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Sample records for bones of lower extremity

  1. Quality of Life Following Amputation or Limb Preservation in Patients with Lower Extremity Bone Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary E Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Although functional differences have been described between patients with lower extremity bone sarcoma with amputation and limb preservation surgery, differences have not clearly been shown between the two groups related to quality of life. The aim of the study was to determine if there is a difference in overall quality of life in lower extremity bone sarcoma survivors related to whether they had an amputation or a limb preservation procedure. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty-two long-term survivors of lower extremity bone sarcoma were studied to make a comparison of the overall quality of life, pain assessment and psychological evaluations in limb preservation and amputation patients. Forty-eight patients with limb preservation and thirty-four patients with amputations were enrolled in the study. Validated psychometric measures including the Quality of Life Questionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and visual analog scales were utilized.RESULTS: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation was significantly higher than patients with amputation (p-value < 0.01. Significant differences were noted in the categories of material well being, job satisfiers and occupational relations. CONCLUSION: The overall quality of life of patients with limb preservation appears to be better than for those patients with amputation based on the quality of life questionnaire in patients surviving lower extremity bone sarcoma. Further analysis needs to verify the results and focus on the categories that significantly affect the overall quality of life.

  2. Role of three-phase bone scintigraphy in therapy of lower extremity infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grund, F.M.; Larson, B.W.; Sinn, L.M.; Peterson, L.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of three-phase bone scintigraphy to predict the need for prolonged antibiotic therapy and assess results of therapy of lower extremity infections in patients with diabetes mellitus and/or peripheral vascular disease. The authors retrospectively reviewed three-phase bone scans from 39 patients who completed either 3 weeks or 3 months of oral ciprofloxacin based on initial clinical and radiologic impression. bone scans were obtained at diagnosis and 1 year later. IN 31 patients, increased focal activity was shown on the delayed images. Nineteen of 25 were successfully treated with 3 months of antibiotics, but only one of six were successfully treated with 3 weeks of antibiotics. Eight patient showed no focal increased uptake on delayed images, and seven of these were successfully treated with 3 weeks of antibiotics

  3. Management of Lower Extremity Long-bone Fractures in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

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    Schulte, Leah M; Scully, Ryan D; Kappa, Jason E

    2017-09-01

    The AO classification system, used as a guide for modern fracture care and fixation, follows a basic philosophy of care that emphasizes early mobility and return to function. Lower extremity long-bone fractures in patients with spinal cord injury often are pathologic injuries that present unique challenges, to which the AO principles may not be entirely applicable. Optimal treatment achieves healing without affecting the functional level of the patient. These injuries often result from low-energy mechanisms in nonambulatory patients with osteopenic bone and a thin, insensate soft-tissue envelope. The complication rate can be high, and the outcomes can be catastrophic without proper care. Satisfactory results can be obtained through various methods of immobilization. Less frequently, internal fixation is applied. In certain cases, after discussion with the patient, amputation may be suitable. Prevention strategies aim to minimize bone loss and muscle atrophy.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in upper and lower extremity long bone fractures of emergency department trauma patients.

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    Frouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Delirroyfard, Ali; Mazdaie, Behnaz; Bagherzadegan, Elnaz

    2017-08-01

    Long bone fractures are common injuries caused by trauma. Some studies have demonstrated that ultrasound has a high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures in traumatic patients. This cross-sectional study assessed 100 patients admitted to the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran with trauma to the upper and lower extremities, from September 2014 through October 2015. In all patients, first ultrasound and then standard plain radiography for the upper and lower limb was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21 to determine the specificity and sensitivity. The mean age of patients with upper and lower limb trauma were 31.43±12.32 years and 29.63±5.89 years, respectively. Radius fracture was the most frequent compared to other fractures (27%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value, and negative predicted value of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in the diagnosis of upper extremity long bones were 95.3%, 87.7%, 87.2% and 96.2%, respectively, and the highest accuracy was observed in left arm fractures (100%). Tibia and fibula fractures were the most frequent types compared to other fractures (89.2%). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in the diagnosis of upper extremity long bone fractures were 98.6%, 83%, 65.4% and 87.1%, respectively, and the highest accuracy was observed in men, lower ages and femoral fractures. The results of this study showed that ultrasound compared with plain radiography has a high accuracy in the diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures.

  5. [TRANSOSSEOUS OSTEOSYNTHESIS OF LOWER EXTREMITIES BONES FRACTURES AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF PATIENTS IN THE TREATMENT PERIOD].

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    Dyusupov, A; Dyusupov, A; Manarbekov, E; Bukatov, A; Serikbaev, A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study is a comparative analysis of the quality of life in the treatment of fractures of the bones of the lower extremities of various localizations using transosseous and submerged osteosynthesis. We examined 397 patients with injuries of the lower segment of the lower extremity (patellar fractures - 81, multiple bones fractures of the tibia - 84 and fractures of the ankles, accompanied by a dislocation of the foot - 232). Patients were distributed in the subgroups depending on the treatment. The main group was performed using transosseous osteosynthesis, the comparison group - submerged osteosynthesis. The quality of life was examined using a general questionnaire SF-36 and specialized KOOS (with patella fractures) and FOAS (fractures of the bones of the lower leg and ankles). In patients with all localizations of fractures the quality of life was exceeded in the subgroups of the transosseous osteosynthesis group over the parameters of the comparison group. The most significant differences with the use of specialized questionnaires were revealed 6-9 months after trauma with a tendency to leveling to the end of the study (1 year). A more pronounced excess of the quality of life in the main group was seen in fractures of the shin bones. The study of the quality of life allows us to recommend the use of transosseous osteosynthesis for the treatment of lower segment of the lower limb bone fractures.

  6. Major amputation of lower extremity: prognostic value of positive bone biopsy cultures.

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    Vaznaisiene, D; Beltrand, E; Laiskonis, A P; Yazdanpanah, Y; Migaud, H; Senneville, E

    2013-02-01

    To assess the correlation between culture results of section's osseous slice biopsy (SOB) and the distal infected site responsible for the amputation performed concomitantly during major amputation of lower extremity. The influence of a positive culture of SOB on the patients' outcome was also evaluated. We conducted a retrospective study of medical charts of patients who underwent SOB during major amputation of lower extremity at our institution from 2000 to 2009. Fifty-seven patients (42 males/15 females, mean age 52.16years) who undergone major limb amputation (47 below knee and ten above knee) were included. The initial medical conditions of the investigated patients were: trauma (n=32), infection (n=13), trophic disorders (n=10) and tumor (n=2). The major cause of amputation was an uncontrolled infection, accouting for 64.9% of the cases (37/57) (foot=5, ankle=8, leg=24), the remaining 20 patients had trophic disorders of lower limb. Twenty-one (36.8%) from 57 biopsies were sterile, 12 (21.1%) doubtful and 24 (42.1%) positive. Thirty-one (54.4%) patients had an antibiotic-free interval before limb amputation. Independently of the bacterial species, 69.6% of the microorganisms identified from SOB were found in the distal infected site. Patients with positive SOB had a significantly longer interval between the decision to amputate the patient and the surgical procedure (200.2 vs. 70.1days; P<0.03) and a shorter total duration of antibiotic therapy before amputation than patients with negative SOB (3.68 vs. 6.08months; P<0.03). The delay for complete healing was significantly higher in patients with a positive SOB compared with those with a negative SOB (3.57 vs. 2.48months; P<0.03). Our results suggest that the infection may extend from the distal site to the level of amputation in a large proportion of cases and that the delay with which the amputation is performed after the decision has been taken may play a role in this event. Study level IV

  7. A comparative analysis of functional outcomes in adolescents and young adults with lower-extremity bone sarcoma.

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    Ginsberg, Jill P; Rai, Shesh N; Carlson, Claire A; Meadows, Anna T; Hinds, Pamela S; Spearing, Elena M; Zhang, Lijun; Callaway, Lulie; Neel, Michael D; Rao, Bhaskar N; Marchese, Victoria G

    2007-12-01

    Comparison of functional mobility and quality of life is performed in patients with lower-extremity bone sarcoma following either amputation, limb-sparing surgery, or rotationplasty with four different types of outcome measures: (1) an objective functional mobility measure that requires patients to physically perform specific tasks, functional mobility assessment (FMA); (2) a clinician administered tool, Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Scale (MSTS); (3) a patient questionnaire, Toronto Extremity Salvage Scale (TESS); and (4) a health-related quality of life (HRQL) measure, Short Form-36 version 2 (SF-36v.2). This is a prospective multi-site study including 91 patients with lower-extremity bone sarcoma following amputation, limb-sparing surgery, or rotationplasty. One of three physical therapists administered the quality of life measure (SF-36v.2) as well as a battery of functional measures (FMA, MSTS, and TESS). Differences between patients who had amputation, limb-sparing surgery, or rotationplasty were consistently demonstrated by the FMA. Patients with limb sparing femur surgery performed better than those patients with an above the knee amputation but similarly to a small number of rotationplasty patients. Several of the more conventional self-report measures were shown to not have the discriminative capabilities of the FMA in these cohorts. In adolescents with lower-extremity bone sarcoma, it may be advantageous to consider the use of a combination of outcome measures, including the FMA, for objective functional mobility assessment along with the TESS for a subjective measure of disability and the SF-36v.2 for a quality-of-life measure. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  8. The effects of extracorporeal shockwave on acute high-energy long bone fractures of the lower extremity.

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    Wang, Ching-Jen; Liu, Hao-Chen; Fu, Te-Hu

    2007-02-01

    High-energy long bone fractures of the lower extremity are at risk of poor fracture healing and high rate of non-union. Extracorporeal shockwave was shown effective to heal non-union of long bone fracture. However, the effect of shockwave on acute fractures is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of shockwave on acute high-energy fractures of the lower extremity. Between January and October 2004, 56 patients with 59 acute high-energy fractures were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups with 28 patients with 28 fractures in the study group and 28 patients with 31 fractures in the control group. Both groups showed similar age, gender, type of fracture and follow-up time. Patients in the study group received open reduction and internal fixation and shockwave treatment immediately after surgery on odd-numbered days of the week, whereas, patients in the control group received open reduction and internal fixation without shockwave treatment on even-numbered days of the week. Postoperative managements were similarly performed in both groups including crutch walking with non-weight bearing on the affected limb until fracture healing shown on radiographs. The evaluation parameters included clinical assessments of pain score and weight bearing status of the affected leg and serial radiographs at 3, 6 and 12 months. The primary end-point is the rate of non-union at 12 months, and the secondary end point is the rate of fracture healing at 3, 6 and 12 months. At 12 months, the rate of non-union was 11% for the study group versus 20% for the control group (P fracture healing was noted in the study group than the control group at 3, 6 and 12 months (P fracture healing and decreasing the rate of non-union in acute high-energy fractures of the lower extremity.

  9. Modified classification and single-stage microsurgical repair of posttraumatic infected massive bone defects in lower extremities.

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    Yang, Yun-fa; Xu, Zhong-he; Zhang, Guang-ming; Wang, Jian-wei; Hu, Si-wang; Hou, Zhi-qi; Xu, Da-chuan

    2013-11-01

    Posttraumatic infected massive bone defects in lower extremities are difficult to repair because they frequently exhibit massive bone and/or soft tissue defects, serious bone infection, and excessive scar proliferation. This study aimed to determine whether these defects could be classified and repaired at a single stage. A total of 51 cases of posttraumatic infected massive bone defect in lower extremity were included in this study. They were classified into four types on the basis of the conditions of the bone defects, soft tissue defects, and injured limb length, including Type A (without soft tissue defects), Type B (with soft tissue defects of 10 × 20 cm or less), Type C (with soft tissue defects of 10 × 20 cm or more), and Type D (with the limb shortening of 3 cm or more). Four types of single-stage microsurgical repair protocols were planned accordingly and implemented respectively. These protocols included the following: Protocol A, where vascularized fibular graft was implemented for Type A; Protocol B, where vascularized fibular osteoseptocutaneous graft was implemented for Type B; Protocol C, where vascularized fibular graft and anterior lateral thigh flap were used for Type C; and Protocol D, where limb lengthening and Protocols A, B, or C were used for Type D. There were 12, 33, 4, and 2 cases of Types A, B, C, and D, respectively, according to this classification. During the surgery, three cases of planned Protocol B had to be shifted into Protocol C; however, all microsurgical repairs were completed. With reference to Johner-Wruhs evaluation method, the total percentage of excellent and good results was 82.35% after 6 to 41 months of follow-up. It was concluded that posttraumatic massive bone defects could be accurately classified into four types on the basis of the conditions of bone defects, soft tissue coverage, and injured limb length, and successfully repaired with the single-stage repair protocols after thorough debridement. Thieme Medical

  10. Self-reported dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids and association with bone and lower extremity function.

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    Rousseau, James H; Kleppinger, Alison; Kenny, Anne M

    2009-10-01

    To assess the relationship between self-reported omega-3 fatty acid (O3FA) intake and bone mineral density (BMD) and lower extremity function in older adults. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline information from three separate ongoing studies of older adults, pooled for this analysis. Academic health center. Two hundred forty-seven men (n=118) and women (n=129) residing in the community or an assisted living facility. Self-reported dietary intake (O3FA, omega-6 fatty acids (O6FA), protein, and total calorie); BMD of the hip or heel; and lower extremity function including leg strength, chair rise time, walking speed, Timed Up and Go, and frailty. The mean reported intake of O3FA was 1.27 g/day. Correlation coefficients (r) between O3FA and T-scores from total femur (n=167) were 0.210 and 0.147 for combined femur and heel T scores. Similar correlations were found for leg strength (r=0.205) and chair rise time (r=-0.178), but the significance was lost when corrected for protein intake. Subjects with lower reported O3FA intake (<1.27 g/day) had lower BMD than those with higher reported O3FA intake. In a multiple regression analysis with femoral neck BMD as the dependent variable and reported intake of O3FA, O6FA, protein, and vitamin D as independent variables, reported O3FA intake was the only significant variable, accounting for 6% of the variance in BMD. Older adults had low reported intakes of O3FA. There was an association between greater reported O3FA intake and higher BMD. There was no independent association between reported O3FA intake and lower extremity function. Results from this preliminary report are promising and suggest further investigation.

  11. Lymphoscintigraphy of the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, N.Z.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty one lower extremities of 26 normal healthy volunteers and 26 extremities of 13 patients with oedema have been studied. Dynamic quantitative lymphoscintigraphy using 99Tc-m antimony sulphide colloid during passive exercise as well as before and after active exercise was performed. parameters of lymphatic function including percentage of radioactivity cleared from the injection site, the percentage uptake by the inguinal lymph nodes, the time of arrival of activity at the regional lymph nodes and the lymphatic reserve index have been evaluated. The percentage clearance of activity from the injection site was found technically difficult to standardize and proved to be an unreliable parameter of lymphatic function. However, the quantitation of nodal uptake, the lymphatic transit time and the lymphatic reserve capacity accurately depicted the lymphatic functional status of an individual. The physiologic parameters of lymphatic function of the contralateral lower extremities were compared and a physiologic difference in the lymphatic capacity of the two limbs was scintigraphically documented. (author)

  12. Quantitative bone scintigraphy in the evaluation of angular deformity of the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcke, H.T.; Zapf, S.E.; Mandell, G.A.; Sharkey, C.A.; Cooley, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique for quantitative analysis of growth plates in varus or valgus deformity about the knee has been developed. Computer-generated regions of interest are placed on magnification scintigraphs to divide distal femoral and proximal tibial physes into four equal segments. The ratio of counts in the medial half to counts in the lateral half was studied in 31 children (22 normal, 9 with angular deformity). Normal ratios were 0.74 to 0.98 for femora and 0.98 to 1.20 for tibias. In eight of nine patients with deformity, the ratio was abnormal; in two patients the ratio returned to normal when the deformity ceased to progress

  13. Bone suture anchor fixation in the lower extremity: a review of insertion principles and a comparative biomechanical evaluation.

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    Scranton, Pierce E; Lawhon, S Michael; McDermott, John E

    2005-07-01

    Suture anchors have been developed for the fixation of ligaments, capsules, or tendons to bone. These devices have led to improved fixation, smaller incisions, earlier limb mobility, and improved outcomes. They were originally developed for use in shoulder reconstructions but are now used in almost all extremities. In the lower leg they are used in the tibia, the talus, the calcaneus, tarsal bones, and phalanges. Nevertheless, techniques for insertion and mechanisms of failure are not well described. Five suture anchors were studied to determine the pullout strength in four distal cadaver femurs and four proximal cadaver tibias from 55- and 62-year-old males. Eight hundred ninety Newton line was used, testing the anchors to failure with an Instron testing device (Instron, Norwood, MA). The anchor devices were inserted randomly and tested blindly (12 tests per anchor device, 60 tests in all). Two anchors in each group tested failed at low loads. Both types of plastic anchors had failures at the eyelet. Average pullout strength varied from 85.4 to 185.6 N. Insertion techniques are specific for each device, and they must be followed for optimal fixation. In this study, in all five groups of anchors tested two of the 12 anchors in each group failed with minimal force. On the basis of this finding we recommend that, if suture anchor fixation is necessary, at least two anchors should be used. Since there appears to be a percentage of failure in all devices, the second anchor can serve as a backup. It is imperative that surgeons be familiar with the insertion techniques of each device before use.

  14. Effects of cast-mediated immobilization on bone mineral mass at various sites in adolescents with lower-extremity fracture.

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    Ceroni, Dimitri; Martin, Xavier; Delhumeau, Cécile; Rizzoli, René; Kaelin, André; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie

    2012-02-01

    Leg or ankle fractures occur commonly in the pediatric population and are primarily treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. The most predictable consequences of immobilization and subsequent weight-bearing restriction are loss of bone mineral mass, substantial muscle atrophy, and functional limitations. The purposes of this study were to determine if lower-limb fractures in adolescents are associated with abnormal bone mineral density or content at the time of fracture, and to quantify bone mineral loss at various sites due to cast-mediated immobilization and limited weight-bearing. We recruited fifty adolescents aged ten to sixteen years who had undergone cast immobilization for a leg or ankle fracture. Dual x-ray absorptiometry scans of the total body, lumbar spine, hip, leg, and calcaneus were performed at the time of fracture and at cast removal. Patients with a fracture were paired with healthy controls according to sex and age. Values at baseline and at cast removal, or at equivalent time intervals in the control group, were compared between groups and between the injured and uninjured legs of the adolescents with the fracture. At the time of fracture, there were no observed differences in the bone mineral density or bone mineral content Z-scores of the total body or the lumbar spine, or in the bone mineral density Z-scores of the calcaneus, between the injured and healthy subjects. At cast removal, bone mineral parameters on the injured side were significantly lower than those on the uninjured side in the injured group. Differences ranged from -5.8% to -31.7% for bone mineral density and from -5.2% to -19.4% for bone mineral content. During the cast period, the injured adolescents had a significant decrease of bone mineral density at the hip, greater trochanter, calcaneus, and total lower limb as compared with the healthy controls. Lower-limb fractures are not related to osteopenia in adolescents at the time of fracture. However, osteopenia

  15. The results of bone deformity correction using a spider frame with web-based software for lower extremity long bone deformities.

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    Tekin, Ali Çağrı; Çabuk, Haluk; Dedeoğlu, Süleyman Semih; Saygılı, Mehmet Selçuk; Adaş, Müjdat; Esenyel, Cem Zeki; Büyükkurt, Cem Dinçay; Tonbul, Murat

    2016-03-22

    To present the functional and radiological results and evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-assisted external fixator (spider frame) in patients with lower extremity shortness and deformity. The study comprised 17 patients (14 male, 3 female) who were treated for lower extremity long bone deformity and shortness between 2012 and 2015 using a spider frame. The procedure's level of difficulty was determined preoperatively using the Paley Scale. Postoperatively, the results for the patients who underwent tibial operations were evaluated using the Paley criteria modified by ASAMI, and the results for the patients who underwent femoral operations were evaluated according to the Paley scoring system. The evaluations were made by calculating the External Fixator and Distraction indexes. The mean age of the patients was 24.58 years (range, 5-51 years). The spider frame was applied to the femur in 10 patients and to the tibia in seven. The mean follow-up period was 15 months (range, 6-31 months) from the operation day, and the mean amount of lengthening was 3.0 cm (range, 1-6 cm). The mean duration of fixator application was 202.7 days (range, 104-300 days). The mean External Fixator Index was 98 days/cm (range, 42-265 days/cm). The mean Distraction Index was 10.49 days/cm (range, 10-14 days/cm). The computer-assisted external fixator system (spider frame) achieves single-stage correction in cases of both deformity and shortness. The system can be applied easily, and because of its high-tech software, it offers the possibility of postoperative treatment of the deformity.

  16. The results of bone deformity correction using a spider frame with web-based software for lower extremity long bone deformities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekin Ali Çağrı

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present the functional and radiological results and evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-assisted external fixator (spider frame in patients with lower extremity shortness and deformity. Materials and methods: The study comprised 17 patients (14 male, 3 female who were treated for lower extremity long bone deformity and shortness between 2012 and 2015 using a spider frame. The procedure’s level of difficulty was determined preoperatively using the Paley Scale. Postoperatively, the results for the patients who underwent tibial operations were evaluated using the Paley criteria modified by ASAMI, and the results for the patients who underwent femoral operations were evaluated according to the Paley scoring system. The evaluations were made by calculating the External Fixator and Distraction indexes. Results: The mean age of the patients was 24.58 years (range, 5–51 years. The spider frame was applied to the femur in 10 patients and to the tibia in seven. The mean follow-up period was 15 months (range, 6–31 months from the operation day, and the mean amount of lengthening was 3.0 cm (range, 1–6 cm. The mean duration of fixator application was 202.7 days (range, 104–300 days. The mean External Fixator Index was 98 days/cm (range, 42–265 days/cm. The mean Distraction Index was 10.49 days/cm (range, 10–14 days/cm. Conclusion: The computer-assisted external fixator system (spider frame achieves single-stage correction in cases of both deformity and shortness. The system can be applied easily, and because of its high-tech software, it offers the possibility of postoperative treatment of the deformity.

  17. The structure of long tubular bones fractures of lower extremity by the data of the regional bureau of forensic-medical examination

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    Savka I.H.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the research is carrying out forensic-medical analysis of cases from expert’s practice with fractures of the long bones based on the findings of the Regional Bureau of Forensic-Medical Examination over 2009-2012 years period. The research has been carried out using methods of statistical and comparative analysis. Their distribution by gender, age, localization, character and type of external influence, the conditions of their occurrence and participation of other persons has been outlined. Fractures of lower extremity bones make up from 15,8 to 22,5% of all the cases of mechanical trauma with lethal outcomes. Therewith male persons suffer more often from injury of the left extremity at different day time and season. The principal mechanism of their origin is injury resulting from road accidents in the countryside with the participation of other persons.

  18. Does morbid obesity negatively affect the hospital course of patients undergoing treatment of closed, lower-extremity diaphyseal long-bone fractures?

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    Baldwin, Keith D; Matuszewski, Paul E; Namdari, Surena; Esterhai, John L; Mehta, Samir

    2011-01-03

    Obesity is prevalent in the developed world and is associated with significant costs to the health care system. The effect of morbid obesity in patients operatively treated for long-bone fractures of the lower extremity is largely unknown. The National Trauma Data Bank was accessed to determine if morbidly obese patients (body mass index >40) with lower extremity fractures have longer length of hospital stay, higher cost, greater rehabilitation admission rates, and more complications than nonobese patients. We identified patients with operatively treated diaphyseal femur (6920) and tibia (5190) fractures. Polytrauma patients and patients younger than 16 years were excluded. Morbidly obese patients were identified by ICD-9 and database comorbidity designation (femur, 131 morbidly obese; tibia, 75 morbidly obese). Patients meeting these criteria who were not morbidly obese were used as controls. Sensitivity analyses were performed to analyze patients with isolated trauma to the tibia or femur. Morbidly obese patients were more likely to be admitted to a subacute facility. Length of stay trended higher in morbidly obese patients. There was no significant relationship between obesity and inpatient mortality or inpatient complications. These trends held true when considering patients with multiple injuries and patients who had isolated long-bone injuries. Our study showed that morbidly obese patients may have greater rehabilitation needs following long-bone fractures in the lower extremity. Our study showed no difference in mortality or complications, although further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Reconstruction of Extensive Soft-Tissue Defects with Concomitant Bone Defects in the Lower Extremity with the Latissimus Dorsi-Serratus Anterior-Rib Free Flap.

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    Sia, Wei Tee; Xu, Germaine Guiqin; Puhaindran, Mark Edward; Tan, Bien Keem; Cheng, Mathew Hern Wang; Chew, Winston Yoon Chong

    2015-07-01

    The combined latissimus dorsi-serratus anterior-rib (LD-SA-rib) free flap provides a large soft-tissue flap with a vascularized bone flap through a solitary vascular pedicle in a one-stage reconstruction. Seven LD-SA-rib free flaps were performed in seven patients to reconstruct concomitant bone and extensive soft-tissue defects in the lower extremity (tibia, five; femur, one; foot, one). The patients were all male, with an average age of 34 years (range, 20-48 years). These defects were secondary to trauma in five patients and posttraumatic osteomyelitis in two patients. All flaps survived and achieved bony union. The average time to bony union was 9.4 months. Bone hypertrophy of at least 20% occurred in all flaps. All patients achieved full weight-bearing ambulation without aid at an average duration of 23.7 months. Two patients developed stress fractures of the rib flap. There was no significant donor site morbidity, except for two patients who had pleural tears during harvesting of the flap. The LD-SA-rib flap provides a large soft-tissue component and a vascularized bone flap for reconstruction of composite large soft-tissue defects with concomitant bone defects of the lower extremity in a one-stage procedure. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Sports nuclear medicine. Bone imaging for lower extremity pain in athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brill, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    Increased participation in sports by the general public has led to an increase in sports-induced injuries, including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis, and a host of musculotendinous maladies. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m MDP has been used with increasing frequency in detecting stress fractures, but this study can miss certain important conditions and detect other lesions of lesser clinical significance. This paper demonstrates the spectrum of findings on bone scanning in nonacute sports trauma and offers suggestions for the optimal use of Tc-99m MDP for detecting the causes of lower extremity pain in athletes

  1. Short-term effects of teriparatide versus placebo on bone biomarkers, structure, and fracture healing in women with lower-extremity stress fractures: A pilot study.

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    Almirol, Ellen A; Chi, Lisa Y; Khurana, Bharti; Hurwitz, Shelley; Bluman, Eric M; Chiodo, Christopher; Matzkin, Elizabeth; Baima, Jennifer; LeBoff, Meryl S

    2016-09-01

    In this pilot, placebo-controlled study, we evaluated whether brief administration of teriparatide (TPTD) in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures would increase markers of bone formation in advance of bone resorption, improve bone structure, and hasten fracture healing according to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Premenopausal women with acute lower-extremity stress fractures were randomized to injection of TPTD 20-µg subcutaneous (s.c.) (n = 6) or placebo s.c. (n = 7) for 8 weeks. Biomarkers for bone formation N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP) and osteocalcin (OC) and resorption collagen type-1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX) and collagen type 1 cross-linked N-telopeptide (NTX) were measured at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. The area between the percent change of P1NP and CTX over study duration is defined as the anabolic window. To assess structural changes, peripheral quantitative computed topography (pQCT) was measured at baseline, 8 and 12 weeks at the unaffected tibia and distal radius. The MRI of the affected bone assessed stress fracture healing at baseline and 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment, bone biomarkers P1NP and OC increased more in the TPTD- versus placebo-treated group (both p ≤ 0.01), resulting in a marked anabolic window (p ≤ 0.05). Results from pQCT demonstrated that TPTD-treated women showed a larger cortical area and thickness compared to placebo at the weight bearing tibial site, while placebo-treated women had a greater total tibia and cortical density. No changes at the radial sites were observed between groups. According to MRI, 83.3% of the TPTD- and 57.1% of the placebo-treated group had improved or healed stress fractures (p = 0.18). In this randomized, pilot study, brief administration of TPTD showed anabolic effects that TPTD may help hasten fracture healing in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures. Larger prospective studies are warranted to determine

  2. Prevention of Lower Extremity Injuries in Basketball

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    Taylor, Jeffrey B.; Ford, Kevin R.; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Terry, Lauren N.; Hegedus, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lower extremity injuries are common in basketball, yet it is unclear how prophylactic interventions affect lower extremity injury incidence rates. Objective: To analyze the effectiveness of current lower extremity injury prevention programs in basketball athletes, focusing on injury rates of (1) general lower extremity injuries, (2) ankle sprains, and (3) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears. Data Sources: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials were searched in January 2015. Study Selection: Studies were included if they were randomized controlled or prospective cohort trials, contained a population of competitive basketball athletes, and reported lower extremity injury incidence rates specific to basketball players. In total, 426 individual studies were identified. Of these, 9 met the inclusion criteria. One other study was found during a hand search of the literature, resulting in 10 total studies included in this meta-analysis. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 2. Data Extraction: Details of the intervention (eg, neuromuscular vs external support), size of control and intervention groups, and number of injuries in each group were extracted from each study. Injury data were classified into 3 groups based on the anatomic diagnosis reported (general lower extremity injury, ankle sprain, ACL rupture). Results: Meta-analyses were performed independently for each injury classification. Results indicate that prophylactic programs significantly reduced the incidence of general lower extremity injuries (odds ratio [OR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.57-0.85; P basketball athletes. Conclusion: In basketball players, prophylactic programs may be effective in reducing the risk of general lower extremity injuries and ankle sprains, yet not ACL injuries. PMID:26502412

  3. Relationship of Lower Extremity Muscle Strength with Balance and Lower Extremity Functions in Elderly Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Başkurt

    2018-03-01

    Conclusions: Functional score, mobility and balance are related to lower extremity muscle strength in elderly women. Increasing muscle strength will reduce the risk of falls and increase independence.

  4. Prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson William

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This retrospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of lower extremity venous duplication using duplex ultrasound in the patient population of a large urban medical center. Materials and Methods: The reports of all lower extremity venous ultrasound examinations performed at our institution between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 were reviewed. Ultrasound examinations that were performed for purposes other than the detection of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis were excluded. The prevalence of duplication and its specific location were recorded. In addition, the prevalence of thrombus and its specific location were also recorded. Results: A total of 3118 exams were performed in 2664 patients. Of the 2664 patients, 2311 had only one examination performed during the study period; 353 patients had more than one examination performed. We found that 10.1% of patients (270/2664 had at least one venous segment duplicated and 5.4% of patients (143/2664 had a thrombus in at least one venous segment. There was a statistically significant difference in the prevalence of both duplication and thrombus with a change in venous segment. Only 0.4% of patients (11/2664 had thrombus within a duplicated segment. Of those who had more than one examination performed, 15.3% (54/353 had the same venous segment(s seen on one examination but not another. Conclusion: Lower extremity venous duplication is a frequent anatomic variant that is seen in 10.1% of patients, but it may not be as common as is generally believed. It can result in a false negative result for deep vein thrombosis.

  5. Segmental transports for posttraumatic lower extremity bone defects: are femoral bone transports safer than tibial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, Emmanouil; Kenawey, Mohamed; Krettek, Christian; Ettinger, Max; Jagodzinski, Michael; Hankemeier, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    The long-term outcomes following femoral and tibial segment transports are not well documented. Purpose of the study is to compare the complication rates and life quality scores of femoral and tibial transports in order to find what are the complication rates of femoral and tibial monorail bone transports and if they are different? We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 8 femoral and 14 tibial consecutive segment transports performed with the monorail technique between 2001 and 2008 in our institution. Mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.1 years with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. Aetiology of the defects was posttraumatic in all cases. Four femoral (50%) and nine tibial (64%) fractures were open. The Short Form-36 (SF-36) health survey was used to compare the life quality after femoral and tibial bone transports. The Mann-Whiney U test, Fisher exact test, and the Student's two tailed t-test were used for statistical analysis. P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. The tibial transport was associated with higher rates of severe complications and additional procedures (1.5 ± 0.9 vs. 3.4 ± 2.7, p = 0.048). Three patients of the tibial group were amputated because of recurrent infections and one developed a complete regenerate insufficiency that was treated with partial diaphyseal tibial replacement. Contrary to that none of patients of the femoral group developed a complete regenerate insufficiency or was amputated. Tibial bone transports have a higher rate of complete and incomplete regenerate insufficiency and can more often end in an amputation. The authors suggest systematic weekly controls of the CRP value and of the callus formation in patients with posttraumatic tibia bone transports. Further comparative studies comparing the results of bone transports with and without intramedullary implants are necessary.

  6. Clinical application of lower extremity CTA and lower extremity perfusion CT as a method of diagnostic for lower extremity atherosclerotic obliterans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Il Bong; Dong, Kyung Rae [Dept. Radiological Technology, Gwangju Health University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Eun Hoe [Dept. Radiological Science, Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess clinical application of lower extremity CTA and lower extremity perfusion CT as a method of diagnostic for lower extremity atherosclerotic obliterans. From January to July 2016, 30 patients (mean age, 68) were studied with lower extremity CTA and lower extremity perfusion CT. 128 channel multi-detector row CT scans were acquired with a CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens medical solution, Germany) of lower extremity perfusion CT and lower extremity CTA. Acquired images were reconstructed with 3D workstation (Leonardo, Siemens, Germany). Site of lower extremity arterial occlusive and stenosis lesions were detected superficial femoral artery 36.6%, popliteal artery 23.4%, external iliac artery 16.7%, common femoral artery 13.3%, peroneal artery 10%. The mean total DLP comparison of lower extremity perfusion CT and lower extremity CTA, 650 mGy-cm and 675 mGy-cm, respectively. Lower extremity perfusion CT and lower extremity CTA were realized that were never be two examination that were exactly the same legions. Future through the development of lower extremity perfusion CT soft ware programs suggest possible clinical applications.

  7. Short-term effects of teriparatide versus placebo on bone biomarkers, structure, and fracture healing in women with lower-extremity stress fractures: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Almirol

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: In this randomized, pilot study, brief administration of TPTD showed anabolic effects that TPTD may help hasten fracture healing in premenopausal women with lower-extremity stress fractures. Larger prospective studies are warranted to determine the effects of TPTD treatment on stress fracture healing in premenopausal women.

  8. Bone Fractures Following External Beam Radiotherapy and Limb-Preservation Surgery for Lower Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Relationship to Irradiated Bone Length, Volume, Tumor Location and Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Parent, Amy L.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to ≥40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. Results: For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 ± 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 ± 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 ± 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 ± 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 ± 17%, compared with 37 ± 11 Gy, 32 ± 9 cm, 59 ± 8 Gy, and 64 ± 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. Conclusions: The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  9. Ultrasonography of the lower extremity veins: Anatomy and basic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Ahn, Kyung Sik; Kang, Chang Ho; Cho, Sung Bum [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasonography is an imaging modality widely used to evaluate venous diseases of the lower extremities. It is important to understand the normal venous anatomy of the lower extremities, which has deep, superficial, and perforating venous components, in order to determine the pathophysiology of venous disease. This review provides a basic description of the anatomy of the lower extremity veins and useful techniques for approaching each vein via ultrasonography.

  10. Ultrasonography of the lower extremity veins: Anatomy and basic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Ahn, Kyung Sik; Kang, Chang Ho; Cho, Sung Bum

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is an imaging modality widely used to evaluate venous diseases of the lower extremities. It is important to understand the normal venous anatomy of the lower extremities, which has deep, superficial, and perforating venous components, in order to determine the pathophysiology of venous disease. This review provides a basic description of the anatomy of the lower extremity veins and useful techniques for approaching each vein via ultrasonography

  11. A new method of lower extremity immobilization in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Xuhai; Dai, Tangzhi; Shu, Xiaochuan; Pu, Yuanxue; Feng, Gang; Li, Xuesong; Liao, Dongbiao; Du, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    We developed a new method for immobilization of the fix lower extremities by using a thermoplastic mask, a carbon fiber base plate, a customized headrest, and an adjustable angle holder. The lower extremities of 11 patients with lower extremity tumors were immobilized by this method. CT simulation was performed for each patient. For all 11 patients, the device fit was suitable and comfortable and had good reproducibility, which was proven in daily radiotherapy

  12. On the limit distribution of lower extreme generalized order statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In a wide subclass of generalized order statistics (gOs), which contains most of the known and important models of ordered random variables, weak conver- gence of lower extremes are developed. A recent result of extreme value theory of m−gOs (as well as the classical extreme value theory of ordinary order ...

  13. On the Limit Distribution of Lower Extreme Generalized Order Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a wide subclass of generalized order statistics ( g O s ) , which contains most of the known and important models of ordered random variables, weak convergence of lower extremes are developed. A recent result of extreme value theory of m − g O s (as well as the classical extreme value theory of ordinary order statistics) ...

  14. Bone fractures following external beam radiotherapy and limb-preservation surgery for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma: relationship to irradiated bone length, volume, tumor location and dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, Colleen I; Parent, Amy L; Griffin, Anthony M; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W M; Catton, Charles N; Ferguson, Peter C; Wunder, Jay S; Bell, Robert S; Sharpe, Michael B; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >or=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +/- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +/- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +/- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +/- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +/- 17%, compared with 37 +/- 11 Gy, 32 +/- 9 cm, 59 +/- 8 Gy, and 64 +/- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  15. The Bt-DUX: Development of a subjective measure of health-related quality of life in patients who underwent surgery for lower extremity malignant bone tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.P. Bekkering (Peter); T.P.M. Vliet Vlieland (Theodora); H.M. Koopman (Hendrik); G.R. Schaap (Gerard); H.W.B. Schreuder; A. Beishuizen (Auke); W.J.E. Tissing (Wim); P.M. Hoogerbrugge (Peter); J.K. Anninga (Jacob); A.H.M. Taminiau (Antonie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. To examine the practical applicability, internal consistency, and validity of the Bt-DUX, a disease-specific Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) instrument. The Bt-Dux was developed to examine patients' individual values of their life after a malignant bone tumor of the

  16. Administrative Algorithms to identify Avascular necrosis of bone among patients undergoing upper or lower extremity magnetic resonance imaging: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhaiya, Medha; Dong, Yan; Sparks, Jeffrey A; Losina, Elena; Costenbader, Karen H; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2017-06-19

    Studies of the epidemiology and outcomes of avascular necrosis (AVN) require accurate case-finding methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate performance characteristics of a claims-based algorithm designed to identify AVN cases in administrative data. Using a centralized patient registry from a US academic medical center, we identified all adults aged ≥18 years who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of an upper/lower extremity joint during the 1.5 year study period. A radiologist report confirming AVN on MRI served as the gold standard. We examined the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and positive likelihood ratio (LR + ) of four algorithms (A-D) using International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition (ICD-9) codes for AVN. The algorithms ranged from least stringent (Algorithm A, requiring ≥1 ICD-9 code for AVN [733.4X]) to most stringent (Algorithm D, requiring ≥3 ICD-9 codes, each at least 30 days apart). Among 8200 patients who underwent MRI, 83 (1.0% [95% CI 0.78-1.22]) had AVN by gold standard. Algorithm A yielded the highest sensitivity (81.9%, 95% CI 72.0-89.5), with PPV of 66.0% (95% CI 56.0-75.1). The PPV of algorithm D increased to 82.2% (95% CI 67.9-92.0), although sensitivity decreased to 44.6% (95% CI 33.7-55.9). All four algorithms had specificities >99%. An algorithm that uses a single billing code to screen for AVN among those who had MRI has the highest sensitivity and is best suited for studies in which further medical record review confirming AVN is feasible. Algorithms using multiple billing codes are recommended for use in administrative databases when further AVN validation is not feasible.

