed that the charge transfer rate was enhanced at poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE when compared with bare GCE and poly-AzrS/GCE. - Highlights: • The poly-AzrS/MWCNTs/GCE showed good sensitivity towards DA sensing. • The sensor reduced the overoxidation potentials for DA. • This electrode was successfully used for simultaneous sensing of DA and 5-HT. • The electrode was effectively used for the determination of DA in pharmaceutical formulations.

  11. The role of muscarinic cholinergic signaling in cost-benefit decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fobbs, Wambura

    Animals regularly face decisions that affect both their immediate success and long term survival. Such decisions typically involve some form of cost-benefit analysis and engage a number of high level cognitive processes, including learning, memory and motivational influences. While decision making has been a focus of study for over a century, it's only in the last 20 years that researchers have begun to identify functional neural circuits that subserve different forms of cost-benefit decision making. Even though the cholinergic system is both functionally and anatomically positioned to modulate cost-benefit decision circuits, the contribution of the cholinergic system to decision making has been little studied. In this thesis, I investigated the cognitive and neural contribution of muscarinic cholinergic signaling to cost-benefit decision making. I, first, re-examined the effects of systemic administration of 0.3 mg/kg atropine on delay and probability discounting tasks and found that blockade of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by atropine induced suboptimal choices (impulsive and risky) in both tasks. Since the effect on delay discounting was restricted to the No Cue version of the delay discounting task, I concluded that muscarinic cholinergic signaling mediates both forms of cost-benefit decision making and is selectively engaged when decisions require valuation of reward options whose costs are not externally signified. Second, I assessed the impact of inactivating the nucleus basalis (NBM) on both forms decision making and the effect of injecting atropine locally into the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), basolateral amygdala (BLA), or nucleus accumbens (NAc) core during the No Cue version of the delay discounting task. I discovered that although NBM inactivation failed to affect delay discounting, it induced risk aversion in the probability discounting task; and blockade of intra- NAc core, but not intra-OFC or intra-BLA, muscarinic cholinergic signaling lead to

  12. The effect of LRRK2 mutations on the cholinergic system in manifest and premanifest stages of Parkinson's disease: a cross-sectional PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Ying; Wile, Daryl J; Fu, Jessie Fanglu; Valerio, Jason; Shahinfard, Elham; McCormick, Siobhan; Mabrouk, Rostom; Vafai, Nasim; McKenzie, Jess; Neilson, Nicole; Perez-Soriano, Alexandra; Arena, Julieta E; Cherkasova, Mariya; Chan, Piu; Zhang, Jing; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Aasly, Jan O; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; McKeown, Martin J; Adam, Michael J; Ruth, Thomas J; Schulzer, Michael; Sossi, Vesna; Stoessl, A Jon

    2018-02-15

    Markers of neuroinflammation are increased in some patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease compared with individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, suggesting possible differences in disease pathogenesis. Previous PET studies have suggested amplified dopamine turnover and preserved serotonergic innervation in LRRK2 mutation carriers. We postulated that patients with LRRK2 mutations might show abnormalities of central cholinergic activity, even before the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Between June, 2009, and December, 2015, we recruited participants from four movement disorder clinics in Canada, Norway, and the USA. Patients with Parkinson's disease were diagnosed by movement disorder neurologists on the basis of the UK Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank criteria. LRRK2 carrier status was confirmed by bidirectional Sanger sequencing. We used the PET tracer N- 11 C-methyl-piperidin-4-yl propionate to scan for acetylcholinesterase activity. The primary outcome measure was rate of acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis, calculated using the striatal input method. We compared acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rates between groups using ANCOVA, with adjustment for age based on the results of linear regression analysis. We recruited 14 patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease, 16 LRRK2 mutation carriers without Parkinson's disease, eight patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, and 11 healthy controls. We noted significant between-group differences in rates of acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis in cortical regions (average cortex p=0·009, default mode network-related regions p=0·006, limbic network-related regions p=0·020) and the thalamus (p=0·008). LRRK2 mutation carriers without Parkinson's disease had increased acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rates compared with healthy controls in the cortex (average cortex, p=0·046). Patients with LRRK2 Parkinson's disease had significantly higher acetylcholinesterase activity in some cortical regions (average cortex p=0

  13. N-palmitoyl serotonin alleviates scopolamine-induced memory impairment via regulation of cholinergic and antioxidant systems, and expression of BDNF and p-CREB in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, A Young; Doo, Choon Nan; Son, Eun Jung; Sung, Nak Yun; Lee, Kun Jong; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2015-12-05

    N-Palmitoyl-5-hydroxytryptamines (Pal-5HT), a cannabinoid, has recently been reported to express anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory actions in RBL-2H3 cells, and ameliorate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in HT-22 cells. In this study, we examined the effect of Pal-5HT on deficits of learning and memory induced by scopolamine in mice. Memory performance was evaluated using Morris water maze test and passive avoidance test. Activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), level of oxidative stress markers, and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) were determined. Loss of neuronal cells in hippocampus was evaluated by histological examinations. Pal-5HT significantly improved the amnesia in the behavioral assessment. Pal-5HT regulated cholinergic function by inhibiting scopolamine-induced elevation of AChE activity and decline of ChAT activity. Pal-5HT suppressed oxidative stress by increasing activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) or NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase-1 (NQO-1) and lowering MDA level. Additionally, it prevented against scopolamine-induced expression of iNOS and COX-2. Moreover, Pal-5HT suppressed the death of neuronal cells in CA1 and CA3 regions, while it restored expression of p-CREB and BDNF in hippocampus. Taken together, Pal-5HT is suggested to ameliorate deficits of memory and learning through regulation of cholinergic function, activation of antioxidant systems as well as restoration of BDNF and p-CREB expression. From these, Pal-5HT may be a potential candidate to prevent against neurodegeneration related to the memory deficit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Substructure boosts to dark matter annihilation from Sommerfeld enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2009-01-01

    The recently introduced Sommerfeld enhancement of the dark matter annihilation cross section has important implications for the detection of dark matter annihilation in subhalos in the Galactic halo. In addition to the boost to the dark matter annihilation cross section from the high densities of these subhalos with respect to the main halo, an additional boost caused by the Sommerfeld enhancement results from the fact that they are kinematically colder than the Galactic halo. If we further believe the generic prediction of the cold dark matter paradigm that in each subhalo there is an abundance of substructure which is approximately self-similar to that of the Galactic halo, then I show that additional boosts coming from the density enhancements of these small substructures and their small velocity dispersions enhance the dark matter annihilation cross section even further. I find that very large boost factors (10 5 to 10 9 ) are obtained in a large class of models. The implications of these boost factors for the detection of dark matter annihilation from dwarf spheroidal galaxies in the Galactic halo are such that, generically, they outshine the background gamma-ray flux and are detectable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope.

