WorldWideScience

Sample records for bony heterogeneity effects

  1. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Instability in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak Maneklal; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Jones, Morgan H.; Fening, Stephen D.; Miniaci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often as a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a bone block (i.e. Latarjet) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs Defects (HSD)). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability achieved through a Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Methods: Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were tested at all combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and three external rotation (ER) levels (0°, 40°, and 80°). Each experiment comprised of anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid under a 50N medial load applied on the humerus, simulating the static load of soft tissues. Translational distance and medial-lateral displacement of the humeral head, along with horizontal reaction forces were recorded for every trial. Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen's coracoid process anterior to the glenoid flush with the articulating surface. Four different humeral head defects were created of sizes 6%, 19%, 31%, and 44% of humeral diameter. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed with statistical significance set at p Latarjet augmentation (Fig. 1A). However, at an arm position of 60° ABD and 80° ER increasing HSD size led to a decrease in stability for both the defect state and post-Latarjet trials (Fig. 1B). Nevertheless, Latarjet augmentation helped in regaining stability for every combination of bony defects. With a HSD size of 44% the defect state had 0% intact translation for all 18 specimens. Conclusion: Clinically

  2. Effect of antiresorptive drugs on bony turnover in the jaw: denosumab compared with bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristow, Oliver; Gerngroß, Carlos; Schwaiger, Markus; Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Kehl, Victoria; Jansen, Heike; Hahnefeld, Lilian; Koerdt, Steffen; Otto, Sven; Pautke, Christoph

    2014-04-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw as a result of treatment with receptor activators of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) inhibitors (denosumab) is a new type of bony necrosis, the exact pathogenesis of which is unknown. Our aim was to find out whether the turnover of bone in the jaw is increased after denosumab has been given compared with other skeletal sites, and if that turnover might have a role in denosumab-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (DRONJ). Bone scintigraphic images of 45 female patients with breast cancer and bone metastases were analysed retrospectively, and divided into 3 groups: those given denosumab, those given a bisphosphonate, and a control group (n=15 in each). All patients had bone scintigraphy before treatment (T0) and during the course of treatment after 12 (T1) and 24 (T2) months. The data were analysed quantitatively using 6 preset bony regions of interest. There was similar turnover of bone in the mandible compared with other skeletal sites (such as the femur), while the maxilla showed significantly higher turnover. None of the bony regions investigated showed any significant changes after the bisphosphonate had been given. There was a tendency to increase bone turnover in those patients taking denosumab. The bone turnover of the jawbone is not overtly changed either by a bisphosphonate or denosumab, so it seems unlikely that oversuppression of bony turnover in the jawbones plays an important part either in the pathogenesis of DRONJ or in the bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Effects of Latarjet Reconstruction on Glenohumeral Kinematics in the Presence of Combined Bony Defects: A Cadaveric Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ronak M; Walia, Piyush; Gottschalk, Lionel; Kuklis, Matthew; Jones, Morgan H; Fening, Steve D; Miniaci, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    Recurrent glenohumeral instability is often a result of underlying bony defects in the glenoid and/or humeral head. Anterior glenoid augmentation with a coracoid bone block (ie, Latarjet procedure) has been recommended for glenoid bone loss in the face of recurrent instability. However, no study has investigated the effect of Latarjet augmentation in the setting of both glenoid and humeral head defects (Hill-Sachs defects). To evaluate the glenohumeral kinematics of the Latarjet procedure in the presence of combined bony defects. Controlled laboratory study. Eighteen fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens void of all surrounding soft tissue were tested at all combinations of glenohumeral abduction (ABD) angles of 20°, 40°, and 60° and 3 external rotation (ER) levels of 0°, 40°, and 80°. Each experiment comprised anterior dislocation by translating the glenoid under a 50-N medial load applied on the humerus, simulating the static load of soft tissue. The primary outcome measurement was defined as the percentage of intact translation (normalized distance to dislocation). Specimens were tested in an intact condition (no defect), with different combinations of defects, and with Latarjet augmentation. The Latarjet procedure was performed for 20% and 30% glenoid defects by transferring the specimen's coracoid process anterior to the glenoid so that it was flush with the articulating surface. Results depended on the position of the arm. At 20° of ABD and 0° of ER, a 20% glenoid defect decreased the percentage of intact translation regardless of the humeral head defect size (P ≤ .0001). In this same setting, Latarjet reconstruction restored translation to dislocation greater than the native intact joint for all sizes of humeral head defects. At 60° of ABD and 80° of ER, a 20% glenoid defect led to an overall decrease in translation to dislocation with increasing humeral head defects. While Latarjet augmentation resulted in increased translation to dislocation for all

  4. Heterogeneity effects in neutron transport computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbard, E.M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is, generally, an intricate heterogeneous structure whose adjacent components may differ radically in their neutronic properties. The heterogeneities in the structure of the reactor complicate the work of the reactor analyst and tend to degrade the efficiency of the numerical methods used in reactor computations. Two types of heterogeneity effects are considered. First, certain singularities in the solution of the neutron transport equation, induced by heterogeneities, are briefly described. Second, the effect of heterogeneities on neutron leakage rates, and consequently on effective diffusion coefficients, are discussed. (5 figures) (U.S.)

  5. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how...... causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects....... This might lead us to find heterogeneous effects when the true effect is homogenous, or to wrongly estimate not only the magnitude but also the sign of heterogeneous effects. We apply a test for the robustness of heterogeneous causal effects in the face of varying degrees and patterns of selection bias...

  6. Effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J. W. B.; Koetter, M.; Kolari, J. W.; Kool, C. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Bank efficiency estimates often serve as a proxy of managerial skill since they quantify sub-optimal production choices. But such deviations can also be due to omitted systematic differences among banks. In this study, we examine the effects of heterogeneity on bank efficiency scores. We compare

  7. On the compensation effect in heterogeneous catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Bligaard; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2003-01-01

    For a class of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions, we explain the compensation effect in terms of a switching of kinetic regimes leading to a concomitant change in the apparent activation energy and in the prefactor for the overall rate of the reaction. We first use the ammonia synthesis...

  8. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  9. Effect of autologous platelet-rich plasma in combination with bovine porous bone mineral and bio-guide membrane on bone regeneration in mandible bicortical bony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tie-Lou; Lu, Hui-Jie; Liu, Guo-qin; Tang, Da-Hai; Zhang, Xin-hai; Pan, Zhu-Lin; Wang, Shi-Feng; Zhang, Qing-fu

    2014-01-01

    Growth factors contained in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can induce osteoblast differentiation in certain studies, whereas in others, osteogenesis of PRP on mandible bone defects has not been proved clinically. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of autologous PRP on the osteogenic potential of combining bovine porous bone mineral (BPBM) and bio-guide membrane (BGM) in promoting mandible bicortical bony defects in rabbits. One circular mandible bicortical bony defects were created in each of 54 rabbits, which were divided into 3 groups: group 1: 18 of the defects were left unfilled as a negative control; group 2: 18 of the defects were grafted with autologous PRP and BPBM/BGM; group 3: 18 of the defects were grafted with BPBM/BGM without PRP. Animals were killed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation. Harvested tissue and specimens were evaluated histologically and radiographically, and metabolized observation was performed. Histological parameters associated with osteoblast activities, bone trabecula, neovascularization, newly formed mineralized bone, rudimental grafts and connective tissue formation were measured. Densities of the bones at 4, 8, and 12 weeks were studied by radiographic. The bone defect closure ratio was measured at 12 weeks. The bone metabolized parameter alkaline phosphatase was also measured and compared between 4, 8, and 12 weeks. The platelet concentration of PRP is 4.19- to 4.43-fold to that of the whole blood. Histological analysis showed new bone formation at all therapeutic sites including BPBM/BGM grafts with or without PRP. A statistically significant difference in new bone formation between group PRP/BPBM/BGM and group BPBM/BGM was observed. Untreated defects of group control showed the less bone regeneration. There was significant difference of bone density between group PRP/BPBM/BGM and control, and group BPBM/BGM and control, at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperative. There were more bone defects filling, and the grafts were

  10. Long-term effect on tooth vitality of regenerative therapy in deep periodontal bony defects: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, Massimo; Goracci, Cecilia; Zucchelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, many authors have investigated the effect of periodontal disease and treatment on pulpal status with controversial results. This study was conducted to verify whether periodontal disease in a deep intrabony defect and complex therapy, including aggressive root planing such as in periodontal regeneration, have an influence on tooth vitality. One hundred thirty-seven patients who fulfilled the requirements were included. The collected data did not support the need for "preventive" root canal treatment in severely compromised teeth that are planned to undergo periodontal regenerative surgery.

  11. Phylogenetic classification of bony fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Wiley, Edward O; Arratia, Gloria; Acero, Arturo; Bailly, Nicolas; Miya, Masaki; Lecointre, Guillaume; Ortí, Guillermo

    2017-07-06

    Fish classifications, as those of most other taxonomic groups, are being transformed drastically as new molecular phylogenies provide support for natural groups that were unanticipated by previous studies. A brief review of the main criteria used by ichthyologists to define their classifications during the last 50 years, however, reveals slow progress towards using an explicit phylogenetic framework. Instead, the trend has been to rely, in varying degrees, on deep-rooted anatomical concepts and authority, often mixing taxa with explicit phylogenetic support with arbitrary groupings. Two leading sources in ichthyology frequently used for fish classifications (JS Nelson's volumes of Fishes of the World and W. Eschmeyer's Catalog of Fishes) fail to adopt a global phylogenetic framework despite much recent progress made towards the resolution of the fish Tree of Life. The first explicit phylogenetic classification of bony fishes was published in 2013, based on a comprehensive molecular phylogeny ( www.deepfin.org ). We here update the first version of that classification by incorporating the most recent phylogenetic results. The updated classification presented here is based on phylogenies inferred using molecular and genomic data for nearly 2000 fishes. A total of 72 orders (and 79 suborders) are recognized in this version, compared with 66 orders in version 1. The phylogeny resolves placement of 410 families, or ~80% of the total of 514 families of bony fishes currently recognized. The ordinal status of 30 percomorph families included in this study, however, remains uncertain (incertae sedis in the series Carangaria, Ovalentaria, or Eupercaria). Comments to support taxonomic decisions and comparisons with conflicting taxonomic groups proposed by others are presented. We also highlight cases were morphological support exist for the groups being classified. This version of the phylogenetic classification of bony fishes is substantially improved, providing resolution

  12. Effects of Population Heterogeneity on Accuracy of DIF Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, María Elena; Ercikan, Kadriye; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity within English language learners (ELLs) groups has been documented. Previous research on differential item functioning (DIF) analyses suggests that accurate DIF detection rates are reduced greatly when groups are heterogeneous. In this simulation study, we investigated the effects of heterogeneity within linguistic (ELL) groups on…

  13. Bony sequestrum: A radiologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennin, Felicie; Bousson, Valerie; Parlier, Caroline; Jomaah, Nabil; Khanine, Vanessa; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Lariboisiere Hospital, Department of Radiology, Paris (France)

    2011-08-15

    According to a pathological definition, a bony sequestrum is defined as a piece of devitalized bone that has been separated from the surrounding bone during the process of necrosis. However, the radiological definition of a sequestrum is different and refers to an image of calcification visible within a lucent lesion, completely separated from the surrounding bone, without referring to the vascular status and histological nature of the calcified tissue. The term ''button sequestrum'' has been used in calvarial lesions. The prototype conditions that may present with a bony sequestrum are osteomyelitis and skeletal tuberculosis. Other conditions such as radiation necrosis, eosinophilic granuloma, metastatic carcinoma, primary lymphoma of bone, aggressive fibrous tumors may also manifest as osteolytic lesions containing a sequestrum. In addition, some primary bone tumors produce a matrix that may mineralize and sometimes simulate a bone sequestrum. These include osteoid tumors (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma), cartilaginous tumors (chondroma and chondroblastoma), lipomatous tumors (lipoma), and benign fibrous tumors (fibromyxoma, myxoma, and desmoplastic fibroma). Therefore, various conditions may present at imaging as a small area of osteolysis containing central calcifications. However, a careful analysis of the sequestrum as well as the associated clinical and radiological findings often enables to point toward a limited number of conditions. (orig.)

  14. Bony sequestrum: A radiologic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennin, Felicie; Bousson, Valerie; Parlier, Caroline; Jomaah, Nabil; Khanine, Vanessa; Laredo, Jean-Denis

    2011-01-01

    According to a pathological definition, a bony sequestrum is defined as a piece of devitalized bone that has been separated from the surrounding bone during the process of necrosis. However, the radiological definition of a sequestrum is different and refers to an image of calcification visible within a lucent lesion, completely separated from the surrounding bone, without referring to the vascular status and histological nature of the calcified tissue. The term ''button sequestrum'' has been used in calvarial lesions. The prototype conditions that may present with a bony sequestrum are osteomyelitis and skeletal tuberculosis. Other conditions such as radiation necrosis, eosinophilic granuloma, metastatic carcinoma, primary lymphoma of bone, aggressive fibrous tumors may also manifest as osteolytic lesions containing a sequestrum. In addition, some primary bone tumors produce a matrix that may mineralize and sometimes simulate a bone sequestrum. These include osteoid tumors (osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma), cartilaginous tumors (chondroma and chondroblastoma), lipomatous tumors (lipoma), and benign fibrous tumors (fibromyxoma, myxoma, and desmoplastic fibroma). Therefore, various conditions may present at imaging as a small area of osteolysis containing central calcifications. However, a careful analysis of the sequestrum as well as the associated clinical and radiological findings often enables to point toward a limited number of conditions. (orig.)

  15. Injury of anterior cruciate ligament with associated bony lesions: MR image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon; Oh, Yeon Hee; Lee, Chang Wook [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Min [Chungbuk Univ. College of Medicine, Chongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeon Kyeong; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Sung Woo [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-01

    To evaluate the characteristic MR findings in injury of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with associated bony lesions. We reviewed MR findings and the corresponding arthroscopic or operative results of 48 patients with ACL injuries, and evaluated ACL signal intensity and contour. In associated bony lesions, we determined the location of avulsion fracture and bony bruise. Complete ACL tears were seen in 27 cases, partial tears in 13, and avulsion injury in eight. Complete tears showed heterogeneously increased signal intensity with contour bulging in ten cases (37%), and combined bony lesion in 14 (52%). ACL with a thin continous low signal intensity band surrounding heterogeneously-increased signal intensity suggested partial tears, and was seen in three of 13 proven cases (23%) of partial ACL tears;combined bony lesion was seen in four such cases(31%). There were eight cases of avulsion fracture;the most frequent site was the anterolateral portion of the tibial spine (n=6). The most frequent sites of bony lesion were at the midportion of the lateral femoral condyle (n=6), and the posterior portion of the lateral tibial plateau (n=6);the next most frequent site was the anterior portion of the lateral tibial plateau (n=5). Tearing of the ACL was seen on MRI as ligament discontinuity, and heterogeneously increased signal intensity with ACL contour bulging. The most frequent sites of associated bony lesions were the midportion of the lateral femoral condyle, and the posterior portion of the lateral tibial plateau. In associated bony lesions, bony contusion suggested ACL tearing, but avulsion fracture suggested ligament avulsion injury without tear.

  16. Bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Do; Yoon, Young Nam; Um, Ki Doo; Ra, Jong Ill; Lee, Wan [School of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Ankylosis of joint is defined as limited movement due to infection, trauma, or surgical procedure. A 59-year-old female with a chief complaint of limited movements during mouth opening had a positive history of trauma to her right TMJ area about 5 years ago. From that time, progressive mouth opening limitation and intermittent pain have occurred. At the time of admission the patient showed mandibular deviation to the right side during mouth opening, with a maximum opening limited to 5 mm. On plain radiographs, right condylar enlargement and joint space reduction by newly formed bony tissues were observed. CT scans showed right condylar enlargement, cortical sclerosis, and thickening of the condyle, articular fossa and articular eminence.

  17. Bony ankylosis of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Do; Yoon, Young Nam; Um, Ki Doo; Ra, Jong Ill; Lee, Wan

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosis of joint is defined as limited movement due to infection, trauma, or surgical procedure. A 59-year-old female with a chief complaint of limited movements during mouth opening had a positive history of trauma to her right TMJ area about 5 years ago. From that time, progressive mouth opening limitation and intermittent pain have occurred. At the time of admission the patient showed mandibular deviation to the right side during mouth opening, with a maximum opening limited to 5 mm. On plain radiographs, right condylar enlargement and joint space reduction by newly formed bony tissues were observed. CT scans showed right condylar enlargement, cortical sclerosis, and thickening of the condyle, articular fossa and articular eminence.

  18. Bony ankylosis following thermal and electrical injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balen, P.F.; Helms, C.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Objective. Bony ankylosis has been described following trauma, paralysis, psoriasis, Reiter's syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Reports of bony ankylosis following thermal and electrical injury are limited.Design and patients. Thirteen cases of burn-related joint ankylosis in four patients are presented.Conclusion. Patients with burns from thermal or electrical injury may develop bony ankylosis among other radiographic manifestations. This bony ankylosis may result either from bridging extra-articular heterotopic ossification with preservation of the underlying joint or from intra-articular fusion due to joint destruction. (orig.)

  19. Heterogeneous guilt sensitivities and incentive effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellemare, Charles; Sebald, Alexander; Suetens, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    Psychological games of guilt aversion assume that preferences depend on (beliefs about) beliefs and on the guilt sensitivity of the decision-maker. We present an experiment designed to measure guilt sensitivities at the individual level for various stake sizes. We use the data to estimate...... a structural choice model that allows for heterogeneity, and permits that guilt sensitivities depend on stake size. We find substantial heterogeneity of guilt sensitivities in our population, with 60% of decision makers displaying stake-dependent guilt sensitivity. For these decision makers, we find...... that average guilt sensitivities are significantly different from zero for all stakes considered, while significantly decreasing with the level of stakes....

  20. EFFECT OF TOPOGRAPHIC AND GEOLOGIC HETEROGENEITIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geologic heterogeneities and topographic variations in relation to aquifer distribution ad occurrence in Akwa Ibom State have been assessed based on geologic and geophysical studies sixty-six sounding points together with electric log responses of representative wells together with surface geologic data have been ...

  1. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Katayama

    Full Text Available The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales.

  2. Landscape heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship: effect of range size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Naoki; Amano, Tatsuya; Naoe, Shoji; Yamakita, Takehisa; Komatsu, Isamu; Takagawa, Shin-ichi; Sato, Naoto; Ueta, Mutsuyuki; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of landscape heterogeneity to biodiversity may depend on the size of the geographic range of species, which in turn can reflect species traits (such as habitat generalization) and the effects of historical and contemporary land covers. We used nationwide bird survey data from Japan, where heterogeneous landscapes predominate, to test the hypothesis that wide-ranging species are positively associated with landscape heterogeneity in terms of species richness and abundance, whereas narrow-ranging species are positively associated with landscape homogeneity in the form of either open or forest habitats. We used simultaneous autoregressive models to explore the effects of climate, evapotranspiration, and landscape heterogeneity on the richness and abundance of breeding land-bird species. The richness of wide-ranging species and the total species richness were highest in heterogeneous landscapes, where many wide-ranging species showed the highest abundance. In contrast, the richness of narrow-ranging species was not highest in heterogeneous landscapes; most of those species were abundant in either open or forest landscapes. Moreover, in open landscapes, narrow-ranging species increased their species richness with decreasing temperature. These results indicate that heterogeneous landscapes are associated with rich bird diversity but that most narrow-ranging species prefer homogeneous landscapes--particularly open habitats in colder regions, where grasslands have historically predominated. There is a need to reassess the generality of the heterogeneity-biodiversity relationship, with attention to the characteristics of species assemblages determined by environments at large spatiotemporal scales.

  3. Laboratory investigations of effective flow behavior in unsaturated heterogeneous sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe; Høgh Jensen, Karsten

    1999-01-01

    Two-dimensional unsaturated flow and transport through heterogeneous sand was investigated under controlled laboratory conditions. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of five homogeneous sands and three heterogeneous systems composed of these five sands was measured using a steady state flux...... controlled method. The heterogeneous sand systems were established in a laboratory tank for three realizations of random distributions of the homogeneous sands comprising a system of 207 grid cells. The water flux was controlled at the upper boundary, while a suction was applied at the lower boundary...... realizations of the heterogeneous sand were quite similar, thus suggesting that this type of heterogeneous flow system can be treated as an equivalent homogeneous medium characterized by effective parameters....

  4. Bony Regrowth After Deep Lateral Orbital Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sathyadeepak; Eichhorn, Knut; Leibowitz, Steven; Goldberg, Robert

    2018-01-25

    To report on 2 cases of late bony regrowth with clinically apparent proptosis after deep lateral orbital decompression for thyroid orbitopathy. A retrospective review of 2 cases identified by the authors as having late bony regrowth. The authors review the clinical, historical, radiologic, and anatomical findings and discuss the significance thereof. Bony regrowth with bowing toward the middle cranial fossa is observed at postoperative month 8 in the first case. Cortical bone and marrow was observed to regrow at 2 years postoperatively in the second case. Both patients underwent successful repeat deep lateral orbital decompression with resolution of proptosis and clinical symptoms. Late bony regrowth should be considered as a possible cause of recurrent proptosis after orbital decompression in thyroid eye disease.

  5. Measuring the effects of heterogeneity on distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toweissy, Mohamed; Zeineldine, Osman; Mukkamala, Ravi

    1991-01-01

    Distributed computer systems in daily use are becoming more and more heterogeneous. Currently, much of the design and analysis studies of such systems assume homogeneity. This assumption of homogeneity has been mainly driven by the resulting simplicity in modeling and analysis. A simulation study is presented which investigated the effects of heterogeneity on scheduling algorithms for hard real time distributed systems. In contrast to previous results which indicate that random scheduling may be as good as a more complex scheduler, this algorithm is shown to be consistently better than a random scheduler. This conclusion is more prevalent at high workloads as well as at high levels of heterogeneity.

  6. Effective thermal neutron absorption cross section for heterogeneous mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabanska, B.; Igielski, A.; Krynicka-Drozdowicz, E.; Woznicka, U.

    1989-01-01

    The first estimations (basing on Umiastowski's theory) of the influence of the sample heterogeneity of the effective thermal neutron absorption cross section were compared with the results obtained for the homogeneous mixture which components and concentration were the same as those of the heterogeneous sample. An experiment was prepared to determine how good this estimate is. Three artificial heterogeneous cylindrical samples (2R = H = 9 cm) were manufactured from pure silver cylinders embedded in plexiglass, keeping the Ag content and varying the size of cylinders (2R = H = 1.0 cm, 0.6 cm and 0.4 cm). Calculations performed show that the experimental effect of the sample heterogeneity can be significant. 5 figs., 5 tabs, 11 refs. (author)

  7. Guided tissue regeneration for periodontal infra-bony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, I G; Worthington, H V; Giedrys-Leeper, E; Tucker, R J

    2006-04-19

    random-effects models. Any heterogeneity was investigated. The primary outcome measure was change in clinical attachment. The search produced 626 titles, of these 596 were clearly not relevant to the review. The full text of 32 studies of possible relevance was obtained and 15 studies were excluded. Therefore 17 RCTs were included in this review, 16 studies testing GTR alone and two testing GTR+bone substitutes (one study had both test treatment arms).No tooth loss was reported in any study although these data are incomplete where patient follow up was not complete. For attachment level change, the mean difference between GTR and OFD was 1.22 mm (95% CI Random Effects: 0.80 to 1.64, chi squared for heterogeneity 69.1 (df = 15), P periodontal treatment than open flap debridement, including improved attachment gain, reduced pocket depth, less increase in gingival recession and more gain in hard tissue probing at re-entry surgery. However there is marked variability between studies and the clinical relevance of these changes is unknown. As a result, it is difficult to draw general conclusions about the clinical benefit of GTR. Whilst there is evidence that GTR can demonstrate a significant improvement over conventional open flap surgery, the factors affecting outcomes are unclear from the literature and these might include study conduct issues such as bias. Therefore, patients and health professionals need to consider the predictability of the technique compared with other methods of treatment before making final decisions on use. Since trial reports were often incomplete, we recommend that future trials should follow the CONSORT statement both in their conduct and reporting. There is therefore little value in future research repeating simple, small efficacy studies. The priority should be to identify factors associated with improved outcomes as well as investigating outcomes relevant to patients. Types of research might include large observational studies to generate

  8. Habitat heterogeneity hypothesis and edge effects in model metacommunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michaela; Drossel, Barbara

    2017-08-07

    Spatial heterogeneity is an inherent property of any living environment and is expected to favour biodiversity due to a broader niche space. Furthermore, edges between different habitats can provide additional possibilities for species coexistence. Using computer simulations, this study examines metacommunities consisting of several trophic levels in heterogeneous environments in order to explore the above hypotheses on a community level. We model heterogeneous landscapes by using two different sized resource pools and evaluate the combined effect of dispersal and heterogeneity on local and regional species diversity. This diversity is obtained by running population dynamics and evaluating the robustness (i.e., the fraction of surviving species). The main results for regional robustness are in agreement with the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis, as the largest robustness is found in heterogeneous systems with intermediate dispersal rates. This robustness is larger than in homogeneous systems with the same total amount of resources. We study the edge effect by arranging the two types of resources in two homogeneous blocks. Different edge responses in diversity are observed, depending on dispersal strength. Local robustness is highest for edge habitats that contain the smaller amount of resource in combination with intermediate dispersal. The results show that dispersal is relevant to correctly identify edge responses on community level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Hodgkinson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type, and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type. The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation.

  10. Heterogeneity in the Effects of Online Persuasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, M.C.; Eckles, D.

    2012-01-01

    Average effects of influence strategies on consumers' attitudes and behaviors have been studied extensively. Less is known about the relative size of individual differences in these effects, despite recognition of their importance in social psychology. Two experiments use repeated exposures to

  11. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on quantification in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, G.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Mazoyer, B.; Wienhard, K.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of the limited spatial resolution of positron emission tomographic scanners, the measurements of physiological parameters are compromised by tissue heterogeneity. The effect of tissue heterogeneity on a number of parameters was studied by simulation and an analytical method. Five common tracer models were assessed. The input and tissue response functions were assumed to be free from noise and systematic errors. The kinetic model was assumed to be perfect. Two components with different kinetics were mixed in different proportions and contrast with respect to the model parameters. Different experimental protocols were investigated. Of three methods investigated for the measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) (steady state, dynamic, integral), the second one was least sensitive to errors caused by tissue heterogeneity and the main effect was an underestimation of the distribution volume. With the steady state method, errors in oxygen extraction fraction caused by tissue heterogeneity were always found to be less than the corresponding errors in CBF. For myocardial blood flow the steady state method was found to perform better than the bolus method. The net accumulation of substrate (i.e. rCMR glc in the case of glucose analogs) was found to be comparatively insensitive to tissue heterogeneity. Individual rate constans such as k 2 and k 3 for efflux and metabolism of the substrate in the pool of unmetabolized substrate in the tissue, respectively, were found to be more sensitive. In studies of radioligand binding, using only tracer doses, the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the parameter k on .B max could be considerable. In studies of radioligand binding using a protocol with two experiments, one with high and one with low specific activity, B max was found to be insensitive while K d was very sensitive to tissue heterogeneity. (orig.)

  12. Effect of heterogeneities on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Takekawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent researches have indicated coupling between volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Some of them calculated static stress transfer in subsurface induced by the occurrences of earthquakes. Most of their analyses ignored the spatial heterogeneity in subsurface, or only took into account the rigidity layering in the crust. On the other hand, a smaller scale heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters has been suggested by geophysical investigations. It is difficult to reflect that kind of heterogeneity in analysis models because accurate distributions of fluctuation are not well understood in many cases. Thus, the effect of the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity on evaluating the earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions is also not well understood. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the assumption of homogeneity on evaluating earthquake triggering of volcanic eruptions using finite element simulations. The crust is treated as a stochastic media with different heterogeneous parameters (correlation length and magnitude of velocity perturbation in our simulations. We adopt exponential and von Karman functions as spatial auto-correlation functions (ACF. In all our simulation results, the ignorance of the smaller scale heterogeneity leads to underestimation of the failure pressure around a chamber wall, which relates to dyke initiation. The magnitude of the velocity perturbation has a larger effect on the tensile failure at the chamber wall than the difference of the ACF and the correlation length. The maximum effect on the failure pressure in all our simulations is about twice larger than that in the homogeneous case. This indicates that the estimation of the earthquake triggering due to static stress transfer should take account of the heterogeneity of around hundreds of meters.

  13. Investigating the effect of heterogeneity on infill wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Bagheri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, improving oil recovery (IOR has become an important subject for the petroleum industry. One IOR method is infill drilling, which improves hydrocarbon recovery from virgin zones of the reservoir. Determining the appropriate location for the infill wells is very challenging and greatly depends on different factors such as the reservoir heterogeneity. This study aims to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on the location of infill well. In order to characterize the effect of heterogeneity on infill well locations, some geostatistical methods, e.g., sequential gaussian simulation, have been applied to generate various heterogeneity models. In particular, different correlation ranges (R were used to observe the effect of heterogeneity. Results revealed that an increase in correlation ranges will lead to (1 a higher field oil production total, and (2 a faster expansion of the drainage radius which consequently reduced the need for infill wells. The results of this study will help engineers to appropriately design infill drilling schemes.

  14. The effect of heterogeneity on HIV prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvert, Bertran; Sitta, Rémi; Zarca, Kevin; Mahiane, Séverin Guy; Pretorius, Carel; Lissouba, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the prevention of HIV heterosexual acquisition are usually conducted among adult African populations with high heterogeneity in individual risk of infection. The objectives were to (a) review how this heterogeneity has been considered when designing and interpreting such RCTs, (b) evaluate its effect on the findings and the statistical power of these trials, and (c) assess the potential advantages of using the crossover design with single failure-time endpoint. Individual-level HIV prevention RCTs conducted in Africa and published in the period 1998-2008 were reviewed. Using Monte Carlo simulations and statistical calculations, we assessed the effect of heterogeneity on the findings and the statistical power of HIV prevention RCTs. All reviewed RCTs used the parallel design. The heterogeneity in individual risk of infection within study sites was not used for stratification nor generally considered in the design and interpretation of RCTs. Simulations showed that in the context of high HIV incidence, high heterogeneity can lead to a substantial underestimation of the impact of an intervention and reduced statistical power. Calculations demonstrated that the crossover design allowed for similar or better estimation and statistical power. The crossover design has the ethical advantage of sharing the potential benefits and risks of the intervention between participants. Only trials with two treatment arms and two follow-up periods were modeled. The baseline risk of infection of each participant was assumed to be constant over time and HIV status was assessed at the end of each follow-up period. The heterogeneity in individual risk of HIV infection is an underestimated problem which should be taken into account when designing and interpreting RCTs that test prevention methods of HIV heterosexual acquisition in adult African populations with high HIV incidence. When the effects of tested interventions are rapidly reversible, the

  15. The effect of heterogeneity on invasion in spatial epidemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neri, Franco M; Bates, Anne; Füchtbauer, Winnie Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity in host populations is an important factor affecting the ability of a pathogen to invade, yet the quantitative investigation of its effects on epidemic spread is still an open problem. In this paper, we test recent theoretical results, which extend the established “percolation...... Bayesian inference methods, estimating pathogen transmission parameters for each individual population. We find a significant, negative correlation between heterogeneity and the probability of pathogen invasion, thereby validating the theory. The value of the correlation is also in remarkably good...

  16. On the Effects of Heterogeneous Packet Lengths on Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compta, Pol Torres; Fitzek, Frank; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    a best case scenario as coded packets will incur little overhead to handle such packets. However, packet lengths are quite heterogeneous in real networks, which can cause a high overhead or, alternatively, a high delay in the transmission of data packets. As we show, this can have a severe effect...... on a variety of applications. This paper proposes a series of mechanisms to manage heterogeneous packet lengths and analyzes the induced overhead of those mechanisms using real packet length distributions provided by CAIDA and own measurements using video content. Our results show that an appropriate...

  17. Effect of Heterogeneity in Initial Geographic Distribution on Opinions’ Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Balankin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Spin dynamics on networks allows us to understand how a global consensus emerges out of individual opinions. Here, we are interested in the effect of heterogeneity in the initial geographic distribution of a competing opinion on the competitiveness of its own opinion. Accordingly, in this work, we studied the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the majority rule dynamics using a three-state spin model, in which one state is neutral. Monte Carlo simulations were performed on square lattices divided into square blocks (cells. Accordingly, one competing opinion was distributed uniformly among cells, whereas the spatial distribution of the rival opinion was varied from the uniform to heterogeneous, with the median-to-mean ratio in the range from 1 to 0. When the size of discussion group is odd, the uncommitted agents disappear completely after  3.30 ± 0.05 update cycles, and then the system evolves in a two-state regime with complementary spatial distributions of two competing opinions. Even so, the initial heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of one of the competing opinions causes a decrease of this opinion competitiveness. That is, the opinion with initially heterogeneous spatial distribution has less probability to win, than the opinion with the initially uniform spatial distribution, even when the initial concentrations of both opinions are equal. We found that although the time to consensus , the opinion’s recession rate is determined during the first 3.3 update cycles. On the other hand, we found that the initial heterogeneity of the opinion spatial distribution assists the formation of quasi-stable regions, in which this opinion is dominant. The results of Monte Carlo simulations are discussed with regard to the electoral competition of political parties.

  18. Upscaling of CO2-Brine Flow with Capillary Heterogeneity Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, A.; Itthisawatpan, K.; Durlofsky, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale simulation of CO2 storage operations can be expensive computationally, particularly when the effects of fine-scale capillary pressure heterogeneity are included. These effects, which are often ignored in traditional reservoir simulation, can significantly impact the movement of CO2 and should therefore be included in carbon storage simulations. The application of upscaling techniques that handle capillary heterogeneity could lead to reductions in computational cost, though general and robust procedures for this problem have yet to be presented. In this work, we develop and apply a new upscaling technique for two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media with capillary heterogeneity effects. Fine-scale capillary pressure is modeled using the Leverett J-function and varies with permeability. We show that accurate upscaled models can be constructed by first upscaling capillary pressure under the assumption of capillary equilibrium, and then computing coarse-scale relative permeability functions using a global dynamic upscaling procedure. Some of the key numerical treatments associated with the overall procedure, such as near-well upscaling and the use of global coarse-scale iteration to improve model accuracy, will be described. The new upscaling approach is applied to synthetic heterogeneous two-dimensional aquifer models with flow driven by CO2 injection. Injection via both vertical and horizontal wells is considered. Fine-scale reference results are compared with coarse-scale results generated using both the new upscaling approach and alternative (simpler) methods. In general, of the techniques considered, our new approach is shown to provide the best overall accuracy. Different CO2 injection rates and well locations are considered, which allows us to explore the robustness of the upscaled model. Various strategies for enhancing model robustness will also be applied and assessed.

  19. Primary bony Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Binesh, Fariba; Mirjalili, Mohammad Reza; Akhavan, Ali; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma most commonly presents with progressive painless enlargement of peripheral lymph nodes, especially around the cervical region. At the time of diagnosis osseous involvement is uncommon and even in the late stages only 9–35% of cases have any bony involvement. Rarely Hodgkin’s lymphoma presents as an osseous lesion without involvement of lymph nodes, therefore the histological diagnosis of osseous Hodgkin’s lymphoma can be problematic. Here, the authors present a rare case of...

  20. Scattering theory and effective medium approximations to heterogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubernatis, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The formal analogy existing between problems studied in the microscopic theory of disordered alloys and problems concerned with the effective (macroscopic) behavior of heterogeneous materials is discussed. Attention is focused on (1) analogous approximations (effective medium approximations) developed for the microscopic problems by scattering theory concepts and techniques, but for the macroscopic problems principally by intuitive means, (2) the link, provided by scattering theory, of the intuitively developed approximations to a well-defined perturbative analysis, (3) the possible presence of conditionally convergent integrals in effective medium approximations

  1. Physical heterogeneity control on effective mineral dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heewon; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Hydrologic heterogeneity may be an important factor contributing to the discrepancy in laboratory and field measured dissolution rates, but the governing factors influencing mineral dissolution rates among various representations of physical heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Here, we present multiple reactive transport simulations of anorthite dissolution in 2D latticed random permeability fields and link the information from local grid scale (1 cm or 4 m) dissolution rates to domain-scale (1m or 400 m) effective dissolution rates measured by the flux-weighted average of an ensemble of flow paths. We compare results of homogeneous models to heterogeneous models with different structure and layered permeability distributions within the model domain. Chemistry is simplified to a single dissolving primary mineral (anorthite) distributed homogeneously throughout the domain and a single secondary mineral (kaolinite) that is allowed to dissolve or precipitate. Results show that increasing size in correlation structure (i.e. long integral scales) and high variance in permeability distribution are two important factors inducing a reduction in effective mineral dissolution rates compared to homogeneous permeability domains. Larger correlation structures produce larger zones of low permeability where diffusion is an important transport mechanism. Due to the increased residence time under slow diffusive transport, the saturation state of a solute with respect to a reacting mineral approaches equilibrium and reduces the reaction rate. High variance in permeability distribution favorably develops large low permeability zones that intensifies the reduction in mixing and effective dissolution rate. However, the degree of reduction in effective dissolution rate observed in 1 m × 1 m domains is too small (equilibrium conditions reduce the effective dissolution rate by increasing the saturation state. However, in large domains where less- or non-reactive zones develop, higher

  2. Inertial Effects on Flow and Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Alon; Berkowitz, Brian

    2018-02-02

    We investigate the effects of high fluid velocities on flow and tracer transport in heterogeneous porous media. We simulate fluid flow and advective transport through two-dimensional pore-scale matrices with varying structural complexity. As the Reynolds number increases, the flow regime transitions from linear to nonlinear; this behavior is controlled by the medium structure, where higher complexity amplifies inertial effects. The result is, nonintuitively, increased homogenization of the flow field, which leads in the context of conservative chemical transport to less anomalous behavior. We quantify the transport patterns via a continuous time random walk, using the spatial distribution of the kinetic energy within the fluid as a characteristic measure.

  3. On heterogeneity of treatment effects and clinical freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, J A; Avendaño-Solá, C

    2015-01-01

    Three decades ago, John R Hampton announced the death of clinical freedom. Since then, evidence-based medicine has been the predominant paradigm in clinical research. By applying a population-based approach, the randomised controlled trial has become the cornerstone for demonstrating the overall effect of a treatment and for developing guidelines. The new patient-centred medicine movement is rediscovering the important implications of heterogeneity of treatment effects for clinical practice and that a better understanding of such variability can contribute to improve health outcomes for individual patients through practicing a science-based clinical freedom. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effects of fault heterogeneity on seismic energy and spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Michele; Santini, Stefano

    2017-12-01

    We study the effects of friction heterogeneity on the dynamics of a seismogenic fault. To this aim, we consider a fault model containing two asperities with different static frictions and a rate-dependent dynamic friction. We consider the seismic events produced by the consecutive failure of the two asperities and study their properties as functions of the ratio between static frictions. In particular, we calculate the moment rate, the stress evolution during fault slip, the average stress drop, the partitioning of energy release, the seismic energy, the far-field waveforms and the spectrum of seismic waves. These quantities depend to various extent on the friction distribution on the fault. In particular, the stress distribution on the fault is always strongly heterogeneous at the beginning of the seismic event. Seismic energy and frictional heat decrease with increasing friction heterogeneity, while seismic efficiency is constant. We obtain an equation relating seismic efficiency to the parameters of the friction law, showing that the efficiency is maximum for smaller values of dynamic friction. The seismic spectrum depends on the friction distribution as to the positions and the values of the minima. However, under the model assumption that the slip durations are the same for both asperities, the corner frequency is independent of the friction distribution, but it depends on the friction law and on the coupling between asperities. The model provides a relation between the total radiated energy and the seismic moment that is consistent with the empirical relation between the two quantities. The fault model with one asperity is also considered as a particular case. The model is applied to the 1965 Rat Islands (Alaska) earthquake and shows the role of fault heterogeneity in controlling the spatial distribution of stress drop as well as the time dependence and the final amount of radiated energy.

  5. The Cardiovascular and Neurotoxic Effects of the  Venoms of Six Bony and Cartilaginous Fish Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fish venoms are often poorly studied, in part due to the difficulty in obtaining, extracting, and storing them. In this study, we characterize the cardiovascular and neurotoxic effects of the venoms from the following six species of fish: the cartilaginous stingrays Neotrygon kuhlii and Himantura toshi, and the bony fish Platycephalus fucus, Girella tricuspidata, Mugil cephalus, and Dentex tumifrons. All venoms (10–100 μg/kg, i.v., except G. tricuspidata and P. fuscus, induced a biphasic response on mean arterial pressure (MAP in the anesthetised rat. P. fucus venom exhibited a hypotensive response, while venom from G. tricuspidata displayed a single depressor response. All venoms induced cardiovascular collapse at 200 μg/kg, i.v. The in vitro neurotoxic effects of venom were examined using the chick biventer cervicis nerve‐muscle (CBCNM preparation. N. kuhlii, H. toshi, and P. fucus venoms caused concentration‐dependent inhibition of indirect twitches in the CBCNM preparation. These three venoms also inhibited responses to exogenous acetylcholine (ACh and carbachol (CCh, but not potassium chloride (KCl, indicating a post‐synaptic mode of action. Venom from G. tricuspidata, M. cephalus, and D. tumifrons had no significant effect on indirect twitches or agonist responses in the CBCNM. Our results demonstrate that envenoming by these species of fish may result in moderate cardiovascular and/or neurotoxic effects. Future studies aimed at identifying the molecules responsible for these effects could uncover potentially novel lead compounds for future pharmaceuticals, in addition to generating new knowledge about the evolutionary relationships between venomous animals.

  6. The effect of systemically administered bisphosphonates on bony healing after tooth extraction and osseointegration of dental implants in the rabbit maxilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, InSoo; Ki, HyungChun; Lee, Won; Kim, Heesung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of bisphosphonates on bone healing after tooth extraction and osseointegration of dental implants in a rabbit model. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into four groups; one control and three experimental. The experimental were treated with intravenous zoledronic acid (ZA, 0.1 mg/kg) twice per week starting 4 (Z4 group) and 8 (Z8 group) weeks before surgery until the end of the experiments. The experimental ZD4 group was treated with intravenous ZA (0.01 mg/kg) and intramuscular dexamethasone (1 mg/kg) twice per week starting 4 weeks before surgery until the end of the experiments. The maxillary first premolar was extracted, and an implant with a diameter of 1.5 mm was placed between the incisor and the premolar of each maxilla. Healing of the extraction socket was evaluated and histomorphometric analysis around the implant was performed, using the bone-to-implant contact ratio (BIC) and bone area ratio (BA) 4 and 8 weeks after the surgery. The control group underwent a normal healing process, but all experimental groups showed necrotic bone with hollow lacunae. BIC and BA in the control group increased from the 4- to 8-week evaluations, but decreased in the experimental groups from 4 to 8 weeks. BIC and BA of the Z8 and ZD4 groups were higher than those of the control group at the 4-week evaluation, but were lower than the control at the the 8-week evaluation. This study showed that administration of bisphosphonates interferes with normal bone remodeling after tooth extraction. The experimental groups showed good initial stability, but long-term healing around the implants was impaired. Within the limits of this study, it may be suggested that patients taking bisphosphonates should be treated with caution when performing tooth extraction or placing dental implants.

  7. Dosimetric effect of tissue heterogeneity for (125)I prostate implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Susana Maria; Teixeira, Nuno José; Fernandes, Lisete; Teles, Pedro; Vaz, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    To use Monte Carlo (MC) together with voxel phantoms to analyze the tissue heterogeneity effect in the dose distributions and equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for (125)I prostate implants. Dose distribution calculations in low dose-rate brachytherapy are based on the dose deposition around a single source in a water phantom. This formalism does not take into account tissue heterogeneities, interseed attenuation, or finite patient dimensions effects. Tissue composition is especially important due to the photoelectric effect. The computed tomographies (CT) of two patients with prostate cancer were used to create voxel phantoms for the MC simulations. An elemental composition and density were assigned to each structure. Densities of the prostate, vesicles, rectum and bladder were determined through the CT electronic densities of 100 patients. The same simulations were performed considering the same phantom as pure water. Results were compared via dose-volume histograms and EUD for the prostate and rectum. The mean absorbed doses presented deviations of 3.3-4.0% for the prostate and of 2.3-4.9% for the rectum, when comparing calculations in water with calculations in the heterogeneous phantom. In the calculations in water, the prostate D 90 was overestimated by 2.8-3.9% and the rectum D 0.1cc resulted in dose differences of 6-8%. The EUD resulted in an overestimation of 3.5-3.7% for the prostate and of 7.7-8.3% for the rectum. The deposited dose was consistently overestimated for the simulation in water. In order to increase the accuracy in the determination of dose distributions, especially around the rectum, the introduction of the model-based algorithms is recommended.

  8. Effect of Heterogeneity of JSFR Fuel Assemblies to Power Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Shimazu, Yoichiro; Hibi, Koki; Fujimura, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: 1) Strong heterogeneity of JSFR assemblies was successfully calculated by BACH. 2) Verification test of BACH: • Infinite assembly model; • Color set model; • Good agreement with Monte-Carlo results. 3) Core calculations 3 models for inner duct was used; inward model, outward model and homogeneous model. • k eff difference between the inward and out ward model → 0.3%Δk; • ~20% effect on flux and power distributions. Therefore, we have to pay careful attention for the location of inner duct in fuel loading of JSFR

  9. Effects of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions under flow heterogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lazaro; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of the mixing process in aquifers is of primary importance when assessing attenuation of pollutants. In aquifers different hydraulic and chemical properties can increase mixing and spreading of the transported species. Mixing processes control biogeochemical transformations such as precipitation/dissolution reactions or degradation reactions that are fast compared to mass transfer processes. Reactions are local phenomena that fluctuate at the pore scale, but predictions are often made at much larger scales. However, aquifer heterogeities are found at all scales and generates flow heterogeneities which creates complex concentration distributions that enhances mixing. In order to assess the impact of spatial flow heterogeneities at pore scale we study concentration profiles, gradients and reaction rates using a random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method and kernel density estimators to reconstruct concentrations and gradients in two setups. First, we focus on a irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B → C under homogeneous flow to distinguish phenomena of incomplete mixing of reactants from finite-size sampling effects. Second, we analise a fast reversible bimolecular chemical reaction A+B rightleftharpoons C in a laminar Poiseuille flow reactor to determine the difference between local and global reaction rates caused by the incomplete mixing under flow heterogeneities. Simulation results for the first setup differ from the analytical solution of the continuum scale advection-dispersion-reaction equation studied by Gramling et al. (2002), which results in an overstimation quantity of reaction product (C). In the second setup, results show that actual reaction rates are bigger than the obtained from artificially mixing the system by averaging the concentration vertically. - LITERATURE Gramling, C. M.,Harvey, C. F., Meigs, and L. C., (2002). Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci

  10. Morphological effects on sensitivity of heterogeneous energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sidhartha; Rai, Nirmal; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    The mesoscale physical response under shock loading in heterogeneous energetics is inherently linked to the microstructural characteristics. The current work demonstrates the connection between the microstructural features of porous energetic material and its sensitivity. A unified levelset based framework is developed to characterize the microstructures of a given sample. Several morphological metrics describing the mesoscale geometry of the materials are extracted using the current tool including anisotropy, tortuosity, surface to volume, nearest neighbors, size and curvature distributions. The relevant metrics among the ones extracted are identified and correlated to the mesoscale response of the energetic materials under shock loading. Two classes of problems are considered here: (a) field of idealized voids embedded in the HMX material and (b) real samples of pressed HMX. The effects of stochasticity associated with void arrangements on the sensitivity of the energetic material samples are shown. In summary, this work demonstrates the relationship between the mesoscale morphology and shock response of heterogeneous energetic materials using a levelset based framework.

  11. Effective IPTV channel management method over heterogeneous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hyunchul; Lee, Dai-boong; Song, Hwangjun

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents an effective IPTV channel management method using SVC (scalable video coding) that considers concurrently both channel zapping time and network utilization. A broadcasting channel is encoded in two-layered bitstream (base-layer channel and enhancement-layer channel) to supply for heterogeneous environments. The proposed algorithm locates only a limited numbers of base-layer channels close to users to reduce the network delay part of channel zapping time and adjusts the length of GOP (group of picture) into each base-layer channel to decrease the video decoding delay part of channel zapping time, which are performed based on user's channel preference information. Finally, the experimental results are provided to show the performance of the proposed schemes.

  12. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    -powered base stations is a promising cost-effective solution to considerably enhance user experience. In such a network topology, which is denoted as heterogeneous deployment, the macro layer is expected to provide wider coverage but lower average data speeds whereas small cells are targeted at extending...... network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum...... statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...

  13. Inertial Effects on Flow and Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, B.; Nissan, A.

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the effects of high velocities (inertial effects) in various heterogeneous porous media on fluid flow and tracer transport. We generate three pore-scale configurations that differ in terms of their structural complexity, and investigate 10 realizations of each type. For each realization, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations to obtain the spatial flow field; tracer transport is then modeled by a particle tracking algorithm that uses a semi-analytic, streamline-based method to simulate advective motion. At a sufficiently high Reynolds number (within the laminar regime), inertial effects become relevant, and we observe a transition from linear to nonlinear flow that deviates from Darcy's law. The sensitivity to this transition and the strength of the nonlinear behavior are controlled by the structure of the medium: higher complexity tends to amplify effects of inertia, which lead to spatial homogenization of the flow field. In the context of transport, at increasingly high Reynolds numbers, the portion of the velocity field that actively contributes to tracer transport exhibits increasingly narrower distributions of velocity values. This result leads to more uniform tracer transport, reducing the degree of anomalous behavior. We interpret the effects of high velocities in porous media on transport within the Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) framework, using the spatial distribution of the kinetic energy within the fluid - which is itself a function of the Reynolds number - as a characteristic measure.

  14. The effects of floodplain soil heterogeneity on meander planform shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, D.; Abad, J. D.; Langendoen, E. J.; GarcíA, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    Past analytical studies of meander planform development have mostly focused on the complexity of the governing equations, i.e., hydrodynamics, and less so on the stream bank resistance to erosion, whose spatial heterogeneity is difficult to describe deterministically. This motivated the use of a Monte Carlo approach to examine the effects of floodplain soils and their distribution on planform development, with the goal of including bank erosion properties in the analysis. Simulated bank erosion rates are controlled by the resistance to hydraulic erosion of the bank soils using an excess shear stress approach. The spatial distribution of critical shear stress across the floodplain is delineated on a rectangular, equidistant grid with varying degrees of variability. The corresponding erodibility coefficient is computed using a field-derived empirical relation. For a randomly disturbed distribution, in which the mean resistance to erosion exponentially increases away from the valley centerline, two relevant parameters are identified: the standard deviation of the critical shear stress distribution, which controls skewness and variability of the channel centerline, and the cross-valley increase in soil resistance, which constrains lateral migration and also affects bend skewness. For a purely random distribution, migrated centerlines exhibit larger variability for increasing spatial scales of floodplain soil heterogeneity. For equal stochastic variability of the corresponding governing parameters, relating meander migration to hydraulic erosion of the bank soils produces more variability and shape complexity than the "classic" bank migration approach of Ikeda et al. (1981), which relates migration rate to excess velocity at the outer bank. Finally, the proposed stochastic approach provides a foundation for estimating a suitable spatial density of measurements to characterize the physical properties of floodplain soils and vegetation.

  15. Effect of point source and heterogeneity on the propagation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This paper stands to investigate the possibility of propagation of SH waves due to a point source in a magnetoelastic monoclinic layer lying over a heterogeneous monoclinic half-space. The heterogeneity is caused by consideration of quadratic variation in rigidity. The methodology employed combines an efficient ...

  16. An Unusual Presentation of Frontal Bony Defect with Pneumocephalus and its Management in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Tong Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocephalus can be caused by neurosurgical procedures, endoscopic sinus surgery, craniofacial trauma, tumors of the skull base, frontal sinus cranialization, and can rarely occur spontaneously. The treatment options are conservative treatment, craniotomy, osteoplastic flap surgery of the frontal sinus, and endoscopic endonasal surgery. We herein present the case of a 61-year-old man with a frontal sinus bony defect with pneumocephalus caused by craniotomy who presented atypically with left facial cellulitis, followed by meningitis and seizures. This bony defect was successfully repaired with endoscopic modified Lothrop procedure (EMLP. At 18 months' follow-up after the surgery, neither obvious postoperative complications nor signs of pneumocephalus were noted. EMLP offered a less invasive, safer, and effective way to repair the frontal bony defect in our elderly patient.

  17. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  18. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  19. Bony orbital distances among the Filipino population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Constance M; Jimenez, David F; Laskey, Antoinette; Alcantara, Briccio G; Braddock, Stephen R

    2002-03-01

    Six hundred and seventy seven radiographs were selected from the logs of films taken in a major hospital in Metro Manila, Philippines over the course of the previous year. Two hundred and eighty-eight female and 389 male, healthy Filipinos between the ages of birth and twenty years were selected based on the availability of a modified Waters' projection and lateral skull film taken at the same time. Measurements for the lateral orbital wall were made at the site of the suture on the medial surface of the zygomatic bone. The medial orbital wall measurement was the distance between the dacrya using a correction factor formula of CF = D-d/D where D is the target film distance and d is the object film distance (1). The actual bony measurements were calculated. The data was gathered and plotted according to sex and in age in years. Graphs were generated using SAS over a graph software. Lines were smooth using cubic spline technique developed by Reinsch with the smoothest value of 75 (2). The mean plus two, four, and six standard deviations were included in each of the curves.

  20. Effect of site-specific heterogeneous evolution on phylogenetic reconstruction: a simple evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiqun; Su, Zhixi; Zhong, Yang; Gu, Xun

    2009-07-15

    Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous evolution may mislead phylogenetic analysis, which has been neglected for a long time. We evaluate the effect of heterogeneous evolution on phylogenetic analysis, using 18 fish mitogenomic coding sequences as an example. Using the software DIVERGE, we identify 198 amino acid sites that have experienced heterogeneous evolution. After removing these sites, the rest of sites are shown to be virtually homogeneous in the evolutionary rate. There are some differences between phylogenetic trees built with heterogeneous sites ("before tree") and without heterogeneous sites ("after tree"). Our study demonstrates that for phylogenetic reconstruction, an effective approach is to identify and remove sites with heterogeneous evolution, and suggests that researchers can use the software DIVERGE to remove the influence of heterogeneous evolution before reconstructing phylogenetic trees.

  1. Heterogeneous Effects of Direct Hypoxia Pathway Activation in Kidney Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Salama

    Full Text Available General activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathways is classically associated with adverse prognosis in cancer and has been proposed to contribute to oncogenic drive. In clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC HIF pathways are upregulated by inactivation of the von-Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. However HIF-1α and HIF-2α have contrasting effects on experimental tumor progression. To better understand this paradox we examined pan-genomic patterns of HIF DNA binding and associated gene expression in response to manipulation of HIF-1α and HIF-2α and related the findings to CCRC prognosis. Our findings reveal distinct pan-genomic organization of canonical and non-canonical HIF isoform-specific DNA binding at thousands of sites. Overall associations were observed between HIF-1α-specific binding, and genes associated with favorable prognosis and between HIF-2α-specific binding and adverse prognosis. However within each isoform-specific set, individual gene associations were heterogeneous in sign and magnitude, suggesting that activation of each HIF-α isoform contributes a highly complex mix of pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects.

  2. Effects of Heterogeneous Social Interactions on Flocking Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, M. Carmen; Parley, Jack T.; Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo

    2018-02-01

    Social relationships characterize the interactions that occur within social species and may have an important impact on collective animal motion. Here, we consider a variation of the standard Vicsek model for collective motion in which interactions are mediated by an empirically motivated scale-free topology that represents a heterogeneous pattern of social contacts. We observe that the degree of order of the model is strongly affected by network heterogeneity: more heterogeneous networks show a more resilient ordered state, while less heterogeneity leads to a more fragile ordered state that can be destroyed by sufficient external noise. Our results challenge the previously accepted equivalence between the static Vicsek model and the equilibrium X Y model on the network of connections, and point towards a possible equivalence with models exhibiting a different symmetry.

  3. The effect of soil heterogeneity on ATES performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, W.; Rijnaarts, H.; Grotenhuis, T.; van Gaans, P.

    2012-04-01

    Due to an increasing demand for sustainable energy, application of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) is growing rapidly. Large-scale application of ATES is limited by the space that is available in the subsurface. Especially in urban areas, suboptimal performance is expected due to thermal interference between individual wells of a single system, or interference with other ATES systems or groundwater abstractions. To avoid thermal interference there are guidelines on well spacing. However, these guidelines, and also design calculations, are based on the assumption of a homogeneous subsurface, while studies report a standard deviation in logpermeability of 1 to 2 for unconsolidated aquifers (Gelhar, 1993). Such heterogeneity may create preferential pathways, reducing ATES performance due to increased advective heat loss or interference between ATES wells. The role of hydraulic heterogeneity of the subsurface related to ATES performance has received little attention in literature. Previous research shows that even small amounts of heterogeneity can result in considerable uncertainty in the distribution of thermal energy in the subsurface and an increased radius of influence (Ferguson, 2007). This is supported by subsurface temperature measurements around ATES wells, which suggest heterogeneity gives rise to preferential pathways and short-circuiting between ATES wells (Bridger and Allen, 2010). Using 3-dimensional stochastic heat transport modeling, we quantified the influence of heterogeneity on the performance of a doublet well energy storage system. The following key parameters are varied to study their influence on thermal recovery and thermal balance: 1) regional flow velocity, 2) distance between wells and 3) characteristics of the heterogeneity. Results show that heterogeneity at the scale of a doublet ATES system introduces an uncertainty up to 18% in expected thermal recovery. The uncertainty increases with decreasing distance between ATES wells. The

  4. Heterogeneous Firms and Imperfect Substitution: The Productivity Effect of Migrants

    OpenAIRE

    Anette Haas; Michael Lucht

    2013-01-01

    To examine the impact of migrants on the average firm productivity, wages and welfare we construct a general equilibrium model with monopolistic competition a la Melitz (2003) considering heterogeneous firms with different productivity levels and imperfect substitutability between migrants and natives. This gives rise to wage differences between natives and migrants. As a consequence firms with a higher share of migrants realize wage cost advantages. The heterogeneous distribution of migrants...

  5. Fuel pin and subassembly heterogeneity effect on neutronics properties of a fast power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, T.; Yoshida, T. [Nippon Atomic Industry Group Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1980-09-15

    Heterogeneous structure of a fuel pin subassembly may exert influence on the neutronic properties of a fast power reactor such as criticality factor, sodium void reactivity, and Doppler coefficient. Study was performed to examine this effect quantitatively for a typical 1000 MW(e) power reactor. The heterogeneity effect was evaluated in two steps. One is for the heterogeneity of fuel pin cell loaded inside wrapper tubes. Another is for the gross heterogeneity of a subassembly, namely the lumped fuel-pins in the central part and the peripheral wrapper tube region. It is shown that the combined heterogeneity effect on k/sub eff/ is as large as 0.6%{Delta}/k. This large heterogeneity is mainly caused by the {sup 238}U resonance self-shielding effect.

  6. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  7. Size effects on free vibration of heterogeneous beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanati Bahman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the influence of microstructure on the free vibration of geometrically similar heterogeneous beams with free-free boundary conditions was numerically investigated by detailed finite element analysis (FEA to identify and quantify any effect of beam size on transverse modal frequencies when the microstructural scale is comparable to the overall size. ANSYS Mechanical APDL was used to generate specific unit cells at the microstructural scale comprised of two isotropic materials with different material properties. Unit cell variants containing voids and inclusions were considered. At the macroscopic scale, four beam sizes consisting of one, two, three or four layers of defined unit cells were represented by repeatedly regenerating the unit cell as necessary. In all four beam sizes the aspect ratio was kept constant. Changes to the volume fractions of each material were introduced while keeping the homogenized properties of the beam fixed. The influence of the beam surface morphology on the results was also investigated. The ANSYS results were compared with the analytical results from solution to Timoshenko beam and nonlocal Timoshenko beam as well as numerical results for a Micropolar beam. In nonlocal Timoshenko beams the Eringen’s small length scale coefficients were estimated for some of the studied models. Numerical analyses based on Micropolar theory were carried out to study the modal frequencies and a method was suggested to estimate characteristic length in bending and coupling number via transverse vibration which verifies the use of Micropolar elasticity theory in dynamic analysis.