  17. Prediction of Lower Extremity Movement by Cyclograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kutilek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gait is nowadays undergoing extensive analysis. Predictions of leg movements can be used for orthosis and prosthesis programming, and also for rehabilitation. Our work focuses on predicting human gait with the use of angle-angle diagrams, also called cyclograms. In conjunction with artificial intelligence, cyclograms offer a wide area of medical applications. We have identified cyclogram characteristics such as the slope and the area of the cyclogram for a neural network learning algorithm. Neural networks learned by cyclograms offer wide applications in prosthesis control systems.

  18. Heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans) and lower-extremity swelling mimicking deep-venous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orzel, J.A.; Rudd, T.G.; Nelp, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    A quadriplegic patient with a swollen leg was suspected of having deep-venous thrombosis, and was studied with radionuclide venography (RNV) and contrast venography. Focal narrowing of the femoral vein, seen on RNV, was due to extrinsic compression. Although soft-tissue radiographs were normal, Tc-99m diphosphonate imaging established the diagnosis of early heterotopic bone formation (myositis ossificans), which was responsible for the venous compression. Clinically this inflammatory process can mimic deep-venous thrombosis, and should be considered in evaluating patients at risk for both heterotopic bone formation and deep-venous thrombosis

  19. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  20. Varus deformity of the left lower extremity causing degenerative lesion of the posterior horn of the left medial meniscus in a patient with Paget’s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Kaissi, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] We report on a 42-year-old woman who presented with persistent pain in her left knee with no history of trauma. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI of the left knee showed discontinuity between the anterior and posterior horns of the left medial meniscus, causing effectively the development of degenerative lesion of the posterior horn. The latter was correlated to varus deformity of the left lower extremity associated with subsequent narrowing of the medial knee joint. The unusual craniofacial contour of the patient, the skeletal survey and the elevated serum alkaline phosphatase were compatible with the diagnosis of Paget’s disease of the bone. To alleviate the adverse effect of the mal-alignment of the left femur onto the left knee, corrective osteotomy of the left femoral diaphysis by means of fixators was performed. To the best of our knowledge this is the first clinical report describing the management and the pathological correlation of a unilateral varus deformity of the femoral shaft and degenerative lesions of the left knee in a patient with Paget’s disease of the bone.

  1. Malignant bone tumors of the pelvis and of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullotta, U.; Reiser, M.; Feuerbach, S.; Biehl, T.; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1981-01-01

    Bone tumors of the extremities are usually diagnosed by conventional radiography. A good angiogram may render information not only about intra- and extraosseous extension of the tumor, but often also about the biological dignity. CT is usually not necessary, especially since it is sometimes difficult to define the extraosseous borders of these extremity tumors with this method. In bone tumors of the pelvis, however, neither conventional radiography nor angiography render reliable information about the extent of the tumor, which CT is very well able to do. Therefore CT is primarily indicated for evaluation of bone tumors in this region. Angiography is done only for preoperative evaluation of the vascular architecture or for potential therapeutic embolisation. (orig.) [de

  2. Reliability of a New Lower-Extremity Motor Coordination Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antosiak-Cyrak Katarzyna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Motor coordination is a basic motor ability necessary for daily life, which also allows athletes to win a sports rivalry and patients to assess their recovery progress after therapy and rehabilitation. The aim of the present study was to assess the reliability of a new lower-extremity rate of movements test and testing apparatus.

  3. Reconstruction of Lower Extremity Primary Malignant and Metastatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Lower extremity tumors and endoprosthesis. 1130. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ¦ Volume 20 ¦ Issue 9 ¦ September 2017 renal failure, and the other patients died due to advanced metastatic disease. None of our patients who received radiotherapy and chemotherapy died due to oncologic treatment.

  4. Reconstruction of the Lower Extremity Using Free Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of lower-extremity reconstruction has focused on wound coverage and functional recovery. However, there are limitations in the use of a local flap in cases of extensive defects of the lower-extremities. Therefore, free flap is a useful option in lower-extremity reconstruction.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of 49 patients (52 cases who underwent lower-extremity reconstruction at our institution during a 10-year period. In these patients, we evaluated causes and sites of defects, types of flaps, recipient vessels, types of anastomosis, survival rate, and complications.ResultsThere were 42 men and 10 women with a mean age of 32.7 years (range, 3-72 years. The sites of defects included the dorsum of the foot (19, pretibial area (17, ankle (7, heel (5 and other sites (4. The types of free flap included latissimus dorsi muscle flap (10, scapular fascial flap (6, anterolateral thigh flap (6, and other flaps (30. There were four cases of vascular complications, out of which two flaps survived after intervention. The overall survival of the flaps was 96.2% (50/52. There were 19 cases of other complications at recipient sites such as partial graft loss (8, partial flap necrosis (6 and infection (5. However, these complications were not notable and were resolved with skin grafts.ConclusionsThe free flap is an effective method of lower-extremity reconstruction. Good outcomes can be achieved with complete debridement and the selection of appropriate recipient vessels and flaps according to the recipient site.

  5. Roentgenoendovascular dilatation and recanalization of vessels of lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabkin, I.Kh.; Matevosov, A.L.; Gotman, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of using roentgenoendovascular dilatation (RED) of vessels of lower extremities are presented. RED is recommended in treating patients with short segmented stenoses of common and external illiac arteries and also with the similar damages of surficial femoral arteries. Dilatation is a success when there is permeability in at least one of the three central crus arteries. Success of delayed results of vessel dilatation is to a certain degree in inverse proportion to time and length of occlusion

  6. Treatment of lower extremity arterial occlusive through retrograde access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xueqiang; Guo Pingfan; Zhang Jinchi; Cai Fanggang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of retrograde access for the interventional treatment of lower extremity arterial occlusive diseases when the occluded segment of lower extremity artery could not be reached through antegrade access. Methods: Twenty-seven cases (male 17, female 10; age range 32-89 years) were retrospectively investigated, including 18 with lower limb arteriosclerosis obliterans, 7 with diabetic foot and 2 with thromboangiitis obliterans. According to the Fontaine staging, 6 cases were classified as Fontaine Ⅱ, 11 were classified as Fontaine Ⅲ and 10 were classified as Fontaine Ⅳ. All cases underwent endovascular operation through antegrade access first with an attempt to cross the occlusive segment, but in vain. So retrograde access was tried via puncture of pedis dorsalis or posterior tibial artery or exposure of lateral branches of posterior tibial artery, peroneal artery or dorsal artery by open surgery,which followed by Percutaneous transluminal angiography and (or) stenting. Results: The operation through retrograde access was successful in all cases with obvious improvement of ischemic symptoms. Hematoma at the puncture site occurred in 3 patients, and paresthesia of toes occurred in 1 after dorsalis pedis arteriotomy. No severe perioperative complication occurred. The average ankle brachial index increased from 0.37 ± 0.11 preoperatively to 0.85 ± 0.12 postoperatively. Conclusions: Retrograde access could be used as an alternative strategy in lower extremity arterial occlusive diseases when the occluded segment could not reach through antegrade access. (authors)

  7. Progression of disease preceding lower extremity amputation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Søe; Petersen, Janne; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with non-traumatic lower extremity amputation are characterised by high age, multi-morbidity and polypharmacy and long-term complications of atherosclerosis and diabetes. To ensure early identification of patients at risk of amputation, we need to gain knowledge about...... the progression of diseases related to lower extremity amputations during the years preceding the amputation. DESIGN: A retrospective population-based national registry study. SETTING: The study includes data on demographics, diagnoses, surgery, medications and healthcare services from five national registries....... Data were retrieved from 14 years before until 1 year after the amputation. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the progression of diseases and use of medication and healthcare services. PARTICIPANTS: An unselected cohort of patients (≥50 years; n=2883) subjected to a primary non...

  8. Reconstruction of the Lower Extremity Using Free Flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jo Kang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of lower-extremity reconstruction has focused on wound coverage andfunctional recovery. However, there are limitations in the use of a local flap in cases of extensivedefects of the lower-extremities. Therefore, free flap is a useful option in lower-extremityreconstruction.Methods We performed a retrospective review of 49 patients (52 cases who underwentlower-extremity reconstruction at our institution during a 10-year period. In these patients,we evaluated causes and sites of defects, types of flaps, recipient vessels, types of anastomosis,survival rate, and complications.Results There were 42 men and 10 women with a mean age of 32.7 years (range, 3-72years. The sites of defects included the dorsum of the foot (19, pretibial area (17, ankle(7, heel (5 and other sites (4. The types of free flap included latissimus dorsi muscle flap(10, scapular fascial flap (6, anterolateral thigh flap (6, and other flaps (30. There werefour cases of vascular complications, out of which two flaps survived after intervention. Theoverall survival of the flaps was 96.2% (50/52. There were 19 cases of other complications atrecipient sites such as partial graft loss (8, partial flap necrosis (6 and infection (5. However,these complications were not notable and were resolved with skin grafts.Conclusions The free flap is an effective method of lower-extremity reconstruction. Goodoutcomes can be achieved with complete debridement and the selection of appropriaterecipient vessels and flaps according to the recipient site.

  9. Outcomes of lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Patel, Virendra I; Judelson, Dejah R; Goodney, Philip P; McPhee, James T; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Cronenwett, Jack L; Schanzer, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Acute limb ischemia remains one of the most challenging emergencies in vascular surgery. Historically, outcomes following interventions for acute limb ischemia have been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine contemporary outcomes following lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia. All patients undergoing infrainguinal lower extremity bypass between 2003 and 2011 within hospitals comprising the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified. Patients were stratified according to whether or not the indication for lower extremity bypass was acute limb ischemia. Primary end points included bypass graft occlusion, major amputation, and mortality at 1 year postoperatively as determined by Kaplan-Meier life table analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate independent predictors of mortality and major amputation at 1 year. Of 5712 lower extremity bypass procedures, 323 (5.7%) were performed for acute limb ischemia. Patients undergoing lower extremity bypass for acute limb ischemia were similar in age (66 vs 67; P = .084) and sex (68% male vs 69% male; P = .617) compared with chronic ischemia patients, but were less likely to be on aspirin (63% vs 75%; P < .0001) or a statin (55% vs 68%; P < .0001). Patients with acute limb ischemia were more likely to be current smokers (49% vs 39%; P < .0001), to have had a prior ipsilateral bypass (33% vs 24%; P = .004) or a prior ipsilateral percutaneous intervention (41% vs 29%; P = .001). Bypasses performed for acute limb ischemia were longer in duration (270 vs 244 minutes; P = .007), had greater blood loss (363 vs 272 mL; P < .0001), and more commonly utilized prosthetic conduits (41% vs 33%; P = .003). Acute limb ischemia patients experienced increased in-hospital major adverse events (20% vs 12%; P < .0001) including myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure exacerbation, deterioration in renal function

  10. Assessment of lower extremity ischemia using smartphone thermographic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H. Lin, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Conventional diagnostic modalities for assessing arterial circulation or tissue perfusion include blood pressure measurement, ultrasound evaluation, and contrast-based angiographic assessment. An infrared thermal camera can detect infrared radiation energy from the human body, which generates a thermographic image to allow tissue perfusion analysis. We describe a smartphone-based miniature thermal imaging system that can be used as an adjunctive imaging modality to assess tissue perfusion. This smartphone-based camera device is noninvasive, simple to use, and cost-effective in assessing patients with lower extremity tissue perfusion. Assessment of patients with lower extremity arterial ischemia can be performed by a variety of diagnostic modalities, including ankle-brachial index, absolute systolic ankle or toe pressure, transcutaneous oximetry, arterial Doppler waveform, arterial duplex ultrasound, computed tomography scan, arterial angiography, and thermal imaging. We herein describe a noninvasive imaging modality using smartphone-based infrared thermography.

  11. CRPS of the upper or lower extremity: surgical treatment outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosson Gedge D

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hypothesis is explored that CRPS I (the "new" RSD persists due to undiagnosed injured joint afferents, and/or cutaneous neuromas, and/or nerve compressions, and is, therefore, a misdiagnosed form of CRPS II (the "new" causalgia. An IRB-approved, retrospective chart review on a series of 100 consecutive patients with "RSD" identified 40 upper and 30 lower extremity patients for surgery based upon their history, physical examination, neurosensory testing, and nerve blocks. Based upon decreased pain medication usage and recovery of function, outcome in the upper extremity, at a mean of 27.9 months follow-up (range of 9 to 81 months, gave results that were excellent in 40% (16 of 40 patients, good in 40% (16 of 40 patients and failure 20% (8 of 40 patients. In the lower extremity, at a mean of 23.0 months follow-up (range of 9 to 69 months the results were excellent in 47% (14 of 30 patients, good in 33% (10 of 30 patients and failure 20% (6 of 30 patients. It is concluded that most patients referred with a diagnosis of CRPS I have continuing pain input from injured joint or cutaneous afferents, and/or nerve compressions, and, therefore, similar to a patient with CRPS II, they can be treated successfully with an appropriate peripheral nerve surgical strategy.

  12. MR imaging findings of fatigue fractures of lower extremity in young soldiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo, Jong Hyun; Moon, Sung Hee; Kim, Young Bok; Park, Yang Hee; Park, Jin Kyoon

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the MR imaging findings of fatigue fractures of the lower extremity in young soldiers. In 22 cases of fatigue fractures of the lower extremity in young soldiers proven by clinical findings and radiological follow up, the MRI findings were retrospectively evalvated. All patients were male and aged between 19 and 21 years. As seen on MRI, the bone marrow edema, intramedullary low signal intensity band, cortical fracture line, periosteal reaction, surrounding soft tissue edema, and enhancement pattern were analyzed and the site of involvement was determined in the axial plane. The locations of fatigue fractures of the lower extremity were the tibia (n=12), fibula (n=8), femur (n=1) and second metatarsus (n=1). All occurred in diaphyses: the junction of the proximal and middle (n=10), middle (n=9), proximal (n=2), and distal shaft (n=1). The sites of involvement were the posteromedial (n=6) and medial side (n=6) of the tibia, and the entire portion of the fibula(n=5) in the axial plane. MRI findings were bone marrow edema in 20 cases, intramedullary low signal intensity band in 14 (which were continuous with the cortex or cortical fracture line), cortical fracture line in 13, and periosteal reaction and surrounding soft tissue edema in all. On gadolinium-enhanced images, enhancement was seen in the bone marrow in 19 cases, in the subperiosteal region in 18, and in the surrounding soft tissue in 22. In fatigue fractures of the lower extremity in young soldiers, the main locations were the tibia and fibula, and characteristic MR imaging findings were intramedullary low signal intensity bands, which were continuous with the cortex or cortical fracture line and often accompanied by bone marrow edema, periosteal reaction, and surrounding soft tissue edema

  13. Strengths of lower extremity and lower trunk muscles in females with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Bokaee

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is one of the most common orthopaedic problemsof the knee joint. Muscular weakness considered as a risk factor of this syndrome. Muscular weaknesscan alter lower extremity kinematics and lead to this syndrome. Also according to the kinetic chain,weakness in one motor segment can influence other motor segments. So the aim of this study was todetermine the association between muscular strengths of both lower extremity and trunks muscles andPFPS.Materials and Methods: 40 women participated in this study (20 subjects with PFPS and 20 ascontrols. In both groups isometric strengths of the lower extremity and lower trunk muscles wereevaluated with Nicholas hand-held dynamometer and then compared with each other.Results: There was a significant decrease in strength of the hip abductors, adductors, external rotators,flexors and extensors, quadriceps, ankle plantarflexors, dorsiflexors, flexor and lateral flexors of the trunkin patients with PFPS.Conclusion: Our results indicate that decrease in strength of the hip and trunk muscles is associatedwith the knee injury. It seems strengthening of muscles of these areas to be effective in preventing theinjury, reducing the risk of more injury and treatment of patients with this syndrome.

  14. Normal venous anatomy and physiology of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notowitz, L B

    1993-06-01

    Venous disease of the lower extremities is common but is often misunderstood. It seems that the focus is on the exciting world of arterial anatomy and pathology, while the topic of venous anatomy and pathology comes in second place. However, venous diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency, leg ulcers, and varicose veins affect much of the population and may lead to disability and death. Nurses are often required to answer complex questions from the patients and his or her family about the patient's disease. Patients depend on nurses to provide accurate information in terms they can understand. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of the normal venous system of the legs before one can understand the complexities of venous diseases and treatments. This presents an overview of normal venous anatomy and physiology.

  15. CT measurements of torsion and length in the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidelich, H.A.; Strecker, W.; Schneider, E.

    1992-01-01

    Complex corrective osteotomies in the lower extremities require precise preoperative planning. Fifty patients who had suffered fractures of the lower limbs and had been treated by osteosynthetic or conservative methods were studied, using a GE 9800 Quick CT; accurate and reproducible measurements of the angles of torsion of the femur and tibia were obtained. Digital images were produced to standardise the planes of measurement and to measure the length of the limb. The most important clinical measurement is the intra-individual difference of the torsional angles. Amongst normals this is 4.3 ± 2.3deg in the femur and 6.1 ± 4.5deg in the tibia. Radiation exposure was measured by a LiF-thermoluminescence dosimeter on an Alderson phantom. Skin dose was 6.3 ± 1.2 mGy and gonadal dose for females was 2.5 ± 0.3 mGy and for males 0.7 ± 0.1 mGy. (orig./GDG) [de

  16. Ability of Ultrasonography in Detection of Different Extremity Bone Fractures; a Case Series Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgi, Farzad; Shayesteh Azar, Massoud; Montazer, Seyed Hossein; Chabra, Aroona; Heidari, Seyed Farshad; Khalilian, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Despite radiography being the gold standard in evaluation of orthopedic injuries, using bedside ultrasonography has several potential supremacies such as avoiding exposure to ionizing radiation, availability in pre-hospital settings, being extensively accessible, and ability to be used on the bedside. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in detection of extremity bone fractures. This study is a case series study, which was prospectively conducted on multiple blunt trauma patients, who were 18 years old or older, had stable hemodynamic, Glasgow coma scale 15, and signs or symptoms of a possible extremity bone fracture. After initial assessment, ultrasonography of suspected bones was performed by a trained emergency medicine resident and prevalence of true positive and false negative findings were calculated compared to plain radiology. 108 patients with the mean age of 44.6 ± 20.4 years were studied (67.6% male). Analysis was done on 158 sites of fracture, which were confirmed with plain radiography. 91 (57.6%) cases were suspected to have upper extremity fracture(s) and 67 (42.4%) to have lower ones. The most frequent site of injuries were forearm (36.7%) in upper limbs and leg (27.8%) in lower limbs. Prevalence of true positive and false negative cases for fractures detected by ultrasonography were 59 (64.8%) and 32 (35.52%) for upper and 49 (73.1%) and 18 (26.9%) for lower extremities, respectively. In addition, prevalence of true positive and false negative detected cases for intra-articular fractures were 24 (48%) and 26 (52%), respectively. The present study shows the moderate sensitivity (68.3%) of ultrasonography in detection of different extremity bone fractures. Ultrasonography showed the best sensitivity in detection of femur (100%) and humerus (76.2%) fractures, respectively. It had low sensitivity in detection of in intra-articular fractures.

  17. Epidemiological characteristics of lower extremity cellulitis after a typhoon flood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Lin

    Full Text Available The flood after a typhoon may lead to increase in patients with cellulitis of lower limbs. However, the microbiological features of these cases are rarely reported. We conducted a study of patients with lower extremity cellulitis after a typhoon followed in southern Taiwan to study the risk factors of cellulitis and the bacteriological features of the patients.We reviewed all the medical records of cellulitis at emergency departments of two teaching hospitals in southern Taiwan 30 days before and after the landing of Typhoon Morakot and collected data on the demographic and bacteriological characteristics. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between the daily number of patients and the rainfall in the Tainan area.The number of cellulitis patients increased from 183 to 344 during the 30-day period after the typhoon. The number peaked in the third and fourth days and lasted for 3 weeks. The proportion of patients with water immersion of the affected limb was higher after the typhoon (6% vs. 37%, odds ratio [OR]: 9.0, 95% Confidence interval [CI]: 4.7-17.2. We found cultures from the infected limbs with immersion had more polymicrobial (73% vs. 26%, OR: 7.8, 95% CI: 3.2-19.2 and Gram-negative bacilli infection (86% vs. 34%, OR: 11.8, 95% CI: 4.1-34.5.Flood arose from Typhoon Morakot caused increases in cellulitis patients, which lasted for 3 weeks. Antibiotic treatment that were effective to both Gram-positive cocci and Gram-negative bacilli are recommended for patients with limbs emerged in the water.

  18. The diagnostic value of indirect lower limb CT venography in the lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Li; Guo Youmin; Wang Jianguo; Guo Xiaojuan; Liu Min; Guo Yulin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate indirect CT venography (CTV) in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Methods: A total of 516 acute pulmonary embolism patients proved by objective test were analyzed retrospectively. Using the results of lower limb compression sonography as reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of indirect CTV were calculated. The agreement between lower extremity venous sonography and indirect CTV were assessed by Kappa analysis. Results: Among 516 patients with acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE), 110 patients underwent both CTV and CTPA and lower extremity sonography. DVT were detected by CTV and sonography simultaneously in 48 patients, while no DVT was detected in 39 patients by both examinations. Thirteen patients were diagnosed to have DVT by CTV without sonography detection, and DVT was detected in other 10 patients only by sonography. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of indirect CTV was 82.8% (48/58), 75.0% (39/52), 78.7% (48/61) and 79.6% (39/49). The agreement between lower extremity venous sonography and indirect CTV was good for femoropopliteal vein (Kappa value range from 0.874 to 0.914, P=0.000). Thrombi detected by CTV were 62 and 52 respectively, and for sonography were 67 and 51 respectively. For calf veins, the agreement decreased (Kappa value range from 0.464 to 0.584, P=0.000). Thrombi detected by CTV were 6, 25 and 13 respectively, and for sonography were 13, 38 and 19 respectively. The agreement for external iliac vein was poor (Kappa value range from 0.230 to 0.262, P=0.067 and 0.004, respectively). Thrombi detected by CTV were 33, and for sonography were 17. Conclusions: The indirect CTV has high accuracy in the diagnosis of DVT. Combined CTPA and CTV can image pulmonary arteries and lower extremity veins in one examination. Indirect CTV can reveal thrombus in large pelvic veins, which has an advantage

  19. Local dynamic stability of lower extremity joints in lower limb amputees during slope walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Ling; Gu, Dong-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb amputees have a higher fall risk during slope walking compared with non-amputees. However, studies on amputees' slope walking were not well addressed. The aim of this study was to identify the difference of slope walking between amputees and non-amputees. Lyapunov exponents λS was used to estimate the local dynamic stability of 7 transtibial amputees' and 7 controls' lower extremity joint kinematics during uphill and downhill walking. Compared with the controls, amputees exhibited significantly lower λS in hip (P=0.04) and ankle (P=0.01) joints of the sound limb, and hip joints (P=0.01) of the prosthetic limb during uphill walking, while they exhibited significantly lower λS in knee (P=0.02) and ankle (P=0.03) joints of the sound limb, and hip joints (P=0.03) of the prosthetic limb during downhill walking. Compared with amputees level walking, they exhibited significantly lower λS in ankle joints of the sound limb during both uphill (P=0.01) and downhill walking (P=0.01). We hypothesized that the better local dynamic stability of amputees was caused by compensation strategy during slope walking.

  20. High-resolution Sonographic Measurements of Lower Extremity Bursae in Chinese Healthy Young Men

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    Yong-Yan Gao

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Using HR-US imaging, we were able to analyze lower extremity bursae with high detection rates in healthy young men. The normal ranges of lower extremity bursa dimensions in healthy young men measured by HR-US in this study could be used as reference values for evaluation of bursa abnormalities in the lower extremity.

  1. Evaluation of a morphing based method to estimate muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellikaan, P; van der Krogt, M M; Carbone, V; Fluit, R; Vigneron, L M; Van Deun, J; Verdonschot, N; Koopman, H F J M

    2014-03-21

    To generate subject-specific musculoskeletal models for clinical use, the location of muscle attachment sites needs to be estimated with accurate, fast and preferably automated tools. For this purpose, an automatic method was used to estimate the muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity, based on the assumption of a relation between the bone geometry and the location of muscle attachment sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of this morphing based method. Two cadaver dissections were performed to measure the contours of 72 muscle attachment sites on the pelvis, femur, tibia and calcaneus. The geometry of the bones including the muscle attachment sites was morphed from one cadaver to the other and vice versa. For 69% of the muscle attachment sites, the mean distance between the measured and morphed muscle attachment sites was smaller than 15 mm. Furthermore, the muscle attachment sites that had relatively large distances had shown low sensitivity to these deviations. Therefore, this morphing based method is a promising tool for estimating subject-specific muscle attachment sites in the lower extremity in a fast and automated manner. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variability of morphometric parameters of feet in various forms of lower extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konnova O.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify the various forms of lower extremities variability of linear and angular parameters of feet in girls aged 17-19 years. Material and Methods. The object of the study included 242 students from Saratov State Medical University, 17—19 years. Foot digital plantography photometric device-software complex «Plantvizor» and measuring distances between sibling points of lower extremities to highlight their forms have been used as a method of research. Results. 8 forms of lower extremities, among which half per cent occurs in isolated form, valgus-direct from the mil-lennim clearance opening and a trapezoidal shape of lower extremities varus. In all forms of lower extremities morphometric parameters of feet and ratio of statistically significant differences in various forms of lower extremities have been studied. Conclusion. Anatomical basis for operational adjustment of axial disorders of tibiae and its influence on morphofunctional state of foot can be resulted from the study.

  3. [Localized Scleroderma of Lower Extremities:Clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-dan; Wang, Hong-wei; Wu, Zhi-hong; Hou, Bo; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Feng; Jin, Zheng-yu; Yuan, Xie

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical and musculoskeletal characteristics of localized scleroderma with lower extremities affected. All the localized scleroderma patients,who received magnetic resonance (MR ) examinations of affected lower extremities at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from April 2013 to June 2014,were retrospectively reviewed. Their clinical data and laboratory results of antinuclear antibody,anti-double stranded-DNA antibody, and anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibody were collected and analyzed. All the MR examinations were non-contrast imaging using Siemens Skyra 3.0T MR scanner. There were 16 localized scleroderma patients with lower extremities affected, 11 of whom were linear scleroderma, 4 generalized morphea, and 1 deep morphea. Female to male ratio was 1:2.2. The mean age was 22.5 years. The mean time span was 7.4 years. Four of the 14 patients (28.6%) who received antinuclear antibody test were positive. All the 10 patients who received anti-double stranded-DNA antibody test and the 7 patients who received anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibody test were negative. The most common musculoskeletal MR features were subcutaneous septal thickening (16/16) and fascial thickening (11/16). The thickened speta and fascia could either be hypointenstiy or hyperintensity on turbo inversion recovery magnitude/proton density weighted imaging. Other MR manifestations were intramuscular speta thickening (3/16), muscular abnormal signals (1/16), and bone marrow abnormal signals (2/16). Musculoskeletal manifestations of the lower extremities with localized scleroderma can be well revealed using MR imaging.

  4. Pediatric lower extremity mower injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sean M; Elwood, Eric T

    2011-09-01

    Lawn mower injuries in children represent an unfortunate common problem to the plastic reconstructive surgeon. There are approximately 68,000 per year reported in the United States. Compounding this problem is the fact that a standard treatment algorithm does not exist. This study follows a series of 7 pediatric patients treated for lower extremity mower injuries by a single plastic surgeon. The extent of soft tissue injury varied. All patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy as a bridge to definitive closure. Of the 7 patients, 4 required skin grafts, 1 required primary closure, 1 underwent a lower extremity amputation secondary to wounds, and 1 was repaired using a cross-leg flap. Function limitations were minimal for all of our patients after reconstruction. Our basic treatment algorithm is presented with initial debridement followed by the simplest method possible for wound closure using negative pressure wound therapy, if necessary.

  5. Impact of Foot Type on Cost of Lower Extremity Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    were at higher risk for injury. Additionally, researchers have found relationships between chronic heel pain and osteoarthritis of the knee and hip...Cost of Injury, in Physical Training and Sports Injury Prevention Guidelines . 2010, U.S. Army Public Health Command (Provisional). 11. Injury...study. BMC Musculoskelet Disord, 2007. 8: p. 41. 48. Reilly, K., et al., The role of foot and ankle assessment of patients with lower limb osteoarthritis

  6. Effects of aquatic PNF lower extremity patterns on balance and ADL of stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of aquatic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) patterns in the lower extremity on balance and activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty poststroke participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). The experimental group performed lower extremity patterns in an aquatic environment, and the control group performed lower extremity patterns on the ground. Both exe...

  7. Delayed reconstruction of mangled lower extremities: soft tissue management

    OpenAIRE

    Tiftikçioğlu, Yiğit Özer; Erçin, Burak Sercan; Erdem, Mehmet; Biçer, Ahmet; Özkayın, Nadir; Özek, Cüneyt

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to propose a new, practical and versatile algorithm for the management of traumatic lower limb soft tissue wounds for patients who did not undergo early reconstruction.Materials and methods: A total of 81 patients (54 males, 27 females; mean age 37.1 years; range 11 to 64 years) managed due to complex lower limb injuries at our institution between January 2008 and December 2012 were analyzed retrospectively in this study. Age and gender of the patients, type of tra...

  8. Bone and Gallium scintigraphy in primary malignant and benign bone tumors of the extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepahdari, S.; Martin, W.B.; Ryan, J.; Simon, M.; Kirchner, P.

    1985-01-01

    A six yer prospective evaluation of 129 patients suspected of having a primary bone tumor included Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy followed by Ga-67 imaging at 48-72 hours. Blood pool images were part of bone scintigraphy in nearly half of the patients. Extent and intensity of tracer uptake in tumor and adjacent bone and joints were recorded for each tracer by two observers blind to the diagnosis. Tissue samples obtained in every patient by biopsy or tumor excision after scintigraphy, revealed 72 malignant and 57 benign bone tumors. The bone scan was positive in 95% (69/72) of malignancies. The scintigraphic intensity of benign and malignant lesions was comparable with both Tc-99m MDP and Ga-67. On the other hand, bone scintigraphy showed 72% (52/72) of bone malignancies to have abnormal proximal and distal bone/joint uptake whereas the Ga-67 images revealed this in only 6% (4/65) of malignancies. Benign lesions manifested this enhanced contiguous bone/joint uptake on only 8% (5/55) of bone and 0% of Ga-67 scans. This study concludes positive bone, blood pool, or Ga-67 images have less specificity for malignancy than the presence of increased Tc-99m MDP deposition in a contiguous bone/joint, but negative scintigraphic results strongly favor a benign lesion. Ga-67 was more accurate than Tc-99m MDP in portraying intraosseous extent of malignant tumors; however, this is now preferably done with C.T

  9. Hemolymphangioma of the lower extremities in children: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosmidis Ilias

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Hemo-lymphangiomas are rare benign tumors that arise from congenital malformation of the vascular system. They are usually diagnosed at birth or early in childhood. The management of hemo-lymphangiomas in children remains challenging because complete resection is often difficult to be achieved and recurrences are common. Methods We present the case of two children with a mass on their left tibia. Imaging modalities, plain radiograph, Ultrasonography and Magnetic Resonance were used to investigate the nature of the mass, the anatomical relationship to the neighboring tissues and help planning the surgical resection. The dominant diagnosis was hemo-lymphangioma. Both lesions increased in size in a short period of follow-up thus we decided to proceed to surgical excision. The diagnosis of hemo-lymphangioma was confirmed by histological examination of the surgical specimen. Post-operatively, seroma was formed to the first patient, managed by placing a drainage and immobilizing the limb on a splint. The second patient experienced no complications post-operatively. After 12 months of follow-up both patients had no complications or recurrence. Conclusions Very few cases of hemo-lymphangiomas of the extremities have been reported in the literature. Those tumors can grow slowly and remain asymptomatic for a long period of time or may become aggressive and enlarge rapidly, without invasive ability though. Radical resection is the choice of treatment offering the lowest recurrence rates. Other therapeutic methods are: aspiration and drainage, cryotherapy, injection of sclerotic agents and radiotherapy; although none of those offers better results that the surgical excision.

  10. CT-Venography for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhashi, Toshio [Iwaki Kyoritsu Hospital, Fukushima (Japan); Ishii, Kiyoshi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Saito, Haruo; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Shoki

    2000-12-01

    We evaluated imaging of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities using CT-Venography. CT-Venography was performed in 11 patients with suspected DVT. This method clearly demonstrated thrombus extension of DVT and collateral circulation. We concluded that CT-Venography was useful in the evaluation of DVT of the lower extremities. (author)

  11. Radicular lower extremity pain as the first symptom of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti J.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Toolo Trauma Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Topeliuksenkatu 5, 00029, Helsinki (Finland); Stahls, Anders; Bohling, Tom [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, 00014, Helsinki (Finland); Kivioja, Aarne [Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, 00029, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-08-01

    Clinical symptoms of hyperparathyroidism are generally nausea, vomiting, fatigue, constipation, and hypotonicity of the muscles and ligaments; bone pain and tenderness are also seen but are more common in secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report a histologically confirmed case of a 28-year-old man whose sole symptom of primary hyperparathyroidism was lower extremity radicular pain due to a vertebral brown tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated brown tumor to be hyperintense on T2-weighted and slightly hypointense on T1-weighted sequences; it showed intense contrast enhancement with gadolinium. Because brown tumors usually contain hemosiderin a short T2 should have been expected, but this was not seen in our case. Healing resulted in decreasing contrast enhancement on T1-weighted sequences and increasingly short T2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a lumbar vertebral brown tumor associated with primary hyperparathyroidism. (orig.)

  12. Radicular lower extremity pain as the first symptom of primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, Antti O.T.; Kiuru, Martti J.; Koskinen, Seppo K.; Stahls, Anders; Bohling, Tom; Kivioja, Aarne

    2004-01-01

    Clinical symptoms of hyperparathyroidism are generally nausea, vomiting, fatigue, constipation, and hypotonicity of the muscles and ligaments; bone pain and tenderness are also seen but are more common in secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report a histologically confirmed case of a 28-year-old man whose sole symptom of primary hyperparathyroidism was lower extremity radicular pain due to a vertebral brown tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated brown tumor to be hyperintense on T2-weighted and slightly hypointense on T1-weighted sequences; it showed intense contrast enhancement with gadolinium. Because brown tumors usually contain hemosiderin a short T2 should have been expected, but this was not seen in our case. Healing resulted in decreasing contrast enhancement on T1-weighted sequences and increasingly short T2. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a lumbar vertebral brown tumor associated with primary hyperparathyroidism. (orig.)

  13. Predictors of lower-extremity amputation in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pickwell, Kirsty; Siersma, Volkert; Kars, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Infection commonly complicates diabetic foot ulcers and is associated with a poor outcome. In a cohort of individuals with an infected diabetic foot ulcer, we aimed to determine independent predictors of lower-extremity amputation and the predictive value for amputation...... of the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF) classification system and to develop a risk score for predicting amputation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively studied 575 patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer presenting to 1 of 14 diabetic foot clinics in 10 European countries....... RESULTS Among these patients, 159 (28%) underwent an amputation. Independent risk factors for amputation were as follows: periwound edema, foul smell, (non)purulent exudate, deep ulcer, positive probe-to-bone test, pretibial edema, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein. Increasing IWGDF severity...

  14. Penetrating injury of the lungs and multiple injuries of lower extremities caused by aircraft bombs splinters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Injuries caused by aircraft bombs cause severe damages to the human body. They are characterized by massive destruction of injured tissues and organs, primary contamination by polymorph bacterial flora and modified reactivity of the body. Upon being wounded by aircraft bombs projectiles a victim simultaneously sustains severe damages of many organs and organ systems due to the fact that a large number of projectiles at the same time injure the chest, stomach, head and extremities. Case report. We presented a patient, 41 years of age, injured by aircraft bomb with hemo-pneumothorax and destruction of the bone and soft tissue structures of the foot, as well as the treatment result of such heavy injuries. After receiving thoracocentesis and short reanimation, the patient underwent surgical procedure. The team performed thoracotomy, primary treatment of the wound and atypical resection of the left lung. Thoracic drains were placed. The wounds on the lower leg and feet were treated primarily. Due to massive destruction of bone tissue of the right foot by cluster bomb splinters, and impossibility of reconstruction of the foot, guillotine amputation of the right lower leg was performed. Twelve days after the wounding caused by cluster bomb splinters, soft tissue of the left lower leg was covered by Tirsch free transplantant and the defect in the area of the left foot was covered by dorsalis pedis flap. The transplant and flap were accepted and the donor sites were epithelized. Twenty-six days following the wounding reamputation was performed and amputation stump of the right lower leg was closed. The patient was given a lower leg prosthesis with which he could move. Conclusion. Upon being wounded by aircraft bomb splinters, the injured person sustains severe wounds of multiple organs and organ systems due to simultaneous injuries caused by a large number of projectiles. It is necessary to take care of the vital organs first because they

  15. Focal myositis of lower extremity responsive to botulinum A toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrovic, Josko; Prka, Zeljko; Zic, Rado; Marusic, Srecko; Morovic-Vergles, Jadranka

    2014-01-01

    Focal myositis is a rare, mostly benign disease (pseudotumor) of skeletal muscle, histopathologically characterized by interstitial myositis and tumorous enlargement of a single muscle. The etiology of focal myositis remains unknown; however, localized myopathy has been postulated to be caused by denervation lesions. This case report describes a patient that presented with clinical, laboratory, electromyoneurography, and magnetic resonance imaging features of focal myositis complicated with intervertebral disk protrusion in the lumbosacral spine affected with radicular distress. In most cases, focal myositic lesions show spontaneous regression, relapses are rare, and long-term prognosis is good. There is a wide spectrum of therapeutic options, from no therapy at all through nonsteroidal antirheumatics and glucocorticoids to radiotherapy, surgical excision, and immunosuppressants. In the patient presented, treatment with glucocorticoids, methotrexate, and surgical excision failed to produce satisfactory results. Clinical improvement, pain relief, and reduction in lower leg volume were only achieved by local infiltration of botulinum A toxin.

  16. Comparison of the Effects of Walking with and without Nordic Pole on Upper Extremity and Lower Extremity Muscle Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Je-Myung; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Ha-Roo; Kim, Bo-In; Jung, Ju-Hyeon

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Nordic pole walking on the electromyographic activities of upper extremity and lower extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into two groups as follows: without Nordic pole walking group (n=13) and with Nordic pole walking group (n=13). The EMG data were collected by measurement while the subjects walking on a treadmill for 30 minutes by measuring from one heel strike to the next. [Results] Both the average values and maximum values of the muscle activity of the upper extremity increased in both the group that used Nordic poles and the group that did not use Nordic poles, and the values showed statistically significant differences. There was an increase in the average value for muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi, but the difference was not statistically significant, although there was a statistically significant increase in its maximum value. The average and maximum values for muscle activity of the lower extremity did not show large differences in either group, and the values did not show any statistically significant differences. [Conclusion] The use of Nordic poles by increased muscle activity of the upper extremity compared with regular walking but did not affect the lower extremity.

  17. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized "tuning" of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G; Birch, Helen L; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Parker, Anthony W; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E

    2014-01-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by 10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  18. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized ``tuning'' of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Birch, Helen L.; Gikas, Panagiotis D.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E.