  15. Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

    2007-08-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and

  16. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  17. Fructus mume Ethanol Extract Prevents Inflammation and Normalizes the Septohippocampal Cholinergic System in a Rat Model of Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bang, Ji Hye; Lee, Jun; Han, Jung-Soo; Kang, Hyung Won; Jeon, Won Kyung

    2016-02-01

    Fructus mume (F. mume), the unripe fruit of Prunus mume, has long been used in Asian countries to treat cough and chronic diarrhea. We previously reported that F. mume exerts anti-inflammatory effects in a model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH), a key etiological factor of vascular dementia (VaD). The present study was performed to investigate the protective effects of an ethanolic extract of F. mume on the inflammatory response and cholinergic dysfunction in a model of CCH induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAo) in Wistar rats. Rats were assigned to three treatment groups: sham plus vehicle, BCCAo plus vehicle, and BCCAo plus F. mume extract (200 mg/kg). F. mume was administered by oral gavage from days 21 to 42 following BCCAo. Glial cell numbers were measured in the white matter and hippocampus. The hippocampal expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, angiotensin-II (Ang-II), receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) were also evaluated. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) levels in the hippocampus and basal forebrain were examined. Rats with BCCAo showed an increase in the number of glial cells and levels of proinflammatory cytokines, Ang-II, RAGE, and MAPKs, all of which were significantly attenuated by F. mume treatment. F. mume administration also restored ChAT expression in the basal forebrain and hippocampus following chronic BCCAo. These results suggest that F. mume is a potentially valuable drug or nutraceutical for the treatment of VaD.

  18. Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  19. Aluminium and Acrylamide Disrupt Cerebellum Redox States, Cholinergic Function and Membrane-Bound ATPase in Adult Rats and Their Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbel, Imen; Amara, Ibtissem Ben; Ktari, Naourez; Elwej, Awatef; Boudawara, Ons; Boudawara, Tahia; Zeghal, Najiba

    2016-12-01

    Accumulation of aluminium and acrylamide in food is a major source of human exposure. Their adverse effects are well documented, but there is no information about the health problems arising from their combined exposure. The aim of the present study was to examine the possible neurotoxic effects after co-exposure of pregnant and lactating rats to aluminium and acrylamide in order to evaluate redox state, cholinergic function and membrane-bound ATPases in the cerebellum of adult rats and their progeny. Pregnant female rats have received aluminium (50 mg/kg body weight) via drinking water and acrylamide (20 mg/kg body weight) by gavage, either individually or in combination from the 14th day of pregnancy until day 14 after delivery. Exposure to these toxicants provoked an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) and advanced oxidation protein product (AOPP) levels and a decrease in SOD, CAT, GPx, Na + K + -ATPase, Mg 2+ -ATPase and AChE activities in the cerebellum of mothers and their suckling pups. A reduction in GSH, NPSH and vitamin C levels was also observed. These changes were confirmed by histological results. Interestingly, co-exposure to these toxicants exhibited synergism based on physical and biochemical variables in the cerebellum of mothers and their progeny.

  20. Histamine modulates dopaminergic neuronal survival by boosting microglial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva, Tatiana Filipa Melo

    2013-01-01

    As células microgliais são os principais intervenientes na resposta inflamatória inata no cérebro adulto. Num contexto de lesão cerebral, a resposta das células da microglia envolve mecanismos de fagocitose de neurónios mortos ou danificados, libertação de fatores tróficos e/ou inflamatórios, e a produção de espécies reativas de oxigénio (ROS). A histamina é uma amina encontrada em grandes quantidades em mastócitos, neurónios histaminérgicos, e leucócitos. No Sistema Nervoso Central (SNC),...

  1. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists in the VTA and RMTg have opposite effects on morphine-induced locomotion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidl, Stephan; Dhillon, Ekamjeet S; Sharma, Natasha; Ludwig, Jessica

    2017-04-14

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) each contribute to opiate reward and each receive inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, the two principle brainstem cholinergic cell groups. We compared the contributions of VTA or RMTg muscarinic cholinergic receptors to locomotion induced by morphine infusions into the same sites. VTA co-infusion of atropine completely blocked VTA morphine-induced locomotion providing additional support for the important role of VTA muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the stimulant effects of opiates. By contrast, RMTg co-infusion of atropine increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. Furthermore, RMTg co-infusion of the M3-selective antagonist 4-DAMP, but not the M4-selective antagonist Tropicamide, strongly increased RMTg morphine-induced locomotion. RMTg infusions of 4-DAMP, but not of Tropicamide, by themselves strongly increased drug-free locomotion. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the RMTg thus also contribute to the stimulant effects of morphine, but in a way opposite to those in VTA. We suggest that the net effect of endogenous cholinergic input to the RMTg on drug-free and on RMTg morphine-induced locomotion is inhibitory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of reliability of a interleaving PFC boost converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulam Amer Sandepudi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability plays an important role in power supplies. For other electronic equipment, a certain failure mode, at least for a part of the total system, can often be employed without serious (critical effects. However, for power supply no such condition can be accepted, since very high demands on its reliability must be achieved. At higher power levels, the continuous conduction mode (CCM boost converter is preferred topology for implementation a front end with PFC. As a result, significant efforts have been made to improve the performance of high boost converter. This paper is one of the efforts for improving the performance of the converter from the reliability point of view. In this paper, interleaving boost power factor correction converter is simulated with single switch in continuous conduction mode (CCM, discontinuous conduction mode (DCM and critical conduction mode (CRM under different output power ratings. Results of the converter are explored from reliability point of view.

  3. Radiotherapy Boost Following Conservative Surgery for Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cendales, Ricardo; Ospino, Rosalba; Torres, Felipe; Cotes, Martha

    2009-01-01

    Nearly half of breast cancer patients in developing countries present with a locally advanced cancer. Treatment is centered on a multimodal approach based on chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy. The growing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy has led to a more conservative surgical approach; nonetheless, it is not yet considered as a standard. There are no clear recommendations on the use of a radiotherapy boost in such situation. A Medline search was developed. Most articles are retrospective series. Survival free of locoregional relapse in patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, breast conserving surgery and radiotherapy is good. All articles described a boost administered to nearly all patients without regard to their prognostic factors, given that a locally advanced tumor is already considered as a poor prognostic factor. Even tough the poor level of evidence, a recommendation can be made: radiotherapy boost should be administered to all patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and breast conserving surgery.

  4. Boosted black holes on Kaluza-Klein bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi; Tomizawa, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    We construct an exact stationary solution of black-hole-bubble sequence in the five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein theory by using solitonic solution-generating techniques. The solution describes two stationary black holes with topology S 3 on a Kaluza-Klein bubble and has a linear momentum component in the compactified direction. We call the solution boosted black holes on Kaluza-Klein bubble because it has the linear momentum. The Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass and the linear momentum depend on the two boosted velocity parameters of black holes. In the effective four-dimensional theory, the solution has an electric charge which is proportional to the linear momentum. The solution includes the static solution found by Elvang and Horowitz. The small and the big black holes limits are investigated. The relation between the solution and the single boosted black string are considered

  5. Performance of Boosted W Boson Identification with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This note presents the performance of a variety of techniques used to identify highly- boosted hadronically-decaying $W$ bosons. The studies presented here are divided into two parts: the first is based on Monte Carlo simulation, and the second compares the simulations to 20.3$\\pm$0.6 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-–proton collisions data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. Various tagging approaches and different grooming algorithms are compared in simulation, using a signal of large-$R$ jets containing a highly boosted $W$ boson and a background of large-$R$ jets originating from high-momentum light quarks or gluons. These techniques could also be utilised to identify hadronic decays of boosted $Z$ and Higgs bosons. A sample enriched in $t\\bar{t}\\to (W^+b)(W^-\\bar{b}) \\to (q\\bar{q}b)(\\mu \\bar{\

  6. Self-boosting vaccines and their implications for herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Lavine, Jennie S; Grenfell, Bryan T