  8. Heterogenization of Homogeneous Catalysts: the Effect of the Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, W.L.; Ott, K.C.; Hall, K.A.; de Rege, F.M.; Morita, D.K.; Tumas, W.; Brown, G.H.; Broene, R.D.

    1999-06-29

    We have studied the influence of placing a soluble, homogeneous catalyst onto a solid support. We determined that such a 'heterogenized' homogeneous catalyst can have improved activity and selectivity for the asymmetric hydrogenation of enamides to amino acid derivatives. The route of heterogenization of RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} cations occurs via electrostatic interactions with anions that are capable of strong hydrogen bonding to silica surfaces. This is a novel approach to supported catalysis. Supported RhDuPhos(COD){sup +} is a recyclable, non-leaching catalyst in non-polar media. This is one of the few heterogenized catalysts that exhibits improved catalytic performance as compared to its homogeneous analog.

  9. Heterogeneity in Consumer Demands and the Income Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    , implying that cross-sectional estimates of income elasticities for these goods are biased. The goods are the following: food eaten outside home, alcohol and tobacco, transportation, and energy. The elasticity of alcohol and tobacco is more than halved when taking unobserved heterogeneity into account......This paper uses unique Spanish panel data on household expenditures to test whether unobservable heterogeneity in household demands (taste, etc.) is correlated with total expenditures (income). The main finding is that tastes are indeed correlated with income for about half of the goods considered...

  10. DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA FOR PROLIFERATIVE THYROID LESIONS IN BONY FISHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid proliferative lesions are rather common in bony fishes but disagreement exists in the fish pathology community concerning diagnostic criteria for hyperplastic versus neoplastic lesions. To simplify the diagnosis of proliferative thyroid lesions and to reduce confusion reg...

  11. Conservative Treatment for Bony Healing in Pediatric Lumbar Spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Tezuka, Fumitake; Yamashita, Kazuta; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-06-15

    A retrospective review of prospectively collected data. The aim of this study was to investigate recent outcomes of conservative treatment for bony healing in pediatric patients with lumbar spondylolysis (LS) and to identify the problems that need to be resolved. Several diagnostic and therapeutic techniques for LS have been developed recently, leading to better outcomes for bony healing. Overall, 63 consecutive pediatric patients (53 boys and 10 girls) with LS (average age: 13.8 years; range: 6-17 years) were analyzed. Diagnosis and staging (very early, early, progressive, and terminal) were based on multidetector computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For all patients except those with terminal-stage pars defect, conservative treatment included rest, avoidance of sports, and the use of a thoraco-lumbo-sacral-type trunk brace. Follow-up MRI was performed monthly. When the signal changes resolved, CT scans were obtained to assess bony healing. Three patients dropped out during the study period. A total of 60 patients were included (50 boys and 10 girls) in this study (follow-up rate: 95.2%), with 86 instances of LS (very early: 36, early: 16, progressive: 15, terminal: 19) in 65 laminae. In the very early stage, the bony healing rate was 100%, and average treatment period was 2.5 months (range: 1-7 months). In the early stage, the bony healing rate was 93.8%, and the average treatment period was 2.6 months (range: 1-6 months). In the progressive stage, the bony healing rate was 80.0%, and the average treatment period was 3.6 months (range: 3-5 months). The average overall recurrence rate was 26.1%. All patients showing recurrence eventually achieved bony healing. High bony healing rates and short treatment periods were observed with conservative treatment in pediatric patients with LS. However, the recurrence rates were relatively high. This issue should be targeted in future studies. 2.

  12. Metal-free phenanthrenequinone cyclotrimer as an effective heterogeneous catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xuan; Su, Qi; Zhi, Linjie; Thomas, Arne; Feng, Xinliang; Su, Dang Sheng; Schlögl, Robert; Müllen, Klaus

    2009-08-19

    A phenanthrenequinone macrocyclic trimer was synthesized and used as a heterogeneous catalyst for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. This model molecule under comparable kinetic conditions is up to 47 times more active than extended solid catalysts including nanocarbons, metal phosphates, and oxides, confirming the hypothesis that diketone-like groups can serve as active sites.

  13. An effective modular process for biodiesel manufacturing using heterogeneous catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimian, A.C.; Rothenberg, G.

    2016-01-01

    We present an innovative reaction set-up and process for biodiesel manufacturing by heterogeneous catalysis. This process has two key advantages over the state-of-the-art process: it enables a variable reaction time and easy catalyst switching/replacement. The process principle presented here is

  14. Effect of Electromagnetic Fields on Transfer Processes in Heterogeneous Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, H. C.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 5 (2001), s. 1065-1071 ISSN 0017-9310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921 Keywords : electromagnetic field * transfer processes * heterogeneous system Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2001

  15. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  16. Doe productivity indices and sire effects of a heterogeneous rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IJAAAR

    Doe productivity indices are important in evaluating rabbit population since it influences the efficiency and profitability of rabbit production for small-holders and commercial rabbit production. Rabbits for this study were obtained from heterogeneous populations reared in south-western Nigeria, and a total of fifty- six adult ...

  17. Modeling the effects of vegetation heterogeneity on wildland fire behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, A. L.; Linn, R.; Sieg, C.; Middleton, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation structure and densities are known to drive fire-spread rate and burn severity. Many fire-spread models incorporate an average, homogenous fuel density in the model domain to drive fire behavior. However, vegetation communities are rarely homogenous and instead present significant heterogeneous structure and fuel densities in the fires path. This results in observed patches of varied burn severities and mosaics of disturbed conditions that affect ecological recovery and hydrologic response. Consequently, to understand the interactions of fire and ecosystem functions, representations of spatially heterogeneous conditions need to be incorporated into fire models. Mechanistic models of fire disturbance offer insight into how fuel load characterization and distribution result in varied fire behavior. Here we use a physically-based 3D combustion model—FIRETEC—that solves conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species to compare fire behavior on homogenous representations to a heterogeneous vegetation distribution. Results demonstrate the impact vegetation heterogeneity has on the spread rate, intensity, and extent of simulated wildfires thus providing valuable insight in predicted wildland fire evolution and enhanced ability to estimate wildland fire inputs into regional and global climate models.

  18. Membrane heterogeneity : from lipid domains to curvature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semrau, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Membrane heterogeneity on the micro- and nanometer scale plays an important role for a large number of biological processes. In parallel to the conception of refined membrane models, new experimental techniques to determine membrane microstructure were developed in recent years. Single molecule

  19. Doe productivity indices and sire effects of a heterogeneous rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabbits for this study were obtained from heterogeneous populations reared in south-western Nigeria, and a total of fifty-six adult rabbits (6 months old) ... It was concluded that, the major factors affecting doe productivity indices in this population were low litter size at birth, long kindling interval and pre-weaning mortality.

  20. Relationship of bony trabecular characteristics and age to bone mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dong Hoon; Song, Young Han; Yoon, Young Nam; Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do

    2006-01-01

    Bony strength is dependent on bone mass and bony structure. So this study was designed to investigate the relationship between the bone mass and bony mass and bony trabecular characteristics. Study subjects were 51 females (average age 68.6 years) and 20 males (average age 66.4 years). Bony mineral density (BMD, grams/cm 2 ) of proximal femur was measured by a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected from the digitized radiographs of proximal femur. A customized computer program processed morphologic operations (MO) of ROIs. 44 skeletal variables of MO were calculated from ROIs on the Ward's triangle and greater trochanter of femur. WHO BMD classes were predicted by MO variables of the same ROI. Classification and Regression Tree analysis was used for calculating weighted kappa values, sensitivity and specificity of MO. The discriminating factors of morphologic operation were branch point, branch point [per cm sq]. Age also played important role in distinguishing osteoporotic classes. The sensitivity of MO at Ward's triangle and Greater Trochanter was 91.8%, 65.6%, respectively. The specificity of MO was 100% at Ward's triangle and Greater Trochanter. Bony trabecular characteristics obtained using radiological bone morphometric analysis seem to be related to bone mass

  1. Price Competition in Two-Sided Markets with Heterogeneous Consumers and Network Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filistrucchi, L.; Klein, T.J.

    We model a two-sided market with heterogeneous customers and two heterogeneous network effects. In our model, customers on each market side care differently about both the number and the type of customers on the other side. Examples of two-sided markets are online platforms or daily newspapers. In

  2. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuxart, J.; Wrenger, B.; Martinez-Villagrasa, D.; Reuder, J.; Jonassen, M.O.; Jimenez, M.A.; Lothon, M.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Dunnermann, J.; Conangla, L.; Garai, A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point
    measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here
    we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term
    in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated
    by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate

  3. Neutron and gamma transport effects by heterogeneous core designs. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, S.K.

    1977-01-01

    The use of diffusion theory for the prediction of power production near a reactor core-blanket interface and the assumption that gammas are absorbed in situ can lead to substantial errors. This is primarily due to the breakdown of Fick's law for neutron diffusion near the core-blanket boundary, and the gamma leakage from the core into the blanket. These considerations are more pronounced in a situation where a large number of internal blanket assemblies are present, such as in the large heterogeneous core designs. The power distribution is studied for both fission and gamma heating in a large heterogeneous LMFBR with 3 core zones separated by 2 internal blanket zones. Comparisons are made between diffusion and transport theory for neutronics calculations, and between in-situ absorption and rigorous transport theory calculation for gamma heating.

  4. Effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on intraspecific competition in the invasive, clonal plant Alternanthera philoxeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Dong, Bi-Cheng; Alpert, Peter; Li, Hong-Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang; Lei, Guang-Chun; Yu, Fei-Hai

    2012-03-01

    Fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in soil nutrient availability can increase the growth of individual plants, the productivity of plant communities and interspecific competition. If this is due to the ability of plants to concentrate their roots where nutrient levels are high, then nutrient heterogeneity should have little effect on intraspecific competition, especially when there are no genotypic differences between individuals in root plasticity. We tested this hypothesis in a widespread, clonal species in which individual plants are known to respond to nutrient heterogeneity. Plants derived from a single clone of Alternanthera philoxeroides were grown in the greenhouse at low or high density (four or 16 plants per 27·5 × 27·5-cm container) with homogeneous or heterogeneous availability of soil nutrients, keeping total nutrient availability per container constant. After 9 weeks, measurements of size, dry mass and morphology were taken. Plants grew more in the heterogeneous than in the homogeneous treatment, showing that heterogeneity promoted performance; they grew less in the high- than in the low-density treatment, showing that plants competed. There was no interactive effect of nutrient heterogeneity and plant density, supporting the hypothesis that heterogeneity does not affect intraspecific competition in the absence of genotypic differences in plasticity. Treatments did not affect morphological characteristics such as specific leaf area or root/shoot ratio. Results indicate that fine-scale, spatial heterogeneity in the availability of soil nutrients does not increase competition when plants are genetically identical, consistent with the suggestion that effects of heterogeneity on competition depend upon differences in plasticity between individuals. Heterogeneity is only likely to increase the spread of monoclonal, invasive populations such as that of A. philoxeroides in China.

  5. Effect of reservoir heterogeneity on air injection performance in a light oil reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Air injection is a good option to development light oil reservoir. As well-known that, reservoir heterogeneity has great effect for various EOR processes. This also applies to air injection. However, oil recovery mechanisms and physical processes for air injection in heterogeneous reservoir with dip angle are still not well understood. The reported setting of reservoir heterogeneous for physical model or simulation model of air injection only simply uses different-layer permeability of porous media. In practice, reservoir heterogeneity follows the principle of geostatistics. How much of contrast in permeability actually challenges the air injection in light oil reservoir? This should be investigated by using layered porous medial settings of the classical Dykstra-Parsons style. Unfortunately, there has been no work addressing this issue for air injection in light oil reservoir. In this paper, Reservoir heterogeneity is quantified based on the use of different reservoir permeability distribution according to classical Dykstra-Parsons coefficients method. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on physical process and production performance of air injection in light oil reservoir through numerical reservoir simulation approach. The basic model is calibrated based on previous study. Total eleven pseudo compounders are included in this model and ten complexity of reactions are proposed to achieve the reaction scheme. Results show that oil recovery factor is decreased with the increasing of reservoir heterogeneity both for air and N2 injection from updip location, which is against the working behavior of air injection from updip location. Reservoir heterogeneity sometimes can act as positive effect to improve sweep efficiency as well as enhance production performance for air injection. High O2 content air injection can benefit oil recovery factor, also lead to early O2 breakthrough in heterogeneous reservoir. Well

  6. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hervier, Antoine [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-12-21

    the band bending at the interface, gives rise to a steady-state flow of hot holes to the surface. This leads to a decrease in turnover on the surface, an effect which is enhanced when a reverse bias is applied to the diode. Similar experiments were carried out for CO oxidation. On Pt/Si diodes, the reaction rate was found to increase when a forward bias was applied. When the diode was exposed to visible light and a reverse bias was applied, the rate was instead decreased. This implies that a flow of negative charges to the surface increases turnover, while positive charges decrease it. Charge flow in an oxide supported metal catalyst can be modified even without designing the catalyst as a solid state electronic device. This was done by doping stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiO2 films with F, and using the resulting oxides as supports for Pt films. In the case of stoichiometric TiO2, F was found to act as an n-type dopant, creating a population of filled electronic states just below the conduction band, and dramatically increasing the conductivity of the oxide film. The electrons in those states can transfer to surface O, activating it for reaction with CO, and leading to increased turnover for CO oxidation. This reinforces the hypothesis that CO oxidation is activated by a flow of negative charges to the surface. The same set of catalysts was used for methanol oxidation. The electronic properties of the TiO2 films again correlated with the turnover rates, but also with selectivity. With stoichiometric TiO2 as the support, F-doping caused an increase in selectivity toward the formation of partial oxidation products, formaldehyde and methyl formate, versus the total oxidation product, CO2. With non-stoichiometric TiO2, F-doping had the reverse effect. Ambient Pressure X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to investigate this F-doping effect in reaction conditions. In O2 alone, and in

  7. Continuous Trading Dynamically Effectively Complete Market with Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhenjiang

    In a framework of heterogeneous beliefs, I investigate a two-date consumption model with continuous trading over the interval [0; T], in which information on the aggregate consumption at time T is revealed by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Bridge. This information structure allows investors to speculate o...... a sufficient statistic for computation of the price of redundant dividend derivative and the equilibrium portfolios. The investors form their Pareto optimal trading strategies as if they intend to dynamically endogenously replicate the value of the dividend derivative....... with respect to the aggregate consumption. With normally distributed dividend, the equilibrium stock price is endogenized in a Radner equilibrium as a precision weighted average of the investors’ posterior mean minus a risk premium determined by the average posterior precision. The stock price is also...

  8. The spectrum of allergy to South African bony fish (Teleosti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volunteer population-based cohort in the Western Cape. Participants. 105 volunteer subjects with suspected fish allergy were recruited by advertising in the local press. Main outcome. Species-specific bony fish allergy was confirmed or refuted by DBPCFC. Results. The four most common seafood species reported to cause ...

  9. Comparative Ecology Of The African Bony Tongue Fish Heterotis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ecology of sympatric African bony tongue fish, Heterotis niloticus and the catfish, Clarias gariepinus were compared during the dry and rainy conditions in the lower Oluwa River and its adjacent floodplains. Both species are common economic fish in Nigeria. There was no significant difference in the mean sizes of H.

  10. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function.

  11. Cranial bony decompressions in the management of head injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-22

    Sep 22, 2012 ... Conclusion: Bony decompression is useful in the management of head trauma. Careful selection of cases and appropriate radiological assessment are important and will guide decision for either craniotomy or craniectomy. Key words: Craniectomy, craniotomy, trauma flap, traumatic brain injury.

  12. Avifauna of Boni-Dodori National Reserves, Lamu and Garissa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. A comprehensive avian survey was conducted between April 2012 and November. 2013 in Boni and Dodori National reserves, the connecting Aweer Community. Conservancy corridor, and the adjacent forests. Survey methods were Timed Species. Counts (TSCs), mist netting and opportunistic observations.

  13. Resource heterogeneity, soil fertility, and species diversity: effects of clonal species on plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilts, J Alexander; Mittelbach, Gary G; Reynolds, Heather L; Gross, Katherine L

    2011-05-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in soil resources is widely thought to promote plant species coexistence, and this mechanism figures prominently in resource-ratio models of competition. However, most experimental studies have found that nutrient enhancements depress diversity regardless of whether nutrients are uniformly or heterogeneously applied. This mismatch between theory and empirical pattern is potentially due to an interaction between plant size and the scale of resource heterogeneity. Clonal plants that spread vegetatively via rhizomes or stolons can grow large and may integrate across resource patches, thus reducing the positive effect of small-scale resource heterogeneity on plant species richness. Many rhizomatous clonal species respond strongly to increased soil fertility, and they have been hypothesized to drive the descending arm of the hump-shaped productivity-diversity relationship in grasslands. We tested whether clonals reduce species richness in a grassland community by manipulating nutrient heterogeneity, soil fertility, and the presence of rhizomatous clonal species in a 6-year field experiment. We found strong and consistent negative effects of clonals on species richness. These effects were greatest at high fertility and when soil resources were applied at a scale at which rhizomatous clonals could integrate across resource patches. Thus, we find support for the hypothesis that plant size and resource heterogeneity interact to determine species diversity.

  14. The Impact of Effect Size Heterogeneity on Meta-Analysis: A Monte Carlo Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, Mark J.; Florax, Raymond J.G.M.; Groot, de Henri L.F.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the impact of effect size heterogeneity on the results of a meta-analysis. Specifically, we address the small sample behaviour of the OLS, the fixed effects regression and the mixed effects meta-estimators under three alternative scenarios

  15. Coronectomy of lower third molars with and without guided bony regeneration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yiu Yan

    2016-02-01

    This pilot study for a split-mouth, randomised, clinical trial compared the incidence of postoperative complications, root migration, and adjacent second molar periodontal attachment after coronectomy of the lower third molars with or without guided bony regeneration. Six patients (three men and three women, mean (range) age 27 (21-44) years), each with bilateral lower third molars in close proximity to the inferior alveolar nerve, were recruited. One third molar of each patient was randomised to be treated by coronectomy with guided bony regeneration, and the other side coronectomy alone. All subjects were reviewed for 12 months. No neurosensory deficit was noted in either group. We found no significant differences between the two groups in postoperative morbidity. Mean (SD) root migration after coronectomy with guided bony regeneration at postoperative 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months were 0.14 (0.34), 0.56 (0.68), 0.63 (0.83), and 0.63 (0.83) mm, respectively. These were significantly less than the results in the control group from postoperative 3 months onwards (3 months p=0.01, 6 months p=0.004, and 12 months p=0.003). There was a trend towards reduced periodontal depth at the adjacent second molar in the study group compared with that in the control group, but not significantly so. These results show that coronectomy of lower third molars with guided bony regeneration has low morbidity and seems to reduce root migration. A full-scale randomised clinical trial will show the effect on root migration and periodontal attachment of the adjacent second molar. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bony surface registration of navigation system in the lateral or prone position: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Toshihiro; Goto, Tetsuya; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Nagm, Alhusain; Yamamoto, Yasunaga; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    Navigation systems have become essential tools in neurosurgery. Precise registration is indispensable for the accuracy of navigation. The rapid and precise registration by surface matching on the facial skin is possible using the landmarks of the face in the supine position. On the other hand, incomplete registration often occurs in the lateral or prone position due to the direction of the face and displacement of the skin by headpins and obscuring of the skin by the bispectral index monitor and many electrodes on the forehead as well as the eye patch. Surface matching on the occipital scalp is not suitable for registration because the shape of the occipital scalp is flat and it is compressed in the supine position when obtaining preoperative neuroimaging. To overcome this problem, the authors have developed a new method of registration designated as "bony surface registration" in which surface matching is achieved using the bony surface of the skull after exposure. Between June and December 2014, this technique was used in 23 patients and its effectiveness was examined. Registration time was markedly shortened and useful navigation was achieved due to accurate registration in all patients. This is the first report of a registration methodology for a navigation system in the lateral or prone position. This bony surface registration method is useful for navigation system image-guided surgery in the lateral or prone position.

  17. Dynamic and heterogeneous effects of sibling death on children's outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Jason; Vidal-Fernandez, Marian; Wolfe, Barbara

    2018-01-02

    This paper explores the effects of experiencing the death of a sibling on children's developmental outcomes. Recent work has shown that experiencing a sibling death is common and long-term effects are large. We extend understanding of these effects by estimating dynamic effects on surviving siblings' cognitive and socioemotional outcomes, as well as emotional and cognitive support by parents. Using the Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (CNLSY79), we find large initial effects on cognitive and noncognitive outcomes that decline over time. We also provide evidence that the effects are larger if the surviving child is older and less prominent if the deceased child was either disabled or an infant, suggesting sensitive periods of exposure. Auxiliary results show that parental investments in the emotional support of surviving children decline following the death of their child.

  18. Self-transparency effects in heterogeneous nonlinear scattering media and their possible use in lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'tshuler, G.B.; Ermolaev, V.S.; Krylov, K.I.; Manenkov, A.A.; Prokhorov, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission of intense laser beams through heterogeneous scattering media is considered. Effects of intensity limitation, self-recovery of the wave front of a transmitted beam, and bistable reflection associated with the laser-induced self-transparency (suppression of scattering) of such media are predicted because of the compensation of the linear refractive-index difference Δn/sub L/ of the heterocomponents of a medium by nonlinear change Δn/sub N//sub L/ for different mechanisms of nonlinearity. Applications of these effects in lasers for Q switching and mode locking are discussed. The observation of self-transparency effects in several heterogeneous media (glass particles in toluene and nitrobenzene, and lead molybdenite powder) for cw Ar- and pulsed Nd- and CO 2 -laser radiation is reported. Q switching and mode locking have also been demonstrated with a YAG:Nd laser using nonlinear scattering in a heterogeneous cell as a control element in a laser resonator

  19. Using Dirichlet Processes for Modeling Heterogeneous Treatment Effects across Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miratrix, Luke; Feller, Avi; Pillai, Natesh; Pati, Debdeep

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the distribution of site level effects is an important problem, but it is also an incredibly difficult one. Current methods rely on distributional assumptions in multilevel models for estimation. There it is hoped that the partial pooling of site level estimates with overall estimates, designed to take into account individual variation as…

  20. Diverse Friendship Networks and Heterogeneous Peer Effects on Adolescent Misbehaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yilan; Fan, Linlin

    2018-01-01

    This study estimates peer effects in diverse friendship networks by friend types. Evidence from friendship networks for 57,351 U.S. high school adolescents demonstrates that adolescents are more likely to make friends with someone of the same immigrant status or ethnicity ('similar friends') than those with different backgrounds ('dissimilar…

  1. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  2. Limited Benefits of Heterogeneous Dual-Task Training on Transfer Effects in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussier, Maxime; Brouillard, Philippe; Bherer, Louis

    2017-09-01

    It has often been reported that cognitive training has limited transfer effects. The present study addresses training context variability as a factor that could increase transfer effects, as well as the manifestation through time of transfer effects. Fifty-eight older adults were assigned to an active placebo or two dual-task training conditions, one in which the training context varies between sessions (heterogeneous training) and the other in a fixed training context (homogeneous training). Transfer was assessed with near and far-modality transfer tasks. Results show that heterogeneous and homogeneous training led to larger near-modality transfer effects than an active placebo (computer lessons). Transfer effects were roughly comparable in both training groups, but heterogeneous training led to a steeper improvement of the dual-task coordination learning curve within training sessions. Also, results indicated that dual-task cost did not improve in the active placebo group from the pre- to the post-training sessions. Heterogeneous training showed modest advantages over homogeneous training. Results also suggest that transfer effects on dual-task cost induced by training take place early on in the post-training session. These findings provide valuable insights on benefits arising from variability in the training protocol for maximizing transfer effects. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. [Ultrastructure of granulocytes of bony fishes (orders Salmoniformes, Cypriniformes, Perciformes)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flerova, E A; Balabanova, L V

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of data on utrastructure of granulocytes of freshwater and marine bony fish of orders Salmoniformes, Cypriniformes, and Perciformes showed that in all studied species there were revealed two types of granulocytes - neutrophils and eosinophils. The exception was the bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix L. whose pronephros hemopoietic tissue was found to contain one type of the granulocytic line - neutrophils. The identification parameters of granular leukocytes are specific granules filling the cytoplasm. The main form of specific granules in neutrophils of bony fish of various phylogenetic groups is an elongated granule with different distribution of fibrils or a granule that has crystalloid formed from fibrils. The main form of eosinophil granules - large, electron-dense, homogenous.

  4. Imaging of the hip and bony pelvis. Techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). MRI Centre; Johnson, K.J. [Princess of Wales Birmingham Children' s Hospital (United Kingdom); Whitehouse, R.W. (eds.) [Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook on imaging of the bony pelvis and hip joint that provides a detailed description of the techniques and imaging findings relevant to this complex anatomical region. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging the pelvis and hip are discussed in detail. The second part of the book documents the application of these techniques to the diverse clinical problems and diseases encountered. Among the many topics addressed are congenital and developmental disorders including developmental dysplasia of the hip, irritable hip and septic arthritis, Perthes' disease and avascular necrosis, slipped upper femoral epiphysis, bony and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, tumours and hip prostheses. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. (orig.)

  5. Effective Data Acquisition Protocol for Multi-Hop Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Networks Using Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Khedr

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In designing wireless sensor networks (WSNs, it is important to reduce energy dissipation and prolong network lifetime. Clustering of nodes is one of the most effective approaches for conserving energy in WSNs. Cluster formation protocols generally consider the heterogeneity of sensor nodes in terms of energy difference of nodes but ignore the different transmission ranges of them. In this paper, we propose an effective data acquisition clustered protocol using compressive sensing (EDACP-CS for heterogeneous WSNs that aims to conserve the energy of sensor nodes in the presence of energy and transmission range heterogeneity. In EDACP-CS, cluster heads are selected based on the distance from the base station and sensor residual energy. Simulation results show that our protocol offers a much better performance than the existing protocols in terms of energy consumption, stability, network lifetime, and throughput.

  6. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  7. Effect of homogenous-heterogeneous reactions on MHD Prandtl fluid flow over a stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imad Khan

    Full Text Available An analysis is performed to explore the effects of homogenous-heterogeneous reactions on two-dimensional flow of Prandtl fluid over a stretching sheet. In present analysis, we used the developed model of homogeneous–heterogeneous reactions in boundary layer flow. The mathematical configuration of presented flow phenomenon yields the nonlinear partial differential equations. Using scaling transformations, the governing partial differential equations (momentum equation and homogenous-heterogeneous reactions equations are transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODE’s. Then, resulting non-linear ODE’s are solved by computational scheme known as shooting method. The quantitative and qualitative manners of concerned physical quantities (velocity, concentration and drag force coefficient are examined under prescribed physical constrained through figures and tables. It is observed that velocity profile enhances verses fluid parameters α and β while Hartmann number reduced it. The homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions parameters have reverse effects on concentration profile. Concentration profile shows retarding behavior for large values of Schmidt number. Skin fraction coefficient enhances with increment in Hartmann number H and fluid parameter α. Keywords: Prandtl fluid, Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions, Stretching sheet, MHD

  8. The heterogeneous world of congruency sequence effects: An update.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wout eDuthoo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Congruency sequence effects (CSEs refer to the observation that congruency effects in conflict tasks are typically smaller following incongruent compared to following congruent trials. This measure has long been thought to provide a unique window into top-down attentional adjustments and their underlying brain mechanisms. According to the renowned conflict monitoring theory, CSEs reflect enhanced selective attention following conflict detection. Still, alternative accounts suggested that bottom-up associative learning suffices to explain the pattern of reaction times and error rates. A couple of years ago, a review by Egner (2007 pitted these two rivalry accounts against each other, concluding that both conflict adaptation and feature integration contribute to the CSE. Since then, a wealth of studies has further debated this issue, and two additional accounts have been proposed, offering intriguing alternative explanations. Contingency learning accounts put forward that predictive relationships between stimuli and responses drive the CSE, whereas the repetition expectancy hypothesis suggests that top-down, expectancy-driven control adjustments affect the CSE. In the present paper, we build further on the previous review (Egner, 2007 by summarizing and integrating recent behavioural and neurophysiological studies on the CSE. In doing so, we evaluate the relative contribution and theoretical value of the different attentional and memory-based accounts. Moreover, we review how all of these influences can be experimentally isolated, and discuss designs and procedures that can critically judge between them.

  9. Between Organism and Sky: Oscar Bony, 1965-1976

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Quiles

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Oscar Bony was a key figure in the generation of avant-garde artists who famously broke with the Instituto Torcuato Di Tella in the wake of censorship at Experiencias ’68. He was also the official photographer for RCA’s affiliate record label in Argentina between 1967 and 1973, producing publicity for a new wave of rock n’ roll bands and solo popular music acts including Los Gatos and Arco Iris. Attending to key phases in his artistic oeuvre as well as close readings of his expertly crafted popular images, this article attempts to bridge these seemingly irreconcilable aspects of Bony’s practice. At first glance, his rock photography, known as el estilo Bony, has little relation to his art, and is perhaps even its political antithesis: “creative” work in the service of a top-down business model. Yet a closer look at both endeavors yields a lasting interplay between flesh and concept—at the grain of the work, a dialectic between incontrovertible index and crafted, calculated image—that was the artist’s central preoccupation in the fraught decade between the military coups. As such, Bony provides an opportunity to recover a category often absent from the Argentine art of this moment: the body, factual and libidinal.

  10. Canine hip dysplasia: significance of early bony spurring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to call attention to new bone production that often occurs early in the sequence of pathological changes associated with canine hip dysplasia. New bone production extending to bony remodeling, as well as femoral head subluxation, both occur in the sequence of pathologic changes associated with canine hip dysplasia. Subluxation is considered primary, while osteoarthrosis is a secondary feature, and both are used in the diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia. This report concerns the significance of the presence of a solitary bony osteophyte, or spur, that is frequently evident on the caudal aspect of the femoral neck as viewed on the conventional ventrodorsal projection. This report utilizes findings from pelvic radiographs of 605 dogs (five breeds). There was a greater frequency (54%)of this bony change in cases diagnosed radiographically as dysplastic than in cases diagnosed as normal(15%).Thus, it is suggested that this minimal radiographic change can be used as an indicator of early canine hip dysplasia, especially in the absence of subluxation of the femoral head

  11. NOx AND HETEROGENEITY EFFECTS IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, Dan; Camaioni, Donald M.; Orlando, Thom

    2000-01-01

    We summarize contributions from our EMSP supported research to several field operations of the Office of Environmental Management (EM). In particular we emphasize its impact on safety programs at the Hanford and other EM sites where storage, maintenance and handling of HLW is a major mission. In recent years we were engaged in coordinated efforts to understand the chemistry initiated by radiation in HLW. Three projects of the EMSP (''The NOx System in Nuclear Waste,'' ''Mechanisms and Kinetics of Organic Aging in High Level Nuclear Wastes, D. Camaioni--PI'' and ''Interfacial Radiolysis Effects in Tanks Waste, T. Orlando--PI'') were involved in that effort, which included a team at Argonne, later moved to the University of Notre Dame, and two teams at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Much effort was invested in integrating the results of the scientific studies into the engineering operations via coordination meetings and participation in various stages of the resolution of some of the outstanding safety issues at the sites. However, in this Abstract we summarize the effort at Notre Dame

  12. Effects of heterogeneity on earthquake location at ISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, R. D.

    1992-12-01

    Earthquake location at the International Seismological Centre is carried out by routine least-squares analysis using Jeffreys-Bullen travel times. It is impossible to examine every earthquake in detail, but when obvious discrepancies in location become apparent, adjustments can be made by analysts, usually in phase identification or the restraint of depth. Such discrepancies often result from inappropriateness of the Jeffreys-Bullen model. The effect is most apparent in subduction zones, where it is often difficult to reconcile local and teleseismic observations, and differences from the standard model can result in substantial mislocations. Large events, located by steeply descending teleseismic phases, may be only slightly misplaced, with large residuals at close stations giving a true indication of velocity anomalies. Small events, however, are often significantly misplaced, although giving small residuals at a few close stations. These apparently well located events give compensating misinformation about velocities and location. In other areas, especially mid-oceanic ridges, difficulties in depth determination are likely to be related to deviations from a laterally homogeneous velocity model.

  13. Long-Run Effects in Large Heterogeneous Panel Data Models with Cross-Sectionally Correlated Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Chudik, Alexander; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M Hashem; Raissi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a cross-sectionally augmented distributed lag (CS-DL) approach to the estimation of long-run effects in large dynamic heterogeneous panel data models with cross-sectionally dependent errors. The asymptotic distribution of the CS-DL estimator is derived under coefficient heterogeneity in the case where the time dimension (T) and the cross-section dimension (N) are both large. The CS-DL approach is compared with more standard panel data estimators that are based on autoregre...

  14. Long-run effects in large heterogenous panel data models with cross-sectionally correlated errors

    OpenAIRE

    Chudik, Alexander; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Pesaran, M. Hashem; Raissi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a cross-sectionally augmented distributed lag (CS-DL) approach to the estimation of long-run effects in large dynamic heterogeneous panel data models with cross-sectionally dependent errors. The asymptotic distribution of the CS-DL estimator is derived under coefficient heterogeneity in the case where the time dimension (T) and the cross-section dimension (N) are both large. The CS-DL approach is compared with more standard panel data estimators that are based on autoregre...

  15. Oxalic acid as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in the upper troposphere and its indirect aerosol effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zobrist

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice freezing points of aqueous solutions containing various immersed solid dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, adipic, succinic, phthalic and fumaric have been measured with a differential scanning calorimeter. The results show that only the dihydrate of oxalic acid (OAD acts as a heterogeneous ice nucleus, with an increase in freezing temperature between 2 and 5 K depending on solution composition. In several field campaigns, oxalic acid enriched particles have been detected in the upper troposphere with single particle aerosol mass spectrometry. Simulations with a microphysical box model indicate that the presence of OAD may reduce the ice particle number density in cirrus clouds by up to ~50% when compared to exclusively homogeneous cirrus formation without OAD. Using the ECHAM4 climate model we estimate the global net radiative effect caused by this heterogeneous freezing to result in a cooling as high as −0.3 Wm−2.

  16. Effect of heterogeneous microvasculature distribution on drug delivery to solid tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Wenbo; Xu, Xiao Yun; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Most of the computational models of drug transport in vascular tumours assume a uniform distribution of blood vessels through which anti-cancer drugs are delivered. However, it is well known that solid tumours are characterized by dilated microvasculature with non-uniform diameters and irregular branching patterns. In this study, the effect of heterogeneous vasculature on drug transport and uptake is investigated by means of mathematical modelling of the key physical and biochemical processes in drug delivery. An anatomically realistic tumour model accounting for heterogeneous distribution of blood vessels is reconstructed based on magnetic resonance images of a liver tumour. Numerical simulations are performed for different drug delivery modes, including direct continuous infusion and thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery, and the anti-cancer effectiveness is evaluated through changes in tumour cell density based on predicted intracellular concentrations. Comparisons are made between regions of different vascular density, and between the two drug delivery modes. Our numerical results show that both extra- and intra-cellular concentrations in the liver tumour are non-uniform owing to the heterogeneous distribution of tumour vasculature. Drugs accumulate faster in well-vascularized regions, where they are also cleared out more quickly, resulting in less effective tumour cell killing in these regions. Compared with direct continuous infusion, the influence of heterogeneous vasculature on anti-cancer effectiveness is more pronounced for thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery. (paper)

  17. Effect of heterogeneities on the thermoelectric power of pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In service working conditions, the vessel of the Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) undergoes an ageing due to irradiation. In order to follow the evolution of the mechanical characteristics of the steel in service, EDF launched a surveillance program which consists to carry out mechanical tests on samples aged in reactor. However, the results of these tests have the disadvantage to be affected by the presence of heterogeneities within the steel. Indeed, because of its manufacturing process, the steel contains segregated areas. Thus, EDF launched Thermoelectric Power Measurements (TEP) on the resilience samples of the surveillance program, to complete the mechanical tests and to help with their interpretation. However, these measurements are today difficult to analyse because they include at the same time the effect of the irradiation and the effect of the metallurgical heterogeneities. The aim of this work consisted in evaluating the effect of the heterogeneities on the TEP of the non-irradiated vessel steel. For that, a numerical model was developed which allows to calculate the TEP of a composite structure. We have shown that the model is pertinent to highlight the effect of the heterogeneities on the TEP of the vessel steel, which is considered like a 'matrix'/'segregation' composite. The model allowed us to put emphasis on the influence of different parameters on the TEP measurement. We have thus showed that the measurements conditions have an important effect on the obtained TEP value (influence of the applied pressure, the position of the sample on the device, the site of the metallurgical heterogeneities,...). (author)

  18. The effect of heterogeneous dynamics of online users on information filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bo-Lun; Zeng, An; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of the Internet requires effective information filtering techniques to extract the most essential and relevant information for online users. Many recommendation algorithms have been proposed to predict the future items that a given user might be interested in. However, there is an important issue that has always been ignored so far in related works, namely the heterogeneous dynamics of online users. The interest of active users changes more often than that of less active users, which asks for different update frequency of their recommendation lists. In this paper, we develop a framework to study the effect of heterogeneous dynamics of users on the recommendation performance. We find that the personalized application of recommendation algorithms results in remarkable improvement in the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Our findings may help online retailers make better use of the existing recommendation methods. - Highlights: • We study the effect of heterogeneous dynamics of users on recommendation. • Due to the user heterogeneity, their amount of links in the probe set is different. • The personalized algorithm implementation improves the recommendation performance. • Our results suggest different update frequency for users – recommendation list.

  19. The effect of small intestine heterogeneity on irreversible electroporation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary

    2014-09-01

    Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) is an ablation modality that utilizes microsecond electric fields to produce nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. This results in selective cell death while preserving all other molecules, including the extracellular matrix. Here, finite element analysis and experimental results are utilized to examine the effect of NTIRE on the small intestine due to concern over collateral damage to this organ during NTIRE treatment of abdominal cancers. During previous studies, the electrical treatment parameters were chosen based on a simplified homogeneous tissue model. The small intestine, however, has very distinct layers, and a more realistic model is needed to further develop this technology for precise clinical applications. This study uses a two-dimensional finite element solution of the Laplace and heat conduction equations to investigate how small intestine heterogeneities affect the electric field and temperature distribution. Experimental results obtained by applying NTIRE to the rat small intestine in vivo support the heterogeneous effect of NTIRE on the tissue. The numerical modeling indicates that the electroporation parameters chosen for this study avoid thermal damage to the tissue. This is supported by histology obtained from the in vivo study, which showed preservation of extracellular structures. The finite element model also indicates that the heterogeneous structure of the small intestine has a significant effect on the electric field and volume of cell ablation during electroporation and could have a large impact on the extent of treatment. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue should be accounted for in clinical treatment planning.

  20. Segmentation of Craniomaxillofacial Bony Structures from MRI with a 3D Deep-Learning Based Cascade Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Dong; Wang, Li; Trullo, Roger; Li, Jianfu; Yuan, Peng; Xia, James

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is commonly used as a diagnostic and treatment planning imaging modality in craniomaxillofacial (CMF) surgery to correct patient’s bony defects. A major disadvantage of CT is that it emits harmful ionizing radiation to patients during the exam. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered to be much safer and noninvasive, and often used to study CMF soft tissues (e.g., temporomandibular joint and brain). However, it is extremely difficult to accurately segment CMF bony structures from MRI since both bone and air appear to be black in MRI, along with low signal-to-noise ratio and partial volume effect. To this end, we proposed a 3D deep-learning based cascade framework to solve these issues. Specifically, a 3D fully convolutional network (FCN) architecture is first adopted to coarsely segment the bony structures. As the coarsely segmented bony structures by FCN tend to be thicker, convolutional neural network (CNN) is further utilized for fine-grained segmentation. To enhance the discriminative ability of the CNN, we particularly concatenate the predicted probability maps from FCN and the original MRI, and feed them together into the CNN to provide more context information for segmentation. Experimental results demonstrate a good performance and also the clinical feasibility of our proposed 3D deep-learning based cascade framework. PMID:29417097

  1. Effect of homogenous-heterogeneous reactions on MHD Prandtl fluid flow over a stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imad; Malik, M. Y.; Hussain, Arif; Salahuddin, T.

    An analysis is performed to explore the effects of homogenous-heterogeneous reactions on two-dimensional flow of Prandtl fluid over a stretching sheet. In present analysis, we used the developed model of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in boundary layer flow. The mathematical configuration of presented flow phenomenon yields the nonlinear partial differential equations. Using scaling transformations, the governing partial differential equations (momentum equation and homogenous-heterogeneous reactions equations) are transformed into non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODE's). Then, resulting non-linear ODE's are solved by computational scheme known as shooting method. The quantitative and qualitative manners of concerned physical quantities (velocity, concentration and drag force coefficient) are examined under prescribed physical constrained through figures and tables. It is observed that velocity profile enhances verses fluid parameters α and β while Hartmann number reduced it. The homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions parameters have reverse effects on concentration profile. Concentration profile shows retarding behavior for large values of Schmidt number. Skin fraction coefficient enhances with increment in Hartmann number H and fluid parameter α .

  2. Model-based definition of population heterogeneity and its effects on metabolism in sporulating Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Mineo; Ohashi, Yoshiaki; Tani, Saeka; Ishii, Kotaro; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Nanamiya, Hideaki; Kawamura, Fujio; Tomita, Masaru; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2007-08-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms dormant, robust spores as a tactic to ensure survival under conditions of starvation. However, the sporulating culture includes sporulating and non-sporulating cells, because a portion of the cell population initiates sporulation in wild-type strain. We anticipated that the population effect must be considered carefully to analyse samples yielding population heterogeneity. We first built a mathematical model and simulated for signal transduction of the sporulation cue to see what mechanisms are responsible for generating the heterogeneity. The simulated results were confirmed experimentally, where heterogeneity is primarily modulated by negative feedback circuits, resulting in generation of a bistable response within the sporulating culture. We also confirmed that mutants relevant to negative feedback yield either sporulating or non-sporulating subpopulations. To see the effect of molecular mechanism between sporulating and non-sporulating cells in distinct manner, metabolome analysis was conducted using the above mutants. The metabolic profiles exhibited distinct characteristics with time regardless of whether sporulation was initiated or not. In addition, several distinct characteristics of metabolites were observed between strains, which was inconsistent with previously reported data. The results imply that careful consideration must be made in the interpretation of data obtained from cells yielding population heterogeneity.

  3. Effects of incomplete mixing on reactive transport in flows through heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Elise E.; Richter, David H.; Bolster, Diogo

    2017-11-01

    The phenomenon of incomplete mixing reduces bulk effective reaction rates in reactive transport. Many existing models do not account for these effects, resulting in the overestimation of reaction rates in laboratory and field settings. To date, most studies on incomplete mixing have focused on diffusive systems; here, we extend these to explore the role that flow heterogeneity has on incomplete mixing. To do this, we examine reactive transport using a Lagrangian reactive particle tracking algorithm in two-dimensional idealized heterogeneous porous media. Contingent on the nondimensional Peclet and Damköhler numbers in the system, it was found that near well-mixed behavior could be observed at late times in the heterogeneous flow field simulations. We look at three common flow deformation metrics that describe the enhancement of mixing in the flow due to velocity gradients: the Okubo-Weiss parameter (θ ), the largest eigenvalue of the Cauchy-Green strain tensor (λC), and the finite-time Lyapunov exponent (Λ ). Strong mixing regions in the heterogeneous flow field identified by these metrics were found to correspond to regions with higher numbers of reactions, but the infrequency of these regions compared to the large numbers of reactions occurring elsewhere in the domain imply that these strong mixing regions are insufficient in explaining the observed near well-mixed behavior. Since it was found that reactive transport in these heterogeneous flows could overcome the effects of incomplete mixing, we also search for a closure for the mean concentration. The conservative quantity u2¯, where u =CA-CB , was found to predict the late time scaling of the mean concentration, i.e., Ci¯˜u2¯ .

  4. Combined effects of landscape composition and heterogeneity on farmland avian diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Joana; Reino, Luís; Stoate, Chris; Moreira, Francisco; Ribeiro, Paulo F; Santos, José L; Rotenberry, John T; Beja, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    Conserving biodiversity on farmland is an essential element of worldwide efforts for reversing the global biodiversity decline. Common approaches involve improving the natural component of the landscape by increasing the amount of natural and seminatural habitats (e.g., hedgerows, woodlots, and ponds) or improving the production component of the landscape by increasing the amount of biodiversity-friendly crops. Because these approaches may negatively impact on economic output, it was suggested that an alternative might be to enhance the diversity (compositional heterogeneity) or the spatial complexity (configurational heterogeneity) of land cover types, without necessarily changing composition. Here, we develop a case study to evaluate these ideas, examining whether managing landscape composition or heterogeneity, or both, would be required to achieve conservation benefits on avian diversity in open Mediterranean farmland. We surveyed birds in farmland landscapes of southern Portugal, before (1995-1997) and after (2010-2012) the European Union's Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) reform of 2003, and related spatial and temporal variation in bird species richness to variables describing the composition, and the compositional and configurational heterogeneity, of the natural and production components of the landscape. We found that the composition of the production component had the strongest effects on avian diversity, with a particularly marked effect on the richness of farmland and steppe bird species. Composition of the natural component was also influential, mainly affecting the richness of woodland/shrubland species. Although there were some effects of compositional and configurational heterogeneity, these were much weaker and inconsistent than those of landscape composition. Overall, we suggest that conservation efforts in our area should focus primarily on the composition of the production component, by striving to maximize the prevalence of biodiversity

  5. Effects of 2 nm size added heterogeneity on non-exponential dielectric response, and the dynamic heterogeneity view of molecular liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.; Khouri, J.

    2012-09-01

    To investigate how non-exponential response could vary under different conditions, we studied the effects of adding 2 nm size polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A, whose molecules have the same terminal (epoxide) dipoles as the tentacle-like side chains attached to the silsesquioxane core of the POSS molecule. Dielectric relaxation spectra show that, on initial addition, the POSS nano-heterogeneity decreases the non-exponential response parameter β, which is consistent with the dynamic heterogeneity view, but it also decreases the relaxation time τm, which is inconsistent with that view. The variations in β and τm with the composition have a thermal equivalence. Despite the lack of translational diffusion required for dynamic heterogeneity, plastic crystals show non-exponential response and non-Arrhenius dynamics. Measurements of β and τm seem more appropriate than using probe molecules or modeling nonlinear response data as a sum of linear responses for testing the dynamic heterogeneity view. Data on molecular liquid mixtures is not generally consistent with this view, and adding a solute does not always decrease β. Studies of mixtures of different size rigid molecules with identical dipolar groups, including polymers, may be useful for comparing the relative effects of temperature and molecular size on β and τm.

  6. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuxart, Joan; Wrenger, Burkhard; Martínez-Villagrasa, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius O.; Jiménez, Maria A.; Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Hartogensis, Oscar; Dünnermann, Jens; Conangla, Laura; Garai, Anirban

    2016-07-01

    The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate its importance as a term in the surface energy budget (SEB), for which the turbulent fluxes are computed using the eddy-correlation method. The heterogeneities are estimated from satellite and model fields for scales near 1 km or broader, while the smaller scales are estimated through direct measurements with remotely piloted aircraft and thermal cameras and also by high-resolution modelling. The variability of the surface temperature fields is not found to decrease clearly with increasing resolution, and consequently the advection term becomes more important as the scales become finer. The advection term provides non-significant values to the SEB at scales larger than a few kilometres. In contrast, surface heterogeneities at the metre scale yield large values of the advection, which are probably only significant in the first centimetres above the ground. The motions that seem to contribute significantly to the advection term in the SEB equation in our case are roughly those around the hectometre scales.

  7. Estimation of the advection effects induced by surface heterogeneities in the surface energy budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cuxart

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of terrain heterogeneities in one-point measurements is a continuous subject of discussion. Here we focus on the order of magnitude of the advection term in the equation of the evolution of temperature as generated by documented terrain heterogeneities and we estimate its importance as a term in the surface energy budget (SEB, for which the turbulent fluxes are computed using the eddy-correlation method. The heterogeneities are estimated from satellite and model fields for scales near 1 km or broader, while the smaller scales are estimated through direct measurements with remotely piloted aircraft and thermal cameras and also by high-resolution modelling. The variability of the surface temperature fields is not found to decrease clearly with increasing resolution, and consequently the advection term becomes more important as the scales become finer. The advection term provides non-significant values to the SEB at scales larger than a few kilometres. In contrast, surface heterogeneities at the metre scale yield large values of the advection, which are probably only significant in the first centimetres above the ground. The motions that seem to contribute significantly to the advection term in the SEB equation in our case are roughly those around the hectometre scales.

  8. Allergenicity of bony and cartilaginous fish - molecular and immunological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, J N; Sharp, M F; Ruethers, T; Taki, A; Campbell, D E; Lopata, A L

    2017-03-01

    Allergy to bony fish is common and probably increasing world-wide. The major heat-stable pan-fish allergen, parvalbumin (PV), has been identified and characterized for numerous fish species. In contrast, there are very few reports of allergic reactions to cartilaginous fish despite widespread consumption. The molecular basis for this seemingly low clinical cross-reactivity between these two fish groups has not been elucidated. PV consists of two distinct protein lineages, α and β. The α-lineage of this protein is predominant in muscle tissue of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes), while β-PV is abundant in muscle tissue of bony fish (Osteichthyes). The low incidence of allergic reactions to ingested rays and sharks is likely due to the lack of molecular similarity, resulting in reduced immunological cross-reactivity between the two PV lineages. Structurally and physiologically, both protein lineages are very similar; however, the amino acid homology is very low with 47-54%. Furthermore, PV from ancient fish species such as the coelacanth demonstrates 62% sequence homology to leopard shark α-PV and 70% to carp β-PV. This indicates the extent of conservation of the PV isoforms lineages across millennia. This review highlights prevalence data on fish allergy and sensitization to fish, and details the molecular diversity of the two protein lineages of the major fish allergen PV among different fish groups, emphasizing the immunological and clinical differences in allergenicity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effective conductivity of isotropic highly heterogeneous formations: Numerical and theoretical issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Igor; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2013-02-01

    We consider three-dimensional uniform flow in heterogeneous porous media characterized by a spatially variable hydraulic conductivity K(x); the latter is considered as a stationary random function of lognormal distribution (mean ln KG and variance σY2 of Y = ln K) and of finite integral scale IY. We investigate the effective conductivity Kef of such formation by adopting a structural model of cubical inclusions that tessellate the space. The domain is large compared to IY. The dependence of Kef/KG upon σY2 is determined by numerical simulations that are performed in parallel employing 2.5 × 109 cells. This technical note focuses on numerical issues in media with strong heterogeneity: domain discretization and the averaging scheme for the intercell conductivity. The effective conductivity is also derived using the self-consistent approximation.

  10. Heterogeneity in the response to gasoline prices: Evidence from Pennsylvania and implications for the rebound effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillingham, Kenneth; Jenn, Alan; Azevedo, Inês M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The consumer response to changing gasoline prices has long interested economists and policymakers, for it has important implications for the effects of gasoline taxation and vehicle energy efficiency policies. This study examines both the elasticity of driving with respect to changing gasoline prices and heterogeneity in this elasticity by geography, the fuel economy of the vehicle, and the age of the vehicle. We use detailed annual vehicle-level emissions inspection test data from Pennsylvania that include odometer readings, inspection zip codes, and extensive vehicle characteristics. We estimate a short-run gasoline price elasticity of driving demand of − 0.10, and find substantial heterogeneity in this responsiveness. The elasticity is largely driven by low fuel economy vehicles, as well as vehicles between 3 and 7 years old. Our findings help reconcile some of the recent literature and provide guidance on the magnitude of the direct rebound effect from light duty vehicle energy efficiency policies.

  11. A bootstrap test for instrument validity in heterogeneous treatment effect models

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a specification test for the instrument validity conditions in the heterogeneous treatment effect model with a binary treatment and a discrete instrument. A necessary testable implication for the joint restriction of instrument exogeneity and instrument monotonicity is given by nonnegativity of point-identifiable complier's outcome densities. Our specification test infers this testable implication using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov type test statistic. We provide a bootstrap algor...

  12. Flow and transport in unsaturated fractured rock: Effects of multiscale heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2002-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogeologic properties at different scales may have different effects on flow and transport processes in a subsurface system. A model for the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is developed to represent complex heterogeneity at two different scales: (1) layer scale corresponding to geologic layering and (2) local scale. The layer-scale hydrogeologic properties are obtained using inverse modeling, based on the available measurements collected from the Yucca Mountain site. Calibration results show a significant lateral and vertical variability in matrix and fracture properties. Hydrogeologic property distributions in a two-dimensional, vertical cross section of the site are generated by combining the average layer-scale matrix and fracture properties with local-scale perturbations generated using a stochastic simulation method. The unsaturated water flow and conservative (nonsorbing) tracer transport through the cross section are simulated for different sets of matrix and fracture property fields. Comparison of simulation results indicates that the local-scale heterogeneity of matrix and fracture properties has a considerable effect on unsaturated flow processes, leading to fast flow paths in fractures and the matrix. These paths shorten the travel time of a conservative tracer from the source (repository) horizon in the unsaturated zone to the water table for small fractions of total released tracer mass. As a result, the local-scale heterogeneity also has a noticeable effect on global tracer transport processes, characterized by an average breakthrough curve at the water table, especially at the early arrival time of tracer mass. However, the effect is not significant at the later time after 20 percent tracer mass reaches the water table. The simulation results also verify that matrix diffusion plays an important role in overall solute transport processes in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain

  13. Application of Effective Medium Theory to the Three-Dimensional Heterogeneity of Mantle Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    A self-consistent theory for the effective elastic parameters of stochastic media with small-scale 3D heterogeneities has been developed using a 2nd-order Born approximation to the scattered wavefield (T. H. Jordan, GJI, in press). Here we apply the theory to assess how small-scale variations in the local anisotropy of the upper mantle affect seismic wave propagation. We formulate a anisotropic model in which the local elastic properties are specified by a constant stiffness tensor with hexagonal symmetry of arbitrary orientation. This orientation is guided by a Gaussian random vector field with transversely isotropic (TI) statistics. If the outer scale of the statistical variability is small compared to a wavelength, then the effective seismic velocities are TI and depend on two parameters, a horizontal-to-vertical orientation ratio ξ and a horizontal-to-vertical aspect ratio, η. If ξ = 1, the symmetry axis is isotropically distributed; if ξ 1, it is horizontally biased (girdle distribution). If η = 1, the heterogeneity is geometrically isotropic; as η à∞, the medium becomes a horizontal stochastic laminate; as η à0, the medium becomes a vertical stochastic bundle. Using stiffness tensors constrained by laboratory measurements of mantle xenoliths, we explore the dependence of the effective P and S velocities on ξ and η. The effective velocities are strongly controlled by the orientation ratio ξ; e.g., if the hexagonal symmetry axis of the local anisotropy is the fast direction of propagation, then vPH > vPV and vSH > vSV for ξ > 1. A more surprising result is the 2nd-order insensitivity of the velocities to the heterogeneity aspect ratio η. Consequently, the geometrical anisotropy of upper-mantle heterogeneity significantly enhances seismic-wave anisotropy only through local variations in the Voigt-averaged velocities, which depend primarily on rock composition and not deformation history.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of fluid flow induced by thermal effect in heterogeneity porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a coupled lattice Boltzmann model is used to visually study fluid flow induced by thermal effect in heterogeneity porous media reconstructed by the quartet structure generation set. The fluid flow behavior inside porous media is presented and analyzed under different conditions. The simulation results indicate that the pore morphological properties of porous media and the Rayleigh number have noticeable impact on the velocity distribution and flow rate of fluid.

  15. Effects of surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow in microchannel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masilamani, Kannan; Ganguly, Suvankar; Feichtinger, Christian; Bartuschat, Dominik; Rüde, Ulrich, E-mail: suva_112@yahoo.co.in [Department of Computer Science 10 University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr.11 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann and finite-difference (LB-FD) model is applied to simulate the effects of three-dimensional surface roughness and electrokinetic heterogeneity on electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a microchannel. The lattice-Boltzmann (LB) method has been employed to obtain the flow field and a finite-difference (FD) method is used to solve the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for the electrostatic potential distribution. Numerical simulation of flow through a square cross-section microchannel with designed roughness is conducted and the results are critically analysed. The effects of surface heterogeneity on the electroosmotic transport are investigated for different roughness height, width, roughness interval spacing, and roughness surface potential. Numerical simulations reveal that the presence of surface roughness changes the nature of electroosmotic transport through the microchannel. It is found that the electroosmotic velocity decreases with the increase in roughness height and the velocity profile becomes asymmetric. For the same height of the roughness elements, the EOF velocity rises with the increase in roughness width. For the heterogeneously charged rough channel, the velocity profile shows a distinct deviation from the conventional plug-like flow pattern. The simulation results also indicate locally induced flow vortices which can be utilized to enhance the flow and mixing within the microchannel. The present study has important implications towards electrokinetic flow control in the microchannel, and can provide an efficient way to design a microfluidic system of practical interest. (paper)

  16. The value of heterogeneity for cost-effectiveness subgroup analysis: conceptual framework and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Manuel A; Manca, Andrea; Claxton, Karl; Sculpher, Mark J

    2014-11-01

    This article develops a general framework to guide the use of subgroup cost-effectiveness analysis for decision making in a collectively funded health system. In doing so, it addresses 2 key policy questions, namely, the identification and selection of subgroups, while distinguishing 2 sources of potential value associated with heterogeneity. These are 1) the value of revealing the factors associated with heterogeneity in costs and outcomes using existing evidence (static value) and 2) the value of acquiring further subgroup-related evidence to resolve the uncertainty given the current understanding of heterogeneity (dynamic value). Consideration of these 2 sources of value can guide subgroup-specific treatment decisions and inform whether further research should be conducted to resolve uncertainty to explain variability in costs and outcomes. We apply the proposed methods to a cost-effectiveness analysis for the management of patients with acute coronary syndrome. This study presents the expected net benefits under current and perfect information when subgroups are defined based on the use and combination of 6 binary covariates. The results of the case study confirm the theoretical expectations. As more subgroups are considered, the marginal net benefit gains obtained under the current information show diminishing marginal returns, and the expected value of perfect information shows a decreasing trend. We present a suggested algorithm that synthesizes the results to guide policy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Exact asymptotic relations for the effective response of linear viscoelastic heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallican, Valentin; Brenner, Renald; Suquet, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    This article addresses the asymptotic response of viscoelastic heterogeneous media in the frequency domain, at high and low frequencies, for different types of elementary linear viscoelastic constituents. By resorting to stationary principles for complex viscoelasticity and adopting a classification of the viscoelastic behaviours based on the nature of their asymptotic regimes, either elastic or viscous, four exact relations are obtained on the overall viscoelastic complex moduli in each case. Two relations are related to the asymptotic uncoupled heterogeneous problems, while the two remaining ones result from the viscoelastic coupling that manifests itself in the transient regime. These results also provide exact conditions on certain integrals in time of the effective relaxation spectrum. This general setting encompasses the results obtained in preceding studies on mixtures of Maxwell constituents [1,2]. xml:lang="fr"

  18. The Effect of Viscosity and Heterogeneity on Propagation of G–Type Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Shishir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes yield motions of massive rock layers accompanied by vibrations which travel in waves. This paper analyses the possibility of G-type wave propagation along the plane surface at the interface of two different media which is assumed to be heterogeneous and viscoelastic. The upper layer is considered to be viscoelastic and the lower half space is considered to be an initially stressed heterogeneous half space. The dispersion equation, as well as the phase and group velocities, is obtained in closed form. The dispersion equation agrees with the classical Love type wave. The effects of the nonhomogeneity of the parameters and the initial stress on the phase and group velocities are expressed by means of a graph.