    2014-11-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by 10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  19. Novel application of lower body positive-pressure in the rehabilitation of an individual with multiple lower extremity fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Judit; Leiter, Jeff R S; Peeler, Jason D

    2011-06-01

    Lower extremity fractures, if not treated appropriately, can increase the risk of morbidity. Partial weight-bearing after surgical repair is recommended; however, current methods of partial weight-bearing may cause excessive loads through the lower extremity. A new rehabilitation tool that uses lower body positive-pressure is described, that may allow partial weight-bearing while preventing excessive loads, thereby improving functional outcomes. A patient with multiple lower extremity fractures underwent a 6-month rehabilitation programme using bodyweight support technology 3 times per week, post-surgery. The patient experienced a reduction in pain and an improvement in ankle range of motion (p=0.002), walking speed (p>0.05) and physical function (p=0.004), as assessed by the Foot and Ankle Module of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Lower Limb Outcomes Assessment Instrument. Training did not appear to affect fracture healing, as was evident on radiograph. The effect of lower body positive-pressure on effusion, which has not previously been reported in the literature, was also investigated. No significant difference in effusion of the foot and ankle when using lower body positive-pressure was found. Initial results suggest that this new technology may be a useful rehabilitation tool that allows partial weight-bearing during the treatment of lower extremity injuries.

  20. Lower extremity osteoarthritis is associated with lower health-related quality of life among retired professional footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Aoki, Haruhito; Kerkhoffs, Gino M M J

    2018-03-15

    The objective of the current study was to explore whether retired professional footballers suffering from lower extremity OA have a lower health-related quality of life than those without OA or current professional footballers. An observational study based on a cross-sectional design by means of questionnaires was conducted. Participants were retired and current professional footballers recruited by the World Players' Union (FIFPro). Information about lower extremity OA (clinically diagnosed by a medical professional) was gathered, while health-related quality of life (Global Physical Health and Global Mental Health scores) was assessed through a validated scale. A total of 396 retired and 361 current professional footballers were included in the analyses (response rate of 54%). The group of retired professional footballers was on average 36 years old, and they had competed in professional football for 11 years (retired for 5 years). The group of current professional footballers was on average 25 years old, and they had been active in professional football for 7 years. Within the group of retired professional footballers, prevalence of lower extremity OA was 33%. Both Global Physical Health and Global Mental Health scores among retired professional footballers with lower extremity OA were significantly lower than among retired players without OA and current players, but these scores were nearly similar to the norm for the general population (regardless the presence of OA or not). Health-related quality of life among retired professional footballers with lower extremity OA was significantly lower than among retired players without OA and current players but nearly similar to the norm for the general population (regardless the presence of OA or not). A rational recommendation is that a support measure such as the After Career Consultation should be introduced among retired professional footballers in order to empower their sustainable health and quality of life

  1. The Effects of Load Carriage and Muscle Fatigue on Lower-Extremity Joint Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Ozimek, Elicia; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel are commonly afflicted by lower-extremity overuse injuries. Load carriage and muscular fatigue are major stressors during military basic training. Purpose: To examine effects of load carriage and muscular fatigue on lower-extremity joint mechanics during walking. Method: Eighteen men performed the following tasks: unloaded…

  2. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography.

  3. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Hwang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography.

  4. Infection in the ischemic lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, D E; Marek, J M; Langsfeld, M

    1998-06-01

    Infections in the lower extremity of the patient with ischemia can cover a broad spectrum of different diseases. An understanding of the particular pathophysiologic circumstances in the ischemic extremity can be of great value in understanding the natural history of the disease and the potential complications that may occur. Optimizing blood flow to the extremity by using revascularization techniques is important for any patient with an ischemic lower extremity complicated by infection or ulceration. Infections in the ischemic lower extremity require local débridement and systemic antibiotics. For severe infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis or the fetid foot, more extensive local débridement and even amputation may be required. Fundamentals of managing prosthetic graft infection require removing the infected prosthesis, local wound débridement, and systemic antibiotics while attempting to preserve viability of the lower extremity using autogenous graft reconstruction.

  5. Post-thrombotic syndrome of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosnjakovic, S.; Gerhard, U.; Buck, J.

    1980-01-01

    The postthrombotic syndrome with chronic venous insufficiency develops either gradually over a number of years or after a latent period of varying length. The clinical manifestations correlate with morphological and functional phlebographic findings of the superficial and deep veins. The conservative therapy of the post-thrombotic syndrome, consisting of anti-coagulant therapy, compression dressing or active physical exercise, must be consistently enforced. Indication of vascular surgical intervention should be carefully noted. Optimal examination of the patho-anatomical findings in the phlebogram is imperative as an important aid in decision-making. (orig.) [de

  6. Post-thrombotic syndrome of the lower extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosnjakovic, S; Gerhard, U; Buck, J

    1980-09-01

    The postthrombotic syndrome with chronic venous insufficiency develops either gradually over a number of years or after a latent period of varying length. The clinical manifestations correlate with morphological and functional phlebographic findings of the superficial and deep veins. The conservative therapy of the post-thrombotic syndrome, consisting of anti-coagulant therapy, compression dressing or active physical exercise, must be consistently enforced. Indication of vascular surgical intervention should be carefully noted. Optimal examination of the patho-anatomical findings in the phlebogram is imperative as an important aid in decision-making.

  7. Body composition of the human lower extremity observed by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masataka; Hasegawa, Makiko; Wu, Chung-Lei; Mimaru, Osamu

    1987-01-01

    Using computed tomography image, the body composition on the lower extremity were observed in 24 adult human (10 male, 14 female). CT image were taken at proximal section (upper a third on thigh), distal section (lower a third on thigh) and leg section (upper a third on leg), and the quantities determind from the images included the area of total cross-section, muscle, subcutaneous fat, connective tissue and bone in the each cross-section. The ratios of the each components to total area were surveyed. The age related changes and the differences between the three body types, which were defined by Rohrer's index, were discussed in both sexes. The following results were obtained. 1. The ratio of the each component to total sectional area in the three section levels was the highest in the muscle following in order of subcutaneous fat, connective tissue and bone in man generally. On the other hand, in female, the subcutaneous fat was higher than the muscle in the proximal section by A and C body types, but the muscle was higher than the subcutaneous fat by D body type in this section and by all body types in distal and leg sections. 2. Concerning the correlationship between the ratios of the components in the section and Rohrer's index or ages, they were in positive relation on the ratios of the subcutaneous fat and the connective tissue, and were in negative relation on the ratio of the muscle in the femoral section by male. 3. Decreasing with age of muscular area were found at under 50 ages in extensor, at 50 age in adductor and at about 60 ages in flexor on the proximal section, and at 50 age in extensor, after 55 age in adductor and at about 60 age in flexor on the distal section in man respectively. On the leg section, the decreasing tendency with ages were predominant in flexor by man and were found after 50 age by female too. (author)

  8. Analysis and evaluation of functional status of lower extremity amputee-appliance systems: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, S

    1976-11-01

    This paper introduces an integrated, objective and biomechanically sound approach for the analysis and evaluation of the functional status of lower extremity amputee-appliance systems. The method is demonstrated here in its application to the unilateral lower extremity amputee-axillary crutches system and the unilateral below-knee amputee-PTB prosthesis system, both of which are commonly encountered in day-to-day rehabilitation practice.

  9. [Magnetotherapy in obliterating vascular diseases of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Iu B; Shval'b, P G; Lastushkin, A V; Baranov, V M; Sigaev, A A; Zueva, G V; Karpov, E I

    1992-01-01

    The investigators have developed a polymagnetic system "Avrora-MK-01" employing running impulse magnetic field to treat diseases of the leg vessels by the action on peripheral capillary bed. At a pregangrene stage a positive effect on peripheral capillaries was achieved in 75-82% of the patients treated.

  10. Skeletal muscle CT of lower extremities in myotonic dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryosuke; Imai, Terukuni; Sadashima, Hiromichi; Matsumoto, Sadayuki; Yamamoto, Toru; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Maya, Kiyomi; Tanabe, Masaya

    1988-01-01

    We evaluated the leg and thigh muscles of 4 control subjects and 10 patients with myotonic dystrophy using computed tomography. Taking previous reports about the skeletal muscle CT of myotonic dystrophy into account, we concluded that the following 5 features are characteristic of myotonic dystrophy: 1. The main change is the appearance of low-density areas in muscles; these areas reflect fat tissue. In addition, the muscle mass decreases in size. 2. The leg is more severely affected than the thigh. 3. In the thigh, although the m. quadriceps femoris, especially the vastus muscles, tends to be affected, the m. adductor longus and magnus tend to be preserved. 4. In the leg, although the m. tibialis anterior and m. triceps surae tend to be affected, the m. peroneus longus, brevis, and m. tibialis posterior tend to be preserved. 5. Compensatory hypertrophy is often observed in the m. rectus femoris, m. adductor longus, m. adductor magnus, m. peroneus longus, and m. peroneus brevis, accompanied by the involvement of their agonist muscles. (author)

  11. Chronic Ankle Instability and Neural Excitability of the Lower Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Michelle M; Gribble, Phillip A; Pietrosimone, Brian G

    2015-08-01

    Neuromuscular dysfunction of the leg and thigh musculature, including decreased strength and postural control, is common in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Understanding how CAI affects specific neural pathways may provide valuable information for targeted therapies. To investigate differences in spinal reflexive and corticospinal excitability of the fibularis longus and vastus medialis between limbs in patients with unilateral CAI and between CAI patients and participants serving as healthy controls. Case-control study. Research laboratory. A total of 56 participants volunteered, and complete data for 21 CAI patients (9 men, 12 women; age = 20.81 ± 1.63 years, height = 171.57 ± 11.44 cm, mass = 68.84 ± 11.93 kg) and 24 healthy participants serving as controls (7 men, 17 women; age = 22.54 ± 2.92 years, height = 172.35 ± 10.85 cm, mass = 69.15 ± 12.30 kg) were included in the final analyses. Control participants were matched to CAI patients on sex, age, and limb dominance. We assigned "involved" limbs, which corresponded with the involved limbs of the CAI patients, to control participants. Spinal reflexive excitability was assessed via the Hoffmann reflex and normalized to a maximal muscle response. Corticospinal excitability was assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Active motor threshold (AMT) was defined as the lowest transcranial magnetic stimulation intensity required to elicit motor-evoked potentials equal to or greater than 100 μV in 5 of 10 consecutive stimuli. We obtained motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) at percentages ranging from 100% to 140% of AMT. Fibularis longus MEP amplitudes were greater in control participants than in CAI patients bilaterally at 100% AMT (control involved limb: 0.023 ± 0.031; CAI involved limb: 0.014 ± 0.008; control uninvolved limb: 0.021 ± 0.022; CAI uninvolved limb: 0.015 ± 0.007; F1,41 = 4.551, P = .04) and 105% AMT (control involved limb: 0.029 ± 0.026; CAI involved limb: 0.021 ± 0

  12. Management of lower extremity riding lawn mower injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroening, L; Davids, J R

    2000-01-01

    Eight children are injured by riding lawn mowers every day. The child, usually a bystander or passenger on the mower, can sustain life-threatening and limb-threatening injuries. Multidisciplinary care must be available to manage the numerous issues presented by the unique circumstance of a child with a severe injury in the acute and chronic settings. Whether the limb is salvaged or amputated, the ultimate goal is optimal functional outcome for the patient. We have developed a team approach to address these injuries from their onset until patient maturity, maximizing our ability to achieve this goal.

  13. Tail-like Congenital Duplication of Lower Extremity (Extra Leg or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-01

    Jan 1, 2018 ... ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Congenital duplication of lower extremity, either complete or incomplete is extremely rare. Only 26 cases had been reported till 2010, of which only 5 cases had feature of complete duplication. Theories have been proposed that the cause of this abnormality includes maternal ...

  14. The quality of visual information about the lower extremities influences visuomotor coordination during virtual obstacle negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Kretch, Kari S; Zhou, Zixuan; Finley, James M

    2018-05-09

    Successful negotiation of obstacles during walking relies on the integration of visual information about the environment with ongoing locomotor commands. When information about the body and environment are removed through occlusion of the lower visual field, individuals increase downward head pitch angle, reduce foot placement precision, and increase safety margins during crossing. However, whether these effects are mediated by loss of visual information about the lower extremities, the obstacle, or both remains to be seen. Here, we used a fully immersive, virtual obstacle negotiation task to investigate how visual information about the lower extremities is integrated with information about the environment to facilitate skillful obstacle negotiation. Participants stepped over virtual obstacles while walking on a treadmill with one of three types of visual feedback about the lower extremities: no feedback, end-point feedback, or a link-segment model. We found that absence of visual information about the lower extremities led to an increase in the variability of leading foot placement after crossing. The presence of a visual representation of the lower extremities promoted greater downward head pitch angle during the approach to and subsequent crossing of an obstacle. In addition, having greater downward head pitch was associated with closer placement of the trailing foot to the obstacle, further placement of the leading foot after the obstacle, and higher trailing foot clearance. These results demonstrate that the fidelity of visual information about the lower extremities influences both feed-forward and feedback aspects of visuomotor coordination during obstacle negotiation.

  15. Stress fractures in the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Ferco H.; Jonge, Milko C. de; Maas, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologist should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely

  16. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    OpenAIRE

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman,Lindsey; Games,Kenneth; Wasik,Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Leamor Kahanov,1 Lindsey E Eberman,2 Kenneth E Games,2 Mitch Wasik2 1College of Health Science, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, USA; 2Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA Abstract: Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing ...

  17. Rap system of stress stimulation can promote bone union after lower tibial bone fracture: a clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jian-fei; Shen, Jia-zuo; Li, Da-kun; Lin, Da-sheng; Li, Lin; Li, Qiang; Qi, Peng; Lian, Ke-jian; Ding, Zhen-qi

    2012-01-01

    Lower tibial bone fracture may easily cause bone delayed union or nonunion because of lacking of dynamic mechanical load. Research Group would design a new instrument as Rap System of Stress Stimulation (RSSS) to provide dynamic mechanical load which would promote lower tibial bone union postoperatively. This clinical research was conducted from January 2008 to December 2010, 92 patients(male 61/female 31, age 16-70 years, mean 36.3 years) who suffered lower tibial bone closed fracture were given intramedullary nail fixation and randomly averagely separated into experimental group and control group(according to the successively order when patients went for the admission procedure). Then researchers analysed the clinical healing time, full weight bearing time, VAS (Visual Analogue Scales) score and callus growth score of Lane-Sandhu in 3,6,12 months postoperatively. The delayed union and nonunion rates were compared at 6 and 12 months separately. All the 92 patients had been followed up (mean 14 months). Clinical bone healing time in experimental group was 88.78±8.80 days but control group was 107.91±9.03 days. Full weight bearing time in experimental group was 94.07±9.81 days but control group was 113.24±13.37 days respectively (Ptibial bone union, reduce bone delayed union or nonunion rate. It is an adjuvant therapy for promoting bone union after lower tibial bone fracture.

  18. Are levels of bone turnover related to lower bone mass of adolescents previously fed a macrobiotic diet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parsons, T.J.; Dusseldorp, van M.; Seibel, M.J.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dutch adolescents who consumed a macrobiotic (vegan-type) diet in early life, demonstrate a lower relative bone mass than their omnivorous counterparts. We investigated whether subjects from the macrobiotic group showed signs of catching up with controls in terms of relative bone mass, reflected by

  19. Results of a prospective randomized controlled trial of early ambulation for patients with lower extremity autografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorello, David John; Peck, Michael; Albrecht, Marlene; Richey, Karen J; Pressman, Melissa A

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice to keep those patients with lower extremity autografts immobile until post-operative day (POD) 5. There is however inherent risks associated with even short periods of immobility. As of now there are no randomized controlled trials looking at early ambulation of patients with lower extremity autografts in the burn community.The objective of this study was to show that patients who begin ambulation within 24 hours of lower extremity autografting will have no increased risk of graft failure than those patients who remain immobile until POD 5. Thirty-one subjects who received autografts to the lower extremity were randomized after surgery into either the early ambulation group (EAG;17 subjects) or the standard treatment group (STG;14 subjects). Those subjects randomized to the EAG began ambulating with physical therapy on POD 1. Subjects in the STG maintained bed rest until POD 5. There was no difference in the number of patients with graft loss in either the EAG or STG on POD 5, and during any of the follow-up visits. No subjects required regrafting. There was a significant difference in the mean minutes of ambulation, with the EAG ambulating longer than the STG (EAG 23.4 minutes [SD 12.03], STG 14.1 [SD 9.00], P=.0235) on POD 5. Burn patients with lower extremity autografts can safely ambulate on POD 1 without fear of graft failure compared with those patients that remain on bed rest for 5 days.

  20. Fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with sodium morrhuate for the treatment of lower extremity varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiting; Jiang Zhongpu; Zhou Yi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate in treating lower extremity varices. Methods: A total of 30 cases (39 diseased lower limbs) with lower extremity varices were enrolled in this study. Under fluoroscopic guidance foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate was carried out in all patients. The obstructed condition of the great saphenous vein was observed during the following three months. Results: The technical success was achieved in all 39 patients. The mean dose of foam sclerosant used for each diseased limb was 5.9 ml (3.4-8.2 ml). Disappearance of blood flow reflux in lower extremity vein immediately after the treatment was seen in 35 patients (90%). Three months after the therapy, vascular sonography showed that the great saphenous vein was obstructed, and no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: For the treatment of lower extremity varices, fluoroscopically-guided foam sclerotherapy with injection of domestic sodium morrhuate is safe and effective with satisfactory results. This technique is a newly-developed micro-invasive therapy for lower extremity varices. (authors)

  1. Nursing care of catheter-directed thrombolysis therapy for acute arterial embolism of lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Ge Jingping; Gu Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical effect of nursing intervention for interventional catheter-directed thrombolysis therapy in patients with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities. Methods: The experience of nursing care for 48 cases with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities which was treated with interventional catheter-directed thrombolysis was retrospectively analyzed. Results: With the help of active nursing care and rational treatment the occluded arteries were completely reopened in 40 cases and partially reopened in 8 cases. Complete relief from the clinical symptoms was obtained in 42 cases and partial remission was seen in 6 cases. Conclusion: For getting a complete recovery and improving living quality after catheter-directed thrombolysis in patients with acute arterial embolism of lower extremities, the key points are sufficient preoperative preparation, perioperative painstaking nursing care as well as postoperative correct guidance of exercise program. (authors)

  2. Relative incidence of phlebitis associated with peripheral intravenous catheters in the lower versus upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaya, A; Schwartz, Y; Kory, R; Yinnon, A M; Ben-Chetrit, E

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral venous access in elderly, hospitalized patients is often challenging. The usual alternative is insertion of a central venous catheter, with associated risk for complications. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative incidence of phlebitis secondary to lower as compared to upper extremity intravenous catheters (IVCs) and associated risk factors. A non-randomized, observational, cohort-controlled study was carried out. Consecutive patients receiving a lower extremity IVC were enrolled and compared with patients receiving an upper extremity IVC. Patients were followed from insertion until removal of the IVC. The major endpoint was phlebitis. The incidence of phlebitis secondary to upper extremity IVCs was 3/50 (6 %) compared to 5/53 (9.4 %) in lower extremity IVCs (χ(2) Yates = 0.08, p = 0.776). Age, gender, obesity, diabetes mellitus, site (arm versus leg, left versus right), and size of needle were not found to be risk factors for phlebitis according to univariate analysis. None of the patients developed bloodstream infection. In elderly patients with poor venous access, lower extremity IVCs are a reasonable and low-risk alternative to central venous catheters.

  3. The comparative study of conventional and innovative phlebographies in lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Guoping; Gu Jianping; He Xu; Lou Wensheng; Chen Liang; Su Haobo; Song Jinghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The clinical values of conventional phlebography via percutaneous dorsal pedal vein access with scalp puncture was compared with innovative phlebography via a percutaneous great saphenous approach with retained catheter in lower extremity for detection of venous diseases. Methods: Conventional and innovative phlebographies in lower extremity were performed in 34 suffering lower extremities of 30 patients, and the efficacy of the two methods was compared in demonstrating the venous diseases in lower extremities. Results: The rates of vascular display of the common iliac vein, the valve of saphenous-femoral vein and the first couple valve of femoral vein were 100%, 100% and 91.18% respectively with innovative phlebography while the rates of vascular display were 32.25%, 73.53% and 64.71% respectively with conventional phlebography. Iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), venous valvular disfunction of saphenous-femoral vein and the venous valvular disfunction of the first couple valve of femoral vein were shown in 14, 25 and 21 cases respectively by innovative phlebography, and in 3, 14 and 12 cases respectively by conventional phlebography in patients suffering from varicose veins and chronic swelling of the lower extremities. There was significant difference between the innovative and conventional phlebographies (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The innovative phlebography possesses a higher efficacy in diagnosing IVCS, venous valvular disfunctions of saphenous-femoral vein and the first couple valve of femoral vein compared with conventional method. It would be an alternative method to the conventional one or percutaneous femoral venous approach. (authors)

  4. MR imaging findings of lower extremity sepsis caused by vibro vulnificus: A report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jihyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Min, Soo Kee; Lee, Jeong A; Lee, Kwan Seop

    2017-01-01

    Lower extremity infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus sepsis is a rapidly progressing fatal condition. Prompt diagnosis followed by early and aggressive treatment with antibiotics and fasciotomy is crucial. In this report, we described lower extremity magnetic resonance (MR) images of three patients with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. In our cases, MR imaging of lower extremity with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis showed three common findings. First, the MR signal abnormalities appeared simultaneously in all layers, including skin, subcutaneous fat, muscles, and deep fasciae. Second, the inflammation showed symmetry on both legs. Third, none of our cases was accompanied by abscess formation. These imaging features may represent rapid progression of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis and could be helpful for accurate diagnosis, and prompt and aggressive treatment

  5. MR imaging findings of lower extremity sepsis caused by vibro vulnificus: A report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jihyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Min, Soo Kee; Lee, Jeong A; Lee, Kwan Seop [Hallym University College of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Lower extremity infection caused by Vibrio vulnificus sepsis is a rapidly progressing fatal condition. Prompt diagnosis followed by early and aggressive treatment with antibiotics and fasciotomy is crucial. In this report, we described lower extremity magnetic resonance (MR) images of three patients with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis. In our cases, MR imaging of lower extremity with Vibrio vulnificus sepsis showed three common findings. First, the MR signal abnormalities appeared simultaneously in all layers, including skin, subcutaneous fat, muscles, and deep fasciae. Second, the inflammation showed symmetry on both legs. Third, none of our cases was accompanied by abscess formation. These imaging features may represent rapid progression of Vibrio vulnificus sepsis and could be helpful for accurate diagnosis, and prompt and aggressive treatment.

  6. A finite element lower extremity and pelvis model for predicting bone injuries due to knee bolster loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, L. van; Hoof, J. van; Barbir, A.; Made, R. van der; Slaats, P.M.A.; McCann, M.J.; Ridella, S.A.; Rupp, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Injuries to the knee-thigh-hip (KTH) complex in frontal motor vehicle crashes are of substantial concern because of their frequency and potential to result in long-term disability. Current frontal impact Anthropometric Test Dummies (ATDs) have been shown to respond differently than human cadavers

  7. MR features of multiple enchondromas with associated chondrosarcoma in the lower extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kyung Yoon; Sung, Mi Sook; Lee, Hee Jeong; Park, Il Joong; Lee, Jae Young; Yu, Won Jong; Lee, Gook Jin; Jeon, Sang Hoon; Yu, Mi Na; Yoon, Se Cheol [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Multiple enchondromas are well described in the literature, however, the associated spectrum of MR imaging findings remains unclear. Secondary chondrosarcoma of the hand and feet associated with multiple enchondromas is extremely rare. Herein, we reported a case of multiple enchondromas of intramedullary, intracortical, and periosteal location with associated low-grade chondrosarcomas in the lower extremities on MR imaging in a 57 year old woman.

  8. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by two different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, A.; Vestergaard, A.; Dohn, U.M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the ability of two different dedicated extremity MRI (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. Methods: CR and two MRI examinations (using 0.2 T Esaote Artoscan and 0...

  9. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the ability of 2 different dedicated extremity magnetic resonance imaging (E-MRI) units and conventional radiography (CR) for identifying bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints. METHODS: CR and 2 MRI-examinations (on 0.2T Esaote...

  10. Validity and interobserver agreement of lower extremity local tissue water measurements in healthy women using tissue dielectric constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads R; Birkballe, Susanne; Nørregaard, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurement may become an important tool in the clinical evaluation of chronic lower extremity swelling in women; however, several factors are known to influence TDC measurements, and comparative data on healthy lower extremities are few.......Tissue dielectric constant (TDC) measurement may become an important tool in the clinical evaluation of chronic lower extremity swelling in women; however, several factors are known to influence TDC measurements, and comparative data on healthy lower extremities are few....

  11. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A; Madoff, David C

    2015-07-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  12. Evaluation of a morphing based method to estimate muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellikaan, P.; van der Krogt, Marjolein; Carbone, Vincenzo; Fluit, René; Vigneron, L.M.; van Deun, J.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To generate subject-specific musculoskeletal models for clinical use, the location of muscle attachment sites needs to be estimated with accurate, fast and preferably automated tools. For this purpose, an automatic method was used to estimate the muscle attachment sites of the lower extremity, based

  13. Effects of aquatic PNF lower extremity patterns on balance and ADL of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of aquatic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) patterns in the lower extremity on balance and activities of daily living (ADL) in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty poststroke participants were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 10) or a control group (n = 10). The experimental group performed lower extremity patterns in an aquatic environment, and the control group performed lower extremity patterns on the ground. Both exercises were conducted for 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Balance was measured with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and One Leg Stand Test (OLST). Activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM). A paired t-test was used to measure pre- and post-experiment differences, and an independent t-test was used to measure between-group differences. [Results] The experimental and control groups showed significant differences for all pre- and post-experiment variables. In the between-group comparison, the experimental group was significantly difference from the control group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that performing aquatic proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation patterns in the lower extremity enhances balance and ADL in stroke patients.

  14. Establishing the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale, and determining its validity and reliability in lower extremity amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hülya; Gafuroğlu, Ümit; Ryall, Nicola; Yüksel, Selcen

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine (SIGAM) mobility scale to Turkish, and to test its validity and reliability in lower extremity amputees. Adaptation of the scale into Turkish was performed by following the steps in American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) guideline. Turkish version of the scale was tested twice on 109 patients who had lower extremity amputations, at hours 0 and 72. The reliability of the Turkish version was tested for internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Structural validity was tested using the "scale validity" method. For this purpose, the scores of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Functional Ambulation Scale (FAS), Get Up and Go Test, and Satisfaction with the Prosthesis Questionnaire (SATPRO) were calculated, and analyzed using Spearman's correlation test. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.67 for the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale. Cohen's kappa coefficients were between 0.224 and 0.999. Repeatability according to the results of the SIGAM mobility scale (grades A-F) was 0.822. We found significant and strong positive correlations of the SIGAM mobility scale results with the FAS, Get Up and Go Test, SATPRO, and all of the SF-36 subscales. In our study, the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale was found as a reliable, valid, and easy to use scale in everyday practice for measuring mobility in lower extremity amputees. Implications for Rehabilitation Amputation is the surgical removal of a severely injured and nonfunctional extremity, at a level of one or more bones proximal to the body. Loss of a lower extremity is one of the most important conditions that cause functional disability. The Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine (SIGAM) mobility scale contains 21 questions that evaluate the mobility of lower extremity amputees. Lack of a specific Turkish scale that evaluates rehabilitation results and mobility of lower extremity amputees, and determines their

  15. Botulinum therapy for poststroke spasticity of the lower extremity (clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Krylova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the topical problem – the medical rehabilitation of patients with poststroke spasticity. It describes clinical cases of patients with poststroke spasticity of the upper and lower extremities who have received combined therapy using botulinum toxin type A (Botox injections.

  16. Striving for Normalcy after Lower Extremity Reconstruction with Free Tissue: The Role of Secondary Esthetic Refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Haddock, Nicholas T; Mackay, Duncan; Wink, Jason D; Newman, Andrew S; Levin, L Scott; Kovach, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Many patients with successful lower extremity salvage have postoperative functional and esthetic concerns. Such concerns range from contour irregularity preventing proper shoe-fitting to esthetic concerns involving color, contour, and texture match. The purpose of this study is to determine the overall incidence as well as factors associated with an increased likelihood of undergoing secondary, esthetic refinements of lower extremity free flaps and to review current revision techniques. All patients undergoing lower extremity soft tissue coverage for limb salvage procedures between January 2007 and June 2013 at a single institution were included in the analysis. Patients who underwent secondary refinements for lower extremity free flaps were compared with patients not undergoing secondary procedures. During the study period, 152 patients underwent reconstruction and were eligible for inclusion. Of these, 32 (21.1%) patients underwent secondary, esthetic revisions. Few differences in patient or case characteristics were noted, although revision patients trended toward being younger, having lower body mass index, with defects secondary to acute trauma located below the ankle. The most common revision was complex soft tissue rearrangement or surgical flap debulking/direct excision (87.5% of patients), followed by scar revision (12.5%), suction-assisted lipectomy (3.1%), laser scar revision (3.1%), and tissue expansion with local tissue rearrangement (3.1%). A significant portion of patients desire secondary revisions following the initial procedure. This is especially true of younger patients with below ankle reconstruction. In many patients, an esthetic consideration should not be of secondary concern, but should be part of the ultimate reconstructive algorithm for lower extremity limb salvage. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Intra-arterial Ultra-low-Dose CT Angiography of Lower Extremity in Diabetic Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Özgen, Ali, E-mail: draliozgen@hotmail.com [Yeditepe University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Sanioğlu, Soner [Yeditepe University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery (Turkey); Bingöl, Uğur Anıl [Yeditepe University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery (Turkey)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeTo image lower extremity arteries by CT angiography using a very low-dose intra-arterial contrast medium in patients with high risk of developing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN).Materials and MethodsThree cases with long-standing diabetes mellitus and signs of lower extremity atherosclerotic disease were evaluated by CT angiography using 0.1 ml/kg of the body weight of contrast medium given via 10-cm-long 4F introducer by puncturing the CFA. Images were evaluated by an interventional radiologist and a cardiovascular surgeon. Density values of the lower extremity arteries were also calculated. Findings in two cases were compared with digital subtraction angiography images performed for percutaneous revascularization. Blood creatinine levels were followed for possible CIN.ResultsIntra-arterial CT angiography images were considered diagnostic in all patients and optimal in one patient. No patient developed CIN after intra-arterial CT angiography, while one patient developed CIN after percutaneous intervention.ConclusionIntra-arterial CT angiography of lower extremity might be performed in selected patients with high risk of developing CIN. Our limited experience suggests that as low as of 0.1 ml/kg of the body weight of contrast medium may result in adequate diagnostic imaging.

  18. Interjoint coordination of the lower extremities in short-track speed skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Purevsuren, Tserenchimed; Park, Won Man; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2017-10-01

    In short-track speed skating, the three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities during the whole skating cycle have not been studied. Kinematic parameters of the lower extremities during skating are presented as joint angles versus time. However, the angle-time presentation is not sufficient to describe the relationship between multi-joint movement patterns. Thus, angle-angle presentations were developed and used to describe interjoint coordination in sport activities. In this study, 15 professional male skaters' full body motion data were recorded using a wearable motion capture system during short-track speed skating. We investigated the three-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremities and then established the interjoint coordination between hip-knee and knee-ankle for both legs during the whole skating cycle. The results demonstrate the relationship between multi-joint movements during different phases of short-track speed skating. This study provides fundamentals of the movement mechanism of the lower extremities that can be integrated with physiotherapy to improve skating posture and prevent injuries from repetitive stress since physiological characteristics play an important role in skating performance.

  19. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  20. A Retrospective Review from 2006 to 2011 of Lower Extremity Injuries in Badminton in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Reeves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To describe lower extremity injuries for badminton in New Zealand. Methods: Lower limb badminton injuries that resulted in claims accepted by the national insurance company Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC in New Zealand between 2006 and 2011 were reviewed. Results: The estimated national injury incidence for badminton injuries in New Zealand from 2006 to 2011 was 0.66%. There were 1909 lower limb badminton injury claims which cost NZ$2,014,337 (NZ$ value over 2006 to 2011. The age-bands frequently injured were 10–19 (22%, 40–49 (22%, 30–39 (14% and 50–59 (13% years. Sixty five percent of lower limb injuries were knee ligament sprains/tears. Males sustained more cruciate ligament sprains than females (75 vs. 39. Movements involving turning, changing direction, shifting weight, pivoting or twisting were responsible for 34% of lower extremity injuries. Conclusion: The knee was most frequently injured which could be due to multi-planar loading. Turning or cutting movements typically involve motion in the frontal and transverse planes that may place the knee at greater risk of injury than movement in the sagittal plane alone. Further research on badminton specific movements is warranted to better understand the mechanisms of lower extremity injuries in the sport. Sports medicine and support personnel should take into account the susceptibility of the knee to injury when designing training and injury prevention programmes given the large number of change of direction movements during badminton.

  1. Distant Migration of Multiple Siliconomas in Lower Extremities following Breast Implant Rupture: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Joo Hyun; Song, Seung Yong; Lew, Dae Hyun; Lee, Dong Won

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Siliconoma from ruptured breast implants has been reported in multiple body sites, including but not limited to the breast parenchyma, axillary lymph nodes, upper arm, and even lower leg. In this regard, we report a rare case of distant silicone migration to the lower extremities after traumatic breast implant rupture. A 55-year-old Asian woman who received bilateral augmentation mammoplasty 20 years ago presented with ruptured breast implants from a car accident 2 years earlier. Mag...

  2. Analysis of radiographic bone parameters throughout the surgical lengthening and deformity correction of extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Nenad; Poposka, Anastasika; Samardziski, Milan; Kamnar, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Radiographic examination of extremities in surgical lengthening and/or correction of deformities is of crucial importance for the assessment of new bone formation. The purpose of this study is to confirm the diagnostic value of radiography in precise detection of bone parameters in various lengthening or correction stages in patients treated by limb-lengthening and deformity correction. 50 patients were treated by the Ilizarov method of limb lengthening or deformity correction at the University Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic in Skopje, and analysed over the period from 2006 to 2012. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of 27 patients with limb-lengthening because of congenital shortening. The second group consisted of 23 patients treated for acquired limb deformities. The results in both groups were received in three stages of new bone formation and were based on the appearance of 3 radiographic parameters at the distraction/compression site. The differences between the presence of all radiographic bone parameters in different stages of new bone formation were statistically signficant in both groups, especially the presence of the cortical margin in the first group (Cochran Q=34.43, df=2, p=0.00000). The comparative analysis between the two groups showed a statistically significant difference in the presence of initial bone elements and cystic formations only in the first stage. Almost no statistical significance in the differences between both groups of patients with regard to 3 radiographic parameters in 3 stages of new bone formation, indicates a minor influence of the etiopathogenetic background on the new bone formation in patients treated by gradual lengthening or correction of limb deformities.

  3. Improved Training Program for Fall Prevention of Warfighters with Lower Extremity Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Release; Distribution Unlimited The views , opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Overseas Contingency Operations have produced many U.S. warfighters with lower extremity injuries

  4. New options for vascularized bone reconstruction in the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdek, Matthew T; Wagner, Eric R; Wyles, Cody C; Nanos, George P; Moran, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Originally described in the 1970s, vascularized bone grafting has become a critical component in the treatment of bony defects and non-unions. Although well established in the lower extremity, recent years have seen many novel techniques described to treat a variety of challenging upper extremity pathologies. Here the authors review the use of different techniques of vascularized bone grafts for the upper extremity bone pathologies. The vascularized fibula remains the gold standard for the treatment of large bone defects of the humerus and forearm, while also playing a role in carpal reconstruction; however, two other important options for larger defects include the vascularized scapula graft and the Capanna technique. Smaller upper extremity bone defects and non-unions can be treated with the medial femoral condyle (MFC) free flap or a vascularized rib transfer. In carpal non-unions, both pedicled distal radius flaps and free MFC flaps are viable options. Finally, in skeletally immature patients, vascularized fibular head epiphyseal transfer can provide growth potential in addition to skeletal reconstruction.

  5. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  6. Evaluation of the Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam: Lower Extremity Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Basta, Marten N; Serletti, Joseph M; Chang, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate the training of plastic surgery residents, we analyzed a knowledge-based curriculum for plastic and reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity. The Plastic Surgery In-Service Training Exam (PSITE) is a commonly used tool to assess medical knowledge in plastic surgery. We reviewed the lower extremity content on 6 consecutive score keys (2008-2013). Questions were classified by taxonomy, anatomy, and subject. Answer references were quantified by source and relative year of publication. Totally, 107 questions related to the lower extremity (9.1% of all questions) and 14 questions had an associated image (13.1%). Questions required decision making (49%) over interpretation (36%) and direct recall (15%) skills (p < 0.001). Conditions of the leg (42.1%) and thigh (24.3%) constituted most of the questions. Subject matter focused on flap reconstruction (38.3%), nerve injury (8.4%), and congenital deformity (6.5%). Analysis of 263 citations to 66 unique journals showed that Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (54.9%) was the highest yield primary source. The median year of publication relative to PSITE administration was 6 (range: 1-58) with a mode of 2 years. Plastic Surgery by Mathes et al. was the most referenced textbook (21.9%). These data establish a benchmark for lower extremity training during plastic surgery residency. Study efforts focused on the most common topics and references will enhance trainee preparation for lower extremity PSITE questions. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology and Impact on Performance of Lower Extremity Stress Injuries in Professional Basketball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Moin; Madden, Kim; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Rogowski, Joseph P; Stotts, Jeff; Samani, Marisa J; Sikka, Robby; Bedi, Asheesh

    Professional basketball players in the National Basketball Association (NBA) subject their lower extremities to significant repetitive loading during both regular-season and off-season training. Little is known about the incidence of lower extremity bony stress injuries and their impact on return to play and performance in these athletes. Stress injuries of the lower extremity will have significant impact on performance. Case series. Level 4. All bony stress injuries from 2005 to 2015 were identified from the NBA. Number of games missed due to injury and performance statistics were collected from 2 years prior to injury to 2 years after the injury. A linear regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of injury for players who returned to sport. A total of 76 lower extremity bony stress injuries involving 75 NBA players (mean age, 25.4 ± 4.1 years) were identified. Fifty-five percent (42/76) involved the foot, and most injuries occurred during the regular season (82.9%, 63/76), with half occurring within the first 6 weeks. Among players who sustained a fifth metatarsal stress fracture, 42.9% were unable to return to professional play. Players who sustained stress injuries had reduced play performance, specifically related to number of games played ( P = 0.014) and number of steals per game ( P = 0.004). Players who had surgery had significantly better performance at 2 years than those who were managed nonoperatively, independent of the type of injury (β = 4.561; 95% CI, 1.255-7.868). Lower extremity bony stress injuries may significantly affect both short- and long-term player performance and career length. Stress injuries result in decreased player performance, and surgical intervention results in improved performance metrics compared with those treated using conservative methods. Stress injuries result in decreased player performance, and surgical intervention results in improved performance metrics.