    2012-12-04

    Advances in vaccine technology over the past two centuries have facilitated far-reaching impact in the control of many infections, and today's emerging vaccines could likewise open new opportunities in the control of several diseases. Here we consider the potential, population-level effects of a particular class of emerging vaccines that use specific viral vectors to establish long-term, intermittent antigen presentation within a vaccinated host: in essence, "self-boosting" vaccines. In particular, we use mathematical models to explore the potential role of such vaccines in situations where current immunization raises only relatively short-lived protection. Vaccination programs in such cases are generally limited in their ability to raise lasting herd immunity. Moreover, in certain cases mass vaccination can have the counterproductive effect of allowing an increase in severe disease, through reducing opportunities for immunity to be boosted through natural exposure to infection. Such dynamics have been proposed, for example, in relation to pertussis and varicella-zoster virus. In this context we show how self-boosting vaccines could open qualitatively new opportunities, for example by broadening the effective duration of herd immunity that can be achieved with currently used immunogens. At intermediate rates of self-boosting, these vaccines also alleviate the potential counterproductive effects of mass vaccination, through compensating for losses in natural boosting. Importantly, however, we also show how sufficiently high boosting rates may introduce a new regime of unintended consequences, wherein the unvaccinated bear an increased disease burden. Finally, we discuss important caveats and data needs arising from this work.

  7. The Lateral Decubitus Breast Boost: Description, Rationale, and Efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Michelle S.; McNeese, Marsha D.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Perkins, George H.; Strom, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and evaluate the modified lateral decubitus boost, a breast irradiation technique. Patients are repositioned and resimulated for electron boost to minimize the necessary depth for the electron beam and optimize target volume coverage. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,606 patients were treated with post-lumpectomy radiation at our institution between January 1, 2000, and February 1, 2008. Of these, 231 patients underwent resimulation in the lateral decubitus position with electron boost. Distance from skin to the maximal depth of target volume was measured in both the original and boost plans. Age, body mass index (BMI), boost electron energy, and skin reaction were evaluated. Results: Resimulation in the lateral decubitus position reduced the distance from skin to maximal target volume depth in all patients. Average depth reduction by repositioning was 2.12 cm, allowing for an average electron energy reduction of approximately 7 MeV. Mean skin entrance dose was reduced from about 90% to about 85% (p < 0.001). Only 14 patients (6%) experienced moist desquamation in the boost field at the end of treatment. Average BMI of these patients was 30.4 (range, 17.8-50.7). BMI greater than 30 was associated with more depth reduction by repositioning and increased risk of moist desquamation. Conclusions: The lateral decubitus position allows for a decrease in the distance from the skin to the target volume depth, improving electron coverage of the tumor bed while reducing skin entrance dose. This is a well-tolerated regimen for a patient population with a high BMI or deep tumor location.

  8. [Cholinergic receptors in early (pre-nervous) sea urchin embryos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buznikov, G A; Rakic, L

    1998-10-01

    Agonists of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) nicotine and 1-acetyl-4-methylpiperazine do not act on the early sea urchin embryogenesis but evoke calcium shock in both oocytes and early embryos under certain conditions. Many nAChR ligands protect both oocytes and embryos against this shock. There seem to exist putative nAChR on the cell surface of the early sea urchin oocytes and early embryos. Pre-nervous acetylcholine seems to be functionally coupled via these receptors with the second messengers, endogenous activators of the protein kinase C.

  9. Effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis sera on cultured cholinergic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touzeau, G.; Kato, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Dissociated monolayer cultures of chick ciliary ganglion neurons have been used to study the effects of control and ALS sera. The cultured neurons survive and extend neurites for a minimum of 2 weeks in a standard tissue culture medium that contains 10% heat-inactivated human serum. Three parameters of the neurons have been examined when cultured in control and ALS sera for 8 to 12 days: (1) neuronal survival, (2) activity of the enzyme choline acetyltransferase, and (3) synthesis of 3 H-acetylcholine using 3 H-choline as precursor. ALS sera cause a small decrease in these three parameters, but this difference is not significant

  10. Boosted Objects: A Probe of Beyond the Standard Model Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdesselam, A.; /Oxford U.; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; /DESY; Bitenc, U.; /Freiburg U.; Brooijmans, G.; /Columbia U.; Butterworth, J.; /University Coll. London; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.; /Cracow, INP; Buarque Franzosi, D.; /Turin U.; Buckingham, R.; /Oxford U.; Chapleau, B.; /McGill U.; Dasgupta, M.; /Manchester U.; Davison, A.; /University Coll. London; Dolen, J.; /UC, Davis; Ellis, S.; /Washington U., Seattle; Fassi, F.; /Lyon, IPN; Ferrando, J.; /Oxford U.; Frandsen, M.T.; /Oxford U.; Frost, J.; /Cambridge U.; Gadfort, T.; /Brookhaven; Glover, N.; /Durham U.; Haas, A.; /SLAC; Halkiadakis, E.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /INFN, Milan Bicocca /Oxford U. /Ohio State U. /Rutherford /Oxford U. /Oxford U. /Maryland U. /Bristol U. /Princeton U. /Oxford U. /Oxford U. /Arizona U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Rutherford /Bristol U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Weizmann Inst. /Washington U., Seattle /Johns Hopkins U. /Oslo U. /Durham U. /Princeton U. /Paris, LPTHE /CERN /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins /Granada U. /SLAC /Rutherford /Toronto U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U. /Yale U.; /more authors..

    2012-06-12

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.

  11. A Two-Stage Wind Grid Inverter with Boost Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Che, Yanbo; Zhang, Wen; Ge, Leijiao; Zhang, Jijie

    2014-01-01

    At present, the conversion efficiency of commercial small wind grid inverter is low, and, in case of low wind speed, the wind energy cannot be used efficiently. In order to resolve this problem, it is necessary to improve the topological structure and control strategy, and design a new small wind grid inverter. In this paper, we apply a two-voltage stage topology with boost converter. The boost circuit is to achieve the maximum power output of the wind energy by the segmented regulation, whil...

  12. Boosted objects: a probe of beyond the Standard Model physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Bitenc, U; Brooijmans, G; Butterworth, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P; Buarque Franzosi, D; Buckingham, R; Chapleau, B; Dasgupta, M; Davison, A; Dolen, J; Ellis, S; Fassi, F; Ferrando, J; Frandsen, M T; Frost, J; Gadfort, T; Glover, N; Haas, A; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, K; Hays, C; Hill, C; Jackson, J; Issever, C; Karagoz, M; Katz, A; Kreczko, L; Krohn, D; Lewis, A; Livermore, S; Loch, P; Maksimovic, P; March-Russell, J; Martin, A; McCubbin, N; Newbold, D; Ott, J; Perez, G; Policchio, A; Rappoccio, S; Raklev, A R; Richardson, P; Salam, G P; Sannino, F; Santiago, J; Schwartzman, A; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C; Sinervo, P; Sjoelin, J; Son, M; Spannowsky, M; Strauss, E; Takeuchi, M; Tseng, J; Tweedie, B; Vermillion, C; Voigt, J; Vos, M; Wacker, J; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wilson, M G

    2011-01-01

    We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.