  19. Potential implications of the bystander effect on TCP and EUD when considering target volume dose heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderson, Michael J; Kirkby, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In light of in vitro evidence suggesting that radiation-induced bystander effects may enhance non-local cell killing, there is potential for impact on radiotherapy treatment planning paradigms such as the goal of delivering a uniform dose throughout the clinical target volume (CTV). This work applies a bystander effect model to calculate equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) for external beam prostate treatment and compares the results with a more common model where local response is dictated exclusively by local absorbed dose. The broad assumptions applied in the bystander effect model are intended to place an upper limit on the extent of the results in a clinical context. EUD and TCP of a prostate cancer target volume under conditions of increasing dose heterogeneity were calculated using two models: One incorporating bystander effects derived from previously published in vitro bystander data ( McMahon et al. 2012 , 2013a); and one using a common linear-quadratic (LQ) response that relies exclusively on local absorbed dose. Dose through the CTV was modelled as a normal distribution, where the degree of heterogeneity was then dictated by changing the standard deviation (SD). Also, a representative clinical dose distribution was examined as cold (low dose) sub-volumes were systematically introduced. The bystander model suggests a moderate degree of dose heterogeneity throughout a target volume will yield as good or better outcome compared to a uniform dose in terms of EUD and TCP. For a typical intermediate risk prostate prescription of 78 Gy over 39 fractions maxima in EUD and TCP as a function of increasing SD occurred at SD ∼ 5 Gy. The plots only dropped below the uniform dose values for SD ∼ 10 Gy, almost 13% of the prescribed dose. Small, but potentially significant differences in the outcome metrics between the models were identified in the clinically-derived dose distribution as cold sub-volumes were introduced. In terms of

  20. Effect of crustal heterogeneities and effective rock strength on the formation of HP and UHP rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan; White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    next step, we performed several hundred numerical simulations to understand the effects of km-scale heterogeneities and material parameters on pressure magnitudes, using a model setup that is otherwise very similar to the one of Li et al. (2010). Results show that significant non-lithostatic pressures occur if (lower) crustal rocks are dry or if km-scale (nappe-sized) heterogeneities with dryer rocks are present within the crust. Overpressure magnitudes can be up to 1 GPa or 100% and in some cases rock assemblages are temporarily in the coesite stability field at a depth of only 40 km, followed by rapid exhumation to the surface. Tectonic overpressures can vary strongly in magnitude versus time, but peak pressures are present sufficiently long for metamorphic reactions to occur. The presence of heterogeneities can affect the crustal-scaled deformation pattern, and the effective friction angle of crustal-scale rocks (or the dryness of these rocks) is a key parameter that determines the magnitude of non-lithostatic pressures. Our results thus reconcile previous findings and highlight the importance of having an accurate knowledge of the fluid-pressure, initial crustal structure and rock composition during continental collision. If rocks are dry by the time they enter a subduction zone, or are stronger/dryer than surrounding rocks, they are likely to develop significantly higher pressures than nearby rocks. This might explain the puzzling observation that some nappes have very high peak pressures, while juxtaposed nappes have much lower values, without clear structural evidence for deep burial and exhumation along a subduction channel of the high-pressure nappe. Our models might also give a partial explanation of why the reported timescales for high and ultra-high pressure stages of peak metamorphism are often very short. References: Burov, E., Francois, T., Agard, P., Le Pourhiet, L., Meyer, B., Tirel, C., Lebedev, S., Yamato, P., Brun, J.-P., 2014. Tectonophysics

  1. Inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty for bony ankylosed elbows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Chadrabose

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bony ankylosis of elbow is challenging and difficult problem to treat. The options are excision arthroplasty and total elbow replacement. We report our midterm results on nine patients, who underwent inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty in our hospital with good functional results. Materials Our case series includes 9 patients (seven males and two females with the mean age of 34 years (13-56 years. Five patients had trauma, two had pyogenic arthritis, one had tuberculous arthritis, and one had pyogenic arthritis following surgical fixation. Results The average duration of follow up is 65 months (45 months-80 months. The mean Mayo's elbow performance score (MEPS preoperatively was 48 (35-70. The MEPS at final follow up was 80 (60-95. With no movement at elbow and fixed in various degrees of either flexion or extension preoperatively, the mean preoperative position of elbow was 64°(30°to 100°. The mean post operative range of motion at final follow up was 27°of extension (20-500, 116°of flexion (1100-1300, and the arc of motion was 88°(800-1000. One patient had ulnar nerve neuropraxia and another patient developed median nerve neuropraxia, and both recovered completely in six weeks. No patient had symptomatic instability of the elbow. All patients were asymptomatic except one patient, who had pain mainly on heavy activities. Conclusion We conclude that inverted 'V' osteotomy excision arthroplasty is a viable option in the treatment of bony ankylosis of the elbow in young patients.

  2. A method to calculate the effect of heterogeneous composition on bundle power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    In the DUPIC fuel cycle, the spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel is used in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor. Depending on the initial condition and burnup history of PWR fuel, the DUPIC fuel composition varies accordingly. In order to see the effect of the fuel composition, a simple and fast method was developed and applied to the DUPIC fuel. This report discusses the method developed to predict the effect of heterogeneous fuel composition on the bundle power. (author). 3 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Characterizing the surface heterogeneity of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roy, DP

    2005-10-10

    Full Text Available of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data D. P. Roy a; T. Landmann ba Department of Geography, College Park, and NASA Goddard, Space Flight Center, University of Maryland. Code 614.5 (B32), Greenbelt, MD 20771. USAb CSIR Environmentek... Characterizing the surface heterogeneity of fire effects using multi-temporal reflective wavelength data D. P. ROY*{ and T. LANDMANN{ {Department of Geography, University of Maryland, College Park, and NASA Goddard, Space Flight Center, Code 614.5 (B32...

  4. Correlation of Effective Dispersive and Polar Surface Energies in Heterogeneous Self-Assembled Monolayer Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Yanxin; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    grown oil oxidized (100) silicon Surfaces in a vapor phase process using five different precursors. Experimentally, effective surface energy components of the fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers were determined from measured contact angles using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. We show......We show, theoretically, that the measured effective dispersive and polar surface energies of a heterogeneous Surface are correlated; the correlation, however, differs whether a Cassic or an Israelachvili and Gee model is assumed. Fluorocarbon self-assembled monolayers with varying coverage were...

  5. The effects of transit time heterogeneity on brain oxygenation during rest and functional activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Peter M; Jespersen, Sune N; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    The interpretation of regional blood flow and blood oxygenation changes during functional activation has evolved from the concept of ‘neurovascular coupling', and hence the regulation of arteriolar tone to meet metabolic demands. The efficacy of oxygen extraction was recently shown to depend on the heterogeneity of capillary flow patterns downstream. Existing compartment models of the relation between tissue metabolism, blood flow, and blood oxygenation, however, typically assume homogenous microvascular flow patterns. To take capillary flow heterogeneity into account, we modeled the effect of capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) on the ‘oxygen conductance' used in compartment models. We show that the incorporation of realistic reductions in CTH during functional hyperemia improves model fits to dynamic blood flow and oxygenation changes acquired during functional activation in a literature animal study. Our results support earlier observations that oxygen diffusion properties seemingly change during various physiologic stimuli, and posit that this phenomenon is related to parallel changes in capillary flow patterns. Furthermore, our results suggest that CTH must be taken into account when inferring brain metabolism from changes in blood flow- or blood oxygenation-based signals . PMID:25492112

  6. Effects of dispersal and environmental heterogeneity on the replacement and nestedness components of β-diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianuca, Andros T; Declerck, Steven A J; Lemmens, Pieter; De Meester, Luc

    2017-02-01

    Traditionally metacommunity studies have quantified the relative importance of dispersal and environmental processes on observed β-diversity. Separating β-diversity into its replacement and nestedness components and linking such patterns to metacommunity drivers can provide richer insights into biodiversity organization across spatial scales. It is often very difficult to measure actual dispersal rates in the field and to define the boundaries of natural metacommunities. To overcome those limitations, we revisited an experimental metacommunity dataset to test the independent and interacting effects of environmental heterogeneity and dispersal on each component of β-diversity. We show that the balance between the replacement and nestedness components of β-diversity resulting from eutrophication changes completely depending on dispersal rates. Nutrient enrichment negatively affected local zooplankton diversity and generated a pattern of β-diversity derived from nestedness in unconnected, environmentally heterogeneous landscapes. Increasing dispersal erased the pattern of nestedness, whereas the replacement component gained importance. In environmentally homogeneous metacommunities, dispersal limitation created community dissimilarity via species replacement whereas the nestedness component remained low and unchanged across dispersal levels. Our study provides novel insights into how environmental heterogeneity and dispersal interact and shape metacommunity structure. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. The effects of nitrate on the heterogeneous uptake of sulfur dioxide on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, L. D.; Zhao, X.; Sun, Z. Y.; Yang, Y. W.; Fu, H. B.; Zhang, S. C.; Cheng, T. T.; Yang, X.; Wang, L.; Chen, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrate is often found to be associated with atmospheric particles. Surface nitrate can change the hygroscopicity of these particles, and thus impact their chemical reactivity. However, the influence of nitrate on heterogeneous reactions of atmospheric trace gases is poorly understood. In this work, the effects of nitrate on heterogeneous conversion of SO2 with hematite at 298 K are investigated using an in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and a White cell coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (White cell-FTIR). It is found that nitrate participates in heterogeneous reactions of SO2, accelerates the formation rate of sulfate, and leads to the formation of surface-adsorbed HNO3 and gas-phase N2O and HONO. The results indicate that low to moderate amounts of nitrate significantly enhance the reactivity of hematite-nitrate mixtures, the uptake of SO2, and the formation of sulfate on hematite. For mixtures, the sample containing 24% nitrate exhibits the highest sulfate formation rate, and its corresponding uptake coefficient calculated by geometric surface area is about 5.5 times higher than that of hematite alone. The sample containing 48% nitrate presents the highest Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) uptake coefficient, and the value is about 8 times higher than that of pure hematite. No uptake of SO2 and formation of sulfate are observed on pure nitrate. Evidence presented herein implies a significant contribution of the unreleased HNO3 and HONO in the particles for the conversion of SO2 and the enhanced formation of sulfate in the atmosphere. A possible mechanism for the influence of nitrate on the heterogeneous conversion of SO2 on hematite is proposed, and atmospheric implications based on these results are discussed.

  8. Study of the heterogeneity effects of lung in the evaluation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho

    2006-02-01

    The main objective of radiotherapy is to deliver the highest possible dose to the tumour, in order to destroy it, reducing as much as possible the doses to healthy tissues adjacent to the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to do a planning of the treatment. The more complex is the treatment, the more difficult the planning will be, demanding computation sophisticated methods in its execution, in order to consider the heterogeneities present in the human body. Additionally, with the appearing of new radiotherapeutic techniques, that used irradiation fields of small area, for instance, the intensity modulated radiotherapy, the difficulties for the execution of a reliable treatment planning, became still larger. In this work it was studied the influence of the lung heterogeneity in the planning of the curves of percentage depth dose, PDP, obtained with the Eclipse R planning system for different sizes of irradiation fields, using the correction algorithms for heterogeneities available in the planning system: modified Batho, general Batho and equivalent tissue-air ratio. A thorax phantom, manufactured in acrylic, containing a region made of cork to simulate the lung tissue, was used. The PDP curves generated by the planning system were compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and with the use of thermoluminescent, TL, dosimetry. It was verified that the algorithms used by the Eclipse R system for the correction of heterogeneity effects are not able to generate correct results for PDP curves in the case of small fields, occurring differences of up to 100%, when the 1x1 cm 2 treatment field is considered. These differences can cause a considerable subdosage in the lung tissue, reducing the possibility of the patient cure. (author)

  9. Identifying Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in Clinical Trials Using Subpopulations of Events: STEPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Ann A.; Bonetti, Marco; Cole, Bernard F.; Yip, Wai-ki; Gelber, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigators conducting randomized clinical trials (RCTs) often explore treatment effect heterogeneity to assess whether treatment efficacy varies according to patient characteristics. Identifying heterogeneity is central to making informed personalized health care decisions. Treatment effect heterogeneity can be investigated using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP), a non-parametric graphical approach that constructs overlapping patient subpopulations with varying values of a characteristic. Procedures for statistical testing using STEPP when the endpoint of interest is survival remain an area of active investigation. Motivating Data A STEPP analysis was used to explore patterns of absolute and relative treatment effects for varying levels of a breast cancer biomarker, Ki-67, in the phase III BIG (Breast International Group) 1-98 RCT, comparing letrozole to tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Absolute treatment effects were measured by differences in 4-year cumulative incidence of breast cancer recurrence, while relative effects were measured by the subdistribution hazard ratio in the presence of competing risks using O − E (observed-minus-expected) methodology, an intuitive non-parametric method. While estimation of hazard ratio values based on O − E methodology has been shown, a similar development for the subdistribution hazard ratio has not. Furthermore, we observed that the STEPP analysis, may not produce results, even with 100 patients within each subpopulation. After further investigation through simulation studies, we observed inflation of the type I error rate of the traditional test statistic and sometimes singular variance-covariance matrix estimates that may lead to results not being produced. This is due to the lack of a sufficient number of events within the subpopulations, which we refer to as instability of a STEPP analysis. Methods We introduce

  10. The heterogeneity of the cigarette price effect on body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Courtemanche, Charles J

    2012-09-01

    Previous studies estimate the average effect of cigarette price on body mass index (BMI), with recent research showing that their different methodologies all point to a negative effect after several years. This literature, however, ignores the possibility that the effect could vary throughout the BMI distribution or across socioeconomic and demographic groups due to differences in underlying obesity risks or preferences for health. We evaluate heterogeneity in the long-run impact of cigarette price on BMI by performing quantile regressions and stratifying the sample by race, education, age, and sex. Cigarette price has a highly heterogeneous negative effect that is more than three times as strong at high BMI levels--where weight loss is most beneficial for health--than at low levels. The effects are also strongest for blacks, college graduates, middle-aged adults, and women. We also assess the implications for disparities, conduct robustness checks, and evaluate potential mechanisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Minimally Invasive Surgery Combined with Regenerative Biomaterials in Treating Intra-Bony Defects: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Wenyang; Song, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    Background With the popularity of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in periodontics, numerous publications have evaluated the benefits of MIS with or without various regenerative biomaterials in the treatment of periodontal intra-bony defects. However, it is unclear if it is necessary to use biomaterials in MIS. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials in patients with intra-bony defects to compare the clinical outcomes of MIS with regenerative biomaterials for MIS alone. Methods The authors retrieved English publications on relevant studies from Cochrane CENTRAL, PubMed, Medline, Embase, Clinical Evidence, and ClinicalTrails.gov (up to June 30, 2015). The main clinical outcomes were the reduction of probing pocket depths (PPDs), gain of clinical attachment level (CAL), recession of gingival margin (REC) and radiographic bone fill. Review Manager 5.2 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, England) was used to calculate the heterogeneity and mean differences of the main clinical outcomes. Results In total, 464 studies in the literature were identified but only four were ultimately feasible. The results showed no significant difference regarding CAL gain (P = 0.32) and PPD reduction (P = 0.40) as well as REC increase (P = 0.81) and radiographic bone fill (P = 0.64) between the MIS plus biomaterials group and the MIS alone group. Conclusions The meta-analysis suggested no significant difference in treatment of intra-bony defects between the MIS plus biomaterials group and the MIS alone group, indicating that it is important to take costs and benefits into consideration when a decision is made about a therapeutic approach. There needs to be an in-depth exploration of the induction of intrinsic tissue healing of MIS without biomaterials to achieve optimal outcomes. PMID:26785405

  12. Accounting for Heterogeneity in Relative Treatment Effects for Use in Cost-Effectiveness Models and Value-of-Information Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Nicky J; Soares, Marta O; Palmer, Stephen; Ades, Anthony E; Harrison, David; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Rowan, Kathy M

    2015-07-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) models are routinely used to inform health care policy. Key model inputs include relative effectiveness of competing treatments, typically informed by meta-analysis. Heterogeneity is ubiquitous in meta-analysis, and random effects models are usually used when there is variability in effects across studies. In the absence of observed treatment effect modifiers, various summaries from the random effects distribution (random effects mean, predictive distribution, random effects distribution, or study-specific estimate [shrunken or independent of other studies]) can be used depending on the relationship between the setting for the decision (population characteristics, treatment definitions, and other contextual factors) and the included studies. If covariates have been measured that could potentially explain the heterogeneity, then these can be included in a meta-regression model. We describe how covariates can be included in a network meta-analysis model and how the output from such an analysis can be used in a CEA model. We outline a model selection procedure to help choose between competing models and stress the importance of clinical input. We illustrate the approach with a health technology assessment of intravenous immunoglobulin for the management of adult patients with severe sepsis in an intensive care setting, which exemplifies how risk of bias information can be incorporated into CEA models. We show that the results of the CEA and value-of-information analyses are sensitive to the model and highlight the importance of sensitivity analyses when conducting CEA in the presence of heterogeneity. The methods presented extend naturally to heterogeneity in other model inputs, such as baseline risk. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, T., E-mail: tommy.dalgaard@agrsci.dk [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Hutchings, N. [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Dragosits, U. [CEH Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0QB, Scotland (United Kingdom); Olesen, J.E.; Kjeldsen, C. [Aarhus University, Department of Agroecology, Blichers Alle 20, P.O. Box 50, DK-8830 Tjele (Denmark); Drouet, J.L.; Cellier, P. [INRA, UMR Environnement et Grandes Cultures, BP 01, 78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20-30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N accumulation (p > 0.95) was also identified and needs to be included when modelling landscape level N-fluxes and greenhouse gas emissions. - Highlights: > Farm-N balances and the distribution on types of N-losses are modelled for 56 farms. > Farm type significantly affects N-losses and soil-N accumulation. > A non-linear relation between livestock density and ammonia loss is identified. > Approaches for upscaling from farm to landscape level are discussed. > Accounting farm heterogeneity is important when upscaling N-losses. - This study illustrates the importance of including non-linear effects of farm and landscape heterogeneity on the modelling and upscaling of farm nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural landscapes.

  14. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgaard, T.; Hutchings, N.; Dragosits, U.; Olesen, J.E.; Kjeldsen, C.; Drouet, J.L.; Cellier, P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20-30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N accumulation (p > 0.95) was also identified and needs to be included when modelling landscape level N-fluxes and greenhouse gas emissions. - Highlights: → Farm-N balances and the distribution on types of N-losses are modelled for 56 farms. → Farm type significantly affects N-losses and soil-N accumulation. → A non-linear relation between livestock density and ammonia loss is identified. → Approaches for upscaling from farm to landscape level are discussed. → Accounting farm heterogeneity is important when upscaling N-losses. - This study illustrates the importance of including non-linear effects of farm and landscape heterogeneity on the modelling and upscaling of farm nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions in agricultural landscapes.

  15. Combined effects of waggle dance communication and landscape heterogeneity on nectar and pollen uptake in honey bee colonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Nürnberger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The instructive component of waggle dance communication has been shown to increase resource uptake of Apis mellifera colonies in highly heterogeneous resource environments, but an assessment of its relevance in temperate landscapes with different levels of resource heterogeneity is currently lacking. We hypothesized that the advertisement of resource locations via dance communication would be most relevant in highly heterogeneous landscapes with large spatial variation of floral resources. To test our hypothesis, we placed 24 Apis mellifera colonies with either disrupted or unimpaired instructive component of dance communication in eight Central European agricultural landscapes that differed in heterogeneity and resource availability. We monitored colony weight change and pollen harvest as measure of foraging success. Dance disruption did not significantly alter colony weight change, but decreased pollen harvest compared to the communicating colonies by 40%. There was no general effect of resource availability on nectar or pollen foraging success, but the effect of landscape heterogeneity on nectar uptake was stronger when resource availability was high. In contrast to our hypothesis, the effects of disrupted bee communication on nectar and pollen foraging success were not stronger in landscapes with heterogeneous compared to homogenous resource environments. Our results indicate that in temperate regions intra-colonial communication of resource locations benefits pollen foraging more than nectar foraging, irrespective of landscape heterogeneity. We conclude that the so far largely unexplored role of dance communication in pollen foraging requires further consideration as pollen is a crucial resource for colony development and health.

  16. Heterogeneity in cost-effectiveness of lifestyle counseling for metabolic syndrome risk groups -primary care patients in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Inna; Hellström, Lennart; Johansson, Pia

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials have indicated that lifestyle interventions for patients with lifestyle-related cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors (the metabolic syndrome) are cost-effective. However, patient characteristics in primary care practice vary considerably, i.e. they exhibit heterogeneity in risk factors. The cost-effectiveness of lifestyle interventions is likely to differ over heterogeneous patient groups. METHODS: Patients (62 men, 80 women) in the Kalmar Metabolic Syndrome Pr...

  17. Vaccination Games with Peer Effects in a Heterogeneous Hospital Worker Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Tassier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a game theoretic model to analyze the Nash equilibrium of vaccine decisions in a hospital population with heterogeneous contacts. We use the model in conjunction with person-to-person contact data within a large university hospital. We simulate, using agent-based models, the probability of infection for various worker types in the data and use these probabilities to identify the Nash equilibrium vaccine choices of hospital workers. The analysis suggests that there may be large differences in vaccination rates among hospital worker groups. We extend the model to include peer effects within the game. The peer effects may create additional equilibria or may further cement existing equilibria depending on parameter values. Further, depending on the magnitude of the peer effects and the costs of infection and vaccination, peer effects may increase or decrease differences in worker group vaccination rates within the hospital.

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite on protein: structural effect of silk sericin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akari; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ogata, Shin-ichi; Yamazaki, Masao; Furutani, Yoshiaki; Kinoshita, Hisao; Tanihara, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Acidic proteins play an important role during mineral formation in biological systems, but the mechanism of mineral formation is far from understood. In this paper, we report on the relationship between the structure of a protein and hydroxyapatite deposition under biomimetic conditions. Sericin, a type of silk protein, was adopted as a suitable protein for studying structural effect on hydroxyapatite deposition, since it forms a hydroxyapatite layer on its surface in a metastable calcium phosphate solution, and its structure has been reported. Sericin effectively induced hydroxyapatite nucleation when it has high molecular weight and a β sheet structure. This indicates that the specific structure of a protein can effectively induce heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite in a biomimetic solution, i.e. a metastable calcium phosphate solution. This finding is useful in understanding biomineralization, as well as for the design of organic polymers that can effectively induce hydroxyapatite nucleation. PMID:16849195

  19. Effects of permeability heterogeneity on the performance of surfactant-enhanced remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S. [Kyonggi Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    The subsurface contamination by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) is a complicated process and difficult to treat because these organic contaminants tend to adsorb onto the soil matrix. They have low water solubility and a limited rate of mass transfer for biodegradation. NAPLs may leach from the soil for a longer period of time and may eventually become a long-term continuous contamination source of the soil and groundwater. One method to enhance pump-and-treat aquifer remediation performance involves surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR). Because their success depends on the delivery of injected chemical and water into the subsurface to contact the organic liquids, geologic heterogeneities are likely the main factors which reduce the effectiveness of SEAR processes. This paper presented a study that involved numerical simulations to assess the effect of spatial variability of aquifer permeability on NAPL recovery and injection pressure as well as spatial and temporal distributions of NAPLs during the remediation process. The paper outlined the mathematical backgrounds, numerical model, and results and discussion. It was concluded the effectiveness of SEAR is sensitive to injection time due to dispersion of surfactant slug with the presence of a higher degree of heterogeneity. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Random Process Theory Approach to Geometric Heterogeneous Surfaces: Effective Fluid-Solid Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlyupin, Aleksey; Aslyamov, Timur

    2017-06-01

    Realistic fluid-solid interaction potentials are essential in description of confined fluids especially in the case of geometric heterogeneous surfaces. Correlated random field is considered as a model of random surface with high geometric roughness. We provide the general theory of effective coarse-grained fluid-solid potential by proper averaging of the free energy of fluid molecules which interact with the solid media. This procedure is largely based on the theory of random processes. We apply first passage time probability problem and assume the local Markov properties of random surfaces. General expression of effective fluid-solid potential is obtained. In the case of small surface irregularities analytical approximation for effective potential is proposed. Both amorphous materials with large surface roughness and crystalline solids with several types of fcc lattices are considered. It is shown that the wider the lattice spacing in terms of molecular diameter of the fluid, the more obtained potentials differ from classical ones. A comparison with published Monte-Carlo simulations was discussed. The work provides a promising approach to explore how the random geometric heterogeneity affects on thermodynamic properties of the fluids.

  1. Effective Block-Scale Dispersion and Its Self-Averaging Behavior in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Felipe; Dentz, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Upscaled (effective) dispersion coefficients in spatially heterogeneous flow fields must (1) account for the sub-scale variability that is filtered out by homogenization and (2) be modeled as a random function to incorporate the uncertainty associated with non-ergodic solute bodies. In this study, we use the framework developed in de Barros and Rubin (2011) [de Barros F.P.J. and Rubin Y., Modelling of block-scale macrodispersion as a random function. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 676 (2011): 514-545] to develop novel semi-analytical expressions for the first two statistical moments of the block-effective dispersion coefficients in three-dimensional spatially random flow fields as a function of the key characteristic length scales defining the transport problem. The derived expressions are based on perturbation theory and limited to weak-to-mild heterogeneity and uniform-in-the-mean steady state flow fields. The semi-analytical solutions provide physical insights of the main controlling factors influencing the temporal scaling of the dispersion coefficient of the solute body and its self-averaging dispersion behavior. Our results illustrate the relevance of the joint influence of the block-scale and local-scale dispersion in diminishing the macrodispersion variance under non-ergodic conditions. The impact of the statistical anisotropy ratio in the block-effective macrodispersion self-averaging behavior is also investigated. The analysis performed in this work has implications in numerical modeling and grid design.

  2. Radiographic Study on the Bony Changes of Mandibular Condyle Head in Temporomandibular Disorder Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moo Soon; You, Dong Soo

    1989-01-01

    The author has studied radiographic bony changes of mandibular condyle head in temporomandibular disorder patients using Oblique lateral transcranial projection, Orthopantomography, and Tomography. The bony change types and the frequencies of occurrence and the incidences of bony changes in three different radiographic techniques were examined. The coincidences of body change types between the Oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram, the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram were also examined. The results were as follows: 1. The mean age of patients was 31.7 years and under 40 years were 24 patients, women were 27 patients, men were 4 patients. 2. The observable cases of bony changes in all three radiographic techniques were 19 cases (50%) of 38 cases and the observable cases of bony changes in only Tomography were 5 cases (13.2%). 3. The most frequent radiographic bony change type was osteophyte and next orders were flattening, erosion, concavity. 4. The positional incidences of bony changes in Tomogram were 31 cases in lateral part and 27 cases in central part. 5. The coincidence of bony change types between the oblique lateral transcranial projection and the lateral part of Tomogram was 80%, and the coincidence between the Orthopantomogram and the medial part of Tomogram was 76.9%.

  3. Quantitative computed tomography as a test of endurance for evaluation of bony plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo Filho, E.V.; Costa, L.A.V.S.; Oliveira, D.C.; Freitas, P.M.C.; Teixeira, M.W.; Costa, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine the radiodensity of bony plates. The CT scans provided information regarding radiodensity of bony plates and allowed to verify the uniformity of bone mineral density in their scope. The proposed methodology should be considered as another tool for determining the resistance of these biomaterials. (author)

  4. The effects of hypercapnia on cortical capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) in anesthetized mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Angleys, Hugo; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    2018-01-01

    Capillary flow patterns are highly heterogeneous in the resting brain. During hyperemia, capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH) decreases, in proportion to blood's mean transit time (MTT) in passive, compliant microvascular networks. Previously, we found that functional activation reduces...

  5. [Short-term effects of air pollution in Italy: risk heterogeneity from 1996 to 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggeri, Annibale; Baccini, Michela

    2009-01-01

    in the epidemiological literature heterogeneity of short-term effects of air pollutants among different populations is widely documented. It is commonly attributed to air pollutants characteristics, modality of exposure, individual susceptibility or pollutant-temperature interaction. The case of a time trend in effect size is questionable. In the present paper we compare results of Italian studies on short-term effects of air pollutants based on data for the calendar years 1996-2005. Study objective is to evaluate time stability of risk estimates taking into account of between cities heterogeneity. daily series of deaths for natural causes and daily series of average air pollutants concentrations were obtained from the MISA and EpiAir datasets. Effect estimates were obtained by Bayesian random effect meta-analysis to cope with between city heterogeneity. there was no difference in effect estimates using the case crossover or Poisson regression approach on the time period 2001-2005 and the ten Italian cities of the EpiAir study. Using the MISA dataset (time period 1996-2002) and the same statistical approach (Poisson regression with seasonality regression spline) we compared the overall effect estimates selecting different subset of italian cities. The EpiAir cities-subset showed higher risk estimates either for PM10 or NO2. Last, considering the same subset of cities we found an increase in percent variation of mortality for natural causes for 10 microg/m3 of PM10 from 0,36% (CI 95% 0.1;0.8) in the period 1996-2002 to 0.66% (0.4;0.9) in the period 2001-2005. For NO2 we found respectively a change from 0.72% (0.3;1.1) to 1.12% (0.5;1.6). the results of the EpiAir study are not immediately comparable to the MISA results because the the set of cities included in the two studies is different, the statistical approach is different, and the calendar time period is different. The present analysis shows that considering the subset of cities for which we have data for both

  6. Method of improving heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Xia, Huifen

    2018-01-01

    The project of polymer flooding has achieved great success in Daqing oilfield, and the main oil reservoir recovery can be improved by more than 15%. But, for some strong oil reservoir heterogeneity carrying out polymer flooding, polymer solution will be inefficient and invalid loop problem in the high permeability layer, then cause the larger polymer volume, and a significant reduction in the polymer flooding efficiency. Aiming at this problem, it is studied the method that improves heterogeneous oil reservoir polymer flooding effect by positively-charged gel profile control. The research results show that the polymer physical and chemical reaction of positively-charged gel with the residual polymer in high permeability layer can generate three-dimensional network of polymer, plugging high permeable layer, and increase injection pressure gradient, then improve the effect of polymer flooding development. Under the condition of the same dosage, positively-charged gel profile control can improve the polymer flooding recovery factor by 2.3∼3.8 percentage points. Under the condition of the same polymer flooding recovery factor increase value, after positively-charged gel profile control, it can reduce the polymer volume by 50 %. Applying mechanism of positively-charged gel profile control technology is feasible, cost savings, simple construction, and no environmental pollution, therefore has good application prospect.

  7. Effect of droplet size on the droplet behavior on the heterogeneous surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Yeon; Son, Sung Wan; Ha, ManYeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Gap [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The characteristics of a three-dimensional hemispherical droplet on a heterogeneous surface were studied using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The hydrophilic surface has a hydrophobic part at the center. The hemispherical droplets are located at the center of the heterogeneous surface. According to the contact angles of hydrophilic and hydrophobic bottom surfaces, the droplet either separates or reaches a new equilibrium state. The separation time varies according to the change in droplet size, and it affects the status of droplet separation. The droplet separation behavior was investigated by analyzing the velocity vector around the phase boundary line. The shape and separation time of a droplet are determined by the contact angle of each surface. The speed of droplet separation increases as the difference in contact angle increases between the hydrophobic surface and hydrophilic surface. The separation status and the separation time of a droplet are also determined by the change of the droplet size. As the size of the droplet decreases, the effect of surface tension decreases, and the separation time of the droplet also decreases. On the other hand, as the droplet becomes larger, the effect of surface tension increases and the time required for the droplet to separate also increases.

  8. Living with heterogeneities in bioreactors: understanding the effects of environmental gradients on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Alvaro R; Galindo, Enrique; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2006-11-01

    The presence of spatial gradients in fundamental culture parameters, such as dissolved gases, pH, concentration of substrates, and shear rate, among others, is an important problem that frequently occurs in large-scale bioreactors. This problem is caused by a deficient mixing that results from limitations inherent to traditional scale-up methods and practical constraints during large-scale bioreactor design and operation. When cultured in a heterogeneous environment, cells are continuously exposed to fluctuating conditions as they travel through the various zones of a bioreactor. Such fluctuations can affect cell metabolism, yields, and quality of the products of interest. In this review, the theoretical analyses that predict the existence of environmental gradients in bioreactors and their experimental confirmation are reviewed. The origins of gradients in common culture parameters and their effects on various organisms of biotechnological importance are discussed. In particular, studies based on the scale-down methodology, a convenient tool for assessing the effect of environmental heterogeneities, are surveyed.

  9. Measurement of effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients for powder beds used in heterogeneous uptake experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulter, James E; Marschall, Jochen

    2006-09-07

    The effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients for characteristic oxide powder beds used in heterogeneous uptake experiments have been measured using countercurrent diffusion and transient pressure drop techniques. Room-temperature thermal-velocity-normalized effective Knudsen diffusion coefficients are found to lie in the 0.15 to 0.35 microm range for magnesium silicate, aluminum oxide, and iron oxide powder beds. Measured values are compared with theoretical estimates and are consistent with low bed tortuosities (below 3) expected for media with open porosity above 0.5. The impact of uncertainties in effective diffusion coefficients on corrections of measured uptake coefficients is discussed. The value of careful uptake measurements in both the low and high sample mass limits is reinforced, as this allows uptake corrections independent of explicitly measured or estimated diffusion coefficient values. It is suggested that correction procedures requiring tortuosity values greater than 3 are suspect.

  10. Effects of heterogeneous wealth distribution on public cooperation with collective risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Feng; Wang, Long

    2010-07-01

    The distribution of wealth among individuals in real society can be well described by the Pareto principle or "80-20 rule." How does such heterogeneity in initial wealth distribution affect the emergence of public cooperation, when individuals, the rich and the poor, engage in a collective-risk enterprise, not to gain a profit but to avoid a potential loss? Here we address this issue by studying a simple but effective model based on threshold public goods games. We analyze the evolutionary dynamics for two distinct scenarios, respectively: one with fair sharers versus defectors and the other with altruists versus defectors. For both scenarios, particularly, we in detail study the dynamics of the population with dichotomic initial wealth-the rich versus the poor. Moreover, we demonstrate the possible steady compositions of the population and provide the conditions for stability of these steady states. We prove that in a population with heterogeneous wealth distribution, richer individuals are more likely to cooperate than poorer ones. Participants with lower initial wealth may choose to cooperate only if all players richer than them are cooperators. The emergence of pubic cooperation largely relies on rich individuals. Furthermore, whenever the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is sufficiently large, cooperation of a few rich individuals can substantially elevate the overall level of social cooperation, which is in line with the well-known Pareto principle. Our work may offer an insight into the emergence of cooperative behavior in real social situations where heterogeneous distribution of wealth among individual is omnipresent.

  11. Wetting at the nanometer scale: effects of long-range forces and substrate heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checco, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Wetting phenomena on the nano-scale remain poorly understood in spite of their growing theoretical and practical interest. In this context, the present work aimed at studying partial wetting of nanometer-sized alkane droplets on 'model' surfaces build by self-assembly of organic monolayers. For this purpose a novel technique, based on 'noncontact' Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), has been developed to image, with minimal artefacts, drops of adjustable size directly condensed on so- lid surfaces. We have thus shown that contact angle of alkanes, wetting a weakly heterogeneous, silanized substrate, noticeably decreases from its macroscopic value for droplets sizes in the submicron range. The line tension, arising in this case from purely dispersive long-range interactions between the liquid and the substrate, is theoretically too weak to be responsible for the observed effect. Therefore we have supposed that contact angle is affected by mesoscopic chemical heterogeneities of the substrate whenever the droplets size becomes sufficiently small. This scenario has been supported by numerical simulations based on a simplified model of the spatial distribution of surface defects. Similar experiments, performed on different substrates (monolayers made of alkane-thiols self-assembled on gold and of alkyl chains covalently bound onto a silicon surface), have also shown that wetting on small scales is strongly affected by minimal physical and chemical surface heterogeneities. Finally, to provide further examples of the potential of the above mentioned AFM technique, we have studied the wettability of nano-structured surfaces and the local wetting properties of hair. (author) [fr

  12. Viral vaccines for bony fish: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; García-Espinosa, Gary

    2013-05-01

    Since 1970, aquaculture production has grown. In 2010, it had an annual average rate of 6.3% with 59.9 million tons of product and soon could exceed capture fisheries as a source of fishery products. However, the occurrence of viral diseases continues to be a significant limiting factor and its control is important for the development of this sector. In aquaculture farms, fish are reared under intensive culture conditions, and the use of viral vaccines has enabled an increase in production. Several types of vaccines and strategies of vaccination have been developed; however, this approach has not reached the expected goals in the most susceptible stage (fingerlings). Currently, there are inactivated and recombinant commercial vaccines, mainly for salmonids and cyprinids. In addition, updated genomic and proteomic technology has expedited the research and expansion of new vaccine models, such as those comprised of subunits or DNA. The objective of this review is to cover the various types of viral vaccines that have been developed and are available for bony fishes, as well as the advantages and challenges that DNA vaccines present for massive administration in a growing aquaculture, possible risks for the environment, the controversy regarding genetically modified organisms and possible acceptance by consumers.

  13. Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Marcia S; Koesbardiati, Toetik; Weissmann, John David; Milella, Marco; Reyna-Blanco, Carlos S; Suwa, Gen; Kondo, Osamu; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; White, Tim D; Zollikofer, Christoph P E

    2018-04-17

    The dispersal of modern humans from Africa is now well documented with genetic data that track population history, as well as gene flow between populations. Phenetic skeletal data, such as cranial and pelvic morphologies, also exhibit a dispersal-from-Africa signal, which, however, tends to be blurred by the effects of local adaptation and in vivo phenotypic plasticity, and that is often deteriorated by postmortem damage to skeletal remains. These complexities raise the question of which skeletal structures most effectively track neutral population history. The cavity system of the inner ear (the so-called bony labyrinth) is a good candidate structure for such analyses. It is already fully formed by birth, which minimizes postnatal phenotypic plasticity, and it is generally well preserved in archaeological samples. Here we use morphometric data of the bony labyrinth to show that it is a surprisingly good marker of the global dispersal of modern humans from Africa. Labyrinthine morphology tracks genetic distances and geography in accordance with an isolation-by-distance model with dispersal from Africa. Our data further indicate that the neutral-like pattern of variation is compatible with stabilizing selection on labyrinth morphology. Given the increasingly important role of the petrous bone for ancient DNA recovery from archaeological specimens, we encourage researchers to acquire 3D morphological data of the inner ear structures before any invasive sampling. Such data will constitute an important archive of phenotypic variation in present and past populations, and will permit individual-based genotype-phenotype comparisons. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  14. Heterogeneous effects of oil shocks on exchange rates: evidence from a quantile regression approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianfang; Zhu, Huiming; You, Wanhai; Ren, Yinghua

    2016-01-01

    The determinants of exchange rates have attracted considerable attention among researchers over the past several decades. Most studies, however, ignore the possibility that the impact of oil shocks on exchange rates could vary across the exchange rate returns distribution. We employ a quantile regression approach to address this issue. Our results indicate that the effect of oil shocks on exchange rates is heterogeneous across quantiles. A large US depreciation or appreciation tends to heighten the effects of oil shocks on exchange rate returns. Positive oil demand shocks lead to appreciation pressures in oil-exporting countries and this result is robust across lower and upper return distributions. These results offer rich and useful information for investors and decision-makers.

  15. Effects of farm heterogeneity and methods for upscaling on modelled nitrogen losses in agricultural landscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Dragosits, U

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illustrate the importance of farm scale heterogeneity on nitrogen (N) losses in agricultural landscapes. Results are exemplified with a chain of N models calculating farm-N balances and distributing the N-surplus to N-losses (volatilisation, denitrification, leaching......) and soil-N accumulation/release in a Danish landscape. Possible non-linearities in upscaling are assessed by comparing average model results based on (i) individual farm level calculations and (ii) averaged inputs at landscape level. Effects of the non-linearities that appear when scaling up from farm...... to landscape are demonstrated. Especially in relation to ammonia losses the non-linearity between livestock density and N-loss is significant (p > 0.999), with around 20–30% difference compared to a scaling procedure not taking this non-linearity into account. A significant effect of farm type on soil N...

  16. Soil heterogeneity effects on water and solute transport. Methodological comparison in different climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    1996-11-01

    Spatial heterogeneity of soils is important to consider for soil water and solute transport. The results of the present work indicated that spatial heterogeneity affects all investigated soils and for widely varying climates. Both soil water content and temperature patterns for a bare and vegetated transect in a typical sand dune area in China indicated preferential transport of soil water after rainfall. Infiltrating soil water appeared to follow paths that had high water content before the rainfall. The effect of rainfall was therefore not a larger uniformity of soil water, but rather increasing variability. Preferential flow was observed by tracer and dye in Tunisia. The experimental data indicated a high degree of bypass or preferential flow within small plots and non-sigmoid breakthrough curves suggesting tailing phenomena and immobile fractions of soil water. The groundwater tracer concentration increased up to twice the concentration of the water in the unsaturated zone withdrawn from different depths. This consequently shows that bypass directly to the groundwater occurred also for unsaturated conditions. Soil layering appeared to be a significant cause for preferential flow for both sand and clay soils. The results also showed great variability for hydraulic properties in terms of van Genuchten parameters for a small plot in a temperate climate. The present work supports the dual-porosity hypothesis. But findings also indicate that the observation scale is important to consider when averaging the process in time and space. 95 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  17. Nanoparticle-enhanced spectral photoacoustic tomography: effect of oxygen saturation and tissue heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, William C.; Jia, Congxian; Wear, Keith A.; Garra, Brian S.; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging for breast cancer detection, infectious disease diagnostics and preclinical animal research may be achievable through combined use of targeted exogenous agents - such as nanoparticles - and spectral Photoacoustic Tomography (PAT). However, tissue heterogeneity can alter fluence distributions and acoustic propagation, corrupting measured PAT absorption spectra and complicating in vivo nanoparticle detection and quantitation. Highly absorptive vascular structures represent a common confounding factor, and variations in vessel hemoglobin saturation (SO2) may alter spectral content of signals from adjacent/deeper regions. To evaluate the impact of this effect on PAT nanoparticle detectability, we constructed heterogeneous phantoms with well-characterized channel-inclusion geometries and biologically relevant optical and acoustic properties. Phantoms contained an array of tubes at several depths filled with hemoglobin solutions doped with varying concentrations of gold nanorods with an absorption peak at 780 nm. Both overlying and target network SO2 was tuned using sodium dithionite. Phantoms were imaged from 700 to 900 nm using a custom PAT system comprised of a tunable pulsed laser and a research-grade ultrasound system. Recovered nanoparticle spectra were analyzed and compared with results from both spectrophotometry and PAT data from waterimmersed tubes containing blood and nanoparticle solutions. Results suggested that nanoparticle selection for a given PAT application should take into account expected oxygenation states of both target blood vessel and background tissue oxygenation to achieve optimal performance.

  18. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors

  19. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  1. Extraspinal Percutaneous Osteoplasty for the Treatment of Painful Bony Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Heon; Kim, Su Young; Ok, Hwoe Gyeong; Kim, Tae Kyun; Kim, Kyung Hoon

    2018-02-19

    Extraspinal percutaneous osteoplasties (POPs) are novel techniques for the treatment of painful bony metastasis, which is often the cause of both persistent and incidental breakthrough pain. This retrospective study explored the efficacy and complications of extraspinal POPs. The origin of the cancer metastasis, performed POP sites, necessity of adjacent joint injections, pain and Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) scores, complications related to the POPs, and life expectancy were evaluated from the medical records from 2009 to 2016. A total of 47 (M/F = 28/19) patients had received 54 POPs, including costoplasty, scapuloplasty, ilioplasty, humeroplasty, ischioplasty, femoroplasty, sternoplasty, and puboplasty, in order of frequency. The most common sites for the origin of the cancer, in order of frequency, were the lung, liver, breast, colon, and kidney. All patients receiving POPs including scapuloplasty, ilioplasty, humeroplasty, and femoroplasty needed adjacent joint injections before or after the POPs. Pain due to metastatic lesions was reduced significantly immediately after the POPs and the reduction was sustained until the end of their lives. The median KPS was increased from 35.4% to 67.7% immediately after the POPs. There were no complications related to the procedures. The mean life expectancy after performing the POPs, for 35 patients which died afterwards, was 99.3 days, ranging from 1 to 767 days. Even though pain in the isolated POP sites may be difficult to measure due to overlapping systemic pain, the POPs provided immediate local pain relief, and the patients showed better physical performance without procedure-related complications. © 2018 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  2. Response function theories that account for size distribution effects - A review. [mathematical models concerning composite propellant heterogeneity effects on combustion instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents theoretical models developed to account for the heterogeneity of composite propellants in expressing the pressure-coupled combustion response function. It is noted that the model of Lengelle and Williams (1968) furnishes a viable basis to explain the effects of heterogeneity.

  3. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, X.; Ju, W.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs) for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP) estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI) is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE) in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m-2 yr-1 to 4.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m-2 yr-1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI) and elevation have small and additive effects on improving the spatial scaling

  4. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m−2 yr−1 to 4.8 g C m−2 yr−1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m−2 yr−1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI and elevation have small and additive effects on improving

  5. Pore-scale modelling of the combined effect of physical and chemical heterogeneity on reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, T. D. S.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations to study the combined impact of physical and chemical heterogeneity in subsurface rock to provide insights into the source of the discrepancy observed between mineral dissolution rates observed in laboratory experiments and in field-scale natural systems. The ultimate goal of this work is to use pore-scale simulation to compute upscaled properties - such as effective reaction rate - for use in larger-scale models.We present a methodology to simulate multispecies reactive flow through pore-space images obtained from micro-tomography. Using the sequential non-iterative approach, we couple the simulation of the transport equations with an advanced geochemical solver designed specifically for applications that require sequential equilibrium calculations. This geochemical solver uses novel numerical methods for the solution of multiphase chemical equilibrium and kinetics problems in a well-stirred batch model. Our model assumes that reactions can be classified into fast reactions, which are considered to be in equilibrium, and slow reactions, considered to be controlled by kinetics. This assumption of partial equilibrium simplifies the problem by replacing differential equations with algebraic ones. We allow for chemical heterogeneity of the solid phase by associating each voxel to a different mineral and reaction rate. A steady-state flow problem is solved in the pore space using a finite volume method to calculate the velocity field. Then we solve an advection-diffusion equation for the concentration and, modelling each liquid voxel as a well-mixed batch with a solid wall where applicable, we calculate reaction using the aforementioned geochemical solver. Both fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactions are considered, geometry changes due to dissolution and precipitation are taken into account, and the velocity field is updated. We present the validation tests for acidic brine injected into rock for a range of transport (P

  6. Effects of tissue heterogeneity on the optical estimate of breast density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Pifferi, Antonio; Quarto, Giovanna; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Ganino, Serena; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2012-01-01

    Breast density is a recognized strong and independent risk factor for developing breast cancer. At present, breast density is assessed based on the radiological appearance of breast tissue, thus relying on the use of ionizing radiation. We have previously obtained encouraging preliminary results with our portable instrument for time domain optical mammography performed at 7 wavelengths (635–1060 nm). In that case, information was averaged over four images (cranio-caudal and oblique views of both breasts) available for each subject. In the present work, we tested the effectiveness of just one or few point measurements, to investigate if tissue heterogeneity significantly affects the correlation between optically derived parameters and mammographic density. Data show that parameters estimated through a single optical measurement correlate strongly with mammographic density estimated by using BIRADS categories. A central position is optimal for the measurement, but its exact location is not critical. PMID:23082283

  7. Algodystrophy in children and young adults with isotopic bony hypofixation. A propos of 5 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doury, P.; Pattin, S.; Eulry, F.; Granier, R.; Gaillard, F.

    1986-12-01

    The authors report 5 observations of young adults 3 teen-agers and 2 children suffering from algodystrophy, and in whom isotopic exploration of the skeleton disclosed a clear bony hypofixation during the entire evolution. These observations confirm their 1981 work concerning a young adult suffering from algodystrophy with isotopic bony hypofixation. Recent Canadian and American studies emphasize also the frequency of isotopic hypofixation in children algodystrophy. It seems, therefore, that isotopic bony hypofixation (linked perhaps to a decreased blood flow), is rather specific of algodystrophy in young subjects.

  8. The good, the bad, and the different: a primer on aspects of heterogeneity of treatment effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Daniel C; Hines, Lisa E; Graff, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    The concept of heterogeneity is concerned with understanding differences within and across patients and studies. Heterogeneity of treatment effects is nonrandom variability in response to treatment and includes both benefits and harms. Because not all patients respond the same way, treatment decisions applied in a "one size fits all" fashion based on the average response observed in clinical trials may lead to suboptimal outcomes for some patients. Variation in outcomes among patients may be caused by observable and nonobservable factors. Changes in patients' health status over time can contribute to variability among patients. Assuming that the results from clinical trials are homogeneous across patients may fail to take into account clinically significant variability where some patients may receive benefit and others harm. Subgroup analyses and prediction models are 2 tools to explain variability observed within a study. Evidence synthesis with meta-analysis can provide useful information on the overall effectiveness and response among groups of patients undersampled in individual studies. Yet caution is warranted if the meta-analysis is missing studies or the individual studies comprising the meta-analysis are inherently different.For those making clinical, coverage, and reimbursement decisions at a population level, such as clinicians and pharmacy and therapeutics committee members, understanding the variation among patients, among subpopulations or populations of patients, among clinical studies, or within a meta-analysis is important to ensuring optimal patient outcomes. This article presents a variety of tools and resources to aid decision makers as they evaluate the literature to determine when clinically relevant differences exist.

  9. Heterogeneous effects of health insurance on out-of-pocket expenditure on medicines in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Veronika J; Santa-Ana-Tellez, Yared; Servan-Mori, Edson; Avila-Burgos, Leticia

    2012-01-01

    Given the importance of health insurance for financing medicines and recent policy changes designed to reduce health-related out-of-pocket expenditure (OOPE) in Mexico, our study examined and analyzed the effect of health insurance on the probability and amount of OOPE for medicines and the proportion spent from household available expenditure (AE) funds. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis by using the Mexican National Household Survey of Income and Expenditures for 2008. Households were grouped according to household medical insurance type (Social Security, Seguro Popular, mixed, or no affiliation). OOPE for medicines and health costs, and the probability of occurrence, were estimated with linear regression models; subsequently, the proportion of health expenditures from AE was calculated. The Heckman selection procedure was used to correct for self-selection of health expenditure; a propensity score matching procedure and an alternative procedure using instrumental variables were used to correct for heterogeneity between households with and without Seguro Popular. OOPE in medicines account for 66% of the total health expenditures and 5% of the AE. Households with health insurance had a lower probability of OOPE for medicines than their comparison groups. There was heterogeneity in the health insurance effect on the proportion of OOPE for medicines out of the AE, with a reduction of 1.7% for households with Social Security, 1.4% for mixed affiliation, but no difference between Seguro Popular and matched households without insurance. Medicines were the most prevalent component of health expenditures in Mexico. We recommend improving access to health services and strengthening access to medicines to reduce high OOPE. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Low effect of young afforestations on bird communities inhabiting heterogeneous Mediterranean cropland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S. Sánchez-Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Afforestation programs such as the one promoted by the EU Common Agricultural Policy have spread tree plantations on former cropland. These afforestations attract generalist forest and ubiquitous species but may cause severe damage to open habitat species, especially birds of high conservation value. We investigated the effects of young (<20 yr tree plantations dominated by pine P. halepensis on bird communities inhabiting the adjacent open farmland habitat in central Spain. We hypothesize that pine plantations located at shorter distances from open fields and with larger surface would affect species richness and conservation value of bird communities. Regression models controlling for the influence of land use types around plantations revealed positive effects of higher distance to pine plantation edge on community species richness in winter, and negative effects on an index of conservation concern (SPEC during the breeding season. However, plantation area did not have any effect on species richness or community conservation value. Our results indicate that the effects of pine afforestation on bird communities inhabiting Mediterranean cropland are diluted by heterogeneous agricultural landscapes.

  11. Revisiting Rebound Effects from Material Resource Use. Indications for Germany Considering Social Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Buhl

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the original investigation by William Stanley Jevons, compensations of energy savings due to improved energy efficiency are mostly analyzed by providing energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions. In support of a sustainable resource management, this paper analyzes so-called rebound effects based on resource use. Material flows and associated expenditures by households allow for calculating resource intensities and marginal propensities to consume. Marginal propensities to consume are estimated from data of the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP in order to account for indirect rebound effects for food, housing and mobility. Resource intensities are estimated in terms of total material requirements per household final consumption expenditures along the Classification of Individual Consumption according to Purpose (COICOP. Eventually, rebound effects are indicated on the basis of published saving scenarios in resource and energy demand for Germany. In sum, compensations due to rebound effects are lowest for food while the highest compensations are induced for mobility. This is foremost the result of a relatively high resource intensity of food and a relatively low resource intensity in mobility. Findings are provided by giving various propensity scenarios in order to cope with income differences in Germany. The author concludes that policies on resource conservation need to reconsider rebound effects under the aspect of social heterogeneity.

  12. Effect of Different Loading Conditions on the Nucleation and Development of Shear Zones Around Material Heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Nardini, L.; Morales, L. F.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Rock deformation at depths in the Earth's crust is often localized in high temperature shear zones, which occur in the field at different scales and in a variety of lithologies. The presence of material heterogeneities has long been recognized to be an important cause for shear zones evolution, but the mechanisms controlling initiation and development of localization are not fully understood, and the question of which loading conditions (constant stress or constant deformation rate) are most favourable is still open. To better understand the effect of boundary conditions on shear zone nucleation around heterogeneities, we performed a series of torsion experiments under constant twist rate (CTR) and constant torque (CT) conditions in a Paterson-type deformation apparatus. The sample assemblage consisted of copper-jacketed Carrara marble hollow cylinders with one weak inclusion of Solnhofen limestone. The CTR experiments were performed at maximum bulk strain rates of 1.8-1.9*10-4 s-1, yielding shear stresses of 19-20 MPa. CT tests were conducted at shear stresses between 18.4 and 19.8 MPa resulting in shear strain rates of 1-2*10-4 s-1. All experiments were run at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure. Maximum bulk shear strains (γ) were ca. 0.3 and 1. Strain localized within the host marble in front of the inclusion in an area termed process zone. Here grain size reduction is intense and local shear strain (estimated from markers on the jackets) is up to 8 times higher than the applied bulk strain, rapidly dropping to 2 times higher at larger distance from the inclusion. The evolution of key microstructural parameters such as average grain size and average grain orientation spread (GOS, a measure of lattice distortion) within the process zone, determined by electron backscatter diffraction analysis, differs significantly as a function of loading conditions. Both parameters indicate that, independent of bulk strain and distance from the inclusion, the

  13. Serological markers suggest heterogeneity of effectiveness of malaria control interventions on Bioko Island, equatorial Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie Cook

    Full Text Available In order to control and eliminate malaria, areas of on-going transmission need to be identified and targeted for malaria control interventions. Immediately following intense interventions, malaria transmission can become more heterogeneous if interventions are more successful in some areas than others. Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea, has been subject to comprehensive malaria control interventions since 2004. This has resulted in substantial reductions in the parasite burden, although this drop has not been uniform across the island.In 2008, filter paper blood samples were collected from 7387 people in a cross-sectional study incorporating 18 sentinel sites across Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. Antibodies were measured to P. falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1 by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Age-specific seropositivity rates were used to estimate seroconversion rates (SCR. Analysis indicated there had been at least a 60% decline in SCR in four out of five regions on the island. Changes in SCR showed a high degree of congruence with changes in parasite rate (PR and with regional reductions in all cause child mortality. The mean age adjusted concentration of anti-AMA-1 antibodies was mapped to identify areas where individual antibody responses were higher than expected. This approach confirmed the North West of the island as a major focus of continuing infection and an area where control interventions need to be concentrated or re-evaluated.Both SCR and PR revealed heterogeneity in malaria transmission and demonstrated the variable effectiveness of malaria control measures. This work confirms the utility of serological analysis as an adjunct measure for monitoring transmission. Age-specific seroprevalence based evidence of changes in transmission over time will be of particular value when no baseline data are available. Importantly, SCR data provide additional evidence to link malaria control activities to contemporaneous

  14. Effects of hypertrophy and fibrosis on regional and global functional heterogeneity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sung-A; Lee, Sang-Chol; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Hahn, Hye-Jin; Jang, Shin Yi; Park, Sung-Ji; Choi, Jin-Oh; Park, Seung Woo; Oh, Jae K

    2012-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a disease that typically has heterogeneous hypertrophy and dysfunction of the myocardium. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) can be used to accurately assess ventricular wall thickness and regional fibrosis. We investigated the effects of hypertrophy and fibrosis on the heterogeneity of regional and global myocardial function in HCM. Forty patients who were diagnosed with HCM were consecutively enrolled. Echocardiography and CMR with delayed hyper-enhancement imaging (DHE) was performed for each patient. Left ventricular (LV) regional and global longitudinal strain (SL(R) and SL(G)) were obtained by two-dimensional speckle tracking method on echocardiography. With CMR, regional myocardial wall thickness was measured, and the amount of DHE was calculated semi-quantitatively in each segment. Overall, 720 segments were analyzed. SL(R) was significantly decreased in the hypertrophied segments (thickness > 11 mm) and segments with DHE (P < 0.001). SL(R) was correlated with myocardial wall thickness (r = 0.47, P = 0.001) and amount of regional DHE (r = 0.39, P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, regional LV wall thickness and amount of DHE were the only independent determinants of SL(R). SL(G) was associated with LV diastolic functional parameters in echocardiography, total DHE volume, and LV mass index. Total DHE volume and LV mass index were independent determinants of SL(G) on multivariate analysis. The extent of regional myocardial fibrosis is associated with regional myocardial function independently of morphological changes of the myocardium, and the correlation extended to global LV function. In this context, DHE may be a useful parameter to discover early myocardial dysfunction independently of LV hypertrophy.

  15. Effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Jiannong; Liu, Quan; Li, Xia; Gao, Yang; Jia, Xingcan; Sheng, Jiujiang; Liu, Yangang

    2015-12-01

    The effect of heterogeneous aqueous reactions on the secondary formation of inorganic aerosols during haze events was investigated by analysis of comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and concentrations [e.g., particular matters (PM2.5), nitrate (NO3), sulfate (SO4), ammonium (NH4)], gas-phase precursors [e.g., nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3)], and relevant meteorological parameters [e.g., visibility and relative humidity (RH)]. The measurements were conducted in Beijing, China from Sep. 07, 2012 to Jan. 16, 2013. The results show that the conversion ratios of N from NOx to nitrate (Nratio) and S from SO2 to sulfate (Sratio) both significantly increased in haze events, suggesting enhanced conversions from NOx and SO2 to their corresponding particle phases in the late haze period. Further analysis shows that Nratio and Sratio increased with increasing RH, with Nratio and Sratio being only 0.04 and 0.03, respectively, when RH reactions, because solar radiation and thus the photochemical capacity are reduced by the increases in aerosols and RH. This point was further affirmed by the relationships of Nratio and Sratio to O3: the conversion ratios increase with decreasing O3 concentration when O3 concentration is lower than reactions likely changed aerosols and their precursors during the haze events: in the beginning of haze events, the precursor gases accumulated quickly due to high emission and low reaction rate; the occurrence of heterogeneous aqueous reactions in the late haze period, together with the accumulated high concentrations of precursor gases such as SO2 and NOx, accelerated the formation of secondary inorganic aerosols, and led to rapid increase of the PM2.5 concentration.