  8. Comparison of three-dimensional lower extremity running kinematics of young adult and elderly runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Reginaldo K; Duarte, Marcos

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the three-dimensional lower extremity running kinematics of young adult runners and elderly runners. Seventeen elderly adults (age 67-73 years) and 17 young adults (age 26-36 years) ran at 3.1 m x s(-1) on a treadmill while the movements of the lower extremity during the stance phase were recorded at 120 Hz using three-dimensional video. The three-dimensional kinematics of the lower limb segments and of the ankle and knee joints were determined, and selected variables were calculated to describe the movement. Our results suggest that elderly runners have a different movement pattern of the lower extremity from that of young adults during the stance phase of running. Compared with the young adults, the elderly runners had a substantial decrease in stride length (1.97 vs. 2.23 m; P = 0.01), an increase in stride frequency (1.58 vs. 1.37 Hz; P = 0.002), less knee flexion/extension range of motion (26 vs. 33 degrees ; P = 0.002), less tibial internal/external rotation range of motion (9 vs. 12 degrees ; P heel strike (-5.8 vs. -1.0 degrees ; P = 0.009), and greater asynchronies between the ankle and knee movements during running. These results may help to explain why elderly individuals could be more susceptible to running-related injuries.

  9. Pathologic features of lower extremity arterial lesions in diabetes mellitus:an analysis of 162 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xiangjiang; Zhang Jiwei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the angiographic manifestations of lower extremity atherosclerotic occlusion in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: The angiographic findings of lower extremity in 162 patients with diabetes mellitus were retrospectively analyzed. (1) The arteries of lower extremity were divided into the following four segments: iliac, femoral, popliteal and crural artery. The involvements of these arteries were documented. (2) Based on the lesion's number, location, nature (stricture or occlusion) and length ( 5 cm), the diabetic arterial diseases were categorized. Results: (1) Of 162 diabetic lower limbs, multiple segmental lesions were seen in 131, superficial femoral arterial lesions in 130, and crural arterial lesions in 139, of which 130 arterial lesions had at least two below-the-knee arteries being involved. (2) Based on segmental angiographic classification, a total of 660 vascular lesions were detected, including stricture lesions (33.8%) and occlusive lesions (66.2%). Of the 437 occlusions, 70.5% were located in below-the-knee arteries, and most of which were longer than 10 cm and located in anterior and posterior tibial arteries, while only a few peroneal arteries were involved (P < 0.0001). One hundred and fifty-two lesions were detected in superficial femoral arteries, of which 49 (31.2%) were located at the origin of the superficial femoral artery and 56 (35.7) were in the adductor canal hiatus. Conclusion: The main feature of peripheral arterial disease of lower extremity caused by diabetes mellitus is multi-level atherosclerotic occlusion, the superficial femoral and the crural arteries are most likely to be involved. The lesions of superficial femoral artery are often located at the arterial origin and in the adductor canal hiatus, while the deep femoral artery and the femoral artery are less involved. Long occlusive lesions are more prevalent in crural arteries, especially in anterior and posterior tibial arteries. (J Intervent

  10. Outcomes of Soft Tissue Reconstruction for Traumatic Lower Extremity Fractures with Compromised Vascularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badash, Ido; Burtt, Karen E; Leland, Hyuma A; Gould, Daniel J; Rounds, Alexis D; Azadgoli, Beina; Patel, Ketan M; Carey, Joseph N

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic lower extremity fractures with compromised arterial flow are limb-threatening injuries. A retrospective review of 158 lower extremities with traumatic fractures, including 26 extremities with arterial injuries, was performed to determine the effects of vascular compromise on flap survival, successful limb salvage and complication rates. Patients with arterial injuries had a larger average flap surface area (255.1 vs 144.6 cm2, P = 0.02) and a greater number of operations (4.7 vs 3.8, P = 0.01) than patients without vascular compromise. Patients presenting with vascular injury were also more likely to require fasciotomy [odds ratio (OR): 6.5, confidence interval (CI): 2.3-18.2] and to have a nerve deficit (OR: 16.6, CI: 3.9-70.0), fracture of the distal third of the leg (OR: 2.9, CI: 1.15-7.1) and intracranial hemorrhage (OR: 3.84, CI: 1.1-12.9). After soft tissue reconstruction, patients with arterial injuries had a higher rate of amputation (OR: 8.5, CI: 1.3-53.6) and flap failure requiring a return to the operating room (OR: 4.5, CI: 1.5-13.2). Arterial injury did not correlate with infection or overall complication rate. In conclusion, arterial injuries resulted in significant complications for patients with lower extremity fractures requiring flap coverage, although limb salvage was still effective in most cases.

  11. The effect of anesthesia type on the postoperative complications of major lower extremity surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Murat Bakış; Sinem Sarı; Ayhan Öznur Cillimoğlu; Özgür Özbey; Bakiye Uğur; Mustafa Oğurlu

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Regional anesthesia is preferred more than general anesthesia in major lower extremity surgery. In our study, we aimed to investigate the relationship incidence of complications between regional anesthesia and general anesthesia in major surgery. Method: A total of 372 patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively in the study. The number of patients undergoing general anesthesia and regional anesthesi...

  12. Peroneal island flap for wound coverage in complex injuries of the lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazal A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Akil Fazal1, Haroon-ur-Rashid1, Tahseen Cheema21Section of Orthopedics, Department of Surgery, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan; 2Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USABackground: Complex injuries of the lower extremity pose a therapeutic challenge owing to limited availability of local soft tissue for coverage. One option in this region is the pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on perforators of the peroneal artery. In this case series, we present our experience of the peroneal island pedicled flap for reconstruction of lower extremity wounds.Methods: Records of 18 cases of peroneal island flap admitted consecutively to the Section of Orthopedics at Aga Khan University Hospital from January 1996 to December of 2009 were studied and their outcomes determined.Results: The most common indication for coverage was open wounds due to a road traffic accident (n = 10, followed by burns (n = 3. The most common area exposed was the lower third of the leg followed by the middle third. The tibia was exposed in 11 patients. The flaps ranged in size from 35 cm2 to over 200 cm2. In 13 patients, the flaps healed uneventfully, while in the remaining five there was partial flap necrosis. In four of the latter patients, the residual wound healed with conservative measures only, but the fifth patient required further surgery to achieve acceptable coverage.Conclusion: The peroneal artery flap appears to be a simple, useful, and reliable flap in the armamentarium of the surgeon when planning soft tissue coverage of the lower extremity.Keywords: leg injuries, surgical flaps, lower extremity

  13. Endovascular Management of Deep venous Thrombosis of Lower Extremity in Patients with Malignant Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jang, Nam Kyu; Han, Seung Min; Kang, Heoung Keun; Choi, Soo Jin Nah [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of endovascular management of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with malignant disease. Between January 2002 and January 2008, six consecutive patients (5 male and 1 female, mean age-65 years) with lower extremity DVT and malignant disease underwent endovascular management. The duration of symptoms lasted 4-120 days (mean-31 days; 20 days or less in four patients and more than 20 days in two). A catheter-directed thrombolysis was performed via the ipsilateral popliteal vein or common femoral vein, used alone or combined with a percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy. Angioplasty or stent placement was performed in residual stenosis or occlusion of the vein. The follow-up period lasted 1-14 months (mean 7.6 months) and was performed via a color Doppler ultrasonography or computed tomographic venography. Technical success and relief from symptoms was achieved within two days was achieved in five patients. Minor hemorrhagic complications occurred in two cases: hematuria and a hematoma at the puncture site. Upon follow-up, a recurrent DVT occurred in three patients as well as a patent venous flow in two. One patient died within 1 month due to a metastatic mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Endovascular management of the lower extremity DVT is effective for quickly eliminating a thrombus, relieving symptoms, and decreasing hemorrhagic complications in patients with malignant disease.

  14. Endovascular Management of Deep venous Thrombosis of Lower Extremity in Patients with Malignant Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jang, Nam Kyu; Han, Seung Min; Kang, Heoung Keun; Choi, Soo Jin Nah

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of endovascular management of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with malignant disease. Between January 2002 and January 2008, six consecutive patients (5 male and 1 female, mean age-65 years) with lower extremity DVT and malignant disease underwent endovascular management. The duration of symptoms lasted 4-120 days (mean-31 days; 20 days or less in four patients and more than 20 days in two). A catheter-directed thrombolysis was performed via the ipsilateral popliteal vein or common femoral vein, used alone or combined with a percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy. Angioplasty or stent placement was performed in residual stenosis or occlusion of the vein. The follow-up period lasted 1-14 months (mean 7.6 months) and was performed via a color Doppler ultrasonography or computed tomographic venography. Technical success and relief from symptoms was achieved within two days was achieved in five patients. Minor hemorrhagic complications occurred in two cases: hematuria and a hematoma at the puncture site. Upon follow-up, a recurrent DVT occurred in three patients as well as a patent venous flow in two. One patient died within 1 month due to a metastatic mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Endovascular management of the lower extremity DVT is effective for quickly eliminating a thrombus, relieving symptoms, and decreasing hemorrhagic complications in patients with malignant disease

  15. MR manifestation of lower extremity rhabdomyolysis caused by crush injury in earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhengyan; Zou Ling; Song Bin; Liu Chang; Sun Jiayu; Zhang Weiwei; Zhang Cuiping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Rhabdomyolysis (RM) is a common disorder resulting from a large variety of causes. Acute injury is one of the main reasons. The purpose is to describe the MRI manifestations of rhabdomyolysis caused by 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake in Sichuan province and to discuss their importance in diagnosis and treatment of rhabdomyolysison in clinic practice. Methods: Three patients with rhabdomyolysis caused by earthquake were studied via 1.5 T MRI. In all the patients, T 1 and T 2 weighted sequences with and without fat suppression, and short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both lower extremities were obtained in axial, coronal and sagittal planes. All patients were given contrast material during imaging, and MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) of both lower extremity vessels were performed. The MRI characteristics of damaged extremities in 3 cases were studied. Results: MRI showed swelling of the affected muscles and subcutaneous fat tissue on both T 1 and T 2 weighted images. The margins of involved muscles were blurred. On T 1 weighted images, swollen muscles showed equal or slightly decreased intensity with small patterns of increased intensity in some local areas. On T 2 weighted and STIR sequences, the affected muscles showed inhomogeneous increased signal intensity with clearer margin. Slight fluid collection in spatium intermusculare was observed. Contrast-enhanced scanning showed nonhomologous intensification of damaged muscles, the enhancement inside the muscles was decreased when compared with normal muscles. The locations of all these abnormal intensity were correlated with the injury history and clinic physical examinations. MRA showed no lower extremity vessels were affected. Conclusion: MRI has very high sensitivity in detecting the injury of muscles. It's very useful in evaluating the extent and severity of muscles affected in rhabdomyolysis caused by trauma. Also it's very valuable to evaluate the condition of blood vessels in involved extremity

  16. Validation of the SF-6D Health State Utilities Measure in Lower Extremity Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Gundle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Health state utilities measures are preference-weighted patient-reported outcome (PRO instruments that facilitate comparative effectiveness research. One such measure, the SF-6D, is generated from the Short Form 36 (SF-36. This report describes a psychometric evaluation of the SF-6D in a cross-sectional population of lower extremity sarcoma patients. Methods. Patients with lower extremity sarcoma from a prospective database who had completed the SF-36 and Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS were eligible for inclusion. Computed SF-6D health states were given preference weights based on a prior valuation. The primary outcome was correlation between the SF-6D and TESS. Results. In 63 pairs of surveys in a lower extremity sarcoma population, the mean preference-weighted SF-6D score was 0.59 (95% CI 0.4–0.81. The distribution of SF-6D scores approximated a normal curve (skewness = 0.11. There was a positive correlation between the SF-6D and TESS (r=0.75, P<0.01. Respondents who reported walking aid use had lower SF-6D scores (0.53 versus 0.61, P=0.03. Five respondents underwent amputation, with lower SF-6D scores that approached significance (0.48 versus 0.6, P=0.06. Conclusions. The SF-6D health state utilities measure demonstrated convergent validity without evidence of ceiling or floor effects. The SF-6D is a health state utilities measure suitable for further research in sarcoma patients.

  17. Pelvic and lower extremity injuries in Homer's Iliad: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanakos, Spyridon P; Bot, Arjan G J; Macheras, George A

    2015-01-01

    The Iliad, composed approximately in the middle of the eighth century bc, constitutes the leading and oldest known example of heroic epic. The Homeric epic presents the conflicts that took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War, offering a realistic description of battle wounds. We studied the text of The Iliad in ancient Greek and in the translations in modern Greek and English and searched for all recorded injuries to the pelvis and lower extremities. A total of 16 traumatic injuries of pelvis and lower extremities were described, including 7 fatal wounds, while in 9 cases, the outcome was unknown.The Iliad remains the oldest record of Greek medicine and a unique source of surgical history. To study the vividly reported events is a great experience, particularly for a surgeon.

  18. The Effect of Sport Specialization on Lower Extremity Injury Rates in High School Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Bell, David; Brooks, Margaret Alison; Hetzel, Scott; Pfaller, Adam; Post, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Sport specialization has been shown to be associated with increased risk of musculoskeletal lower extremity injuries (LEI) in adolescent athletes presenting in clinical settings. However, the association of sport specialization and incidence of LEI has not been studied prospectively in a large population of adolescent athletes. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of LEI in high school athletes identified as having low (LOW), moderate (MOD) or high (HIGH) level...

  19. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Rachel E; Caserotti, P.; Cauley, Jane A

    2016-01-01

    -dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1......The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original...... research studies of older adults (>= 65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight...

  20. Incidence and determinants of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, R N; Siem, D; van Middelkoop, M; van Os, A G; Bierma‐Zeinstra, S M A; Koes, B W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a systematic overview of published reports on the incidence and associated potential risk factors of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners. An electronic database search was conducted using the PubMed–Medline database. Two observers independently assessed the quality of the studies and a best evidence synthesis was used to summarise the results. The incidence of lower extremity running injuries ranged from 19.4% to 79.3%. The predominant site of these injuries was the knee. There was strong evidence that a long training distance per week in male runners and a history of previous injuries were risk factors for injuries, and that an increase in training distance per week was a protective factor for knee injuries. PMID:17473005

  1. Isolated lower extremity metastases, 9 years after initial diagnosis of retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, M.E.; Smith, S.E. [University of Maryland, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Baltimore, MD (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2006-10-15

    We report the development of isolated lower extremity metastases, in a child, 9 years after her initial diagnosis and treatment of bilateral infantile retinoblastomas. The radiographic, scintigraphic, computed tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings are discussed. The dominant metastatic focus was blastic, involving the medial cuneiform. Additional occult lesions were found in the base of the second metatarsal, middle cuneiform, navicular and tibial diaphysis. An open biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. The occurrence of late distant metastases is rare in the USA. (orig.)

  2. Electromyographic evaluation of high-intensity elastic resistance exercises for lower extremity muscles during bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinstrup, Jonas; Skals, Sebastian; Calatayud, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prolonged hospital bed rest after severe injury or disease leads to rapid muscle atrophy and strength loss. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of lower extremity strengthening exercises using elastic resistance that can be performed while lying in a hospit......, the present study has the potential to provide a reference table of exercises to select from when individualizing and progressing strengthening exercises during the early rehabilitation of bedridden individuals....

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: Korean Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Young Hwan; Joh, Jin Hyun; Kang, Jin Mo; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chang, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Jang Yong; Bae, Jae Ik; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Chang Won; Park, Sung Il; Yim, Nam Yeol; Jeon, Yong Sun; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Park, Ki Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity deep vein thrombosis is a serious medical condition that can result in death or major disability due to pulmonary embolism or post-thrombotic syndrome. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment are required to improve symptoms and salvage the affected limb. Early thrombus clearance rapidly resolves symptoms related to venous obstruction, restores valve function and reduces the incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome. Recently, endovascular treatment has been established as a standard method for early thrombus removal. However, there are a variety of views regarding the indications and procedures among medical institutions and operators. Therefore, we intend to provide evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis by multidisciplinary consensus. These guidelines are the result of a close collaboration between interventional radiologists and vascular surgeons. The goals of these guidelines are to improve treatment, to serve as a guide to the clinician, and consequently to contribute to public health care. PMID:27699156

  4. Measurement Properties of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saurabh P; Fulton, Allison; Quach, Cedric; Thistle, Megan; Toledo, Cesar; Evans, Neil A

    2016-03-01

    Systematic review of measurement properties. Many primary studies have examined the measurement properties, such as reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change, of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) in different clinical populations. A systematic review summarizing these properties for the LEFS may provide an important resource. To locate and synthesize evidence on the measurement properties of the LEFS and to discuss the clinical implications of the evidence. A literature search was conducted in 4 databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL), using predefined search terms. Two reviewers performed a critical appraisal of the included studies using a standardized assessment form. A total of 27 studies were included in the review, of which 18 achieved a very good to excellent methodological quality level. The LEFS scores demonstrated excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients ranging between 0.85 and 0.99) and demonstrated the expected relationships with measures assessing similar constructs (Pearson correlation coefficient values of greater than 0.7). The responsiveness of the LEFS scores was excellent, as suggested by consistently high effect sizes (greater than 0.8) in patients with different lower extremity conditions. Minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence level (MDC90) for the LEFS scores varied between 8.1 and 15.3 across different reassessment intervals in a wide range of patient populations. The pooled estimate of the MDC90 was 6 points and the minimal clinically important difference was 9 points in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions, which are indicative of true change and clinically meaningful change, respectively. The results of this review support the reliability, validity, and responsiveness of the LEFS scores for assessing functional impairment in a wide array of patient groups with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions.

  5. Acute deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity: anatomical distribution, comparison of anticoagulation, thrombolysis and interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang; Naijun; Che Guoping; Gu Jianping; Lou Wensheng; He Xu; Chen Liang; Su Haobo; Song Jinhua; Wang Tao; Xu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anatomical distribution of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity, and compare different therapeutic methods including anticoagulation alone, thrombolysis through dorsal vein and interventional therapy. Methods: The clinical data, venography and therapies of 204 acute DVT patients were retrospectively studied According to the distribution, DVT were classified into three types including peripheral, central and mixed types. According to the difference of the therapeutic method, each type of DVT was divided into three groups, Group A (37 patients) anticoagulation alone: Group B (55 patients) thrombolysis through dorsal vein: and Group C (112 patients) interventional therapy. The results of different kind of treatment method in each type of DVT were evaluated before the patients were discharged and the Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: There were 132 patients with DVT in the left lower extremity, 62 in right lower extremity, and 10 in both extremities.. The complication of pulmonary embolism (PE) occurred in 4, 5 and 2 cases respectively, and the morbidity was 3.0%, 8.1% and 20.0% (χ 2 =6.494, P=0.039) respectively. There was significant statistical difference among them. There were 23 cases of peripheral type of DVT, 48 central type and 133 mixed type. The complication of PE were observed in 2, 5 and 4 cases respectively in each type. The morbidity was 8.7%, 10.4% and 3.0% respectively (χ 2 =4.350, P=0.114). There were no statistical significance among them. In the 23 cases of peripheral type DVTs, 2 of 5 in group A and 11 of 18 in group B had excellent therapeutic response. In the 48 cases of central type of DVTs, 1 of 10 in group A, 2 of 5 in in group B and 26 of 33 in group C had excellent therapeutic response. There were statistically significant differences among groups A, B and C (χ 2 =16.157, P=0.000). In the 133 cases of mixed type DVTs, 1 of 22 in group A, 10 of 32 in group B and 65

  6. New Methods of Treatment for Trophic Lesions of the Lower Extremities in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Bolgarska

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Complications in the form of trophic ulcers of the lower extremities are one of the serious consequences of diabetes mellitus (DM, as they often lead to severe health and social problems, up to high amputations. The aim of the study was the development and clinical testing of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for the comprehensive treatment of trophic ulcers of the lower extremities in patients with DM. Materials and methods. Here are presented the results of treatment of 63 patients (42 women and 21 men with neuropathic type of trophic lesions of the lower limbs or postoperative defects at the stage of granulation. Of them, 32 patients (study group received local intradermal injections of hyaluronic acid preparations and sodium succinate (Lacerta into the extracellular matrix. Patients of the comparison group were treated with hydrocolloid materials (hydrocoll, granuflex. The level of glycated hemoglobin, the degree of circulatory disorders (using ankle brachial index, before and after the test with a load and neuropathic disorders (on a scale for the evaluation of neurologic dysfunctions — NDS were assessed in patients. Results. The results of treatment were assessed by the rate of defect healing during 2 or more months. In the study group, 24 patients showed complete healing of the defect (75 %, while in the control group the healing was observed in 16 patients (51.6 %. During the year, relapses occurred in 22.2 % of cases in the study group, and in 46.9 % — in the control one (p < 0.05. Conclusion. The developed method of treatment using Lacerta allowed to increase the effectiveness of therapy, to speed recovery, to decrease a number of complications in patients with DM and trophic ulcers of the lower extremities.

  7. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. PMID:25848327

  8. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  9. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen includ...

  10. Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Biologically Based Assay of Lower Extremity Impairment and Gait Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Heather T.; Dunning, Kari; Belagaje, Samir; Kissela, Brett M.; Ying, Jun; Laine, Jarmo; Page, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. (a) To determine associations among motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, lower extremity (LE) impairment, and gait velocity and (b) determine the association between the presence of a detectable MEP signal with LE impairment and with gait velocity. Method. 35 subjects with chronic, stable LE hemiparesis were undergone TMS, the LE section of the Fugl-Meyer Impairment Scale (LE FM), and 10-meter walk test. We recorded presence, amplitude, and latency of MEPs in the a...

  11. Attribution of extreme precipitation in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River during May 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiang; Tian, Qinhua; Yu, Rong; Zhou, Baiquan; Xia, Jiangjiang; Burke, Claire; Dong, Buwen; Tett, Simon F. B.; Freychet, Nicolas; Lott, Fraser; Ciavarella, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    May 2016 was the third wettest May on record since 1961 over central eastern China based on station observations, with total monthly rainfall 40% more than the climatological mean for 1961-2013. Accompanying disasters such as waterlogging, landslides and debris flow struck part of the lower reaches of the Yangtze River. Causal influence of anthropogenic forcings on this event is investigated using the newly updated Met Office Hadley Centre system for attribution of extreme weather and climate events. Results indicate that there is a significant increase in May 2016 rainfall in model simulations relative to the climatological period, but this increase is largely attributable to natural variability. El Niño years have been found to be correlated with extreme rainfall in the Yangtze River region in previous studies—the strong El Niño of 2015-2016 may account for the extreme precipitation event in 2016. However, on smaller spatial scales we find that anthropogenic forcing has likely played a role in increasing the risk of extreme rainfall to the north of the Yangtze and decreasing it to the south.

  12. Effect of Footwear on Joint Pain and Function in Older Adults With Lower Extremity Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy; Luna, Sarah

    Lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition among older adults; given the risks of surgical and pharmaceutical interventions, conservative, lower-cost management options such as footwear warrant further investigation. This systematic review investigated the effects of footwear, including shoe inserts, in reducing lower extremity joint pain and improving gait, mobility, and quality of life in older adults with OA. The CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PubMed, RECAL, and Web of Knowledge databases were searched for publications from January 1990 to September 2014, using the terms "footwear," "shoes," "gait," "pain," and "older adult." Participants who were 50 years or older and those who had OA in at least one lower extremity joint narrowed the results. Outcomes of interest included measures of pain, comfort, function, gait, or quality of life. Exclusion criteria applied to participants with rheumatoid arthritis, amputation, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, use of modified footwear or custom orthotics, purely biomechanical studies, and outcomes of balance or falls only. Single-case studies, qualitative narrative descriptions, and expert opinions were also excluded. The initial search resulted in a total of 417 citations. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria. Two randomized controlled trials and 3 quasiexperimental studies reported lateral wedge insoles may have at least some pain-relieving effects and improved functional mobility in older adults at 4 weeks to 2 years' follow-up, particularly when used with subtalar and ankle strapping. Three randomized controlled trials with large sample sizes reported that lateral wedges provided no knee pain relief compared with flat insoles. Hardness of shoe soles did not significantly affect joint comfort in the foot in a quasiexperimental study. A quasiexperimental designed study investigating shock-absorbing insoles showed reduction in knee joint pain with 1 month of wear. Finally, a cross-sectional prognostic study indicated

  13. Lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis: A unique initial presentation of Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Weiss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease is a disease of the bowel, typically presenting with diarrhea, weight loss, and abdominal pain. Complications such as abscesses, fistulas, and strictures may require surgical intervention. We would like to report a patient with Crohn's disease who presented for the first time with left lower extremity necrotizing fasciitis. There are very few reports of necrotizing fasciitis in Crohn's disease as the initial presentation.

  14. Concussion May Increase the Risk of Subsequent Lower Extremity Musculoskeletal Injury in Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel C; Jones, Debi; Harrison, Ashley; Moser, Michael; Tillman, Susan; Farmer, Kevin; Pass, Anthony; Clugston, James R; Hernandez, Jorge; Chmielewski, Terese L

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory-based studies on neuromuscular control after concussion and epidemiological studies suggest that concussion may increase the risk of subsequent musculoskeletal injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if athletes have an increased risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after return to play from a concussion. Injury data were collected from 2006 to 2013 for men's football and for women's basketball, soccer and lacrosse at a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Ninety cases of in-season concussion in 73 athletes (52 male, 21 female) with return to play at least 30 days prior to the end of the season were identified. A period of up to 90 days of in-season competition following return to play was reviewed for time-loss injury. The same period was studied in up to two control athletes who had no concussion within the prior year and were matched for sport, starting status and position. Lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries occurred at a higher rate in the concussed athletes (45/90 or 50 %) than in the non-concussed athletes (30/148 or 20 %; P relationship between concussion and an increased risk of lower extremity musculoskeletal injury after return to play, and may have implications for current medical practice standards regarding evaluation and management of concussion injuries.

  15. Lower extremity joint moments of collegiate soccer players differ between genders during a forward jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joseph M; Garrison, J Craig; Palmieri-Smith, Riann; Kerrigan, D Casey; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2008-05-01

    Lower extremity kinetics while performing a single-leg forward jump landing may help explain gender biased risk for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. Gender comparison of lower extremity joint angles and moments. Static groups comparison. Motion analysis laboratory. 8 male and 8 female varsity, collegiate soccer athletes. 5 single-leg landings from a 100cm forward jump. Peak and initial contact external joint moments and joint angles of the ankle, knee, and hip. At initial heel contact, males exhibited a adduction moment whereas females exhibited a abduction moment at the hip. Females also had significantly less peak hip extension moment and significantly less peak hip internal rotation moment than males had. Females exhibited greater knee adduction and hip internal rotation angles than men did. When decelerating from a forward jump, gender differences exist in forces acting at the hip.

  16. Lower Extremity Arterial Calcification as a Predictor of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hwa Seon; Jung Park, Mi; Nyeo Jeon, Kyung; Min Cho, Jae; Soo Bae, Kyung; Seob Choi, Dae; Boem Na, Jae; Cheol Choi, Ho; Young Choi, Hye; Eun Kim, Ji; Bueum Cho, Soo; Eun Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Until now, there has been no study on the relationship between the calcification of the lower extremity arteries and significant coronary arterial disease (CAD). To evaluate whether lower extremity calcium scores (LECS) are associated with CAD and whether this can predict multivessel-CAD in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We retrospectively enrolled 103 PAD patients without cardiac symptoms or known CAD. All patients underwent cardiac computed tomography (CT) and lower extremity CT within 1 month and were categorized as nonsignificant CAD, single-CAD, or multivessel-CAD. The coronary calcium scores (CCS) were quantitatively measured according to the Agatston method and LECS were semi-quantitatively measured according to the presence of lower extremity calcification in the segment. The extent of CAD was evaluated according to the presence of ≥ 50% luminal diameter stenosis in the segment of CAD. LECS in multivessel-CAD were significantly higher than those in nonsignificant CAD (10.0 ± 5.8 versus 4.0 ± 3.1, P < 0.001). LECS significantly correlated with CCS (r = 0.831, P < 0.001) and the extent of CAD (r = 0.631, P < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated LECS and log-transformed CCS were independent predictors for multivessel-CAD. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the diagnostic performance of LECS was 0.807 (95% confidence interval = 0.724-0.891, P < 0.001) for predicting multivessel-CAD. Peripheral arterial calcification is significantly correlated with CAD extent in patients with PAD. Peripheral arterial calcification can be a useful marker for predicting multivessel-CAD

  17. A training tool for lower extremity amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neutelings, I.M.P.; Hengeveld, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract People with a prosthetic limb miss a sense of touch at this particular part of their body. The work described in this paper focuses on providing people with a lower extremity amputation with an alternative sensory stimulus in order to help them experience what they can no longer feel. To

  18. Enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities with synergy spine coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Naoki

    2002-01-01

    A synergy spine coil is a phased-array coil designed for spine imaging. The coil's sensitive area is narrow in both the x-axis and y-axis directions but very wide in the z-axis direction. It is therefore suitable for using in long parts of the body, such as the spine. We used the coil for enhanced MR angiography in the lower extremities, which requires a very long field of view on the z-axis direction. Using on the NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association) standard test for special-purpose coils, the sensitive volume of the synergy spine coil was first measured by using a phantom. It was found that the sensitive lengths along x-axis and y-axis were 300 mm and 120 mm, respectively, while that along z-axis could set at any length required for the examination by modifying the element number. The above area was confirmed to be sufficient for obtaining enhanced MR angiograms of the lower extremities. The results of this study showed the use of the synergy spine coil in enhanced MR angiography of the lower extremities is superior to the use of a conventional whole body coil for obtaining good MR angiograms with a good single-to-noise ratio (SNR). (author)

  19. Biomechanical compensations of the trunk and lower extremities during stepping tasks after unilateral transtibial amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amanda M; Gaffney, Brecca M; Davidson, Bradley S; Christiansen, Cory L

    2017-11-01

    Lower extremity movement compensations following transtibial amputation are well-documented and are likely influenced by trunk posture and movement. However, the biomechanical compensations of the trunk and lower extremities, especially during high-demand tasks such as step ascent and descent, remain unclear. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during step ascent and descent tasks for three groups of individuals: diabetic/transtibial amputation, diabetic, and healthy. An ANCOVA was used to compare peak trunk, hip and knee joint angles and moments in the sagittal and frontal planes between groups. Paired t-tests were used to compare peak joint angles and moments between amputated and intact limbs of the diabetic/transtibial amputation group. During step ascent and descent, the transtibial amputation group exhibited greater trunk forward flexion and lateral flexion compared to the other two groups (Pbiomechanical compensations of the trunk and lower extremities in individuals with dysvascular transtibial amputation, by identifying low back, hip, and knee joint moment patterns unique to transtibial amputation during stepping tasks. In addition, the results suggest that some movement compensations may be confounded by the presence of diabetes and precede limb amputation. The increased and asymmetrical loading patterns identified may predispose individuals with transtibial amputation to the development of secondary pain conditions, such as low back pain or osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of unilateral arm swing motion on lower extremity running mechanics associated with injury risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agresta, Cristine; Ward, Christian R; Wright, W Geoffrey; Tucker, Carole A

    2018-06-01

    Many field sports involve equipment that restricts one or both arms from moving while running. Arm swing during running has been examined from a biomechanical and physiologic perspective but not from an injury perspective. Moreover, only bilateral arm swing suppression has been studied with respect to running. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of running with one arm restrained on lower extremity mechanics associated with running or sport-related injury. Fifteen healthy participants ran at a self-selected speed with typical arm swing, with one arm restrained and with both arms restrained. Lower extremity kinematics and spatiotemporal measures were analysed for all arm swing conditions. Running with one arm restrained resulted in increased frontal plane knee and hip angles, decreased foot strike angle, and decreased centre of mass vertical displacement compared to typical arm swing or bilateral arm swing restriction. Stride length was decreased and step frequency increased when running with one or both arms restrained. Unilateral arm swing restriction induces changes in lower extremity kinematics that are not similar to running with bilateral arm swing restriction or typical arm swing motion. Running with one arm restrained increases frontal plane mechanics associated with risk of knee injury.

  1. Lower Extremity Salvage with Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Free Flap in Condition of Symmetrical Peripheral Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Yeon Lim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Symmetrical peripheral gangrene (SPG is rare but devastating complication which is characterized by symmetrical ischemic change of the distal extremities. In this report, we describe our management protocol for SPG, focusing on surgical approaches. Between January 2007 and February 2016, 10 thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP free flaps were performed in 6 patients with SPG. Three patients were male and mean age was 56 (range, 44–69 years. All the patients were in shock. The causes of shock were sepsis in 4 cases, respiratory arrest in 1 case, and hypovolemia in 1 case. Eight transmetatarsal amputations and 2 Lisfranc amputations were performed. Flap sizes ranged from 7 × 11 cm to 25 × 15 cm. There were 3 cases of partial necrosis of the flap: two healed conservatively with dressings and one required skin graft. Three of the patients were later able to walk independently at Functional Ambulation Classification (FAC level 6, one patient could walk independently on level surfaces at FAC level 5, and 2 could walk independently using walking aids, classified at FAC level 4. The average follow-up period was 18 (range, 6–54 months. In patients with SPG, minimal bone amputation and foot salvage with TDAP flaps were successful. Separate reconstruction of bone and soft tissue had good outcomes.

  2. Primary chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities: preoperative color duplex Doppler ultrasound study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selfa, S.; Diago, T.; Ricart, M.; Chulia, R.; Martin, F.

    2000-01-01

    To asses the role of color duplex Doppler ultrasound (CDU) in the preoperative study of patients with varicose veins in lower extremities. We employed CDU to examine varicose veins in 342 lower limbs, assessing reflux in saphenous veins (SV), deep venous system (DVS) and perforating veins (PV). We analyzed the relationship between the anatomical extent of the reflux and the clinical findings. Insufficiency of the superficial venous system alone was uncommon, occurring in only 10.8% of the limbs examined. Reflux was observed in SV and PV in 48.2% of the legs. It was detected in all three systems in 29.2% of cases. The presence of reflux in more than one system and more than one value was associated with increased clinical severity. The site of venous reflux in lower extremities with varicose veins varies. Greater clinical severity is observed in the presence of more marked reflux in the DVS and PV. CDU provides anatomic and functional data on the three venous systems of the lower limbs, allowing an individualized therapeutic surgery. Preoperative localization of incompetent PV by means of CDU facilities their ligation. CDU is the technique of choice for the preoperative examination of the venous systems of patients with varicose veins. (Author)

  3. The clinical efficacy evaluation of transcatheter hardening treatment for varicose veins of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junhui; Ren Yi; He Ping; Xiong Hongli; Wang Li; Zhou Xianbo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical efficacy and safety of transcatheter absolute ethanol injection treatment on varicose veins of lower extremity. Methods: twenty-there patients with 25 varicose veins of lower extremity were treated by puncture of great saphenous vein above 1-2 cm of complicated inner ankle, perforating catheter to the point below the 3-4 cm of the conjunction of great saphenous vein and Femoral vein and pressing the conjunction of these two veins. Under the monitor of DSA, inject the absolute ethanol slowly while retrieve the catheter little by little (one limb with varicose veins injected total volume 15-20 mi), in the mean time, using contrast agent to monitor the level of embolism until the formation of total embolism in the all great saphenous veins. Results: All the cases were retrospectively followed up with CDFI examination after 3-12 months of the surgery, No blood flow were seen in the 25 embolismic great saphenous vein. Clinical symptom were alleviated obviously after 2-3 weeks of treatment; varicose veins were collapse after 3 to 7 days. Two cases of leg ulceration were healed after 4 to 6 weeks of operation. 20 limbs were found mild swelling in the 2 day after the surgery. However, all the cases were disappeared after 1 to 2 weeks; 4 treated limbs developed delayed paresthesia in the 3 day after the surgery, and recovered totally in the 2 weeks. No complications of deep vein thrombosis, lung thrombosis etc al, were found after operation. Conclusions: Using transcatheter injection of absolute ethanol to treat varicose veins of lower extremity has the advantage of less invasion, more safety and low appearance of complications. The short term efficacy is solid while the long term effect needs further evaluation. (authors)

  4. Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumitt, Jason; Heiderscheit, Bryan C; Manske, Robert C; Niemuth, Paul E; Rauh, Mitchell J

    2013-06-01

    Functional tests have been used primarily to assess an athlete's fitness or readiness to return to sport. The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time-loss sports-related low back or lower extremity injury. A total of 193 Division III athletes from 15 university teams (110 females, age 19.1 ± 1.1 y; 83 males, age 19.5 ± 1.3 y) were tested prior to their sports seasons. Athletes performed the functional tests in the following sequence: SLJ, SLH, LEFT. The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury. Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury. Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time-loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more. Female athletes with a greater than 10% side-to-side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4-fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4). Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3-fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury. The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury. Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population. The single-leg hop for distance and the lower extremity functional test, when administered to Division III

  5. Preliminary clinical application of SilverHawk directional atherectomy device in arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jun; Jiang Hong; Xu Gang; Yang Xiaohong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficiency and security of SilverHawk directional atherectomy device in treating arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity. Methods: Seven patients with lower extremity ischemia were treated with SilverHawk directional atherectomy. The lesions length varied from 1.8 to 14.5 cm. Clinical symptoms (Fontaine classification) included 4 cases of grade Ⅱ b, I case of grade Ⅲ, 2 cases of grade Ⅳ. The ABI varied from 0.28 to 0.65. Patency was evaluated with color duplex sonography or CTA besides clinical examination during follow-up. Results: Seven occlusive lesions were recanalizated successfully. The technical success (residual stenosis < 30%) rate was 100%. Clinical symptoms were obviously improved or disappeared. The ABI varied from 0.82 to 1.18 (P=0.002), and Fontaine classification included 6 cases of Ⅰ; 1 case of Ⅱ a. Patency rate was 100% and the ABI varied from 0.75 to 1.14 (P=0.938). Fontaine classifications keep consistent 1-6 months after operation. Conclusion: SilverHawk directional atherectomy was a safe and effective way for treatment of lower arteriosclerosis obliteran. (authors)

  6. The Influence of Lower Extremity Lean Mass on Landing Biomechanics During Prolonged Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Melissa M; Tritsch, Amanda J; Cone, John R; Schmitz, Randy J; Henson, Robert A; Shultz, Sandra J

    2017-08-01

      The extent to which lower extremity lean mass (LELM) relative to total body mass influences one's ability to maintain safe landing biomechanics during prolonged exercise when injury incidence increases is unknown.   To examine the influence of LELM on (1) pre-exercise lower extremity biomechanics and (2) changes in biomechanics during an intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) and (3) determine whether these relationships differ by sex. We hypothesized that less LELM would predict higher-risk baseline biomechanics and greater changes toward higher-risk biomechanics during the IEP.   Cohort study.   Controlled laboratory.   A total of 59 athletes (30 men: age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg; 29 women: age = 20.6 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) participated.   Before completing an individualized 90-minute IEP designed to mimic a soccer match, participants underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry testing for LELM.   Three-dimensional lower extremity biomechanics were measured during drop-jump landings before the IEP and every 15 minutes thereafter. A previously reported principal components analysis reduced 40 biomechanical variables to 11 factors. Hierarchical linear modeling analysis then determined the extent to which sex and LELM predicted the baseline score and the change in each factor over time.   Lower extremity lean mass did not influence baseline biomechanics or the changes over time. Sex influenced the biomechanical factor representing knee loading at baseline (P = .04) and the changes in the anterior cruciate ligament-loading factor over time (P = .03). The LELM had an additional influence only on women who possessed less LELM (P = .03 and .02, respectively).   Lower extremity lean mass influenced knee loading during landing in women but not in men. The effect appeared to be stronger in women with less LELM. Continually decreasing knee loading over time may reflect a

  7. Complication of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities with pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Teruyasu; Morita, Rikushi

    1993-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the complication of the pulmonary embolism and the localization of the venous thrombus in the lower extremities using Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) venography. Tc-99m MAA venography clearly demonstrated most of the deep and superficial veins from the leg to the pelvis and the abdomen. The incidence of venous thrombosis was highest in the pelvic veins (28.8%), and second in the superficial leg veins (10.9%). The complication of pulmonary embolism was highest in the pelvic venous thrombosis (20.4%), and second in the femoral venous thrombosis (16.0%). (author)

  8. Complication of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities with pulmonary embolism; Approach by radionuclide studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Teruyasu; Morita, Rikushi (Shiga Medical School, Otsu (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    We studied the relationship between the complication of the pulmonary embolism and the localization of the venous thrombus in the lower extremities using Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin (MAA) venography. Tc-99m MAA venography clearly demonstrated most of the deep and superficial veins from the leg to the pelvis and the abdomen. The incidence of venous thrombosis was highest in the pelvic veins (28.8%), and second in the superficial leg veins (10.9%). The complication of pulmonary embolism was highest in the pelvic venous thrombosis (20.4%), and second in the femoral venous thrombosis (16.0%). (author).