  13. The motilin receptor agonist erythromycin stimulates hunger and food intake through a cholinergic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloose, Eveline; Vos, Rita; Janssen, Pieter; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Depoortere, Inge; Tack, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Motilin-induced phase III contractions have been identified as a hunger signal. These phase III contractions occur as part of the migrating motor complex (MMC), a contractility pattern of the gastrointestinal tract during fasting. The mechanism involved in this association between subjective hunger feelings and gastrointestinal motility during the MMC is largely unknown, however, as is its ability to stimulate food intake. We sought to 1) investigate the occurrence of hunger peaks and their relation to phase III contractions, 2) evaluate whether this relation was cholinergically driven, and 3) assess the ability of the motilin receptor agonist erythromycin to induce food intake. An algorithm was developed to detect hunger peaks. The association with phase III contractions was studied in 14 healthy volunteers [50% men; mean ± SEM age: 25 ± 2 y; mean ± SEM body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 23 ± 1]. The impact of pharmacologically induced phase III contractions on the occurrence of hunger peaks and the involvement of a cholinergic pathway were assessed in 14 healthy volunteers (43% men; age: 29 ± 3 y; BMI: 23 ± 1). Last, the effect of erythromycin administration on food intake was examined in 15 healthy volunteers (40% men; age: 28 ± 3 y; BMI: 22 ± 1). The occurrence of hunger peaks and their significant association with phase III contractions was confirmed (P hunger peaks (P hunger feelings through a cholinergic pathway. Moreover, erythromycin stimulated food intake, suggesting a physiologic role of motilin as an orexigenic signal from the gastrointestinal tract. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02633579. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Acid-gastric antisecretory effect of the ethanolic extract from Arctium lappa L. root: role of H+, K+-ATPase, Ca2+influx and the cholinergic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luisa Mota; Burci, Ligia de Moura; Crestani, Sandra; de Souza, Priscila; da Silva, Rita de Cássia Melo Vilhena de Andrade Fonseca; Dartora, Nessana; de Souza, Lauro Mera; Cipriani, Thales Ricardo; da Silva-Santos, José Eduardo; André, Eunice; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula

    2018-04-01

    Arctium lappa L., popularly known as burdock, is a medicinal plant used worldwide. The antiulcer and gastric-acid antisecretory effects of ethanolic extract from roots of Arctium lappa (EET) were already demonstrated. However, the mechanism by which the extract reduces the gastric acid secretion remains unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antisecretory mode of action of EET. The effects of EET on H + , K + -ATPase activity were verified in vitro, whereas the effects of the extract on cholinergic-, histaminergic- or gastrinergic-acid gastric stimulation were assessed in vivo on stimulated pylorus ligated rats. Moreover, ex vivo contractility studies on gastric muscle strips from rats were also employed. The incubation with EET (1000 µg/ml) partially inhibited H + , K + -ATPase activity, and the intraduodenal administration of EET (10 mg/kg) decreased the volume and acidity of gastric secretion stimulated by bethanechol, histamine, and pentagastrin. EET (100-1000 µg/ml) did not alter the gastric relaxation induced by histamine but decreased acetylcholine-induced contraction in gastric fundus strips. Interestingly, EET also reduced the increase in the gastric muscle tone induced by 40 mM KCl depolarizing solution, as well as the maximum contractile responses evoked by CaCl 2 in Ca 2+ -free depolarizing solution, without impairing the effect of acetylcholine on fundus strips maintained in Ca 2+ -free nutritive solution. Our results reinforce the gastric antisecretory properties of preparations obtained from Arctium lappa, and indicate that the mechanisms involved in EET antisecretory effects include a moderate reduction of the H + , K + -ATPase activity associated with inhibitory effects on calcium influx and of cholinergic pathways in the stomach muscle.

  15. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  16. Sleep and dreaming: induction and mediation of REM sleep by cholinergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, J A

    1992-12-01

    The most important recent work on the neurobiology of sleep has focused on the precise cellular and biochemical mechanisms of rapid eye movement sleep mediation. Direct and indirect evidence implicates acetylcholine-containing neurons in the peribrachial pons as critical in the triggering and maintenance of rapid eye movement sleep. Other new studies provide support for the hypothesis that the cholinergic generator system is gated during waking by serotonergic and noradrenergic influences. A growing consensus regarding the basic neurobiology has stimulated new thinking about the brain basis of consciousness during waking and dreaming.

  17. Pyroclastic Eruption Boosts Organic Carbon Fluxes Into Patagonian Fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Christian H.; Korup, Oliver; Ulloa, Héctor; Iroumé, Andrés.

    2017-11-01

    Fjords and old-growth forests store large amounts of organic carbon. Yet the role of episodic disturbances, particularly volcanic eruptions, in mobilizing organic carbon in fjord landscapes covered by temperate rainforests remains poorly quantified. To this end, we estimated how much wood and soils were flushed to nearby fjords following the 2008 eruption of Chaitén volcano in south-central Chile, where pyroclastic sediments covered >12 km2 of pristine temperate rainforest. Field-based surveys of forest biomass, soil organic content, and dead wood transport reveal that the reworking of pyroclastic sediments delivered 66,500 + 14,600/-14,500 tC of large wood to two rivers entering the nearby Patagonian fjords in less than a decade. A similar volume of wood remains in dead tree stands and buried beneath pyroclastic deposits ( 79,900 + 21,100/-16,900 tC) or stored in active river channels (5,900-10,600 tC). We estimate that bank erosion mobilized 132,300+21,700/-30,600 tC of floodplain forest soil. Eroded and reworked forest soils have been accreting on coastal river deltas at >5 mm yr-1 since the eruption. While much of the large wood is transported out of the fjord by long-shore drift, the finer fraction from eroded forest soils is likely to be buried in the fjords. We conclude that the organic carbon fluxes boosted by rivers adjusting to high pyroclastic sediment loads may remain elevated for up to a decade and that Patagonian temperate rainforests disturbed by excessive loads of pyroclastic debris can be episodic short-lived carbon sources.

  18. beta-amyloid((1-42))-induced cholinergic lesions in rat nucleus basalis bidirectionally modulate serotonergic innervation of the basal forebrain and cerebral cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T; O'Mahony, S; Kelly, JP; Konya, C; Borostyankoi, ZA; Gorcs, TJ; Zarandi, M; Penke, B; Leonard, BE; Luiten, PGM; Keijser, Jan N.

    Ample experimental evidence suggests that beta -amyloid (A beta), when injected into the rat magnocellular nucleus basalis (MBN), impels excitotoxic injury of cholinergic projection neurons. Whereas learning and memory dysfunction is a hallmark of A beta -induced cholinergic deficits, anxiety, or

  19. Cholinergic Neurotransmission: Function and Dysfunction, International Cholinergic Symposium (8th) Held at Montreal (Quebec) on 26-30 July 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    antagonize 1 mM carbachol stimulated [3 Hlinositol phosphates accumulation in ventral hippocampus, it was suggested that this response was activated by the...M1 and M3 receptors. The inhibition of forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation by 1 mM carbachol in the area was antagonized by DAU 6202 (Kb, 37±0.7 nM...organophosphate inhibitors resulted in first data on short aminoacid sequences from the ChE phosphorylation site; today the primary structures of several ChEs

  20. Cholinergic degeneration is associated with increased plaque deposition and cognitive impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic dysfunction and deposition of plaques containing amyloid ß-peptides (Aß) are two of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we combine APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice with the cholinergic immunotoxin mu p75-saporin (SAP) to integrate partial basal forebrain cholinergic degenera...... decline and accelerated plaque burden. SAP treated APP/PS1 mice might thus constitute an improved model of Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology and cognitive deficits compared to the conventional APP/PS1 model without selective removal of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons........ Additionally, APP/PS1 mice treated with SAP showed a tendency towards an increased level of soluble and insoluble Aß1-40 and Aß1-42 measured in brain tissue homogenate. Our results suggest that the combination of cholinergic degeneration and Aß overexpression in the APP/PS1 mouse model results in cognitive...