  16. Peripheral Dose Heterogeneity Due to the Thread Effect in Total Marrow Irradiation With Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yutaka [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Verneris, Michael R. [Division of Hematology, Oncology, and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Dusenbery, Kathryn E. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wilke, Christopher T. [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Storme, Guy; Weisdorf, Daniel J. [Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Hui, Susanta K., E-mail: huixx019@umn.edu [Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To report potential dose heterogeneity leading to underdosing at different skeletal sites in total marrow irradiation (TMI) with helical tomotherapy due to the thread effect and provide possible solutions to reduce this effect. Methods and Materials: Nine cases were divided into 2 groups based on patient size, defined as maximum left-to-right arm distance (mLRD): small mLRD (≤47 cm) and large mLRD (>47 cm). TMI treatment planning was conducted by varying the pitch and modulation factor while a jaw size (5 cm) was kept fixed. Ripple amplitude, defined as the peak-to-trough dose relative to the average dose due to the thread effect, and the dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters for 9 cases with various mLRD was analyzed in different skeletal regions at off-axis (eg, bones of the arm or femur), at the central axis (eg, vertebrae), and planning target volume (PTV), defined as the entire skeleton plus 1-cm margin. Results: Average ripple amplitude for a pitch of 0.430, known as one of the magic pitches that reduce thread effect, was 9.2% at 20 cm off-axis. No significant differences in DVH parameters of PTV, vertebrae, or femur were observed between small and large mLRD groups for a pitch of ≤0.287. Conversely, in the bones of the arm, average differences in the volume receiving 95% and 107% dose (V95 and V107, respectively) between large and small mLRD groups were 4.2% (P=.016) and 16% (P=.016), respectively. Strong correlations were found between mLRD and ripple amplitude (rs=.965), mLRD and V95 (rs=−.742), and mLRD and V107 (rs=.870) of bones of the arm. Conclusions: Thread effect significantly influences DVH parameters in the bones of the arm for large mLRD patients. By implementing a favorable pitch value and adjusting arm position, peripheral dose heterogeneity could be reduced.

  17. Effects of Heterogeneities, Sampling Frequencies, Tools and Methods on Uncertainties in Subsurface Contaminant Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzedine, S. M.; McNab, W. W.

    2007-12-01

    Long-term monitoring (LTM) is particularly important for contaminants which are mitigated by natural processes of dilution, dispersion, and degradation. At many sites, LTM can require decades of expensive sampling at tens or even hundreds of existing monitoring wells, resulting in hundreds of thousands, or millions of dollars per year for sampling and data management. Therefore, contaminant sampling tools, methods and frequencies are chosen to minimize waste and data management costs while ensuring a reliable and informative time-history of contaminant measurement for regulatory compliance. The interplay play between cause (i.e. subsurface heterogeneities, sampling techniques, measurement frequencies) and effect (unreliable data and measurements gap) has been overlooked in many field applications which can lead to inconsistencies in time- histories of contaminant samples. In this study we address the relationship between cause and effect for different hydrogeological sampling settings: porous and fractured media. A numerical model has been developed using AMR-FEM to solve the physicochemical processes that take place in the aquifer and the monitoring well. In the latter, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations while in the former the flow is governed by the diffusivity equation; both are fully coupled to mimic stressed conditions and to assess the effect of dynamic sampling tool on the formation surrounding the monitoring well. First of all, different sampling tools (i.e., Easy Pump, Snapper Grab Sampler) were simulated in a monitoring well screened in different homogeneous layered aquifers to assess their effect on the sampling measurements. Secondly, in order to make the computer runs more CPU efficient the flow in the monitoring well was replaced by its counterpart flow in porous media with infinite permeability and the new model was used to simulate the effect of heterogeneities, sampling depth, sampling tool and sampling frequencies on the

  18. Detection of bony metastases of androgen-independent prostate cancer by PET-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, Samuel D. J.; Imbriaco, Massimo; Larson, Steven M.; Garza, Dahlia; Zhang Jiaju; Kalaigian, Hovanes; Finn, Ronald D.; Reddy, David; Horowitz, Steven M.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Scher, Howard I.

    1996-01-01

    Fourteen F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) studies were carried out in 13 patients known to have bony metastases from carcinoma of the prostate. One patient was newly diagnosed. The remaining patients had various types of therapy and were considered hormonally resistant. The average age was 67. All patients had extensive bony metastases shown on the conventional Tc99m-MDP bone scans. Only about 18% of bony lesions apparent on the conventional bone scans showed corresponding increase of FDG uptake. Anatomical correlation was performed by using co-registered images of SPECT and PET in the same area. The positive FDG uptake was not related to the duration of illness, level of PSA, previous therapy, and magnitude of disease involvement. It appears that only a small percentage of bony metastases is associated with increased glycolysis. It is possible that other metabolic processes are more important than glycolysis for providing prostate cancer with a source of energy and nutrients

  19. Detection of bony metastases of androgen-independent prostate cancer by PET-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Samuel D. J.; Imbriaco, Massimo; Larson, Steven M.; Garza, Dahlia; Zhang Jiaju; Kalaigian, Hovanes; Finn, Ronald D.; Reddy, David; Horowitz, Steven M.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Scher, Howard I

    1996-08-01

    Fourteen F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) studies were carried out in 13 patients known to have bony metastases from carcinoma of the prostate. One patient was newly diagnosed. The remaining patients had various types of therapy and were considered hormonally resistant. The average age was 67. All patients had extensive bony metastases shown on the conventional Tc99m-MDP bone scans. Only about 18% of bony lesions apparent on the conventional bone scans showed corresponding increase of FDG uptake. Anatomical correlation was performed by using co-registered images of SPECT and PET in the same area. The positive FDG uptake was not related to the duration of illness, level of PSA, previous therapy, and magnitude of disease involvement. It appears that only a small percentage of bony metastases is associated with increased glycolysis. It is possible that other metabolic processes are more important than glycolysis for providing prostate cancer with a source of energy and nutrients.

  20. Results of Bony Chest Wall Reconstruction with Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene Soft Tissue Patch

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Haibo; Kitano, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The early and long-term outcomes of bony chest wall reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) soft tissue patch remain a concern. No clinical study has reported the shrinkage of Gore-Tex following reconstruction to date.

  1. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  2. Effect of size, quaternary structure and translational error on the static and dynamic heterogeneity of beta-galactosidase and measurement of electrophoretic dynamic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Douglas B; Haslam, Allison M; Silverstein, Harlyn J; Chikamatsu, Miki; Shadabi, Elnaz; Nichols, Ellert R

    2010-08-01

    Single enzyme molecule assays were performed using capillary electrophoresis-based protocols on beta-galactosidase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus helveticus and Bacillus circulans. The enzyme was found to show static heterogeneity with respect to catalytic rate and the variance in rate increased with protein size. This is consistent with the proposal that random errors in translation may be an important underlying component of enzyme heterogeneity. Additionally these enzymes were found to show static heterogeneity with respect to electrophoretic mobility. Comparison of wild-type and rpsL E. coli beta-galactosidase expressed in the presence and absence of streptomycin suggested that increases in error do not result in detectable increases in the dynamic heterogeneity of activity with increasing temperature. Finally, a method was developed to measure the dynamic heterogeneity in electrophoretic mobility.

  3. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  4. The Heterogeneous Oxidation of Organic Droplets -Temperature and Physical Phase Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, H.; Tang, C.; Lin, L.

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of oleic acid droplets with ozone are studied at different temperatures to imitating the atmospheric condition. The reactions are monitored concomitantly by using attenuated total reflectance Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) for the organic species and UV-VIS spectrometry for the ozone concentration, in order to investigate reaction rate discrepancies reported in literature as well as the oxidation mechanism, temperature and physical phase effects. The less and semi- volatile products are identified and resolved by a liquid chromatography and a gas chromatography mass spectrometer, respectively. The identified products are predominantly composed by nananoic acid and azelaic acid and might be due to propagation reactions possibly initiated by a secondary reaction such as the stabilized Criegee intermediates reacting with oleic acid. For temperature effect, the oxidation rate decreases with temperature when the oleic acid droplets are in the same physical phases. As oleic acid turns into the solid phase, the oxidation mechanism is observed to be different from the liquid phase. Furthermore, the concentration of ozone was monitored to examine the kinetics of the oxidation reaction. The integrated ozone profile recorded by UV-VIS spectrometry shows that the consumed ozone represents only approximately 12% of total oleic acid for the solid cases at 4°C in contrast to 30% for the liquid cases at 25°C, and hence confirmed the existence of secondary reactions.

  5. The Community College Effect Revisited: The Importance of Attending to Heterogeneity and Complex Counterfactuals*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jennie E.; Pfeffer, Fabian T.; Goldrick-Rab, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are controversial educational institutions, often said to simultaneously expand college opportunities and diminish baccalaureate attainment. We assess the seemingly contradictory functions of community colleges by attending to effect heterogeneity and to alternative counterfactual conditions. Using data on postsecondary outcomes of high school graduates of Chicago Public Schools, we find that enrolling at a community college penalizes more advantaged students who otherwise would have attended four-year colleges, particularly highly selective schools; however, these students represent a relatively small portion of the community college population, and these estimates are almost certainly biased. On the other hand, enrolling at a community college has a modest positive effect on bachelor's degree completion for disadvantaged students who otherwise would not have attended college; these students represent the majority of community college goers. We conclude that discussions among scholars, policymakers, and practitioners should move beyond considering the pros and cons of community college attendance for students in general to attending to the implications of community college attendance for targeted groups of students. PMID:25825705

  6. Characterization of a viscoelastic heterogeneous object with an effective model by nonlinear full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesgouez, A.

    2018-05-01

    The determination of equivalent viscoelastic properties of heterogeneous objects remains challenging in various scientific fields such as (geo)mechanics, geophysics or biomechanics. The present investigation addresses the issue of the identification of effective constitutive properties of a binary object by using a nonlinear and full waveform inversion scheme. The inversion process, without any regularization technique or a priori information, aims at minimizing directly the discrepancy between the full waveform responses of a bi-material viscoelastic cylindrical object and its corresponding effective homogeneous object. It involves the retrieval of five constitutive equivalent parameters. Numerical simulations are performed in a laboratory-scale two-dimensional configuration: a transient acoustic plane wave impacts the object and the diffracted fluid pressure, solid stress or velocity component fields are determined using a semi-analytical approach. Results show that the retrieval of the density and of the real parts of both the compressional and the shear wave velocities have been carried out successfully regarding the number and location of sensors, the type of sensors, the size of the searching space, the frequency range of the incident plane pressure wave, and the change in the geometric or mechanical constitution of the bi-material object. The retrieval of the imaginary parts of the wave velocities can reveal in some cases the limitations of the proposed approach.

  7. Heterogeneity and proliferation of invasive cancer subclones in game theory models of the Warburg effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, M

    2015-04-01

    The Warburg effect, a switch from aerobic energy production to anaerobic glycolysis, promotes tumour proliferation and motility by inducing acidification of the tumour microenvironment. Therapies that reduce acidity could impair tumour growth and invasiveness. I analysed the dynamics of cell proliferation and of resistance to therapies that target acidity, in a population of cells, under the Warburg effect. The dynamics of mutant cells with increased glycolysis and motility has been assessed in a multi-player game with collective interactions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. Perturbations of the level of acidity in the microenvironment have been used to simulate the effect of therapies that target glycolysis. The non-linear effects of glycolysis induce frequency-dependent clonal selection leading to coexistence of glycolytic and non-glycolytic cells within a tumour. Mutants with increased motility can invade such a polymorphic population and spread within the tumour. While reducing acidity may produce a sudden reduction in tumour cell proliferation, frequency-dependent selection enables it to adapt to the new conditions and can enable the tumour to restore its original levels of growth and invasiveness. The acidity produced by glycolysis acts as a non-linear public good that leads to coexistence of cells with high and low glycolysis within the tumour. Such a heterogeneous population can easily adapt to changes in acidity. Therapies that target acidity can only be effective in the long term if the cost of glycolysis is high, that is, under non-limiting oxygen concentrations. Their efficacy, therefore, is reduced when combined with therapies that impair angiogenesis. © 2015 The Authors Cell Proliferation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Study of the heterogeneities effect in the dose distributions of Leksell Gamma Knife (R), through Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas C, E.L.; Al-Dweri, F.M.O.; Lallena R, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work they are studied, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the effects that take place in the dose profiles that are obtained with the Leksell Gamma Knife (R), when they are kept in account heterogeneities. The considered heterogeneities simulate the skull and the spaces of air that are in the head, like they can be the nasal breasts or the auditory conduits. The calculations were made using the Monte Carlo Penelope simulation code (v. 2003). The geometry of each one of the 201 sources that this instrument is composed, as well as of the corresponding channels of collimation of the Gamma Knife (R), it was described by means of a simplified model of geometry that has been recently studied. The obtained results when they are kept in mind the heterogeneities they present non worthless differences regarding those obtained when those are not considered. These differences are maximum in the proximities of the interfaces among different materials. (Author)

  9. Expanding the Scope of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy: Evidence for Effectiveness in a Heterogeneous Psychiatric Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sheryl M.; Bieling, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions (e.g., MBSR; Kabat-Zinn, 1990; MBCT; Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002) have demonstrated effectiveness in a number of distinct clinical populations. However, few studies have evaluated MBCT within a heterogeneous group of psychiatric adult outpatients. This study examined whether a wider variety of patients…

  10. Specification of electron beam quality from ionization distribution in central axis and a study about heterogenity effects in these distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Some parameters on physical and terapeutic properties of the electron beams generated by ''nevratron XII'' accelerator of the Hospital of Medicine in Ribeirao Preto - USP, Brasil are evaluated. The effects from heterogenities into an irradiated mean, called ''phantom'' or simulator are studied. (M.J.C.) [pt

  11. Effects of physical and chemical heterogeneity on water-quality samples obtained from wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Gibs, Jacob

    1993-01-01

    Factors that affect the mass of chemical constituents entering a well include the distributions of flow rate and chemical concentrations along and near the screened or open section of the well. Assuming a layered porous medium (with each layer being characterized by a uniform hydraulic conductivity and chemical concentration), a knowledge of the flow from each layer along the screened zone and of the chemical concentrations in each layer enables the total mass entering the well to be determined. Analyses of hypothetical systems and a site at Galloway, NJ, provide insight into the temporal variation of water-quality data observed when withdrawing water from screened wells in heterogeneous ground-water systems.The analyses of hypothetical systems quantitatively indicate the cause-and-effect relations that cause temporal variability in water samples obtained from wells. Chemical constituents that have relatively uniform concentrations with depth may not show variations in concentrations in the water discharged from a well after the well is purged (evacuation of standing water in the well casing). However, chemical constituents that do not have uniform concentrations near the screened interval of the well may show variations in concentrations in the well discharge water after purging because of the physics of ground-water flow in the vicinity of the screen.Water-quality samples were obtained through time over a 30 minute period from a site at Galloway, NJ. The water samples were analyzed for aromatic hydrocarbons, and the data for benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene were evaluated for temporal variations. Samples were taken from seven discrete zones, and the flow-weighted concentrations of benzene, toluene, and meta+para xylene all indicate an increase in concentration over time during pumping. These observed trends in time were reproduced numerically based on the estimated concentration distribution in the aquifer and the flow rates from each zone.The results of

  12. Effect of the image resolution on the statistical descriptors of heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Alonso, René; Barbosa, Romeli; Ortegón, Jaime

    2018-02-01

    The characterization and reconstruction of heterogeneous materials, such as porous media and electrode materials, involve the application of image processing methods to data acquired by scanning electron microscopy or other microscopy techniques. Among them, binarization and decimation are critical in order to compute the correlation functions that characterize the microstructure of the above-mentioned materials. In this study, we present a theoretical analysis of the effects of the image-size reduction, due to the progressive and sequential decimation of the original image. Three different decimation procedures (random, bilinear, and bicubic) were implemented and their consequences on the discrete correlation functions (two-point, line-path, and pore-size distribution) and the coarseness (derived from the local volume fraction) are reported and analyzed. The chosen statistical descriptors (correlation functions and coarseness) are typically employed to characterize and reconstruct heterogeneous materials. A normalization for each of the correlation functions has been performed. When the loss of statistical information has not been significant for a decimated image, its normalized correlation function is forecast by the trend of the original image (reference function). In contrast, when the decimated image does not hold statistical evidence of the original one, the normalized correlation function diverts from the reference function. Moreover, the equally weighted sum of the average of the squared difference, between the discrete correlation functions of the decimated images and the reference functions, leads to a definition of an overall error. During the first stages of the gradual decimation, the error remains relatively small and independent of the decimation procedure. Above a threshold defined by the correlation length of the reference function, the error becomes a function of the number of decimation steps. At this stage, some statistical information is lost

  13. Systematic Analysis of the Effect of Small Scale Permeability Heterogeneity on Hyporheic Exchange Flux and Residence Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, G.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) contributes significantly to whole stream biogeochemical cycling. Biogeochemical reactions within the HZ are often transport limited, thus, understanding these reactions requires knowledge about the magnitude of hyporheic fluxes (HF) and the residence time (RT) of these fluxes within the HZ. While the hydraulics of HF are relatively well understood, studies addressing the influence of permeability heterogeneity lack systematic analysis and have even produced contradictory results (e.g. [1] vs. [2]). In order to close this gap, this study uses a statistical numerical approach to elucidate the influence of permeability heterogeneity on HF and RT. We simulated and evaluated 3750 2D-scenarios of sediment heterogeneity by means of Gaussian random fields with focus on total HF and RT distribution. The scenarios were based on ten realizations of each of all possible combinations of 15 different correlation lengths, 5 dipping angles and 5 permeability variances. Roughly 500 hyporheic stream traces were analyzed per simulation, for a total of almost two million stream traces analyzed for correlations between permeability heterogeneity, HF, and RT. Total HF and the RT variance positively correlated with permeability variance while the mean RT negatively correlated with permeability variance. In contrast, changes in correlation lengths and dipping angles had little effect on the examined properties RT and HF. These results provide a possible explanation of the seemingly contradictory conclusions of recent studies, given that the permeability variances in these studies differ by several orders of magnitude. [1] Bardini, L., Boano, F., Cardenas, M.B, Sawyer, A.H, Revelli, R. and Ridolfi, L. "Small-Scale Permeability Heterogeneity Has Negligible Effects on Nutrient Cycling in Streambeds." Geophysical Research Letters, 2013. doi:10.1002/grl.50224. [2] Zhou, Y., Ritzi, R. W., Soltanian, M. R. and Dominic, D. F. "The Influence of Streambed Heterogeneity on

  14. Insights into the effects of patchy ice layers on water balance heterogeneity in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Simon; Kettridge, Nicholas; Devito, Kevin; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands in boreal and sub-arctic settings are characterised by a high degree of seasonality. During winter soils are frozen and snow covers the surface preventing peat moss growth. Conversely, in summer, soils unfreeze and rain and evapotranspiration drive moss productivity. Although advances have been made in understanding growing season water balance and moss dynamics in northern peatlands, there remains a gap in knowledge of inter-seasonal water balance as layers of ice break up during the spring thaw. Understanding the effects of ice layers on spring water balance is important as this coincides with periods of high wildfire risk, such as the devastating Fort McMurrary wildfire of May, 2016. We hypothesise that shallow layers of ice disconnect the growing surface of moss from a falling water table, and prevent water from being supplied from depth. A disconnect between the evaporating surface and deeper water storage will lead to the drying out of the surface layer of moss and a greater risk of severe spring wildfires. We utilise the unsaturated flow model Hydrus 2D to explore water balance in peat layers with an impermeable layer representing ice. Additionally we create models to represent the heterogeneous break up of ice layers observed in Canadian boreal peatlands; these models explore the ability of breaks in an ice layer to connect the evaporating surface to a deeper water table. Results show that peatlands with slower rates of moss growth respond to dry periods by limiting evapotranspiration and thus maintain moist conditions in the sub-surface and a water table above the ice layer. Peatlands which are more productive continue to grow moss and evaporate during dry periods; this results in the near surface mosses drying out and the water table dropping below the level of the ice. Where there are breaks in the ice layer the evaporating surface is able to maintain contact with a falling water table, but connectivity is limited to above the breaks, with

  15. Effect of chemical heterogeneity on photoluminescence of graphite oxide treated with S-/N-containing modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Amani M.; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Montenegro, José María; Bandosz, Teresa J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphite oxide (GO) obtained using Hummers method was modified by hydrothermal treatment either with sulfanilic acid or polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate at 100 °C or 85 °C, respectively. Both modifiers contain sulfur in the oxidized forms and nitrogen in the reduced forms. The materials were characterized using FTIR, XPS, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration and SEM. Their photoluminescent properties and their alteration with an addition of Ag+ were also measured. As a result of these modifications nitrogen was introduced to the graphene layers as amines, imides, amides, and sulfur as sulfones and sulfonic acids. Moreover, the presence of polyaniline was detected. This significantly affected the polarity, acid-base character, and conductivity of the materials. Apparently carboxylic groups of GO were involved in the surface reactions. The modified GOs lost their layered structure and the modifications resulted in the high degree of structural and chemical heterogeneity. Photoluminescence in visible light was recorded and linked to the presence of heteroatoms. For the polystyrene (3-ammonium) sulfonate modified sample addition of Ag+ quenched the photoluminescence at low wavelength showing sensitivity as a possible optical detector. No apparent effect was found for the sulfanilic acid modified sample.

  16. Methylparaben removal using heterogeneous photocatalysis: effect of operational parameters and mineralization/biodegradability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Benítez, Henry; Peñuela, Gustavo A

    2017-03-01

    Methylparaben (MePB) is an organic compound employed mainly in the manufacture of different personal care products. However, it has been recently listed as a potential endocrine disrupter chemical. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to evaluate the degradation of MePB in aqueous solutions using heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO 2 and hydrogen peroxide. In this way, effects of pH and the initial concentrations of catalyst, H 2 O 2 , and pollutant on treatment were analyzed. A face centered, central composite design was used for determination of the influence of each parameter in the process and the conditions under which the pollutant suffers the highest rates of degradation were selected. In general, results indicate that combination TiO 2 /H 2 O 2 /light irradiation leads to ∼90 % of substrate removal after 30 min of reaction and that hydroxyl free radicals are the main specie responsible for organic matter elimination. Finally, in terms of mineralization and biodegradability, experimental results indicated that part of the organic matter was transformed into CO 2 and water and the photo-treatment promoted an increase in samples biodegradability.

  17. Fog modelling during the ParisFog campaign: predictive approach and spatial heterogeneity effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiaojing

    2010-01-01

    In fog or low clouds modeling, the accurate comprehension of the interaction among the turbulence, the microphysics and the radiation is still an important issue in improvement of numerical prediction quality. The improvement of fog modeling is important both in forecasting in transportation and in industrial domain by reason of their discharges atmospheric (cooling tower, smog...). The 1D version of Code-Saturne has been used for the numerical simulation with the observational data from the ParisFog campaign, which took place at the SIRTA site during 2006-2007 winter. The comparison between the simulation and observation shows that the model is able to reproduce correctly the fog evolution from its formation to its dissipation. The sensitivity analysis of the behavior of the different parameterizations shows that the fog dynamic is sensible to the turbulence closure, the fog water content to the sedimentation processes and the fog droplet spectrum to the nucleation scheme. The performance of a long-period simulation in forecasting mode shows that the robustness of the model and the contribution of the coupling by nudging and a mesoscale model in 36 hours advance. The 3D version of Code-Saturne allows us to study the effect of spatial heterogeneity on the fog formation. Firstly, the simulations have been performed within a homogeneous horizontal domain with RANS mode. And then, the surface roughness in different type of surface and the building area will be taken into account. (author) [fr

  18. Heterogeneous nucleation promotes carrier transport in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ruipeng

    2012-09-04

    A new way to investigate and control the growth of solution-cast thin films is presented. The combination of in situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements with dissipation capabilities (QCM-D) and in situ grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) in an environmental chamber provides unique quantitative insights into the time-evolution of the concentration of the solution, the onset of nucleation, and the mode of growth of the organic semiconductor under varied drying conditions. It is demonstrated that careful control over the kinetics of solution drying enhances carrier transport significantly by promoting phase transformation predominantly via heterogeneous nucleation and sustained surface growth of a highly lamellar structure at the solid-liquid interface at the expense of homogeneous nucleation. A new way to investigate and control the growth of drop-cast thin films is presented. The solution-processing of small-molecule thin films of TIPS-pentacene is investigated using time-resolved techniques to reveal the mechanisms of nucleation and growth leading to solid film formation. By tuning the drying speed of the solution, the balance between surface and bulk growth modes is altered, thereby controlling the lamellar formation and tuning the carrier mobility in organic field-effect transistors Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Heterogeneous structure and surface tension effects on mechanical response in pulmonary acinus: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshiyama, Kenichiro; Nishimoto, Keisuke; Ii, Satoshi; Sera, Toshihiro; Wada, Shigeo

    2018-01-20

    The pulmonary acinus is a dead-end microstructure that consists of ducts and alveoli. High-resolution micro-CT imaging has recently provided detailed anatomical information of a complete in vivo acinus, but relating its mechanical response with its detailed acinar structure remains challenging. This study aimed to investigate the mechanical response of acinar tissue in a whole acinus for static inflation using computational approaches. We performed finite element analysis of a whole acinus for static inflation. The acinar structure model was generated based on micro-CT images of an intact acinus. A continuum mechanics model of the lung parenchyma was used for acinar tissue material model, and surface tension effects were explicitly included. An anisotropic mechanical field analysis based on a stretch tensor was combined with a curvature-based local structure analysis. The airspace of the acinus exhibited nonspherical deformation as a result of the anisotropic deformation of acinar tissue. A strain hotspot occurred at the ridge-shaped region caused by a rod-like deformation of acinar tissue on the ridge. The local structure becomes bowl-shaped for inflation and, without surface tension effects, the surface of the bowl-shaped region primarily experiences isotropic deformation. Surface tension effects suppressed the increase in airspace volume and inner surface area, while facilitating anisotropic deformation on the alveolar surface. In the lungs, the heterogeneous acinar structure and surface tension induce anisotropic deformation at the acinar and alveolar scales. Further research is needed on structural variation of acini, inter-acini connectivity, or dynamic behavior to understand multiscale lung mechanics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Implications of Heterogeneity of Treatment Effect for Reporting and Analysis of Randomized Trials in Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashyna, Theodore J; Burke, James F; Sussman, Jeremy B; Prescott, Hallie C; Hayward, Rodney A; Angus, Derek C

    2015-11-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are conducted to guide clinicians' selection of therapies for individual patients. Currently, RCTs in critical care often report an overall mean effect and selected individual subgroups. Yet work in other fields suggests that such reporting practices can be improved. Specifically, this Critical Care Perspective reviews recent work on so-called "heterogeneity of treatment effect" (HTE) by baseline risk and extends that work to examine its applicability to trials of acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Because patients in RCTs in critical care medicine-and patients in intensive care units-have wide variability in their risk of death, these patients will have wide variability in the absolute benefit that they can derive from a given therapy. If the side effects of the therapy are not perfectly collinear with the treatment benefits, this will result in HTE, where different patients experience quite different expected benefits of a therapy. We use simulations of RCTs to demonstrate that such HTE could result in apparent paradoxes, including: (1) positive trials of therapies that are beneficial overall but consistently harm or have little benefit to low-risk patients who met enrollment criteria, and (2) overall negative trials of therapies that still consistently benefit high-risk patients. We further show that these results persist even in the presence of causes of death unmodified by the treatment under study. These results have implications for reporting and analyzing RCT data, both to better understand how our therapies work and to improve the bedside applicability of RCTs. We suggest a plan for measurement in future RCTs in the critically ill.

  1. The Effect of Methyl, Hydroxyl, and Ketone Functional Groups on the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Succinic Acid Aerosol by OH Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M.; Zhang, H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    The heterogeneous oxidation of atmospheric organic aerosols can influence their effects on climate, human health, and visibility. During oxidation, functionalization occurs when an oxygenated functional group is added to a molecule, leaving the carbon skeleton intact. Fragmentation involves carbon-carbon bond cleavage and produces two products with smaller carbon numbers than the parent compound. To gain better insights into how the molecular structure of more oxygenated organic compounds affects heterogeneous reactivity, succinic acid aerosols are photo-oxidized in an aerosol flow tube reactor, and the reaction products are analyzed using Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry for online chemical analysis. The effect of various functional groups (CH3, OH, C=O) along the carbon backbone on the heterogeneous reaction mechanisms are also investigated using model compounds. For this series of compounds, the formation of more oxygenated products through functionalization can be explained by well-known condensation-phase reactions such as Russell and Bennett and Summers. The number of fragmentation products is found to increase with the presence of OH and CH3 groups. This can be attributed to the increased number of tertiary carbons, enhancing the fragmentation after multiple oxidation steps. Smaller dicaids (oxalic acid and malonic acid) can be formed through the fragmentation processes in the heterogeneous oxidation of succinic acid. The effect of molecular structure on reaction kinetics, volatilization, and the relative importance of functionalization and fragmentation pathways will be discussed.

  2. Understanding the effect of single-fracture heterogeneity from single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Martin; Doughty, Christine; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Niemi, Auli

    2013-12-01

    The single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer test is a method used to estimate the tracer retardation properties of a fracture or fracture zone. The effects of single-fracture aperture heterogeneity on SWIW-test tracer breakthrough curves are examined by numerical modelling. The effects of the matrix diffusion and sorption are accounted for by using a particle tracking method through the addition of a time delay added to the advective transport time. For a given diffusion and sorption property ( P m) value and for a heterogeneous fracture, the peak concentration is larger compared to a homogeneous fracture. The cumulative breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture is similar to that for a homogeneous fracture and a less sorptive/diffusive tracer. It is demonstrated that the fracture area that meets the flowing water, the specific flow-wetted surface (sFWS) of the fracture, can be determined by matching the observed breakthrough curve for a heterogeneous fracture to that for a homogeneous fracture with an equivalent property parameter. SWIW tests are also simulated with a regional pressure gradient present. The results point to the possibility of distinguishing the effect of the regional pressure gradient from that of diffusion through the use of multiple tracers with different P m values.

  3. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on earth rotation in tidal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chao, Benjamin F; Sun, Wenke; Kuang, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D) density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD) in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8) and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal) are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle only contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. Nevertheless, including the 3D variation of the density in the mantle into account explained a substantial portion of the discrepancy between the observed signals in PM and LOD extracted from the lump-sum values based on continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94) and the computed contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon). In other word, the difference of the two, at all tidal frequencies (long-periods, diurnals, and semi-diurnals) contains contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the Reference Earth Model (REM), which is the next major objective in global geophysics research beyond PREM.

  4. SU-F-T-171: Manufacturing Cost Effective Heterogeneous Phantoms for Use in Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, J; Chen, Y; Ahmad, S; Johnson, D [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of 3D printing cost effective heterogeneous phantoms for use in proton therapy treatment planning quality assurance. Methods: A desktop 3D printer was utilized to create a series of 2 cm × 2 cm × 4 cm PLA plastic blocks of varying fill materials and hexagonal fill pattern. The blocks were than tested when filled with air, polyurethane foam, paraffin, silicone, and caulk of calcium carbonate – acrylic polymer blend. The blocks were evaluated with a “GE Lightspeed” 16 slice CT scanner and average CT# of the materials’ centers evaluated. Blocks were then placed into a custom aperture fitted to a Mevion Proton system to determine the relative stopping power of each. Scans were performed in water tank with Marcus type parallel plate chamber under a beam with a range of 15 cm and modulation of 2 cm. Shifts in range occurring relative to the 80% distal edge of the open SOBP were evaluated. Results: The CT#s of the blocks were plotted against their measured relative stopping power. This curve was compared to that which is in clinical use. While the trend agrees generally, specific differences between the relative stopping powers were as great as 10%. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that it is possible to utilize different cost effective materials in the manufacturing of phantoms for use in proton therapy. While different materials may provide better agreement to established calibration curves, a custom curve specific to the materials used may be utilized to accurately predict proton treatment dose distributions.

  5. The effects of spatial heterogeneity and subsurface lateral transfer on evapotranspiration estimates in large scale Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouholahnejad, E.; Fan, Y.; Kirchner, J. W.; Miralles, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Most Earth system models (ESM) average over considerable sub-grid heterogeneity in land surface properties, and overlook subsurface lateral flow. This could potentially bias evapotranspiration (ET) estimates and has implications for future temperature predictions, since overestimations in ET imply greater latent heat fluxes and potential underestimation of dry and warm conditions in the context of climate change. Here we quantify the bias in evaporation estimates that may arise from the fact that ESMs average over considerable heterogeneity in surface properties, and also neglect lateral transfer of water across the heterogeneous landscapes at global scale. We use a Budyko framework to express ET as a function of P and PET to derive simple sub-grid closure relations that quantify how spatial heterogeneity and lateral transfer could affect average ET as seen from the atmosphere. We show that averaging over sub-grid heterogeneity in P and PET, as typical Earth system models do, leads to overestimation of average ET. Our analysis at global scale shows that the effects of sub-grid heterogeneity will be most pronounced in steep mountainous areas where the topographic gradient is high and where P is inversely correlated with PET across the landscape. In addition, we use the Total Water Storage (TWS) anomaly estimates from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) remote sensing product and assimilate it into the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) to correct for existing free drainage lower boundary condition in GLEAM and quantify whether, and how much, accounting for changes in terrestrial storage can improve the simulation of soil moisture and regional ET fluxes at global scale.

  6. Slope stability of bioreactor landfills during leachate injection: effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic municipal solid waste conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Rajiv K; Reddy, Krishna R

    2014-03-01

    In bioreactor landfills, leachate recirculation can significantly affect the stability of landfill slope due to generation and distribution of excessive pore fluid pressures near side slope. The current design and operation of leachate recirculation systems do not consider the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the increased pore gas pressures in landfilled waste caused due to leachate recirculation on the physical stability of landfill slope. In this study, a numerical two-phase flow model (landfill leachate and gas as immiscible phases) was used to investigate the effects of heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of MSW on moisture distribution and pore-water and capillary pressures and their resulting impacts on the stability of a simplified bioreactor landfill during leachate recirculation using horizontal trench system. The unsaturated hydraulic properties of MSW were considered based on the van Genuchten model. The strength reduction technique was used for slope stability analyses as it takes into account of the transient and spatially varying pore-water and gas pressures. It was concluded that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW with varied unit weight and saturated hydraulic conductivity significantly influenced the moisture distribution and generation and distribution of pore fluid pressures in landfill and considerably reduced the stability of bioreactor landfill slope. It is recommended that heterogeneous and anisotropic MSW must be considered as it provides a more reliable approach for the design and leachate operations in bioreactor landfills.

  7. Quantifying Effects of Spatial Heterogeneity of Farmlands on Bird Species Richness by Means of Similarity Index Pairwise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Morelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown how intensification of farming is the main cause of loss biodiversity in these environments. During the last decades, agroecosystems in Europe have changed drastically, mainly due to mechanization of agriculture. In this work, species richness in bird communities was examined on a gradient of spatial heterogeneity of farmlands, in order to quantify its effects. Four categories of farmland spatial heterogeneity were defined, based on landscape and landuse parameters. The impact of features increasing the spatial heterogeneity was quantified comparing the similarity indexes between bird communities in several farmlands of Central Italy. The effects of environmental variables on bird richness were analyzed using GLM. The results highlighted that landscape features surrogates of high nature values (HNVs of farmlands can increase more than 50% the bird species richness. The features more related to bird richness were hedgerows, scattered shrubs, uncultivated patches, and powerlines. The results confirm that the approach based on HNV for evaluating the farmlands is also suitable in order to study birds’ diversity. However, some species are more sensitive to heterogeneity, while other species occupy mainly homogeneous farmlands. As a consequence, different conservation methods must be considered for each farmland bird species.

  8. Bony injuries in homicide cases (1994-2014). A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flieger, Alexander; Kölzer, Sarah C; Plenzig, Stefanie; Heinbuch, Sara; Kettner, Mattias; Ramsthaler, Frank; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2016-09-01

    Even when human skeletal remains are found in contexts indicative of body disposal after homicide, none of the bones may manifest injuries. When skeletons are incomplete, there are two possibilities, the injured bones are missing or none were injured. This leads to the question how frequently bones are injured during homicide, where the injuries tend to be placed, and whether the frequency of injury is related to the type of homicide. To answer these questions, the postmortem reports from all autopsies performed for homicide victims at the Institute of Legal Medicine at the University Hospital in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, between 1994 and 2014, were retrospectively evaluated for bony injuries discovered during autopsy. In 90 cases, a preliminary postmortem computed tomography (pmCT) examination had been performed. The cases were categorized into the following five groups by type of fatal trauma: blunt force, sharp force, gunshot injury, strangulation, or other. In total, the postmortem reports for 897 homicides (527 male, 370 female) were evaluated. The number of victims per trauma category were sharp force, 309; blunt force, 179; gunshot injury, 242; strangulation, 92; and other, 75. Bony injuries had been reported in 70.9 % of the homicides. The "gunshot" category contained the highest proportion of victims with bony injuries (92.6 %). With 80.4 %, the second-highest proportion of victims with bony injuries was in the "blunt force" category, followed by 66.3 % of victims in the "sharp force" group. In contrast, with 53.3 %, the second-lowest proportion of victims with bony injuries was in the "strangulation" category, which contained a preponderance of female victims, followed by 17.3 % of victims with bony injuries in the "other" category. Bony injuries thus occurred in the majority of homicides. Forensic osteological analysis should, therefore, always be performed on badly decomposed human remains. Where necessary, the additional use of visualization

  9. Conformity-based cooperation in online social networks: The effect of heterogeneous social influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Jianwei; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the conformity model by introducing heterogeneous social influence into the analysis. We associate the influence of a player in the network with its degree centrality assuming that players of higher degree exhibit more social influence on its neighbors. The results show that the equilibrium level of cooperators can be dramatically enhanced if the conformity-driven players are preferentially influenced by neighbors of higher degree. We attribute this finding to two elementary mechanisms in the evolutionary process: (1) degree-based social influence facilitates the formation of strategic clusters around hubs; and (2) payoff-heterogeneity between cooperative clusters and defective clusters contributes to the promotion of cooperation. This research reveals the important role of heterogeneous social influence on the emergence of cooperation in social networks.

  10. The effect of flow maldistribution in heterogeneous parallel-plate active magnetic regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Engelbrecht, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    The heat transfer properties and performance of parallel plate active magnetic regenerators (AMR) with heterogeneous plate spacing are investigated using detailed models previously published. Bulk heat transfer characteristics in the regenerator are predicted as a function of variation in plate s...... having a standard deviation greater than about 5 % on their plate spacing are severely penalized in terms of both cooling power and achievable temperature span due to the inhomogeneity of the stacks.......The heat transfer properties and performance of parallel plate active magnetic regenerators (AMR) with heterogeneous plate spacing are investigated using detailed models previously published. Bulk heat transfer characteristics in the regenerator are predicted as a function of variation in plate...... spacing. The results are quantified through a Nusselt number scaling factor that is applied in a detailed 1D AMR model. In this way, the impact of flow maldistribution due to heterogeneous parallel plate stacks on AMR performance is systematically investigated. It is concluded that parallel plate stacks...

  11. Vaccine effects on heterogeneity in susceptibility and implications for population health management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langwig, Kate E.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Jones, Darbi R.; Viss, Jessie R.; Rutan, Barbara J.; Egan, Nicholas A.; Sá-Guimarães, Pedro; Min Sun Kim,; Kurath, Gael; Gomes, M. Gabriela M.; Lipsitch, Marc; Bansal, Shweta; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneity in host susceptibility is a key determinant of infectious disease dynamics but is rarely accounted for in assessment of disease control measures. Understanding how susceptibility is distributed in populations, and how control measures change this distribution, is integral to predicting the course of epidemics with and without interventions. Using multiple experimental and modeling approaches, we show that rainbow trout have relatively homogeneous susceptibility to infection with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus and that vaccination increases heterogeneity in susceptibility in a nearly all-or-nothing fashion. In a simple transmission model with an R0 of 2, the highly heterogeneous vaccine protection would cause a 35 percentage-point reduction in outbreak size over an intervention inducing homogenous protection at the same mean level. More broadly, these findings provide validation of methodology that can help to reduce biases in predictions of vaccine impact in natural settings and provide insight into how vaccination shapes population susceptibility.

  12. Combined effects of climatic gradient and domestic livestock grazing on reptile community structure in a heterogeneous agroecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Guy; Gavish, Yoni; Shacham, Boaz; Giladi, Itamar; Bouskila, Amos; Ziv, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Grazing plays an important role in shaping ecological communities in human-related ecosystems. Although myriad studies have explored the joint effect of grazing and climate on plant communities, this interactive effect has rarely been studied in animals. We hypothesized that the effect of grazing on the reptile community varies along a climatic gradient in relation to the effect of grazing on habitat characteristics, and that grazing differentially affects reptiles of different biogeographic regions. We tested our hypotheses by collecting data on environmental characteristics and by trapping reptiles in four heterogeneous landscapes experiencing differing grazing intensities and distributed along a sharp climatic gradient. We found that while reptile diversity increased with grazing intensity at the mesic end of the gradient, it decreased with grazing intensity at the arid end. Moreover, the proportion of reptile species of differing biogeographic origins varied with the interactive effect of climate and grazing. The representation of species originating in arid biogeographic zones was highest at the arid end of the climatic gradient, and representation increased with grazing intensity within this area. Regardless of the climatic context, increased grazing pressure results in a reduction in vegetation cover and thus in changes in habitat characteristics. By reducing vegetation cover, grazing increased habitat heterogeneity in the dense mesic sites and decreased habitat heterogeneity in the arid sites. Thus, our results suggest that the same direction of habitat alteration caused by grazing may have opposite effects on biodiversity and community composition in different climatic contexts.

  13. Effect of deep inspiration avoidance on ventilation heterogeneity and airway responsiveness in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David G; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G; Salome, Cheryl M

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms by which deep inspiration (DI) avoidance increases airway responsiveness in healthy subjects are not known. DI avoidance does not alter respiratory mechanics directly; however, computational modeling has predicted that DI avoidance would increase baseline ventilation heterogeneity. The aim was to determine if DI avoidance increased baseline ventilation heterogeneity and whether this correlated with the increase in airway responsiveness. Twelve healthy subjects had ventilation heterogeneity measured by multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) before and after 20 min of DI avoidance. This was followed by another 20-min period of DI avoidance before the inhalation of a single methacholine dose. The protocol was repeated on a separate day with the addition of five DIs at the end of each of the two periods of DI avoidance. Baseline ventilation heterogeneity in convection-dependent and diffusion-convection-dependent airways was calculated from MBNW. The response to methacholine was measured by the percent fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (FVC) (airway narrowing) and percent fall in FVC (airway closure). DI avoidance increased baseline diffusion-convection-dependent airways (P = 0.02) but did not affect convection-dependent airways (P = 0.9). DI avoidance increased both airway closure (P = 0.002) and airway narrowing (P = 0.02) during bronchial challenge. The increase in diffusion-convection-dependent airways due to DI avoidance did not correlate with the increase in either airway narrowing (r(s) = 0.14) or airway closure (r(s) = 0.12). These findings suggest that DI avoidance increases diffusion-convection-dependent ventilation heterogeneity that is not associated with the increase in airway responsiveness. We speculate that DI avoidance reduces surfactant release, which increases peripheral ventilation heterogeneity and also predisposes to peripheral airway closure.

  14. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation and postirradiation incubation on heterogeneous nuclear RNA size in murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Sauerbier, W.

    1978-01-01

    We have analyzed the decrease in synthesis of individual size classes of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) in ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated Merwin plasmacytoma (MPC-11) cells at various times of postirradiation incubation. HnRNA from nonirradiated control cells is distributed over a wide range from approximately 60S to 5S, with 42S RNA carrying more label than any other size class. HnRNA from uv-irradiated cells shows a dose-dependent shift in size distribution toward lower molecular weight. The size distribution of hnRNA synthesized after prolonged times of postirradiation incubation is restored toward normal, i.e., synthesis of long RNA molecules increases relative to the synthesis of short ones. Analysis of the total number of hnRNA chains synthesized during a 20-min [ 3 H]uridine pulse shows a considerable eduction in their number with increasing uv dose. Murine cell lines are excision-repair-deficient but capable of post replication repair inhibited by caffeine. HnRNA transcripts of cells incubated in its presence were studied. The caffeine, which has no effect on hnRNA size in control cells, inhibits to a considerable extent the restoration of full-length transcripts during postirradiation incubation. The lack of excision repair in MPC-11 was confirmed by the analysis of pyrimidine dimers in trichloracetic acid-insoluble and soluble fractions within 8 h of postirradiation incubation. The size of parental and daughter strand DNA in uv-irradiated cells was correlated with RNA transcript size. The parental DNA in these experiments does not change its size as a consequence of uv exposure and postirradiation incubation. In contrast, daughter DNA strands are short in uv-irradiated cells and they increase in size during postirradiation incubation to reach the size of parental strands after 8 h

  15. The effect of spatially heterogeneous damage in simple models of earthquake fault networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiampo, K. F.; Dominguez, R.; Klein, W.; Serino, C.; Kazemian, J.

    2011-12-01

    Natural earthquake fault systems are highly heterogeneous in space; inhomogeneities occur because the earth is made of a variety of materials of different strengths and dissipate stress differently. Because the spatial arrangement of these materials is dependent on the geologic history, the spatial distribution of these various materials can be quite complex and occur over a variety of length scales. One way that the inhomogeneous nature of fault systems manifests itself is in the spatial patterns which emerge in seismicity (Tiampo et al., 2002, 2007). Despite their inhomogeneous nature, real faults are often modeled as spatially homogeneous systems. One argument for this approach is that earthquake faults experience long range stress transfer, and if this range is longer than the length scales associated with the inhomogeneities of the system, the dynamics of the system may be unaffected by the inhomogeneities. However, it is not clear that this is always the case. In this work we study the scaling of earthquake models that are variations of Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) and Burridge-Knopoff (BK) models, in order to explore the effect of spatial inhomogeneities on earthquake-like systems when interaction ranges are long, but not necessarily longer than the distances associated with the inhomogeneities of the system (Burridge and L. Knopoff, 1967; Rundle and Jackson, 1977; Olami et al., 1988). For long ranges and without inhomogeneities, such models have been found to produce scaling similar to GR scaling found in real earthquake systems (Rundle and Klein, 1993). In the earthquake models discussed here, damage is distributed inhomogeneously throughout and the interaction ranges, while long, are not longer than all of the damage length scales. In addition, we attempt to model the effect of a fixed distribution of asperities, and find that this has an effect on the magnitude-frequency relation, producing larger events at regular intervals, We find that the scaling

  16. Effects of Lateral Heterogeneity and Power Law Rheology on Glacially Induced Surface Motion and Gravity Rate of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P.; Wang, H.; van der Wal, W.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geodetic measurements from GPS, satellite altimetry, tide-gauges, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and space-borne gravimetry (such as GRACE) have been used to monitor global change. Since these measurements contain contributions from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and other tectonic processes, they must be modeled and removed in order to observe current climate change. In the past, most GIA models assumed that the earth is laterally homogeneous and the rheology is linear. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of lateral heterogeneity and Power-Law rheology on GIA induced land uplift rate, horizontal velocities, relative sealevels, J-dot and the secular gravity rate of change in the southern part of Hudson Bay, which is detected by the GRACE mission. Here, GIA is modeled with a spherical, self-gravitating, compressible viscoelastic, laterally heterogeneous earth using the Finite-Element Method. The effect of gravitationally self-consistent sea levels in realistic oceans is also included. Lateral variations in mantle viscosities and lithospheric thickness are inferred from the seismic tomography model S20A using well known scaling relationships. Power-Law rheologies in the whole mantle or in combination with linear rheologies in the upper or lower mantle are also investigated. Both ICE-5G and ICE-4G deglaciation models are used to investigate their effect on the pattern of rebound. Preliminary results show that both lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology have strong effects on the direction and magnitude of horizontal velocities. The effects of lateral heterogeneity and power-law rheology are also large enough to be detected in land uplift rate, relative sealevels, J-dot and gravity rate of change. Their implication on observing the effects of global warming will also be discussed.

  17. Theoretical analysis of non-Gaussian heterogeneity effects on subsurface flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2017-04-01

    Much of the stochastic groundwater literature is devoted to the analysis of flow and transport in Gaussian or multi-Gaussian log hydraulic conductivity (or transmissivity) fields, Y(x)=ln\\func K(x) (x being a position vector), characterized by one or (less frequently) a multiplicity of spatial correlation scales. Yet Y and many other variables and their (spatial or temporal) increments, ΔY, are known to be generally non-Gaussian. One common manifestation of non-Gaussianity is that whereas frequency distributions of Y often exhibit mild peaks and light tails, those of increments ΔY are generally symmetric with peaks that grow sharper, and tails that become heavier, as separation scale or lag between pairs of Y values decreases. A statistical model that captures these disparate, scale-dependent distributions of Y and ΔY in a unified and consistent manner has been recently proposed by us. This new "generalized sub-Gaussian (GSG)" model has the form Y(x)=U(x)G(x) where G(x) is (generally, but not necessarily) a multiscale Gaussian random field and U(x) is a nonnegative subordinator independent of G. The purpose of this paper is to explore analytically, in an elementary manner, lead-order effects that non-Gaussian heterogeneity described by the GSG model have on the stochastic description of flow and transport. Recognizing that perturbation expansion of hydraulic conductivity K=eY diverges when Y is sub-Gaussian, we render the expansion convergent by truncating Y's domain of definition. We then demonstrate theoretically and illustrate by way of numerical examples that, as the domain of truncation expands, (a) the variance of truncated Y (denoted by Yt) approaches that of Y and (b) the pdf (and thereby moments) of Yt increments approach those of Y increments and, as a consequence, the variogram of Yt approaches that of Y. This in turn guarantees that perturbing Kt=etY to second order in σYt (the standard deviation of Yt) yields results which approach those we obtain

  18. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon [School of Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence.

  19. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, YeNa; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Jin, Wook; Park, Ji Seon; Park, So Young

    2017-03-01

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis.

  20. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Young; Kim, Seong Gon; Choi, Hang Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence

  1. Bilateral bony fusion around the supraspinatus muscle inducing muscle hypoplasia and shoulder pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, YeNa; Jin, Wook; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Department of Radiology, 892, Dongnam-ro, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kyung Nam; Park, Ji Seon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, 23 Kyunghee-daero, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We describe the case of a 30-year-old man who developed chronic bilateral shoulder pain that relapsed and remitted over the course of 1 year. The patient was diagnosed with congenital shoulder fusion anomalies. The right shoulder showed anomalous accessory articulation between the distal third of the clavicle and the acromion along with normal articulation of the shoulder on CT. At the left shoulder, bony fusions were present between the distal portion of the clavicle, the acromion, and the coracoid process, and between the coracoid process, upper portion of the glenoid, and upper body of the scapula, which formed a bony canal and was responsible for hypoplasia of the supraspinatus muscle on CT and MRI. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such congenital shoulder anomalies with extreme bony fusion and is an illustrative example of how imaging may be used to differentiate fusion from other congenital abnormalities of the shoulder to aid diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Using patient self-reports to study heterogeneity of treatment effects in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, R. C.; Loo, van H. M.; Wardenaar, K. J.; Bossarte, R. M.; Brenner, L. A.; Ebert, D. D.; de Jonge, P.; Nierenberg, A. A.; Rosellini, A. J.; Sampson, N. A.; Schoevers, R. A.; Wilcox, M. A.; Zaslavsky, A. M.

    Backgrounds. Clinicians need guidance to address the heterogeneity of treatment responses of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). While prediction schemes based on symptom clustering and biomarkers have so far not yielded results of sufficient strength to inform clinical decision-making,

  3. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Trenga, Anthony P.; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A.; Abel, Mark F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. Methods All patients aged ?13 years (n?=?75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003?2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiograph...

  4. Bony morphology of the hip in professional ballet dancers compared to athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2017-07-01

    To compare hip bony morphology between ballet dancers and a sporting control group and to determine the relationship with hip pain. Thirty-three professional ballet dancers and 33 age- and sex-matched athletes completed questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and underwent clinical testing and 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging to measure acetabular coverage with lateral centre edge angles, femoral head-neck junction concavity with alpha angles at anterior and superior positions, femoral neck-shaft angles, and acetabular version angles. Bony morphological measures fell within normal ranges. Dancers had higher neck-shaft angles (dancers 134.6 ± 4.6°/athletes130.8 ± 4.7°, p = 0.002), lower acetabular version angles (13.5 ± 4.7°/17.1 ± 4.7°, p = 0.003), lower superior alpha angles (38.9 ± 6.9°/46.7 ± 10.6°, p ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that differentiates them from athletes. Hip pain correlated poorly with bony morphology. • Ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that may allow extreme hip motion. • Morphological parameter means fell within normal reference intervals in dancers. • Bony morphology correlates poorly with hip pain. • The risk of hip injury due to abnormal morphology requires prospective studies.

  5. Primary flap closure combined with Emdogain alone or Emdogain and Cerasorb in the treatment of intra-bony defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokan, Ivan; Bill, Josip S; Schlagenhauf, Ulrich

    2006-12-01

    To compare clinical outcomes of three different modalities of treatment for deep intra-bony defects. Fifty-six patients were paralleled for clinical parameters and randomly assigned to treatment. They displayed one angular defect each with an intra-bony component > or =3 mm, probing pocket depth (PPD) and probing attachment level (PAL) > or =7 mm, and plaque index (PI) <1. Nineteen defects were treated, respectively, with enamel matrix derivative (EMD)+tricalcium phosphate (TCP) or EMD alone and 18 defects with modified Widman flap (MWF). Primary flap closure was used in all three groups. PI, gingival index, bleeding on probing, PPD, PAL, and recession (REC) were measured before and 12 months after treatment. Treatment with EMD alone yielded a 3.9+/-1.3 mm PPD decrease and a 3.7+/-1.0 mm PAL gain (p<0.001), whereas EMD+beta-TCP produced a 4.1+/-1.2 mm PPD reduction and a 4.0+/-1.0 mm PAL gain (p<0.001). These outcome parameters did not differ between the two groups. REC increased by 0.7+/-1.3 mm. After MWF treatment, attachment gain was 2.1+/-1.4 mm (p<0.001) and PPD reduction was 3.8+/-1.8 mm, whereas REC increased by 1.5+/-0.7 mm (p=0.042 versus EMD). Both EMD treatments showed similar clinical effects, with significant PAL gain and a significantly lower REC increase in comparison with MWF treatment.

  6. Effective Electrostatic Interactions Between Two Overall Neutral Surfaces with Quenched Charge Heterogeneity Over Atomic Length Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.

    2017-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo results as a reference, a classical density functional theory ( CDFT) is shown to reliably predict the forces between two heterogeneously charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution, whereas the Poisson-Boltzmann ( PB) theory is demonstrated to deteriorate obviously for the same system even if the system parameters considered fall within the validity range of the PB theory in the homogeneously charged surfaces. By applying the tested CDFT, we study the effective electrostatic potential of mean force ( EPMF) between two face-face planar and hard surfaces of zero net charge on which positive and negative charges are separated and considered to present as discontinuous spots on the inside edges of the two surfaces. Main conclusions are summarized as follows: (i) strength of the EPMF in the surface charge separation case is very sensitively and positively correlated with the surface charge separation level and valency of the salt ion. Particularly, the charge separation level and the salt ion valency have a synergistic effect, which makes high limit of the EPMF strength in the surface charge separation case significantly go beyond that of the ideal homogeneously charged surface counterpart at average surface charge density similar to the average surface positive or negative charge density in the charge separation case. (ii) The surface charge distribution patterns mainly influence sign of the EPMF: symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns induce repulsive and attractive (at small distances) EPMF, respectively; but with low valency salt ions and low charge separation level the opposite may be the case. With simultaneous presence of both higher valency cation and anion, the EPMF can be repulsive at intermediate distances for asymmetrical patterns. (iii) Salt ion size has a significant impact, which makes the EPMF tend to become more and more repulsive with the ion diameter regardless of the surface charge distribution patterns and the valency of

  7. Environmental effects on vertebrate species richness: testing the energy, environmental stability and habitat heterogeneity hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explaining species richness patterns is a central issue in biogeography and macroecology. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms driving biodiversity patterns, but the causes of species richness gradients remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explain the impacts of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity factors on variation of vertebrate species richness (VSR, based on the VSR pattern in China, so as to test the energy hypothesis, the environmental stability hypothesis, and the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dataset was compiled containing the distributions of 2,665 vertebrate species and eleven ecogeographic predictive variables in China. We grouped these variables into categories of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity and transformed the data into 100 × 100 km quadrat systems. To test the three hypotheses, AIC-based model selection was carried out between VSR and the variables in each group and correlation analyses were conducted. There was a decreasing VSR gradient from the southeast to the northwest of China. Our results showed that energy explained 67.6% of the VSR variation, with the annual mean temperature as the main factor, which was followed by annual precipitation and NDVI. Environmental stability factors explained 69.1% of the VSR variation and both temperature annual range and precipitation seasonality had important contributions. By contrast, habitat heterogeneity variables explained only 26.3% of the VSR variation. Significantly positive correlations were detected among VSR, annual mean temperature, annual precipitation, and NDVI, whereas the relationship of VSR and temperature annual range was strongly negative. In addition, other variables showed moderate or ambiguous relations to VSR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The energy hypothesis and the environmental stability hypothesis were supported, whereas little

  8. Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: Effects of scale and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, A.H.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Lawer, J.J.; Steel, E. A.; Ebersole, J.L.; Lee, S.Y.

    2018-01-01

    Climate-change driven increases in water temperature pose challenges for aquatic organisms. Predictions of impacts typically do not account for fine-grained spatiotemporal thermal patterns in rivers. Patches of cooler water could serve as refuges for anadromous species like salmon that migrate during summer. We used high-resolution remotely sensed water temperature data to characterize summer thermal heterogeneity patterns for 11,308 km of second–seventh-order rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California (USA). We evaluated (1) water temperature patterns at different spatial resolutions, (2) the frequency, size, and spacing of cool thermal patches suitable for Pacific salmon (i.e., contiguous stretches ≥ 0.25 km, ≤ 15 °C and ≥ 2 °C, aooler than adjacent water), and (3) potential influences of climate change on availability of cool patches. Thermal heterogeneity was nonlinearly related to the spatial resolution of water temperature data, and heterogeneity at fine resolution ( 2.7 and  5.7 and < 49.4 km. Thermal heterogeneity varied among rivers, some of which had long uninterrupted stretches of warm water ≥ 20 °C, and others had many smaller cool patches. Our models predicted little change in future thermal heterogeneity among rivers, but within-river patterns sometimes changed markedly compared to contemporary patterns. These results can inform long-term monitoring programs as well as near-term climate-adaptation strategies.

  9. Melorheostosis of the hand with complicating bony spur formation and bursal inflammation: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ameen, S.; Anderson, S.E.; Nagy, L.; Gerich, U.

    2002-01-01

    A 37-year old woman presented with intolerable pain associated with a slowly growing mass on the dorsum of the right hand. The radiographs were characteristic of melorheostosis involving the third and fourth metacarpals, with a cortical bony projection extending from the base of the third metacarpal eroding slightly into the fourth metacarpal, associated with bursal formation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an inflamed bursal collection adjacent to the spur. This region corresponded to the patient's severe clinical, focal pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in which melorheostosis of the hand has been associated with bony spur formation and complicated by an inflamed bursa. (orig.)

  10. Dosimetric evaluation in heterogeneous tissue of anterior electron beam irradiation for treatment of retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsner, S.M.; Hogstrom, K.R.; Kurup, R.G.; Moyers, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    A dosimetric study of anterior electron beam irradiation for treatment of retinoblastoma was performed to evaluate the influence of tissue heterogeneities on the dose distribution within the eye and the accuracy of the dose calculated by a pencil beam algorithm. Film measurements were made in a variety of polystyrene phantoms and in a removable polystyrene eye incorporated into a tissue substitute phantom constructed from a human skull. Measurements in polystyrene phantoms were used to demonstrate the algorithm's ability to predict the effect of a lens block placed in the beam, as well as the eye's irregular surface shape. The eye phantom was used to measure dose distributions within the eye in both the sagittal and transverse planes in order to test the algorithm's ability to predict the dose distribution when bony heterogeneities are present. Results show (1) that previous treatment planning conclusions based on flat, uniform phantoms for central-axis depth dose are adequate; (2) that a three-dimensional heterogeneity correction is required for accurate dose calculations; and (3) that if only a two-dimensional heterogeneity correction is used in calculating the dose, it is more accurate for the sagittal than the transverse plane

  11. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements – Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fauchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR brightness temperatures (BTs at the top of the atmosphere (TOA as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm, and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB and the (ii horizontal radiative transport (HRT leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE. A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ∼ 250 m with averaged values of up to 5–7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ∼ 250 m with average values of up to 1–2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial

  12. Land market interactions between heterogeneous agents in a heterogeneous landscape-tracing the macro-scale effects of individual trade-offs between environmental amenities and disamenities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filatova, Tatiana; van der Veen, A.; Parker, Dawn C.