  9. Roy's Adaptation Model-Guided Education and Promoting the Adaptation of Veterans With Lower Extremities Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmi, Somayeh; Farsi, Zahra

    2015-10-01

    Any defect in extremities of the body can affect different life aspects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Roy's adaptation model-guided education on promoting the adaptation of veterans with lower extremities amputation. In a randomized clinical trial, 60 veterans with lower extremities amputation referring to Kowsar Orthotics and Prosthetics Center of veterans clinic in Tehran, Iran, were recruited with convenience method and were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during 2013 - 2014. For data collection, Roy's adaptation model questionnaire was used. After completing the questionnaires in both groups, maladaptive behaviors were determined in the intervention group and an education program based on Roy's adaptation model was implemented. After two months, both groups completed the questionnaires again. Data was analyzed with SPSS software. Independent t-test showed statistically significant differences between the two groups in the post-test stage in terms of the total score of adaptation (P = 0.001) as well as physiologic (P = 0.0001) and role function modes (P = 0.004). The total score of adaptation (139.43 ± 5.45 to 127.54 ± 14.55, P = 0.006) as well as the scores of physiologic (60.26 ± 5.45 to 53.73 ± 7.79, P = 0.001) and role function (20.30 ± 2.42 to 18.13 ± 3.18, P = 0.01) modes in the intervention group significantly increased, whereas the scores of self-concept (42.10 ± 4.71 to 39.40 ± 5.67, P = 0.21) and interdependence (16.76 ± 2.22 to 16.30 ± 2.57, P = 0.44) modes in the two stages did not have a significant difference. Findings of this research indicated that the Roy's adaptation model-guided education promoted the adaptation level of physiologic and role function modes in veterans with lower extremities amputation. However, this intervention could not promote adaptation in self-concept and interdependence modes. More intervention is advised based on Roy's adaptation model for improving the

  10. The effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation in lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ayse B; Tosun, Fadime; Demirel, Ismail; Unlu, Serap; Bayar, Mustafa K; Erhan, Omer L

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of anesthetic technique and ambient temperature on thermoregulation for patients undergoing lower extremity surgery. Our study included 90 male patients aged 18-60 years in American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status groups I or II who were scheduled for lower extremity surgery. Patients were randomly divided into three groups according to anesthetic technique: general anesthesia (GA), epidural anesthesia (EA), and femoral-sciatic block (FS). These groups were divided into subgroups according to room temperature: the temperature for group I was 20-22 °C and that for group II was 23-25 °C. Therefore, we labeled the groups as follows: GA I, GA II, EA I, EA II, FS I, and FS II. Probes for measuring tympanic membrane and peripheral temperature were placed in and on the patients, and mean skin temperature (MST) and mean body temperature (MBT) were assessed. Postoperative shivering scores were recorded. During anesthesia, tympanic temperature and MBT decreased whereas MST increased for all patients. There was no significant difference between tympanic temperatures in either the room temperature or anesthetic method groups. MST was lower in group GA I than in group GA II after 5, 10, 15, 20, 60 and 90 min whereas MBT was significantly lower at the basal level (p temperature affected thermoregulation in Group GA.

  11. A review of the risk factors for lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, Erin Anne; Whatman, Chris; Harris, Nigel; Bradshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence for selected risk factors of lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers. An electronic search of key databases from 1969 to July 2013 was conducted using the keywords dancers, ballet dancers, athletes, adolescent, adolescence, young, injury, injuries, risk, overuse, lower limb, lower extremity, lower extremities, growth, maturation, menarche, alignment, and biomechanics. Thirteen published studies were retained for review. Results indicated that there is a high incidence of lower extremity overuse injuries in the target population. Primary risk factors identified included maturation, growth, and poor lower extremity alignment. Strong evidence from well-designed studies indicates that young elite female ballet dancers suffer from delayed onset of growth, maturation, menarche, and menstrual irregularities. However, there is little evidence that this deficit increases the risk of overuse injury, with the exception of stress fractures. Similarly, there is minimal evidence linking poor lower extremity alignment to increased risk of overuse injury. It is concluded that further prospective, longitudinal studies are required to clarify the relationship between growth, maturation, menarche, and lower extremity alignment, and the risk of lower extremity overuse injury in young elite female ballet dancers.

  12. Prophylactic IVC Filter Placement during Endovascular Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Cho, Han Il; Lee, Yeum Sik; Bang, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Hwan

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of an IVC filter implantation in the prevent of a pulmonary embolism (PE) during endovascular treatment for a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities. We implanted IVC filters in 43 patients (22 females, 21 males, average age: 63 years) with DVT and who had undergone treatments including thrombolysis, aspiration and mechanical thrombectomy, as well as stent placement. We evaluated the incidence of PE by capturing the thrombus within the IVC filters, as well as the amount of captured thrombus. New developing PE or aggravating of PE in patients with existing PE was avoided in all patients. No thrombus was evident in the IVC filter of 19 (44%) of the patients, whereas any thrombus was captured in 24 (56%) of the patients. Small amounts of thrombus were captured in 10 patients, whereas large amounts of thrombus were captured in 14 patents within the IVC filter. We performed a retrieval of the IVC filters in 17 patients within an average period of 15.3 days (range 6-45 days). The captured incidence of migrated thrombus in the IVC filters was high in 56% of cases. As a result, PE was effectively prevented by IVC filters during the interventional treatment of DVT in the lower extremities

  13. Prophylactic IVC Filter Placement during Endovascular Treatment of Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Cho, Han Il; Lee, Yeum Sik; Bang, Dong Ho; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Hwan [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of an IVC filter implantation in the prevent of a pulmonary embolism (PE) during endovascular treatment for a deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities. We implanted IVC filters in 43 patients (22 females, 21 males, average age: 63 years) with DVT and who had undergone treatments including thrombolysis, aspiration and mechanical thrombectomy, as well as stent placement. We evaluated the incidence of PE by capturing the thrombus within the IVC filters, as well as the amount of captured thrombus. New developing PE or aggravating of PE in patients with existing PE was avoided in all patients. No thrombus was evident in the IVC filter of 19 (44%) of the patients, whereas any thrombus was captured in 24 (56%) of the patients. Small amounts of thrombus were captured in 10 patients, whereas large amounts of thrombus were captured in 14 patents within the IVC filter. We performed a retrieval of the IVC filters in 17 patients within an average period of 15.3 days (range 6-45 days). The captured incidence of migrated thrombus in the IVC filters was high in 56% of cases. As a result, PE was effectively prevented by IVC filters during the interventional treatment of DVT in the lower extremities.

  14. Catheter-directed thrombolysis of below-knee deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Sohn, Young Jun; Heo, Eun A; Cho, Hyun Sun; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Hwan [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of the use of local thrombolysis for below-knee deep vein thrombosis (DVT). From a population of 41 patients with a lower extremity DVT, the prospective clinical trial included 11 patients (7 female, 4 male, average age 61.4 years) treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase for below-knee DVT. After removal of the proximal ilofemoral DVT, additional interventional procedures to remove the residual thrombosis and restore the venous flow from the below-knee vein were performed in cases of continuous occlusion of venous flow from the popliteal and tibial veins. Under ultrasound (US) guidance, catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase was performed through the ipsilateral popliteal vein. After administration of oral anticoagulation therapy, CT and venography were performed to identify patency and the presence of a recurrent thrombosis. Successful removal of the thrombus and restoration of venous flow were achieved in all of the patients (100%). Restoration of flow with a residual thrombus occurred in one case. Focal venous stenosis was discovered in four cases. The duration of urokinase infusion was 1-4 days (average 2.36 days), which was considered long. For 15.2 months, the venous lumen of all cases was preserved without a recurrent thrombosis. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is an effective procedure for recanalization of below-knee DVT in patients with a lower extremity DVT.

  15. Catheter-directed thrombolysis of below-knee deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Byung Suk; Sohn, Young Jun; Heo, Eun A; Cho, Hyun Sun; Park, Seong Hoon; Lee, Young Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of the use of local thrombolysis for below-knee deep vein thrombosis (DVT). From a population of 41 patients with a lower extremity DVT, the prospective clinical trial included 11 patients (7 female, 4 male, average age 61.4 years) treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase for below-knee DVT. After removal of the proximal ilofemoral DVT, additional interventional procedures to remove the residual thrombosis and restore the venous flow from the below-knee vein were performed in cases of continuous occlusion of venous flow from the popliteal and tibial veins. Under ultrasound (US) guidance, catheter-directed thrombolysis with urokinase was performed through the ipsilateral popliteal vein. After administration of oral anticoagulation therapy, CT and venography were performed to identify patency and the presence of a recurrent thrombosis. Successful removal of the thrombus and restoration of venous flow were achieved in all of the patients (100%). Restoration of flow with a residual thrombus occurred in one case. Focal venous stenosis was discovered in four cases. The duration of urokinase infusion was 1-4 days (average 2.36 days), which was considered long. For 15.2 months, the venous lumen of all cases was preserved without a recurrent thrombosis. Catheter-directed thrombolysis is an effective procedure for recanalization of below-knee DVT in patients with a lower extremity DVT

  16. Reliability of isometric lower-extremity muscle strength measurements in children with cerebral palsy: implications for measurement design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, Lydia; Brehm, Merel A.; Scholtes, Vanessa A.; Jansen, Laura; Woudenberg-Vos, Hester; Dallmeijer, Annet J.

    2013-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) typically show muscle weakness of the lower extremities, which can be measured with the use of handheld dynamometry (HHD). The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine test-retest reliability and measurement error of isometric lower-extremity strength

  17. FDG-PET imaging of lower extremity muscular activity during level walking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Naoyuki; Iwaya, Tsutomu; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed muscular activity of the lower extremities during level walking using positron emission tomography (PET) with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). We examined 17 healthy male subjects; 11 were assigned to a walking group and 6 to a resting group. After 18 F-FDG injection, the walking group subjects walked at a free speed for 15 min. A whole-body image was then obtained by a PET camera, and the standardized uptake ratio (SUR) was computed for each muscle. The SUR for each muscle of the walking group was compared with that for the corresponding muscles in the resting group. The level of muscular activity of all the muscles we examined were higher during level walking than when resting. The activity of the lower leg muscles was higher than that of the thigh muscles during level walking. The muscular activity of the soleus was highest among all the muscles examined. Among the gluteal muscles, the muscular activity of the gluteus minimus was higher than that of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius. The concurrent validity of measuring muscular activity of the lower extremity during level walking by the PET method using 18 F-FDG was demonstrated. (author)

  18. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Peng, Kuo-Cheng Lo, Lin-Hwa Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005. Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001. The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000. When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05, and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball.

  19. Complications of Sclerotherapy with Sclerosing Foam in Lower Extremity Varicose Veins

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    Hossein Hemmati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Using sclerotherapy with foam has caused a great change in treatment of varicose veins. Although, it is more than a century that it is being used, no exact and comprehensive knowledge of its complications has been published yet with regard to the existing facilities in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, Patients with varicose veins of lower extremity referred to cardiology clinic of Razi hospital, Rasht were included in the study after doppler sonography and in case of presence of varicose veins with more than 2 mm diameter in lower extremities without inadequacy of saphenofemoral and saphenopopliteal valve. They then underwent sclerosing with foam treatment. The total number of patients was 156 who were examined 2 weeks and 3 months after sclerotherapy in terms of complications such as pain, pigmentation, recurrence, phlebitis, deep vein thrombosis and skin necrosis. Results: Out of 156 patients, 47 were men and 109 women whose mean±SD age was 46.5±12.2 years. Two weeks after sclerotherapy, pain in 95 patients (65.1%, pigmentation in 79 patients (53.4%, recurrence in 5 patients (3.4%, necrosis in 8 patients (5.5% and no phlebitis was witnessed. Three months after sclerotherapy, pain in 10 patients (6.8%, pigmentation in 52 patients (35.1%, recurrence in 13 patients (8.8% and phlebitis in 13 patients (8.8% were seen; however, necrosis was not observed Conclusion: Sclerotherapy with foam is an effective, safe and inexpensive method for treatment of varicose veins of lower extremities. Thus, in case of a careful selection of patients and conduction in an equipped center, few complications will be seen.

  20. The comparison of combined femoral-sciatic nerve block with spinal anesthesia at lower extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Almaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, we aimed to compare the spinal anesthesia technique with combined femoral-sciatic block technique in patients undergoing lower limb surgery. Methods: In this study, after obtaining the approval of the Dicle University Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, scheduled for elective lower extremity surgery, the ASA 1-2 groups, between the ages of 18-65, 60 patients were enrolled. Study was planned as a prospective, randomized and controlled. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups as the spinal anesthesia (Group S and combined sciatic-femoral nerve block (Group CSF to be. Results: Demographic data similar between the groups (p> 0.05. The implementation period of the technique was long in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. Surgery delivery time was shorter in the Group S compared with in the Group CSF (p <0.001. The time of motor block occurrence was longer in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. The duration of motor block was long in the Group CSF compared with in the Group S (p <0.001. Conclusion: The each of two methods is safe and effective in lower extremity orthopedic surgery, but the application of peripheral nerve block to provide the long-term advantages such as postoperative analgesia and reducing postoperative analgesic consumption. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (2: 443-446

  1. Test-retest and interrater reliability of the functional lower extremity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitz, Karyn; Shultz, Rebecca; Hodgins, Melissa; Matheson, Gordon O

    2014-12-01

    Repeated-measures clinical measurement reliability study. To establish the reliability and face validity of the Functional Lower Extremity Evaluation (FLEE). The FLEE is a 45-minute battery of 8 standardized functional performance tests that measures 3 components of lower extremity function: control, power, and endurance. The reliability and normative values for the FLEE in healthy athletes are unknown. A face validity survey for the FLEE was sent to sports medicine personnel to evaluate the level of importance and frequency of clinical usage of each test included in the FLEE. The FLEE was then administered and rated for 40 uninjured athletes. To assess test-retest reliability, each athlete was tested twice, 1 week apart, by the same rater. To assess interrater reliability, 3 raters scored each athlete during 1 of the testing sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess the test-retest and interrater reliability of each of the FLEE tests. In the face validity survey, the FLEE tests were rated as highly important by 58% to 71% of respondents but frequently used by only 26% to 45% of respondents. Interrater reliability intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.83 to 1.00, and test-retest reliability ranged from 0.71 to 0.95. The FLEE tests are considered clinically important for assessing lower extremity function by sports medicine personnel but are underused. The FLEE also is a reliable assessment tool. Future studies are required to determine if use of the FLEE to make return-to-play decisions may reduce reinjury rates.

  2. Sports-related muscle injuries of the lower extremity: MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Marquez, A.; Gil-Garcia, M.; Valls, C.; Narvaez-Garcia, J.; Andia-Navarro, E.; Pozuelo-Segura, O.; Portabella-Blavia, F.

    1999-01-01

    Sports-related injuries of the lower extremity are frequent. Before magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was available, ultrasound, radionuclide scintigraphy and computed tomography were used to evaluate muscle trauma. Although relatively inexpensive, these imaging modalities are limited by their low specificity. The high degree of soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability of MR imaging, allow direct visualization as well as characterization of traumatic muscle lesions. This pictorial review highlights the spectrum of traumatic muscle lesions on MRI, with emphasis on its typical appearances. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral lower extremity hyperkeratotic plaques: a case report of ichthyosis vulgaris

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    Leight H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hayley Leight, Zachary Zinn, Omid JalaliDepartment of Dermatology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA Abstract: Here, we report a case of a middle-aged woman presenting with severe, long-standing, hyperkeratotic plaques of the lower extremities unrelieved by over-the-counter medications. Initial history and clinical findings were suggestive of an inherited ichthyosis. Ichthyoses are genetic disorders characterized by dry scaly skin and altered skin-barrier function. A diagnosis of ichthyosis vulgaris was confirmed by histopathology. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: filaggrin gene, FLG, profilaggrin, keratohyalin granules, hyperkeratosis

  4. Percutaneous aspiration thrombectomy for the treatment of acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis: is thrombolysis needed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, J.H. [Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: radkwon@dreamwiz.com; Seo, T.-S. [Department of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, H.J.; Park, H.C. [Department of Surgery, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Aim: To assess the technical feasibility and initial success of aspiration thrombectomy as a potential alternative to lytic therapy in initial endovascular management of acute lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Materials and Methods: From July 2004 to October 2007, a retrospective analysis of 27 patients (male:female 5:22; mean age 59 years) with acute iliofemoral or femoropopliteal DVT of less than 2 weeks was performed. All patients underwent sonography of the lower extremities, and 13 patients underwent computed tomography (CT) venography. All patients received an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter and were initially treated with aspiration thrombectomy using the pullback technique with or without basket thrombus fragmentation. If persistent stenotic portions (>50% luminal narrowing) were noted, balloon angioplasty or stent placement was performed. Successful recanalization was defined as successful restoration of antegrade flow in the treated vein with elimination of any underlying obstructive lesion. Results: The mean procedure time was 65 min (range 40-100 min). Successful initial recanalization was achieved in 24 patients (88.9%) without complications. Urokinase was required for three patients (11.1%) due to a hard thrombus remaining in the iliac vein. Of the 27 patients, 23 had residual venous stenosis in the common iliac vein or external iliac vein. Therefore, balloon angioplasty (n = 23) and stent placement (n = 22) was performed. The remaining four patients were treated using only aspiration thrombectomy without angioplasty or stent placement. Conclusion: Aspiration thrombectomy without catheter-directed thrombolysis is a safe and effective treatment for acute DVT of the lower extremities, and minimizes the risk of haemorrhagic complications.

  5. Endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrigley, Clinton W; Vance, Ansar; Niesen, Timothy; Grilli, Christopher; Velez, J Daniel; Agriantonis, Demetrios J; Kimbiris, George; Garcia, Mark J; Leung, Daniel A

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the feasibility, safety, and outcome of endovascular recanalization of native chronic total occlusions (CTOs) in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts. Retrospective review of 19 limbs in 18 patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts that underwent recanalization of native arterial occlusions between February 2009 and April 2013 was performed. Nine of the limbs presented with acute ischemia and 10 presented with chronic ischemia, including eight with critical limb ischemia and two with disabling claudication. The mean patency of the failed bypass grafts (63% venous) was 27 months. All limbs had Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus class D lesions involving the native circulation. Technical success of the endovascular recanalization procedure was achieved in all but one limb (95%). The mean ankle brachial indices before and after treatment were 0.34 and 0.73, respectively. There were no major complications or emergency amputations. Mean patient follow-up was 64 weeks, and two patients were lost to follow-up. Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 87%, 48%, and 16%, respectively. Successful secondary procedures were performed in seven patients, with secondary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months of 88%, 73%, and 44%, respectively. Limb salvage rates at 12 and 24 months were 94% and 65%, and amputation-free survival rates at 12 and 24 months were 87% and 60%, respectively. Endovascular recanalization of native CTOs in patients with failed lower-extremity bypass grafts is technically feasible and safe and results in acceptable limb salvage. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Poor outcome of bilateral lower extremity morel-lavallee lesions: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sharon S; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Siskind, Eric; Kasabian, Armen K; Huang, Su-I D

    2014-03-01

    The Morel-Lavallee lesion is a closed, internal degloving injury that results when a strong, shearing force is applied parallel to the plane of injury, as is common in vehicular trauma. It is an underdiagnosed entity that is often missed during the initial trauma workup as symptoms can be subtle. There are few reports of lesions occurring below the knee. Most cases affect the proximal thigh and trochanter, as these tend to be dependent areas in high velocity trauma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first literature report of bilateral lower extremity Morel-Lavallee lesions.

  7. TOTAL JOINT REPLACEMENT OF THE LOWER EXTREMITY IN PATIENTS WITH JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS

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    Стюарт Б. Гудмэн

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement of the lower extremity in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is becoming more commonly performed worldwide. These young adults experience severe pain and disability from end-stage arthritis, and require joint replacement of the hip or knee to alleviate pain, and restore ambulation and function. These procedures are very challenging from the anesthesia and surgical point of view, due to small overall proportions, numerous bony and other deformities and soft tissue contractures. Joint replacement operations for JIA are best performed by experienced teams, where pre-operative and peri-operative care, and post-operative rehabilitation can be optimized in a collaborative, patient-centered environment.

  8. Recovery of decreased bone mineral mass after lower-limb fractures in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceroni, Dimitri; Martin, Xavier E; Delhumeau, Cécile; Farpour-Lambert, Nathalie J; De Coulon, Geraldo; Dubois-Ferrière, Victor; Rizzoli, René

    2013-06-05

    Loss of bone mineral mass, muscle atrophy, and functional limitations are predictable consequences of immobilization and subsequent weight-bearing restriction due to leg or ankle fractures. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine whether decreased bone mineral mass following lower-limb fractures recovers at follow-up durations of six and eighteen months in adolescents. In the present study, we included fifty adolescents who underwent cast immobilization for a leg or ankle fracture. Dual x-ray absorptiometry scans of four different sites (total hip, femoral neck, entire lower limb, and calcaneus) were performed at the time of the fracture, at cast removal, and at follow-ups of six and eighteen months. Patients with fractures were paired with healthy controls according to sex, age, and ethnicity. Dual x-ray absorptiometry values were compared between groups and between injured and non-injured legs in adolescents with fractures. Among those with fractures, lower-limb bone mineral variables were significantly lower at the injured side compared with the non-injured side at cast removal, with differences ranging from 6.2% to 31.7% (p < 0.0001). Similarly, injured adolescents had significantly lower bone mineral values at the level of the injured lower limb compared with healthy controls (p < 0.0001). At the six-month follow-up, there were still significant residual differences between injured and non-injured legs in adolescents with fractures (p < 0.0001). However, a significant residual difference between healthy controls and injured adolescents was present only for femoral neck bone mineral density (p = 0.011). At the eighteen-month follow-up, no significant difference was observed at any lower-limb site. Bone mineral loss following a fracture of the lower limb in adolescents is highly significant and affects the lower limb both proximal to and distal to the fracture site. In contrast to observations in adults, a rapid bone mass reversal occurs with full

  9. Rotational profile of the lower extremity in achondroplasia: computed tomographic examination of 25 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hae-Ryong; Suh, Seung-Woo [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rare Diseases Institute, Seoul (Korea); Choonia, Abi-Turab [Laud Clinic, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Mumbai (India); Hong, Suk Joo; Cha, In Ho [Korea University Guro Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Seok-Hyun [Dongguk University Ilsan Buddist Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Goyang (Korea); Park, Jong-Tae [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Department of Occupational and Enviornmental Medicine, Ansan (Korea)

    2006-12-15

    To evaluate lower-extremity rotational abnormalities in subjects with achondroplasia using computed tomography (CT) scans. CT scans were performed in 25 subjects with achondroplasia (13 skeletally immature, mean age 8.7 years; 12 skeletally mature, mean age 17.6 years). In a total of 50 bilateral limbs, CT images were used to measure the angles of acetabular anteversion, femoral anteversion, and tibial external torion. Measurement was performed by three examiners and then repeated by one examiner. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were analyzed, and results were compared with previously reported normal values. Mean values for skeletally immature and skeletally mature subjects were 13.6{+-}7.5 and 21.5{+-}6.4 respectively for acetabular anteversion, 27.1{+-}20.8 and 30.5{+-}20.1 for femoral torsion, and 21.6{+-}10.6 and 22.5{+-}10.8 for tibial torsion. Intra- and interobserver agreements were good to excellent. Acetabular anteversion and femoral anteversion in skeletally mature subjects were greater than normal values in previous studies. Both skeletally immature and mature subjects with achondroplasia had decreased tibial torsion compared to normal skeletally immature and mature subjects. Lower-extremity rotational abnormalities in subjects with achondroplasia include decreased tibial external torsion in both skeletally immature and mature subjects, as well as increased femoral and acetabular anteversion in skeletally mature subjects. (orig.)

  10. Rotational profile of the lower extremity in achondroplasia: computed tomographic examination of 25 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Hae-Ryong; Suh, Seung-Woo; Choonia, Abi-Turab; Hong, Suk Joo; Cha, In Ho; Lee, Seok-Hyun; Park, Jong-Tae

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate lower-extremity rotational abnormalities in subjects with achondroplasia using computed tomography (CT) scans. CT scans were performed in 25 subjects with achondroplasia (13 skeletally immature, mean age 8.7 years; 12 skeletally mature, mean age 17.6 years). In a total of 50 bilateral limbs, CT images were used to measure the angles of acetabular anteversion, femoral anteversion, and tibial external torion. Measurement was performed by three examiners and then repeated by one examiner. Inter- and intraobserver agreements were analyzed, and results were compared with previously reported normal values. Mean values for skeletally immature and skeletally mature subjects were 13.6±7.5 and 21.5±6.4 respectively for acetabular anteversion, 27.1±20.8 and 30.5±20.1 for femoral torsion, and 21.6±10.6 and 22.5±10.8 for tibial torsion. Intra- and interobserver agreements were good to excellent. Acetabular anteversion and femoral anteversion in skeletally mature subjects were greater than normal values in previous studies. Both skeletally immature and mature subjects with achondroplasia had decreased tibial torsion compared to normal skeletally immature and mature subjects. Lower-extremity rotational abnormalities in subjects with achondroplasia include decreased tibial external torsion in both skeletally immature and mature subjects, as well as increased femoral and acetabular anteversion in skeletally mature subjects. (orig.)

  11. Sexuality in persons with lower extremity amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenheimer, C; Kerrigan, A J; Garber, S L; Monga, T N

    2000-06-15

    There is a paucity of information regarding sexual functioning in persons with lower extremity amputations. The purpose of this study was to describe sexual and psychological functioning and health status in persons with lower extremity amputation. Self-report surveys assessed sexual functioning (Derogatis Inventory), depression (Beck Depression Inventory, anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), and health status (Health Status Questionnaire) in a convenience sample of 30 men with lower extremity amputations. Mean age of the participants was 57 years (range 32-79). Mean duration since amputation was 23 months (range 3-634 months). Twenty one subjects (70%) had trans-tibial and seven subjects (23%) had trans-femoral amputations. A majority of subjects were experiencing problems in several domains of sexual functioning. Fifty three percent (n = 16) of the subjects were engaged in sexual intercourse or oral sex at least once a month. Twenty seven percent (n = 8) were masturbating at least once a month. Nineteen subjects (63%) reported orgasmic problems and 67% were experiencing erectile difficulties. Despite these problems, interest in sex was high in over 90% of the subjects. There was no evidence of increased prevalence of depression or anxiety in these subjects when compared to other outpatient adult populations. Sexual problems were common in the subjects studied. Despite these problems, interest in sex remained high. Few investigations have been directed toward identifying the psychological and social factors that may contribute to these problems and more research with a larger population is needed in this area.

  12. Footwear traction and lower extremity noncontact injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannop, John W; Luo, Geng; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-11-01

    Football is the most popular high school sport; however, it has the highest rate of injury. Speculation has been prevalent that foot fixation due to high footwear traction contributes to injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the athlete's specific footwear traction (measured with their own shoes on the field of play) and lower extremity noncontact injury in high school football. For 3 yr, 555 high school football athletes had their footwear traction measured on the actual field of play at the start of the season, and any injury the athletes suffered during a game was recorded. Lower extremity noncontact injury rates, grouped based on the athlete's specific footwear traction (both translational and rotational), were compared. For translational traction, injury rate reached a peak of 23.3 injuries/1000 game exposures within the midrange of translational traction, before decreasing to 5.0 injuries/1000 game exposures in the high range of traction. For rotational traction, there was a steady increase in injury rate as footwear traction increased, starting at 4.2 injuries/1000 game exposures at low traction and reaching 19.2 injuries/1000 game exposures at high traction. A relationship exists between footwear traction and noncontact lower extremity injury, with increases in rotational traction leading to a greater injury rate and increases in translational traction leading to a decrease in injury. It is recommended that athletes consider selecting footwear with the lowest rotational traction values for which no detriment in performance results.

  13. Extremes in vitamin K status of bone are related to bone ultrasound properties in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Summeren, M. J. H.; Vermeer, C.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Schurgers, L. J.; Takken, T.; Fischer, K.; Kuis, W.

    2008-01-01

    Osteopenia is a common complication of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In adults, low bone density and increased fracture risk are associated with low vitamin K status of bone. The vitamin K-dependent protein osteocalcin plays an important role in bone metabolism. Its activity depends upon

  14. [Lower extremity amputation rates in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-González, Nelly; Ascencio-Montiel, Iván Jesús; Libreros-Bango, Vita Norma; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Héctor; Campos-Hernández, Ángel; Dávila-Torres, Javier; Kumate-Rodríguez, Jesús; Borja-Aburto, Víctor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The lower extremity amputations diminish the quality of life of patients with Diabetes Mellitus (DM). The aim of this study was to describe the lower extremity amputation rates in subjects with DM in the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS), comparing 2004 and 2013. A comparative cross-sectional study was done. Amputations were identified from the hospital records of System of Medical Statistics (DataMart). The DM patient census was obtained from the System of Integral Attention to Health. Major and minor amputations rates were expressed per 100,000 DM patients. We observed 2 334 340 and 3 416 643 DM patients during 2004 and 2013, respectively. The average age at the time of the amputation was similar in 2004 and 2013 (61.7 and 65.6 years old for minor and major amputations respectively). The major amputations rates were 100.9 and 111.1 per 100 000 subjects with DM in during 2004 and 2013 (p = 0.001); while minor amputations rates were 168.8 and 162.5 per 100 000 subjects with DM in during 2004 and 2013 respectively (p = 0.069). The lower extremity amputations rates at IMSS are very high compared with that reported in developed countries. The major amputations rate increased in 2013 compared with 2004.

  15. The Effect of Fatigue in Proxmal and Distal Muscles of Lower Extremity on Postural Control

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    Mozhgan Moghadam

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies have shown the effects of muscular fatigue on proprioception and neuromuscular control. However all available researches have studied just the effect of local fatigue in ankle joint muscles on postural control, and no study have found about the effect of fatigue in proximal muscles of the lower extremity on postural control. To compare changes in postural control parameters after isokinetic fatigue of proximal and distal muscles of lower extremity. Materials & Methods: Subjects were twenty healthy men (age: 22.6±2.4 years, height: 173.7± 3.6 cm, weight: 63.3±7.9kg. There were 4 test sessions, with a randomized order according to site and plane of fatigue. During each session one of these muscle groups was fatigued using a Biodex isokinetic dynamometer: ankle plantar / dorsi flexors, ankle evertor / inventors, hip flexor / extensors and hip abductor/adductors. The biodex stability system was used to perform dynamic balance test before and after muscle fatigue in each session. Overall, anterior / posterior, and medial/lateral stability indices were recorded. The higher the stability indices, the lower the balancing skill. Results: Analysis of pre-and post fatigue balance results of all sessions, demonstrated significant increase (P<0.05 in all stability indices. Repeated measures ANOVA performed on the rate of changes in stability indices during each session revealed that hip muscle fatigue caused much more increase in stability indices than ankle muscle fatigue (P<0.05. Conclusion: Isokinetic fatigue of both ankle and hip muscles significantly decreases postural control ability in healthy young men. In addition, our findings suggest that the hip joint musculature plays a more prominent role in postural control.

  16. Reliability of 4-meter and 10-meter walk tests after lower extremity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Bayram; Baris, Refik Hilmi; Yuksel, Ertugrul; Cekmece, Senol; Kalkan, Serpil; Karatosun, Vasfi

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the test-retest reliability of the 4-meter walk test (4 MWT) and 10-meter walk test (10 MWT) in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery during inpatient rehabilitation. In all, 102 patients with total hip arthroplasty (THA), total knee arthroplasty (TKA), lower extremity fracture (LEF) and soft tissue operation were recruited. Patients performed two 4 MWT and two 10 MWT trials on the same day. The same researcher performed all the measurements to avoid inter-rater variability. The 4 MWT and 10 MWT were shown to have excellent test-retest reliability. The ICCs for the 4 MWT and 10 MWT were found as 0.94 and 0.95, respectively. The SEMs for the 4 MWT and 10 MWT were 2.0 and 5.5 seconds, respectively. The smallest real difference at the 95% confidence level (SRD95) was 5.5 seconds for the 4 MWT and 12.2 seconds for 10 MWT and SRD95 percentage was 31.2 for the 4 MWT and 28.5 for the 10 MWT. Both the 4 MWT and the 10 MWT have excellent reliability in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery such as TKA, THA, LEF and soft tissue operation during inpatient rehabilitation. Clinicians and researchers can be confident that changes above the SRD95s for the different patient groups, for both sexes and with regard to weight-bearing status, represent a real clinical change in rehabilitation process. Implications for Rehabilitation The 4 MWT and the 10 MWT are simple methods and were also shown to be reliable measurement methods in many patient groups. This study illustrates that the test-retest reliability of the 4 MWT and 10 MWT are excellent in patients undergoing lower extremity surgery during inpatient rehabilitation (ICC: 0.94 for 4 MWT, ICC: 0.95 for 10 MWT). Clinicians and researchers can be confident that changes above the SRD95s for the different patient groups, for both sexes and with regard to weight-bearing status represent a real clinical change in rehabilitation process.

  17. Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Biologically Based Assay of Lower Extremity Impairment and Gait Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather T. Peters

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (a To determine associations among motor evoked potential (MEP amplitude, MEP latency, lower extremity (LE impairment, and gait velocity and (b determine the association between the presence of a detectable MEP signal with LE impairment and with gait velocity. Method. 35 subjects with chronic, stable LE hemiparesis were undergone TMS, the LE section of the Fugl-Meyer Impairment Scale (LE FM, and 10-meter walk test. We recorded presence, amplitude, and latency of MEPs in the affected tibialis anterior (TA and soleus (SO. Results. MEP presence was associated with higher LEFM scores in both the TA and SO. MEP latency was larger in subjects with lower LEFM and difficulty walking. Conclusion. MEP latency appears to be an indicator of LE impairment and gait. Significance. Our results support the precept of using TMS, particularly MEP latency, as an adjunctive LE outcome measurement and prognostic technique.

  18. Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Biologically Based Assay of Lower Extremity Impairment and Gait Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Heather T; Dunning, Kari; Belagaje, Samir; Kissela, Brett M; Ying, Jun; Laine, Jarmo; Page, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives . (a) To determine associations among motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, lower extremity (LE) impairment, and gait velocity and (b) determine the association between the presence of a detectable MEP signal with LE impairment and with gait velocity. Method . 35 subjects with chronic, stable LE hemiparesis were undergone TMS, the LE section of the Fugl-Meyer Impairment Scale (LE FM), and 10-meter walk test. We recorded presence, amplitude, and latency of MEPs in the affected tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SO). Results . MEP presence was associated with higher LEFM scores in both the TA and SO. MEP latency was larger in subjects with lower LEFM and difficulty walking. Conclusion . MEP latency appears to be an indicator of LE impairment and gait. Significance . Our results support the precept of using TMS, particularly MEP latency, as an adjunctive LE outcome measurement and prognostic technique.

  19. Neuropathic Pain Medication Use Does Not Alter Outcomes of Spinal Cord Stimulation for Lower Extremity Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Dermot P; Martins, Yuri Chaves; Doshi, Tina; Bicket, Mark; Zhang, Kui; Hanna, George; Ahmed, Shihab

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for the treatment of lower extremity pain is believed to the result of increased activity in the descending inhibitory and decreased activity in the ascending excitatory tracts. Evidence suggests that the analgesia afforded by SCS may be altered using certain neuropathic pain medications that also modulate neurotransmitters in these sensory tracts. We hypothesize that neuropathic pain medications may alter the response to SCS therapy. One hundred and fifteen subjects undergoing SCS therapy for lower extremity pain were retrospectively examined. The pharmacologic profile, including stable use of neuropathic and opioid medications, were recorded. Three separate logistic regression models examined the odds ratio of primary outcomes; a successful SCS trial, a 50% decrease in pain or a 50% reduction in opioid use one year after implant. Neither the use of opioids or neuropathic pain medications were associated with changes in the odds of a successful SCS trial or a 50% pain reduction. A higher dose of chronic opioids use prior to a trial was associated with greater odds of having a 50% reduction in opioid use following implant. OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.02, p-value neuropathic pain medications did not change the odds of either a successful SCS trial, or of experiencing a 50% reduction in pain at one year. The association between higher opioid doses and greater odds of a 50% reduction in opioid use may be the reflective of SCS's ability to reduce opioid reliance in chronic pain patients. © 2017 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. An early validation of the Society for Vascular Surgery lower extremity threatened limb classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cull, David L; Manos, Ginger; Hartley, Michael C; Taylor, Spence M; Langan, Eugene M; Eidt, John F; Johnson, Brent L

    2014-12-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) recently established the Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System, a staging system using Wound characteristic, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) to stratify the risk for limb amputation at 1 year. Although intuitive in nature, this new system has not been validated. The purpose of the following study was to determine whether the WIfI system is predictive of limb amputation and wound healing. Between 2007 and 2010, we prospectively obtained data related to wound characteristics, extent of infection, and degree of postrevascularization ischemia in 139 patients with foot wounds who presented for lower extremity revascularization (158 revascularization procedures). After adapting those data to the WIfI classifications, we analyzed the influence of wound characteristics, extent of infection, and degree of ischemia on time to wound healing; empirical Kaplan-Meier survival curves were compared with theoretical outcomes predicted by WIfI expert consensus opinion. Of the 158 foot wounds, 125 (79%) healed. The median time to wound healing was 2.7 months (range, 1-18 months). Factors associated with wound healing included presence of diabetes mellitus (P = .013), wound location (P = .049), wound size (P = .007), wound depth (P = .004), and degree of ischemia (P valid. Further validation of the WIfI classification system with multicenter data is justified. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Kinematic and kinetic synergies of the lower extremities during the pull in olympic weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Kristof; Redden, Josh; Sabick, Michelle; Harris, Chad

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify multijoint lower extremity kinematic and kinetic synergies in weightlifting and compare these synergies between joints and across different external loads. Subjects completed sets of the clean exercise at loads equal to 65, 75, and 85% of their estimated 1-RM. Functional data analysis was used to extract principal component functions (PCF's) for hip, knee, and ankle joint angles and moments of force during the pull phase of the clean at all loads. The PCF scores were then compared between joints and across loads to determine how much of each PCF was present at each joint and how it differed across loads. The analyses extracted two kinematic and four kinetic PCF's. The statistical comparisons indicated that all kinematic and two of the four kinetic PCF's did not differ across load, but scaled according to joint function. The PCF's captured a set of joint- and load-specific synergies that quantified biomechanical function of the lower extremity during Olympic weightlifting and revealed important technical characteristics that should be considered in sports training and future research.