  1. Cholinergic PET imaging in infections and inflammation using 11C-donepezil and 18F-FEOBV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Mortensen, Frank Viborg

    2017-01-01

    with Staphylococcus aureus, and PET scanned at 24, 72, 120, and 144 h post-inoculation. Four pigs with post-operative abscesses were also imaged. Finally, we present initial data from human patients with infections, inflammation, and renal and lung cancer. Results In mice, the FDG uptake in abscesses peaked at 24 h...... exhibit more intense accumulation than 18F-FDG at sites of chronic inflammation. Cholinergic PET imaging may therefore have potential applications for basic research into cholinergic mechanisms of immune modulation, but also clinical applications for diagnosing infections, inflammatory disorders...

  2. Boosted jet identification using particle candidates and deep neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This note presents developments for the identification of hadronically decaying top quarks using deep neural networks in CMS. A new method that utilizes one dimensional convolutional neural networks based on jet constituent particles is proposed. Alternative methods using boosted decision trees based on jet observables are compared. The new method shows significant improvement in performance.

  3. Integrated Current Balancing Transformer for Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sen, Gökhan; Ouyang, Ziwei; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2011-01-01

    A simple, PCB compatible integrated solution is proposed for the current balancing requirement of the primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC). Input inductor and the current balancing transformer are merged into the same core, which reduces the number of components allowing a cheaper an...

  4. Biochar boosts tropical but not temperate crop yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, Simon; Abalos Rodriguez, Diego; Prodana, Marija; Bastos, Ana Catarina; Groenigen, van Jan Willem; Hungate, Bruce A.; Verheijen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Applying biochar to soil is thought to have multiple benefits, from helping mitigate climate change [1, 2], to managing waste [3] to conserving soil [4]. Biochar is also widely assumed to boost crop yield [5, 6], but there is controversy regarding the extent and cause of any yield benefit [7].

  5. Solar-Based Boost Differential Single Phase Inverter | Eya | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... current concurrently and finally, it is portable. This research also shows the disparity between the simulated results of open loop and closed loop of boost differential inverter systems. The dc power source is photovoltaic cell. The maximum power point tracker is in-cooperated in capturing the maximum power from the sun.

  6. Boosting food security in sub-Saharan Africa through cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boosting food security in sub-Saharan Africa through cassava production: a case study of Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Economic History ... The paper argues that cassava which is widely grown in Sub-Saharan Africa with a lot of variety of food derivatives from it can reduce to the barest minimum the present state of food ...

  7. HIV-prevention studies: Educate smarter, boost women's earning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the 'very hard-to-reach' youth of informal settlements countrywide. 'Although it was done in a small community, we need to think of feasible ways in which we can ... strewn about below the condocans, perhaps indicating the community's. HIV-prevention studies: Educate smarter, boost women's earning power. Professor ...

  8. Adaptive Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm in KDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper proposes the use of adaptive kernel in a meshsize boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. The algorithm is a bias reduction scheme like other existing schemes but uses adaptive kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. An empirical study for this scheme is conducted and the findings are comparatively ...

  9. Adaptive Kernel In The Bootstrap Boosting Algorithm In KDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper proposes the use of adaptive kernel in a bootstrap boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. The algorithm is a bias reduction scheme like other existing schemes but uses adaptive kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. An empirical study for this scheme is conducted and the findings are comparatively ...

  10. Characteristics of thermalization of boost-invariant plasma from holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heller, M.P.; Janik, R.A.; Witaszczyk, P.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the approach toward the hydrodynamic regime of boost-invariant N=4 super Yang-Mills plasma at strong coupling starting from various far-from-equilibrium states at τ=0. The results are obtained through a numerical solution of Einstein’s equations for the dual geometries, as described in

  11. Congress OKs $2 Billion Boost for the NIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    President Donald Trump last week signed a $1.1 trillion spending bill for fiscal year 2017, including a welcome $2 billion boost for the NIH that will support former Vice President Joe Biden's Cancer Moonshot initiative, among other priorities. However, researchers who rely heavily on NIH grant funding remain concerned about proposed cuts for 2018. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Higher-Order Hybrid Gaussian Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we shall use higher-order hybrid Gaussian kernel in a meshsize boosting algorithm in kernel density estimation. Bias reduction is guaranteed in this scheme like other existing schemes but uses the higher-order hybrid Gaussian kernel instead of the regular fixed kernels. A numerical verification of this scheme ...

  13. A THREE-PHASE BOOST DC-AC CONVERTER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    - strate the feasibility of the proposed three-phase inverter. The inverter is intended to be used in three-phase electric drives and uninterruptible power supply (UPS) systems. Keywords: Boost converter, three-phase dc-ac converter, sliding ...

  14. Multistage switched inductor boost converter for renewable energy application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maroti, Pandav Kiran; Padmanaban, Sanjeevikumar; Bhaskar, Mahajan Sagar

    2017-01-01

    In this paper Multistage Switched Inductor Boost Converter (Multistage SIBC) is uttered for renewable energy applications. The projected converter is derived from an amalgamation of the conventional step-up converter and inductor stack. The number of inductor and duty ratio decides the overall...

  15. Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter with Bidirectional Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Sen, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a bidirectional dc/dc converter operated with batteries both in the input and output. Primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) with transformer series connection on the high voltage side is preferred due to its ability to handle high currents in the low voltage side...

  16. Boost IORT in Breast Cancer: Body of Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Sedlmayer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The term IORT (intraoperative radiotherapy is currently used for various techniques that show decisive differences in dose delivery. The largest evidence for boost IORT preceding whole breast irradiation (WBI originates from intraoperative electron treatments with single doses around 10 Gy, providing outstandingly low local recurrence rates in any risk constellation also at long term analyses. Compared to other boost methods, an intraoperative treatment has evident advantages as follows. Precision. Direct visualisation of the tumour bed during surgery guarantees an accurate dose delivery. This fact has additionally gained importance in times of primary reconstruction techniques after lumpectomy to optimise cosmetic outcome. IORT is performed before breast tissue is mobilised for plastic purposes. Cosmesis. As a consequence of direct tissue exposure without distension by hematoma/seroma, IORT allows for small treatment volumes and complete skin sparing, both having a positive effect on late tissue tolerance and, hence, cosmetic appearance. Patient Comfort. Boost IORT marginally prolongs the surgical procedure, while significantly shortening postoperative radiotherapy. Its combination with a 3-week hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy to the whole breast (WBI is presently tested in the HIOB trial (hypofractionated WBI preceded by IORT electron boost, a prospective multicenter trial of the International Society of Intraoperative Radiotherapy (ISIORT.