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneity in both the spatial environment and economic agents is a crucial driver of land market dynamics. We present an agent-based land market model where land from agriculture use is transferred into urban. The model combines the microeconomic demand, supply, and bidding foundations of

  13. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    Naturally occurring geologic heterogeneity is an important, but often overlooked, aspect of seismic wave propagation. This dissertation presents a strategy for modeling the effects of heterogeneity using a combination of geostatistics and Finite Difference simulation. In the first chapter, I discuss my motivations for studying geologic heterogeneity and seis- mic wave propagation. Models based upon fractal statistics are powerful tools in geophysics for modeling heterogeneity. The important features of these fractal models are illustrated using borehole log data from an oil well and geomorphological observations from a site in Death Valley, California. A large part of the computational work presented in this disserta- tion was completed using the Finite Difference Code E3D. I discuss the Python-based user interface for E3D and the computational strategies for working with heterogeneous models developed over the course of this research. The second chapter explores a phenomenon observed for wave propagation in heteroge- neous media - the generation of unexpected shear wave phases in the near-source region. In spite of their popularity amongst seismic researchers, approximate methods for modeling wave propagation in these media, such as the Born and Rytov methods or Radiative Trans- fer Theory, are incapable of explaining these shear waves. This is primarily due to these method's assumptions regarding the coupling of near-source terms with the heterogeneities and mode conversion. To determine the source of these shear waves, I generate a suite of 3D synthetic heterogeneous fractal geologic models and use E3D to simulate the wave propaga- tion for a vertical point force on the surface of the models. I also present a methodology for calculating the effective source radiation patterns from the models. The numerical results show that, due to a combination of mode conversion and coupling with near-source hetero- geneity, shear wave energy on the order of 10% of the

  14. Spatial and temporal trends of drought effects in a heterogeneous semi-arid forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assal, Timothy J.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Sibold, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Drought has long been recognized as a driving mechanism in the forests of western North America and drought-induced mortality has been documented across genera in recent years. Given the frequency of these events are expected to increase in the future, understanding patterns of mortality and plant response to severe drought is important to resource managers. Drought can affect the functional, physiological, structural, and demographic properties of forest ecosystems. Remote sensing studies have documented changes in forest properties due to direct and indirect effects of drought; however, few studies have addressed this at local scales needed to characterize highly heterogeneous ecosystems in the forest-shrubland ecotone. We analyzed a 22-year Landsat time series (1985–2012) to determine changes in forest in an area that experienced a relatively dry decade punctuated by two years of extreme drought. We assessed the relationship between several vegetation indices and field measured characteristics (e.g. plant area index and canopy gap fraction) and applied these indices to trend analysis to uncover the location, direction and timing of change. Finally, we assessed the interaction of climate and topography by forest functional type. The Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI), a measure of canopy water content, had the strongest correlation with short-term field measures of plant area index (R2 = 0.64) and canopy gap fraction (R2 = 0.65). Over the entire time period, 25% of the forested area experienced a significant (p-value trend in NDMI, compared to less than 10% in a positive trend. Coniferous forests were more likely to be associated with a negative NDMI trend than deciduous forest. Forests on southern aspects were least likely to exhibit a negative trend while north aspects were most prevalent. Field plots with a negative trend had a lower live density, and higher amounts of standing dead and down trees compared to plots with no trend. Our analysis

  15. The inequality-resource curse of conflict: Heterogeneous effects of mineral deposit discoveries

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, Joeri; Tessema, Yibekal; Sakamoto, Takuto; Schodde, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Despite a sizeable literature, there is no consensus as to whether and how mineral resources are linked to conflict. In this paper, we estimate the relationship between giant mineral deposit discoveries and the intensity of armed conflict (measured by battle deaths) around the world in the post-war era. The impact of such discoveries is potentially heterogeneous with respect to mineral commodity type: metals with a low value-to-weight ratio are not easy to exploit and smuggle and will disprop...

  16. Monte Carlo Investigation on the Effect of Heterogeneities on Strut Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) Dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Craig

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer for women with more than 225,000 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2012 (ACS, 2012). With the high prevalence, comes an increased emphasis on researching new techniques to treat this disease. Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) has been used as an alternative to whole breast irradiation (WBI) in order to treat occult disease after lumpectomy. Similar recurrence rates have been found using ABPI after lumpectomy as with mastectomy alone, but with the added benefit of improved cosmetic and psychological results. Intracavitary brachytherapy devices have been used to deliver the APBI prescription. However, inability to produce asymmetric dose distributions in order to avoid overdosing skin and chest wall has been an issue with these devices. Multi-lumen devices were introduced to overcome this problem. Of these, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI) has demonstrated the greatest ability to produce an asymmetric dose distribution, which would have greater ability to avoid skin and chest wall dose, and thus allow more women to receive this type of treatment. However, SAVI treatments come with inherent heterogeneities including variable backscatter due to the proximity to the tissue-air and tissue-lung interfaces and variable contents within the cavity created by the SAVI. The dose calculation protocol based on TG-43 does not account for heterogeneities and thus will not produce accurate dosimetry; however Acuros, a model-based dose calculation algorithm manufactured by Varian Medical Systems, claims to accurately account for heterogeneities. Monte Carlo simulation can calculate the dosimetry with high accuracy. In this thesis, a model of the SAVI will be created for Monte Carlo, specifically using MCNP code, in order to explore the affects of heterogeneities on the dose distribution. This data will be compared to TG-43 and Acuros calculated dosimetry to explore their accuracy.

  17. Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in a subtropical reservoir and their effects over the benthic macroinvertebrate community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Guilherme de Souza Beghelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the influences of the environment spatial heterogeneity on benthic macroinvertebrates considering transverse and longitudinal gradients as also seasonality. METHODS: Four samplings were performed: two in the wet and two in the dry season in the riverine, transitional and lacustrine zones in the littoral and profundal regions of Itupararanga reservoir, SP, Brazil. Abiotic characterization of the water and of the sediment was performed. The biotic characterization was based on richness, dominance, diversity, and density of organisms, as well as on the relative abundance of predominant taxa. Two-way ANOSIM analyses were performed for both biotic and abiotic components, in order to test the significance of the differences in the longitudinal and transverse directions as well as of the differences between seasons. RESULTS: Compartmentalization was present in both directions, longitudinal and transverse. In a general way, the littoral region presented higher diversity values when compared with the profundal region, and the riverine zone presented high densities and high percentage of taxons, which usually indicate organic pollution. The differentiation between the transitional and lacustrine zones was determined mainly by taxonomic composition. Seasonality was also observed and the transportation of small particles, the entrance of nutrients, and the presence of macrophytes were considered as determinants for differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these results demonstrate the responses of benthic macroinvertebrate communities considering distinct sources of variation: longitudinal heterogeneity, determined by the increasing distance from the forming rivers that leads to a gradient of physical and chemical conditions; transverse heterogeneity, determined by the proximity with the land environment and depth differences. Seasonal heterogeneity was recorded during the period of this research and

  18. The effect of organic ion-exchange resin on properties of heterogeneous ion-exchange membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivčík, J.; Vladařová, J.; Hadrava, J.; Černín, A.; Brožová, Libuše

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 14, - (2010), s. 179-184 ISSN 1944-3994. [Membrane Science and Technology Conference of Visegrad Countries /4./ PERMEA 2009, 07.07.2009-11.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA4/116 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : heterogeneous ion-exchange membrane * membrane modification * particle size of distribution Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2010

  19. Effective Wettability of Heterogenous Fracture Surfaces Using the Lattice-Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Santos, J.; Prodanovic, M.; Landry, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Fracture walls in the subsurface are often structured by minerals of different composition (potentially further altered in contact with fluids during hydrocarbon extraction or CO2 sequestration), this yields in a heterogeneous wettability of the surface in contact with the fluids. The focus of our work is to study how surfaces presenting different mineralogy and roughness affect multiphase flow in fractures. Using the Shan-Chen model of the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) we define fluid interaction and surface attraction parameters to simulate a system of a wetting and a non-wetting fluid. In this work, we use synthetically created fractures presenting different arrangements of wetting and non-wetting patches, and with or without roughness; representative of different mineralogy, similar workflow can be applied to fractures extracted from X-ray microtomography images of fractures porous media. The results from the LBM simulations provide an insight on how the distribution of mineralogy and surface roughness are related with the observed macroscopic contact angle. We present a comparison between the published analytical models, and our results based on surface areas, spatial distribution and local fracture aperture. The understanding of the variables that affect the contact angle is useful for the comprehension of multiphase processes in naturally fractured reservoirs like primary oil production, enhanced oil recovery and CO2 sequestration. The macroscopic contact angle analytical equations for heterogeneous surfaces with variable roughness are no longer valid in highly heterogeneous systems; we quantify the difference thus offering an alternative to analytical models.

  20. Effect of Heterogeneity of Vertex Activation on Epidemic Spreading in Temporal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of sensor technologies and the prevalence of electronic communication services provide us with a huge amount of data on human communication behavior, including face-to-face conversations, e-mail exchanges, phone calls, message exchanges, and other types of interactions in various online forums. These indirect or direct interactions form potential bridges of the virus spread. For a long time, the study of virus spread is based on the aggregate static network. However, the interaction patterns containing diverse temporal properties may affect dynamic processes as much as the network topology does. Some empirical studies show that the activation time and duration of vertices and links are highly heterogeneous, which means intense activity may be followed by longer intervals of inactivity. We take heterogeneous distribution of the node interactivation time as the research background to build an asynchronous communication model. The two sides of the communication do not have to be active at the same time. One derives the threshold of virus spreading on the communication mode and analyzes the reason the heterogeneous distribution of the vertex interactivation time suppresses the spread of virus. At last, the analysis and results from the model are verified on the BA network.

  1. Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: Effects of scale and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, A.H.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Lawer, J.J.; Steel, E. A.; Ebersole, J.L.; Lee, S.Y.

    2018-01-01

    Climate-change driven increases in water temperature pose challenges for aquatic organisms. Predictions of impacts typically do not account for fine-grained spatiotemporal thermal patterns in rivers. Patches of cooler water could serve as refuges for anadromous species like salmon that migrate during summer. We used high-resolution remotely sensed water temperature data to characterize summer thermal heterogeneity patterns for 11,308 km of second–seventh-order rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California (USA). We evaluated (1) water temperature patterns at different spatial resolutions, (2) the frequency, size, and spacing of cool thermal patches suitable for Pacific salmon (i.e., contiguous stretches ≥ 0.25 km, ≤ 15 °C and ≥ 2 °C, aooler than adjacent water), and (3) potential influences of climate change on availability of cool patches. Thermal heterogeneity was nonlinearly related to the spatial resolution of water temperature data, and heterogeneity at fine resolution ( 2.7 and  5.7 and programs as well as near-term climate-adaptation strategies.

  2. Modeling the Heterogeneous Effects of GHG Mitigation Policies on Global Agriculture and Forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, A.; Henderson, B.; Hertel, T. W.; Rose, S. K.; Sohngen, B.

    2010-12-01

    Agriculture and forestry are envisioned as potentially key sectors for climate change mitigation policy, yet the depth of analysis of mitigation options and their economic consequences remains remarkably shallow in comparison to that for industrial mitigation. Farming and land use change - much of it induced by agriculture -account for one-third of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Any serious attempt to curtail these emissions will involve changes in the way farming is conducted, as well as placing limits on agricultural expansion into areas currently under more carbon-intensive land cover. However, agriculture and forestry are extremely heterogeneous, both in the technology and intensity of production, as well as in the GHG emissions intensity of these activities. And these differences, in turn, give rise to significant changes in the distribution of agricultural production, trade and consumption in the wake of mitigation policies. This paper assesses such distributional impacts via a global economic analysis undertaken with a modified version of the GTAP model. The paper builds on a global general equilibrium GTAP-AEZ-GHG model (Golub et al., 2009). This is a unified modeling framework that links the agricultural, forestry, food processing and other sectors through land, and other factor markets and international trade, and incorporates different land-types, land uses and related CO2 and non-CO2 GHG emissions and sequestration. The economic data underlying this work is the global GTAP data base aggregated up to 19 regions and 29 sectors. The model incorporates mitigation cost curves for different regions and sectors based on information from the US-EPA. The forestry component of the model is calibrated to the results of the state of the art partial equilibrium global forestry model of Sohngen and Mendelson (2007). Forest carbon sequestration at both the extensive and intensive margins are modeled separately to better isolate land competition between

  3. Correlation between bony changes measured with cone beam computed tomography and clinical dysfunction index in patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Naichuan; Liu, Yan; Yang, Xianrui; Luo, Zhiqiang; Shi, Zongdao

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the correlation between clinical dysfunction index (Di) and condylar bony changes, glenoid fossa bony changes and joint space changes. Clinical data and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 240 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) were analyzed. The patients were assigned a score of Helkimo's clinical Di ranging from 1 to 25 and thereafter divided into 3 groups by the degree of Helkimo's Di. The condylar bony changes observed with CBCT were graded by the classification method of Koyama et al. Glenoid fossa bony changes and joint space changes were both classified as "positive" or "negative". Spearman's rank correlation test was used to correlate the score or degree of Helkimo's Di with the maximum condylar bony changes, glenoid fossa bony changes, and joint space changes. There was a significant correlation between the Helkimo's Di score and the maximum condylar bony changes (P ≤ 0.0001) and glenoid fossa bony changes (P ≤ 0.0001), and there was a poor correlation between the Helkimo's Di score and joint space changes (P = 0.184). Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the degree of Helkimo's Di and the maximum condylar bony changes (P ≤ 0.0001) and glenoid fossa bony changes (P ≤ 0.0001), but there was a poor correlation between the degree of Helkimo's Di and joint space changes (P = 0.346). Both the score and degree of Helkimo's Di were highly correlated with maximum condylar changes and glenoid fossa bony changes, but not with joint space changes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular Fin Effect from Heterogeneous Self-Assembled Monolayer Enhances Thermal Conductance across Hard-Soft Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xingfei; Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

    2017-10-04

    Thermal transport across hard-soft interfaces is critical to many modern applications, such as composite materials, thermal management in microelectronics, solar-thermal phase transition, and nanoparticle-assisted hyperthermia therapeutics. In this study, we use equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations combined with the Green-Kubo method to study how molecularly heterogeneous structures of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) affect the thermal transport across the interfaces between the SAM-functionalized gold and organic liquids (hexylamine, propylamine and hexane). We focus on a practically synthesizable heterogeneous SAM featuring alternating short and long molecular chains. Such a structure is found to improve the thermal conductance across the hard-soft interface by 46-68% compared to a homogeneous nonpolar SAM. Through a series of further simulations and analyses, it is found that the root reason for this enhancement is the penetration of the liquid molecules into the spaces between the long SAM molecule chains, which increase the effective contact area. Such an effect is similar to the fins used in macroscopic heat exchanger. This "molecular fin" structure from the heterogeneous SAM studied in this work provides a new general route for enhancing thermal transport across hard-soft material interfaces.

  5. Effect of Mechanical Heterogeneity on the Crack Driving Force of a Reactor Pressure Vessel Outlet Nozzle DMW Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingyan, Zhao; Yinghao, Cui; He, Xue

    2017-12-01

    The welding mechanical heterogeneity, load complexity, material and geometrical structure makes it very difficult to assess the structural integrity of dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joints. Based on a numerical simulated approach of the continuous change of material mechanical property in the buttering layer, a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) outlet nozzle DMW joint with service loads is studied, effect of mechanical heterogeneity on the stress-strain field and stress triaxiality at the semi-elliptical surface crack front are discussed. The analyses show that once the crack extends into the high hardness zone of Alloy 182 buttering, the strain decreases sharply, the strain gradient increases and the crack propagation slows down. The influence of strength mismatch on the stress triaxiality at the shallow crack front is greater than that at the deep crack front. The interaction between strength mismatch and crack depth directly affects the crack growth direction.

  6. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhnova, Ganna; van der Loeff, Maarten F Schim; Heijne, Janneke C M; Kretzschmar, Mirjam E

    2016-08-01

    The WHO's early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART) of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM), stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys.

  7. Impact of Heterogeneity in Sexual Behavior on Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Transmission with Test-and-Treat Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna Rozhnova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The WHO's early-release guideline for antiretroviral treatment (ART of HIV infection based on a recent trial conducted in 34 countries recommends starting treatment immediately upon an HIV diagnosis. Therefore, the test-and-treat strategy may become more widely used in an effort to scale up HIV treatment and curb further transmission. Here we examine behavioural determinants of HIV transmission and how heterogeneity in sexual behaviour influences the outcomes of this strategy. Using a deterministic model, we perform a systematic investigation into the effects of various mixing patterns in a population of men who have sex with men (MSM, stratified by partner change rates, on the elimination threshold and endemic HIV prevalence. We find that both the level of overdispersion in the distribution of the number of sexual partners and mixing between population subgroups have a large influence on endemic prevalence before introduction of ART and on possible long term effectiveness of ART. Increasing heterogeneity in risk behavior may lead to lower endemic prevalence levels, but requires higher coverage levels of ART for elimination. Elimination is only feasible for populations with a rather low degree of assortativeness of mixing and requires treatment coverage of almost 80% if rates of testing and treatment uptake by all population subgroups are equal. In this case, for fully assortative mixing and 80% coverage endemic prevalence is reduced by 57%. In the presence of heterogeneity in ART uptake, elimination is easier to achieve when the subpopulation with highest risk behavior is tested and treated more often than the rest of the population, and vice versa when it is less. The developed framework can be used to extract information on behavioral heterogeneity from existing data which is otherwise hard to determine from population surveys.

  8. Boni Mores and Consent for Child Research in South Africa | Strode ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article concludes by stating that simply requiring proxy consent for non therapeutic health research with children is insufficient as it cannot always be assumed that proxy consenters will act in the best interests of the child. Thus the boni mores principle acts as a limit on autonomy in order to protect the child participant.

  9. Syngnathia-congenital unilateral bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Ramachandra Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders involving orofacial region represents approximately 20% of all birth defects. Out of these disorders, congenital bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible (syngnathia is rare. Usually syngnathia is associated with other anomalies and syndromes. This case report presents a unilateral fusion of maxilla and mandible with no other anomalies.

  10. The bony manifestation of Rickets. A case report | Leon | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes a case of the bony manifestation of Rickets. Although vitamin D deficiency has become less common, Rickets still is seen among the Eritrean pediatric population. Rickets is an entity in which mineralization is decreased at the level of the growth plates, resulting in growth retardation and delayed ...

  11. Natural resources utilization by the Aweer in Boni-lungi and Dodori ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to record the utilization of Boni-Lungi and Dodori National Reserves by the Aweer community. Results indicate the procuring of a wide gamut of provisional, regulatory, cultural and supportive services from these reserves by the community ranging from wood forest products utilized in construction to ...

  12. Value of diffusion weighted MRI in differentiating benign from malignant bony tumors and tumor like lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Zaki Kotb

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: DWI has been proven to be highly useful in the differentiation of benign, malignant bone tumors and tumor like bony lesions. Measurement of ADC values improves the accuracy of the diagnosis of bone tumors and tumor like lesions. Moreover, measurement of ADC values can be used in the follow up of tumors and their response to therapy.

  13. Comparison of megavoltage position verification for prostate irradiation based on bony anatomy and implanted fiducials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Dehnad, Homan; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The patient position during radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer can be verified with the help of portal images acquired during treatment. In this study we quantify the clinical consequences of the use of image-based verification based on the bony anatomy and the prostate target

  14. [Inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect in incomplete cleft palate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia; Ma, Lian

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the inconformity between soft tissue defect and bony defect by observing the cleft extent of palate with complete secondary palate bony cleft in incomplete cleft palate patient. The patients with incomplete cleft palate treated in Hospital of Stomatology Peking University from July 2012 to June 2013 were reviewed, of which 75 cases with complete secondary palate bony cleft were selected in this study. The CT scan and intraoral photograph were taken before operation. The patients were classified as four types according to the extent of soft tissue defect. Type 1: soft tissue defect reached incisive foremen region, Type 2 was hard and soft cleft palate, Type 3 soft cleft palate and Type 4 submucous cleft palate. Type 1 was defined as conformity group (CG). The other three types were defined as inconformity group (ICG) and divided into three subgroups (ICG-I), (ICG-II) and (ICG-III). Fifty-seven patients were in ICG group, and the rate of inconformity was 76% (57/75). The percentage of ICG-I, ICG-II and ICG-III was 47% (27/57), 23% (13/57) and 30% (17/57), respevtively. There are different types of soft tissue deformity with complete secondary palate bony cleft. The inconformity between soft tissue and hard tissue defect exits in 3/4 of isolated cleft palate patients.

  15. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  16. Computer-guided technique evaluation of the bony palate for planning individual implant placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagimni, Pinar; Govsa, Figen; Ozer, Mehmet Asim; Kazak, Zuhal

    2017-05-01

    Different clinical problems may require a surgical approach to the dental arch, such as dentofacial orthopedics, implant-supported dental prothesis, maxillary orthodontics protraction, removable appliances, and posttraumatic dental reconstruction. The aim of this study is to analyze the dental arch size and type for supporting individual dental protheses. In this study, the reference measurements on the length of the bony palate, maxillary intercanine width, maxillary intermolar width, and the ratio of the maxillary to the palatinal surface were studied in 120 bony palates using a computer software program. The average length of the bony palate, maxilla, and palatine was measured as 104.4 ± 30.3, 40.05 ± 4.05, and 15.00 ± 3.03 mm, respectively. The right and left sides of average width of intermaxillary distances were measured as 13.75 ± 1.50 and 12.51 ± 1.50 mm, respectively. The average width of intermolar distance was calculated as 19.82 ± 1.61 mm (right side) and 18.89 ± 1.69 mm (left side), respectively. The maxillary dentitions were classified as square (17%), round-square (63.5%), round (14.4%), and round V-shaped arches (5.1%). The round-square ones showed no prominent principal component. Among the maxillary arches, the round arches were characterized by small values and round V-shaped ones with the largest values. Asymmetry between the right and the left bony palate was observed. The areas with equal bony palate on both sides were present in 64.4% of the cases, and in 33.1% of the cases, bony palate was dominant on the right. The primary principle in reconstructive treatment should be describing geometrical forms and mathematical details of the bony palate. Three-dimensional reference values relative to the dental arch may increase the success of individual treatment of surgical procedures and reduce possible complications. With the help of certain software, this research has made possible to investigate the variability of the

  17. Estudo experimental dos efeitos da heparina de baixo peso molecular (Enoxaparina na formação de calo ósseo em fêmures de ratos The effects of low-molecular-weight heparin (Enoxaparin on bony callus formation in rats' femurs - an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mussi Filho

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O tromboembolismo venoso é uma complicação grave que pode ocorrer após fraturas. O tratamento anticoagulante mais utilizado é com a heparina de baixo peso molecular (HBPM. Existem estudos que mostram que essa droga pode interferir no metabolismo ósseo. Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência da HBPM no processo de formação de calo ósseo, realizamos um estudo experimental em ratos. A amostra constituiu-se de 22 ratos de linhagem Wistar, machos, que foram submetidos à fratura diafisária de seus fêmures direitos. Foram divididos em dois grupos de 11. No grupo controle, os animais recebiam soro fisiológico e no grupo de estudo, recebiam HBPM, enoxaparina, diariamente, por 28 dias. Após este período os ratos foram submetidos à eutanásia e os fêmures foram avaliados. No estudo macroscópico foi constatada consolidação em 11 animais (100% que não receberam enoxaparina, e, em dez animais (90,9% que receberam a droga em estudo. No estudo histológico foi constatada a formação de calo ósseo em todos os fêmures. Concluiu-se neste experimento que a enoxaparina não altera o processo de consolidação óssea em fêmures de ratos Wistar.Venous thromboembolism is a serious complication that may follow fractures. The most commonly used anticoagulant treatment is low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH. There are some studies showing that this drug may interfere on bone metabolism. With the objective of evaluating the LMWH influence on the process of bony callus formation, we conducted an experimental study on rats. Sample was constituted of 22 Wistar male rats, which were submitted to diaphyseal fracture on their right femurs. They were divided into two groups of 11 subjects each. In the control group, the animals received saline solution and in the study group, they received LMWH - enoxaparin - in a daily basis, during 28 days. After that period, the rats were submitted to euthanasia for femur assessment purposes. At the macroscopic study

  18. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaelyn J Eberle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma, despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut. Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus, esocid (pike, and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.. Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence

  19. First record of eocene bony fishes and crocodyliforms from Canada's Western Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Jaelyn J; Gottfried, Michael D; Hutchison, J Howard; Brochu, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands (Nunavut). Although temporally correlative strata crop out over 1,000 km west, on Canada's westernmost Arctic Island - Banks Island, Northwest Territories - they have been interpreted as predominantly marine. We document the first Eocene bony fish and crocodyliform fossils from Banks Island. We describe fossils of bony fishes, including lepisosteid (Atractosteus), esocid (pike), and amiid, and a crocodyliform, from lower - middle Eocene strata of the Cyclic Member, Eureka Sound Formation within Aulavik National Park (∼76°N. paleolat.). Palynology suggests the sediments are late early to middle Eocene in age, and likely spanned the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO). These fossils extend the geographic range of Eocene Arctic lepisosteids, esocids, amiids, and crocodyliforms west by approximately 40° of longitude or ∼1100 km. The low diversity bony fish fauna, at least at the family level, is essentially identical on Ellesmere and Banks Islands, suggesting a pan-High Arctic bony fish fauna of relatively basal groups around the margin of the Eocene Arctic Ocean. From a paleoclimatic perspective, presence of a crocodyliform, gar and amiid fishes on northern Banks provides further evidence that mild, year-round temperatures extended across the Canadian Arctic during early - middle Eocene time. Additionally, the Banks Island crocodyliform is consistent with the phylogenetic hypothesis of a Paleogene divergence time between the two extant alligatorid lineages Alligator

  20. Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Dalstra, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010.......Association between condylar morphology and changes in bony microstructure and subsynovial inflammation in experimental temporomandibular joint arthritis. 86. Congress of the European Orthodontic Society, Slovenien, 2010....

  1. Diffuse bony involvement in disseminated BCG disease in a patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin) vaccination is carried out worldwide to prevent tuberculosis. It is considered to be very effective and has an excellent safety profile, but complications do occur. These may range from erythema and abscess at the site of inoculation to extensive disseminated disease including regional and ...

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma KnifeTM: II. Effects of heterogeneous versus homogeneous media for stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Timmerman, Robert; DesRosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul; Dittmer, Phil; Papiez, Lech

    2004-01-01

    The absence of electronic equilibrium in the vicinity of bone-tissue or air-tissue heterogeneity in the head can misrepresent deposited dose with treatment planning algorithms that assume all treatment volume as homogeneous media. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) and measurements with a specially designed heterogeneous phantom were applied to investigate the effect of air-tissue and bone-tissue heterogeneity on dose perturbation with the Leksell Gamma Knife TM . The dose fall-off near the air-tissue interface caused by secondary electron disequilibrium leads to overestimation of dose by the vendor supplied treatment planning software (GammaPlan TM ) at up to 4 mm from an interface. The dose delivered to the target area away from an air-tissue interface may be underestimated by up to 7% by GammaPlan TM due to overestimation of attenuation of photon beams passing through air cavities. While the underdosing near the air-tissue interface cannot be eliminated with any plug pattern, the overdosage due to under-attenuation of the photon beams in air cavities can be eliminated by plugging the sources whose beams intersect the air cavity. Little perturbation was observed next to bone-tissue interfaces. Monte Carlo results were confirmed by measurements. This study shows that the employed Monte Carlo treatment planning is more accurate for precise dosimetry of stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife TM for targets in the vicinity of air-filled cavities

  3. Modeling the large-scale effects of surface moisture heterogeneity on wetland carbon fluxes in the West Siberian Lowland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Bohn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We used a process-based model to examine the role of spatial heterogeneity of surface and sub-surface water on the carbon budget of the wetlands of the West Siberian Lowland over the period 1948–2010. We found that, while surface heterogeneity (fractional saturated area had little overall effect on estimates of the region's carbon fluxes, sub-surface heterogeneity (spatial variations in water table depth played an important role in both the overall magnitude and spatial distribution of estimates of the region's carbon fluxes. In particular, to reproduce the spatial pattern of CH4 emissions recorded by intensive in situ observations across the domain, in which very little CH4 is emitted north of 60° N, it was necessary to (a account for CH4 emissions from unsaturated wetlands and (b use spatially varying methane model parameters that reduced estimated CH4 emissions in the northern (permafrost half of the domain (and/or account for lower CH4 emissions under inundated conditions. Our results suggest that previous estimates of the response of these wetlands to thawing permafrost may have overestimated future increases in methane emissions in the permafrost zone.

  4. GaAsSb/InGaAs heterojunction tunnel field-effect transistors with a heterogeneous channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ru; Yu, Yu-Tzu; Hsin, Yue-Ming

    2018-03-01

    This study presents a new structure to improve off-state current and ambipolar conduction in GaAsSb/InGaAs heterojunction tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFET). A GaAsSb/InGaAs heterogeneous channel was proposed to form p-GaAsSb/i-InGaAs junction at the source side and i-GaAsSb/n-InGaAs junction at the drain side. In the off-state bias condition, the band offsets of GaAsSb/InGaAs in the channel can prevent electrons tunneling to the drain side to reduce the leakage current and ambipolar conduction. Through simulation, heterogeneous channel HTFETs demonstrate that the off-state current can be reduced by four orders of magnitude and still demonstrate a high on-state current compared with GaAsSb/InGaAs HTFETs. As a result, the proposed heterogeneous channel HTFET exhibits suppressed ambipolar conduction even when the drain doping is as high as 1 × 1019 cm‑3.

  5. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  6. Effects of spatial heterogeneity on butterfly species richness in Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Simonson, S.E.; Stohlgren, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated butterfly responses to plot-level characteristics (plant species richness, vegetation height, and range in NDVI [normalized difference vegetation index]) and spatial heterogeneity in topography and landscape patterns (composition and configuration) at multiple spatial scales. Stratified random sampling was used to collect data on butterfly species richness from seventy-six 20 ?? 50 m plots. The plant species richness and average vegetation height data were collected from 76 modified-Whittaker plots overlaid on 76 butterfly plots. Spatial heterogeneity around sample plots was quantified by measuring topographic variables and landscape metrics at eight spatial extents (radii of 300, 600 to 2,400 m). The number of butterfly species recorded was strongly positively correlated with plant species richness, proportion of shrubland and mean patch size of shrubland. Patterns in butterfly species richness were negatively correlated with other variables including mean patch size, average vegetation height, elevation, and range in NDVI. The best predictive model selected using Akaike's Information Criterion corrected for small sample size (AICc), explained 62% of the variation in butterfly species richness at the 2,100 m spatial extent. Average vegetation height and mean patch size were among the best predictors of butterfly species richness. The models that included plot-level information and topographic variables explained relatively less variation in butterfly species richness, and were improved significantly after including landscape metrics. Our results suggest that spatial heterogeneity greatly influences patterns in butterfly species richness, and that it should be explicitly considered in conservation and management actions. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  7. Effects of spatial heterogeneity and material anisotropy on the fracture pattern and macroscopic effective toughness of Mancos Shale in Brazilian tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, SeonHong; Sun, WaiChing; Ingraham, Mathew D.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2017-08-01

    For assessing energy-related activities in the subsurface, it is important to investigate the impact of the spatial variability and anisotropy on the geomechanical behavior of shale. The Brazilian test, an indirect tensile-splitting method, is performed in this work, and the evolution of strain field is obtained using digital image correlation. Experimental results show the significant impact of local heterogeneity and lamination on the crack pattern characteristics. For numerical simulations, a phase field method is used to simulate the brittle fracture behavior under various Brazilian test conditions. In this study, shale is assumed to consist of two constituents including the stiff and soft layers to which the same toughness but different elastic moduli are assigned. Microstructural heterogeneity is simplified to represent mesoscale (e.g., millimeter scale) features such as layer orientation, thickness, volume fraction, and defects. The effect of these structural attributes on the onset, propagation, and coalescence of cracks is explored. The simulation results show that spatial heterogeneity and material anisotropy highly affect crack patterns and effective fracture toughness, and the elastic contrast of two constituents significantly alters the effective toughness. However, the complex crack patterns observed in the experiments cannot completely be accounted for by either an isotropic or transversely isotropic effective medium approach. This implies that cracks developed in the layered system may coalesce in complicated ways depending on the local heterogeneity, and the interaction mechanisms between the cracks using two-constituent systems may explain the wide range of effective toughness of shale reported in the literature.

  8. The Effect of Biological Processes on Sea Spray Aerosol Composition and the Impact on Nitric Acid Heterogeneous Reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Ryder, O. S.; Michaud, J. M.; Sauer, J. S.; Mayer, K. J.; Moore, K.; Burkart, M. D.; Prather, K. A.

    2016-12-01

    Once in the atmosphere, sea spray aerosols (SSA) produced from breaking waves can undergo heterogeneous reaction with atmospheric trace gases. As SSA evolve in the atmosphere, their physical and chemical properties can undergo transformation, affecting particle characteristics such as light scattering ability and toxicity. One of the important heterogeneous reactions that readily occur in the atmosphere is that between SSA and gaseous HNO3, a reactive nitrogen species, where an example reaction of NaCl with HNO3is shown in eq. (1). NaCl(s or aq) + HNO3(g) -> NaNO3(s or aq) + HCl(g) (1). Recent studies using laboratory platforms that accurately replicate the chemical complexity of the nascent SSA particles have shown that SSA can exhibit a variety of distinct complex chemical compositions, dependent on the biogeochemical state of the seawater. Biological processes, such as cell growth, lysis, degradation, and enzymatic processes, have been suggested to have significant impact on the chemical composition of SSA, thus having an effect on their atmospheric properties such as reactivity due to changes at the particle-air interface. Additionally, HNO3reactive uptake onto the generated particles has revealed a new heterogeneous reaction pathway involving specific class of organic molecules shown in eq. (2). R-COONa + HNO3 -> NaNO3+ R-COOH (2). However, such organic molecules' chemistry may be altered through biological processes, leading to different behavior. Size resolved chemical composition data of reacted nascent SSA particles analyzed in situ using an aerosol reaction flow tube coupled with aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry and off-line microscopy measurements are presented, to further illustrate the significance of biological processes on SSA interface and their heterogeneous reactivity.

  9. [Effect of doxorubicine and heterogenous electromagnetic and thermal fields on the nonlinear dynamics of carcinoma Guerin development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, V E; Dziatkovs'ka, I I; Nikolov, M O; Romanov, A V; Mel'nyk, Iu H; Dziatkovs'ka, N M

    2010-07-01

    While local hyperthermia application the intratumoral blood flow is enhancing, leading to oxygenation and vascular permeability for antitumoral medicines. The work objective was to investigate the dependence of the development kinetics in carcinoma Gereni (CG) from combined action of doxorubicin (DR) and the kind of thermal impact, a contact one--due to a contact delivery of heat from a water heater and without contact - due to the tumor electromagnetic irradiation (EMI) using heterogenous electromagnetic field (EMF). DR was injected to the animals in a mass concentration of 1,5 mg on 1 kg of their body mass. The DR injection, a contact heating and EMI were started on the 8th day after the tumor reinoculation and kept on conducting once a 2 days. The course had included 5 injections and/or 5 seances of a contact heating and/or EMF. The combined action of DR and EMI, using spatially heterogenous EMF of applicator in environment of physiological hyperthermia, have had influenced mostly the inhibition of a nonlinear dynamics in CG development. Antitumoral action of DR in the animals with CG was influenced by thermal and nonthermal effects, which were initiated by spatially heterogenous EMF. Nonlinear dynamics of a CG development in animals did not depend from horizontal direction of isolines of a spatially heterogenous EMF of inductive applicator towards the tumor and duration of the irradiation procedure (15 or 30 minutes) after DR injection. The data obtained were exploited in clinical practice for the inductothermy optimal regimes elaboration while conducting complex treatment of patients, suffering oncological diseases.

  10. Endocrine and Local IGF-I in the Bony Fish Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Anne-Constance; Faass, Oliver; Köllner, Bernd; Shved, Natallia; Link, Karl; Casanova, Ayako; Wenger, Michael; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Ullrich, Oliver; Reinecke, Manfred; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2016-01-26

    A role for GH and IGF-I in the modulation of the immune system has been under discussion for decades. Generally, GH is considered a stimulator of innate immune parameters in mammals and teleost fish. The stimulatory effects in humans as well as in bony fish often appear to be correlated with elevated endocrine IGF-I (liver-derived), which has also been shown to be suppressed during infection in some studies. Nevertheless, data are still fragmentary. Some studies point to an important role of GH and IGF-I particularly during immune organ development and constitution. Even less is known about the potential relevance of local (autocrine/paracrine) IGF-I within adult and developing immune organs, and the distinct localization of IGF-I in immune cells and tissues of mammals and fish has not been systematically defined. Thus far, IGF-I has been localized in different mammalian immune cell types, particularly macrophages and granulocytes, and in supporting cells, but not in T-lymphocytes. In the present study, we detected IGF-I in phagocytic cells isolated from rainbow trout head kidney and, in contrast to some findings in mammals, in T-cells of a channel catfish cell line. Thus, although numerous analogies among mammals and teleosts exist not only for the GH/IGF-system, but also for the immune system, there are differences that should be further investigated. For instance, it is unclear whether the primarily reported role of GH/IGF-I in the innate immune response is due to the lack of studies focusing on the adaptive immune system, or whether it truly preferentially concerns innate immune parameters. Infectious challenges in combination with GH/IGF-I manipulations are another important topic that has not been sufficiently addressed to date, particularly with respect to developmental and environmental influences on fish growth and health.

  11. The effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of four animal species in a Danish landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forchhammer Mads C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation in carrying capacity and population return rates is generally ignored in traditional studies of population dynamics. Variation is hard to study in the field because of difficulties controlling the environment in order to obtain statistical replicates, and because of the scale and expense of experimenting on populations. There may also be ethical issues. To circumvent these problems we used detailed simulations of the simultaneous behaviours of interacting animals in an accurate facsimile of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of skylarks Alauda arvensis, voles Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify and evaluate the importance of spatial and temporal heterogeneity on the population dynamics of the four species. Results Both spatial and temporal heterogeneity affected the relationship between population growth rate and population density in all four species. Spatial heterogeneity accounted for 23–30% of the variance in population growth rate after accounting for the effects of density, reflecting big differences in local carrying capacity associated with the landscape features important to individual species. Temporal heterogeneity accounted for 3–13% of the variance in vole, skylark and spider, but 43% in beetles. The associated temporal variation in carrying capacity would be problematic in traditional analyses of density dependence. Return rates were less than one in all species and essentially invariant in skylarks, spiders and beetles. Return rates varied over the landscape in voles, being slower where there were larger fluctuations in local population sizes. Conclusion Our analyses estimated the traditional parameters of carrying capacities and return rates, but these are now seen as varying continuously over the landscape depending on habitat quality and the mechanisms

  12. Study of dosimetric effects due to metallic heterogeneity of tissue expanders in post-mastectomy radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trombetta, Debora M.; Silva, Ademir X. da; Rosa, Luiz A.R. da

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. In each year approximately 20% of the new cases of cancer in women are breast cancers. Despite the increase in the use of breast-conserving treatment, some women still require mastectomy as their primary surgical management. A large part of these women, whom undergo a mastectomy, realize a breast reconstruction afterwards. The most common options for reconstruction include autogenous tissue techniques and tissue expansion followed by breast implant placement. Many trials have demonstrated a survival benefit associated with post-mastectomy radiotherapy mainly if the treatment starts right after the mastectomy. In such case patients whom were realizing the breast reconstruction using tissue expanders can be irradiated using this. These patients posses a material with high atomic number within the irradiated area, so this metallic port becomes an heterogeneity which can modify the calculated doses distribution for the treatment. The study was due through the quantification of the relative transmission of 6MV and 15MV radiotherapy beam, making use of computer simulations with Monte Carlo method implemented by the MCNPX code. The results show that the presence of this metallic heterogeneity changes the transmission of the beam, causing a reduction up to 13% in the geometric shadowed region. According to dosimetric protocols, which recommend that the reduction in the dose should be bellow of 5%, the difference found in the study could be significant. (author)

  13. Effects of diffusion on total biomass in heterogeneous continuous and discrete-patch systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, Don; Ming Ni, Wei; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models of populations on a system of two connected patches previously have shown that when the two patches differ in maximum growth rate and carrying capacity, and in the limit of high diffusion, conditions exist for which the total population size at equilibrium exceeds that of the ideal free distribution, which predicts that the total population would equal the total carrying capacity of the two patches. However, this result has only been shown for the Pearl-Verhulst growth function on two patches and for a single-parameter growth function in continuous space. Here, we provide a general criterion for total population size to exceed total carrying capacity for three commonly used population growth rates for both heterogeneous continuous and multi-patch heterogeneous landscapes with high population diffusion. We show that a sufficient condition for this situation is that there is a convex positive relationship between the maximum growth rate and the parameter that, by itself or together with the maximum growth rate, determines the carrying capacity, as both vary across a spatial region. This relationship occurs in some biological populations, though not in others, so the result has ecological implications.

  14. Impingement-type bony morphology was related to cartilage defects, but not pain in professional ballet dancers' hips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Smith, Peter; Cook, Jill

    2018-03-03

    Professional ballet dancers may have hip bony morphology that predisposes them to cartilage or labral injury. However, the relationship between bony morphology and pathology has not been investigated in ballet. This study investigates associations between bony morphology, chondrolabral defects and hip pain in ballet dancers. Cross-sectional study. 33 male and female professional ballet dancers, (mean age 27 years (range 19-39)), completed questionnaires with hip pain measured on a visual analogue scale; and underwent 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (3T MRI) to measure lateral centre edge angles (LCEA), alpha angles in the anterior and superior position, femoral neck-shaft angles (NSA) and acetabular version angles; and to detect acetabular labral tear and articular cartilage defects. Seventeen dancers (51.5%) had impingement-type (alpha angle>50.5° or acetabular version 20°) and 19 (58%) had instability-type (LCEA135°) bony morphology. Cartilage defect prevalence was higher in dancers with impingement-type bony morphology (n=14) compared to those without impingement-type morphology (n=4, p=0.001). There was no relationship between instability-type bony morphology and cartilage defects (p>0.05). There was no relationship between labral tears and bony morphology (p>0.05). Neither chondrolabral pathology nor any morphological feature were associated with hip pain (p>0.05 for all). Impingement-type bony morphology was related to cartilage defects, but not labral tear. Hip pain was not associated with pathology or bony morphology. Longitudinal studies are warranted to determine if bony features, such as cam morphology, acetabular retroversion or anteversion, are precursors to symptomatic hip joint injury or osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2018 Sports Medicine Australia. All rights reserved.

  15. The heterogeneous effects of urbanization and income inequality on CO2 emissions in BRICS economies: evidence from panel quantile regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huiming; Xia, Hang; Guo, Yawei; Peng, Cheng

    2018-04-12

    This paper empirically examines the effects of urbanization and income inequality on CO 2 emissions in the BRICS economies (i.e., Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) during the periods 1994-2013. The method we used is the panel quantile regression, which takes into account the unobserved individual heterogeneity and distributional heterogeneity. Our empirical results indicate that urbanization has a significant and negative impact on carbon emissions, except in the 80 th , 90 th , and 95 th quantiles. We also quantitatively investigate the direct and indirect effect of urbanization on carbon emissions, and the results show that we may underestimate urbanization's effect on carbon emissions if we ignore its indirect effect. In addition, in middle- and high-emission countries, income inequality has a significant and positive impact on carbon emissions. The results of our study indicate that in the BRICS economies, there is an inverted U-shaped environmental Kuznets curve (EKC) between the GDP per capita and carbon emissions. The conclusions of this study have important policy implications for policymakers. Policymakers should try to narrow the income gap between the rich and the poor to improve environmental quality; the BRICS economies can speed up urbanization to reduce carbon emissions, but they must improve energy efficiency and use clean energy to the greatest extent in the process.

  16. Middle-school students of United Arab Emirates: effects of heterogeneous small group work on attitudes toward mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, H M; Jumaa, M

    2000-10-01

    This study compared the effects of two instructional strategies, small heterogeneous cooperative learning experience versus lecture and discussion, on students' attitudes toward mathematics. 54 boys and 57 girls in Grade 8 of four middle-school mathematics classes participated. Two classes (57 students) were taught using a cooperative learning method and the other two classes (54 students) were taught using traditional lecture and discussion. Differences between attitudes of boys and girls were also investigated and discussed in the light of Arabic culture. The results suggested that cooperative learning might be a valuable method with which to teach mathematics concepts to boys.

  17. Homogeneous and heterogeneous photoredox-catalyzed hydroxymethylation of ketones and keto esters: catalyst screening, chemoselectivity and dilution effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel G. Griesbeck

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous titanium- and dye-catalyzed as well as the heterogeneous semiconductor particle-catalyzed photohydroxymethylation of ketones by methanol were investigated in order to evaluate the most active photocatalyst system. Dialkoxytitanium dichlorides are the most efficient species for chemoselective hydroxymethylation of acetophenone as well as other aromatic and aliphatic ketones. Pinacol coupling is the dominant process for semiconductor catalysis and ketone reduction dominates the Ti(OiPr4/methanol or isopropanol systems. Application of dilution effects on the TiO2 catalysis leads to an increase in hydroxymethylation at the expense of the pinacol coupling.

  18. Effect of method of heterogenization of ephedrine and reaction conditions on the enantioselectivity of Michael additions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krotov, V.V.; Staroverov, S.M.; Nesterenko, P.N.; Lisichkin. G.V.

    1987-11-10

    A series of heterogeneous catalysts for asymmetric Michael additions was synthesized based on ephedrine chemically bound to the surface of silica. The length of the hydrocarbon chain binding the active center to the support surface affects the sign of rotation of the reaction product from the asymmetric addition of thiophenol to benzylideneacetophenone. Grafting ephedrine to the silica surface via a short hydrocarbon chain results in a change in the configuration of the reaction product. Silanol groups on the silica surface are involved in the transition state, as evidenced by data obtained using silica which has been exhaustively treated with trimethylchlorosilane. The absolute specific rotation of 1,3-diphenyl-3-thiophenylpropan-1-one has been established.

  19. Effects of heterogeneous wind fields and vegetation composition on modeled estimates of pollen source area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K. D.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J. W.; Holloway, T.

    2015-12-01

    Fossil pollen records from lakes, bogs, and small hollows offer the main source of information about vegetation responses to climate change and land use over timescales of decades to millennia. Millions of pollen grains are released from individual trees each year, and are transported by wind before settling out of the atmosphere. Reconstructing past vegetation from sedimentary pollen records, however, requires careful modeling of pollen production, transport, and deposition. The atmosphere is turbulent, and regional wind patterns shift from day to day. In accordance with this, it is necessary for pollen transport models to adequately account for variable, non-uniform wind patterns and vegetation heterogeneity. Using a simulation approach, with both simulated vegetation patterns and vegetation gradients, as well as simulated wind fields, we show the inconsistency in pollen loading proportions and local vegetation proportions when non-uniform wind patterns are incorporated. Vegetation upwind from the lake is over-represented due to the increased prevalence of winds transporting pollen from that area. The inclusion of North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) wind records affirms this finding. Of the lake sites explored in this study, none had uniform wind patterns. The use of a settlement-era gridded vegetation dataset, compiled by the PalEON project and based on Public Land Survey System (PLSS) records allows us to model pollen source area with realistic vegetation heterogeneity. Due to differences in productivity, pollen fall speeds, and neighboring vegetation, there exist patterns of vegetation that may be poorly characterized due to over/under representation of different taxa. Better understanding these differences in representation allows for more accurate reconstruction of historical vegetation, and pollen-vegetation relationships.

  20. Effect of Substrate Character on Heterogeneous Ozone Reaction Rate with Individual PAHs and Their Reaction Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, B. A.; Stevens, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vehicle exhaust contains many unregulated chemical compounds that are harmful to human health and the natural environment, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a class of organic compounds derived from fuel combustion that can be carcinogenic and mutagenic. PAHs have been quantified in vehicle-derived ultrafine particles (Dphealth problems, including respiratory and cardiac disease. Once emitted into the atmosphere, particle-bound PAHs can undergo “aging” reactions with oxidants, such as ozone, to form more polar species. These polar reaction products include species such as quinones that can be more toxic than the parent PAH compounds. Here, 0.4ppm ozone was reacted over a 24-hour period with the 16 EPA priority PAHs plus coronene adsorbed to (i) a quartz fiber filter and (ii) NIST diesel PM. The difference in the PAH/O3 heterogeneous reaction rate resulting from the two substrates will be discussed. The experiments were completed by spiking a known PAH mixture to the solid, reacting the samples with gas-phase ozone, and determining both PAH loss over time and products formed, using thermal-desorption gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The individual PAHs anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluorene, adsorbed to a QFF were also separately reacted with 0.4 ppm ozone. A volatilization control and the collection of volatilized PAHs using a Tenax-packed thermal desorption vial completed the mass balance and aided determination parent-product relationships. Heterogeneous reaction products analyzed directly without derivatization indicate the formation of 9,10-anthracenedione, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and (1,1’-biphenyl)-2,2’-dicarboxaldehyde from the reaction of ozone with the PAH mix on a QFF, but only 9,10-anthracenedione was detected for the diesel PM reaction. The implications of these results for aging of diesel particulate in urban environments will be discussed.

  1. The impact of local diffusion on longitudinal macrodispersivity and its major effect upon anomalous transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, Igor; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2009-05-01

    Flow and transport are solved for a heterogeneous medium modeled as an ensemble of spherical inclusions of uniform radius R and of conductivities K, drawn from a pdf f(K) ( Fig. 1). This can be regarded as a particular discretization scheme, allowing for accurate numerical and semi-analytical solutions, for any given univariate f(Y)(Y=lnK) and integral scale IY. The transport is quantified by the longitudinal equivalent macrodispersivity α, for uniform mean flow of velocity U and for a large (ergodic) plume of a conservative solute injected in a vertical plane ( x=0) and moving past a control plane at x≫IY. In the past we have solved transport for advection solely for highly heterogeneous media of σY2⩽8. We have found that α increases in a strong nonlinear fashion with σY2 and transport becomes anomalous for the subordinate model. This effect is explained by the large residence time of solute particles in inclusions of low K. In the present work we examine the impact of local diffusion as quantified by the Peclet number Pe=UIY/D0, where D0 is the coefficient of molecular diffusion. Transport with diffusion is solved by accurate numerical simulations for flow past spheres of low K and for high Pe=O(102-104). It was found that finite Pe reduces significantly α as compared to advection, for σY2≳3(Pe=1000) and for σY2≳1.4(Pe=100), justifying neglection of the effect of diffusion for weak to moderately heterogeneous aquifers (e.g. σY2⩽1). In contrast, diffusion impacts considerably α for large σY2 due to the removal of solute from low K inclusions. Furthermore, anomalous behavior is eliminated, though α may be still large for Pe≫1.

  2. Effect of clonal integration on nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere of rhizomatous clonal plant, Phyllostachys bissetii, under heterogeneous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Jing-Song; Xue, Ge; Peng, Yuanying; Song, Hui-Xing

    2018-07-01

    Clonal integration plays an important role in clonal plant adapting to heterogeneous habitats. It was postulated that clonal integration could exhibit positive effects on nitrogen cycling in the rhizosphere of clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. An in-situ experiment was conducted using clonal fragments of Phyllostachys bissetii with two successive ramets. Shading treatments were applied to offspring or mother ramets, respectively, whereas counterparts were treated to full sunlight. Rhizomes between two successive ramets were either severed or connected. Extracellular enzyme activities and nitrogen turnover were measured, as well as soil properties. Abundance of functional genes (archaeal or bacterial amoA, nifH) in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were determined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Carbon or nitrogen availabilities were significantly influenced by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. Clonal integration significantly increased extracellular enzyme activities and abundance of functional genes in the rhizosphere of shaded ramets. When rhizomes were connected, higher nitrogen turnover (nitrogen mineralization or nitrification rates) was exhibited in the rhizosphere of shaded offspring ramets. However, nitrogen turnover was significantly decreased by clonal integration in the rhizosphere of shaded mother ramets. Path analysis indicated that nitrogen turnover in the rhizosphere of shaded, offspring or mother ramets were primarily driven by the response of soil microorganisms to dissolved organic carbon or nitrogen. This unique in-situ experiment provided insights into the mechanism of nutrient recycling mediated by clonal integration. It was suggested that effects of clonal integration on the rhizosphere microbial processes were dependent on direction of photosynthates transport in clonal plant subjected to heterogeneous light conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Medial depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation: CT evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Sun Young; Lee, Young Uk; Youn, Eun Kyung; Suh, Sang Gyung; Kim, Dong Hyun

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and CT findings of the medial depression and bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation. 1472 PNS CTs of the patients with symptoms of chronic sinusitis were retrospectively evaluated. The total incidence of depressed lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation was 3.5%(52/1472) on PNS CT. There was a statistically significant correlation between the increasing age and the incidence of depressed lamina papyracea. Depression of lamina papyracea anterior to the basal lamella were more common than those of the posterior depression. Associated findings were herniation of adjacent fatty tissue in all cases and the medial bowing and hypertrophied configuration of the medial rectus muscle without significant herniation in 19 cases(34%). Nontraumatic, asymptomatic depression with bony dehiscence of lamina papyracea as an anatomic variation is not uncommon with the incidence of 3.5%. Recognition of its existence and degree may be helpful in avoiding various ocular complication during ethmoid surgery

  4. On the biology of the bony otic capsule and the pathogenesis of otosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land

    2012-01-01

    In human otosclerosis, focal pathological bone remodeling occurs in significant amounts inside the normally anti-resorptive perilabyrinthine domain of the bony otic capsule. Otosclerosis causes hearing loss in 0.2-0.5% of the population by ankylosis of the footplate. The disease cannot be predicted......, avoided or medically reversed as the pathogenesis remains unknown. Previously genetic research has failed to identify a specific otosclerosis-gene and earlier theories of virus infections, autoimmunity or association to generalized bone diseases have been unable to explain why otosclerosis only occurs...... in the bony otic capsule while the rest of the skeleton remains completely normal. Studies from the otopathological laboratory (RH) have revealed how the bone turnover rates increase centrifugally from a sub-normal 0.1% adjacent to the inner ear space towards a normal 10% per year at the capsular periphery...

  5. Valor predicts the thyroid hormones in the evolution the transplant bony marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, C.A.; Carnot, J.; De Castro, R.; Morera, M.L.; Garcia, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this work you values the valor I predict the thyroid hormones in the bony marrow transplant evolution as factors the metabolisms oxidative and the synthesis albumins. The patients received conditioning treatments to the transplant and in the postoperational. The received radiations were 1000 cGy lateral cube, with blocking lung, to those that were subjected 3 sessions irradiation, they are practiced a transplant marrow allogeneic

  6. First Record of Eocene Bony Fishes and Crocodyliforms from Canada’s Western Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    Eberle, Jaelyn J.; Gottfried, Michael D.; Hutchison, J. Howard; Brochu, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discovery of Eocene non-marine vertebrates, including crocodylians, turtles, bony fishes, and mammals in Canada's High Arctic was a critical paleontological contribution of the last century because it indicated that this region of the Arctic had been mild, temperate, and ice-free during the early - middle Eocene (∼53-50 Ma), despite being well above the Arctic Circle. To date, these discoveries have been restricted to Canada's easternmost Arctic - Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Island...

  7. Bony defect of palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, S; Ma, L; Zhou, X; Sun, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize bony defects of the palate and vomer in submucous cleft palate patients (SMCP) by three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) reconstruction and to classify the range of bony defects. Forty-eight consecutive non-operated SMCP patients were included. Diagnosis was based on the presence of at least one of three classical signs of SMCP: bifid uvula, a translucent zone in the midline of the soft palate, and a palpable 'V' notch on the posterior border of the bony palate. Patients were imaged using spiral CT. 3D reconstruction models were created of the palate and vomer. The sagittal extent of the bony cleft in SMCP was classified into four types: type I, no V-shaped hard palate cleft (8.3%); type II, cleft involving the partial palate (43.8%); type III, cleft involving the complete palate and extending to the incisive foramen (43.8%); type IV, cleft involving the complete palate and the alveolar bone (4.2%). The extent of the vomer defect was classified into three types: type A, vomer completely fused with the palate (8.3%); type B, vomer partially fused with the palate (43.8%); type C, vomer not fused with the palate up to the incisive foramen (47.9%). Significant variability in hard palate defects in SMCP is the rule rather than the exception. The association of velopharyngeal insufficiency with anatomical malformations may be complex. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A study of the effect of the heterogeneity of a rod of burnable poisons of the reactors reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Demerdash, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of burnable poisons rods in power water reactors is one of the recommended tools for modifying the economy of this type of reactors. Introducing the burnable poisons rod into the central cell will change the reactivity and hence a perturbation of the flux will result. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the poisons rod and the heterogeneity of the assembly on the reactivity. With the use of code Apollo in a macrocell structure, it has been found that the highest perturbation will occur due to the use of Gadolinium rods (100%). A very important depression of the flux in the burnable poisons rod (especially for Gd, black body) has been observed and the perturbation decreases in the macrocell at a distance of 10 cm from the origin. Although this study shows the importance of evaluating the heterogeneity effects of the poisons rods through the different stages of the poisons rods evolutions, it is considered to be preliminary and a more accurate calculation is required. (author)

  9. An Exponential Tilt Mixture Model for Time-to-Event Data to Evaluate Treatment Effect Heterogeneity in Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Tan, Zhiqiang; Louis, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the effect of a treatment on a time-to-event outcome is the focus of many randomized clinical trials. It is often observed that the treatment effect is heterogeneous, where only a subgroup of the patients may respond to the treatment due to some unknown mechanism such as genetic polymorphism. In this paper, we propose a semiparametric exponential tilt mixture model to estimate the proportion of patients who respond to the treatment and to assess the treatment effect. Our model is a natural extension of parametric mixture models to a semiparametric setting with a time-to-event outcome. We propose a nonparametric maximum likelihood estimation approach for inference and establish related asymptotic properties. Our method is illustrated by a randomized clinical trial on biodegradable polymer-delivered chemotherapy for malignant gliomas patients.

  10. Reliability of the bony anatomy in image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean +/- SD) was 4.0 +/- 2.1 mm and 3.5 +/- 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r >/= 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 +/- 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  11. Effects of Sigh on Regional Lung Strain and Ventilation Heterogeneity in Acute Respiratory Failure Patients Undergoing Assisted Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Tommaso; Eronia, Nilde; Abbruzzese, Chiara; Marcolin, Roberto; Coppadoro, Andrea; Spadaro, Savino; Patroniti, Nicolo'; Bellani, Giacomo; Pesenti, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    In acute respiratory failure patients undergoing pressure support ventilation, a short cyclic recruitment maneuver (Sigh) might induce reaeration of collapsed lung regions, possibly decreasing regional lung strain and improving the homogeneity of ventilation distribution. We aimed to describe the regional effects of different Sigh rates on reaeration, strain, and ventilation heterogeneity, as measured by thoracic electrical impedance tomography. Prospective, randomized, cross-over study. General ICU of a single university-affiliated hospital. We enrolled 20 critically ill patients intubated and mechanically ventilated with PaO2/FIO2 up to 300 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure at least 5 cm H2O (15 with acute respiratory distress syndrome), undergoing pressure support ventilation as per clinical decision. Sigh was added to pressure support ventilation as a 35 cm H2O continuous positive airway pressure period lasting 3-4 seconds at different rates (no-Sigh vs 0.5, 1, and 2 Sigh(s)/min). All study phases were randomly performed and lasted 20 minutes. In the last minutes of each phase, we measured arterial blood gases, changes in end-expiratory lung volume of nondependent and dependent regions, tidal volume reaching nondependent and dependent lung (Vtnondep and Vtdep), dynamic intratidal ventilation heterogeneity, defined as the average ratio of Vt reaching nondependent/Vt reaching dependent lung regions along inspiration (VtHit). With Sigh, oxygenation improved (p ventilation heterogeneity. Our study generates the hypothesis that in ventilated acute respiratory failure patients, Sigh may enhance regional lung protection.