  2. Lower extremity physical performance and hip bone mineral density in elderly black and white men and women : cross-sectional associations in the Health ABC Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taaffe, Dennis R; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Visser, Marjolein; Volpato, Stefano; Nevitt, Michael C; Cauley, Jane A; Tylavsky, Frances A; Harris, Tamara B

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aging is characterized by declines in physical capacity and bone mineral density (BMD), both of which contribute to increased risk for fracture. However, it is unclear if these factors coexist or are independent in elderly people, and if a relationship does exist, whether it varies by

  3. Arterial diseases of lower extremities in diabetic patients: current state and prospects of therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Radikovich Galstyan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral artery diseases (PAD are most serious diabetic complications responsible for the high risk of amputation of lower extremities. The occurrenceof PAD in diabetic patients is much higher than in subjects with undisturbed carbohydrate metabolism. PAD in diabetic patients is frequentlyan asymptomatic condition affecting distal portions of arterial segments and associated with pronounced mediacalcinosis. Standard diagnostic proceduresfor the screening of arterial lesions must be supplemented by non-invasive visualization and measurement of transcutaneous oxygen tensionin patients at risk of PAD and persisting foot ulcers. Of special importance is early diagnosis of critical limb ischemia and prevention of foot lesions.Combined treatment of diabetic foot syndrome in patients with critical limb ischemia includes normalization of foot circulation, surgical interventionand conservative therapy of the wound, monitoring concomitant micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications?

  4. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahanov L

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leamor Kahanov,1 Lindsey E Eberman,2 Kenneth E Games,2 Mitch Wasik2 1College of Health Science, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA, USA; 2Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN, USA Abstract: Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. Keywords: medial tibial stress syndrome, stress injury, nonunion stress fracture

  5. Development and validation of an exercise performance support system for people with lower extremity impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, M A; Reid, J C; Griffin, J Z; Pittman, C B; Patrick, T B; Cutts, J H

    1998-02-01

    To identify innovative strategies to support appropriate, self-directed exercise that increase physical activity levels of people with arthritis. This article reports on one interactive, multimedia exercise performance support system (PSS) for people with lower extremity impairments in strength or flexibility. An interdisciplinary team developed the PSS using self-report of lower extremity musculoskeletal impairments (flexibility and strength) to produce an individualized exercise program with video and print educational materials. Initial evaluation has investigated the validity and reliability of program assessments and recommendations. PSS self-report and professional assessments were similar, with more impairments indicated by self-report. PSS exercise recommendations were similar to those made by 3 expert physical therapists using the same exercise data base. Results of PSS impairment assessments were stable over a 1-week period. PSS exercise recommendations appear to be reliable and a valid reflection of current exercise knowledge in rheumatology. Furthermore, users were able to complete the computer-based program with minimal assistance and reported it to be enjoyable and informative.

  6. Sequence comparison for non-enhanced MRA of the lower extremity arteries at 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Johst

    Full Text Available In this study three sequences for non-contrast-enhanced MRA of the lower extremity arteries at 7T were compared. Cardiac triggering was used with the aim to reduce signal variations in the arteries. Two fast single-shot 2D sequences, a modified Ultrafast Spoiled Gradient Echo (UGRE sequence and a variant of the Quiescent-Interval Single-Shot (QISS sequence were triggered via phonocardiogram and compared in volunteer examinations to a non-triggered 2D gradient echo (GRE sequence. For image acquisition, a 16-channel transmit/receive coil and a manually positionable AngioSURF table were used. To tackle B1 inhomogeneities at 7T, Time-Interleaved Acquisition of Modes (TIAMO was integrated in GRE and UGRE. To compare the three sequences quantitatively, a vessel-to-background ratio (VBR was measured in all volunteers and stations. In conclusion, cardiac triggering was able to suppress flow artifacts satisfactorily. The modified UGRE showed only moderate image artifacts. Averaged over all volunteers and stations, GRE reached a VBR of 4.18±0.05, UGRE 5.20±0.06, and QISS 2.72±0.03. Using cardiac triggering and TIAMO imaging technique was essential to perform non-enhanced MRA of the lower extremities vessels at 7T. The modified UGRE performed best, as observed artifacts were only moderate and the highest average VBR was reached.

  7. Endovascular management of deep venous thrombotic diseases of the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Byung Suk

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism and venous ischemia are acute complications of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities. Delayed complications include a spectrum of debilitating symptoms referred to as postthrombotic syndrome (PST). Because the early symptoms and patient signs are nonspecific for DVT, careful history taking and radiological evaluation of the extent and migration of thrombus should be used to establish an objective diagnosis and the need for treatment. Anticoagulation therapy is recognized as the mainstay treatment in acute DVT. However, there are few data to suggest any major beneficial effect of the early clearing of massive DVT and PTS. Endovascular, catheter-directed, thrombolysis techniques, used alone or in combination with mechanical thrombectomy devices, have been proven to be highly effective in clearing acute DVT, which may allow the preservation of venous valve function and the prevention of subsequent venous occlusive disease. Definitive management of the underlying anatomic occlusive abnormalities should also be undertaken

  8. Endovascular management of deep venous thrombotic diseases of the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Byung Suk [School of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Pulmonary embolism and venous ischemia are acute complications of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities. Delayed complications include a spectrum of debilitating symptoms referred to as postthrombotic syndrome (PST). Because the early symptoms and patient signs are nonspecific for DVT, careful history taking and radiological evaluation of the extent and migration of thrombus should be used to establish an objective diagnosis and the need for treatment. Anticoagulation therapy is recognized as the mainstay treatment in acute DVT. However, there are few data to suggest any major beneficial effect of the early clearing of massive DVT and PTS. Endovascular, catheter-directed, thrombolysis techniques, used alone or in combination with mechanical thrombectomy devices, have been proven to be highly effective in clearing acute DVT, which may allow the preservation of venous valve function and the prevention of subsequent venous occlusive disease. Definitive management of the underlying anatomic occlusive abnormalities should also be undertaken.

  9. State-of-the-art ultrasonographic findings in lower extremity sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzue, Naoto; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Iwame, Toshiyuki; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Hamada, Daisuke; Goto, Tomohiro; Takata, Yoichiro; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Goda, Yuichiro; Tsutsui, Takahiko; Tonogai, Ichiro; Miyagi, Ryo; Abe, Mitsunobu; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Mineta, Kazuaki; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nitta, Akihiro; Higuchi, Tadahiro; Hama, Shingo; C Jha, Subash; Takahashi, Rui; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Athletes sometimes experience overuse injuries. To diagnose these injuries, ultrasonography is often more useful than plain radiography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ultrasonography can show both bone and soft tissue from various angles as needed, providing great detail in many cases. In conditions such as osteochondrosis or enthesopathies such as Osgood-Schlatter disease, Sinding-Larsen-Johansson disease, bipartite patella, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee, painful accessory navicular,and jumper's knee, ultrasonography can reveal certain types of bony irregularities or neovascularization of the surrounding tissue. In patients of enthesopathy, ultrasonography can show the degenerative changes at the insertion of the tendon. Given its usefulness in treatment, ultrasonography is expected to become essential in the management of overuse injuries affecting the lower limb in athletes. J. Med. Invest. 62: 109-113, August, 2015.

  10. MR imaging appearances of soft tissue flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magerkurth, Olaf [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Baden, Baden (Switzerland); Girish, Gandikota; Jacobson, Jon A.; Kim, Sung Moon; Brigido, Monica; Dong, Qian; Jamadar, David A. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor (United States)

    2015-02-15

    MR imaging appearances of different types of reconstructive muscle flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity with associated post-surgical changes due to altered anatomy, radiation, and potential complications, can be challenging. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to tumors allows for limb salvage therapy in a majority of the patients. Decision-making for specific types of soft tissue reconstruction is based on the body region affected, as well as the size and complexity of the defect. Hematomas and infections are early complications that can jeopardize flap viability. The local recurrence of a tumor within six months after a complete resection with confirmed tumor-free margins and adjuvant radiation therapy is rare. Identification of a new lesion similar to the initial tumor favors a finding of tumor recurrence.

  11. Thromboembolic Risk of Endovascular Intervention for Lower Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Philip; Echeverria, Angela; Poi, Mun J; Matos, Jesus; Bechara, Carlos F; Cheung, Mathew; Lin, Peter H

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the risk of thromboembolism during endovascular interventions in patients with symptomatic lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) METHODS: Clinical records of all patients who underwent endovascular interventions for symptomatic lower extremity DVT from 2001 to 2017 were retrospectively analyzed using a prospectively maintained database. Only patients who received an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter were included in the analysis. Trapped intrafilter thrombus was assessed for procedure-related thromboembolism. Clinical outcomes of thrombus management and thromboembolism risk were analyzed. A total 172 patients (mean age 57.4 years, 98 females) who underwent 174 endovascular DVT interventions were included in the analysis. Treatment strategies included thrombolytic therapy (64%), mechanical thrombectomy (n = 86%), pharmacomechanical thrombolysis (51%), balloon angioplasty (98%), and stent placement (28%). Thrombectomy device used included AngioJet (56%), Trellis (19%), and Aspire (11%). Trapped IVC filter thrombus was identified in 58 patients (38%) based on the IVC venogram. No patient developed clinically evident pulmonary embolism (PE). IVC filter retrieval was performed in 98 patients (56%, mean 11.8 months after implantation). Multivariate analysis showed that iliac vein occlusion (P = 0.04) was predictive for procedure-related thromboembolism. Iliac vein thrombotic occlusion is associated with an increased thromboembolic risk in DVT intervention. Retrievable IVC filter should be considered when performing percutaneous thrombectomy in patients with iliac venous occlusion to prevent PE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The role of atherectomy in the treatment of lower extremity peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The incidence of lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE-PAD) continues to increase and associated morbidity remains high. Despite the significant development of percutaneous revascularization strategies, over the past decade, LE-PAD still represents a unique challenge for interventional cardiologists and vascular surgeons. Method Typical features of atherosclerosis that affects peripheral vascular bed (diffuse nature, poor distal runoff, critical limb ischemia, chronic total occlusion) contribute to the disappointing results of traditional percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). New technologies have been developed in attempt to improve the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous revascularization. Among these, atherectomy, debulking and removing atherosclerotic plaque, offers the potential advantage of eliminating stretch on arterial walls and reducing rates of restenosis. Conclusions This review summarizes the features and the current applications of new debulking devices. PMID:23173800

  13. Comparison of sonography and venography in the diagnosis of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostbeck, G.H.; Kettenbach, J.; Henk, C.

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, non-invasive sonographic techniques [real-time ultrasound (US), duplex ultrasonography (DU) and color-coded duplex sonography (CCDS)] have increased in importance for the diagnosis of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. To ascertain the accuracy and limitations of these techniques prospectively, various studies have been performed to compare sonography with venography. This review deals with basic methodologic considerations when two imaging methds are compared and describes the features of deep venous thrombosis seen on US, DU and CCDS. Reports comparing sonography and phlebography for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis are presented and discussed. The advantages and limitations of US, DU and CCDS for the diagnosis of iliac, femoral, popliteal and infrapopliteal venous thrombosis are compared with those of venography, and controversial areas are touched on. (orig.) [de

  14. The Effect of Elevation on Volumetric Measurements of the Lower Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordial M. Gillette

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The empirical evidence for the use of RICE (rest, ice, compression, elevation has been questioned regarding its   clinical effectiveness. The component of RICE that has the least literature regarding its effectiveness is elevation. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if various positions of elevation result in volumetric changes of the lower extremity. Methodology: A randomized crossover design was used to determine the effects of the four following conditions on volumetric changes of the lower extremity: seated at the end of a table (seated, lying supine (flat, lying supine with the foot elevated 12 inches off the table (elevated, and lying prone with the knees bent to 90 degrees (prone. The conditions were randomized using a Latin Square. Each subject completed all conditions with at least 24 hours between each session. Pre and post volumetric measurements were taken using a volumetric tank. The subject was placed in one of the four described testing positions for 30 minutes. The change in weight of the displaced water was the main outcome measure. The data was analyzed using an ANOVA of the pre and post measurements with a Bonferroni post hoc analysis. The level of significance was set at P<.05 for all analyses. Results: The only statistically significant difference was between the gravity dependent position (seated and all other positions (p <.001. There was no significant difference between lying supine (flat, on a bolster (elevated, or prone with the knees flexed to 90 degrees (prone. Conclusions: From these results, the extent of elevation does not appear to have an effect on changes in low leg volume. Elevation above the heart did not significantly improve reduction in limb volume, but removing the limb from a gravity dependent position might be beneficial.

  15. The application of comprehensive nursing measures in interventional therapy for deep vein thrombosis of lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Linfen; Guo Yanxue; Nan Yi; Pan Xiaohui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the effective nursing measures in interventional therapy for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of lower extremities in order to improve the successful rate of the procedure and to decrease the occurrence of complications. Methods: Comprehensive nursing measures, including general nursing care, specific nursing care and emergency nursing care, were employed in 63 DVT patients receiving interventional therapy. Clinical response and complications were observed. Results: After the treatment, the disorder was cured in 31 cases, while excellent result was seen in 26 cases and obvious improvement in 6 cases. During the procedure, bleeding at puncture site occurred in 16 cases, pulmonary embolism in 2 cases and cerebral hemorrhage in one case. No death occurred. Conclusion: Comprehensive nursing measures can effectively prevent or reduce the occurrence of complications, decrease the mortality rate. Therefore, Comprehensive nursing measures are the most helpful nursing care for DVT patients receiving interventional therapy. (authors)

  16. Risk Factor, Job Stress and Quality of Life in Workers With Lower Extremity Pain Who Use Video Display Terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sehoon; Jang, Seong Ho; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si-Bog; Han, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the general characteristics of video display terminal (VDT) workers with lower extremity pain, to identify the risk factors of work-related lower extremity pain, and to examine the relationship between work stress and health-related quality of life. A questionnaire about the general characteristics of the survey group and the musculoskeletal symptom was used. A questionnaire about job stress used the Korean Occupational Stress Scale and medical outcome study 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) to assess health-related quality of life. There were 1,711 subjects in the lower extremity group and 2,208 subjects in the control group. Age, sex, hobbies, and feeling of loading affected lower extremity pain as determined in a crossover analysis of all variables with and without lower extremity pain. There were no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of job stress and SF-36 values of the pain and control groups. Job stress in VDT workers was higher than average, and the quality of life decreased as the stress increased. Factors such as younger age, women, hobbies other than exercise, and feeling of loading influenced lower extremity pain of workers. Further long-term follow-up and supplementary studies are needed to identify risk factors for future lower extremity pain, taking into account ergonomic factors such as worker's posture.

  17. Evaluation of disabilities and activities of daily living of war-related bilateral lower extremity amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Moradi, Ali; Bozorgnia, Shahram; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Long-term consequences and the activities of daily living of bilateral lower limb amputation are not well documented. The aims of our study were to identify the long-term effects of bilateral lower extremity amputations on daily activities and understand how these amputees cope with their mobility assistive devices. Cross-sectional study. A total of 291 veterans with war bilateral lower limb amputations accepted to participate in a cross-sectional study. The average of follow-up was 25.4 years. A total of 152 amputees (54%) were involved in sports averagely 6.7 h per week. Bilateral amputees walk 10 m by the average of 15 ± 33 s, and they could walk continuously with their prosthesis 315 ± 295 m. They wore their prosthesis 6.8 ± 1.7 days per week and 7.9 ± 8.1 h per day. Of these, 6.7% of bilateral lower limb amputees needed help to wear their prosthesis; 88.3% of amputees used assistant device for walking. According to this survey, 73 (42%) prostheses in right limb were appropriate, 95 (54.6%) needed to be replaced, and 6 (3.4) needed to be fixed. On the left side, it was 76 (42%), 92 (52.0%), and 9 (5.1%), respectively. A total of 203 (74.9%) amputees reported limitations in at least one domain of the activities of daily living. The most common single item that affected the patients was ascending and descending stairs by the score of 66% of normal population. Veterans with bilateral lower limb amputations suffering from vast categories of daily problems. This study and its results confirm that bilateral lower limb amputees have major progressive disabilities in daily activities and their social performance. This should attract the attention of amputees' administrative organizations, social workers, health-care providers and caregiver providers. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2014.

  18. Meta-analysis of prognostic factors for amputation following surgical repair of lower extremity vascular trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Z B; Yet, B; Glasgow, S; Cole, E; Marsh, W; Brohi, K; Rasmussen, T E; Tai, N R M

    2015-04-01

    Lower extremity vascular trauma (LEVT) is a major cause of amputation. A clear understanding of prognostic factors for amputation is important to inform surgical decision-making, patient counselling and risk stratification. The aim was to develop an understanding of prognostic factors for amputation following surgical repair of LEVT. A systematic review was conducted to identify potential prognostic factors. Bayesian meta-analysis was used to calculate an absolute (pooled proportion) and relative (pooled odds ratio, OR) measure of the amputation risk for each factor. Forty-five studies, totalling 3187 discrete LEVT repairs, were included. The overall amputation rate was 10·0 (95 per cent credible interval 7·4 to 13·1) per cent. Significant prognostic factors for secondary amputation included: associated major soft tissue injury (26 versus 8 per cent for no soft tissue injury; OR 5·80), compartment syndrome (28 versus 6 per cent; OR 5·11), multiple arterial injuries (18 versus 9 per cent; OR 4·85), duration of ischaemia exceeding 6 h (24 versus 5 per cent; OR 4·40), associated fracture (14 versus 2 per cent; OR 4·30), mechanism of injury (blast 19 per cent, blunt 16 per cent, penetrating 5 per cent), anatomical site of injury (iliac 18 per cent, popliteal 14 per cent, tibial 10 per cent, femoral 4 per cent), age over 55 years (16 versus 9 per cent; OR 3·03) and sex (men 7 per cent versus women 8 per cent; OR 0·64). Shock and nerve or venous injuries were not significant prognostic factors for secondary amputation. A significant proportion of patients who undergo lower extremity vascular trauma repair will require secondary amputation. This meta-analysis describes significant prognostic factors needed to inform surgical judgement, risk assessment and patient counselling. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  20. MRI Findings of Causalgia of the Lower Extremity Following Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ryan Ormond

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Causalgia is continuing pain, allodynia, or hyperalgesia after nerve injury with edema, changes in skin blood flow, or abnormal sudomotor activity. Here we report a case of lower extremity causalgia following elective transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary tumor in a young man. Clinical Presentation. A 33-year-old man with acromegaly underwent elective sublabial transsphenoidal resection of his pituitary tumor. During the three-hour surgery, the lower limbs were kept in a supine, neutral position with a pillow under the knees. The right thigh was slightly internally rotated with a tape to expose fascia lata, which was harvested to repair the sella. Postoperatively, he developed causalgia in a distal sciatic and common peroneal nerve distribution. Pain was refractory to several interventions. Finally, phenoxybenzamine improved his pain significantly. Conclusions. Malpositioning in the operating room resulted in causalgia in this young man. Phenoxybenzamine improved, and ultimately resolved, his symptoms. Improvement in his pain symptoms correlated with resolution of imaging changes in the distal sciatic and peroneal nerves on the side of injury.

  1. In-Hospital Outcomes of Atherectomy During Endovascular Lower Extremity Revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaich, Sidakpal S; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Patel, Samir V; Savani, Chirag; Singh, Vikas; Jhamnani, Sunny; Sonani, Rajesh; Lahewala, Sopan; Thakkar, Badal; Patel, Achint; Dave, Abhishek; Shah, Harshil; Bhatt, Parth; Jaiswal, Radhika; Ghatak, Abhijit; Gupta, Vishal; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Kondur, Ashok; Schreiber, Theodore; Grines, Cindy; Badheka, Apurva O

    2016-02-15

    Contemporary data on clinical outcomes after utilization of atherectomy in lower extremity endovascular revascularization are sparse. The study cohort was derived from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project nationwide inpatient sample database from the year 2012. Peripheral endovascular interventions including atherectomy were identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic and procedural codes. The subjects were divided and compared in 2 groups: atherectomy versus no atherectomy. Two-level hierarchical multivariate mixed models were created. The coprimary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and amputation; secondary outcome was a composite of in-hospital mortality and periprocedural complications. Hospitalization costs were also assessed. Atherectomy utilization (odds ratio, 95% CI, p value) was independently predictive of lower in-hospital mortality (0.46, 0.28 to 0.75, 0.002) and lower amputation rates (0.83, 0.71 to 0.97, 0.020). Atherectomy use was also predictive of significantly lower secondary composite outcome of in-hospital mortality and complications (0.79, 0.69 to 0.90, 0.001). In the propensity-matched cohort, atherectomy utilization was again associated with a lower rate of amputation (11.18% vs 12.92%, p = 0.029), in-hospital mortality (0.71% vs 1.53%, p 0.001), and any complication (13.24% vs 16.09%, p 0.001). However, atherectomy use was also associated with higher costs ($24,790 ± 397 vs $22635 ± 251, p Atherectomy use in conjunction with angioplasty (with or without stenting) was associated with improved in-hospital outcomes in terms of lower amputation rates, mortality, and postprocedural complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lower extremity venous thrombosis in patients younger than 50 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreidy R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Raghid Kreidy1, Pascale Salameh2, Mirna Waked31Department of Vascular Surgery, Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, University of Balamand, 2Laboratory of Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lebanese University, 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Saint George Hospital, University Medical Center, University of Balamand, Beirut, LebanonAim: Lower extremity deep venous thrombosis in the young adult is uncommon and has not been well studied in the literature. The aim of this study is to define risk factors for deep venous thrombosis among patients younger than 50 years of age, to compare them with a control group, and to suggest recommendations for the management and treatment of venous thrombosis in this particular group of patients.Methods: From January 2003 to January 2011, 66 consecutive Lebanese patients (29 males and 37 females younger than 50 years, diagnosed in an academic tertiary-care center with lower extremity deep venous thrombosis by color flow duplex scan, were retrospectively reviewed. Their age varied between 21 and 50 years (mean 38.7 years. The control group included 217 patients (86 males and 131 females older than 50 years (range: 50–96 years; mean 72.9 years.Results: The most commonly reported risk factors in the younger age group were inherited thrombophilia (46.9% compared with 13.8% in the control group; P < 0.001, pregnancy (18.2% compared with 0.5%; P < 0.001, treatment with estrogen drugs (13.6% compared with 2.3%; P = 0.001, and family history of venous thromboembolism (9.1% compared with 3.8%; P = 0.084.Conclusion: Inherited thrombophilia is the most commonly observed risk factor among patients younger than 50 years, with a prevalence of three times more than the control group. Young adults should be screened for thrombophilia even in the presence of transient acquired risk factors. Pregnancy and treatment with estrogen drugs essentially when associated with inherited thrombophilia

  3. Clinical and Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Lower-extremity Vein Thrombosis in Behcet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyahi, Emire; Cakmak, Osman Serdal; Tutar, Burcin; Arslan, Caner; Dikici, Atilla Suleyman; Sut, Necdet; Kantarci, Fatih; Tuzun, Hasan; Melikoglu, Melike; Yazici, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vascular involvement can be seen in up to 40% of patients with Behcet syndrome (BS), the lower-extremity vein thrombosis (LEVT) being the most common type. The aim of the current study was to compare venous Doppler findings and clinical features between BS patients with LEVT and control patients diagnosed as having LEVT due to other causes. All consecutive 78 patients (71 men, 7 women; mean age 38.6 ± 10.3 years) with LEVT due to BS and 50 control patients (29 men, 21 women; mean age 42.0 ± 12.5 years) who had LEVT due to other causes, or idiopathic, were studied with the help of a Doppler ultrasonography after a detailed clinical examination. Patterns of venous disease were identified by cluster analyses. Clinical features of chronic venous disease were assessed using 2 classification systems. Venous claudication was also assessed. Patients with BS were more likely to be men, had significantly earlier age of onset of thrombosis, and were treated mainly with immunosuppressives and less frequently with anticoagulants. Furthermore, they had significantly more bilateral involvement, less complete recanalization, and more frequent collateral formation. While control patients had a disorganized pattern of venous involvement, BS patients had a contiguous and symmetric pattern, involving all deep and superficial veins of the lower extremities, with less affinity for crural veins. Clinical assessment, as measured by the 2 classification systems, also indicated a more severe disease among the BS patients. In line, 51% of the BS patients suffered from severe post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and 32% from venous claudication, whereas these were present in 8% and 12%, respectively, among the controls. Among BS patients, a longer duration of thrombosis, bilateral femoral vein involvement, and using no anticoagulation along with immunosuppressive treatment when first diagnosed were found to be associated independently with severe PTS. Lower-extremity vein

  4. Orthostatic changes in the blood volumes of the lower extremities in practically healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, V K; Koshkin, V M; Karalkin, A V [Vtoroj Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR)

    1979-07-01

    The method and the results of measuring the blood volumes in the lower extremities in the horizontal and vertical position of the body are given. A combination of a single-sensor counter of the whole body and a gamma-chamber with the use of two nondiffuse active radioindicators, erythrocytes labelled with /sup 51/Cr and albumin-sup(99m)Tc in certain sequence, is found to be the most optimal for quantitative evaluation of the regional volumes of the blood. To raise the informativeness of the studies the authors recommend distinguishing ''rapid'' and ''slow'' fractions of the blood volume progressive growth in the crus since the correlation of these fractions reflect the specific features of an individual orthostatic reaction for each examinee.

  5. Common Patterns of Congenital Lower Extremity Shortening: Diagnosis, Classification, and Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; Chauvin, Nancy A; Jaramillo, Diego; Davidson, Richard; Horn, B David; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lower limb shortening is a group of relatively rare, heterogeneous disorders. Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) and fibular hemimelia (FH) are the most common pathologic entities in this disease spectrum. PFFD is characterized by variable degrees of shortening or absence of the femoral head, with associated dysplasia of the acetabulum and femoral shaft. FH ranges from mild hypoplasia to complete absence of the fibula with variable shortening of the tibia. The development of the lower limb requires complex and precise gene interactions. Although the etiologies of PFFD and FH remain unknown, there is a strong association between the two disorders. Associated congenital defects in the lower extremity are found in more than 50% of patients with PFFD, ipsilateral FH being the most common. FH also has a strong association with shortening and bowing of the tibia and with foot deformities such as absence of the lateral rays of the foot. Early diagnosis and radiologic classification of these abnormalities are imperative for appropriate management and surgical planning. Plain radiography remains the main diagnostic imaging modality for both PFFD and FH, and appropriate description of the osseous abnormalities seen on radiographs allows accurate classification, prognostic evaluation, and surgical planning. Minor malformations may commonly be misdiagnosed. ©RSNA, 2015.

  6. Malignant Hidradenocarcinoma in the Lower Extremity: A Case Report of a Rare Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Brendan; Adler, Evan; Bhandari, Tarun; Rose, Michael; DiGuglielmo, Nicola; Sun, Xiu

    Malignant hidradenocarcinomas are rare soft tissue tumors of sweat gland origin. We present the case of a soft tissue, fungating tumor of 15 years' duration of the medial ankle in an 85-year-old male that exhibited malignant features clinically and radiographically. Subsequent punch biopsy revealed a diagnosis of malignant hidradenocarcinoma. Given the risk of recurrence and the poor radiation and chemotherapy options, the patient initially decided to leave the lesion untreated. However, he soon developed lower extremity cellulitis from the exposed lesion and decided to have the tumor excised, eliminating the source of the infection. In the present case study, we discuss the etiology, clinical and radiographic characteristics, and treatment options for this rare lesion. At the 18-month follow-up visit, he had had no recurrence of the lesion. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronopharmacodynamics of Intrathecal Co-injection of Sufentanyl and Bupivacaine in Orthopedic Surgery of Lower Extremities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sadri

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available  

    Background and objectives: In chronopharmacology the biological rhythm variations caused by drug administration is assessed. Evaluation of the time of drug administration and the qualitative and quantitative effects of reactions to drugs is called chronopharmacodynamics. In this study, we assessed the chronopharmacodynamics of intrathecal co-administration of sufentanyl and bupivacaine in surgical operations of lower extremities.  

    Methods: In 2006, patients aged 20-50 with ASA physical status of I and II, who underwent surgical operation of lower extremities were entered into this prospective study. The patients received a slow intrathecal injection of 10 μg sufentanyl and 15 mg bupivacaine into subarachnoid of third and fourth lumbar spaces in 30 seconds. After the operation, the time of first pain sensation and the visual analogue scale (VAS score, as the measure of severity of pain, were recorded.  

    Results: 115 patients were studied in this project. The pain-free interval was considered as the time between injection and patient’s demand for pain relief. This interval was 746 (± 322 minutes. The average score of pain severity on VAS at the time of demand for pain relief was 24.7 (± 9.3. The average pain-free duration in patients injected about noon or at midnight was significantly longer than the pain-free interval of other patients. 

    Conclusion: The results show that intrathecal co-administration of sufentanyl and bupivacaine at noon or midnight (conforming to the circadian rhythm causes better pain-relief with longer duration in comparison with other times of the day or night. 

  8. Routine evaluation ot arteriopathies of the lower extremities by digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacul, F; Pozzi-Mucelli, R; Predonzan, F; Magnaldi, S; Abbona, M; Pozzi-Mucelli, R S; Dalla Palma, L

    1985-11-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 119 patients with lower extremity ischemia using a 14'' amplifier. Four injections of contrast medium were usually necessary for a complete evaluation of this vascular region. Images of good quality were obtained in most cases; movement artifacts and a faint opacification accounted for any poor results, which occured mainly under the knee. The technique of pixel shifting turned out to be very useful to remove movement artifacts. The 'measuring field' allowed us to minimize the problem of the inhomogeneous saturation of the amplifier. In 8% of the cases an intra-arterial DSA has been performed after an unsatisfactory intravenous examination. Conventional angiography appears to be no longer necessary.

  9. Clinical report of an extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jianhui; Yu Changlin; Luo Weidong; Guo Mei; Wang Danhong; Sun Qiyun; Zhang Shi; Zhang Xigang; Li Guang; Niu Wenkai; Chen Jiankui; Li Xiaobing; Ge Feijiao; Ai Huisheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To sum up the experiences from the diagnosis and treatment of patient B subjected to an accidental 60 Co exposure on October 21st, 2004, in Jining, Shandong Province, China. Methods: Radiation dose of B was assessed by analysis of chromosome aberration and microneucleus assay, simulation test of the accident site, autopsy and electron spin resonance (ESR). The ultimate clinical diagnosis was based on analysis of irradiation dose, clinical manifestations and laboratory results. In therapeutical aspects, total environmental protection, HLA-identical allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT), anti- infection and protection managements of organs were given. Results: Patient B was diagnosed as extremely severe bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness (ARS). HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT was performed on the patient from his brother on the 7th day after the accident. The hematopoietic recovery began on the 9th day after transplantation. The patient acquired permanent full donor' engraftment without graft versus host disease (GVHD), But the radiation injury was continuing and the patient complicated with polyinfection in lung, and cardiac insufficiency. On the 45th day after the accident, patient B was performed with tracheotomy and maintained ventilation with respirator. On the 75th day after the accident, patient B died of multiple organ failure. Conclusions: Early triage diagnosis and total environmental protection should be performed as soon as possible for extremely severe bone marrow form of ARS. It is very important to perform a successful HLA-identical allogeneic PBSCT, in order to extend the life time of the patient. Multiple organ injuries and infections of bacteria and fungi usually occurred on this kind of patients, so intense measures of anti-infection and protection of multiple organs should be taken. The important and difficult point in the treatment of this kind ARS might be for help the immune-reconstruction and tissue

  10. Does the anatomical localization of lower extremity venous diseases affect the quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadikoglu, Ganime; Ozcakir, Alis; Ercan, Ilker; Yildiz, Caner; Sadikoglu, Yurtkuran

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the effects of venous diseases at different anatomical localizations on the qualities of life of patients with varicose veins. The study included 354 cases, which was referred to a private vascular and interventional radiology center in Bursa, Turkey between January 2005 to January 2006. The cases were diagnosed with visual inspection and were clinically indicative of varicose veins. Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to radiologically examine the varicose veins. All cases were accepted as class II criteria according to the Clinical, Etiologic, Anatomic, Pathophysiologic classification. The generic Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) was used to measure physical and mental quality of life (QOL). High scores indicated good QOL. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 13.0 program was used for the statistical evaluation. When the life SF-36 quality parameters of cases with different anatomical localizations of the varicose veins were examined, only the mental health scores were found to differ in different groups (pemotional role scores among the mental state determinants. When females and males with deep vein disease were compared, significant differences were found among both physical and mental health determinants. Anatomical localization of lower extremity varicose veins can be accepted as a predictive factor in determining the life qualities of patients with varicosities in their lower limb, and should be used to regulate their therapy and follow up protocols.

  11. Irrigation solutions in open fractures of the lower extremities: evaluation of isotonic saline and distilled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufemi, Olukemi Temiloluwa; Adeyeye, Adeolu Ikechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Open fractures are widely considered as orthopaedic emergencies requiring immediate intervention. The initial management of these injuries usually affects the ultimate outcome because open fractures may be associated with significant morbidity. Wound irrigation forms one of the pivotal principles in the treatment of open fractures. The choice of irrigation fluid has since been a source of debate. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of isotonic saline and distilled water as irrigation solutions in the management of open fractures of the lower extremities. Wound infection and wound healing rates using both solutions were evaluated. This was a prospective hospital-based study of 109 patients who presented to the Accident and Emergency department with open lower limb fractures. Approval was sought and obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Hospital. Patients were randomized into either the isotonic saline (NS) or the distilled water (DW) group using a simple ballot technique. Twelve patients were lost to follow-up, while 97 patients were available until conclusion of the study. There were 50 patients in the isotonic saline group and 47 patients in the distilled water group. Forty-one (42.3%) of the patients were in the young and economically productive strata of the population. There was a male preponderance with a 1.7:1 male-to-female ratio. The wound infection rate was 34% in the distilled water group and 44% in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.315). The mean time ± SD to wound healing was 2.7 ± 1.5 weeks in the distilled water group and 3.1 ± 1.8 weeks in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.389). It was concluded from this study that the use of distilled water compares favourably with isotonic saline as an irrigation solution in open fractures of the lower extremities. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  12. Irrigation solutions in open fractures of the lower extremities: evaluation of isotonic saline and distilled water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Olukemi Temiloluwa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Open fractures are widely considered as orthopaedic emergencies requiring immediate intervention. The initial management of these injuries usually affects the ultimate outcome because open fractures may be associated with significant morbidity. Wound irrigation forms one of the pivotal principles in the treatment of open fractures. The choice of irrigation fluid has since been a source of debate. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of isotonic saline and distilled water as irrigation solutions in the management of open fractures of the lower extremities. Wound infection and wound healing rates using both solutions were evaluated. Methods: This was a prospective hospital-based study of 109 patients who presented to the Accident and Emergency department with open lower limb fractures. Approval was sought and obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Hospital. Patients were randomized into either the isotonic saline (NS or the distilled water (DW group using a simple ballot technique. Twelve patients were lost to follow-up, while 97 patients were available until conclusion of the study. There were 50 patients in the isotonic saline group and 47 patients in the distilled water group. Results: Forty-one (42.3% of the patients were in the young and economically productive strata of the population. There was a male preponderance with a 1.7:1 male-to-female ratio. The wound infection rate was 34% in the distilled water group and 44% in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.315. The mean time ± SD to wound healing was 2.7 ± 1.5 weeks in the distilled water group and 3.1 ± 1.8 weeks in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.389. Conclusions: It was concluded from this study that the use of distilled water compares favourably with isotonic saline as an irrigation solution in open fractures of the lower extremities.

  13. The Tarsal Bone Test: A Basic Test of Health Sciences Students' Knowledge of Lower Limb Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Castillo-López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present study was to design an easy-to-use tool, the tarsal bone test (TBT, to provide a snapshot of podiatry students’ basic anatomical knowledge of the bones of the lower limb. Methods. The study included 254 podiatry students from three different universities, 145 of them were first-year students and 109 were in their fourth and final years. The TBT was administered without prior notice to the participants and was to be completed in 5 minutes. Results. The results show that 97.2% of the subjects (n=247 correctly labelled all tarsal bones, while the other 2.8% (n=7 incorrectly labelled at least one bone, that was either the cuboid (7 times or the navicular (6 times. Although only one fourth-year student inaccurately identified one bone, no significant differences in the distribution of the correct and incorrect responses were found between first and fourth-year students. Conclusions. The TBT seems to be a straightforward and easy-to-apply instrument, and provides an objective view of the level of knowledge acquired at different stages of podiatry studies.

  14. Accuracy and consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy in upper and lower extremity fracture treatment: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerekamp, M.S.H.; Sulkers, George S.I.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Maas, Mario; Schep, Niels W.L.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this systematic review was to compare the diagnostic accuracy, subjective image quality and clinical consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy with standard imaging modalities (2D-fluoroscopy, X-ray or CT) during reduction and fixation of intra-articular upper and lower extremity fractures. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane library. In total 673 articles were identified (up to March 2012). The 19 included studies described patients/cadavers with intra-articular upper/lower extremity fractures and compared 3D-fluoroscopy to standard imaging. The study was performed in accordance with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) guidelines. Diagnostic accuracy was defined by the quality of fracture reduction or implant position and, if possible, expressed as sensitivity and specificity; subjective image quality was determined by the quality of depiction of bone or implants; clinical consequences were defined as corrections in reduction or implant position following 3D-fluoroscopy. Results: Ten cadaver- and nine clinical studies were included. A meta-analysis was not possible, because studies used different scoring protocols to express diagnostic accuracy and reported incomplete data. Based on the individual studies, diagnostic accuracy of 3D-fluoroscopy was better than 2D-fluoroscopy and X-ray, but similar to CT-scanning. Subjective image quality of 3D-fluoroscopy was inferior compared to all other imaging modalities. In 11–40% of the operations additional corrections were performed after 3D-fluoroscopy, while the necessity for these corrections were not recognized based on 2D-fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: Although subjective image quality is rated inferior compared to other imaging modalities, intra-operative use of 3D-fluoroscopy is a helpful diagnostic tool for improving the quality of reduction and implant position in intra-articular fractures.

  15. Assessing functional mobility in survivors of lower-extremity sarcoma: reliability and validity of a new assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Victoria G; Rai, Shesh N; Carlson, Claire A; Hinds, Pamela S; Spearing, Elena M; Zhang, Lijun; Callaway, Lulie; Neel, Michael D; Rao, Bhaskar N; Ginsberg, Jill P

    2007-08-01

    Reliability and validity of a new tool, Functional Mobility Assessment (FMA), were examined in patients with lower-extremity sarcoma. FMA requires the patients to physically perform the functional mobility measures, unlike patient self-report or clinician administered measures. A sample of 114 subjects participated, 20 healthy volunteers and 94 patients with lower-extremity sarcoma after amputation, limb-sparing, or rotationplasty surgery. Reliability of the FMA was examined by three raters testing 20 healthy volunteers and 23 subjects with lower-extremity sarcoma. Concurrent validity was examined using data from 94 subjects with lower-extremity sarcoma who completed the FMA, Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS), Short-Form 36 (SF-36v2), and Toronto Extremity Salvage Scale (TESS) scores. Construct validity was measured by the ability of the FMA to discriminate between subjects with and without functional mobility deficits. FMA demonstrated excellent reliability (ICC [2,1] >or=0.97). Moderate correlations were found between FMA and SF-36v2 (r = 0.60, P < 0.01), FMA and MSTS (r = 0.68, P < 0.01), and FMA and TESS (r = 0.62, P < 0.01). The patients with lower-extremity sarcoma scored lower on the FMA as compared to healthy controls (P < 0.01). The FMA is a reliable and valid functional outcome measure for patients with lower-extremity sarcoma. This study supports the ability of the FMA to discriminate between patients with varying functional abilities and supports the need to include measures of objective functional mobility in examination of patients with lower-extremity sarcoma.