  17. Tricky treats: how and when temptations boost self-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, F.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313869871

    2012-01-01

    The overall aim of this dissertation was to explore how and when temptations boost self-control. More specifically, we aimed to a) replicate and extend previous findings showing that temptations yield enhanced self-control on cognitive as well as behavioral measures; b) examine the role of

  18. 438 Adaptive Kernel in Meshsize Boosting Algorithm in KDE (Pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... Birke, Melanie (2009). “Shape constrained KDE.” Journal of Statistical. Planning & Inference, vol 139, issue 8 , August 2009, pg 2851 –. 2862. Duffy, N. and Hemlbold, D. (2000). “Potential bosters? Advances in Neural info.” Proc. Sys. 12, 258 – 264. Freund, Y. (1995). “Boosting a Weak Learning Algorithm ...

  19. Search for new resonances with boosted signatures at CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The LHC and its experiments are ideally suited to search for these new resonances in order to validate or constrain the corresponding theories. At resonance masses well above 1 TeV, these searches face specific challenges. The decay products have large Lorentz boosts, resulting in very collimated final state topologies. Jet substructure methods and the use of non-isolate...

  20. Modeling and Control of Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Sen, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper state space modeling and closed loop controlled operation have been presented for primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) topology as a battery charging unit. Parasitic resistances have been included to have an accurate dynamic model. The accuracy of the model has been...

  1. Electrical Stimulation of Low-Threshold Proprioceptive Fibers in the Adult Rat Increases Density of Glutamatergic and Cholinergic Terminals on Ankle Extensor α-Motoneurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Gajewska-Woźniak

    Full Text Available The effects of stimulation of low-threshold proprioceptive afferents in the tibial nerve on two types of excitatory inputs to α-motoneurons were tested. The first input is formed by glutamatergic Ia sensory afferents contacting monosynaptically α-motoneurons. The second one is the cholinergic input originating from V0c-interneurons, located in lamina X of the spinal cord, modulating activity of α-motoneurons via C-terminals. Our aim was to clarify whether enhancement of signaling to ankle extensor α-motoneurons, via direct electrical stimulation addressed predominantly to low-threshold proprioceptive fibers in the tibial nerve of awake rats, will affect Ia glutamatergic and cholinergic innervation of α-motoneurons of lateral gastrocnemius (LG. LG motoneurons were identified with True Blue tracer injected intramuscularly. Tibial nerve was stimulated for 7 days with continuous bursts of three pulses applied in four 20 min sessions daily. The Hoffmann reflex and motor responses recorded from the soleus muscle, LG synergist, allowed controlling stimulation. Ia terminals and C-terminals abutting on LG-labeled α-motoneurons were detected by immunofluorescence (IF using input-specific anti- VGLUT1 and anti-VAChT antibodies, respectively. Quantitative analysis of confocal images revealed that the number of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals contacting the soma of LG α-motoneurons increased after stimulation by 35% and by 26%, respectively, comparing to the sham-stimulated side. The aggregate volume of VGLUT1 IF and VAChT IF terminals increased by 35% and by 30%, respectively. Labeling intensity of boutons was also increased, suggesting an increase of signaling to LG α-motoneurons after stimulation. To conclude, one week of continuous burst stimulation of proprioceptive input to LG α-motoneurons is effective in enrichment of their direct glutamatergic but also indirect cholinergic inputs. The effectiveness of such and longer stimulation in models

  2. Boosting physics education through mobile augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crǎciun, Dana; Bunoiu, Mǎdǎlin

    2017-12-01

    The integration of collaborative applications, based on modern learning technologies and the Internet, of various visualization techniques and digital strategies in open, flexible modern learning environments which facilitate access to resources, represents a challenge for physics teachers in Romania in general, and for novice teachers in particular. Although large efforts have been made worldwide to invest in educational technologies, their impact on the students' learning outcomes is quite modest. In this paper, we describe and analyze various curricular and extracurricular activities specifically designed for and undertaken by pre-service physics teachers. These activities employ new educational technologies, mobile augmented reality (MAR) and are based on modern teaching and learning theories. MAR is an extension for mobile devices of augmented reality, an interactive and in real time combination, of real and virtual objects overlaid in the real environment. The obtained results show that pre-service physics teachers are confident in using MAR in their teaching and learning activities, and consider that the activities performed helped them develop the skills necessary for science teachers in a technology-based society and to reflect upon the role of technology in the current Romanian educational context.

  3. [3H]cytisine binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabreza, L.A.; Dhawan, S.; Kellar, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    Cytisine, a ganglionic agonist, competes with high affinity for brain nicotinic cholinergic receptors labeled by any of several nicotinic 3 H-agonist ligands. Here we have examined the binding of [ 3 H]cytisine in rat brain homogenates. [ 3 H]Cytisine binds with high affinity (Kd less than 1 nM), and specific binding represented 60-90% of total binding at all concentrations examined up to 15 nM. The nicotinic cholinergic agonists nicotine, acetylcholine, and carbachol compete with high affinity for [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites, whereas among nicotinic receptor antagonists only dihydro-beta-erythroidine competes with high affinity (in the nanomolar range). Comparison of binding in several brain regions showed that [ 3 H]cytisine binding is higher in the thalamus, striatum, and cortex than in the hippocampus, cerebellum, or hypothalamus. The pharmacology and brain regional distribution of [ 3 H]cytisine binding sites are those predicted for neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist recognition sites. The high affinity and low nonspecific binding of [ 3 H]cytisine should make it a very useful ligand for studying neuronal nicotinic receptors

  4. Interaction of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons with the glucocorticoid system in stress regulation and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati ePaul

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A substantial number of studies on basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN have provided compelling evidence for their role in the etiology of stress, cognitive aging, Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and other neurodegenerative diseases. BFCN project to a broad range of cortical sites and limbic structures, including the hippocampus, and are involved in stress and cognition. In particular, the hippocampus, the primary target tissue of the glucocorticoid stress hormones, is associated with cognitive function in tandem with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis modulation. The present review summarizes glucocorticoid and HPA axis research to date in an effort to establish the manner in which stress affects the release of acetylcholine, glucocorticoids, and their receptor in the context of cognitive processes. We attempt to provide the molecular interactive link between the glucocorticoids and cholinergic system that contributes to BFCN degeneration in stress-induced acceleration of cognitive decline in aging and AD. We also discuss the importance of animal models in facilitating such studies for pharmacological use, which could help decipher disease states and propose leads for pharmacological intervention.

  5. Evaluation of Cholinergic Deficiency in Preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease Using Pupillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Frost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical cholinergic deficiency is prominent in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and published findings of diminished pupil flash response in AD suggest that this deficiency may extend to the visual cortical areas and anterior eye. Pupillometry is a low-cost, noninvasive technique that may be useful for monitoring cholinergic deficits which generally lead to memory and cognitive disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate pupillometry for early detection of AD by comparing the pupil flash response (PFR in AD (N=14 and cognitively normal healthy control (HC, N=115 participants, with the HC group stratified according to high (N=38 and low (N=77 neocortical amyloid burden (NAB. Constriction phase PFR parameters were significantly reduced in AD compared to HC (maximum acceleration p<0.05, maximum velocity p<0.0005, average velocity p<0.005, and constriction amplitude p<0.00005. The high-NAB HC subgroup had reduced PFR response cross-sectionally, and also a greater decline longitudinally, compared to the low-NAB subgroup, suggesting changes to pupil response in preclinical AD. The results suggest that PFR changes may occur in the preclinical phase of AD. Hence, pupillometry has a potential as an adjunct for noninvasive, cost-effective screening for preclinical AD.