  12. Effect of hindpaw electrical stimulation on capillary flow heterogeneity and oxygen delivery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuandong; Wei, Wei; Li, Chenxi; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-02-01

    We report a novel use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) based angiography to visualize and quantify dynamic response of cerebral capillary flow pattern in mice upon hindpaw electrical stimulation through the measurement of the capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH) and capillary mean transit time (MTT) in a wide dynamic range of a great number of vessels in vivo. The OCT system was developed to have a central wavelength of 1310 nm, a spatial resolution of 8 µm and a system dynamic range of 105 dB at an imaging rate of 92 kHz. The mapping of dynamic cerebral microcirculations was enabled by optical microangiography protocol. From the imaging results, the spatial homogenization of capillary velocity (decreased CTH) was observed in the region of interest (ROI) corresponding to the stimulation, along with an increase in the MTT in the ROI to maintain sufficient oxygen exchange within the brain tissue during functional activation. We validated the oxygen consumption due to an increase of the MTT through demonstrating an increase in the deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) during the stimulation by the use of laser speckle contrast imaging.

  13. The effects of spatially heterogeneous prey distributions on detection patterns in foraging seabirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Miramontes

    Full Text Available Many attempts to relate animal foraging patterns to landscape heterogeneity are focused on the analysis of foragers movements. Resource detection patterns in space and time are not commonly studied, yet they are tightly coupled to landscape properties and add relevant information on foraging behavior. By exploring simple foraging models in unpredictable environments we show that the distribution of intervals between detected prey (detection statistics is mostly determined by the spatial structure of the prey field and essentially distinct from predator displacement statistics. Detections are expected to be Poissonian in uniform random environments for markedly different foraging movements (e.g. Lévy and ballistic. This prediction is supported by data on the time intervals between diving events on short-range foraging seabirds such as the thick-billed murre (Uria lomvia. However, Poissonian detection statistics is not observed in long-range seabirds such as the wandering albatross (Diomedea exulans due to the fractal nature of the prey field, covering a wide range of spatial scales. For this scenario, models of fractal prey fields induce non-Poissonian patterns of detection in good agreement with two albatross data sets. We find that the specific shape of the distribution of time intervals between prey detection is mainly driven by meso and submeso-scale landscape structures and depends little on the forager strategy or behavioral responses.

  14. Effect of geometry on concentration polarization in realistic heterogeneous permselective systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Yoav; Shloush, Shahar; Yossifon, Gilad

    2014-04-01

    This study extends previous analytical solutions of concentration polarization occurring solely in the depleted region, to the more realistic geometry consisting of a three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous ion-permselective medium connecting two opposite microchambers (i.e., a three-layer system). Under the local electroneutrality approximation, the separation of variable methods is used to derive an analytical solution of the electrodiffusive problem for the two opposing asymmetric microchambers. The assumption of an ideal permselective medium allows for the analytic calculation of the 3D concentration and electric potential distributions as well as a current-voltage relation. It is shown that any asymmetry in the microchamber geometries will result in current rectification. Moreover, it is demonstrated that for non-negligible microchamber resistances, the conductance does not exhibit the expected saturation at low concentrations but instead shows a continuous decrease. The results are intended to facilitate a more direct comparison between theory and experiments, as now the voltage drop is across a realistic 3D and three-layer system.

  15. Sensing Home: A Cost-Effective Design for Smart Home via Heterogeneous Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohu; Huang, Hao; Qi, Shipeng; Luo, Xincheng; Zeng, Jing; Xie, Qubo; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-12-03

    The aging population has inspired the marketing of advanced real time devices for home health care, more and more wearable devices and mobile applications, which have emerged in this field. However, to properly collect behavior information, accurately recognize human activities, and deploy the whole system in a real living environment is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a feasible wireless-based solution to deploy a data collection scheme, activity recognition model, feedback control and mobile integration via heterogeneous networks. We compared and found a suitable algorithm that can be run on cost-efficient embedded devices. Specifically, we use the Super Set Transformation method to map the raw data into a sparse binary matrix. Furthermore, designed front-end devices of low power consumption gather the living data of the habitant via ZigBee to reduce the burden of wiring work. Finally, we evaluated our approach and show it can achieve a theoretical time-slice accuracy of 98%. The mapping solution we propose is compatible with more wearable devices and mobile apps.

  16. The effect of mesostructure heterogeneity on cracks initiation and the displacement distribution in NCF composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrida, H.; Giannadis, K.; Varna, J.; Ayadi, Z.

    2012-02-01

    Non Crimp Fabrics (NCF) are promising new generation composite materials. They are now being used in some sections of composite industry, for example in wind turbine blades and boat hulls. The aerospace industry also shows an increasing interest in this material, thanks to the low cost of its manufacturing process. NCFs are special types of textile composites, made of layers of parallel fiber bundles oriented in different directions and separated by resin. Due to the manufacturing process the fiber bundles are not perfectly straight. They show a certain degree of waviness which decreases the stiffness and the strength of the material. The heterogeneous mesostructure affects the mechanical properties of the material and the failure mechanisms. This was studied using both numerical and experimental methods. In our experimental approach, a carbon fiber/epoxy resin laminate with uniform fiber distribution was manufactured by voluntarily introducing waviness to simulate the NCF composites. The displacement map was studied against the thickness of a sample loaded in tension, using ESPI (Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry). This can give us a primary idea of the micro damage initiation and the cracks' shapes.

  17. Seeing the forest but not the trees: Heterogeneity in community size effects in Canadian ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattie, N; Schorer, J; Baker, J

    2018-02-01

    The community size effect (or birthplace effect) suggests that high-performance athletes are less likely to emerge from regions with population sizes that are very small or very large. However, previous research on elite Canadian ice hockey players has not considered the influence of intra-national regional variation of population distributions with respect to community size effects. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to test the heterogeneity of the community size effect between Canadian National Hockey League draftees (2000-2014: n = 1505), from 7 provincial regions within Canada (i.e., British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic Provinces). The proportion of athletes in the 9 census population categories were compared to the national and regional general population distributions in the census categories. Results suggest variability of community size effects between the 7 provincial regions within Canada, with only the province of Ontario demonstrating a community size effect congruent with effects reported in previous research. Using regional general population distributions as the comparator to athlete populations changed the direction, meaningfulness and magnitude of community size effects. In conclusion, elite ice hockey player community size effects may not be generalisable to all regions within Canada.

  18. Ethnic Differences in Bony Hip Morphology in a Cohort of 445 Professional Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosler, Andrea B; Crossley, Kay M; Waarsing, Jan H; Jomaah, Nabil; Weir, Adam; Hölmich, Per; Agricola, Rintje

    2016-11-01

    Participation in high-impact athletic activities has recently been associated with a higher prevalence of cam deformity. Bony hip morphology has also emerged as an important factor in the development of hip osteoarthritis. However, it is unknown whether bony morphology differs between ethnicities in athletes participating in high-impact sports. To investigate whether the prevalence of specific bony hip morphological abnormalities differed between professional male soccer players of diverse ethnic backgrounds. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Professional male soccer players from an entire league attending preparticipation screening were invited to participate in this study. Ethnicity was registered, and standardized radiographs of anteroposterior pelvic and Dunn views were obtained. Cam and pincer deformity, and acetabular dysplasia were quantified using the alpha angle, triangular index, and lateral center-edge angle (LCEA). Regression analyses with generalized estimating equations were used to determine prevalence differences in bony hip morphology. A total of 445 male soccer players (890 hips; mean age ± SD, 25 ± 4.9 years) participated in the study, representing the following ethnic groups: Arabic (59%), black (24%), Persian (7%), white (6%), East Asian (2%), and other (2%). The prevalence of cam deformity (alpha angle >60°) ranged from 57.5% to 71.7% across 4 of the groups, but East Asians had a significantly lower prevalence (18.8%; P ≤ .032). A large cam deformity (alpha angle >78°) was more prevalent in white (33.3%) compared with black soccer players (17.8%; P = .041) and was absent in East Asian players. Pincer deformity (LCEA >40°) was uncommon (3%) in all ethnicities. The prevalence of acetabular dysplasia (LCEA <20°) ranged from 8.0% to 16.7%, apart from the white group, in which prevalence was only 1.9% (P = .03). The prevalence of a cam deformity and acetabular dysplasia differed between ethnicities in this cohort of professional

  19. Enhancement of Bacterial Transport in Aerobic and Anaerobic Environments: Assessing the Effect of Metal Oxide Chemical Heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T.C. Onstott

    2005-01-01

    The goal of our research was to understand the fundamental processes that control microbial transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous aquifers and from this enhanced understanding determine the requirements for successful, field-scale delivery of microorganisms to metal contaminated subsurface sites. Our specific research goals were to determine; (1) the circumstances under which the preferential adsorption of bacteria to Fe, Mn, and Al oxyhydroxides influences field-scale bacterial transport, (2) the extent to which the adhesion properties of bacterial cells affect field-scale bacterial transport, (3) whether microbial Fe(III) reduction can enhance field-scale transport of Fe reducing bacteria (IRB) and other microorganisms and (4) the effect of field-scale physical and chemical heterogeneity on all three processes. Some of the spin-offs from this basic research that can improve biostimulation and bioaugmentation remediation efforts at contaminated DOE sites have included; (1) new bacterial tracking tools for viable bacteria; (2) an integrated protocol which combines subsurface characterization, laboratory-scale experimentation, and scale-up techniques to accurately predict field-scale bacterial transport; and (3) innovative and inexpensive field equipment and methods that can be employed to enhance Fe(III) reduction and microbial transport and to target microbial deposition under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions

  20. A Comparative Study of the Effect of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Collaborative Interaction on the Development of EFL Learners’ Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parviz Maftoon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of homogeneous and heterogeneous peer interaction on the development of Iranian EFL learners’ writing skill. Sixty female students of TEFL participated in the study. The participants were divided into two groups based on their English proficiency test scores. The homogeneous group consisted of 14 participants paired with partners with similar English proficiency test scores, while the heterogeneous group consisted of 16 participants who were paired with partners who had higher test scores. The pairs had interaction and peer collaboration before carrying out three types of writing tasks. The Repeated Measures ANOVA was used to compare the student writers’ pretest writing scores with their three post-test scores. The results showed that both groups, very similarly, had significantly higher post-test scores in all three writing tasks. The findings are explained based on the sociocultural theory and Vygotsky’s notion of the zone of proximal development (ZPD. The study offers several important pedagogical implications and suggestions for further research.

  1. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belibel, R.; Avramoglou, T. [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Garcia, A. [CNRS UPR 3407, Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériau, Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Barbaud, C. [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Mora, L., E-mail: Laurence.mora@univ-paris13.fr [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France)

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid–base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie–Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. - Highlights: • We develop different polymers with various chemical compositions. • Wettability properties were calculated using Cassie corrected contact angles. • Percentage of acid groups in polymers is directly correlated to acid part of SFE. • Cassie corrections are necessary for heterogeneous polymers.

  2. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belibel, R.; Avramoglou, T.; Garcia, A.; Barbaud, C.; Mora, L.

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid–base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie–Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. - Highlights: • We develop different polymers with various chemical compositions. • Wettability properties were calculated using Cassie corrected contact angles. • Percentage of acid groups in polymers is directly correlated to acid part of SFE. • Cassie corrections are necessary for heterogeneous polymers.

  3. Effects of mechanical heterogeneity on the tensile and fatigue behaviours in a laser-arc hybrid welded aluminium alloy joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Chao; Huang, Chongxiang; Liu, Yongjie; Li, Jiukai; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Full field strain evolution was characterized using DIC method in fatigue test. • The differences of fatigue failure mechanism between HAZ and FZ were discussed. • Porosity in FZ significantly influenced high cycle fatigue behaviours of the weld. - Abstract: The effects of mechanical heterogeneity on the tensile and high cycle fatigue (10 4 –10 7 cycles) properties were investigated for laser-arc hybrid welded aluminium alloy joints. Tensile–tensile cyclic loading with a stress ratio of 0.1 was applied in a direction perpendicular to the weld direction for up to 10 7 cycles. The local mechanical properties in the tensile test and the accumulated plastic strain in the fatigue test throughout the weld’s different regions were characterized using a digital image correlation technique. The tensile results indicated heterogeneous tensile properties throughout the different regions of the aluminium welded joint, and the heat affected zone was the weakest region in which the strain localized. In the fatigue test, the accumulated plastic strain evolutions in different subzones of the weld were analyzed, and slip bands could be clearly observed in the heat affected zone. A transition of fatigue failure locations from the heat affected zone caused by accumulated plastic strain to the fusion zone induced by fatigue crack at pores could be observed under different cyclic stress levels. The welding porosity in the fusion zone significantly influences the high cycle fatigue behaviour

  4. Meeting the challenge of homogenous boron targeting of heterogeneous tumors for effective boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heber, Elisa M.; Trivillin, Veronica A.; Itoiz, Maria E.; Rebagliati, J. Raul; Batistoni, Daniel; Kreimann, Erica L.; Schwint, Amanda E.; Nigg, David W.; Gonzalez, Beatriz N.

    2006-01-01

    BNCT is a tumor cell targeted radiation therapy. Inadequately boron targeted tumor populations jeopardize tumor control. Meeting the to date unresolved challenge of homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors with effective boron carriers would contribute to therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the degree of variation in boron content delivered by boronophenylalanine (BPA), GB-10 (Na 2 10 B 10 H 10 ) and the combined administration of (BPA+GB-10) in different portions of tumor, precancerous tissue around tumor and normal pouch tissue in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Boron content was evaluated by ICP-AES. The degree of homogeneity in boron targeting was assessed in terms of the coefficient of variation ([S.D./Mean]x100) of boron values. Statistical analysis of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA and the least significant difference test. GB-10 and GB-10 plus BPA achieved respectively a statistically significant 1.8-fold and 3.3-fold increase in targeting homogeneity over BPA. The combined boron compound administration protocol contributes to homogeneous targeting of heterogeneous tumors and would increase therapeutic efficacy of BNCT by exposing all tumor populations to neutron capture reactions in boron. (author)

  5. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  6. The Effect of Velocity Correlation on the Spatial Evolution of Breakthrough Curves in Heterogeneous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudieh, A.; Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.

    2017-12-01

    In heterogeneous media, the velocity distribution and the spatial correlation structure of velocity for solute particles determine the breakthrough curves and how they evolve as one moves away from the solute source. The ability to predict such evolution can help relating the spatio-statistical hydraulic properties of the media to the transport behavior and travel time distributions. While commonly used non-local transport models such as anomalous dispersion and classical continuous time random walk (CTRW) can reproduce breakthrough curve successfully by adjusting the model parameter values, they lack the ability to relate model parameters to the spatio-statistical properties of the media. This in turns limits the transferability of these models. In the research to be presented, we express concentration or flux of solutes as a distribution over their velocity. We then derive an integrodifferential equation that governs the evolution of the particle distribution over velocity at given times and locations for a particle ensemble, based on a presumed velocity correlation structure and an ergodic cross-sectional velocity distribution. This way, the spatial evolution of breakthrough curves away from the source is predicted based on cross-sectional velocity distribution and the connectivity, which is expressed by the velocity transition probability density. The transition probability is specified via a copula function that can help construct a joint distribution with a given correlation and given marginal velocities. Using this approach, we analyze the breakthrough curves depending on the velocity distribution and correlation properties. The model shows how the solute transport behavior evolves from ballistic transport at small spatial scales to Fickian dispersion at large length scales relative to the velocity correlation length.

  7. The effect of intra-trappean heterogeneities on seismic data: A case study from the Deccan Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Dhananjai; Singh, Satish; Sinha, Martin; MacGregor, Lucy

    2007-09-01

    Hydrocarbon exploration interests have renewed the need for developing new sub basalt imaging techniques. One of the most important problems encountered today is seismic imaging below basalt. In recent years, this problem appears to have been overcome partly by using long offset seismic data. However near offset data are yet to be fully utilised due to the complex waveform caused by the surface as well as internal heterogeneity of the basalts. The near normal incidence data, which influence the sub-basalt imaging, are highly useful to understand the internal structure within a basalt layer. The use of converted waves for such targets has been proposed as an alternative in a rather homogeneous basalt layer. With a few synthetic modelling exercises here we highlight the practical difficulties in dealing with more realistic and heterogeneous basalt flow. Full waveform seismograms are computed to understand the effects of intra-trappean sediments on the seismic data. A case study from the Deccan Traps of India is presented in this paper. First, we discuss the effects of intercalated sediments on the overall seismic image. Later, the sonic log data from the field are used to compute the full wave-field response using the reflectivity method and compared with the field data. The feasibility of using mode converted waves (P to S and vice-versa at the top and bottom basalt interfaces) for sub-basalt imaging in Kutch region is discussed through a series of velocity-depth profiles. By comparing with the field data we demonstrate that the effects of multiple thin layering within the basalt can strongly deteriorate the image we seek to interpret and exploit.

  8. Effect of pathological heterogeneity on shear wave elasticity imaging in the staging of deep venous thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    Full Text Available We aimed to observe the relationship between the pathological components of a deep venous thrombus (DVT, which was divided into three parts, and the findings on quantitative ultrasonic shear wave elastography (SWE to increase the accuracy of thrombus staging in a rabbit model.A flow stenosis-induced vein thrombosis model was used, and the thrombus was divided into three parts (head, body and tail, which were associated with corresponding observation points. Elasticity was quantified in vivo using SWE over a 2-week period. A quantitative pathologic image analysis (QPIA was performed to obtain the relative percentages of the components of the main clots.DVT maturity occurred at 2 weeks, and the elasticity of the whole thrombus and the three parts (head, body and tail showed an increasing trend, with the Young's modulus values varying from 2.36 ± 0.41 kPa to 13.24 ± 1.71 kPa; 2.01 ± 0.28 kPa to 13.29 ± 1.48 kPa; 3.27 ± 0.57 kPa to 15.91 ± 2.05 kPa; and 1.79 ± 0.36 kPa to 10.51 ± 1.61 kPa, respectively. Significant increases occurred on different days for the different parts: the head showed significant increases on days 4 and 6; the body showed significant increases on days 4 and 7; and the tail showed significant increases on days 3 and 6. The QPIA showed that the thrombus composition changed dynamically as the thrombus matured, with the fibrin and calcium salt deposition gradually increasing and the red blood cells (RBCs and platelet trabecula gradually decreasing. Significant changes were observed on days 4 and 7, which may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi. Significant heterogeneity was observed between and within the thrombi.Variations in the thrombus components were generally consistent between the SWE and QPIA. Days 4 and 7 after thrombus induction may represent the transition points for acute, sub-acute and chronic thrombi in rabbit models. A dynamic examination of the same part of the thrombus

  9. An approximate analytical methodology for the concentration CDF and corresponding adverse health effects in 3D heterogeneous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarlenga, Antonio; de Barros, Felipe; Fiori, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    series of problems of practical relevance. The basic scenario is constituted by a steady state plume in a 3D heterogeneous formation. In this case the non-reactive transport is ruled by interplay of the spreading (lateral and vertical) and dilution. The second scenario considers two different dynamics of degradation in aerobic and anaerobic conditions which allows the contaminant abatement. The final example links the environmental concentration with adverse health effects. For this case, additional information on toxicological and behavioral parameters are required. Despite the simplifying assumptions adopted, the proposed solutions are appealing in applications due to their simplicity and the fact that they allow to easily propagate the uncertainty from different sources in the final risk endpoint. de Barros, F.P., Fiori, A., 2014. First-order based cumulative distribution function for solute concentration in heterogeneous aquifers: theoretical analysis and implications for human health risk assessment. Water Resour. Res. 50, 4018-4037. Zarlenga, A., Fiori, A., 2013. Steady plumes in heterogeneous porous formations: a stochastic lagrangian approach. Water Resour. Res. 49, 864-873. Zarlenga, A., Fiori, A., 2014. Stochastic analytical modeling of the biodegradation of steady plumes. J. Contam. Hydrol. 157, 106-116.

  10. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  11. Computed tomographic features of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve in pediatric patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Tatsuo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diameters of the various bony canals of the inner ear in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and establish criteria for detecting hypoplasia of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve. Measurements obtained in 118 patients without inner ear malformations among 160 patients with unilateral SNHL were analyzed. The diameters of the internal auditory canal and the bony canals of the cochlear, vestibular, and facial nerves were measured on transverse or coronal computed tomographic images. Mean values (±standard deviation (SD)) were compared between the affected and unaffected ears, and statistical analysis was done. The diameter of the bony canal of the cochlear nerve was significantly smaller in affected ears than in unaffected ears (P<0.01). The affected ears could be divided into groups with (72 ears) and without (46 ears) bony canal stenosis. Most (60%) of the patients with unilateral SNHL showed a significant difference in the diameters of the bony canals of the cochlear nerve between the affected and unaffected sides; moreover, the mean value was significantly smaller in affected ears. The diameter of <1.7 mm on transverse images or <1.8 mm on coronal images suggests hypoplasia. (author)

  12. Mixed-effects location and scale Tobit joint models for heterogeneous longitudinal data with skewness, detection limits, and measurement errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    The joint modeling of mean and variance for longitudinal data is an active research area. This type of model has the advantage of accounting for heteroscedasticity commonly observed in between and within subject variations. Most of researches focus on improving the estimating efficiency but ignore many data features frequently encountered in practice. In this article, we develop a mixed-effects location scale joint model that concurrently accounts for longitudinal data with multiple features. Specifically, our joint model handles heterogeneity, skewness, limit of detection, measurement errors in covariates which are typically observed in the collection of longitudinal data from many studies. We employ a Bayesian approach for making inference on the joint model. The proposed model and method are applied to an AIDS study. Simulation studies are performed to assess the performance of the proposed method. Alternative models under different conditions are compared.

  13. Unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter for improvement of 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Takuya; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Kuroyanagi, Kinya

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of the unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter to improve 3D-CT images of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. The effect of the unsharp masking technique with several combinations of mask size and weighting factor on image resolution was investigated using a spatial frequency phantom made of bone-equivalent material. The 3D-CT images were obtained with scans perpendicular to and parallel to the phantom plates. The contrast transfer function (CTF) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of each spatial frequency component were measured. The FWHM was expressed as a ratio against the actual thickness of phantom plate. The effect on pseudoforamina was assessed using sliced CT images obtained in clinical bony 3D-CT examinations. The effect of the unsharp masking technique on image quality was also visually evaluated using five clinical fracture cases. CTFs did not change. FWHM ratios of original 3D-CT images were smaller than 1.0, regardless of the scanning direction. Those in scans perpendicular to the phantom plates were not changed by the unsharp masking technique. Those in parallel scanning were increased by mask size and weighting factor. The area of pseudoforamina decreased with increases in mask size and weighting factor. The combination of mask size 3 x 3 pixels and weighting factor 5 was optimal. Visual evaluation indicated that preprocessing with the unsharp masking technique improved the image quality of the 3D-CT images. The unsharp masking technique is useful as a preprocessing filter to improve the 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. (author)

  14. Effect of heterogeneity and anisotropy related to the construction method on transfer processes in waste rock piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahmira, Belkacem; Lefebvre, René; Aubertin, Michel; Bussière, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Waste rock piles producing acid mine drainage (AMD) are partially saturated systems involving multiphase (gas and liquid) flow and coupled transfer processes. Their internal structure and heterogeneous properties are inherited from their wide-ranging material grain sizes, their modes of deposition, and the underlying topography. This paper aims at assessing the effect of physical heterogeneity and anisotropy of waste rock piles on the physical processes involved in the generation of AMD. Generic waste rock pile conditions were represented with the numerical simulator TOUGH AMD based on those found at the Doyon mine waste rock pile (Canada). Models included four randomly distributed material types (coarse, intermediate, fine and very fine-grained). The term "randomly" as used in this study means that the vertical profile and spatial distribution of materials in waste rock piles (internal structure) defy stratigraphy principles applicable to natural sediments (superposition and continuity). The materials have different permeability and capillary properties, covering the typical range of materials found in waste rock piles. Anisotropy with a larger horizontal than vertical permeability was used to represent the effect of pile construction by benches, while the construction by end-dumping was presumed to induce a higher vertical than horizontal permeability. Results show that infiltrated precipitation preferentially flows in fine-grained materials, which remain almost saturated, whereas gas flows preferentially through the most permeable coarse materials, which have higher volumetric gas saturation. Anisotropy, which depends on pile construction methods, often controls global gas flow paths. Construction by benches favours lateral air entry close to the pile slope, whereas end-dumping leads to air entry from the surface to the interior of the pile by secondary gas convection cells. These results can be useful to construct and rehabilitate waste rock piles to minimize

  15. Examining Heterogeneity in the Effect of Taking Algebra in Eighth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickles, Jordan H.

    2013-01-01

    Increased access to algebra was a focal point of the National Mathematics Advisory Panel's 2008 report on improving mathematics learning in the United States. Past research found positive effects for early access to algebra, but the focus on average effects may mask important variation across student subgroups. The author addresses whether these…

  16. Globalisation and national trends in nutrition and health: A grouped fixed-effects approach to intercountry heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlander, Lisa; Disdier, Anne-Célia; Etilé, Fabrice

    2017-09-01

    Using a panel dataset of 70 countries spanning 42 years (1970-2011), we investigate the distinct effects of social globalisation and trade openness on national trends in markers of diet quality (supplies of animal proteins, free fats and sugar, average body mass index, and diabetes prevalence). Our key methodological contribution is the application of a grouped fixed-effects estimator, which extends linear fixed-effects models. The grouped fixed-effects estimator partitions our sample into distinct groups of countries in order to control for time-varying unobserved heterogeneity that follows a group-specific pattern. We find that increasing social globalisation has a significant impact on the supplies of animal protein and sugar available for human consumption, as well as on mean body mass index. Specific components of social globalisation such as information flows (via television and the Internet) drive these results. Trade openness has no effect on dietary outcomes or health. These findings suggest that the social and cultural aspects of globalisation should receive greater attention in research on the nutrition transition. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Heterogeneity in rebound effects: Estimated results and impact of China’s fossil-fuel subsidies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ke; Lin, Boqiang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Rebound effects for China’s sectors are estimated. • The input–output model is a suitable model to analysis energy rebound effects across sectors. • The impacts of fossil-fuel subsidies on rebound effects are evaluated. • Technological progress has varies impactions on energy conservation, thereby rebound effects. - Abstract: Improving energy efficiency through technological advancement has become a primary measure to achieve energy conservation targets in China. However, the existence of energy rebound effects may completely or partially offset energy savings associated with technological advancement. From sectors perspective, technological advancement is not a necessary condition for energy conservation for a given sector because of varied rates of technological advancement and dependence among sectors. Adopting the input–output model, this article presents a detailed analysis of energy rebound effects in China’s economy at the aggregate and sectoral level over 2006–2010. The results show that the aggregate sectors’ rebound effect is about 11.31%, which is larger than without considering the interaction among sectors (11.25%); and strongly suggests that technological advancement has varied impacts on energy conservation and rebound effects. Thus various strategies of technological advancement and incorporated mitigation measures are necessary for energy conservation across sectors. Furthermore, the current study confirms that China’s total value of fossil-fuel subsidies reached 160.23 billion US$ (constant 2005 price) in 2006–2010; and after removal of subsidies, the energy use is expected to save 411.35 million toe and the rebound effects for aggregate sectors become 10.64%. Finally, some relevant policy issues are discussed in depth

  18. The Light Source Problem: The Effect of Heterogeneous Stellar Photospheres on Searches for Transiting Exoplanet Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, B. V.; Apai, D.; Giampapa, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    TESS will soon enable the study of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. However, spots and faculae in stellar photospheres can complicate these measurements by mimicking or masking atmospheric features. We detail our work to constrain this effect.

  19. Heterogenous effects of sports participation on education and labor market outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Gorry, Devon

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution of education and labor market benefits from sports participation. Results show that effects are similar across gender, but differ on other dimensions. In particular, participants in team sports show greater gains than those in individual sports. Quantile regressions show that educational gains are larger for low performing populations and earnings gains are larger for low earning individuals. Instrumental variable results also show similar effects across g...

  20. Bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible as a sequelae of noma: A rare case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B.; Awasthi, Ujjwala Rastogi; Mody, Bharat M.; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Garg, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Noma is a gangrenous disease of the orofacial region that leads to severe facial tissue destruction and is a significant cause of death among children. With the advent of modern antibiotics and improved nutrition, children with noma may survive into adulthood, but must face the challenge of undergoing repair of the sequelae of noma. This report describes a case of bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible in a 28-year-old female patient, which was a sequelae of a childhood case of noma

  1. Bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible as a sequelae of noma: A rare case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagewadi, Shivanand B.; Awasthi, Ujjwala Rastogi; Mody, Bharat M.; Suma, Gundareddy N.; Garg, Shruti [Dept. of Medicine and Radiology, ITS Center for Dental Studies and Research, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Noma is a gangrenous disease of the orofacial region that leads to severe facial tissue destruction and is a significant cause of death among children. With the advent of modern antibiotics and improved nutrition, children with noma may survive into adulthood, but must face the challenge of undergoing repair of the sequelae of noma. This report describes a case of bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible in a 28-year-old female patient, which was a sequelae of a childhood case of noma.

  2. Anatomical study of suboccipital vertebral arteries and surrounding bony structures using virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Wenbo; Yang, DeLin; Gu, Shixin; Xu, Qi-Wu; Che, Xiaoming; Wu, Jin-Song; Li, Wensheng

    2014-05-15

    This work aimed to evaluate the efficacy of virtual reality (VR) technology in neurosurgical anatomy through a comparison of the virtual 3D microanatomy of the suboccipital vertebral arteries and their bony structures as part of the resection of tumors in the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) of 20 patients compared to the actual microanatomy of the vertebral arteries of 15 cadaveric headsets. The study was conducted with 2 groups of data: a VR group composed of 20 clinical cases and a physical body group (PB group) composed of 15 cadaveric headsets. In the VR group, the dissection and measurements of the vertebral arteries were simulated on a Dextroscope. In the PB group, the vertebral arteries in the cadaver heads were examined under a microscope and anatomical measurements of VA and bony structures were performed. The length and course of the vertebral arteries and its surrounding bony structures in each group were compared. The distances from the inferior part of the transverse process foramen (TPF) of C1 to the inferior part of TPF of C2 were 17.68±2.86 mm and 18.4±1.82 mm in the PB and VR groups, respectively. The distances between the middle point of the posterior arch of the atlas and the medial intersection of VA on the groove were 17.35±2.23 mm in the PB group and 18.13±2.58 mm in the VR group. The distances between the middle line and the entrance of VA to the lower rim of TPF of Atlas were 28.64±2.67 mm in PB group and 29.23±2.89 mm in VR group. The diameters of the vertebral artery (VA) at the end of the groove and foramen of C2 transverse process were 4.02±046 mm and 4.25±0.51 mm, respectively, in the PB group and 3.54±0.44 mm and 4.47±0.62 mm, respectively, in VR group. The distances between the VA lumen center and midline of the foramen magnum at the level of dural penetration was 10.4±1.13 mm in the PB group and 11.5±1.34 mm in the VR group (P>0.05). VR technology can accurately simulate the anatomical features of the suboccipital

  3. Freshwater Vulnerability beyond Local Water Stress: Heterogeneous Effects of Water-Electricity Nexus Across the Continental United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B; Wang, Chunyan; Font Vivanco, David; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2017-09-05

    Human health and economic prosperity are vulnerable to freshwater shortage in many parts of the world. Despite a growing literature that examines the freshwater vulnerability in various spatiotemporal contexts, existing knowledge has been conventionally constrained by a territorial perspective. On the basis of spatial analyses of monthly water and electricity flows across 2110 watersheds and three interconnected power systems, this study investigates the water-electricity nexus (WEN)'s transboundary effects on freshwater vulnerability in the continental United States in 2014. The effects are shown to be considerable and heterogeneous across time and space. For at least one month a year, 58 million people living in water-abundant watersheds were exposed to additional freshwater vulnerability by relying on electricity generated by freshwater-cooled thermal energy conversion cycles in highly stressed watersheds; for 72 million people living in highly stressed watersheds, their freshwater vulnerability was mitigated by using imported electricity generated in water-abundant watersheds or power plants running dry cooling or using nonfreshwater for cooling purposes. On the country scale, the mitigation effects were the most significant during September and October, while the additional freshwater vulnerability was more significant in February, March, and December. Due to the WEN's transboundary effects, overall, the freshwater vulnerability was slightly worsened within the Eastern Interconnection, substantially improved within the Western Interconnection, and least affected within the ERCOT Interconnection.

  4. Risk Assessment from Heterogeneous Energy Deposition in Tissue. The Problem of Effects from Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, LE; Booz, J

    1992-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation from external or internal sources cause heterogeneous distribution of energy deposition events in the exposed biological system. With the cell being the individual element of the tissue system, the fraction of cells hit, the dose received by the hit, and the biological response of the cell to the dose received eventually determine the effect in tissue. The hit cell may experience detriment, such as change in its DNA leading to a malignant transformation, or it may derive benefit in terms of an adaptive response such as a temporary improvement of DNA repair or temporary prevention of effects from intracellular radicals through enhanced radical detoxification. These responses are protective also to toxic substances that are generated during normal metabolism. Within a multicellular system, the probability of detriment must be weighed 22 against the probability of benefit through adaptive responses with protection against various toxic agents including those produced by normal metabolism. Because irradiation can principally induce both, detriment and adaptive responses, one type of affected cells may not be simply summed up at the expense of cells with others types of effects, in assessing risk to tissue. An inventory of various types of effects in the blood forming system of mammals, even with large ranges of uncertainty, uncovers the possibility of benefit to the system from exposure to low doses of low LET radiation. This experimental approach may complement epidemiological data on individuals exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation and may lead to a more rational appraisal of risk.

  5. The effects of clinical and statistical heterogeneity on the predictive values of results from meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, W G; Rovers, M M; Bonten, M J M; Bootsma, M C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305

    Variance between studies in a meta-analysis will exist. This heterogeneity may be of clinical, methodological or statistical origin. The last of these is quantified by the I(2) -statistic. We investigated, using simulated studies, the accuracy of I(2) in the assessment of heterogeneity and the

  6. Heterogenous Effects of Sports Participation on Education and Labor Market Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorry, Devon

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution of education and labor market benefits from sports participation. Results show that effects are similar across gender, but differ on other dimensions. In particular, participants in team sports show greater gains than those in individual sports. Quantile regressions show that educational gains are larger for…

  7. Student Employment and Persistence: Evidence of Effect Heterogeneity of Student Employment on College Dropout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yool

    2018-01-01

    This study explores how student employment affects college persistence and how these effects differ by individual likelihood of participating in student employment. I analyze data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 using propensity score matching and stratification-multilevel analysis. This study finds that engaging in intense…

  8. Flow resistance interactions on hillslopes with heterogeneous attributes: Effects on runoff hydrograph characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    An improved modeling framework for capturing the effects of dynamic resistance to overland flow is developed for intensively managed landscapes. The framework builds on the WEPP model but it removes the limitations of the “equivalent” plane and static roughness assumption. The enhanced model therefo...

  9. Genetics of susceptibility to leishmaniasis in mice: four novel loci and functional heterogeneity of gene effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Havelková, Helena; Badalová, Jana; Svobodová, M.; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Kurey, Irina; Vladimirov, Vladimir; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2006), s. 220-233 ISSN 1466-4879 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA310/03/1381; GA ČR(CZ) GD310/03/H147 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : leishmaniasis * host response * gene effect Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.533, year: 2006

  10. Linking potential heat source and sink to urban heat island: Heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on land surface temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Cao, Qiwen; Lang, Kun; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-05-15

    Rapid urbanization has significantly contributed to the development of urban heat island (UHI). Regulating landscape composition and configuration would help mitigate the UHI in megacities. Taking Shenzhen, China, as a case study area, we defined heat source and heat sink and identified strong and weak sources as well as strong and weak sinks according to the natural and socioeconomic factors influencing land surface temperature (LST). Thus, the potential thermal contributions of heat source and heat sink patches were differentiated. Then, the heterogeneous effects of landscape pattern on LST were examined by using semiparametric geographically weighted regression (SGWR) models. The results showed that landscape composition has more significant effects on thermal environment than configuration. For a strong source, the percentage of patches has a positive impact on LST. Additionally, when mosaicked with some heat sink, even a small improvement in the degree of dispersion of a strong source helps to alleviate UHI. For a weak source, the percentage and density of patches have positive impacts on LST. For a strong sink, the percentage, density, and degree of aggregation of patches have negative impacts on LST. The effects of edge density and patch shape complexity vary spatially with the fragmentation of a strong sink. Similarly, the impacts of a weak sink are mainly exerted via the characteristics of percent, density, and shape complexity of patches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Note: Effects of adding a viscosity-increasing 2 nm-size molecule on dielectric relaxation features and the dynamic heterogeneity view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouri, Joseph; Johari, G P

    2013-05-21

    To investigate the extent to which dynamic heterogeneity determines the relaxation features, we studied the effect of adding a viscosity-increasing, ∼2 nm size polyhederal oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecule on dielectric relaxation. Addition of POSS increased the relaxation time of the α-process, τ(m,α), and decreased the non-exponential response parameter, β, which is compatible with the dynamic heterogeneity view. But β varied monotonically with the composition, and there was little variation of β with the temperature, which seems incompatible with that view. Effects of adding nm-size particles in simulations may reveal how the size of dynamically heterogeneous regions affects τ(m,α) and β.

  12. Bony manifestation of rickets in a sunny city - a case report from Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhosain Afrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is disease that occurs in growing bones in which defective mineralization occurs in both the bone and the cartilage of the epiphyseal growth plate, resulting in the retardation of growth and skeletal deformities. Rickets is more common in areas with less sunlight. However, this case report presents a case of the bony manifestation of rickets with the intake of vitamin D supplements in Yazd, a city in central Iran that has sunshine almost every day. A patient was referred to an out-patient general pediatric clinic for deformities of the legs and growth disturbance, with his height far below the normal range. The changes that were most evident in his X-rays were the bowing of the long bones of the legs and forearms and the cupping of the wrist metaphyseal region. In summary, we present a patient with bony manifestation of rickets despite living in a sunny area and taking vitamin D supplements. Thus, it is important to remember that rickets is still a common disease among children in Iran. More studies of this issue should be conducted, including the identification of abnormal cases and rescheduling vitamin D supplementation programs.

  13. Bony manifestation of rickets in a sunny city - a case report from Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadhosain Afrand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rickets is disease that occurs in growing bones in which defective mineralization occurs in both the bone and the cartilage of the epiphyseal growth plate, resulting in the retardation of growth and skeletal deformities. Rickets is more common in areas with less sunlight. However, this case report presents a case of the bony manifestation of rickets with the intake of vitamin D supplements in Yazd, a city in central Iran that has sunshine almost every day. A patient was referred to an out-patient general pediatric clinic for deformities of the legs and growth disturbance, with his height far below the normal range. The changes that were most evident in his X-rays were the bowing of the long bones of the legs and forearms and the cupping of the wrist metaphyseal region. In summary, we present a patient with bony manifestation of rickets despite living in a sunny area and taking vitamin D supplements. Thus, it is important to remember that rickets is still a common disease among children in Iran. More studies of this issue should be conducted, including the identification of abnormal cases and rescheduling vitamin D supplementation programs

  14. Results of Bony Chest Wall Reconstruction with Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene Soft Tissue Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibo; Kitano, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The early and long-term outcomes of bony chest wall reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) soft tissue patch remain a concern. No clinical study has reported the shrinkage of Gore-Tex following reconstruction to date. Methods: Thirty-seven patients who underwent bony chest wall reconstruction from 1994 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative chest computed tomography images of 17 patients were examined, and shrinkage of reconstruction materials was measured and compared. Results: Gore-Tex was used for reconstruction in 18 patients, autologous materials were used in 14, Marlex mesh was used in four, and Medifit felt was used in one. No surgery-related deaths were observed. Twenty patients experienced early postoperative complications. Four patients experienced local infection. One patient with Marlex-mesh experienced empyema 33 days postoperatively. Chest drainage time in the Gore-Tex patients was significantly lower than in patients with other types of prosthetic reconstruction. No dislocation or dehiscence was found. Shrinkage of Gore-Tex was absent in 4 patients and acceptable in seven patients. No granulation formation was evident around the Gore-Tex, No significant difference in shrinkage was seen between the different materials used. Conclusion: Chest wall reconstruction with Gore-Tex was feasible with favorable early and long-term results. PMID:25641033

  15. An alternative treatment option for a bony defect from large odontoma using recycled demineralization at chairside

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Odontoma is the most common odontogenic benign tumor, and the treatment of choice is generally surgical removal. After excision, bone grafts may be necessary depending on the need for further treatment, or the size and location of the odontoma. Although the osteogenic capacity of a demineralized tooth was verified as early as 1967 by Urist and many other investigators, the cumbersome procedure, including a long demineralization time, may be less than comfortable for clinicians. A modified ultrasonic technology, with periodic negative pressure and temperature control, facilitated rapid and aseptic preparation of demineralized teeth for bone grafts. This approach reduces the demineralization time dramatically (≤80 minutes), so that the graft material can be prepared chairside on the same day as the extraction. The purpose of this article is to describe two cases of large compound odonotomas used as graft material prepared chairside for enucleation-induced bony defects. These two clinical cases showed favorable wound healing without complications, and good bony support for future dental implants or orthodontic treatment. Finally, this report will suggest the possibility of recycling the benign pathologic hard tissue as an alternative treatment option for conventional bone grafts in clinics. PMID:25922824

  16. Results of bony chest wall reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene soft tissue patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibo; Kitano, Kentaro; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The early and long-term outcomes of bony chest wall reconstruction with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (Gore-Tex) soft tissue patch remain a concern. No clinical study has reported the shrinkage of Gore-Tex following reconstruction to date. Thirty-seven patients who underwent bony chest wall reconstruction from 1994 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative chest computed tomography images of 17 patients were examined, and shrinkage of reconstruction materials was measured and compared. Gore-Tex was used for reconstruction in 18 patients, autologous materials were used in 14, Marlex mesh was used in four, and Medifit felt was used in one. No surgery-related deaths were observed. Twenty patients experienced early postoperative complications. Four patients experienced local infection. One patient with Marlex-mesh experienced empyema 33 days postoperatively. Chest drainage time in the Gore-Tex patients was significantly lower than in patients with other types of prosthetic reconstruction. No dislocation or dehiscence was found. Shrinkage of Gore-Tex was absent in 4 patients and acceptable in seven patients. No granulation formation was evident around the Gore-Tex, No significant difference in shrinkage was seen between the different materials used. Chest wall reconstruction with Gore-Tex was feasible with favorable early and long-term results.

  17. Selected ophthalmic diagnostic tests, bony orbit anatomy, and ocular histology in sambar deer (Rusa unicolor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriá, Arianne P; Gomes Junior, Deusdete C; Oliveira, Alberto Vinícius D; Curvelo, Victor P; Estrela-Lima, Alessandra; Pinna, Melissa H; Meneses, Íris D S; Filho, Emanoel F M; Ofri, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish reference values for diagnostic ophthalmic tests in sambar deer (Rusa unicolor) as well as to describe the most relevant features of the bony orbital anatomy and ocular histology. Twenty healthy animals, free living in a forest reserve, that were captured for clinical evaluation as part of a health survey were evaluated. Schirmer tear test-1 (STT1), conjunctival microbiota, intraocular pressure (IOP), conjunctival cytology, anatomy of the bony orbit, and ocular histology were studied. Mean ± SD STT1 and IOP values were 18.8 ± 4.7 mm and 11.4 ± 2.8 mmHg, respectively. IOP was significantly higher in adult (4-8 years) animals (P = 0.04). Bacterial growth was present in 100% of the samples, with a prevalence for Staphylococcus sp. and Bacillus sp. The conjunctival cytology revealed predominance of columnar epithelial cells with mild pigmentation. The sambar deer orbit is completely encompassed by bone. The ocular histology was very similar to most mammalians. The findings in this study will be useful in the diagnosis of ocular diseases in Rusa unicolor. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  18. Attention and memory evaluation across the life span: heterogeneous effects of age and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, Esther; Ostrosky-Solís, Feggy

    2006-05-01

    The developmental sequences of attention and memory were studied by utilizing normative data derived from the neuropsychological battery named NEUROPSI ATTENTION AND MEMORY. A sample of 521 Spanish-speaking individuals, aged 6 to 85 years, participated in this study. In the adult sample, educational level ranged from 0 to 22 years of education. Data from subtests measuring orientation, attention and concentration, executive functions, working memory, immediate and delayed verbal memory, and immediate and delayed visual memory were included. The factor structure of the analyzed battery is presented. The effects of age and education on this structure were analyzed. Results suggested that although attention and memory are related, their developmental sequences are separated from one another. During childhood, the development of selective and sustained attention, attentional-working memory, and executive functions showed a fast improvement in performance. Development of verbal memory and place and person orientation showed a slower increment in scores. In the adult sample it was found that factors related to memory are sensitive to age, whereas those related to attention and executive functions are sensitive to education. The consideration of both the developmental sequence, as well as differential effects of education, can improve the sensitivity and specificity of neuropsychological measures, allowing early diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction and implementation of adequate rehabilitation programs.

  19. Effective medium approximation for elastic constants of porous solids with microscopic heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berryman, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Formulas for the scattering from an inhomogeneous sphere in a fluid-saturated porous medium are used to construct a self-consistent effective medium approximation for the coefficients in Biot's equations of poroelasticity [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 28, 168 (1956)] when the material constituting the porous solid frame is not homogeneous on the microscopic scale. The discussion is restricted to porous materials exhibiting both macroscopic and microscopic isotropy. Brown and Korringa [Geophysics 40, 608 (1975)] have previously found the general form of these coefficients. The present results give explicit estimates of all the coefficients in terms of the moduli of the solid constituents. The results are also shown to be completely consistent with the well-known results of Gassmann and of Biot and Willis, as well as those of Brown and Korringa

  20. Risk Reduction of Breast Cancer by Childbirth, Breastfeeding, and Their Interaction in Korean Women: Heterogeneous Effects Across Menopausal Status, Hormone Receptor Status, and Pathological Subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Hun Jeong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of childbirth, breastfeeding, and their interaction with breast cancer (BC risk reduction, and to evaluate the heterogeneity in the BC risk reduction effects of these factors by menopause, hormone receptor (HR status, and pathological subtype. Methods BC patients aged 40+ from the Korean Breast Cancer Registry in 2004-2012 and controls from the Health Examinee cohort participants were included in this study after 1:1 matching (12 889 pairs by age and enrollment year. BC risk according to childbirth, breastfeeding, and their interaction was calculated in logistic regression models using odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results BC risk decreased with childbirth (3+ childbirths relative to 1 childbirth: OR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.56 to 0.78 and OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.95 in postmenopausal and premenopausal women, respectively; and the degree of risk reduction by the number of children was heterogeneous according to menopausal status (p-heterogeneity=0.04, HR status (p-heterogeneity<0.001, and pathological subtype (p-heterogeneity<0.001; whereas breastfeeding for 1-12 months showed a heterogeneous association with BC risk according to menopausal status, with risk reduction only in premenopausal women (p-heterogeneity<0.05. The combination of 2 more childbirths and breastfeeding for ≥13 months had a much stronger BC risk reduction of 49% (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.58. Conclusions This study suggests that the combination of longer breastfeeding and more childbirths reduces BC risk more strongly, and that women who experience both 2 or more childbirths and breastfeed for ≥13 months can reduce their BC risk by about 50%.

  1. Heterogeneous effects of market integration on sub-adult body size and nutritional status among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlacher, Samuel S; Liebert, Melissa A; Josh Snodgrass, J; Blackwell, Aaron D; Cepon-Robins, Tara J; Gildner, Theresa E; Madimenos, Felicia C; Amir, Dorsa; Bribiescas, Richard G; Sugiyama, Lawrence S

    2016-07-01

    Market integration (MI)-increasing production for and consumption from a market-based economy-is drastically altering traditional ways of life and environmental conditions among indigenous Amazonian peoples. The effects of MI on the biology and health of Amazonian children and adolescents, however, remain unclear. This study examines the impact of MI on sub-adult body size and nutritional status at the population, regional and household levels among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Anthropometric data were collected between 2005-2014 from 2164 Shuar (aged 2-19 years) living in two geographic regions differing in general degree of MI. High-resolution household economic, lifestyle and dietary data were collected from a sub-sample of 631 participants. Analyses were performed to investigate relationships between body size and year of data collection, region and specific aspects of household MI. Results from temporal and regional analyses suggest that MI has a significant and overall positive impact on Shuar body size and nutritional status. However, household-level results exhibit nuanced and heterogeneous specific effects of MI underlying these overarching relationships. This study provides novel insight into the complex socio-ecological pathways linking MI, physical growth and health among the Shuar and other indigenous Amazonian populations.

  2. Heterogeneous effects of market integration on subadult body size and nutritional status among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urlacher, Samuel S.; Liebert, Melissa A.; Snodgrass, J. Josh; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Cepon-Robins, Tara J.; Gildner, Theresa E.; Madimenos, Felicia C.; Amir, Dorsa; Bribiescas, Richard G.; Sugiyama, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Market integration (MI) – increasing production for and consumption from a market-based economy – is drastically altering traditional ways of life and environmental conditions among indigenous Amazonian peoples. The effects of MI on the biology and health of Amazonian children and adolescents, however, remain unclear. Aim This study examines the impact of MI on subadult body size and nutritional status at the population, regional, and household levels among the Shuar of Amazonian Ecuador. Subjects and Methods Anthropometric data were collected between 2005 and 2014 from 2,164 Shuar (age 2-19 years) living in two geographic regions differing in general degree of MI. High-resolution household economic, lifestyle, and dietary data were collected from a subsample of 631 participants. Analyses were performed to investigate relationships between body size and year of data collection, region, and specific aspects of household MI. Results Results from temporal and regional analyses suggest that MI has a significant and overall positive impact on Shuar body size and nutritional status. However, household-level results exhibit nuanced and heterogeneous specific effects of MI underlying these overarching relationships. Conclusion This study provides novel insight into the complex socio-ecological pathways linking MI, physical growth, and health among the Shuar and other indigenous Amazonian populations. PMID:27230632

  3. Final technical report: The effect of physical and chemical heterogeneities in a porous medium on the transport of bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornberger, George M.; Mills, Aaron L.; Herman, Janet S.

    2001-04-01

    Among the demonstrated processes influencing the transport of bacteria through aquifers, the deposition of cells on mineral surfaces is one of the most important. Heterogeneous distribution of aquifer properties such as mineral-grain oxide coatings and preferred flow paths can control the numbers of microbes arriving a point down gradient from their injection, and these properties can also affect the distribution of the organisms remaining in the sedimentary matrix. The distribution of metal oxide coatings affects the final location of retained cells within the matrix but had no effect on total breakthrough of applied bacteria. We were able to demonstrate transverse mixing of both conservative tracers and bacteria between regions of differing hydraulic conductivity; the conservative tracer could be used to model the transverse mixing of the bacteria. We were able to show that the presence of metal oxide coatings on aquifer surfaces retarded a reactive tracer (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that simulated bacterial retardation in the laboratory. When metal oxide coatings were absent (due to bacterial establishment of a reducing environment) the tracer and bacteria were not retarded. The effect was reproduced in a tracer experiment done in the field. The results suggest that bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by a number of interrelated and confounding factors that prevent accurate prediction of transport given the present state of knowledge.

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using 125 I-ANP 8-33 . Specific 125 I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP

  5. Patterns of congenital bony spinal deformity and associated neural anomalies on X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenga, Anthony P; Singla, Anuj; Feger, Mark A; Abel, Mark F

    2016-08-01

    Congenital malformations of the bony vertebral column are often accompanied by spinal cord anomalies; these observations have been reinforced with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We hypothesized that the incidence of cord anomalies will increase as the number and complexity of bony vertebral abnormalities increases. All patients aged ≤13 years (n = 75) presenting to the pediatric spine clinic from 2003-2013 with congenital bony spinal deformity and both radiographs and MRI were analyzed retrospectively for bone and neural pathology. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare groups for categorical dependent variables. Independent t tests were used for continuous dependent variables. Significance was set at p formation had a higher incidence of cord anomalies (73 %) than failures of formation (50 %) or segmentation (45 %) alone (p = 0.065). Deformities in the sacrococcygeal area had the highest rate of spinal cord anomalies (13 of 15 patients, 87 %). In 35 cases (47 %), MRI revealed additional bony anomalies that were not seen on the radiographs. As the number of bony malformations increased, we found a higher incidence of cord anomalies. Clinicians should have increased suspicion of spinal cord pathology in the presence of mixed failures of segmentation and formation.

  6. Repair of pars defects by segmental transverse wiring for athletes with symptomatic spondylolysis: relationship between bony union and postoperative symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hioki, Akira; Miyamoto, Kei; Sadamasu, Aya; Nozawa, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Fushimi, Kazunari; Hosoe, Hideo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2012-04-20

    Retrospective study of surgery for spondylolysis patients. To assess clinical outcome of bony union using multislice computed tomography after segmental wiring fixation. How bony union affects surgical outcome of spondylolysis repair is unclear. Forty-four athletes with symptomatic spondylolysis (33 men and 11 women; mean age, 24.2 ± 5.4 years) who underwent segmental wiring fixation were evaluated retrospectively at a mean follow-up of 85 ± 17 months. The level of spondylolysis was L5 in 42 cases, and both L4 and L5 in 2 cases, giving a total of 46 operative levels of vertebrae. Bony union using axial and sagittal reconstruction images of computed tomography, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for back pain, and complications were reviewed. State of bony union was classified as bilateral union, unilateral union, or nonunion. The total score and the improvement ratio of the JOA score were compared among the 3 groups. Bilateral bony union was obtained in 29 cases (31 of 46 vertebrae, 67.4%). Six cases (13%) showed unilateral union, and 9 cases (19.6%) showed nonunion. JOA score increased significantly after surgery in all groups, average improvement rate was 78.9% in the bilateral group, 63.6% in the unilateral group, and 29.8% in the nonunion group; differences among the 3 groups were significant (P spondylolysis repair.

  7. The effect of ozone on nicotine desorption from model surfaces:evidence for heterogeneous chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Lee, Sharon K.; Gundel, LaraA.

    2005-05-01

    Assessment of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure using nicotine as a tracer or biomarker is affected by sorption of the alkaloid to indoor surfaces and by its long-term re-emission into the gas phase. However, surface chemical interactions of nicotine have not been sufficiently characterized. Here, the reaction of ozone with nicotine sorbed to Teflon and cotton surfaces was investigated in an environmental chamber by monitoring nicotine desorption over a week following equilibration in dry or humid air (65-70 % RH). The Teflon and cotton surfaces had N{sub 2}-BET surface areas of 0.19 and 1.17 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, and water mass uptakes (at 70 % RH) of 0 and 7.1 % respectively. Compared with dry air baseline levels in the absence of O{sub 3}, gas phase nicotine concentrations decrease, by 2 orders of magnitude for Teflon after 50 h at 20-45 ppb O{sub 3}, and by a factor of 10 for cotton after 100 h with 13-15 ppb O{sub 3}. The ratios of pseudo first-order rate constants for surface reaction (r) to long-term desorption (k) were r/k = 3.5 and 2.0 for Teflon and cotton surfaces, respectively. These results show that surface oxidation was competitive with desorption. Hence, oxidative losses could significantly reduce long-term re-emissions of nicotine from indoor surfaces. Formaldehyde, N-methylformamide, nicotinaldehyde and cotinine were identified as oxidation products, indicating that the pyrrolidinic N was the site of electrophilic attack by O{sub 3}. The presence of water vapor had no effect on the nicotine-O{sub 3} reaction on Teflon surfaces. By contrast, nicotine desorption from cotton in humid air was unaffected by the presence of ozone. These observations are consistent with complete inhibition of ozone-nicotine surface reactions in an aqueous surface film present in cotton but not in Teflon surfaces.

  8. Bony reconstruction of hip in cerebral palsy children Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III to V: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sobky, Tamer A; Fayyad, Tamer A; Kotb, Ahmed M; Kaldas, Beshoy

    2018-05-01

    Hip dislocation is a common source of disability in cerebral palsy children. It has been remedied by various reconstructive procedures. This review aims at providing the best evidence for bony reconstructive procedures in cerebral palsy hip migration. The literature extraction process yielded 36 articles for inclusion in this review. There is fair evidence to indicate that the comparative effectiveness of femoral versus combined pelvifemoral reconstruction favours pelvifemoral reconstruction. All except one were retrospective articles with a significant degree of selection and performance bias and confounding variables that limited the validity and generalizability of the conclusions. The findings of this systematic review provide fair evidence for the use of adequate soft tissue and combined pelvifemoral reconstruction in the management of hip migration in none and minimally ambulatory cerebral palsy children in the short and long term. This has been shown in studies with a summed sizable patient population. There is limited evidence available that would support the use of soft-tissue and isolated femoral reconstruction. In the context of these retrospective and biased studies, it is extremely difficult to identify, with great precision, predictors of surgical success. Future studies should consider prospective designs that allow for bias control, strict patient selection criteria and incorporation of validated quality-of-life scales.

  9. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibel, R; Avramoglou, T; Garcia, A; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid-base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie-Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fine root mercury heterogeneity: metabolism of lower-order roots as an effective route for mercury removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-Jian; Guo, Ying-Ying; Guo, Da-Li; Yin, Sen-Lu; Kong, De-Liang; Liu, Yang-Sheng; Zeng, Hui

    2012-01-17

    Fine roots are critical components for plant mercury (Hg) uptake and removal, but the patterns of Hg distribution and turnover within the heterogeneous fine root components and their potential limiting factors are poorly understood. Based on root branching structure, we studied the total Hg (THg) and its cellular partitioning in fine roots in 6 Chinese subtropical trees species and the impacts of root morphological and stoichiometric traits on Hg partitioning. The THg concentration generally decreased with increasing root order, and was higher in cortex than in stele. This concentration significantly correlated with root length, diameter, specific root length, specific root area, and nitrogen concentration, whereas its cytosolic fraction (accounting for root carbon and sulfur concentrations. The estimated Hg return flux from dead fine roots outweighed that from leaf litter, and ephemeral first-order roots that constituted 7.2-22.3% of total fine root biomass may have contributed most to this flux (39-71%, depending on tree species and environmental substrate). Our results highlight the high capacity of Hg stabilization and Hg return by lower-order roots and demonstrate that turnover of lower-order roots may be an effective strategy of detoxification in perennial tree species.

  11. A safe, efficient and cost effective process for removing petroleum hydrocarbons from a highly heterogeneous and relatively inaccessible shoreline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Turlough F

    2015-10-01

    A rocky, intractable and highly heterogeneous, intertidal zone, was contaminated from a diesel fuel spill that occurred during refuelling of a grader used in road construction, on an operational mine's shiploading facility. A practical, cost-effective, and safer (to personnel by avoiding drilling and earthworks), and non-invasive sampling and remediation strategy was designed and implemented since the location and nature of the impacted geology (rock fill) and sediment, precluded conventional ex-situ and any in-situ treatment where drilling would be required. Enhanced biostimulation with surfactant, available N & P (which were highly constrained), and increased aeration, increased the degradation rate from no discernable change for 2 years post-spill, to 170 mg/kg/day; the maximum degradation rate after intervention. While natural attenuation was ineffective in this application, the low-cost, biostimulation intervention proved successful, allowing the site owner to meet their regulatory obligations. Petroleum hydrocarbons (aliphatic fraction) decreased from ∼20,000 mg/kg to <200 mg/kg at the completion of 180 weeks of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The interactions of squalene, alkanes and other mineral oils with model membranes; effects on membrane heterogeneity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richens, Joanna L; Lane, Jordan S; Mather, Melissa L; O'Shea, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) offer many favourable facets as an artificial membrane system but the influence of any residual oil that remains in the bilayer following preparation is ill-defined. In this study the fluorescent membrane probes di-8-butyl-amino-naphthyl-ethylene-pyridinium-propyl-sulfonate (Di-8-ANEPPS) and Fluoresceinphosphatidylethanolamine (FPE) were used to help understand the nature of the phospholipid-oil interaction and to examine any structural and functional consequences of such interactions on membrane bilayer properties. Concentration-dependent modifications of the membrane dipole potential were found to occur in phospholipid vesicles exposed to a variety of different oils. Incorporation of oil into the lipid bilayer was shown to have no significant effect on the movement of fatty acids across the lipid bilayer. Changes in membrane heterogeneity were, however, demonstrated with increased microdomain formation being visible in the bilayer following exposure to mineral oil, pentadecane and squalene. As it is important that artificial systems provide an accurate representation of the membrane environment, careful consideration should be taken prior to the application of DIBs in studies of membrane structure and organisation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aggregation effects on tritium-based mean transit times and young water fractions in spatially heterogeneous catchments and groundwater systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Stewart

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kirchner (2016a demonstrated that aggregation errors due to spatial heterogeneity, represented by two homogeneous subcatchments, could cause severe underestimation of the mean transit times (MTTs of water travelling through catchments when simple lumped parameter models were applied to interpret seasonal tracer cycle data. Here we examine the effects of such errors on the MTTs and young water fractions estimated using tritium concentrations in two-part hydrological systems. We find that MTTs derived from tritium concentrations in streamflow are just as susceptible to aggregation bias as those from seasonal tracer cycles. Likewise, groundwater wells or springs fed by two or more water sources with different MTTs will also have aggregation bias. However, the transit times over which the biases are manifested are different because the two methods are applicable over different time ranges, up to 5 years for seasonal tracer cycles and up to 200 years for tritium concentrations. Our virtual experiments with two water components show that the aggregation errors are larger when the MTT differences between the components are larger and the amounts of the components are each close to 50 % of the mixture. We also find that young water fractions derived from tritium (based on a young water threshold of 18 years are almost immune to aggregation errors as were those derived from seasonal tracer cycles with a threshold of about 2 months.