  16. Stenting for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. CONDITION AND TARGET POPULATION Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and cardiovascular death. Annually, approximately

  17. Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Lower-Extremity Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, Julie; Bradshaw, Michelle

    Lower-extremity (LE) musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) can have a major impact on the ability to carry out daily activities. The effectiveness of interventions must be examined to enable occupational therapy practitioners to deliver the most appropriate services. This systematic review examined the literature published between 1995 and July 2014 that investigated the effectiveness of occupational therapy interventions for LE MSDs. Forty-three articles met the criteria and were reviewed. Occupational therapy interventions varied on the basis of population subgroup: hip fracture, LE joint replacement, LE amputation or limb loss, and nonsurgical osteoarthritis and pain. The results indicate an overall strong role for occupational therapy in treating clients with LE MSDs. Activity pacing is an effective intervention for nonsurgical LE MSDs, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation is effective for LE joint replacement and amputation. Further research on specific occupational therapy interventions in this important area is needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. Influence of Lower Extremity Muscle Size and Quality on Stair-Climb Performance in Career Firefighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, Craig R; Ryan, Eric D; Tweedell, Andrew J; Barnette, Timothy J; Wagoner, Chad W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of lower extremity muscular size and quality on stair-climb performance (SCP) in career firefighters. Forty-six male career firefighters (age = 37.0 ± 7.2 years; stature = 180.2 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 108.0 ± 19.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Panoramic ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were obtained to determine cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (EI) of each muscle. The CSA of each muscle was then summed together and normalized to body mass (CSA/BM [QCSA]). Additionally, EI was averaged across both muscles (QEI). Participants then performed a timed and weighted SCP assessment where they ascended and descended 26 stairs 4 times as quickly as possible while wearing a weighted vest (22.73 kg) to simulate the weight of their self-contained breathing apparatus and turnout gear. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among variables and the relative contributions of QCSA and QEI to SCP. Partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between QCSA and SCP and QEI and SCP while controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). The results indicated that QCSA and QEI were significantly related to SCP before (r = -0.492, p = 0.001; r = 0.363, p = 0.013, respectively) and after accounting for age and BMI (r = -0.324, p = 0.032; r = 0.413, p = 0.005, respectively). Both QCSA and QEI contributed significantly to the prediction of SCP (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that lower extremity muscle size and quality are important contributors to critical firefighting tasks, which have been shown to be improved with resistance training.

  19. EOS analysis of lower extremity segmental torsion in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumétou, E; Quijano, S; Ilharreborde, B; Presedo, A; Thoreux, P; Mazda, K; Skalli, W

    2014-02-01

    Lower limb torsion varies substantially among healthy children during growth. Values reported in the literature to date have been obtained using semi-quantitative clinical or 2D measurement methods. Quantitative 3D measurement would help determine the physiological range of lower limb torsion. Low-dose stereoradiography with 3D reconstruction provides a good alternative. Its use increases in pediatrics because of radiation minimization. Previous studies have shown accurate and reproducible results of lower limbs reconstruction in adults and children but the torsional parameters haven't been measured yet. The present study reports the values of lower limb segmental torsion and its course during growth in a cohort of healthy children and young adults using the EOS low-dose biplanar X-ray. EOS 3D reconstruction is an accurate and reproducible method to measure the torsional parameters in children. Femoral torsion (FT) and tibial torsion (TT) were studied on 114 volunteers (228 lower limbs) from 6 to 30 years of age divided by age into 5 groups. The EOS™ acquisitions were obtained in subjects standing with their feet offset. Mean FT decreased during growth, passing from 21.6° to 18°, whereas mean TT increased from 26.8° to 34.7°. There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 extreme age groups, but no difference was found between any other age groups. The ICC for intra-observer reproducibility was 0.96 and 0.95 for FT and TT for the first operator, and 0.79 and 0.83 for the second operator respectively. The ICC for inter-observer reproducibility was 0.84 and 0.82 respectively. The course of lower limb segmental torsion observed was consistent with literature reports based upon clinical and 2D measurements. 3D reconstruction of EOS low-dose biplanar imaging appears to be a safe and reliable tool for lower limbs measurements, especially for investigating lower limb segmental torsion in children and adults. Level IV. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  20. [Fractures of the lower extremity in skiing - the influence of ski boots and injury pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürkner, A; Simmen, H P

    2008-12-01

    Though the injury patterns of the lower extremities in skiing have changed since 1970, tibial fractures remain daily work of hospitals near ski slopes. A lot of medical studies have analysed the relevance of well adjusted bindings of the common lesions of the knee joint ligaments. However the influence of the flexibility of the ski boot and the injury pattern has been neglected. 49 tibial fractures have been analysed in a hospital near a large ski resort in the alpes. All fractures occurred during alpine skiing. The type of the fracture, according to the AO-classification and the injury pattern have been documented. Also demographic data, ski experience and specification concerning the ski boot have been questioned. The type of the ski boot and the grade of flexibility, have been documented if possible. It has also been recorded whether the binding opened. In contrast to other studies our patients are represented in widely spread age-groups with a large share of elderly and experienced persons. Young or unexperienced sportsmen suffer primarily from fractures of the tibial diaphysis. With increasing skiing experience the injury pattern is widening on the whole leg. 62 % of all fractures are caused by rotation traumas. Compression, dorsal forces and direct collisions are the other causes. In 59 % of all accidents the binding failed to open. There is an increased risk of complex fractures in the proximal or distal epiphysis if the binding has not opened. 23 % of all fractures occurred with rented ski boots. Only 16 % of all ski boots are labelled with a flexibility index. There is no standardized value for the flexibility of ski boots. The trend can be derived that rigid ski boots with a high flexibility index cause above all fractures of the diaphysis. 10 % of all fractures happened to patients wearing "snowblades". These short skis without safety bindings contributed a considerable share to tibial fractures, even though there is no big leverage. Tibial fractures are

  1. Salvage versus amputation: Utility of mangled extremity severity score in severely injured lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical utility of Mangled extremity severity score (MESS in severely injured lower limbs. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively 25 and prospectively 36 lower limbs in 58 patients with high-energy injuries were evaluated with the use of MESS, to assist in the decision-making process for the care of patients with such injuries. Difference between the mean MESS scores for amputated and salvaged limbs was analyzed. Results: In the retrospective study 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 for the amputated limbs. In the prospective study 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 was the mean score for the salvaged limbs and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 for the amputated limbs. There was a significant difference in the mean scores for salvaged and amputated limbs. Retrospective 21 (84% and prospective 29 (80.5% limbs remained in the salvage pathway six months after the injury. Conclusion: MESS could predict amputation of severely injured lower limbs, having score of equal or more than 7 with 91% sensitivity and 98% specificity. There was a significant difference in the mean MESS scores in the prospective study (n=36, 4.53 (4.53 ± 2.44 in thirty salvaged limbs (83.33% and 8.83 (8.83 ± 2.34 in six amputated limbs (16.66% with a P -value 0.002 ( P -value < 0.01. Similarly there was a significant difference in the mean MESS score in the retrospective study (n=25, 4.65 (4.65 ± 1.32 in twenty salvaged limbs (80% and 8.80 (8.8 ± 1.4 in five amputated limbs (20% with a P -value 0.00005 ( P -value < 0.01. MESS is a simple and relatively easy and readily available scoring system which can help the surgeon to decide the fate of the lower extremity with a high-energy injury.

  2. [RECONSTRUCTION OF LOWER EXTREMITY FUNCTION OF COMPLETE SPINAL CORD INJURY RATS BY FIRST NEURON CONNECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyong; Yuan, Yuan; Li, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effects of the first neuron connection for the reconstruction of lower extremity function of complete spinal cord injury rats. Forty adult female Sprague Dawley rats of 300-350 g in weight were selected to prepare the models of L₁ transverse spinal cord injury. After 2 weeks of establishing model, the rats were randomly divided into control group (n = 20) and experimental group (n = 20). In the experimental group, the right hind limb function was reconstructed directly by the first neuron; in the control group, the other treatments were the same to the experimental group except that the distal tibial nerve and the proximal femoral nerve were not sutured. The recovery of motor function of lower extremity was observed by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) scoring system on bilateral hind limbs at 7, 30, 50, and 70 days after operation. The changes of the spinal cord were observed by HE staining, neurofilament 200 immunohistochemistry staining, and the technique of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing. After establishing models, 6 rats died. The right hind limb had no obvious recovery of the motor function, with the BBB score of 0 in 2 groups; the left hind limb motor function was recovered in different degrees, and there was no significant difference in BBB score between 2 groups (P > 0.05). In the experimental group, HE staining showed that the spinal cord was reconstructed with the sciatic nerve, which was embedded in the spinal cord, and the sciatic nerve membrane was clearly identified, and there was no obvious atrophy in the connecting part of the spinal cord. In the experimental group, the expression of nerve fiber was stained with immunohistochemistry, and the axons of the spinal cord were positively by stained and the peripheral nerve was connected with the spinal cord. HRP labelled synapses were detected by HRP retrograde tracing in the experimental group, while there was no HRP labelled synapse in the control group. Direct reconstruction

  3. Reliability and validity of the Persian lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) in a heterogeneous sample of outpatients with lower limb musculoskeletal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Hessam, Masumeh; Tabatabaei, Saeid; Salehi, Reza; Sohani, Soheil Mansour; Mehravar, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to culturally translate and validate the Persian lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) in a heterogeneous sample of outpatients with lower extremity musculoskeletal disorders (n = 304). This is a prospective methodological study. After a standard forward-backward translation, psychometric properties were assessed in terms of test-retest reliability, internal consistency, construct validity, dimensionality, and ceiling or floor effects. The acceptable level of intraclass correlation coefficient >0.70 and Cronbach's alpha coefficient >0.70 was obtained for the Persian LEFS. Correlations between Persian LEFS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) subscales of Physical Health component (rs range = 0.38-0.78) were higher than correlations between Persian LEFS and SF-36 subscales of Mental Health component (rs range = 0.15-0.39). A corrected item--total correlation of >0.40 (Spearman's rho) was obtained for all items of the Persian LEFS. Horn's parallel analysis detected a total of two factors. No ceiling or floor effects were detected for the Persian LEFS. The Persian version of the LEFS is a reliable and valid instrument that can be used to measure functional status in Persian-speaking patients with different musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity. Implications for Rehabilitation The Persian lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) is a reliable, internally consistent and valid instrument, with no ceiling or floor effects, to determine functional status of heterogeneous patients with musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity. The Persian version of the LEFS can be used in clinical and research settings to measure function in Iranian patients with different musculoskeletal disorders of the lower extremity.

  4. Electrical stimulation of human lower extremities enhances energy consumption, carbohydrate oxidation, and whole body glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Taku; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nakao, Kazuwa; Moritani, Toshio

    2004-03-01

    Our laboratory has recently demonstrated that low-frequency electrical stimulation (ES) of quadriceps muscles alone significantly enhanced glucose disposal rate (GDR) during euglycemic clamp (Hamada T, Sasaki H, Hayashi T, Moritani T, and Nakao K. J Appl Physiol 94: 2107-2112, 2003). The present study is further follow-up to examine the acute metabolic effects of ES to lower extremities compared with voluntary cycle exercise (VE) at identical intensity. In eight male subjects lying in the supine position, both lower leg (tibialis anterior and triceps surae) and thigh (quadriceps and hamstrings) muscles were sequentially stimulated to cocontract in an isometric manner at 20 Hz with a 1-s on-off duty cycle for 20 min. Despite small elevation of oxygen uptake by 7.3 +/- 0.3 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) during ES, the blood lactate concentration was significantly increased by 3.2 +/- 0.3 mmol/l in initial period (5 min) after the onset of the ES (P increased anaerobic glycolysis by ES. Furthermore, whole body glucose uptake determined by GDR during euglycemic clamp demonstrated a significant increase during and after the cessation of ES for at least 90 min (P energy consumption, carbohydrate oxidation, and whole body glucose uptake at low intensity of exercise. Percutaneous ES may become a therapeutic utility to enhance glucose metabolism in humans.

  5. Local changes in bone marrow at MRI after treatment of extremity soft tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Sinchun; Lefkowitz, Robert; Landa, Jonathan; Akin, Oguz; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Cassie, Conrad; Panicek, David M.; Healey, John H.; Alektiar, Kaled M.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and appearance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal changes that occur in local bone marrow after radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Seventy patients with primary STS at the level of a long bone who also had undergone pretreatment MRI and at least one post-treatment MRI of the tumor bed were identified. MRIs of each patient were retrospectively reviewed for new changes in marrow signal in the region of the tumor bed and for the morphology, relative signal intensities, heterogeneity, and progression or regression of changes over time. Focal signal changes in marrow were observed in 26/70 patients (37%) at a median of 9.5 months after RT and/or chemotherapy and diffuse changes in seven (10%) at a median of 8 months. Patients who received neither RT nor chemotherapy did not develop marrow changes. Mean RT doses in patients with changes and those without were 5,867 and 6,076 cGy, respectively. In most patients with focal changes, changes were seen in all sequences and were linear-curvilinear, patchy, or mixed at the level of the tumor bed. Predominant signal intensity of changes was between muscle and fat at T1WI and between muscle and fluid at fat-saturated T2WI or short tau inversion recovery. Most focal changes enhanced heterogeneously and increased or fluctuated in size over time. Changes in MRI appearance of long bone marrow frequently are evident after combined RT and chemotherapy for STS and most commonly increase or fluctuate in size over time. These changes have various non-mass-like configurations and often show signal intensities similar to those of red marrow and thus should not be mistaken for metastases. The marrow changes might represent an early stage of gelatinous transformation of marrow. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of Sports-related Injuries of the Lower Extremity in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, M Cody; Jaramillo, Diego; Bancroft, Laura; Varich, Laura; Logsdon, Gregory; Servaes, Sabah

    2016-10-01

    With increasing participation and intensity of training in youth sports in the United States, the incidence of sports-related injuries is increasing, and the types of injuries are shifting. In this article, the authors review sports injuries of the lower extremity, including both acute and overuse injuries, that are common in or specific to the pediatric population. Common traumatic injuries that occur in individuals of all ages (eg, tears of the acetabular labrum and anterior cruciate ligament) are not addressed, although these occur routinely in pediatric sports. However, some injuries that occur almost exclusively in high-level athletes (eg, athletic pubalgia) are reviewed to increase awareness and understanding of these entities among pediatric radiologists who may not be familiar with them and thus may not look for them. Injuries are described according to their location (ie, hip, knee, or foot and ankle) and pathologic process (eg, apophysitis, osteochondritis dissecans). Examples of abnormalities and normal variants of the anatomy that are often misdiagnosed are provided. The injuries reviewed represent a common and growing subset of pathologic processes about which all pediatric and musculoskeletal radiologists should be knowledgeable. Understanding physeal injury is especially important because missed diagnoses can lead to premature physeal closure and osteoarthritis. © RSNA, 2016.

  7. Management of defects on lower extremities with the use of matriderm and skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Young; Kim, Seong-Hun; Oh, Gwang-Jin; Roh, Si-Gyun; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2014-07-01

    The reconstruction of large skin and soft tissue defects on the lower extremities is challenging. The skin graft is a simple and frequently used method for covering a skin defect. However, poor skin quality and architecture are well-known problems that lead to scar contracture. The collagen-elastin matrix, Matriderm, has been used to improve the quality of skin grafts; however, no statistical and objective review of the results has been reported. Thirty-four patients (23 male and 11 female) who previously received a skin graft and simultaneous application of Matriderm between January 2010 and June 2012 were included in this study. The quality of the skin graft was evaluated using Cutometer, occasionally accompanied by pathologic findings. All 34 patients showed good skin quality compared to a traditional skin graft and were satisfied with their results. The statistical data for the measurement of the mechanical properties of the skin were similar to those for normal skin. In addition, there was no change in the engraftment rate. The biggest problem of a traditional skin graft is scar contracture. However, the dermal matrix presents an improvement in skin quality with elastin and collagen. Therefore, a skin graft along with a simultaneous application of Matriderm is safe and effective and leads to a significantly better outcome from the perspective of skin elasticity.

  8. The effect of anesthesia type on the postoperative complications of major lower extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Bakış

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Regional anesthesia is preferred more than general anesthesia in major lower extremity surgery. In our study, we aimed to investigate the relationship incidence of complications between regional anesthesia and general anesthesia in major surgery. Method: A total of 372 patients who underwent total hip or knee replacement from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively in the study. The number of patients undergoing general anesthesia and regional anesthesia was respectively 118 and 254. If the patient has a history of more than one hip or knee replacements we were included only the first operation in the study. Postoperative complications were investigated over the course of 30 days. Patients' age, sex, type of operation (unilateral, bilateral, whether additional disease, postoperative complications were evaluated. Results: There were no difference for patients' age, sex and in terms of additional diseases. 92 patients general anesthesia and 135 patients regional anesthesia were performed to the patients who underwent total hip replacement, and 26 general anesthesia and 119 regional anesthesia is applied to patients who underwent total knee replacement (p=0.001. Postoperative complications are examined none of patients had no cardiac attack. Pulmonary embolism and death were found 7 in general anesthesia and 2 in regional anesthesia. Surgical site infection was found in 9 patients undergoing general anesthesia and 7 patients undergoing regional anesthesia and difference was statistically significant. Conclusion: In our clinic, regional and general anesthesia in patients undergoing major lower limb surgery applications observe significant difference in terms of complications during the postoperative period of 1 month.

  9. Investigation of postural edema in the lower extremities of traffic control workers

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    Ana Paula Nunes Pereira Brito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Determine the prevalence of postural edema and investigate whether working posture - sitting down or standing up - affect its frequency. METHODS: Sixteen traffic control agents were assessed by water displacement volumetry and the results were analyzed in two groups, depending on working posture. Those who worked standing up for more than 4 hours were allocated to the SU group and those who worked sitting down for more than 4 hours were allocated to the SD group. Each worker was assessed before and after their working shift for three consecutive days. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and the test of equality of two proportions. The significance level was set at p ≤ 0.05. The assessment showed that members of both groups had postural edema of the lower extremities (p ≤ 0.001. RESULTS: When the frequency of postural edema was compared across groups, a trend was observed for greater edema formation in the SU group than in the SD group, although without statistically significant difference. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that traffic control agents suffer postural edema after 4 hours working in either of the postures investigated although with a predominance of edema formation among those who work standing up.

  10. Lower extremity trauma: trends in the management of soft-tissue reconstruction of open tibia-fibula fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrett, Brian M; Matros, Evan; Pribaz, Julian J; Orgill, Dennis P

    2006-04-01

    Open lower leg fractures with exposed bone or tendon continue to be challenging for plastic surgeons. Microvascular free-tissue transfer increases the ability to close wounds, transfer vascularized bone, and prevent amputation, yet remains a complex, invasive procedure with significant complication rates, donor-site morbidity, and failure rates. This review documents the changing treatment protocol in the authors' institution for these injuries. Two hundred ninety consecutive open tibia-fibula fractures over a 12-year period (1992 to 2003) were retrospectively reviewed and methods and outcomes were compared by grouping the fractures into 4-year intervals. The number of open lower extremity fractures increased, whereas the distribution of Gustilo grade I to III fractures remained unchanged. Overall, free-tissue transfer was performed less frequently and constituted 20 percent of reconstructions in period 1 (1992 to 1995), 11 percent in period 2 (1996 to 1999), and 5 percent in period 3 (2000 to 2003). For the most severe fractures, Gustilo grade III, free-flap reconstruction has decreased significantly, constituting 42 percent, 26 percent, and 11 percent of procedures in periods 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Local flaps for grade III fractures have remained relatively constant throughout the study. In contrast, local wound care for grade III fractures, including skin grafts, delayed primary closures, and secondary intention closures has significantly increased from 22 percent to 49 percent of reconstructions from periods 1 through 3. In 1997, the authors began to use the vacuum-assisted closure device and now use it in nearly half of all open fractures. Despite this trend, there has been no change in infection, amputation, or malunion/nonunion rates and a decrease in reoperation rate with at least 1-year follow-up. These results demonstrate a change in practice, with a trend down the reconstructive ladder, currently using fewer free flaps and more delayed closures and

  11. Bone graft substitutes for the treatment of traumatic fractures of the extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Anja; Gorenoi, Vitali; Schönermark, Matthias P

    2012-01-01

    HEALTH POLITICAL AND SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND: Bone graft substitutes are increasingly being used as supplements to standard care or as alternative to bone grafts in the treatment of traumatic fractures. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of bone graft substitutes for the treatment of traumatic fractures as well as the ethical, social and legal implications of their use are the main research questions addressed. A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic medical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE etc.) in December 2009. Randomised controlled trials (RCT), where applicable also containing relevant health economic evaluations and publications addressing the ethical, social and legal aspects of using bone graft substitutes for fracture treatment were included in the analysis. After assessment of study quality the information synthesis of the medical data was performed using metaanalysis, the synthesis of the health economic data was performed descriptively. 14 RCT were included in the medical analysis, and two in the heath economic evaluation. No relevant publications on the ethical, social and legal implications of the bone graft substitute use were found. In the RCT on fracture treatment with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) versus standard care without bone grafting (RCT with an elevated high risk of bias) there was a significant difference in favour of BMP-2 for several outcome measures. The RCT of calcium phosphate (CaP) cement and bone marrow-based composite materials versus autogenous bone grafts (RCT with a high risk of bias) revealed significant differences in favour of bone graft substitutes for some outcome measures. Regarding the other bone graft substitutes, almost all comparisons demonstrated no significant difference. The use of BMP-2 in addition to standard care without bone grafting led in the study to increased treatment costs considering all patients with traumatic open fractures. However, cost savings through the additional use of BMP-2

  12. Muscle activation patterns of the upper and lower extremity during the windmill softball pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary A; Keeley, David W

    2011-06-01

    Fast-pitch softball has become an increasingly popular sport for female athletes. There has been little research examining the windmill softball pitch in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the muscle activation patterns of 3 upper extremity muscles (biceps, triceps, and rhomboids [scapular stabilizers]) and 2 lower extremity muscles (gluteus maximus and medius) during the 5 phases of the windmill softball pitch. Data describing muscle activation were collected on 7 postpubescent softball pitchers (age 17.7 ± 2.6 years; height 169 ± 5.4 cm; mass 69.1 ± 5.4 kg). Surface electromyographic data were collected using a Myopac Jr 10-channel amplifier (RUN Technologies Scientific Systems, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) synchronized with The MotionMonitor™ motion capture system (Innovative Sports Training Inc, Chicago IL, USA) and presented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Gluteus maximus activity reached (196.3% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]), whereas gluteus medius activity was consistent during the single leg support of phase 3 (101.2% MVIC). Biceps brachii activity was greatest during phase 4 of the pitching motion. Triceps brachii activation was consistently >150% MVIC throughout the entire pitching motion, whereas the scapular stabilizers were most active during phase 2 (170.1% MVIC). The results of this study indicate the extent to which muscles are activated during the windmill softball pitch, and this knowledge can lead to the development of proper preventative and rehabilitative muscle strengthening programs. In addition, clinicians will be able to incorporate strengthening exercises that mimic the timing of maximal muscle activation most used during the windmill pitching phases.

  13. Compression ultrasonography of the lower extremity with portable vascular ultrasonography can accurately detect deep venous thrombosis in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Jonathan G; Lovato, Luis M; Jang, Timothy B

    2010-12-01

    Compression ultrasonography of the lower extremity is an established method of detecting proximal lower extremity deep venous thrombosis when performed by a certified operator in a vascular laboratory. Our objective is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of bedside 2-point compression ultrasonography performed in the emergency department (ED) with portable vascular ultrasonography for the detection of proximal lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. We did this by directly comparing emergency physician-performed ultrasonography to lower extremity duplex ultrasonography performed by the Department of Radiology. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study and diagnostic test assessment of a convenience sample of ED patients with a suspected lower extremity deep venous thrombosis, conducted at a single-center, urban, academic ED. All physicians had a 10-minute training session before enrolling patients. ED compression ultrasonography occurred before Department of Radiology ultrasonography and involved identification of 2 specific points: the common femoral and popliteal vessels, with subsequent compression of the common femoral and popliteal veins. The study result was considered positive for proximal lower extremity deep venous thrombosis if either vein was incompressible or a thrombus was visualized. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with the final radiologist interpretation of the Department of Radiology ultrasonography as the criterion standard. A total of 47 physicians performed 199 2-point compression ultrasonographic examinations in the ED. Median number of examinations per physician was 2 (range 1 to 29 examinations; interquartile range 1 to 5 examinations). There were 45 proximal lower extremity deep venous thromboses observed on Department of Radiology evaluation, all correctly identified by ED 2-point compression ultrasonography. The 153 patients without proximal lower extremity deep venous thrombosis all had a negative ED compression

  14. [Ultrasound examination for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kosaku

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is known to be a major risk factor of vein thrombosis. Progression from lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to pulmonary embolism can lead to catastrophic outcome, although the incidence ratio is low. The ability to rule in or rule out DVT is becoming essential for anesthesiologists. Non-invasive technique of ultrasonography is a sensitive and specific tool for the assessment of lower extremity DVT. This article introduces the basics and practical methods of ultrasound examination for lower extremity DVT.

  15. Isolated Deep Venous Thrombosis: Implications for 2-Point Compression Ultrasonography of the Lower Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Srikar; Zeger, Wes; Thom, Christopher; Fields, J Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Two-point compression ultrasonography focuses on the evaluation of common femoral and popliteal veins for complete compressibility. The presence of isolated thrombi in proximal veins other than the common femoral and popliteal veins should prompt modification of 2-point compression technique. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence and distribution of deep venous thrombi isolated to lower-extremity veins other than the common femoral and popliteal veins in emergency department (ED) patients with clinically suspected deep venous thrombosis. This was a retrospective study of all adult ED patients who received a lower-extremity venous duplex ultrasonographic examination for evaluation of deep venous thrombosis during a 6-year period. The ultrasonographic protocol included B-mode, color-flow, and spectral Doppler scanning of the common femoral, femoral, deep femoral, popliteal, and calf veins. Deep venous thrombosis was detected in 362 of 2,451 patients (14.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.3% to 16.1%). Thrombus confined to the common femoral vein alone was found in 5 of 362 cases (1.4%; 95% CI 0.2% to 2.6%). Isolated femoral vein thrombus was identified in 20 of 362 patients (5.5%; 95% CI 3.2% to 7.9%). Isolated deep femoral vein thrombus was found in 3 of 362 cases (0.8%; 95% CI -0.1% to 1.8%). Thrombus in the popliteal vein alone was identified in 53 of 362 cases (14.6%; 95% CI 11% to 18.2%). In our study, 6.3% of ED patients with suspected deep venous thrombosis had isolated thrombi in proximal veins other than common femoral and popliteal veins. Our study results support the addition of femoral and deep femoral vein evaluation to standard compression ultrasonography of the common femoral and popliteal vein, assuming that this does not have a deleterious effect on specificity. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lower extremity revascularization using directional atherectomy: 12-month prospective results of the DEFINITIVE LE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinsey, James F; Zeller, Thomas; Rocha-Singh, Krishna J; Jaff, Michael R; Garcia, Lawrence A

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the safety and effectiveness of directional atherectomy (DA) for endovascular treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in infrainguinal arteries in patients with claudication or critical limb ischemia. To date, no prospective, multicenter, independently-adjudicated study has evaluated the effectiveness and durability of DA in the treatment of PAD. Previous DA studies have not been prospectively powered to evaluate any differences in outcomes in patients with and without diabetes. DEFINITIVE LE (Determination of EFfectiveness of the SilverHawk(®) PerIpheral Plaque ExcisioN System (SIlverHawk Device) for the Treatment of Infrainguinal VEssels / Lower Extremities) prospectively enrolled subjects at 47 multinational centers with an infrainguinal lesion length up to 20 cm. Primary endpoints were defined as primary patency at 12 months for claudicants and freedom from major unplanned amputation for critical limb ischemia (CLI) subjects. A pre-specified statistical hypothesis evaluated noninferiority of primary patency in diabetic versus nondiabetic claudicants. Independent angiographic and sonographic core laboratories assessed outcomes, and events were adjudicated by a clinical events committee. A total of 800 subjects were enrolled. The 12-month primary patency was 78% (95% confidence interval: 74.0% to 80.6%) in claudicants, with a 77% rate in the diabetic subgroup versus 78% in the nondiabetic subgroup (noninferior, p < 0.001). The rate of freedom from major unplanned amputation of the target limb at 12 months in CLI subjects was 95% (95% confidence interval: 90.7% to 97.4%). Periprocedural adverse events included embolization (3.8%), perforation (5.3%), and abrupt closure (2.0%). The bail-out stent rate was 3.2%. The DEFINITIVE LE study demonstrated that DA is a safe and effective treatment modality at 12 months for a diverse patient population with either claudication or CLI. Furthermore, DA was shown to be noninferior for

  17. Deep vein thrombosis in bilateral lower extremities after hip fracture: a retrospective study of 463 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang BF

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bin-Fei Zhang,* Xing Wei,* Hai Huang, Peng-Fei Wang, Ping Liu, Shuang-Wei Qu, Jia-Hao Li, Hu Wang, Yu-Xuan Cong, Yan Zhuang, Kun Zhang Department of Orthopedic Trauma, Hong-Hui Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University College of Medicine, Beilin District, Xi’an, Shaanxi, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To investigate the incidences of deep vein thrombosis (DVT before and after operation in inpatients with hip fractures in both lower extremities.Patients and methods: We collected the clinical data of 463 patients with lower extremities fractures who presented at Xi’an Honghui Hospital between July 1, 2014, and October 31, 2016 and met all the inclusion criteria. Doppler ultrasonography was used to diagnose DVT. The patients were examined preoperatively and postoperatively and divided into the thrombosis and non-thrombosis group according to the ultrasonographic findings. We divided the DVT cases into central, peripheral, and mixed thromboses.Results: The incidence of preoperative DVT was 34.98%, and the prevalence of DVT on the uninjured side was 13.60%. This composition ratio increased to 57.23% postoperatively, and the prevalence of DVT on the uninjured side was 25.05%. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01–1.04; P=0.002, venous thrombosis at admission (OR, 4.05; 95% CI, 2.30–7.13; P=0.000, and the days between the fracture and the operation (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.02–1.20; P=0.020 were the independent risk factors of preoperative DVT. Coronary heart disease (OR, 1.85; 95% CI: 1.18–2.89; P=0.007, venous thrombosis at admission (OR, 22.35; 95% CI: 6.78–73.60; P=0.000, days between fracture and operation (OR, 1.06; 95% CI: 1.01–1.11; P=0.021, and blood loss (OR, 1.002; 95% CI: 1.000–1.003; P=0.014 were independent risk factors of postoperative DVT.Conclusion: The actual incidence of DVT after hip fracture may be underestimated. The incidences of preoperative and postoperative DVTs and the incidence

  18. Determining Reliability of a Dual-Task Functional Mobility Protocol for Individuals With Lower Extremity Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Susan W; Frengopoulos, Courtney; Holmes, Jeff; Viana, Ricardo; Payne, Michael W

    2018-04-01

    To determine the relative and absolute reliability of a dual-task functional mobility assessment. Cross-sectional study. Academic rehabilitation hospital. Individuals (N=60) with lower extremity amputation attending an outpatient amputee clinic (mean age, 58.21±12.59y; 18, 80% male) who were stratified into 3 groups: (1) transtibial amputation of vascular etiology (n=20); (2) transtibial amputation of nonvascular etiology (n=20); and (3) transfemoral or bilateral amputation of any etiology (n=20). Not applicable. Time to complete the L Test measured functional mobility under single- and dual-task conditions. The addition of a cognitive task (serial subtractions by 3's) created dual-task conditions. Single-task performance on the cognitive task was also reported. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) measured relative reliability; SEM and minimal detectable change with a 95% confidence interval (MDC 95 ) measured absolute reliability. Bland-Altman plots measured agreement between assessments. Relative reliability results were excellent for all 3 groups. Values for the dual-task L Test for those with transtibial amputation of vascular etiology (n=20; mean age, 60.36±7.84y; 19, 90% men) were ICC=.98 (95% confidence interval [CI], .94-.99), SEM=1.36 seconds, and MDC 95 =3.76 seconds; for those with transtibial amputation of nonvascular etiology (n=20; mean age, 55.85±14.08y; 17, 85% men), values were ICC=.93 (95% CI, .80-.98), SEM=1.34 seconds, and MDC 95 =3.71 seconds; and for those with transfemoral or bilateral amputation (n=20; mean age, 58.21±14.88y; 13, 65% men), values were ICC=.998 (95% CI, .996-.999), SEM=1.03 seconds, and MDC 95 =2.85 seconds. Bland-Altman plots indicated that assessments did not vary systematically for each group. This dual-task assessment protocol achieved approved levels of relative reliability values for the 3 groups tested. This protocol may be used clinically or in research settings to assess the interaction between cognition

  19. Prevalence and Significance of Unrecognized Lower Extremity Peripheral Arterial Disease in General Medicine Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrae McDermott, Mary; Kerwin, Diana R; Liu, Kiang; Martin, Gary J; O'Brien, Erin; Kaplan, Heather; Greenland, Philip

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of unrecognized lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) among men and women aged 55 years and older in a general internal medicine (GIM) practice and to identify characteristics and functional performance associated with unrecognized PAD. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Academic medical center. PARTICIPANTS We identified 143 patients with known PAD from the noninvasive vascular laboratory, and 239 men and women aged 55 and older with no prior PAD history from a GIM practice. Group 1 consisted of patients with PAD consecutively identified from the noninvasive vascular laboratory (n = 143). Group 2 included GIM practice patients found to have an ankle brachial index less than 0.90, consistent with PAD (n = 34). Group 3 consisted of GIM practice patients without PAD (n = 205). MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Leg functioning was assessed with the 6-minute walk, 4-meter walking velocity, and Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). Of GIM practice patients, 14% had unrecognized PAD. Only 44% of patients in Group 2 had exertional leg symptoms. Distances achieved in the 6-minute walk were 1,130, 1,362, and 1,539 feet for Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, adjusting for age, gender, and race (P < .001). The degree of difficulty walking due to leg symptoms as reported on the WIQ was comparable between Groups 2 and 3 and significantly greater in Group 1 than Group 2. In multiple logistic regression analysis including Groups 2 and 3, current cigarette smoking was associated independently with unrecognized PAD (odds ratio [OR], 6.82; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.55 to 29.93). Aspirin therapy was nearly independently associated with absence of PAD (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.12 to 1.12). CONCLUSION Unrecognized PAD is common among men and women aged 55 years and older in GIM practice and is associated with impaired lower extremity functioning. Ankle brachial index screening may be necessary to diagnose unrecognized PAD in a GIM

  20. Premature Epiphyseal Closure of the Lower Extremities Contributing to Short Stature after cis-Retinoic Acid Therapy in Medulloblastoma: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Jessica J; Levine, Michael A; Belasco, Jean B; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged cis-retinoic acid (RA) exposure contributes to premature epiphyseal closure. cis-RA is administered in various treatment regimens for pediatric cancers, thus increasing the risk for bone deformities and compromised growth. We present a case of premature epiphyseal closure in a 9-year-old female with a history of medulloblastoma and treatment with a multimodal regimen including cis-RA. She was subsequently diagnosed with radiation-induced endocrine late effects including hypothyroidism and growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Seven months after initiation of GH therapy, an increased prominence of the wrists and knees combined with a deceleration in growth velocity prompted further evaluation; radiographs revealed bilateral premature closure of the distal femur and proximal tibia growth plates despite normal left wrist bone age. High doses of vitamin A and its analogs are linked to premature closure of the lower-extremity growth plates in animals and children. Pediatric brain tumor patients are at increased risk of growth failure due to concurrent radiation-induced GHD, damage to the spinal bones, and cis-RA-associated premature closure of the lower-extremity growth plates, with significant reduction in adult stature. A better appreciation of the detrimental effect of cis-RA on the growing skeleton is needed to monitor at-risk patients and to provide timely interventions. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Design and characterization of a magneto-rheological series elastic actuator for a lower extremity exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Zhao, Xuan; Ma, Hao; Qin, Ling; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, an innovative actuator named magneto-rheological series elastic actuator (MRSEA) is designed for the knee joints of a lower extremity exoskeleton CUHK-EXO. MRSEA is designed to reduce the mechanical impedance of the exoskeleton and filter out unwanted collisions. It can also provide large controllable braking torque with low power, and hence improve the system energy efficiency. A description of CUHK-EXO developed to help paraplegic patients regain the mobility to stand up, sit down and walk is firstly introduced, followed by the mechanical design of MRSEA and simulation of the torsion spring pack (TSP) and magneto-rheological (MR) brake of MRSEA. Prototype of MRSEA is fabricated. Preliminary tests are performed to investigate the characteristics of the TSP and MR brake, and walking experiments with a paraplegic patient are performed to evaluate the performance of MRSEA. Experimental results of MRSEA match the modeling and simulation. As compared with the electric motor, the energy efficiency of the innovative MRSEA is improved by 52.8% during a gait cycle.

  2. Comparison of neuromuscular abnormalities between upper and lower extremities in hemiparetic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, M M; AliBiglou, L; Thajchayapong, M; Lilaonitkul, T; Rymer, W Z

    2006-01-01

    We studied the neuromuscular mechanical properties of the elbow and ankle joints in chronic, hemiparetic stroke patients and healthy subjects. System identification techniques were used to characterize the mechanical abnormalities of these joints and to identify the contribution of intrinsic and reflex stiffness to these abnormalities. Modulation of intrinsic and reflex stiffness with the joint angle was studied by applying PRBS perturbations to the joint at different joint angles. The experiments were performed for both spastic (stroke) and contralateral (control) sides of stroke patients and one side of healthy (normal) subjects. We found reflex stiffness gain (GR) was significantly larger in the stroke than the control side for both elbow and ankle joints. GR was also strongly position dependent in both joints. However, the modulation of GR with position was slightly different in two joints. GR was also larger in the control than the normal joints but the differences were significant only for the ankle joint. Intrinsic stiffness gain (K) was also significantly larger in the stroke than the control joint at elbow extended positions and at ankle dorsiflexed positions. Modulation of K with the ankle angle was similar for stroke, control and normal groups. In contrast, the position dependency of the elbow was different. K was larger in the control than normal ankle whereas it was lower in the control than normal elbow. However, the differences were not significant for any joint. The findings demonstrate that both reflex and intrinsic stiffness gain increase abnormally in both upper and lower extremities. However, the major contribution of intrinsic and reflex stiffness to the abnormalities is at the end of ROM and at the middle ROM, respectively. The results also demonstrate that the neuromuscular properties of the contralateral limb are not normal suggesting that it may not be used as a suitable control at least for the ankle study.