  6. The effect of the augmentation of cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine on EEG indices of visuospatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, H N A; Böcker, K B E; Deschamps, P K H; Kemner, C; Kenemans, J L

    2014-03-01

    The cholinergic system has been implicated in visuospatial attention but the exact role remains unclear. In visuospatial attention, bias refers to neuronal signals that modulate the sensitivity of sensory cortex, while disengagement refers to the decoupling of attention making reorienting possible. In the current study we investigated the effect of facilitating cholinergic neurotransmission by nicotine (Nicorette Freshmint 2mg, polacrilex chewing gum) on behavioral and electrophysiological indices of bias and disengagement. Sixteen non-smoking participants performed in a Visual Spatial Cueing (VSC) task while EEG was recorded. A randomized, single-blind, crossover design was implemented. Based on the scarce literature, it was expected that nicotine would specifically augment disengagement related processing, especially manifest as an increase of the modulation of the Late Positive Deflection (LPD) by validity of cueing. No effect was expected on bias related components (cue-locked: EDAN, LDAP; target-locked: P1 and N1 modulations). Results show weak indications for a reduction of the reaction time validity effect by nicotine, but only for half of the sample in which the validity effect on the pretest was largest. Nicotine reduced the result of bias as indexed by a reduced P1 modulation by validity, especially in subjects with strong peripheral responses to nicotine. Nicotine did not affect ERP manifestations of the directing of bias (EDAN, LDAP) or disengagement (LPD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Altitude acclimatization improves submaximal cognitive performance in mice and involves an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Narbona, R; Delgado-García, J M; López-Ramos, J C

    2013-06-15

    The aim of this work was to reveal a hypothetical improvement of cognitive abilities in animals acclimatized to altitude and performing under ground level conditions, when looking at submaximal performance, once seen that it was not possible when looking at maximal scores. We modified contrasted cognitive tasks (object recognition, operant conditioning, eight-arm radial maze, and classical conditioning of the eyeblink reflex), increasing their complexity in an attempt to find performance differences in acclimatized animals vs. untrained controls. In addition, we studied, through immunohistochemical quantification, the expression of choline acetyltransferase and acetyl cholinesterase, enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of acetylcholine, in the septal area, piriform and visual cortexes, and the hippocampal CA1 area of animals submitted to acute hypobaric hypoxia, or acclimatized to this simulated altitude, to find a relationship between the cholinergic system and a cognitive improvement due to altitude acclimatization. Results showed subtle improvements of the cognitive capabilities of acclimatized animals in all of the tasks when performed under ground-level conditions (although not before 24 h), in the three tasks used to test explicit memory (object recognition, operant conditioning in the Skinner box, and eight-arm radial maze) and (from the first conditioning session) in the classical conditioning task used to evaluate implicit memory. An imbalance of choline acetyltransferase/acetyl cholinesterase expression was found in acclimatized animals, mainly 24 h after the acclimatization period. In conclusion, altitude acclimatization improves cognitive capabilities, in a process parallel to an imbalance of the cholinergic system.

  8. Neural stem cells was induced to differentiate into cholinergic neurons in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Yan; Xu Yilong; Pan Jingkun; Tian Lei; Gao Yuhong; Guo Shuilong

    2004-01-01

    The cholinergic-inducing effect of BMP4 on isolated and cultivated rat's cerebral neural stem cells (NSCs) was examined. NSCs which were isolated from two month's old rat's brain region like hippocampus and striatum were cultivated in a medium containing EGF and bFGF, and were identified with morphological character by microscope and nestin immunocytochemistry test. After 24 hours, half NSCs were cultivated with a BMP4-added medium as a experimental group instead of the primary medium, while the an other half NSCs being cultivated with the primary medium as a control group. After 8 days the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) of the cultivated cells was observated by indirect immunofluorescence test. Results showed that more positive cells were found in the experimental group, and the fluorescence intensity were stronger; while less positive cells were found in the control group, and the fluorescence intensity was weaker. The differentiational efficiency of the NSCs was examined by FITC-labelled Flow Cytometry. The results showed that about 16% cells of the experimental group appeared ChAT-positive, while that of control group only 7%. So BMP4 may have the function of inducing NSCs to differentiate into neurons with cholinergic characteristic. (authors)

  9. Stress, chemical defense agents, and cholinergic receptors. Midterm report, 1 November 1987-31 July 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, J.D.

    1989-11-30

    This project is assessing the affects of exposure to a chemical defense agent on anxiety and stress, by using rat models of anxiety (conditioned emotional response (CER); conditioned suppression) and unconditioned non-specific stres (exposure to footshock). The specific experiments determined the plasticity of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites in the central nervous system. The neuroanatomical locus and neuropharmacological profile of changes in binding sites were assessed in brain areas enriched in cholinergic markers. Acetylcholine turnover was measured to determine if the receptor response is compensatory or independent. The effects of acute exposure to doses of a chemical defense agent (soman--XGD) on lethality and behaviors were examined. The experiments involved training and conditioning adult rats to CER using standard operant/respondent techniques. The binding of radiolabelled ligand was studied in vitro using brain membranes and tissue sections (autoradiography). The major findings are that CER produces increases in acetylcholine turnover in brain areas involved in anxiety, and that primarily post-synaptic M1 receptors compensatorly decrease in response. These neurochemical phenomena are directly correlated with several behaviors, including onset and extinction of CER and non-specific stress. Followup experiments have been designed to test the interaction of CER, XGD and neurochemistry.

  10. Cholinergic control of the nocturnal prolactin surge in the pseudopregnant rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, B K; Nikitovitch-Winer, M B

    1975-10-01

    The possible involvement of cholinergic mechanisms in the control of rhythmic secretion of prolactin has been examined in the pseudopregnant rat. Baseline data were obtained in decapitated animals in which the diuranl surge was observed in the 1430--2030 h range and the nocturnal surge during the 2330-0530 h interval. Atrial cannulation permitted a faithful reproduction of the prolactin pattern seen in decapitated rats if at least 3 days elapsed between the cannulation operation and bleeding, while cardiac puncture, under light ether anesthesia, appeared to suppress the diurnal surge. This latter observation appeared to depend on the time of sampling in relation to the onset of the dark phase of the daily lighting cycle. Atropine (35 or 70 mg/100 g BW) was found to inhibit the nocturnal surge in animals bled by either the cardiac puncture or cannulation techniques --an effect which was reversed by pretreatment with eserine (50 or 100 mug/100 g BW). Nicotine (0.75 mg/100 g BW) was found to delay, but not completely to inhibit, the nocturnal surge. When evaluated in the light of other available information, these observations suggest that a complex cholinergic mechanism is involved in control of the nocturnal rhythm of prolactin in pseudopregnancy and that the two surges, diurnal and nocturnal, are differentially controlled.

  11. Wide Temperature Range DC-DC Boost Converters for Command/Control/Drive Electronics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We shall develop wide temperature range DC-DC boost converters that can be fabricated using commercial CMOS foundries. The boost converters will increase the low...

  12. A Survey on Voltage Boosting Techniques for Step-Up DC-DC Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forouzesh, Mojtaba; Siwakoti, Yam Prasad; Gorji, Saman Asghari

    2016-01-01

    Step-up dc-dc converters are used to boost the voltage level of the input to a higher output level. Despite of its features such as simplicity of implementation, the fundamental boost dc-dc converter has shortcomings such as low boost ability and low power density. With these limitations, researc...