  14. Effect of ozonation combined with heterogeneous catalysts and ultraviolet radiation on recycling of gas-station wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman A. Emam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozonation is extensively applied in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater due to the powerful oxidation potential of ozone. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation (HCO of wastewater proceeds through hydroxyl radicals as the oxidation species. The effect of ozonation alone and combined with catalysts in the presence and absence of UV-radiation was investigated to reuse the biologically pretreated gas-station wastewater instead of fresh water. Two types of catalysts: titanium dioxide (TiO2 and activated carbon (AC were studied. The concentration of catalyst, dark adsorption, reaction time and the improvement of biodegradability were studied. The combination of catalysts and ozonation reveals a significant improvement in the removal of contaminants present in wastewater by using the ozonation, adsorption or photocatalysis systems. Maximum dissolved organic carbon (DOC removal of 91% was achieved by the combination of ozone, TiO2 and the UV-radiation system. But, an increase in biodegradability from 0.12 to 0.33 was realised with ozone and the TiO2 system. Furthermore, the biodegradability was increased with increasing catalyst concentration combined with ozone up to 1 g/L with TiO2 and 0.5 g/L with AC.

  15. Effect of Heterogeneity in Coal Ash Chemical Composition on the Onset of Conditions Favorable for Agglomeration in Fluid Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditi B. Khadilkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ash agglomeration issues that arise due to the sticking of slag-wetted, colliding particles have been creating operational difficulties and monetary losses for the fluidized bed combustion (FBC industry. Difficulties have been experienced in the detection of slag-liquid at the low operating temperatures in fluidized bed combustors (FBCs and predicting the agglomeration behavior of fuel. This study aims to study the effect of heterogeneity in ash composition on the detection of slag-liquid in FBCs. It quantifies the slag-liquid amounts at the particle-level, under oxidizing environments, by dividing the bulk fuel into density classes. FactSage™ thermodynamic simulations of each of the particle classes, along with experimental validation of the trends with thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA and high temperature X-ray diffraction (HT-XRD were performed. The results obtained can be used to estimate the stickiness of particles in the development of ash agglomeration models based on particle collisions. The study of these particle classes shows that particle classes with specific minerals can form low temperature eutectics and lead to onset of slag-liquid formation at temperatures below those predicted by bulk analysis alone. Comparison of the differences in slag-liquid formation tendencies under reducing and oxidizing environments is also presented.

  16. The bony labyrinth of the middle Pleistocene Sima de los Huesos hominins (Sierra de Atapuerca, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quam, Rolf; Lorenzo, Carlos; Martínez, Ignacio; Gracia-Téllez, Ana; Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2016-01-01

    We performed 3D virtual reconstructions based on CT scans to study the bony labyrinth morphology in 14 individuals from the large middle Pleistocene hominin sample from the site of the Sima de los Huesos (SH) in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins represent early members of the Neandertal clade and provide an opportunity to compare the data with the later in time Neandertals, as well as Pleistocene and recent humans more broadly. The Atapuerca (SH) hominins do not differ from the Neandertals in any of the variables related to the absolute and relative sizes and shape of the semicircular canals. Indeed, the entire Neandertal clade seems to be characterized by a derived pattern of canal proportions, including a relatively small posterior canal and a relatively large lateral canal. In contrast, one of the most distinctive features observed in Neandertals, the low placement of the posterior canal (i.e., high sagittal labyrinthine index), is generally not present in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins. This low placement is considered a derived feature in Neandertals and is correlated with a more vertical orientation of the ampullar line (LSCm  PPp), and third part of the facial canal (LSCm < FC3). Some variation is present within the Atapuerca (SH) sample, however, with a few individuals approaching the Neandertal condition more closely. In addition, the cochlear shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins is low, indicating a reduction in the height of the cochlea. Although the phylogenetic polarity of this feature is less clear, the low shape index in the Atapuerca (SH) hominins may be a derived feature. Regardless, cochlear height subsequently increased in Neandertals. In contrast to previous suggestions, the expanded data in the present study indicate no difference across the genus Homo in the angle of inclination of the cochlear basal turn (COs < LSCm). Principal components analysis largely confirms these observations. While not

  17. Heterogeneous effects of antiepileptic drugs in an in vitro epilepsy model--a functional multineuron calcium imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yoshie; Takasu, Keiko; Ikegaya, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ogawa, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease characterised by recurrent seizures. Many studies of this disease have focused on local neuronal activity, such as local field potentials in the brain. In addition, several recent studies have elucidated the collective behavior of individual neurons in a neuronal network that emits epileptic activity. However, little is known about the effects of antiepileptic drugs on neuronal networks during seizure-like events (SLEs) at single-cell resolution. Using functional multineuron Ca(2+) imaging (fMCI), we monitored the activities of multiple neurons in the rat hippocampal CA1 region on treatment with the proconvulsant bicuculline under Mg(2+) -free conditions. Bicuculline induced recurrent synchronous Ca(2+) influx, and the events were correlated with SLEs. Other proconvulsants, such as 4-aminopyridine, pentetrazol, and pilocarpine, also induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. We found that the antiepileptic drugs phenytoin, flupirtine, and ethosuximide, which have different mechanisms of action, exerted heterogeneous effects on bicuculline-induced synchronous Ca(2+) influx. Phenytoin and flupirtine significantly decreased the peak, the amount of Ca(2+) influx and the duration of synchronous events in parallel with the duration of SLEs, whereas they did not abolish the synchronous events themselves. Ethosuximide increased the duration of synchronous Ca(2+) influx and SLEs. Furthermore, the magnitude of the inhibitory effect of phenytoin on the peak synchronous Ca(2+) influx level differed according to the peak amplitude of the synchronous event in each individual cell. Evaluation of the collective behavior of individual neurons by fMCI seems to be a powerful tool for elucidating the profiles of antiepileptic drugs. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Spatial Heterogeneity of Climate Change Effects on Dominant Height of Larch Plantations in Northern and Northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Determining the response of dominant height growth to climate change is important for understanding adaption strategies. Based on 550 permanent plots from a national forest inventory and climate data across seven provinces and three climate zones, we developed a climate-sensitive dominant height growth model under a mixed-effects model framework. The mean temperature of the wettest quarter and precipitation of the wettest month were found to be statistically significant explanatory variables that markedly improved model performance. Generally, future climate change had a positive effect on stand dominant height in northern and northeastern China, but the effect showed high spatial variability linked to local climatic conditions. The range in dominant height difference between the current climate and three future BC-RCP scenarios would change from −0.61 m to 1.75 m (−6.9% to 13.5% during the period 2041–2060 and from −1.17 m to 3.28 m (−9.1% to 41.0% during the period 2061–2080 across provinces. The impacts of climate change on stand dominant height decreased as stand age increased. Forests in cold and warm temperate zones had a smaller decrease in dominant height, owing to climate change, compared with those in the mid temperate zone. Overall, future climate change could impact dominant height growth in northern and northeastern China. As spatial heterogeneity of climate change affects dominant height growth, locally specific mitigation measures should be considered in forest management.

  19. Standalone Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Versus Combination with Foraminotomy for the Treatment of Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy Secondary to Bony Foraminal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qunfeng; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Bangke; Jiang, Jiayao; Guo, Xiang; Lu, Xuhua; Ni, Bin

    2016-11-01

    To compare the results of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with anterior cervical foraminotomy (ACF) and standalone ACDF for the treatment of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR). The data of 24 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF combined with ACF for significant bony foraminal stenosis were reviewed. The clinical outcomes, including visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck pain and arm pain and Neck Disability Index, were evaluated by questionnaires. Radiologic outcomes as manifested by C2-7 angle and surgical segmental angle were recorded. The outcomes were compared with outcomes of standalone ACDF for CSR secondary to posterolateral spurs. At the final follow-up evaluation, all patients obtained bone fusion. No patient developed adjacent segment disease. Operative time was longer and blood loss was more in the ACDF combined with ACF group than in the ACDF group (all P 0.05). For CSR with foraminal stenosis secondary to significant bony pathology that cannot be managed with standalone ACDF, ACDF combined with ACF is an effective and safe treatment strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of the Bony External Auditory Canal: A Rare Tumor in a Rare Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasija Arechvo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors originating from ceruminous glands are rare lesions of the external auditory canal. The lack of specific clinical and radiological signs makes their diagnosis challenging. We report the case of an exceptionally rare benign tumor, a syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP, in an atypical location in the bony segment of the external auditory canal with uncommon clinical signs. The special traits of the case included the following: the most lateral component of the tumor was macroscopically cystic and a granular myringitis with an obstructing keratin mass plug was observed behind the mass. The clinical, audiological, radiological, and histological characteristics of the neoplasm are consequently presented. Intraoperative diagnosis of the epidermal cyst was proposed. The final diagnosis of SCAP was determined only by histological analysis after the surgical excision. The educational aspects of the case are critically discussed.

  1. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  2. PrimaryiIntraosseousm meningioma in the orbital bony wall: A case report and review of the literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Jae; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Kim, Hong Dae; Lee, Kwang Hwi; Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Ok Hwa; Yoon, Jung Hee; Kim, Ji Yeon [Dept. of Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi; Kim, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Meningiomas arising outside the intracranial compartment are known as extradural meningiomas. Extradural meningiomas are rare conditions, accounting for less than 2% of all meningiomas. Primary intraosseous meningioma is used to describe a subset of extradural meningiomas arising from bone. A 46-year-old woman presented with left exophthalmos. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images revealed an expansile bony lesion in the orbital lateral wall of the left sphenoid bone. The patient underwent craniotomy for excision of the bony lesion. Pathologic examination revealed an intraosseous meningioma.

  3. The Novel HSP90 inhibitor, IPI-493, is highly effective in human gastrostrointestinal stromal tumor xenografts carrying heterogeneous KIT mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Giuseppe; Sciot, Raf; Wozniak, Agnieszka; Van Looy, Thomas; Wellens, Jasmien; Faa, Gavino; Normant, Emmanuel; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; Schöffski, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    KIT activity is crucial for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Imatinib (IMA) and sunitinib (SUN) are very effective KIT-inhibitors in patients with advanced GIST but have no curative potential. We evaluated the efficacy of the novel HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 alone, or in combination with IMA or SUN in GIST xenografts with KIT mutations. Nude mice (n = 98) were grafted bilaterally with human GIST carrying KIT exon 11 (GIST-PSW), KIT exon 9 (GIST-BOE), or double, KIT imatinib-sensitive exon 11 and imatinib-resistant exon 17 mutations (GIST-48). Mice were divided into six treatment groups and dosed orally for 15 days as follows: (i) control group, sterile water; (ii) IMA alone; (iii) SUN alone; (iv) IPI-493 alone; (v) IPI-493+IMA; and (vi) IPI-493+SUN. Treatment with IPI-493 resulted in tumor growth stabilization, variable proliferation arrest, induction of apoptosis and necrosis, and downregulation of KIT and its signaling cascade, especially in the GIST-BOE model. Significant reduction of vessel density was observed with IPI-493 treatment, and was equal to SUN treatment in GIST-PSW and GIST-BOE xenografts. IPI-493 treatment effects were enhanced in combination with TKIs, especially with IPI-493+SUN. In our hands, IPI-493 showed dose-dependent liver damages. When administered as a single agent in a xenograft model, the HSP90 inhibitor IPI-493 has consistent antitumor activity and induces KIT downregulation in GISTs with heterogeneous KIT mutations. IPI-493 synergizes with TKIs that are commonly used for the treatment of advanced or IMA-resistant GIST. The antitumor response of IPI-493 is particularly enhanced in combination with SUN. ©2011 AACR.

  4. A clinico-radiologic study of bony remodeling of the fractured condyles in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jeong Shin; Park, Chang Seo

    1995-01-01

    Bony remodeling pattern of condyle fractures in children are different from in adult for growing of condyle, also might affect treatment and prognosis of the condyle fracture. Subjects of this clinical and radiologic study were 26 temporomandibular joints diagnosed as condyle fracture in 23 patients under 15 years old age, They were treated with conservative method at Dental Hospital of Yonsei University from Jan., 1986 to Oct., 1994. Bony remodeling related with fracture pattern was evaluated. The results obtained are as follows: 1. The ratio of male to female in patients with condyle fracture was 1 : 0.9 and the difference of sex ratio was not noted. Comparing with preschool-age group and school-age group, age frequency was higher in preschool-age group (83%). 2. Fallen down (54%) was the most frequent cause of condyle fractures. Traffic accident and slip down were followed. 3. The most common clinical sign of condyle fractures was tenderness to palpation (19 cases). Mouth opening limitation (17 cases), swelling (7 cases), malocclusion (3 cases) were next in order. 4. According to sites of condyle fractures, unilateral fractures were in 20 patients and bilateral fractures in 3 patients, therefore total 23 patients-26 cases of condyle fracture were observed. According to fracture distribution, condyle fractures were in 10 patients (44%). Condyle fractures with symphysis fracture (9 patients, 39%), condyle fractures with ascending ramus fracture (2 patients, 9%), condyle fracture with mandibular body fracture (1 patient, 4%), and condyle fractures with mandibular angle fracture (1 patient, 4%) were followed. 5. In displacement pattern of fractured fragment of mandibular condyle, displacement (17 cases, 66%) was most common. Dislocation (5 cases, 19%) and deviation (4 cases, 15%) were next in order. 6. During the observation period of fractured condyles, remodeling patterns of fracture sites related with articular fossa were observed with usual congealer shape in 23

  5. Modeling hypothermia induced effects for the heterogeneous ventricular tissue from cellular level to the impact on the ECG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Kienast

    Full Text Available Hypothermia has a profound impact on the electrophysiological mechanisms of the heart. Experimental investigations provide a better understanding of electrophysiological alterations associated with cooling. However, there is a lack of computer models suitable for simulating the effects of hypothermia in cardio-electrophysiology. In this work, we propose a model that describes the cooling-induced electrophysiological alterations in ventricular tissue in a temperature range from 27°C to 37°C. To model the electrophysiological conditions in a 3D left ventricular tissue block it was essential to consider the following anatomical and physiological parameters in the model: the different cell types (endocardial, M, epicardial, the heterogeneous conductivities in longitudinal, transversal and transmural direction depending on the prevailing temperature, the distinct fiber orientations and the transmural repolarization sequences. Cooling-induced alterations on the morphology of the action potential (AP of single myocardial cells thereby are described by an extension of the selected Bueno-Orovio model for human ventricular tissue using Q10 temperature coefficients. To evaluate alterations on tissue level, the corresponding pseudo electrocardiogram (pECG was calculated. Simulations show that cooling-induced AP and pECG-related parameters, i.e. AP duration, morphology of the notch of epicardial AP, maximum AP upstroke velocity, AP rise time, QT interval, QRS duration and J wave formation are in good accordance with literature and our experimental data. The proposed model enables us to further enhance our knowledge of cooling-induced electrophysiological alterations from cellular to tissue level in the heart and may help to better understand electrophysiological mechanisms, e.g. in arrhythmias, during hypothermia.

  6. Pore-network model of evaporation-induced salt precipitation in porous media: The effect of correlations and heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtian, Hassan; Shokri, Nima; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Salt transport and precipitation in porous media constitute a set of complex and fascinating phenomena that are of considerable interest to several important problems, ranging from storage of CO2 in geological formations, to soil fertility, and protection of pavements and roads, as well as historical monuments. The phenomena occur at the pore scale and are greatly influenced by the heterogeneity of the pore space morphology. We present a pore-network (PN) model to study the phenomena. Vapor diffusion, capillary effect at the brine-vapor interface, flow of brine, and transport of salt and its precipitation in the pores that plug the pores partially or completely are all accounted for. The drying process is modeled by the invasion percolation, while transport of salt in brine is accounted for by the convective-diffusion equation. We demonstrate that the drying patterns, the clustering and connectivity of the pore throats in which salt precipitation occurs, the saturation distribution, and the drying rate are all strongly dependent upon the pore-size distribution, the correlations among the pore sizes, and the anisotropy of the pore space caused by stratification that most natural porous media contain. In particular, if the strata are more or less parallel to the direction of injection of the gas that dries out the pore space (air, for example) and/or causes salt precipitation (CO2, for example), the drying rate increases significantly. Moreover, salt tends to precipitate in clusters of neighboring pores that are parallel to the open surface of the porous medium.

  7. A comparison of the use of bony anatomy and internal markers for offline verification and an evaluation of the potential benefit of online and offline verification protocols for prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Helen A; Hansen, Vibeke N; Parker, Christopher C; Evans, Phil M; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S; Thompson, Alan C; Dearnaley, David P

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion.

  8. Effects of sulphur pollution on forest floor invertebrates (community structure, structural heterogeneity, edge effects, decomposition, Callioplus euoplus, Pterostichus adstrictus, Scaphinotus marginatus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcamo, H. A.

    1997-12-31

    The distribution of insects and other invertebrates was studied in forests under varying regimes of exposure to sulfur compounds in the vicinity of two sour gas plants and at sharp acidification gradients in pine and aspen forests located near a sulfur block. Results showed no effect on most invertebrates at moderate levels of sulfur deposition. At this level, structural heterogeneity of the forest floor was more influential than sulfur levels in determining the macroarthropoid community structure. By contrast, high sulphur contamination and subsequent acidification had a clear negative effect on earthworms, and various species of spiders. Ground beetles and certain epigeic spiders along the sharp acidification gradient at the pine forest were considered vulnerable but resistant and favoured. These results suggested that ecological specialists were most vulnerable to acidification effects, while ecological generalists have been more successful in resisting the effects of acidification. It was also shown that indirect effects at the landscape, habitat or forest type, and microhabitat level, were more important in the case of most of the arthropods than the direct effects. Only earthworms, snails and some Collembola were negatively affected through direct acidity effects.

  9. Effects of sulphur pollution on forest floor invertebrates (community structure, structural heterogeneity, edge effects, decomposition, Callioplus euoplus, Pterostichus adstrictus, Scaphinotus marginatus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcamo, H. A.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of insects and other invertebrates was studied in forests under varying regimes of exposure to sulfur compounds in the vicinity of two sour gas plants and at sharp acidification gradients in pine and aspen forests located near a sulfur block. Results showed no effect on most invertebrates at moderate levels of sulfur deposition. At this level, structural heterogeneity of the forest floor was more influential than sulfur levels in determining the macroarthropoid community structure. By contrast, high sulphur contamination and subsequent acidification had a clear negative effect on earthworms, and various species of spiders. Ground beetles and certain epigeic spiders along the sharp acidification gradient at the pine forest were considered vulnerable but resistant and favoured. These results suggested that ecological specialists were most vulnerable to acidification effects, while ecological generalists have been more successful in resisting the effects of acidification. It was also shown that indirect effects at the landscape, habitat or forest type, and microhabitat level, were more important in the case of most of the arthropods than the direct effects. Only earthworms, snails and some Collembola were negatively affected through direct acidity effects

  10. Statistical Analysis of Spatiotemporal Heterogeneity of the Distribution of Air Quality and Dominant Air Pollutants and the Effect Factors in Qingdao Urban Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution has impacted people’s lives in urban China, and the analysis of the distribution and driving factors behind air quality has become a current research focus. In this study, the temporal heterogeneity of air quality (AQ and the dominant air pollutants across the four seasons were analyzed based on the Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum test method. Then, the spatial heterogeneity of AQ and the dominant air pollutants across four sites were analyzed based on the Wilcoxon signed-rank test method. Finally, the copula model was introduced to analyze the effect of relative factors on dominant air pollutants. The results show that AQ and dominant air pollutants present significant spatiotemporal heterogeneity in the study area. AQ is worst in winter and best in summer. PM10, O3, and PM2.5 are the dominant air pollutants in spring, summer, and winter, respectively. The average concentration of dominant air pollutants presents significant and diverse daily peaks and troughs across the four sites. The main driving factors are pollutants such as SO2, NO2, and CO, so pollutant emission reduction is the key to improving air quality. Corresponding pollution control measures should account for this heterogeneity in terms of AQ and the dominant air pollutants among different urban zones.

  11. Differing effects of attention in single-units and populations are well predicted by heterogeneous tuning and the normalization model of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yuko; Pestilli, Franco; Gardner, Justin L

    2014-01-01

    Single-unit measurements have reported many different effects of attention on contrast-response (e.g., contrast-gain, response-gain, additive-offset dependent on visibility), while functional imaging measurements have more uniformly reported increases in response across all contrasts (additive-offset). The normalization model of attention elegantly predicts the diversity of effects of attention reported in single-units well-tuned to the stimulus, but what predictions does it make for more realistic populations of neurons with heterogeneous tuning? Are predictions in accordance with population-scale measurements? We used functional imaging data from humans to determine a realistic ratio of attention-field to stimulus-drive size (a key parameter for the model) and predicted effects of attention in a population of model neurons with heterogeneous tuning. We found that within the population, neurons well-tuned to the stimulus showed a response-gain effect, while less-well-tuned neurons showed a contrast-gain effect. Averaged across the population, these disparate effects of attention gave rise to additive-offsets in contrast-response, similar to reports in human functional imaging as well as population averages of single-units. Differences in predictions for single-units and populations were observed across a wide range of model parameters (ratios of attention-field to stimulus-drive size and the amount of baseline response modifiable by attention), offering an explanation for disparity in physiological reports. Thus, by accounting for heterogeneity in tuning of realistic neuronal populations, the normalization model of attention can not only predict responses of well-tuned neurons, but also the activity of large populations of neurons. More generally, computational models can unify physiological findings across different scales of measurement, and make links to behavior, but only if factors such as heterogeneous tuning within a population are properly accounted for.

  12. In or out of focus? Subcategories trigger in-group heterogeneity and out-group homogeneity effects in product assortments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpen, E.; Bosmans, A.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate how the presence of a subcategory influences consumers’ variety perceptions of products in and outside that subcategory. Two experiments show that subcategories trigger in-group heterogeneity and out-group homogeneity: consumers focus on the subcategory of interest, such that

  13. The Effect of Globalization in an Endogenous Growth Model with Heterogeneous Firms and Endogenous International Spillovers: Note

    OpenAIRE

    Katsufumi Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows that globalization increases (decreases) the growth rate if and only if the beachhead cost for the domestic market is strictly higher (lower) than that for the foreign market in a endogenous growth model with firm heterogeneity, international trade, and endogenous international spillover under specified necessary and sufficient conditions for exporting firms being more productive than non-exporting firms.

  14. Comparison of carina-based versus bony anatomy-based registration for setup verification in esophageal cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiels, Mélanie; Jin, Peng; van Gurp, Christianne H; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Alderliesten, Tanja; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2018-03-21

    To investigate the feasibility and geometric accuracy of carina-based registration for CBCT-guided setup verification in esophageal cancer IGRT, compared with current practice bony anatomy-based registration. Included were 24 esophageal cancer patients with 65 implanted fiducial markers, visible on planning CTs and follow-up CBCTs. All available CBCT scans (n = 236) were rigidly registered to the planning CT with respect to the bony anatomy and the carina. Target coverage was visually inspected and marker position variation was quantified relative to both registration approaches; the variation of systematic (Σ) and random errors (σ) was estimated. Automatic carina-based registration was feasible in 94.9% of the CBCT scans, with an adequate target coverage in 91.1% compared to 100% after bony anatomy-based registration. Overall, Σ (σ) in the LR/CC/AP direction was 2.9(2.4)/4.1(2.4)/2.2(1.8) mm using the bony anatomy registration compared to 3.3(3.0)/3.6(2.6)/3.9(3.1) mm for the carina. Mid-thoracic placed markers showed a non-significant but smaller Σ in CC and AP direction when using the carina-based registration. Compared with a bony anatomy-based registration, carina-based registration for esophageal cancer IGRT results in inadequate target coverage in 8.9% of cases. Furthermore, large Σ and σ, requiring larger anisotropic margins, were seen after carina-based registration. Only for tumors entirely confined to the mid-thoracic region the carina-based registration might be slightly favorable.

  15. Quantitative computed tomography as a test of endurance for evaluation of bony plates; Utilizacao da tomografia computadorizada quantitativa como teste de resistencia para avaliacao de placas osseas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo Filho, E.V.; Costa, L.A.V.S.; Oliveira, D.C. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Freitas, P.M.C. [Escola de Veterinaria - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Teixeira, M.W.; Costa, F.S. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco - Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine the radiodensity of bony plates. The CT scans provided information regarding radiodensity of bony plates and allowed to verify the uniformity of bone mineral density in their scope. The proposed methodology should be considered as another tool for determining the resistance of these biomaterials. (author)

  16. Factors related to the incidence of anterior disc displacement without reduction and bony changes of the temporomandibular joint in patients with anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Kazuhiro; Yura, Shinya; Inoue, Nobuo; Totsuka, Yasunori

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate factors related to the prevalence of anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) and bony changes of the condylar head (bony changes) in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of patients with anterior open bite. Subjects are comprised of 36 preoperative patients (72 joints) with skeletal anterior open bite without facial asymmetry who had undergone orthognathic surgery at the Hokkaido University Hospital; magnetic resonance imaging of the TMJ and cephalometric analysis were performed before treatment. Logistic regression analysis was performed to clarify relationships among age, overbite, overjet, ANB angle, sella to nasion (SN) to mandibular plane angle (SN-MP angle), SN to ramus plane angle (GZN angle), gonial angle, and incidence of ADDwoR or bony changes in patients with anterior open bite. Fifteen patients had bilateral ADDwoR, and five patients had unilateral ADDwoR; 17 patients had bilateral bony changes, and five patients had unilateral bony changes. SN-MP angle was greater in 20 patients with ADDwoR than that in 16 patients without ADDwoR (p < 0.05). GZN angle was greater in the 20 patients showing bony changes than that in the 16 patients without bony changes (p < 0.05). In terms of dentofacial morphology, SN-MP angle appears to be associated with the incidence of ADDwoR, and GZN angle appears to be associated with bony changes in the TMJ.

  17. Cirrus Horizontal Heterogeneity Effects on Cloud Optical Properties Retrieved from MODIS VNIR to TIR Channels as a Function of the Spatial Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, T.; Platnick, S. E.; Sourdeval, O.; Wang, C.; Meyer, K.; Cornet, C.; Szczap, F.

    2017-12-01

    Cirrus are an important part of the Earth radiation budget but an assessment of their role yet remains highly uncertain. Cirrus optical properties such as Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) and ice crystal effective particle size (Re) are often retrieved with a combination of Visible/Near InfraRed (VNIR) and ShortWave-InfraRed (SWIR) reflectance channels. Alternatively, Thermal InfraRed (TIR) techniques, such as the Split Window Technique (SWT), have demonstrated better sensitivity to thin cirrus. However, current satellite operational products for both retrieval methods assume that cloudy pixels are horizontally homogeneous (Plane Parallel and Homogeneous Approximation (PPHA)) and independent (Independent Pixel Approximation (IPA)). The impact of these approximations on cirrus retrievals needs to be understood and, as far as possible, corrected. Horizontal heterogeneity effects can be more easily estimated and corrected in the TIR range because they are mainly dominated by the PPA bias, which primarily depends on the COT subpixel heterogeneity. For solar reflectance channels, in addition to the PPHA bias, the IPA can lead to significant retrieval errors if there is large photon transport between cloudy columns in addition to brightening and shadowing effects that are more difficult to quantify.The effects of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity are here studied on COT and Re retrievals obtained using simulated MODIS reflectances at 0.86 and 2.11 μm and radiances at 8.5, 11.0 and 12.0 μm, for spatial resolutions ranging from 50 m to 10 km. For each spatial resolution, simulated TOA reflectances and radiances are combined for cloud optical property retrievals with a research-level optimal estimation retrieval method (OEM). The impact of horizontal heterogeneity on the retrieved products is assessed for different solar geometries and various combinations of the five channels.

  18. Is radiographic measurement of bony landmarks reliable for lateral meniscal sizing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jung-Ro; Kim, Taik-Seon; Lim, Hong-Chul; Lim, Hyung-Tae; Yang, Jae-Hyuk

    2011-03-01

    The accuracy of meniscal measurement methods is still in debate. The authors' protocol for radiologic measurements will provide reproducible bony landmarks, and this measurement method of the lateral tibial plateau will correlate with the actual anatomic value. Controlled laboratory study. Twenty-five samples of fresh lateral meniscus with attached proximal tibia were obtained during total knee arthroplasty. Each sample was obtained without damage to the meniscus and bony attachment sites. The inclusion criterion was mild to moderate osteoarthritis in patients with mechanical axis deviation of less than 15°. Knees with lateral compartment osteoarthritic change or injured or degenerated menisci were excluded. For the lateral tibial plateau length measurements, the radiographic beam was angled 10° caudally at neutral rotation, which allowed differentiation of the lateral plateau cortical margins from the medial plateau. The transition points were identified and used for length measurement. The values of length were then compared with the conventional Pollard method and the anatomic values. The width measurement was done according to Pollard's protocol. For each knee, the percentage deviation from the anatomic dimension was recorded. Intraobserver error and interobserver error were calculated. The deviation of the authors' radiographic length measurements from anatomic dimensions was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm. The deviation of Pollard's radiographic length measurements was 4.1 ± 2.0 mm. With respect to accuracy-which represents the frequency of measurements that fall within 10% of measurements-the accuracy of authors' length was 98%, whereas for Pollard's method it was 40%. There was a good correlation between anatomic meniscal dimensions and each radiologic plateau dimensions for lateral meniscal width (R(2) = .790) and the authors' lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .823) and fair correlation for Pollard's lateral meniscal length (R(2) = .660). The reliability of each

  19. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  20. Disentangling the Pure Time Effect From Site and Preference Heterogeneity Effects in Benefit Transfer: An Empirical Investigation of Transferability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fetene, Gebeyehu Manie; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Bonnichsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Two identical open-ended contingent valuation surveys assessing willingness-topay for better protection against flooding were administered in 2005 and 2010 at the same site.The 2010 survey was administered to the same respondents as those interviewed in 2005 as well as to new participants....... This experimental design allows us to separate the pure temporal dimension from the spatial and social dimensions of transferability, thereby permitting an investigation of the temporal reliability associated with a transfer of value estimates over a 5-year time horizon. Having isolated the pure effect of time...

  1. Two-region mass transfer to account for 2D profile scale heterogeneity in a 1D effective plot scale flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Vilim; Coquet, Yves; Gerke, Horst H.

    2017-04-01

    In arable soil landscapes, specific spatial heterogeneities related to tillage and trafficking can influence the movement of water and chemicals. The structure in the topsoil is characterized by spatial patterns with locally compacted zones. The contrasting hydraulic properties of more-and-less compacted soil zones can result in heterogeneous flow fields and preferential flow. Two- or three-dimensional models used to account for soil spatial variability are relatively too complex when trying to include local heterogeneities in the description of field scale flow and transport problems. The idea was to reduce the model complexity linked to the explicit description of heterogeneities in 2D or 3D without deteriorating the validity of simulation results. When reducing the spatial dimensionality, the geometry in a 2D, cross-sectional explicit plot description is removed on the expense of an increased complexity of the 1D model with two flow domains and mass exchange between them. Our objective was to design a simplified 1D model approach that effectively accounts for plot-scale soil structural variability. In this simplified 1D model, effective soil hydraulic parameters can be assigned to each of the two domains separately. Different theoretical scenarios simulating different shape, size and arrangement of compacted clods in the tilled layer were set to estimate their effect on solute behaviour. The mass exchange parameters could be determined from structure quantification and by comparing simplified 1D with reference 2D results accounting for defined soil structural (i.e., here the compacted regions) geometries. The mass exchange is strongly related to the geometry of the compacted zones including their distribution and size within the non-compacted soil. Additionally, the simplified model approach was tested by comparing it with measured results from a field tracer experiment.

  2. Effects of dynamic heterogeneity and density scaling of molecular dynamics on the relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at the glass transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koperwas, K.; Grzybowski, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Wojnarowska, Z.; Paluch, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we define and experimentally verify thermodynamic characteristics of the liquid-glass transition, taking into account a kinetic origin of the process. Using the density scaling law and the four-point measure of the dynamic heterogeneity of molecular dynamics of glass forming liquids, we investigate contributions of enthalpy, temperature, and density fluctuations to spatially heterogeneous molecular dynamics at the liquid-glass transition, finding an equation for the pressure coefficient of the glass transition temperature, dTg/dp. This equation combined with our previous formula for dTg/dp, derived solely from the density scaling criterion, implies a relationship among thermodynamic coefficients at Tg. Since this relationship and both the equations for dTg/dp are very well validated using experimental data at Tg, they are promising alternatives to the classical Prigogine-Defay ratio and both the Ehrenfest equations in case of the liquid-glass transition

  3. Solvent Effects on the Reactions of the Nerve Agent VX with KF/Al2O3: Heterogeneous or Homogeneous Decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkin, Gil; Yehezkel, Lea; Columbus, Ishay; Zafrani, Yossi

    2016-03-04

    Solvent effects on the reactions of the extremely toxic nerve agent VX with KF/Al2O3 powder were explored. Small quantities of water or methanol (5-10 wt %), which effectively mobilized all components while maintaining the heterogeneous nature of the reaction, promoted much faster rates than those obtained with larger quantities. Any amount of acetonitrile resulted in extremely slow transformations. Surprisingly, 5-50 wt % of heptane led to fast reactions due to the combination of its ability to mediate fast diffusion of VX and a MAS centrifugation effect.

  4. Effects of geometric modulation and surface potential heterogeneity on electrokinetic flow and solute transport in a microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Subrata; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2018-04-01

    A numerical investigation is performed on the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in a surface-modulated microchannel to induce enhanced solute mixing. The channel wall is modulated by placing surface-mounted obstacles of trigonometric shape along which the surface potential is considered to be different from the surface potential of the homogeneous part of the wall. The characteristics of the electrokinetic flow are governed by the Laplace equation for the distribution of external electric potential; the Poisson equation for the distribution of induced electric potential; the Nernst-Planck equations for the distribution of ions; and the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow simultaneously. These nonlinear coupled set of governing equations are solved numerically by a control volume method over the staggered system. The influence of the geometric modulation of the surface, surface potential heterogeneity and the bulk ionic concentration on the EOF is analyzed. Vortical flow develops near a surface modulation, and it becomes stronger when the surface potential of the modulated region is in opposite sign to the surface potential of the homogeneous part of the channel walls. Vortical flow also depends on the Debye length when the Debye length is in the order of the channel height. Pressure drop along the channel length is higher for a ribbed wall channel compared to the grooved wall case. The pressure drop decreases with the increase in the amplitude for a grooved channel, but increases for a ribbed channel. The mixing index is quantified through the standard deviation of the solute distribution. Our results show that mixing index is higher for the ribbed channel compared to the grooved channel with heterogeneous surface potential. The increase in potential heterogeneity in the modulated region also increases the mixing index in both grooved and ribbed channels. However, the mixing performance, which is the ratio of the mixing index to pressure drop, reduces with the rise in

  5. Application of computer-aided designed/computer-aided manufactured techniques in reconstructing maxillofacial bony structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustemeyer, Jan; Busch, Alexander; Sari-Rieger, Aynur

    2014-12-01

    Today, virtually planned surgery and computer-aided designed/computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) tools to reconstruct bony structures are being increasingly applied to maxillofacial surgery. However, the criteria for or against the usage of the CAD/CAM technique are disputable, since no evidence-based studies are available. Theoretically, the CAD/CAM technique should be applied to complex cases. In this case report, we present our experiences and discuss the criteria for application. Three cases are reported in which subjects received an osseous reconstruction using CAD/CAM techniques. In the first case, resection of the mandibular body and ramus was carried out, and reconstruction with a vascularised iliac bone transplant was performed. During surgery, a repositioning of the ipsilateral condyle was necessary. The second case comprised a wide mandibular reconstruction together with a repositioning of the condyles and the soft tissue chin using a two-segment osteomyocutaneous fibula flap. In the third case, a two-flap technique consisting of a double-barrelled osseous fibula flap and a radial forearm flap was applied to cover a wide palatine defect. Our experience suggests that the CAD/CAM technique provides an accurate and useful treatment not only in complex cases, but also in simpler ones, to achieve an anatomically correct shape of the bone transplant and to reposition adjacent structures.

  6. Orbital Tumors Excision without Bony Marginotomy under Local and General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Goldberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To present our experience of removing middle to deep orbital tumors using a combination of minimally invasive soft tissue approaches, sometimes under local anesthesia. Methods. In this retrospective case series, 30 patients (13 males and 17 females underwent tumor removal through eyelid crease (17 eyes, conjunctival (nine eyes, lateral canthal (two eyes, and transcaruncular (two eyes approaches. All tumors were located in the posterior half of the orbit. Six cases were removed under monitored anesthesia care with local block, and 24 were under general anesthesia. Results. The median (range age and follow-up duration were 48.5 (31–87 years old and 24.5 (4–375 weeks, respectively. Visual acuity and ocular motility showed improvement or no significant change in all but one patient at the latest followup. Confirmed pathologies revealed cavernous hemangioma (15 cases, pleomorphic adenoma (5 cases, solitary fibrous tumor (4 cases, neurofibroma (2 cases, schwannoma (2 cases, and orbital varix (1 case. None of the patients experienced recurrence. Conclusions. Creating a bony marginotomy increases intraoperative exposure of the deep orbit but adds substantial time and morbidity. Benign orbital tumors can often be removed safely through small soft-tissue incisions, without bone removal and under local anesthesia.

  7. Automated bony region identification using artificial neural networks: reliability and validation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; DeVries, Nicole A.; Shivanna, Kiran H.; Powell, Stephanie M.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Ramme, Austin J.; Adams, Brian D.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to develop tools for automating the identification of bony structures, to assess the reliability of this technique against manual raters, and to validate the resulting regions of interest against physical surface scans obtained from the same specimen. Artificial intelligence-based algorithms have been used for image segmentation, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). For this study, an ANN was created and trained to identify the phalanges of the human hand. The relative overlap between the ANN and a manual tracer was 0.87, 0.82, and 0.76, for the proximal, middle, and distal index phalanx bones respectively. Compared with the physical surface scans, the ANN-generated surface representations differed on average by 0.35 mm, 0.29 mm, and 0.40 mm for the proximal, middle, and distal phalanges respectively. Furthermore, the ANN proved to segment the structures in less than one-tenth of the time required by a manual rater. The ANN has proven to be a reliable and valid means of segmenting the phalanx bones from CT images. Employing automated methods such as the ANN for segmentation, eliminates the likelihood of rater drift and inter-rater variability. Automated methods also decrease the amount of time and manual effort required to extract the data of interest, thereby making the feasibility of patient-specific modeling a reality. (orig.)

  8. Three-dimensional shape differences in the bony pelvis of women with pelvic floor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kirsten M; Handa, Victoria L; Macura, Katarzyna J; DeLeon, Valerie B

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the three-dimensional shape of the bony pelvis differs between women with and without pelvic floor disorders (PFDs). We predict that the levator ani attachment points for the pelvic floor are further displaced from one another in affected relative to unaffected women. Pelvic shape was quantified by collecting coordinate data from landmarks located on three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance images of 19 PFD cases and 16 matched controls. Euclidean distance matrix analysis (EDMA) was used to quantify and compare pelvic shape using these landmark data. There were no significant group differences in age, parity, body mass, racial attribution, cesarean section, or hysterectomy status. After controlling for size as a confounding factor, EDMA results identified significant differences (p = 0.05) in the bispinous diameter (4 % proportionally larger) and distances defining lateral displacement of ischia from pubis (5-6 % proportionally larger) in cases compared to controls. Pelvic shape in women with PFDs is characterized by the proportional mediolateral enlargement of the pelvic midplane and ischial eversion near the subpubic arch, consistent with inferolateral migration of the attachment points for the levator ani and correspondingly lateral displacement. These movements may result in increased strain on the pelvic floor's muscular and connective tissues, increasing the risk of failure over a woman's lifetime.

  9. Primary bony non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the cervical spine: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedrak Mark F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Non-Hodgkin lymphoma primarily originating from the bone is exceedingly rare. To our knowledge, this is the first report of primary bone lymphoma presenting with progressive cord compression from an origin in the cervical spine. Herein, we discuss the unusual location in this case, the presenting symptoms, and the management of this disease. Case presentation We report on a 23-year-old Caucasian-American man who presented with two months of night sweats, fatigue, parasthesias, and progressive weakness that had progressed to near quadriplegia. Magnetic resonance (MR imaging demonstrated significant cord compression seen primarily at C7. Surgical management, with corpectomy and dorsal segmental fusion, in combination with adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, halted the progression of the primary disease and preserved neurological function. Histological analysis demonstrated an aggressive anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Conclusion Isolated primary bony lymphoma of the spine is exceedingly rare. As in our case, the initial symptoms may be the result of progressive cervical cord compression. Anterior corpectomy with posterolateral decompression and fusion succeeded in preventing progressive neurologic decline and maintaining quality of life. The reader should be aware of the unique presentation of this disease and that surgical management is a successful treatment strategy.

  10. Effects of structural heterogeneity on frictional heating from biomarker thermal maturity analysis of the Muddy Mountain thrust, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, G. L.; Savage, H. M.; Polissar, P. J.; Rowe, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    Faults are generally heterogeneous along-strike, with changes in thickness and structural complexity that should influence coseismic slip. However, observational limitations (e.g. limited outcrop or borehole samples) can obscure this complexity. Here we investigate the heterogeneity of frictional heating determined from biomarker thermal maturity and microstructural observations along a well-exposed fault to understand whether coseismic stress and frictional heating are related to structural complexity. We focus on the Muddy Mountain thrust, Nevada, a Sevier-age structure that has continuous exposure of its fault core and considerable structural variability for up to 50 m, to explore the distribution of earthquake slip and temperature rise along strike. We present new biomarker thermal maturity results that capture the heating history of fault rocks. Biomarkers are organic molecules produced by living organisms and preserved in the rock record. During heating, their structure is altered systematically with increasing time and temperature. Preliminary results show significant variability in thermal maturity along-strike at the Muddy Mountain thrust, suggesting differences in coseismic temperature rise on the meter- scale. Temperatures upwards of 500°C were generated in the principal slip zone at some locations, while in others, no significant temperature rise occurred. These results demonstrate that stress or slip heterogeneity occurred along the Muddy Mountain thrust at the meter-scale and considerable along-strike complexity existed, highlighting the importance of careful interpretation of whole-fault behavior from observations at a single point on a fault.

  11. A time series study on the effects of heat on mortality and evaluation of heterogeneity into European and Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities: results of EU CIRCE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Michela; D'Ippoliti, Daniela; De Sario, Manuela; Analitis, Antonis; Menne, Bettina; Katsouyanni, Klea; De' Donato, Francesca K; Basagana, Xavier; Salah, Afif Ben; Casimiro, Elsa; Dörtbudak, Zeynep; Iñiguez, Carmen; Peretz, Chava; Wolf, Tanja; Michelozzi, Paola

    2013-07-03

    The Mediterranean region is particularly vulnerable to the effect of summer temperature.Within the CIRCE project this time-series study aims to quantify for the first time the effect of summer temperature in Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities and compared it with European cities around the Mediterranean basin, evaluating city characteristics that explain between-city heterogeneity. The city-specific effect of maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) was assessed by Generalized Estimation Equations, assuming a linear threshold model. Then, city-specific estimates were included in a random effect meta-regression analysis to investigate the effect modification by several city characteristics. Heterogeneity in the temperature-mortality relationship was observed among cities. Thresholds recorded higher values in the warmest cities of Tunis (35.5°C) and Tel-Aviv (32.8°C) while the effect of Tappmax above threshold was greater in the European cities. In Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities a higher effect was observed among younger age groups (0-14 in Tunis and 15-64 in Tel-Aviv and Istanbul) in contrast with the European cities where the elderly population was more vulnerable. Climate conditions explained most of the observed heterogeneity and among socio-demographic and economic characteristics only health expenditure and unemployment rate were identified as effect modifiers. The high vulnerability observed in the young populations in Eastern-Southern Mediterranean cities represent a major public health problem. Considering the large political and economic changes occurring in this region as well future temperature increase due to climate change, it is important to strengthen research and public health efforts in these Mediterranean countries.

  12. Going deeper into phosphorus adsorbents for lake restoration: Combined effects of magnetic particles, intraspecific competition and habitat heterogeneity pressure on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Arco, Ana; Parra, Gema; de Vicente, Inmaculada

    2018-02-01

    Aquatic population responses to chemical exposure may be exacerbated by intraspecific competition pressures, being also shaped by habitat heterogeneity. Magnetic particles (MPs) have been recently proposed as promising phosphorus (P) adsorbents for lake restoration. This study focuses on assessing the effects of MPs on the abundance of the crustacean Daphnia magna under different levels of both intraspecific competition pressure and habitat heterogeneity. The experimental design consisted of two experiments (in homogeneous and heterogeneous habitats) done in glass jars with four concentrations of MPs: controls of 0g MPsL -1 , and treatments of 1, 1.5 and 2g MPsL -1 . In addition, competition treatments were established by using different population densities, and hence, no competition (C), low (L) and high (H) competition pressures were simulated. The experiments lasted for 7 days, with a 4-day pre-exposure period, in which competition was all allowed to take place, and a 3-day post-exposure period. Twenty-four hours after adding MPs, the MPs were removed by applying a magnetic separation technique. The results showed that competition pressures occurred and significantly reduced population abundances during the pre-exposure period. During the post-exposure period, the combined effects of competition and MPs were detected in both homogeneous (Ho-) and heterogeneous (He-) habitat experiments, showing a significantly drastic reduction in abundances. In fact, the lethal concentration for 50% of the population (LC 50 - 24h) was 0 and 0.16g MPsL -1 in the Ho- and He-experiments respectively, indicating that the addition and especially the removal of MPs cause extreme mortality. These results indicated that even though competition plays a role in shaping populations, its influence was down-weighted by the stronger pressures of MPs. In addition, as no significant differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous habitats were found, we may state that the refuge offered was

  13. Prenatal Maternal Anxiety as a Risk Factor for Preterm Birth and the Effects of Heterogeneity on This Relationship: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarah Rose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Systematic reviews (SR and meta-analyses (MA that previously explored the relationship between prenatal maternal anxiety (PMA and preterm birth (PTB have not been comprehensive in study inclusion, failing to account for effects of heterogeneity and disagree in their conclusions. Objectives. This SRMA provides a summary of the published evidence of the relationship between PMA and PTB while examining methodological and statistical sources of heterogeneity. Methods. Published studies from MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and EMBASE, until June 2015, were extracted and reviewed. Results. Of the 37 eligible studies, 31 were used in this MA; six more were subsequently excluded due to statistical issues, substantially reducing the heterogeneity. The odds ratio for PMA was 1.70 (95% CI 1.33, 2.18 for PTB and 1.67 (95% CI 1.35, 2.07 for spontaneous PTB comparing higher levels of anxiety to lower levels. Conclusions. Consistent findings indicate a significant association between PMA and PTB. Due to the statistical problem of including collinear variables in a single regression model, it is hard to distinguish the effect of the various types of psychosocial distress on PTB. However, a prenatal program aimed at addressing mental health issues could be designed and evaluated using a randomised controlled trial to assess the causal nature of different aspects of mental health on PTB.

  14. Heterogeneity in Preferences and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gørtz, Mette

    This paper discusses the determinants of the retirement decision and the implications of retirement on economic well-being. The main contribution of the paper is to formulate the role of individual heterogeneity explicitly. We argue that individual heterogeneity in 1) productivity of market work...... choices of expenditure, household production and leisure for people in and around retirement. The unobserved individual heterogeneity factor is isolated by comparing cross-sectional evidence and panel data estimates of the effects of retirement on consumption and time allocation. Based on cross......-section data, we can identify a difference in consumption due to retirement status, but when the panel nature of the data is exploited, the effect of retirement on consumption is small and insignificant. Moreover, the analyses point at a large positive effect of retirement on household production. Our results...

  15. Heterogeneous Materials I and Heterogeneous Materials II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, K M

    2004-01-01

    In these two volumes the author provides a comprehensive survey of the various mathematically-based models used in the research literature to predict the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of hetereogeneous materials, i.e., materials containing two or more phases such as fibre-reinforced polymers, cast iron and porous ceramic kiln furniture. Volume I covers linear properties such as linear dielectric constant, effective electrical conductivity and elastic moduli, while Volume II covers nonlinear properties, fracture and atomistic and multiscale modelling. Where appropriate, particular attention is paid to the use of fractal geometry and percolation theory in describing the structure and properties of these materials. The books are advanced level texts reflecting the research interests of the author which will be of significant interest to research scientists working at the forefront of the areas covered by the books. Others working more generally in the field of materials science interested in comparing predictions of properties with experimental results may well find the mathematical level quite daunting initially, as it is apparent that the author assumes a level of mathematics consistent with that taught in final year undergraduate and graduate theoretical physics courses. However, for such readers it is well worth persevering because of the in-depth coverage to which the various models are subjected, and also because of the extensive reference lists at the back of both volumes which direct readers to the various source references in the scientific literature. Thus, for the wider materials science scientific community the two volumes will be a valuable library resource. While I would have liked to see more comparison with experimental data on both ideal and 'real' heterogeneous materials than is provided by the author and a discussion of how to model strong nonlinear current--voltage behaviour in systems such as zinc oxide varistors, my overall

  16. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on the choice of operating mode of an X-ray tube in X-ray diagnostic investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavitskij, R.V.; Gurevich, L.A.; Khasidashvili, I.Sh.

    1986-01-01

    Equivalent thickness of different parts of human body of different constitutions was established according to changes of exposure dose behind pulmonary and bone heterogeneity necessary for creation of X-ray diagnostic equipment. Heterogeneity was estimated using correction factor (heterogeneity factor), indicating the relation of exposure doses behind homogeneous and heterogeneous objects of equal thickness. Dosimetry was conducted to establish heterogeneity factor. Equivalent thickness was established experimentally during investigations of pulmonary and bone tissues depending on X-ray tube voltage

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM}: II. Effects of heterogeneous versus homogeneous media for stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Timmerman, Robert; DesRosiers, Colleen; Randall, Marcus; DesRosiers, Paul; Dittmer, Phil; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, 535 Barnhill Dr, RT041, IN 46202-5289 (United States)

    2004-11-07

    The absence of electronic equilibrium in the vicinity of bone-tissue or air-tissue heterogeneity in the head can misrepresent deposited dose with treatment planning algorithms that assume all treatment volume as homogeneous media. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) and measurements with a specially designed heterogeneous phantom were applied to investigate the effect of air-tissue and bone-tissue heterogeneity on dose perturbation with the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM}. The dose fall-off near the air-tissue interface caused by secondary electron disequilibrium leads to overestimation of dose by the vendor supplied treatment planning software (GammaPlan{sup TM}) at up to 4 mm from an interface. The dose delivered to the target area away from an air-tissue interface may be underestimated by up to 7% by GammaPlan{sup TM} due to overestimation of attenuation of photon beams passing through air cavities. While the underdosing near the air-tissue interface cannot be eliminated with any plug pattern, the overdosage due to under-attenuation of the photon beams in air cavities can be eliminated by plugging the sources whose beams intersect the air cavity. Little perturbation was observed next to bone-tissue interfaces. Monte Carlo results were confirmed by measurements. This study shows that the employed Monte Carlo treatment planning is more accurate for precise dosimetry of stereotactic radiosurgery with the Leksell Gamma Knife{sup TM} for targets in the vicinity of air-filled cavities.

  18. Effect of Reaction Temperature on Biodiesel Production from Chlorella vulgaris using CuO/Zeolite as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianursanti; Delaamira, M.; Bismo, S.; Muharam, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Human needs for fossil energy increase every year. Biodiesel is the main way to resolve this world problem. Biodiesel produces from vegetable oil. But then, the alternative way came from the uses of microalgae in Chlorella vulgaris type causes by its simplicity of growing. In the other hand, this microalgae known for its high lipid content by considering several parameter such as light intensity, medium nutrition, pH and also salinity. Lipid content will be extracted by using Bligh-Dryer method which will be reacted with methanol along transesterification. Beside, there come another matter which is the utilization of homogeny catalyst. The difficulty of separation is the main matter so then biodiesel need to be washed in case normalizing the pH and this process will decrease the quality of biodiesel. To resolve this problem, we’ll be using a heterogeneous catalyst, zeolite, with ability to catalyst the process. Zeolite is easier to separate from the biodiesel so there will not be needed washing process. Heterogeneous catalyst work as well as homogeneous. Variation implemented on transesterification included reaction temperature of 40°C, 60°C, and 80°C. Reaction time, catalyst percentage and the solvent amount remain steady on 4 hours, 3% and 1:400. Complete best result obtained at 60°C with the yield of 36,78%. Through this, heterogeneous catalyst CuO/Zeolite proved to have a capability for replacing homogeneous catalyst and simplify the production of biodiesel particularly in separation step.

  19. A bony-crested Jurassic dinosaur with evidence of iridescent plumage highlights complexity in early paravian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dongyu; Clarke, Julia A; Eliason, Chad M; Qiu, Rui; Li, Quanguo; Shawkey, Matthew D; Zhao, Cuilin; D'Alba, Liliana; Jiang, Jinkai; Xu, Xing

    2018-01-15

    The Jurassic Yanliao theropods have offered rare glimpses of the early paravian evolution and particularly of bird origins, but, with the exception of the bizarre scansoriopterygids, they have shown similar skeletal and integumentary morphologies. Here we report a distinctive new Yanliao theropod species bearing prominent lacrimal crests, bony ornaments previously known from more basal theropods. It shows longer arm and leg feathers than Anchiornis and tail feathers with asymmetrical vanes forming a tail surface area even larger than that in Archaeopteryx. Nanostructures, interpreted as melanosomes, are morphologically similar to organized, platelet-shaped organelles that produce bright iridescent colours in extant birds. The new species indicates the presence of bony ornaments, feather colour and flight-related features consistent with proposed rapid character evolution and significant diversity in signalling and locomotor strategies near bird origins.

  20. 18F-FDG PET demonstrates previously unvisualised bony metastases in a lung cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J.; Rowe, C.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 59-year-old male, presented to his local doctor with the trivial complaint of a persistent dry cough. On clinical examination he was found to have an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node. He was investigated with chest X-ray, Computerised Tomography (CT) and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of the palpable node CT showed a right lung mass, bulky hilar, mediastinal, supraclavicular and cervical lymph nodes FNAC was inconclusive due to an insufficient tissue sample, but suggestive of non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Hence excisional node biopsy was required which revealed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Subsequent CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis for staging revealed no distant involvement. Therefore radical radiotherapy was planned to treat the locally advanced disease. Prior to treatment a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan was organised by his specialist as a baseline study to monitor therapy progress. Non-Attenuation corrected images of the chest, abdomen and pelvis were obtained 40 minutes post administration of 394 MBq 18 F-FDG, on a Siemens 951/3IR PET scanner. The images were reconstructed using both Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subsets-Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithms. The images revealed extensive metastases particularly in the spine and pelvis, besides the known locally advanced thoracic disease A 99m Tc MDP bone scan and plain film radiographs aimed at confirming bony metastases were negative, even though the bone scan noted a slight focus in the right fourth rib. The appearance suggested trauma, but a solitary bone metastasis could not be ruled out MRI of the spine confirmed the PET scan findings. Mr RD was to have curative radical radiotherapy, but after the PET results, it was decided to treat him palliatively. The value of 18 F-FDG PET in staging some cancers such as NSCLC is widely accepted, in this case it was pivotal in altering the patient's management. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New

  1. Morphoscopic analysis of experimentally produced bony wounds from low-velocity ballistic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules A; Tahere, Joy; Agnew, Caitlin; Kieser, David C; Duncan, Warwick; Swain, Michael V; Reeves, Matthew T

    2011-12-01

    Understanding how bone behaves when subjected to ballistic impact is of critical importance for forensic questions, such as the reconstruction of shooting events. Yet the literature addressing microscopic anatomical features of gunshot wounds to different types of bone is sparse. Moreover, a biomechanical framework for describing how the complex architecture of bone affects its failure during such impact is lacking. The aim of this study was to examine the morphological features associated with experimental gunshot wounds in slaughtered pig ribs. We shot the 4th rib of 12 adult pigs with .22 mm subsonic bullets at close range (5 cm) and examined resultant wounds under the light microscope, scanning electron microscope SEM and micro tomograph μCT. In all cases there was a narrow shot channel followed by spall region, with evidence of plastic deformation with burnishing of the surface bone in the former, and brittle fracture around and through individual Haversian systems in the latter. In all but one case, the entrance wounds were characterized by superficially fractured cortical bone in the form of a well-defined collar, while the exit wounds showed delamination of the periosteum. Inorganic residue was evident in all cases, with electron energy dispersive spectroscopy EDS confirming the presence of carbon, phosphate, lead and calcium. This material appeared to be especially concentrated within the fractured bony collar at the entrance. We conclude that gunshot wounds in flat bones may be morphologically divided into a thin burnished zone at the entry site, and a fracture zone at the exit.

  2. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of the Bony Nasolacrimal Canal by Automated Segmentation of Computed Tomography Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Jañez-Garcia

    Full Text Available To apply a fully automated method to quantify the 3D structure of the bony nasolacrimal canal (NLC from CT scans whereby the size and main morphometric characteristics of the canal can be determined.Cross-sectional study.36 eyes of 18 healthy individuals.Using software designed to detect the boundaries of the NLC on CT images, 36 NLC reconstructions were prepared. These reconstructions were then used to calculate NLC volume. The NLC axis in each case was determined according to a polygonal model and to 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomials. From these models, NLC sectional areas and length were determined. For each variable, descriptive statistics and normality tests (Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Shapiro-Wilk were established.Time for segmentation, NLC volume, axis, sectional areas and length.Mean processing time was around 30 seconds for segmenting each canal. All the variables generated were normally distributed. Measurements obtained using the four models polygonal, 2nd, 3rd and 4th degree polynomial, respectively, were: mean canal length 14.74, 14.3, 14.80, and 15.03 mm; mean sectional area 15.15, 11.77, 11.43, and 11.56 mm2; minimum sectional area 8.69, 7.62, 7.40, and 7.19 mm2; and mean depth of minimum sectional area (craniocaudal 7.85, 7.71, 8.19, and 8.08 mm.The method proposed automatically reconstructs the NLC on CT scans. Using these reconstructions, morphometric measurements can be calculated from NLC axis estimates based on polygonal and 2nd, 3rd and 4th polynomial models.

  3. Platelet-Rich Fibrin with Bone Grafts for Regeneration of Bony Defect following Extraction of Supernumerary Teeth: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Balamanikandasrinivasan; Suresh, Nanditha; Muthusamy, Senthilkumar

    Supernumerary teeth are hyperdontic variants due to abnormalities during tooth development. Here, we report a case on regeneration of bony defect, which ensued following extraction of two supernumerary teeth in the mandibular premolar region, using a combination of bone grafts and platelet-rich fibrin. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time synergistic use of biomaterials with bone grafts have been used for this type of management.