  13. 14 CFR 27.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 27.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  14. 14 CFR 29.695 - Power boost and power-operated control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Systems § 29.695 Power boost and power-operated control system. (a) If a power boost or power-operated... failure of all engines. (b) Each alternate system may be a duplicate power portion or a manually operated... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Power boost and power-operated control...

  15. FMNL formins boost lamellipodial force generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kage, Frieda; Winterhoff, Moritz; Dimchev, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Migration frequently involves Rac-mediated protrusion of lamellipodia, formed by Arp2/3 complex-dependent branching thought to be crucial for force generation and stability of these networks. The formins FMNL2 and FMNL3 are Cdc42 effectors targeting to the lamellipodium tip and shown here...... reduces both migration and capability of cells to move against viscous media. Together, we conclude that force generation in lamellipodia strongly depends on FMNL formin activity, operating in addition to Arp2/3 complex-dependent filament branching....

  16. Cholinergic stimulation prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes: Evidence for the modulation of Th17 effector cells via an IFNgamma-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junu George

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Type I diabetes (T1D results from T cell-mediated damage of pancreatic β-cells and loss of insulin production. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway represents a physiological link connecting the central nervous and immune systems via vagus nerve, and functions to control the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Using the multiple-low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ model to induce experimental autoimmune diabetes, we investigated the potential of regulating the development of hyperglycemia through administration of paraoxon, a highly specific acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI. We demonstrate that pretreatment with paraoxon prevented hyperglycemia in STZ-treated C57BL/6 mice. This correlated with a reduction in T cell infiltration into pancreatic islets and preservation of the structure and functionality of β-cells. Gene expression analysis of pancreatic tissue revealed that increased peripheral cholinergic activity prevented STZ-mediated loss of insulin production, this being associated with a reduction in IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 proinflammatory cytokines. Intracellular cytokine analysis in splenic T cells demonstrated that inhibition of AChE led to a shift in STZ-induced immune response from a predominantly disease-causing IL-17-expressing Th17 cells to IFNγ-positive Th1 cells. Consistent with this conclusion, inhibition of AChE failed to prevent STZ-induced hyperglycemia in IFNγ-deficient mice. Our results provide mechanistic evidence for the prevention of murine T1D by inhibition of AChE and suggest a promising strategy for modulating disease severity.

  17. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, John T.; Morrison, William H.; Garden, Adam S.; Weber, Randal S.; Peters, Lester J.; Ang, K. Kian

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a concomitant boost fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for treating patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsillar fossa. Patients and Methods: Between December 1983 and November 1992, 83 patients with squamous carcinoma of the tonsil were treated with concomitant boost fractionation. The distribution of American Joint Committee on Cancer T stages was TX-4, T1-5, T2-29, T3-41, T4-4; N stages were NX-1, N0-26, N1-13, N2-31, N3-12. Patients were treated with standard large fields to 54 Gy in 6 weeks. The boost treatment consisted of a second daily 1.5 Gy fraction for 10-12 fractions, usually delivered during the final phase of treatment. The tumor dose was 69-72 Gy, given over 6 weeks. Twenty-one patients, who all had N2 or N3 regional disease, underwent neck dissections, either before (13 patients) or 6 weeks after radiotherapy (8 patients); the other patients were treated with radiotherapy alone. Results: The 5-year actuarial disease-specific survival and overall survival rates were 71 and 60%, respectively. Patients with T2 and T3 primary tumors had 5-year actuarial local control rates of 96 and 78%, respectively. Patients with T3 disease who received the final-phase boost had a 5-year actuarial local control rate of 82%. Actuarial 5-year regional disease control rates were N0, 92%; N1, 76%; N2, 89%; and N3, 89%. The 21 patients who had neck dissections all had their disease regionally controlled. Patients presenting with nodal disease or after a node excision who were treated with radiation alone had a 5-year actuarial regional disease control rate of 79%. All but five patients had confluent Grade 4 mucositis during treatment. Severe late complications attributable to radiation included mandibular necrosis, in-field osteosarcoma, and chronic dysphagia for solid foods. Conclusions: High rates of local and regional disease control were achieved with the concomitant boost fractionation schedule, with few cases of severe late

  18. Age-related changes in rostral basal forebrain cholinergic and GABAergic projection neurons: relationship with spatial impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos, Cristina; LaSarge, Candi L; McQuail, Joseph A; Hartman, John J; Gilbert, Ryan J; Ormerod, Brandi K; Bizon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Both cholinergic and GABAergic projections from the rostral basal forebrain contribute to hippocampal function and mnemonic abilities. While dysfunction of cholinergic neurons has been heavily implicated in age-related memory decline, significantly less is known regarding how age-related changes in codistributed GABAergic projection neurons contribute to a decline in hippocampal-dependent spatial learning. In the current study, confocal stereology was used to quantify cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase [ChAT] immunopositive) neurons, GABAergic projection (glutamic decarboxylase 67 [GAD67] immunopositive) neurons, and total (neuronal nuclei [NeuN] immunopositive) neurons in the rostral basal forebrain of young and aged rats that were first characterized on a spatial learning task. ChAT immunopositive neurons were significantly but modestly reduced in aged rats. Although ChAT immunopositive neuron number was strongly correlated with spatial learning abilities among young rats, the reduction of ChAT immunopositive neurons was not associated with impaired spatial learning in aged rats. In contrast, the number of GAD67 immunopositive neurons was robustly and selectively elevated in aged rats that exhibited impaired spatial learning. Interestingly, the total number of rostral basal forebrain neurons was comparable in young and aged rats, regardless of their cognitive status. These data demonstrate differential effects of age on phenotypically distinct rostral basal forebrain projection neurons, and implicate dysregulated cholinergic and GABAergic septohippocampal circuitry in age-related mnemonic decline. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Acute modulation of the cholinergic system in the mouse brain detected by pharmacological resting-state functional MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Disha; Blockx, Ines; Guns, Pieter-Jan; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Van Dam, Debby; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Delgado y Palacios, Rafael; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The cholinergic system is involved in learning and memory and is affected in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The possibility of non-invasively detecting alterations of neurotransmitter systems in the mouse brain would greatly improve early diagnosis and

  20. Effect of Estradiol on Neurotrophin Receptors in Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neurons: Relevance for Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Kwakowsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal forebrain is home to the largest population of cholinergic neurons in the brain. These neurons are involved in a number of cognitive functions including attention, learning and memory. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs are particularly vulnerable in a number of neurological diseases with the most notable being Alzheimer’s disease, with evidence for a link between decreasing cholinergic markers and the degree of cognitive impairment. The neurotrophin growth factor system is present on these BFCNs and has been shown to promote survival and differentiation on these neurons. Clinical and animal model studies have demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2 on neurodegeneration in BFCNs. It is believed that E2 interacts with neurotrophin signaling on cholinergic neurons to mediate these beneficial effects. Evidence presented in our recent study confirms that altering the levels of circulating E2 levels via ovariectomy and E2 replacement significantly affects the expression of the neurotrophin receptors on BFCN. However, we also showed that E2 differentially regulates neurotrophin receptor expression on BFCNs with effects depending on neurotrophin receptor type and neuroanatomical location. In this review, we aim to survey the current literature to understand the influence of E2 on the neurotrophin system, and the receptors and signaling pathways it mediates on BFCN. In addition, we summarize the physiological and pathophysiological significance of E2 actions on the neurotrophin system in BFCN, especially focusing on changes related to Alzheimer’s disease.