  4. Comparison of bony dimensions at the level of the pelvic floor in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Tamara A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Summers, Aimee; Larson, Kindra A.; Delancey, John O. L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Compare bony pelvis dimensions at the level of pelvic support in women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Study Design Pelvic floor dimensions of 42 Caucasian women with POP ≥ 1cm beyond the hymen were compared to 42 age and parity-matched women with normal support. Bony landmarks relevant to connective tissue and levator attachments were identified on MRI. Dimensions were independently measured by two examiners and averaged for each subject. Results Measurements (cms) for cases and controls are as follows: Interspinous Diameter, 11.2±0.8 vs. 11.1±0.7, p=0.19; Anterior-Posterior Outlet Diameter, 11.7±0.7 vs. 11.7±0.8, p=0.71; Pubic Symphysis to Ischial Spine - Left, 9.5±0.5 vs. 9.5±0.4, p=0.91; -Right, 9.5±0.4 vs. 9.5±0.5, p=0.81; Sacrococcygeal junction to Ischial Spine - Left, 7.0±0.6 vs. 7.0±0.5, p=0.54; - Right, 7.0±0.6 vs. 6.9±0.4, p=0.32. Conclusion Bony pelvis dimensions are similar at the level of the muscular pelvic floor in Caucasian women with and without POP. PMID:19254580

  5. Preparative treatment with NaOH to selectively concentrate iron oxides of a Chilean volcanic soil material to produce effective heterogeneous Fenton catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzo, Valentina; Pizarro, Carmen; Rubio, María Angélica; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos Duarte; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; Fabris, José Domingos

    2011-01-01

    A Chilean volcanic Ultisol material was first size-fractionated so as to obtain the fraction with mean particle sizes φ   − 1 NaOH, in an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of the selective chemical dissolution to concentrate iron oxides, as a preparation procedure before using the materials as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts. The effects of those treatments on the iron oxides mineralogy were monitored with Mössbauer spectroscopy. The NaOH-treated samples were tested as catalysts towards the H 2 O 2 decomposition. Three or five sequential NaOH treatments were found to be comparably effective, by concentrating nearly the same proportion of iron oxides in the remaining solid phase (25.1 ± 0.4 and 23.3 ± 0.2 mass%, respectively). 298 K-Mössbauer patterns were similar for both samples, with a central (super)paramagnetic Fe 3 +  doublet and a broad sextet, assignable to several closely coexisting magnetically ordered forms of iron oxides. Despite of this nearly similar effect of the two treatments, the Ultisol material treated three times with NaOH presents higher heterogeneous catalytic efficiency and is more suitable to decompose H 2 O 2 than that with five treatments.

  6. Computed tomography findings of bony regeneration after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma with skull base destruction: implications for local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Fumin; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang Chongjong; Su Chihying; Lui Chunchung; Chen Huichun; Sun Limin; Lin Tsungmin

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response of bony destruction (BD) of the skull base following radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and investigate the implications of bony regeneration (BR) on local control and its related factors. Methods and Materials: Ninety patients with NPC with skull base destruction clearly demonstrated on computed tomography (CT) were reviewed. These patients have completed the prescribed treatment and received regular CT follow-up. A total of 338 sets of CT images of the head and neck were reviewed. The tumor response and the appearance of BR in the previous destructive part of the skull base were recorded and analyzed. The tumor response was divided into complete, partial, or no response. BR was defined as recalcification or sclerotic change with partial or complete healing in the previous osteolytic bony defect. Local failure was confirmed either by pathological or merely by imaging studies showing progression of tumor in consecutive radiological pictures. Results: The distribution of specific sites of bony destruction (BD) in these patients included the sphenoid bone (68%), paracavernous sinus area (48%), petrous apex (47%), clivus (44%), pterygoid plates (20%), and others (7%). The CT showed 57 patients (63%) had BR. All were observed within 1 year after treatment. Sixty-two patients (69%) had complete tumor response after treatment. Analyzed by logistic regression method, tumor response after treatment was found to have a statistically significant correlation with BR (p = 0.0004). Most BR (55/57) was demonstrated in patients with complete tumor response. The 3-year actuarial local control rate was 54 % in these patients. The local control was quite different in the comparison of patients with BR versus those with persistent BD (77% vs. 21%, p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that patients with complete tumor response or with BR on imaging had statistically better local control than those without either of the two findings (p

  7. Mitigating acoustic heterogeneous effects in microwave-induced breast thermoacoustic tomography using multi-physical K-means clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingwen; Zhao, Zhiqin; Liu, Shuangli; Nie, Zaiping; Liu, Qinghuo

    2017-11-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography shows great potential for early-stage breast tumor detection, but imaging quality usually suffers due to acoustic heterogeneity of breast tissue. To mitigate this problem, conventional methods estimate the distribution of speeds of sound but at a heavy cost of system complexity or computation burden. We propose an imaging reconstruction method that incorporates dielectric and acoustic properties of tissues as a-priori information and reformulates the velocity estimation problem as a data clustering problem. The proposed method is validated by imaging anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms and real biological tissues. Both simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and significantly improves image fidelity with less computational burden than conventional methods. These results make our approach a promising candidate for clinical breast cancer detection.

  8. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  9. Applied heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Page, A.J.F.

    1988-01-01

    This reference book explains the scientific principles of heterogeneous catalysis while also providing details on the methods used to develop commercially viable catalyst products. A section of the book presents reactor design engineering theory and practices for the profitable application of these catalysts in large-scale industrial processes. A description of the mechanisms and commercial applications of catalysis is followed by a review of catalytic reaction kinetics. There are five chapters on selecting catalyst agents, developing and preparing industrial catalysts, measuring catalyst properties, and analyzing the physico-chemical characteristics of solid catalyst particles. The final chapter reviews the elements of catalytic reactor design, with emphasis on flow regimes vs. reactor types, heat and mass transfer in reactor beds, single- and multi-phase flows, and the effects of thermodynamics and other catalyst properties on the process flow scheme

  10. Synergetic Effect of Ultrasound, the Heterogeneous Fenton Reaction and Photocatalysis by TiO2 Loaded on Nickel Foam on the Degradation of Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shan; Xu, Shanwen; Li, Guangming; Yang, Jixian

    2016-01-01

    The synergistic effect of ultrasound, the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and photocatalysis was studied using a nickel foam (NF)-supporting TiO2 system and rhodamine B (RhB) as a target. The NF-supporting TiO2 system was prepared by depositing TiO2 on the skeleton of NF repeatedly and then calcining it. To optimize the conditions and parameters, the catalytic activity was tested in four systems (ultrasound alone (US), nickel foam (NF), US/NF and NF/US/H2O2). The optimal conditions were fixed at 0.1 g/mL NF, initial 5.00 mg/L RhB, 300 W ultrasonic power, pH = 3 and 5.00 mg/L H2O2. The effects of the dissolution of nickel from NF and quenching of the Fenton reaction were studied on degradation efficiency. When the heterogeneous Fenton reaction is combined with TiO2-photocatalysis, the pollutant removal efficiency is enhanced significantly. Through this synergistic effect, 22% and 80% acetochlor was degraded within 10 min and 80 min, respectively. PMID:28773580

  11. Synergetic Effect of Ultrasound, the Heterogeneous Fenton Reaction and Photocatalysis by TiO₂ Loaded on Nickel Foam on the Degradation of Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shan; Xu, Shanwen; Li, Guangming; Yang, Jixian

    2016-06-08

    The synergistic effect of ultrasound, the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and photocatalysis was studied using a nickel foam (NF)-supporting TiO₂ system and rhodamine B (RhB) as a target. The NF-supporting TiO₂ system was prepared by depositing TiO₂ on the skeleton of NF repeatedly and then calcining it. To optimize the conditions and parameters, the catalytic activity was tested in four systems (ultrasound alone (US), nickel foam (NF), US/NF and NF/US/H₂O₂). The optimal conditions were fixed at 0.1 g/mL NF, initial 5.00 mg/L RhB, 300 W ultrasonic power, pH = 3 and 5.00 mg/L H₂O₂. The effects of the dissolution of nickel from NF and quenching of the Fenton reaction were studied on degradation efficiency. When the heterogeneous Fenton reaction is combined with TiO₂-photocatalysis, the pollutant removal efficiency is enhanced significantly. Through this synergistic effect, 22% and 80% acetochlor was degraded within 10 min and 80 min, respectively.

  12. Evaluation of material heterogeneity dosimetric effects using radiochromic film for COMS eye plaques loaded with 125I seeds (model I25.S16)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, Hilal; Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Özbay, İsmail; Kemikler, Gönül; Tuncer, Samuray

    2013-01-01

    four plaque sizes, indicating dose reduction by COMS plaque compared with homogeneous assumption. The dose ratio (film/PS Hetero) values were close to unity, indicating the PS Hetero calculations agree with those from the film study. Conclusions: Substantial heterogeneity effect on the 125 I dose distributions in an eye phantom for COMS plaques was verified using radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. The calculated doses for uniformly loaded plaques using PS with heterogeneity correction option enabled were corroborated by the EBT film measurement data. Radiochromic EBT film dosimetry is feasible in measuring absolute dose distributions in eye phantom for COMS eye plaques loaded with single or multiple 125 I seeds. Plaque Simulator is a viable tool for the calculation of dose distributions if one understands its limitations and uses the proper heterogeneity correction feature.

  13. Proportional evaluation of anterior cruciate ligament footprint size and knee bony morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Ryu, Keinosuke; Aizawa, Shin; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to reveal the correlation in size between the native anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) footprint and the femoral intercondylar notch and the tibia plateau, and to calculate the proportion in size between the ACL footprint and knee bony morphology. Twenty-six non-paired human cadaver knees were used. All soft tissues around the knee were resected except the ACL. The ACL was cut in the middle, and the femoral bone was cut at the most proximal point of the femoral notch. The ACL was carefully dissected, and the periphery of the ACL insertion site was outlined on both the femoral and tibial sides. An accurate lateral view of the femoral condyle and an axial view of the tibial plateau were photographed with a digital camera, and the images were downloaded to a personal computer. The size of the femoral and tibial ACL footprints and the area of the lateral wall of the intercondylar notch and the tibia plateau were measured with Image J software (National Institution of Health). The sizes of the native femoral and tibial ACL footprints were 69.8 ± 25 and 133.8 ± 31.3 mm(2), respectively. The areas of the lateral wall of the intercondylar notch and the tibia plateau were 390.5 ± 70.5 and 2,281.7 ± 377.3 mm(2), respectively. The femoral ACL footprint area and the area of the lateral wall of the femoral intercondylar notch (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.603, p = 0.001), and the tibial ACL footprint area and the area of the tibia plateau (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.452, p = 0.02) both showed significant correlation. The femoral ACL footprint was 17.8 ± 4.9 %, the size of the lateral wall of the femoral intercondylar notch, and the tibial ACL footprint was 5.9 ± 1.3 %, the size of the tibia plateau. For clinical relevance, the femoral ACL footprint is approximately 18 %, the size of the intercondylar notch, and the tibial ACL footprint is approximately 6 %, the size of the tibia plateau. It might be possible to predict the

  14. Surgically Relevant Bony and Soft Tissue Anatomy of the Proximal Femur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Marc J.; Michalski, Max P.; Campbell, Kevin J.; Goldsmith, Mary T.; Devitt, Brian M.; Wijdicks, Coen A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hip endoscopy facilitates the treatment of extra-articular disorders of the proximal femur. Unfortunately, current knowledge of proximal femur anatomy is limited to qualitative descriptions and lacks surgically relevant landmarks. Purpose: To provide a quantitative and qualitative analysis of proximal femur anatomy in reference to surgically relevant bony landmarks. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen cadaveric hemipelvises were dissected. A coordinate measuring device measured dimensions and interrelationships of the gluteal muscles, hip external rotators, pectineus, iliopsoas, and joint capsule in reference to osseous landmarks. Results: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and femoral head-neck junction were distinct and reliable osseous landmarks. The anteroinferior tip of the vastus tubercle was 17.1 mm (95% CI: 14.5, 19.8 mm) anteroinferior to the center of the gluteus medius lateral insertional footprint and was 22.9 mm (95% CI: 20.1, 25.7 mm) inferolateral to the center of the gluteus minimus insertional footprint. The insertions of the piriformis, conjoint tendon of the hip (superior gemellus, obturator internus, and inferior gemellus), and obturator externus were identified relative to the superomedial border of the greater trochanter. The relationship of the aforementioned footprints were 49% (95% CI: 43%, 54%), 42% (95% CI: 33%, 50%), and 64% (95% CI: 59%, 69%) from the anterior (0%) to posterior (100%) margins of the superomedial border of the greater trochanter, respectively. The hip joint capsule attached distally on the proximal femur 18.2 mm (95% CI: 14.2, 22.2 mm) from the head-neck junction medially on average. Conclusion: The vastus tubercle, superomedial border of the greater trochanter, and the femoral head-neck junction were reliable osseous landmarks for the identification of the tendinous and hip capsular insertions on the proximal femur. Knowledge of the

  15. Permian-Triassic Osteichthyes (bony fishes): diversity dynamics and body size evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Carlo; Koot, Martha B; Kogan, Ilja; Brayard, Arnaud; Minikh, Alla V; Brinkmann, Winand; Bucher, Hugo; Kriwet, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    The Permian and Triassic were key time intervals in the history of life on Earth. Both periods are marked by a series of biotic crises including the most catastrophic of such events, the end-Permian mass extinction, which eventually led to a major turnover from typical Palaeozoic faunas and floras to those that are emblematic for the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Here we review patterns in Permian-Triassic bony fishes, a group whose evolutionary dynamics are understudied. Based on data from primary literature, we analyse changes in their taxonomic diversity and body size (as a proxy for trophic position) and explore their response to Permian-Triassic events. Diversity and body size are investigated separately for different groups of Osteichthyes (Dipnoi, Actinistia, 'Palaeopterygii', 'Subholostei', Holostei, Teleosteomorpha), within the marine and freshwater realms and on a global scale (total diversity) as well as across palaeolatitudinal belts. Diversity is also measured for different palaeogeographical provinces. Our results suggest a general trend from low osteichthyan diversity in the Permian to higher levels in the Triassic. Diversity dynamics in the Permian are marked by a decline in freshwater taxa during the Cisuralian. An extinction event during the end-Guadalupian crisis is not evident from our data, but 'palaeopterygians' experienced a significant body size increase across the Guadalupian-Lopingian boundary and these fishes upheld their position as large, top predators from the Late Permian to the Late Triassic. Elevated turnover rates are documented at the Permian-Triassic boundary, and two distinct diversification events are noted in the wake of this biotic crisis, a first one during the Early Triassic (dipnoans, actinistians, 'palaeopterygians', 'subholosteans') and a second one during the Middle Triassic ('subholosteans', neopterygians). The origination of new, small taxa predominantly among these groups during the Middle Triassic event caused a

  16. A Comparison of the Use of Bony Anatomy and Internal Markers for Offline Verification and an Evaluation of the Potential Benefit of Online and Offline Verification Protocols for Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNair, Helen A.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Parker, Christopher; Evans, Phil M.; Norman, Andrew; Miles, Elizabeth; Harris, Emma J.; Del-Acroix, Louise; Smith, Elizabeth; Keane, Richard; Khoo, Vincent S.; Thompson, Alan C.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of intraprostatic markers in the treatment verification of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Specific aims were: to compare the effectiveness of offline correction protocols, either using gold markers or bony anatomy; to estimate the potential benefit of online correction protocol's using gold markers; to determine the presence and effect of intrafraction motion. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with three gold markers inserted had pretreatment and posttreatment images acquired and were treated using an offline correction protocol and gold markers. Retrospectively, an offline protocol was applied using bony anatomy and an online protocol using gold markers. Results: The systematic errors were reduced from 1.3, 1.9, and 2.5 mm to 1.1, 1.1, and 1.5 mm in the right-left (RL), superoinferior (SI), and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively, using the offline correction protocol and gold markers instead of bony anatomy. The subsequent decrease in margins was 1.7, 3.3, and 4 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. An offline correction protocol combined with an online correction protocol in the first four fractions reduced random errors further to 0.9, 1.1, and 1.0 mm in the RL, SI, and AP directions, respectively. A daily online protocol reduced all errors to <1 mm. Intrafraction motion had greater impact on the effectiveness of the online protocol than the offline protocols. Conclusions: An offline protocol using gold markers is effective in reducing the systematic error. The value of online protocols is reduced by intrafraction motion

  17. The effect of heterogeneity in uptake of the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine on the potential for outbreaks of measles: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, John W; Feng, Zhilan; Omer, Saad B; Smith, Philip J; Rodewald, Lance E

    2016-05-01

    Vaccination programmes to prevent outbreaks after introductions of infectious people aim to maintain the average number of secondary infections per infectious person at one or less. We aimed to assess heterogeneity in vaccine uptake and other characteristics that, together with non-random mixing, could increase this number and to evaluate strategies that could mitigate their impact. Because most US children attend elementary school in their own neighbourhoods, surveys of children entering elementary school (age 5 years before Sept 1) allow assessment of spatial heterogeneity in the proportion of children immune to vaccine-preventable diseases. We used data from a 2008 school-entry survey by the Immunization Division of the California Department of Public Health to obtain school addresses; numbers of students enrolled; proportions of enrolled students who had received one or two doses of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine; and proportions with medical or personal-belief exemptions. Using a mixing model suitable for spatially-stratified populations, we projected the expected numbers of secondary infections per infectious person for measles, mumps, and rubella. We also mapped contributions to this number for measles in San Diego County's 638 elementary schools and its largest district, comprising 200 schools (31%). We then modelled the effect on measles' realised reproduction number (RV) of the following plausible interventions: vaccinating all children with personal-belief exemptions, increasing uptake by 10% to 50% in all low-immunity schools (3 or contacts inter-school >30%) low-immunity schools, and increasing private school uptake to the public school average. In 2008, 39 132 children began elementary school in San Diego County, CA, USA. At entry to school, 97% had received at least one dose of the MMR vaccine, with 2·5% having personal-belief exemptions. We note substantial heterogeneity in immunity throughout the county. Although the average

  18. Quantification of antiangiogenic treatment effects on tissue heterogeneity in glioma tumour xenograft model using a combination of DCE-MRI and 3D-ultramicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominietto, Marco [University and ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Basel, Biomaterials Science Center, Allschwil (Switzerland); Dobosz, Michael; Renner, Anja; Scheuer, Werner [Roche Innovation Center Penzberg, Discovery Oncology, Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development (pRED), Penzberg (Germany); Buergi, Sandra; Rudin, Markus [University and ETH Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Zahlmann, Gudrun [pRED, Oncology DTA, Innovation Center Basel, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    This study aimed at assessing the effects of an anti-angiogenic treatment, which neutralises vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), on tumour heterogeneity. Murine glioma cells have been inoculated into the right brain frontal lobe of 16 mice. Anti-VEGF antibody was administered to a first group (n = 8), while a second group (n = 8) received a placebo. Magnetic resonance acquisitions, performed at days 10, 12, 15 and 23 following the implantation, allowed the derivation of a three-dimensional features dataset characterising tumour heterogeneity. Three-dimensional ultramicroscopy and standard histochemistry analysis have been performed to verify in vivo results. Placebo-treated mice displayed a highly-vascularised area at the tumour periphery, a monolithic necrotic core and a chaotic dense vasculature across the entire tumour. In contrast, the B20-treated group did not show any highly vascularised regions and presents a fragmented necrotic core. A significant reduction of the number of vessel segments smaller than 17 μm has been observed. There was no difference in overall tumour volume and growth rate between the two groups. Region-specific analysis revealed that VEGF inhibition affects only: (1) highly angiogenic compartments expressing high levels of VEGF and characterised by small capillaries, and also (2) the formation and structure of necrotic regions. These effects appear to be transient and limited in time. (orig.)

  19. The impact of horizontal heterogeneities, cloud fraction, and liquid water path on warm cloud effective radii from CERES-like Aqua MODIS retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Painemal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of horizontal heterogeneities, liquid water path (LWP from AMSR-E, and cloud fraction (CF on MODIS cloud effective radius (re, retrieved from the 2.1 μm (re2.1 and 3.8 μm (re3.8 channels, is investigated for warm clouds over the southeast Pacific. Values of re retrieved using the CERES algorithms are averaged at the CERES footprint resolution (∼20 km, while heterogeneities (Hσ are calculated as the ratio between the standard deviation and mean 0.64 μm reflectance. The value of re2.1 strongly depends on CF, with magnitudes up to 5 μm larger than those for overcast scenes, whereas re3.8 remains insensitive to CF. For cloudy scenes, both re2.1 and re3.8 increase with Hσ for any given AMSR-E LWP, but re2.1 changes more than for re3.8. Additionally, re3.8–re2.1 differences are positive (Hσ 45 gm−2, and negative (up to −4 μm for larger Hσ. While re3.8–re2.1 differences in homogeneous scenes are qualitatively consistent with in situ microphysical observations over the region of study, negative differences – particularly evinced in mean regional maps – are more likely to reflect the dominant bias associated with cloud heterogeneities rather than information about the cloud vertical structure. The consequences for MODIS LWP are also discussed.

  20. Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex on the Gratitude of Individuals with Heterogeneous Ability in an Experimental Labor Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, which benefits mental health and interpersonal relationships. Thus, elucidating the neural mechanism of gratitude, which is only now beginning to be investigated, is important. To this end, this study specifies the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC involved in the gratitude of heterogeneous individuals using the transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS technique. Previous neural studies have shown the involvement of mPFC in social cognition and value evaluation, which are closely related to gratitude. However, the causal relationship between this neural area and gratitude has not been fully examined and the effect of individual social heterogeneity has been ignored. Meanwhile, behavioral economics studies have proposed that the abilities of employees in the labor market would affect their gratitude and emotional response. Thus, we designed an experiment based on gift exchange game to investigate the relationship between mPFC and gratitude of heterogeneous employees. Before the experiment, participants were asked to perform self-cognition of their abilities through an appropriately difficult task. We then used the effort of participants to imply their gratitude and analyzed the effort levels of employees with different abilities under anodal, cathodal, and sham stimulations. The results showed that employees under anodal stimulation were significantly likely to increase their effort than those under sham stimulation, and employees under cathodal stimulation ranked at the bottom of the list. Moreover, the effort levels of low-ability employees were obviously higher than those of high-ability employees. The cathodal stimulation of mPFC significantly reduced the effort levels of low-ability employees, whereas its anodal tDCS stimulation increased the effort levels of high-ability employees. These outcomes verify the relationship between mPFC and gratitude using tDCS and provided one of the first

  1. Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Medial Prefrontal Cortex on the Gratitude of Individuals with Heterogeneous Ability in an Experimental Labor Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Guangrong; Niu, Xiaofei; Shang, Huiliang; Li, Jianbiao

    2017-01-01

    Gratitude is an important aspect of human sociality, which benefits mental health and interpersonal relationships. Thus, elucidating the neural mechanism of gratitude, which is only now beginning to be investigated, is important. To this end, this study specifies the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) involved in the gratitude of heterogeneous individuals using the transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) technique. Previous neural studies have shown the involvement of mPFC in social cognition and value evaluation, which are closely related to gratitude. However, the causal relationship between this neural area and gratitude has not been fully examined and the effect of individual social heterogeneity has been ignored. Meanwhile, behavioral economics studies have proposed that the abilities of employees in the labor market would affect their gratitude and emotional response. Thus, we designed an experiment based on gift exchange game to investigate the relationship between mPFC and gratitude of heterogeneous employees. Before the experiment, participants were asked to perform self-cognition of their abilities through an appropriately difficult task. We then used the effort of participants to imply their gratitude and analyzed the effort levels of employees with different abilities under anodal, cathodal, and sham stimulations. The results showed that employees under anodal stimulation were significantly likely to increase their effort than those under sham stimulation, and employees under cathodal stimulation ranked at the bottom of the list. Moreover, the effort levels of low-ability employees were obviously higher than those of high-ability employees. The cathodal stimulation of mPFC significantly reduced the effort levels of low-ability employees, whereas its anodal tDCS stimulation increased the effort levels of high-ability employees. These outcomes verify the relationship between mPFC and gratitude using tDCS and provided one of the first instances of

  2. Effect of spatial heterogeneities of water fluxes and application pattern on cadusafos fate on banana-cultivated andosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saison, C; Cattan, P; Louchart, X; Voltz, M

    2008-12-24

    In tropical humid environments under intensive banana production, pesticide transfer in waters can be of particular concern due to heavy rainfall, steep slopes, and soils with high infiltration capacities. The transfer in percolation and runoff waters of the nematicide cadusafos was investigated during a three month field experiment. The spatial heterogeneity of the banana plantation was taken into account by measuring percolation fluxes both under the banana plants and in the interrows with a specially designed lysimeter device installed at 60 cm depth. At the field scale, 0.34% of the pesticide applied was transferred in percolation, 0.13% in runoff. Forty-nine percent of cadusafos losses occurred by percolation under the banana plants, 23% by interrow percolation, and 28% by runoff. Losses were highest during the three weeks following cadusafos application, and this is also when dissipation in the soil was highest (calculated half-life in the soil: 7d). After this period, losses of cadusafos were low, both in soil and waters. Under the banana plant, saturated fluxes carried most of the pesticide, despite total percolation fluxes being at least five-times higher than saturated ones. Although overall pesticide transfer in water was low (0.5% of applied), it was not negligible due to the frequency of pesticide application in these areas.

  3. Studying boundary effects on animal movement in heterogeneous landscapes: the case of Abax ater (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in hedgerow network landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M; Bastardie, F; Richard, D; Burel, F

    2001-11-01

    Changes in movement possibilities of insect species can be a response to increasing heterogeneity in man made landscapes. We studied the movement of Abax ater (Coleoptera, Carabidae) between woody and cultivated areas in Brittany. Two woody habitats (woods and hedgerows) and two cultivated areas (cornfields and meadows) were considered. Quantifying the movement of the carabid beetle between woody and cultivated areas was done using Mark-Release-Recapture techniques. Marked individuals were released at the centre of circular enclosures (3 m in diameter), encompassing two adjacent habitats, one being wooded, the other cultivated. Individuals were recaptured at the edge of enclosures. Analysis of recaptures showed that flows of individuals from a given habitat to another were constant during the experiment. Flows can be summed up by a probability of move, which depends on the two adjacent habitats surrounding ecotone. When released in cultivated habitats, forest carabid beetles preferentially moved toward woody habitat, but in some enclosures the forest carabid beetles did not exhibited any preference between cultivated areas and woods. In these cases ecotones may include both woody and cultivated areas, and their functional width should be reconsidered. These conclusions were globally in agreement with knowledge about ecology of Abax ater, but ask for confirmation through replicates on different sites. Nevertheless, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the method and give new guidelines for the study of flows of carabid beetles through ecotones.

  4. Experimental constraints on the energy budget of dynamic gouge formation: effects of rock strength, material heterogeneity, and initial flaw characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Ashley; Barber, Troy; Borjas, Christopher; Ghaffari, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Fault core materials are characterized by substantial grain size reduction relative to host and damage zone rocks. The properties of these materials control fault strength and frictional behavior, and they record valuable information about rupture and slip processes. At high strain rates and large stress amplitudes characteristic of earthquake rupture tips, rock failure passes through a fragmentation transition from discrete fracture to pulverization; therefore much of the observed grain size reduction at the leading edge of propagating earthquake ruptures. Past examinations of particle size distributions in gouge formed in the cores of natural faults have led to contrasting conclusions that during a single event, the energy associated with creation of new surface area during this grain size reduction can be as large as 50%, or as little as post-mortem specimens. We show that the energy partitioned into creation of new surface areas approaches a significant portion of the total dissipated energy during our experiments, but this partitioning can be buffered by the presence of flaws and/or significant material heterogeneity. The results of this work have important implications for lithologic controls on gouge formation and energy partitioning during earthquakes.

  5. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity in Chemical Composition on Online Single-Particle Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Sea Spray Aerosol Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Camille M; Collins, Douglas B; Prather, Kimberly A

    2017-04-04

    Knowledge of the surface composition of sea spray aerosols (SSA) is critical for understanding and predicting climate-relevant impacts. Offline microscopy and spectroscopy studies have shown that dry supermicron SSA tend to be spatially heterogeneous particles with sodium- and chloride-rich cores surrounded by organic enriched surface layers containing minor inorganic seawater components such as magnesium and calcium. At the same time, single-particle mass spectrometry reveals several different mass spectral ion patterns, suggesting that there may be a number of chemically distinct particle types. This study investigates factors controlling single particle mass spectra of nascent supermicron SSA. Depth profiling experiments conducted on SSA generated by a fritted bubbler and total ion intensity analysis of SSA generated by a marine aerosol reference tank were compared with observations of ambient SSA observed at two coastal locations. Analysis of SSA produced by utilizing controlled laboratory methods reveals that single-particle mass spectra with weak sodium ion signals can be produced by the desorption of the surface of typical dry SSA particles composed of salt cores and organic-rich coatings. Thus, this lab-based study for the first time unifies findings from offline and online measurements as well as lab and field studies of the SSA particle-mixing state.

  6. Effects of transverse electric field and heterogeneity of a poorly electrically conducting fluid saturated nanoporous zeolites acquiring smart material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudraiah, N.; Ranganna, G.; Shilpa, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explain a Mathematical Model involving Darcy linear drag, Forchheimer quadratic drag, horizontal density gradient and the variation of electrical conductivity due to organic substances dissolved in a heterogeneous Boussinesq poorly conducting couple stress fluid flow (PCPCSFF) through Nano Porous Zeolites regarded as densely packed porous media. Initially, the flow is at rest and set in motion due to initial piecewise horizontal concentration gradient. Analytical solutions, for electric potential using the Maxwell field equations and for velocity and density using nonlinear Darcy – Forchheimer equation in the presence of couple stress and electric force are obtained using the method of time series evolution. The analytical solutions for streamlines and density are computed for different values of time, t, for a particular value of electric number W 1 and couple stress parameterβ and the results are depicted graphically in figures 1 and 2. From these figures we found that the streamlines are closer in the region of x 0 and the density profiles are concentrated in the lower region and develop curvature in the presence of electric field and couple stress parameter. The physical reason for the nature of streamlines and density profiles are given in the last section and some important conclusions are drawn. (author)

  7. Probing functional groups at the gas-aerosol interface using heterogeneous titration reactions: a tool for predicting aerosol health effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyan, Ari; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Guillemin, Michel; Riediker, Michael; Demirdjian, Benjamin; Rossi, Michel J

    2010-12-17

    The complex chemical and physical nature of combustion and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) in general precludes the complete characterization of both bulk and interfacial components. The bulk composition reveals the history of the growth process and therefore the source region, whereas the interface controls--to a large extent--the interaction with gases, biological membranes, and solid supports. We summarize the development of a soft interrogation technique, using heterogeneous chemistry, for the interfacial functional groups of selected probe gases [N(CH(3))(3), NH(2)OH, CF(3)COOH, HCl, O(3), NO(2)] of different reactivity. The technique reveals the identity and density of surface functional groups. Examples include acidic and basic sites, olefinic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) sites, and partially and completely oxidized surface sites. We report on the surface composition and oxidation states of laboratory-generated aerosols and of aerosols sampled in several bus depots. In the latter case, the biomarker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, signaling oxidative stress caused by aerosol exposure, was isolated. The increase in biomarker levels over a working day is correlated with the surface density N(i)(O3) of olefinic and/or PAH sites obtained from O(3) uptakes as well as with the initial uptake coefficient, γ(0), of five probe gases used in the field. This correlation with γ(0) suggests the idea of competing pathways occurring at the interface of the aerosol particles between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for oxidative stress and cellular antioxidants.

  8. Synthesis of biodiesel from sunflower oil over potassium loaded alumina as heterogeneous catalyst: The effect of process parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinkovic Milos M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous catalysis is in recent focus of research for biodiesel production from vegetable oils because of advantages such as easy separation and reuse of catalysts, although homogeneous catalysis is most commonly used method. The aim of this study was preparation of γ-Al2O3 support by modified sol-gel procedure, synthesis of the KI/Al2O3 catalyst and testing its activity in the transesterification of sunflower oil with methanol. Influences of different process parameters on conversion of sunflower oil to methyl esters were examined. The gained results implicate that the potassium iodide incorporation into/onto the structure of γ-Al2O3 significantly influences textural and structural properties of the catalyst. Additionally, the catalyst basic strength is increased and all together those properties are positively affecting the activity of the catalyst in the reaction of transesterification of sunflower oil with methanol. The impregnation of alumina with potassium iodide resulted in the additional formation of basic catalytically active sites. The surface properties of the catalyst have an essential impact on its catalytic performance. Under relatively mild process conditions and relatively short reaction time, the usage of the KI/Al2O3 catalyst resulted in very high conversion to fatty acids methyl esters (i.e. 99.99 %. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172061 i br. TR 34008

  9. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify......Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described...

  10. Thermal properties of heterogeneous fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staicu, D.; Beauvy, M.

    1998-01-01

    Fresh or irradiated nuclear fuels are composites or solid solutions more or less heterogeneous, and their thermal conductivities are strongly dependent on the microstructure. The effective thermal conductivities of these heterogeneous solids must be determined for the modelling of the behaviour under irradiation. Different methods (analytical or numerical) published in the literature can be used for the calculation of this effective thermal conductivity. They are analysed and discussed, but finally only few of them are really useful because the assumptions selected are often not compatible with the complex microstructures observed in the fuels. Numerical calculations of the effective thermal conductivity of various fuels based on the microstructure information provided in our laboratory by optical microscopy or electron micro-probe analysis images, have been done for the validation of these methods. The conditions necessary for accurate results on effective thermal conductivity through these numerical calculations are discussed. (author)

  11. Different effects of surface heterogeneous atoms of porous and non-porous carbonaceous materials on adsorption of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weifeng; Ni, Jinzhi

    2017-05-01

    The surface heterogeneous atoms of carbonaceous materials (CMs) play an important role in adsorption of organic pollutants. However, little is known about the surface heterogeneous atoms of CMs might generate different effect on adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds by porous carbonaceous materials - activated carbons (ACs) and non-porous carbonaceous materials (NPCMs). In this study, we observed that the surface oxygen and nitrogen atoms could decrease the adsorption affinity of both ACs and NPCMs for 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane (TeCA), but the degree of decreasing effects were very different. The increasing content of surface oxygen and nitrogen ([O + N]) caused a sharper decrease in adsorption affinity of ACs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.098∼-0.16) than that of NPCMs (slope of lg (k d /SA) vs [O + N]: -0.025∼-0.059) for TeCA. It was due to the water cluster formed by the surface hydrophilic atoms that could block the micropores and generate massive invalid adsorption sites in the micropores of ACs, while the water cluster only occupied the surface adsorption sites of NPCMs. Furthermore, with the increasing concentration of dissolved TeCA, the effect of surface area on adsorption affinity of NPCMs for TeCA kept constant while the effect of [O + N] decreased due to the competitive adsorption between water molecule and TeCA on the surface of NPCMs, meanwhile, both the effects of micropore volume and [O + N] on adsorption affinity of ACs for TeCA were decreased due to the mechanism of micropore volume filling. These findings are valuable for providing a deep insight into the adsorption mechanisms of CMs for TeCA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal joints in early rheumatoid arthritis: comparison of MRI and high-resolution SPECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, A; Wirrwar, A; Mattes-György, K; Blondin, D; Reichelt, D; Müller, H-W; Schneider, M; Mödder, U; Ostendorf, B

    2009-09-01

    Comparison of MRI with a newly developed high-resolution multi-pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (MPH-SPECT) regarding the detection of bony pathologies of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA). The clinically dominant hand of 15 patients with ERA (disease duration 6 months) was examined using MRI and MPH-SPECT. The evaluation of MRI was achieved according to RAMRIS criteria and for the MPH SPECT regarding pathological tracer uptake and distribution. Image fusions of MRI and MPH-SPECT were provided and the two methods were compared. In MRI 12 of 15 patients showed arthritic joint pathologies, while 8 patients exhibited soft tissue and bony changes. 4 patients had only soft tissue inflammation (synovitis) with a normal bone signal. In MPH-SPECT 10 of 15 patients showed pathologically increased bone metabolism. The fusion images presented a high agreement of the pathological changes in both methods, while areas with increased bone metabolism were not only present in the case of erosions, but also in the case of bone edema. In 2 patients increased bone metabolism was detectable in areas of MR tomographic normal bone, while a clear surrounding synovitis was present in each case here. The comparison of MPH-SPECT with MRI proves that the latter is a sensitive procedure for the detection of bony pathologies of MCP joints in ERA. A normal bone signal in MRI does not exclude early changes in bone metabolism in cases of severe synovialitis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  13. Atlas-based and DTI-guided quantification of human brain cerebral blood flow: feasibility, quality assurance, spatial heterogeneity and age effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Khader M; Ali, Hiba; Shad, Mujeeb U

    2013-10-01

    Accurate and noninvasive quantification of regional cerebral blood perfusion (CBF) of the human brain tissue would advance the study of the complex interplay between human brain structure and function, in both health and disease. Despite the plethora of works on CBF in gray matter, a detailed quantitative white matter perfusion atlas has not been presented on healthy adults using the International Consortium for Brain Mapping atlases. In this study, we present a host of assurance measures such as temporal stability, spatial heterogeneity and age effects of regional and global CBF in selected deep, cortical gray matter and white matter tracts identified and quantified using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We utilized whole brain high-resolution DTI combined with arterial spin labeling to quantify regional CBF on 15 healthy adults aged 23.2-57.1years. We present total brain and regional CBF, corresponding volume, mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy spatial heterogeneity, and dependence on age as additional quality assurance measures to compare with published trends using both MRI and nuclear medicine methods. Total CBF showed a steady decrease with age in gray matter (r=-0.58; P=.03), whereas total CBF of white matter did not significantly change with age (r=0.11; P=.7). This quantitative report offers a preliminary baseline of CBF, volume and DTI measurements for the design of future multicenter and clinical studies utilizing noninvasive perfusion and DT-MRI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy in industrial heterogeneous catalysis: effect of oxidant on FePO4 material phase transformations in direct methanol synthesis from methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C.; Khan, Faiza B.; Hanzel, Darko; Bharuth-Ram, Krish; Likozar, Blaž

    2017-11-01

    The effect of the FePO4 material phase transformation in the direct selective oxidation of methane to methanol was studied using various oxidants, i.e. O2, H2O and N2O. The phases of the heterogeneous catalyst applied, before and after the reactions, were characterized by M¨ossbauer spectroscopy. The main reaction products were methanol, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, whereas formaldehyde was produced in rather minute amounts. The Mössbauer spectra showed the change of the initial catalyst material, FePO4 (tridymite-like phase (tdm)), to the reduced metal form, iron(II) pyrophosphate, Fe2P2O7, and thereafter, the material phase change was governed by the oxidation with individual oxidizing species.Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements applied along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on fresh, reduced and spent catalytic materials demonstrated a transformation of the catalyst to a mixture of phases which depended on operating process conditions. Generally, activity was low and should be a subject of further material optimization and engineering, while the selectivity towards methanol at low temperatures applied was adequate. The proceeding redox mechanism should thus play a key role in catalytic material design, while the advantage of iron-based heterogeneous catalysts primarily lies in them being comparably inexpensive and comprising non-critical raw materials only.

  15. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy in industrial heterogeneous catalysis: effect of oxidant on FePO{sub 4} material phase transformations in direct methanol synthesis from methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasireddy, Venkata D. B. C., E-mail: dasireddy@ki.si [National Institute of Chemistry, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering (Slovenia); Khan, Faiza B. [Energy Technology (South Africa); Hanzel, Darko [Jozef Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Bharuth-Ram, Krish [Durban University of Technology, Physics Department (South Africa); Likozar, Blaž [National Institute of Chemistry, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Reaction Engineering (Slovenia)

    2017-11-15

    The effect of the FePO{sub 4} material phase transformation in the direct selective oxidation of methane to methanol was studied using various oxidants, i.e. O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O. The phases of the heterogeneous catalyst applied, before and after the reactions, were characterized by M¨ossbauer spectroscopy. The main reaction products were methanol, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, whereas formaldehyde was produced in rather minute amounts. The Mössbauer spectra showed the change of the initial catalyst material, FePO{sub 4} (tridymite-like phase (tdm)), to the reduced metal form, iron(II) pyrophosphate, Fe{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, and thereafter, the material phase change was governed by the oxidation with individual oxidizing species.Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements applied along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on fresh, reduced and spent catalytic materials demonstrated a transformation of the catalyst to a mixture of phases which depended on operating process conditions. Generally, activity was low and should be a subject of further material optimization and engineering, while the selectivity towards methanol at low temperatures applied was adequate. The proceeding redox mechanism should thus play a key role in catalytic material design, while the advantage of iron-based heterogeneous catalysts primarily lies in them being comparably inexpensive and comprising non-critical raw materials only.

  16. Effects of nutrient heterogeneity and competition on root architecture of spruce seedlings: implications for an essential feature of root foraging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Nan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have limited understanding of root foraging responses when plants were simultaneously exposed to nutrient heterogeneity and competition, and our goal was to determine whether and how plants integrate information about nutrients and neighbors in root foraging processes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiment was conducted in split-containers, wherein half of the roots of spruce (Picea asperata seedlings were subjected to intraspecific root competition (the vegetated half, while the other half experienced no competition (the non-vegetated half. Experimental treatments included fertilization in the vegetated half (FV, the non-vegetated half (FNV, and both compartments (F, as well as no fertilization (NF. The root architecture indicators consisted of the number of root tips over the root surface (RTRS, the length percentage of diameter-based fine root subclasses to total fine root (SRLP, and the length percentage of each root order to total fine root (ROLP. The target plants used novel root foraging behaviors under different combinations of neighboring plant and localized fertilization. In addition, the significant increase in the RTRS of 0-0.2 mm fine roots after fertilization of the vegetated half alone and its significant decrease in fertilizer was applied throughout the plant clearly showed that plant root foraging behavior was regulated by local responses coupled with systemic control mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We measured the root foraging ability for woody plants by means of root architecture indicators constructed by the roots possessing essential nutrient uptake ability (i.e., the first three root orders, and provided new evidence that plants integrate multiple forms of environmental information, such as nutrient status and neighboring competitors, in a non-additive manner during the root foraging process. The interplay between the responses of individual root modules (repetitive root units to localized

  17. Sub-crestal positioning of implants results in higher bony crest resorption: an experimental study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Gianfranco; Lang, Niklaus P; Salata, Luiz A; Schweikert, Michael T; Gutierrez Hernandez, Maria Elena; Botticelli, Daniele

    2015-12-01

    To compare peri-implant soft- and hard-tissue integration at implants installed juxta- or sub-crestally. Furthermore, differences in the hard and soft peri-implant tissue dimensions at sites prepared with drills or sonic instruments were to be evaluated. Three months after tooth extraction in six dogs, recipient sites were prepared in both sides of the mandible using conventional drills or a sonic device (Sonosurgery(®)). Two implants with a 1.7-mm high-polished neck were installed, one with the rough/smooth surface interface placed at the level of the buccal bony crest (control) and the second placed 1.3 mm deeper (test). After 8 weeks of non-submerged healing, biopsies were harvested and ground sections prepared for histological evaluation. The buccal distances between the abutment/fixture junction (AF) and the most coronal level of osseointegration (B) were 1.6 ± 0.6 and 2.4 ± 0.4 mm; between AF and the top of the bony crest (C), they were 1.4 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.2 mm at the test and control sites, respectively. The top of the peri-implant mucosa (PM) was located more coronally at the test (1.2 ± 0.6 mm) compared to the control sites (0.6 ± 0.5 mm). However, when the original position of the bony crest was taken into account, a higher bone loss and a more apical position of the peri-implant mucosa resulted at the test sites. The placement of implants into a sub-crestal location resulted in a higher vertical buccal bone resorption and a more apical position of the peri-implant mucosa in relation to the level of the bony crest at implant installation. Moreover, peri-implant hard-tissue dimensions were similar at sites prepared with either drills or Sonosurgery(®). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, C; Ding, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  19. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frame, C; Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  20. SU-E-J-33: Comparison Between Soft Tissue Alignment and Bony Alignment for Pancreatic Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Y; Crane, C; Krishnan, S; Das, P; Koay, E; Beddar, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose An IGRT modality for pancreatic cancer treatment with dose escalation at our institution is in-room daily CT imaging. The purpose of this study is to assess the difference between soft tissue alignment and bony alignment for pancreatic tumor localization. Methods Eighteen patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent IMRT treatment with an inspiration breath-hold technique between July 2012 and February 2015 are included in this study. Prior to each treatment, a CT scan was acquired. The CT image guidance started with auto-alignment to either the bony anatomy (vertebral bodies) or fiducials (for the six patients with the stent in/near the tumor) and then, when necessary, manual adjustments were made based on soft tissue alignment using clinical software (CT-Assisted Targeting system). The difference between soft tissue alignment and bony/fiducial alignment was evaluated. Results Of all 380 treatments, manual adjustment was made in 225 treatments, ranging from 11% (3 treatments out of 28) to 96% (27 treatments out of 28) per patient. The mean of the difference between soft tissue alignment and bony/fiducial alignment per patient ranged from −3.6 to 0.3 mm, −1.5 to 2.8 mm, and −3.3 to 3.4 mm in the AP, SI, and RL directions, respectively. The maximum difference over all treatments was −9.5, −14.6, and −14.6 mm in the AP, SI, and RL directions, respectively. Conclusion About 60% of the time, manual adjustment based on soft tissue alignment was required. The extent of manual adjustment was usually small but varied significantly from patient to patient. The ultimate goal of the IGRT modality using daily CT imaging is not to fully cover the target but to spare organs-at-risk as much as possible to avoid them moving into higher dose gradients than accepted in the treatment plan. To this end, manual adjustment based on soft tissue alignment is critically important.

  1. PET imaging for the quantification of biologically heterogeneous tumours: measuring the effect of relative position on image-based quantification of dose-painting targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Keisha C; Barbee, David L; Kissick, Michael W; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-05-21

    Quantitative imaging of tumours represents the foundation of customized therapies and adaptive patient care. As such, we have investigated the effect of patient positioning errors on the reproducibility of images of biologically heterogeneous tumours generated by a clinical PET/CT system. A commercial multi-slice PET/CT system was used to acquire 2D and 3D PET images of a phantom containing multiple spheres of known volumes and known radioactivity concentrations and suspended in an aqueous medium. The spheres served as surrogates for sub-tumour regions of biological heterogeneities with dimensions of 5-15 mm. Between image acquisitions, a motorized-arm was used to reposition the spheres in 1 mm intervals along either the radial or the axial direction. Images of the phantom were reconstructed using typical diagnostic reconstruction techniques, and these images were analysed to characterize and model the position-dependent changes in contrast recovery. A simulation study was also conducted to investigate the effect of patient position on the reproducibility of PET imaging of biologically heterogeneous head and neck (HN) tumours. For this simulation study, we calculated the changes in image intensity values that would occur with changes in the relative position of the patients at the time of imaging. PET images of two HN patients were used to simulate an imaging study that incorporated set-up errors that are typical for HN patients. One thousand randomized positioning errors were investigated for each patient. As a result of the phantom study, a position-dependent trend was identified for measurements of contrast recovery of small objects. The peak contrast recovery occurred at radial and axial positions that coincide with the centre of the image voxel. Conversely, the minimum contrast recovery occurred when the object was positioned at the edges of the image voxel. Changing the position of high contrast spheres by one-half the voxel dimension lead to errors in the

  2. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  3. Modelling foraging movements of diving predators: a theoretical study exploring the effect of heterogeneous landscapes on foraging efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimienti, Marianna; Bartoń, Kamil A; Scott, Beth E; Travis, Justin M J

    2014-01-01

    starting point to understand the energetic reasons for a range of potential predator responses to spatial heterogeneity and environmental uncertainties in terms of search behaviour and predator-prey interactions. We highlight future directions that integrated empirical and modelling studies should take to improve our ability to predict how diving predators will be impacted by the deployment of manmade structures in the marine environment.

  4. Neurobiological heterogeneity in ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zeeuw, P.

    2011-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a highly heterogeneous disorder clinically. Symptoms take many forms, from subtle but pervasive attention problems or dreaminess up to disruptive and unpredictable behavior. Interestingly, early neuroscientific work on ADHD assumed either a

  5. Bird diversity and environmental heterogeneity in North America: A test of the area-heterogeneity trade-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Chocron; Curtis H. Flather; Ronen Kadmon

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Deterministic niche theory predicts that increasing environmental heterogeneity increases species richness. In contrast, a recent stochastic model suggests that heterogeneity has a unimodal effect on species richness since high levels of heterogeneity reduce the effective area available per species, thereby increasing the likelihood of stochastic...

  6. Daily online bony correction is required for prostate patients without fiducial markers or soft-tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, M L; Vial, P; Wiltshire, K L; Bell, L J; Blome, S; Kerestes, Z; Morgan, G W; O'Driscoll, D; Shakespeare, T P; Eade, T N

    2011-09-01

    To compare online position verification strategies with offline correction protocols for patients undergoing definitive prostate radiotherapy. We analysed 50 patients with implanted fiducial markers undergoing curative prostate radiation treatment, all of whom underwent daily kilovoltage imaging using an on-board imager. For each treatment, patients were set-up initially with skin tattoos and in-room lasers. Orthogonal on-board imager images were acquired and the couch shift to match both bony anatomy and the fiducial markers recorded. The set-up error using skin tattoos and offline bone correction was compared with online bone correction. The fiducial markers were used as the reference. Data from 1923 fractions were analysed. The systematic error was ≤1 mm for all protocols. The average random error was 2-3mm for online bony correction and 3-5mm for skin tattoos or offline-bone. Online-bone showed a significant improvement compared with offline-bone in the number of patients with >5mm set-up errors for >10% (P20% (Pmarkers or daily soft-tissue imaging. Copyright © 2011 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Computed tomographic findings of skull base bony changes after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: implications for local recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuan-Miao; Liu, Xue-Wen; Li, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Mo, Yun-Xian; Li, Jian-Peng; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Zheng, Lie; Lv, Yan-Chun; Wu, Pei-Hong

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate bony changes in the skull base after radiotherapy by computed tomography (CT) and their correlation with local recurrence in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) without previous involvement of the skull base. Retrospective study. Sun-Yat Sen University Cancer Center. The records of 80 patients with NPC during the period from January 1992 to December 2005 were reviewed. All patients had been treated with radical radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy at standard doses and were followed up with plain and contrast-enhanced CT every 6 months for 45.5 (range 12-108) months. The types, areas, time of the first occurrence after radiotherapy and development of the postradiation bony changes of the skull base, and local recurrence rates of NPC were measured. Eighteen patients (22.5%) had sclerosis in some area of the skull base, and the sclerosis in 5 (27.8%) of these patients changed into osteoporosis in 1 to 5 years after its appearance. Seventeen patients (21.3%) had osteolysis. The local recurrence rate of patients with osteolysis was observed to be significantly higher than that of patients with sclerosis (p < .0001). The appearance of osteolytic changes in the skull base during follow-up of patients with NPC who had normal skull base morphology before treatment was associated with tumour recurrence.

  8. The Effect of Variation in Developmental Mode on the Population Dynamics of a Spionid Polychaete (Pygospio elegans) in a Heterogeneous Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thonig, Anne

    by the short life span of P. elegans and sweepstakes reproductive success. Additionally, stochastic events, such as rain storms, can lead to abrupt drops in salinity which can be detrimental for P. elegans and hence introduce further changes in population structure. Seasonal dynamics, including sexual...... reproduction, were correlated with temperature, whereas spatial differences in density, size and reproductive activity of P. elegans as well as species diversity of the benthic invertebrate community, were related to sediment structure. A positive correlation between species and allelic richness of P. elegans......The effect of variation in developmental mode on the population dynamics of a spionid polychaete (Pygospio elegans) in a heterogeneous environment. Yhteenveto: Kehitysmuotojen variaatio ja sen vaikutus Pygospio elegans - monisukasmadon populaatiodynamiikkaan heterogeenisessä ympäristössä. Oversigt...

  9. Heterogeneous integration of epitaxial Ge on Si using AlAs/GaAs buffer architecture: suitability for low-power fin field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudait, Mantu K; Clavel, Michael; Goley, Patrick; Jain, Nikhil; Zhu, Yan

    2014-11-07

    Germanium-based materials and device architectures have recently appeared as exciting material systems for future low-power nanoscale transistors and photonic devices. Heterogeneous integration of germanium (Ge)-based materials on silicon (Si) using large bandgap buffer architectures could enable the monolithic integration of electronics and photonics. In this paper, we report on the heterogeneous integration of device-quality epitaxial Ge on Si using composite AlAs/GaAs large bandgap buffer, grown by molecular beam epitaxy that is suitable for fabricating low-power fin field-effect transistors required for continuing transistor miniaturization. The superior structural quality of the integrated Ge on Si using AlAs/GaAs was demonstrated using high-resolution x-ray diffraction analysis. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed relaxed Ge with high crystalline quality and a sharp Ge/AlAs heterointerface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated a large valence band offset at the Ge/AlAs interface, as compared to Ge/GaAs heterostructure, which is a prerequisite for superior carrier confinement. The temperature-dependent electrical transport properties of the n-type Ge layer demonstrated a Hall mobility of 370 cm(2)/Vs at 290 K and 457 cm(2)/Vs at 90 K, which suggests epitaxial Ge grown on Si using an AlAs/GaAs buffer architecture would be a promising candidate for next-generation high-performance and energy-efficient fin field-effect transistor applications.

  10. Up-scaling of a two-phase flow model including gravity effect in geological heterogeneous media: application to CO2 sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Tri-Dat

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the mathematical modeling and the numerical simulation of the migration under gravity and capillarity effects of the supercritical CO 2 injected into a geological heterogeneous sequestration site. The simulations are performed with the code DuMux. Particularly, we consider the up-scaling, from the cell scale to the reservoir scale, of a two-phase (CO 2 -brine) flow model within a periodic stratified medium made up of horizontal low permeability barriers, continuous or discontinuous. The up-scaling is done by the two-scale asymptotic method. First, we consider perfectly layered media. An homogenized model is developed and validated by numerical simulation for different values of capillary number and the incident flux of CO 2 . The homogenization method is then applied to the case of a two-dimensional medium made up of discontinuous layers. Due to the gravity effect, the CO 2 accumulates under the low permeability layers, which leads to a non-standard local mathematical problem. This stratification is modeled using the gravity current approach. This approach is then extended to the case of semi-permeable strata taking into account the capillarity. The up-scaled model is compared with numerical simulations for different types of layers, with or without capillary pressure, and its limit of validity is discussed in each of these cases. The final part of this thesis is devoted to the study of the parallel computing performances of the code DuMux to simulate the injection and migration of CO 2 in three-dimensional heterogeneous media (layered periodic media, fluvial media and reservoir model SPE 10). (author) [fr

  11. Effect of heterogeneous Fenton-like pre-treatment on anaerobic granular sludge performance and microbial community for the treatment of traditional Chinese medicine wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chengyuan, E-mail: suchengyuan2008@126.com [School of Environment and Resources, Guangxi Normal University, 15 Yucai Road, Guilin 541004 (China); School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Harbin 150090 (China); Li, Weiguang [School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, 73 Huanghe Road, Harbin 150090 (China); Lu, Yuxiang; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi [School of Environment and Resources, Guangxi Normal University, 15 Yucai Road, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Rhein has metabolic or physiological toxicity on methanogens in anaerobic granular sludge. • TCM wastewater containing rhein can be successfully treated by the combined treatment. • The productions of the EPS of granular sludge increased after pre-treatment. • Methanoregula, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaerula were predominant in the DC reactor after pre-treatment. - Abstract: The effect of a heterogeneous Fenton-like pre-treatment on the anaerobic processes, characteristics and microbial community of sludge was investigated for traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) wastewater containing rhein. When the concentrations of rhein were 50 mg/L and 100 mg/L, the toxic effect was physiological toxicity for anaerobic granular sludge. Using a single double circle (DC) reactor for the treatment of TCM wastewater containing rhein at concentrations of 15–20 mg/L, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 69%, and coenzyme F{sub 420} was nearly undetectable in the 3D-excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of soluble microbial products (SMP). The abundances of Methanoregula, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaerula were only 5.57%, 2.39% and 1.08% in the DC reactor, respectively. TCM wastewater containing rhein could be successfully treated by the combination of the heterogeneous Fenton-like pre-treatment and the DC reactor processes, and the COD removal rate reached 95%. Meanwhile, the abundances of Methanoregula, Methanobacterium, Methanosphaerula increased to 22.5%, 18.5%, and 13.87%, respectively. For the bacterial community, the abundance of Acidobacteria-Gp6 decreased from 6.99% to 1.07%, while the abundances of Acidobacteria-Gp1 and Acidobacteria-Gp2 increased from 1.61% to 6.55% and from 1.28% to 5.87%, respectively.

  12. Quantification of antiangiogenic treatment effects on tissue heterogeneity in glioma tumour xenograft model using a combination of DCE-MRI and 3D-ultramicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominietto, Marco; Dobosz, Michael; Bürgi, Sandra; Renner, Anja; Zahlmann, Gudrun; Scheuer, Werner; Rudin, Markus

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effects of an anti-angiogenic treatment, which neutralises vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), on tumour heterogeneity. Murine glioma cells have been inoculated into the right brain frontal lobe of 16 mice. Anti-VEGF antibody was administered to a first group (n = 8), while a second group (n = 8) received a placebo. Magnetic resonance acquisitions, performed at days 10, 12, 15 and 23 following the implantation, allowed the derivation of a three-dimensional features dataset characterising tumour heterogeneity. Three-dimensional ultramicroscopy and standard histochemistry analysis have been performed to verify in vivo results. Placebo-treated mice displayed a highly-vascularised area at the tumour periphery, a monolithic necrotic core and a chaotic dense vasculature across the entire tumour. In contrast, the B20-treated group did not show any highly vascularised regions and presents a fragmented necrotic core. A significant reduction of the number of vessel segments smaller than 17 μm has been observed. There was no difference in overall tumour volume and growth rate between the two groups. Region-specific analysis revealed that VEGF inhibition affects only: (1) highly angiogenic compartments expressing high levels of VEGF and characterised by small capillaries, and also (2) the formation and structure of necrotic regions. These effects appear to be transient and limited in time. • VEGF inhibition affects only the highly angiogenic region and small capillaries network • VEGF inhibition is transient in time • Tumour volume is not affected by anti-angiogenic treatment • VEGF inhibition also influences the architecture of necrotic regions.

  13. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  14. Effect of temperature and density fluctuations on the spatially heterogeneous dynamics of glass-forming Van der Waals liquids under high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, K; Grzybowski, A; Grzybowska, K; Wojnarowska, Z; Sokolov, A P; Paluch, M

    2013-09-20

    In this Letter, we show how temperature and density fluctuations affect the spatially heterogeneous dynamics at ambient and elevated pressures. By using high-pressure experimental data for van der Waals liquids, we examine contributions of the temperature and density fluctuations to the dynamics heterogeneity. We show that the dynamic heterogeneity decreases significantly with increasing pressure at a constant structural relaxation time (isochronal condition), while the broadening of the relaxation spectrum remains constant. This observation questions the relationship between spectral broadening and dynamic heterogeneity.

  15. Outcomes of regenerative treatment with rhPDGF-BB and rhFGF-2 for periodontal intra-bony defects: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshkam, Vahid; Chan, Hsun-Liang; Lin, Guo-Hao; Mailoa, James; Giannobile, William V; Wang, Hom-Lay; Oh, Tae-Ju

    2015-03-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effects of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) and recombinant human fibroblast growth factor-2 (rhFGF-2) on treating periodontal intra-bony defects, compared to the control (carrier alone). Electronic and hand searches were performed to identify eligible studies. The weighed mean differences of linear defect fill (LDF), probing depth (PD) reduction, clinical attachment level (CAL) gain and gingival recession (GR) were calculated using random effect meta-analysis. The searches yielded 1018 articles, of which seven studies were included. Only one included study was considered at low risk of bias. The outcomes that reached statistical significance in comparison to carriers alone included: LDF (0.95 mm, 95% CI: 0.62-1.28 mm or 20.17%, 95% CI: 11.81-28.54%) and CAL gain (0.34 mm, 95% CI: 0.03-0.65 mm) for PDGF, and LDF (21.22%, 95% CI: 5.82-36.61%) for FGF-2. Within the limits of this review, rhPDGF-BB demonstrated significantly more LDF and CAL gain; rhFGF-2 resulted in significantly higher percentage of LDF. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Scale-dependent effects of grazing and topographic heterogeneity on plant species richness in a