  3. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkin CA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Charles A Popkin,1 Brian M Schulz,2 Caroline N Park,1 Thomas S Bottiglieri,1 T Sean Lynch1 1Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Center for Shoulder, Elbow and Sports Medicine at Columbia University, New York, NY, 2Kerlan‑Jobe Orthopedic Clinic, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13–14 years (Bantam level from 11–12 years (Pee Wee. Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries. Keywords: youth hockey, body checking, injury prevention, femoroacetabular impingement, apophyseal avulsions

  4. Prediction of core and lower extremity strains and sprains in collegiate football players: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Gary B; Giles, Jessica L; Seibel, Dustin K

    2012-01-01

    Poor core stability is believed to increase vulnerability to uncontrolled joint displacements throughout the kinetic chain between the foot and the lumbar spine. To assess the value of preparticipation measurements as predictors of core or lower extremity strains or sprains in collegiate football players. Cohort study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I Football Championship Subdivision football program. All team members who were present for a mandatory physical examination on the day before preseason practice sessions began (n = 83). Preparticipation administration of surveys to assess low back, knee, and ankle function; documentation of knee and ankle injury history; determination of body mass index; 4 different assessments of core muscle endurance; and measurement of step-test recovery heart rate. All injuries were documented throughout the preseason practice period and 11-game season. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to identify dichotomized predictive factors that best discriminated injured from uninjured status. The 75th and 50th percentiles were evaluated as alternative cutpoints for dichotomization of injury predictors. Players with ≥2 of 3 potentially modifiable risk factors related to core function had 2 times greater risk for injury than those with football injury risk factors that can be identified on preparticipation screening. These predictors need to be assessed in a prospective manner with a larger sample of collegiate football players.

  5. The Incidence of Giacomini Vein and Its Association with Lower Extremity venous Insufficiency: An Ultrasonographic Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Soon Chan; Kwon, Se Hwan; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Park, Ho Chul

    2009-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the incidence of Giacomini vein and its association with lower extremity venous insufficiency by performing US. From September 2006 to July 2007, 173 patients (58 males and 115 females, mean age: 52.7 years, age range: 22-72 years) who had been diagnosed with unilateral/bilateral varicose veins or telangiectasias were evaluated with duplex Doppler ultrasonography. The presence of Giacomini vein, superficial/deep vein reflux, the anatomical sites of the venous reflux and the abnormal perforating veins was investigated in 346 legs. Giacomini veins were found in 33 limbs (9.5%) of 21 patients (12.1%). Bilateral Giacomini veins were found in 12 patients. Of the 33 limbs that had Giacomini veins, 20 limbs had great saphenous vein (GSV) reflux and 4 limbs had small saphenous vein (SSV) reflux. The patients with Giacomini veins were classified into two groups according to the presence of Giacomini vein. There was no significant difference of the GSV reflux (p = 0.155), the SSV reflux (p = 0.760) and the mean velocity of the GSV reflux or the SSV reflux (p = 0.685, p = 0.431, respectively) between the two groups. Our results indicated that Giacomini vein is not associated with either GSV or SSV reflux, and this is contrary to conventional belief

  6. To evaluate the differences of risk factors in patients with lower extremity venous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadikoglu, G.; Ozcakir, A.; Ercan, I.; Ozkaya, G.; Sadikoglu, Y.M.

    2007-01-01

    To determine whether there is difference between risk factors in patients diagnosed to have clinically documented lower extremity venous disease after confirming the diagnosis radiologically by ultrasonographic and venographic evaluation. This study was performed from January 2002 to January 2005 in Bursa, the fourth biggest city of Turkey situated in the west of country in the Marmara region. The study center is a private imaging center working in conjunction with the Department of Health, which performs diagnostic and therapeutic vascular protocols in the region. Five hundred and fifty-three cases with clinically and radiologically documented diagnoses were evaluated with Multi-Variate Statistical Package 3.13 for the presence of pre-defined clusters of 14 different variables. Other statistical analyses were performed by the Statistical Package for Social sciences, version 13.0. Three different clusters were defined. The variables used to define the clusters were: age, gender, educational level, presence of smoking, amount of smoking (pack/per year), disease symptoms, presence of heart disease and radiologically documented diagnosis. Chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins are venous system diseases that are most commonly present in association with more than one concomitant risk factors. (author)

  7. Residual impairment after lower extremity fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faergemann, C; Frandsen, P A; Röck, N D

    1998-01-01

    In a prospective follow-up study of 158 consecutive patients 18 to 64 years old with unilateral lower extremity fracture, our aim was to disclose the impairment and disability 6 months after the injury. The patients were interviewed within 1 week after the trauma, and all patients returned...... the functional status before the injury. Additionally, three major aspects of impairments were measured 6 months after the fractures: range of motion, muscle strength, and pain. Most patients had a significantly higher SIP score 6 months after the fracture(s) than pretraumatically. The mean overall SIP score...... was 2.7 pretraumatically and 8.7 6 months posttraumatically. Major deficits in range of motion was observed, especially in the ankle joint. Additionally, loss of muscle strength was observed in the thigh and calf muscles in one fourth of the patients. Only low levels of residual pain were reported after...

  8. [Clinical analysis of patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombosis complicated with inferior vena cava thrombus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dian-ning; Wu, Xue-jun; Zhang, Shi-yi; Zhong, Zhen-yue; Jin, Xing

    2013-06-04

    To explore the clinical profiles of patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT) complicated with inferior vena cava (IVC) thrombus and summarize their clinical diagnostic and therapeutic experiences. The clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of 20 hospitalized patients with DVT complicated with inferior vena cava thrombus were analyzed retrospectively. All of them were of proximal DVT. There were phlegmasia cerulea dolens (n = 3), pulmonary embolism (n = 3) and completely occlusion of IVC (n = 5). Clinical manifestations were severe. Retrievable inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) was implanted for 17 cases. Catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) through ipsilateral popliteal vein was applied for 7 cases and systemic thrombolysis therapy for 8 cases. The effective rate of thrombolysis for fresh IVC thrombus was 100%. Among 5 cases with Cockett Syndrome, 3 cases underwent balloon dilatation angioplasty and endovascular stenting of iliac vein. And 17 IVCFs were retrieved successfully within 3 weeks. IVC thrombus disappeared completely in 15 cases. Systemic or local thrombolysis with protective IVCF is a safe and effective therapy for nonocclusive IVC thrombus in DVT. And CDT is recommended for symptomatic occlusive IVC thrombus.

  9. Field-expedient screening and injury risk algorithm categories as predictors of noncontact lower extremity injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, M E; Plisky, P J; Butler, R J; Fink, M L; Kiesel, K B; Underwood, F B

    2013-08-01

    In athletics, efficient screening tools are sought to curb the rising number of noncontact injuries and associated health care costs. The authors hypothesized that an injury prediction algorithm that incorporates movement screening performance, demographic information, and injury history can accurately categorize risk of noncontact lower extremity (LE) injury. One hundred eighty-three collegiate athletes were screened during the preseason. The test scores and demographic information were entered into an injury prediction algorithm that weighted the evidence-based risk factors. Athletes were then prospectively followed for noncontact LE injury. Subsequent analysis collapsed the groupings into two risk categories: Low (normal and slight) and High (moderate and substantial). Using these groups and noncontact LE injuries, relative risk (RR), sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios were calculated. Forty-two subjects sustained a noncontact LE injury over the course of the study. Athletes identified as High Risk (n = 63) were at a greater risk of noncontact LE injury (27/63) during the season [RR: 3.4 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 6.0]. These results suggest that an injury prediction algorithm composed of performance on efficient, low-cost, field-ready tests can help identify individuals at elevated risk of noncontact LE injury. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sensitivity and specificity of fluorescence microlymphography for detecting lymphedema of the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keo, Hong H; Schilling, Marianne; Büchel, Roland; Gröchenig, Ernst; Engelberger, Rolf P; Willenberg, Torsten; Baumgartner, Iris; Gretener, Silvia B

    2013-06-01

    Fluorescence microlymphography (FML) is used to visualize the lymphatic capillaries. A maximum spread of the fluorescence dye of ≥ 12 mm has been suggested for the diagnosis of lymphedema. However, data on sensitivity and specificity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of FML for diagnosing lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. Patients with lower extremity swelling were clinically assessed and separated into lymphedema and non-lymphatic edema groups. FML was studied in all affected legs and the maximum spread of lymphatic capillaries was measured. Test accuracy and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess possible threshold values that predict lymphedema. Between March 2008 and August 2011 a total of 171 patients (184 legs) with a median age of 43.5 (IQR 24, 54) years were assessed. Of those, 94 (51.1%) legs were diagnosed with lymphedema. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio and positive and negative predictive value were 87%, 64%, 2.45, 0.20, 72% and 83% for the 12-mm cut-off level and 79%, 83%, 4.72, 0.26, 83% and 79% for the 14-mm cut-off level, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.88). Sensitivity was higher in the secondary versus primary lymphedema (95.0% vs 74.3%, p = 0.045). No major adverse events were observed. In conclusion, FML is a simple and safe technique for detecting lymphedema in patients with leg swelling. A cut-off level of ≥ 14-mm maximum spread has a high sensitivity and high specificity of detecting lymphedema and should be chosen.

  11. Relationships of Functional Tests Following ACL Reconstruction: Exploratory Factor Analyses of the Lower Extremity Assessment Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFabio, Melissa; Slater, Lindsay V; Norte, Grant; Goetschius, John; Hart, Joseph M; Hertel, Jay

    2018-03-01

    After ACL reconstruction (ACLR), deficits are often assessed using a variety of functional tests, which can be time consuming. It is unknown whether these tests provide redundant or unique information. To explore relationships between components of a battery of functional tests, the Lower Extremity Assessment Protocol (LEAP) was created to aid in developing the most informative, concise battery of tests for evaluating ACLR patients. Descriptive, cross-sectional. Laboratory. 76 ACLR patients (6.86±3.07 months postoperative) and 54 healthy participants. Isokinetic knee flexion and extension at 90 and 180 degrees/second, maximal voluntary isometric contraction for knee extension and flexion, single leg balance, 4 hopping tasks (single, triple, crossover, and 6-meter timed hop), and a bilateral drop vertical jump that was scored with the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Peak torque, average torque, average power, total work, fatigue indices, center of pressure area and velocity, hop distance and time, and LESS score. A series of factor analyses were conducted to assess grouping of functional tests on the LEAP for each limb in the ACLR and healthy groups and limb symmetry indices (LSI) for both groups. Correlations were run between measures that loaded on retained factors. Isokinetic and isometric strength tests for knee flexion and extension, hopping, balance, and fatigue index were identified as unique factors for all limbs. The LESS score loaded with various factors across the different limbs. The healthy group LSI analysis produced more factors than the ACLR LSI analysis. Individual measures within each factor had moderate to strong correlations. Isokinetic and isometric strength, hopping, balance, and fatigue index provided unique information. Within each category of measures, not all tests may need to be included for a comprehensive functional assessment of ACLR patients due to the high amount of shared variance between them.

  12. Distant Migration of Multiple Siliconomas in Lower Extremities following Breast Implant Rupture: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo Hyun; Song, Seung Yong; Lew, Dae Hyun; Lee, Dong Won

    2016-10-01

    Siliconoma from ruptured breast implants has been reported in multiple body sites, including but not limited to the breast parenchyma, axillary lymph nodes, upper arm, and even lower leg. In this regard, we report a rare case of distant silicone migration to the lower extremities after traumatic breast implant rupture. A 55-year-old Asian woman who received bilateral augmentation mammoplasty 20 years ago presented with ruptured breast implants from a car accident 2 years earlier. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed intracapsular and extracapsular rupture of the right breast implant, showing "linguine sign." We removed the bilateral breast implants and performed capsulectomy and bilateral reduction mammoplasty using inverted-T incisions. The implant was confirmed as a smooth, silicone gel-filled mammary implant of 125 cm 3 by a Japanese manufacturer, Koken. During her regular follow-up outpatient visits, physical examination revealed 2.5- × 1.5-cm ill-defined, tender, subcutaneous nodules on both knees and 8.5- × 3.0-cm inflammatory changes in the inguinal area with persistent pain. Computed tomography showed no definite mass, but rather infiltrative, nonenhancing soft-tissue densities in the subcutaneous layers of the bilateral inguinal and knee areas. Surgical excision was performed, and pathologic findings confirmed variable vacuoles with foreign body reaction and fibrosis, consistent with siliconoma. It is important to acknowledge that siliconomas can be encountered in patients with ruptured breast implants, especially those manufactured decades ago. Our patient with masses as remote as the inguinal and knee areas is a prime example of how far siliconomas can migrate.

  13. Effect of exercise therapy on lower extremity deep venous thrombosis after total knee arthoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Wu Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of exercise therapy in preventing the lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT after total knee arthoplasty (TKA. Methods: A total of 153 patients with osteoarthritis who were admitted in our hospital for TKA were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the observation group were given continuous passive motion (CPM in combined with exercise therapy, while the patients in the control group were only given CPM. After 2-week treatment, the related coagulation indicators and femoral venous blood flow in the two groups were detected and compared. The occurrence rate of DVT in the two groups was calculated. Results: PT and APTT from 2 weeks to 2 months after operation in the two groups were shortened first and extended later when compared with before operation, while FIB and D-D contents were elevated first and reduced later, and the coagulation indicator levels 2 months after treatment in the two groups were significantly different from those before operation. The femoral venous blood flow peak and average velocity 1 week after operation in the two groups were significantly elevated when compared with before operation. The femoral venous blood flow peak and average velocity 1 week after operation in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group. The occurrence rate of DVT in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group. Conclusions: CPM in combined with exercise therapy for patients after TKA can effectively prevent the formation of DVT, with a significant effect.

  14. The influence of knee alignment on lower extremity kinetics during squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Lindsay V; Hart, Joseph M

    2016-12-01

    The squat is an assessment of lower extremity alignment during movement, however there is little information regarding altered joint kinetics during poorly performed squats. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in joint kinetics and power from altered knee alignment during a squat. Thirty participants completed squats while displacing the knee medially, anteriorly, and with neutral alignment (control). Sagittal and frontal plane torques at the ankle, knee, and hip were altered in the descending and ascending phase of the squat in both the medial and anterior malaligned squat compared to the control squat. Ankle and trunk power increased and hip power decreased in the medial malaligned squat compared to the control squat. Ankle, knee, and trunk power increased and hip power decreased in the anterior malaligned squat compared to the control squat. Changes in joint torques and power during malaligned squats suggest that altered knee alignment increases ankle and trunk involvement to execute the movement. Increased anterior knee excursion during squatting may also lead to persistent altered loading of the ankle and knee. Sports medicine professionals using the squat for quadriceps strengthening must consider knee alignment to reduce ankle and trunk involvement during the movement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Noninvasive measurement of lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction under cuff compression paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, He; Zhao, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Xiaoying; Fang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using a susceptibility-based MRI technique with asymmetric spin-echo (ASE) sequence to assess the lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) alternations under cuff compression paradigm. Approved by the local institutional human study committee, nine healthy young volunteers participated in this study. All the ASE scans were conducted using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner during resting state (pre), 1-3 min (post1) and 3-5 min (post2) after a pressure of 50 mmHg above individual systolic blood pressure imposed on the thigh. Moreover, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements were performed on the same day under the same cuff compression protocol to verify the accuracy of this susceptibility-based method. In all volunteers, the mean MRI based OEF in gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle increased significantly from 0.28 ± 0.02 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.03 (post1, P measured 1-%HbO2 (percentage of deoxyhemoglobin concentration within total hemoglobin) in GAS rose significantly from 0.29 ± 0.03 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.04 (post1, P measuring skeletal muscle oxygenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI.

  17. Prediction of Summer Extreme Precipitation over the Middle and Lower Reaches of the Yangtze River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Ning, L.; Liu, J.; Yan, M.; Sun, W.

    2017-12-01

    Abstract: Summer extreme precipitation (SEP) often causes severe landslide, debris flow and floods over the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River Basin(MLYRB), so skillful prediction of the SEP is critical to the future climate adaptions and mitigations. In this work, the characteristic region over the MLYRB (27°N-32°N,108°1-118°E) is defined by the spatial mode of the rotated empirical orthogonal functions (REOF) of SEP over the China from 1961 to 2014. A physics-based empirical model (PEM) of SEP predictions is built with two preceding predictors with significant physical influences on the SEP over the MLYRB. The first predictor is the spring sea surface temperature (SST) over the Northern Indian Ocean (20°S-20°N,50°E-95°E), and the second predictor is the spring sea surface pressure (SLP) over the Aleutian Island (50°N-70°N,160°E-160°W). Analyses of physical mechanism show that when the spring SST over the Northern Indian Ocean is higher, the South Asian High (SAH) extends to the east and the western Pacific sub-tropical high (WPSH) extends to the west, therefore, the generated secondary circulation induces anomalous upward motions and more water vapor transportation to the MLYRB, resulting more SEP. Meanwhile, when the spring SLP over the Aleutian Island is lower, the also WPSH extends to the west, which leads to a negative omega anomaly centered the MLYRB and more water vapor transportation to the MLYRB, resulting in more SEP. The regression model is built using the data from a training period from 1961 to 1999 with correlation coefficient skill of 0.57 (p<0.01) for prediction of SEP in 1961-1999. The independent forecast of the PEM shows that it is skillful in SEP prediction with the correlation coefficient between observed SEP and model-simulated SEP over the validation period 2000-2014 is 0.51 (p<0.05). This finding shows that the preceding spring SST and SLP can provide useful information for prediction of SEP, and the methodology

  18. What are estimated reimbursements for lower extremity prostheses capable of surgical and nonsurgical lengthening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Eric R; Pepper, Andrew M; Letson, G Douglas

    2012-04-01

    Growing prostheses accommodate skeletally immature patients with bone tumors undergoing limb-preserving surgery. Early devices required surgical procedures for lengthening; recent devices lengthen without surgery. Expenses for newer expandable devices that lengthen without surgery are more than for their predecessors but overall reimbursement amounts are not known. We sought to determine reimbursement amounts associated with lengthening of growing prostheses requiring surgical and nonsurgical lengthening. We retrospectively reviewed 17 patients with growing prostheses requiring surgical expansion and eight patients with prostheses capable of nonsurgical expansion. Insurance documents were reviewed to determine the reimbursement for implantation, lengthening, and complications. Growth data were obtained from the literature. Mean reimbursement amounts of surgical and nonsurgical lengthenings were $9950 and $272, respectively. Estimated reimbursements associated with implantation of a growing prosthesis varied depending on age, sex, and location. The largest difference was found for 4-year-old boys with distal femoral replacement where reimbursement for expansion to maturity for surgical and nonsurgical lengthening prostheses would be $379,000 and $208,000, respectively. For children requiring more than one surgical expansion, net reimbursements were lower when a noninvasive lengthening device was used. Annual per-prosthesis maintenance reimbursements to address complications for surgical and nonsurgical lengthening prostheses were $3386 and $1856, respectively. This study showed that reimbursements for lengthening of growing endoprostheses capable of nonsurgical expansion may be less expensive in younger patients, particularly male patients undergoing distal femur replacement, than endoprostheses requiring surgical lengthening. Longer outcomes studies are required to see if reimbursements for complications differ between devices. Level III, economic and decision

  19. Cigarette Smoking Is Associated with a Lower Concentration of CD105+ Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Beyth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is associated with musculoskeletal degenerative disorders, delayed fracture healing, and nonunion. Bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs, known to express CD105, are important in local trophic and immunomodulatory activity and central to musculoskeletal healing/regeneration. We hypothesized that smoking is associated with lower levels of BMPC. Iliac bone marrow samples were collected from individuals aged 18–65 years during the first steps of pelvic surgery, under IRB approval with informed consent. Patients with active infectious or neoplastic disease, a history of cytotoxic or radiation therapy, primary or secondary metabolic bone disease, or bone marrow dysfunction were excluded. Separation process purity and the number of BMPCs recovered were assessed with FACS. BMPC populations in self-reported smokers and nonsmokers were compared using the two-tailed t-test. 13 smokers and 13 nonsmokers of comparable age and gender were included. The average concentration of BMPCs was 3.52 × 105/mL ± 2.45 × 105/mL for nonsmokers versus 1.31 × 105/mL ± 1.61 × 105/mL for smokers (t= 3.2, P=0.004. This suggests that cigarette smoking is linked to a significant decrease in the concentration of BMPCs, which may contribute to the reduced regenerative capacity of smokers, with implications for musculoskeletal maintenance and repair.

  20. Perceptions and experiences of nutritional care following the overwhelming experience of lower extremity amputation; a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P S; Green, S M; Petersen, J

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Good nutritional care of people following major lower extremity amputation is essential as poor nutritional status can lead to delayed wound healing. Working with patients to identify their perspectives on food, views on nutritional care and the need for dietary counselling enables...... the development of optimised nutritional care. AIM: To explore hospital patients' perspectives on food, dietary counselling, and their experiences of nutritional care following lower extremity amputation. DESIGN: A qualitative, explorative study design was employed. METHOD: An inductive content analysis of semi......-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 17 people over 50 years of age, who had recently undergone major lower extremity amputation, was undertaken. The study was reported according to the COREQ guideline. FINDINGS: Three themes emerged; Responsible for own dietary intake, Diet based on preferences...

  1. Deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity: What is the most important finding in duplex Doppler sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kwak, Jin Young [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The positive findings of deep vein thrombosis on duplex Doppler ultrasonography such as intraluminal clot,non-compressibility of the venous lumen and abnormal or absent Doppler shift signal are well known. However, relatively hypoechoic thrombus is not always seen in sonography, and the vein is frequently compressible in partial thrombosis. In order to evaluate the most common and important findings of deep vein thrombosis, we analysed the findings at duplex Doppler ultrasound in 19 patients and compared the results with those of contrast venography in 11 patients. Duplex Doppler ultrasound examination of the common femoral and popliteal veins was performed for one extremity in 14 patients, and for both extremities in 5 (total 24 extremities). Contrast venography was performed for one extremity in 7 patients, and for both sides in 4 (total 15 extremities).Thrombosis was seen in 45.8%, non-compressibility of lumen in 75%, absent or decreased Doppler signal from common femoral vein in 95.8%. Thrombosis was seen in 41.7%, non-compressibility of lumen in 70.8%, absent or decreased Doppler shift signal from popliteal vein in 95.8%. We conclude that abnormal or absent Doppler shift signal is the most sensitive and important finding of the deep vein thrombosis

  2. Intrarater reliability of hand held dynamometry in measuring lower extremity isometric strength using a portable stabilization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Steven M; Cheng, M Samuel; Smith, A Russell; Kolber, Morey J

    2017-02-01

    Hand held dynamometry (HHD) is a more objective way to quantify muscle force production (MP) compared to traditional manual muscle testing. HHD reliability can be negatively impacted by both the strength of the tester and the subject particularly in the lower extremities due to larger muscle groups. The primary aim of this investigation was to assess intrarater reliability of HHD with use of a portable stabilization device for lower extremity MP in an athletic population. Isometric lower extremity strength was measured for bilateral lower extremities including hip abductors, external rotators, adductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors was measured in a sample of healthy recreational runners (8 male, 7 females, = 30 limbs) training for a marathon. These measurements were assessed using an intrasession intrarater reliability design. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated using 3,1 model based on the single rater design. The standard error of measurement (SEM) for each muscle group was also calculated. ICC were excellent ranging from ICC (3,1) = 0.93-0.98 with standard error of measurements ranging from 0.58 to 17.2 N. This study establishes the use of a HHD with a portable stabilization device as demonstrating good reliability within testers for measuring lower extremity muscle performance in an active healthy population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The consensus among Chinese interventional experts on the standard of interventional therapy for deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Academic Group of Interventional Radiology, Radiology Branch of Chinese Medical Association

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to introduce the indications and contraindications of catheter-directed thrombolysis, percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy, balloon angioplasty and stent implantation for deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity, and also aims to summarize and to illustrate the manipulating procedure, the points for attention, the perioperative complications and preventions in performing different kind of interventional technique. Great importance is attached to the interventional therapy for both acute and subacute deep venous thrombosis of lower extremity in order to effectively reduce the occurrence of post-thrombosis syndrome. (authors)

  4. An evidence-based review of hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions to address dynamic lower extremity valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford KR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Kevin R Ford,1 Anh-Dung Nguyen,2 Steven L Dischiavi,1 Eric J Hegedus,1 Emma F Zuk,2 Jeffrey B Taylor11Department of Physical Therapy, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA; 2Department of Athletic Training, School of Health Sciences, High Point University, High Point, NC, USAAbstract: Deficits in proximal hip strength or neuromuscular control may lead to dynamic lower extremity valgus. Measures of dynamic lower extremity valgus have been previously shown to relate to increased risk of several knee pathologies, specifically anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and patellofemoral pain. Therefore, hip-focused interventions have gained considerable attention and been successful in addressing these knee pathologies. The purpose of the review was to identify and discuss hip-focused exercise interventions that aim to address dynamic lower extremity valgus. Previous electromyography, kinematics, and kinetics research support the use of targeted hip exercises with non-weight-bearing, controlled weight-bearing, functional exercise, and, to a lesser extent, dynamic exercises in reducing dynamic lower extremity valgus. Further studies should be developed to identify and understand the mechanistic relationship between optimized biomechanics during sports and hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions.Keywords: dynamic lower extremity valgus, hip neuromuscular control, ACL injury rehabilitation, patellofemoral pain, hip muscular activation

  5. Prognostic value of biochemical variables for survival after surgery for metastatic bone disease of the extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Hovgaard, Thea Bechman; Hindsø, Klaus; Petersen, Michael Mørk

    2017-03-01

    Prediction of survival in patients having surgery for metastatic bone disease in the extremities (MBDex) has been of interest in more than two decades. Hitherto no consensus on the value of biochemical variables has been achieved. Our purpose was (1) to investigate if standard biochemical variables have independent prognostic value for survival after surgery for MBDex and (2) to identify optimal prognostic cut off values for survival of biochemical variables. In a consecutive cohort of 270 patients having surgery for MBDex, we measured preoperative biochemical variables: hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, C-reactive protein and absolute, neutrophil and lymphocyte count. ROC curve analyses were performed to identify optimal cut off levels. Independent prognostic factors for variables were addressed with multiple Cox regression analyses. Optimal cut off levels were identified as: hemoglobin 7.45 mmol/L, absolute lymphocyte count 8.5 × 10 9 /L, neutrophil 5.68 × 10 9 /L, lymphocyte 1.37 × 10 9 /L, C-reactive protein 22.5 mg/L, and alkaline phosphatase 129 U/L. Regression analyses found alkaline phosphatase (HR 2.49) and neutrophil count (HR 2.49) to be independent prognostic factors. We found neutrophil count and alkaline phosphatase to be independent prognostic variables in predicting survival in patients after surgery for MBDex. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  7. Outcomes of catheter-directed treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis of patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Gaurav; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Moses, Vinu; Chiramel, George K; Ahmed, Munawwar; Mammen, Suraj; Aggarwal, Sunil; Stephen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common illness with an annual incidence of 1 per 1000 adults. The major long-term complication of DVT is post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) which occurs in up to 60% of patients within 2 years of an episode of DVT. We aim to evaluate the outcomes of catheter-directed treatment (CDT) for symptomatic acute or subacute lower extremity DVT. A retrospective 12-year study was conducted on the outcomes of CDT on 54 consecutive patients who presented with acute or subacute lower extremity DVT to our hospital. Descriptive summary statistics and the Chi-square test were used to measure the outcomes of CDT. Grade 3 thrombolysis was achieved in 25 (46.3%) patients, grade 2 thrombolysis in 25 (46.3%) patients, and grade 1 thrombolysis in 4 (7.4%) patients. Significant recanalization (grade 2 or 3 thrombolysis) was possible in 50 (92.6%) patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of significant recanalization that could be achieved between patients who underwent CDT before and after 10 days. There was no significant difference between the thrombolysis achieved between urokinase and r-tPA. PTS was seen in 33% of the patients. Major complications were seen in 5.5% of the patients. CDT is a safe and effective therapeutic technique in patients with acute and subacute lower extremity DVT, if appropriate patient selection is made.

  8. [Early application of the antibiotic-laden bone cement (ALBC) combined with the external fixation support in treating the open fractures of lower limbs complicated with bone defect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jian; Mao, Zhao-Guang; Zhu, Hui-Hua; Guo, Liang

    2017-03-25

    To discuss the curative effect of the early application of the antibiotic-laden bone cement (ALBC) combined with the external fixation support in treating the open fractures of lower limbs complicated with bone defect. From December 2013 to January 2015, 36 cases of lower limb open comminuted fractures complicated with bone defects were treated by the vancomycin ALBC combined with the external fixation support, including 26 males and 10 females with an average age of 38.0 years old ranging from 19 to 65 years old. The included cases were all open fractures of lower limbs complicated with bone defects with different degree of soft tissue injuries. Among them, 25 cases were tibial fractures, 11 cases were femoral fractures. The radiographs indicated a presence of bone defects, which ranged from 3.0 to 6.1 cm with an average of 4.0 cm. The Gustilo classification of open fractures:24 cases were type IIIA, 12 cases were typr IIIB. The percentage of wound infection, bone grafting time, fracture healing time and postoperative joint function of lower limb were observed. The function of injured limbs was evaluated at 1 month after the clinical healing of fracture based on Paley evaluation criterion. All cases were followed up for 3 to 24 months with an average of (6.0±3.0) months. The wound surface was healed well, neither bone infections nor unhealed bone defects were presented. The reoperation of bone grafting was done at 6 weeks after the patients received an early treatment with ALBC, some of them were postponed to 8 weeks till the approximate healing of fractures, the treatment course lasted for 4 to 8 months with an average of(5.5±1.5) months. According to Paley and other grading evaluations of bone and function, there were 27 cases as excellent, 5 cases as good, 3 cases as ordinary. The ALBC combined with external fixation support was an effective method for early treatment to treat the traumatic lower limb open fractures complicated with bone defects. This method

  9. [The application of impulse magnetic therapy for the treatment of the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchitskaya, D B; Gerasimenko, M Yu; Aphanova, T V; Konchugova, T V

    The principal objective of the present work was to evaluate the influence of impulse magnetic therapy on the state of the microcirculatory system in the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities. The study included 59 patients with stage of 1 and 2 lymphedema who were divided into two groups. Those comprising the first group had impulse magnetic therapy applied to their lower extremities while the patients making up the second group served as controls. All the patients were examined with the use of the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) that revealed the initially present pathological changes in the microcirculatory system of their lower extremities. The study has demonstrated that the application of impulse magnetic therapy produced a positive effect on all the constituent components of the microcirculatory blood stream of the patients suffering from lymphedema of the lower extremities. Specifically, the initially increased arteriolar tonus was decreased, the blood flow in the capillary vessels was improved, and congestive phenomena in the venular segments of the microcirculation blood stream were markedly reduced. The results of the LDF examination in the control group gave no evidence of significant changes in the patients' microcirculatory system. The results of the LDF examination of the patients of the control group suggested the absence of any appreciable changes in the microcirculatory system. The present study has demonstrated the advisability of the application of impulse magnetic therapy for the treatment of the patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities as a minimally invasive technique for the evaluation of the condition of the microcirculatory system and the objective assessment of the effectiveness of the outcomes of physiotherapy in the patients with vascular pathology.

  10. PRE-ACTIVITY MODULATION OF LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLES WITHIN DIFFERENT TYPES AND HEIGHTS OF DEEP JUMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Mrdakovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine modulation of pre- activity related to different types and heights of deep jump. Sixteen male soccer players without experience in deep jumps training (the national competition; 15.0 ± 0.5yrs; weight 61.9 ± 6.1kg; height 1.77 ± 0.07m, who participated in the study, performed three types of deep jump (bounce landing, counter landing, and bounce drop jump from three different heights (40cm, 60cm, and 80cm. Surface EMG device (1000Hz was used to estimate muscle activity (maximal amplitude of EMG - AmaxEMG; integral EMG signal - iEMG of five muscles (mm.gastrocnemii, m.soleus, m.tibialis anterior, m.vastus lateralis within 150ms before touchdown. All the muscles, except m. gastrocnemius medialis, showed systematic increase in pre-activity when platform height was raised. For most of the lower extremity muscles, the most significant differences were between values of pre-activity obtained for 40 cm and 80 cm platforms. While the amount of muscle pre-activity in deep jumps from the heights above and beneath the optimal one did not differ significantly from that generated in deep jumps from the optimal drop height of 60 cm, the patterns of muscle pre-activity obtained for the heights above the optimal one did differ from those obtained for the optimal drop height. That suggests that deep jumps from the heights above the optimal one do not seem to be an adequate exercise for adjusting muscle activity for the impact. Muscle pre-activity in bounce drop jumps differed significantly from that in counter landing and bounce landing respectively, which should indicate that a higher amount of pre-activity generated during bounce drop jumps was used for performing take-offs. As this study included the subjects who were not familiar with deep jumps training, the prospective studies should reveal the results of athletes with previous experience

  11. Periprosthetic joint infections in modular endoprostheses of the lower extremities: a retrospective observational study in 101 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonz, Dirk; Zieme, Almut; Prietzel, Torsten; Moche, Michael; Tiepoldt, Solveig; Roth, Andreas; Josten, Christoph; von Salis-Soglio, Georg Freiherr; Heyde, Christoph-E; Ghanem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Modular mega-endoprosthesis systems are used to bridge very large bone defects and have become a widespread method in orthopaedic surgery for the treatment of tumours and revision arthroplasty. However, the indications for the use of modular mega-endoprostheses must be carefully considered. Implanting modular endoprostheses requires major, complication-prone surgery in which the limited salvage procedures should always be borne in mind. The management of periprosthetic infection is particularly difficult and beset with problems. Given this, the present study was designed to gauge the significance of periprosthetic infections in connection with modular mega-implants in the lower extremities among our own patients. Patients who had been fitted with modular endoprosthesis on a lower extremity at our department between September 1994 and December 2011 were examined retrospectively. A total of 101 patients with 114 modular prostheses were identified. Comprising 30 men (29.7 %) and 71 women (70.3 %), their average age at the time of surgery was 67 years (18-92 years). The average follow-up period was 27 months (5 months and 2 weeks to 14 years and 11 months) and the drop-out rate was about 8.8 %. Altogether, there were 19 (17.7 %) endoprosthesis infections: 3 early infections and 16 late or delayed infections. The pathogen spectrum was dominated by coagulase-negative staphylococci (36 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (16 %), including 26 % multi-resistant pathogens. Reinfection occurred in 37 % of cases of infection. Tumours were followed by significantly fewer infections than the other indications. Infections were twice as likely to occur after previous surgery. In our findings modular endoprostheses (18 %) are much more susceptible to infection than primary endoprostheses (0.5-2,5 %). Infection is the most common complication alongside the dislocation of proximal femur endoprostheses. Consistent, radical surgery is essential - although even with an adequate

  12. Observation of the lymph flow in the lower extremities of edematous patients with noninvasive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Isao; Hirota, Akio; Watanabe, Sumio

    1983-01-01

    An RI-lymphography with a computer onlined gamma camera was used for observing the lymph flow of edematous patients without any invasive procedures and for estimating the active movement of lymph vessels. Subjects were composed of 8 normal volunteers (group 1), 41 non-edematous patients (group 2) and 26 edematous patients (group 3). Four mCi of Tc-99m-HSA in a volume of 0.1 ml was injected subcutaneously in the pretibial region of the lower extremity, and immediately after the injection scintigram was recorded on the thigh every 5 sec. for 30 min. Results: 1) Normal volunteers; Time-activity curves showed a gradual increase in RI activity in relation to time without remarkable spike-like fluctuations. The maximum count attained was less than 200 cps in all experiments. 2) Non-edematous patients; In 46 out of 57 experiments (80.8%), the similar time-activity curves were observed as those of the normal volunteers. On the other hand, time-activity curves in 11 out of 57 (19.2%) showed a much steeper stepwise-increase simultaneously with remarkable spike-waves. The maximum count was over 200 cps in these cases. 3) Edematous patients; In 12 out of 35 experiments (34.3%), the maximum count was over 200 cps. In these edematous diseases other than lymphedema and hyperthyroidism, time-activity curves showed a rapid stepwise increase with a lot of spikes, and the maximum count was over 500 cps in 6 experiments. In 23 out of 35 (65.7%), the maximum count was less than 200 cps. In these cases, edema was attributable to secondary lymphedema, hypothyroidism, aging and so on. 4) Relationship between edema and lymph flow: When subjects were divided into 3 groups (non-edema, mild and severe edema), the maximum count 200 cps was observed in 16.7% in non-edema group, 45.8% in mild and 9.1% in severe edema group

  13. The Practice of Physical Activity in the Setting of Lower-Extremities Sarcomas: A First Step toward Clinical Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Assi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower-extremities sarcoma patients, with bone tumor and soft-tissue sarcoma, are a unique population at high risk of physical dysfunction and chronic heart diseases. Thus, providing an adequate physical activity (PA program constitutes a primary part of the adjuvant treatment, aiming to improve patients' quality of life. The main goal of this paper is to offer clear suggestions for clinicians regarding PA around the time between diagnosis and offered treatments. These preliminary recommendations reflect our interpretation of the clinical and preclinical data published on this topic, after a systematic search on the PubMed database. Accordingly, patients could be advised to (1 start sessions of supportive rehabilitation and low-intensity PA after surgery and (2 increase PA intensities progressively during home stay. The usefulness of PA during the preoperative period remains largely unknown but emerging preclinical data on mice bearing intramuscular sarcoma are most likely discouraging. However, efforts are still needed to in-depth elucidate the impact of PA before surgery completion. PA should be age-, sex-, and treatment-adapted, as young/adolescent, women and patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy are more susceptible to physical quality deterioration. Concerning PA intensity, the practice of moderate-intensity resistance and endurance exercises (30–60 min/day are safe after surgery, even when receiving adjuvant chemo/radiotherapy. The general PA recommendations for cancer patients, 150 min/week of combined moderate-intensity endurance/resistance exercises, could be feasible after 18–24 months of rehabilitation. We believe that these suggestions will help clinicians to design a low-risk and useful PA program.

  14. [Intermittent pneumatic compression of the lower extremity muscles in complex prophylactics of postoperative venous thromboses in elderly and senile patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, N I; Openchenko, S V

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of frequency of venous thrombitic complications after different operations on 69 patients aged from 69 through 87 was made. The greatest number of venous thromboses was noted after amputations of the femur. Intermittent pneumatic compression of the lower extremities in addition to standard methods of prophylactics reduced the number of postoperative thromboses from 12.8% to 3.3%.

  15. Perioperative Optimization of Geriatric Lower Extremity Bypass in the Era of Increased Performance Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Turley, Ryan S; Benrashid, Ehsan; Lagoo, Sandhya; Shortell, Cynthia K; Mureebe, Leila

    2017-01-01

    The initiation of bundled payment for care improvement by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has led to increased financial and performance accountability. As most vascular surgery patients are elderly and reimbursed via CMS, improving their outcomes will be critical for durable financial stability. As a first step in forming a multidisciplinary pathway for the elderly vascular patients, we sought to identify modifiable perioperative variables in geriatric patients undergoing lower extremity bypass (LEB). The 2011-2013 LEB-targeted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used for this analysis (n = 5316). Patients were stratified by age <65 (n = 2171), 65-74 (n = 1858), 75-84 (n = 1190), and ≥85 (n = 394) years. Comparisons of patient- and procedure-related characteristics and 30-day postoperative outcomes stratified by age groups were performed with Pearson χ 2 tests for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for continuous variables. During the study period, 5316 total patients were identified. There were 2171 patients aged <65 years, 1858 patients in the 65-74 years age group, 1190 patients in the 75-84 years age group, and 394 patients in the ≥85 years age group. Increasing age was associated with an increased frequency of cardiopulmonary disease (P < 0.001) and a decreased frequency of diabetes, tobacco use, and prior surgical intervention (P < 0.001). Only 79% and 68% of all patients were on antiplatelet and statin therapies, respectively. Critical limb ischemia occurred more frequently in older patients (P < 0.001). Length of hospital stay, transfusion requirements, and discharge to a skilled nursing facility increased with age (P < 0.001). Thirty-day amputation rates did not differ significantly with age (P = 0.12). Geriatric patients undergoing LEB have unique and potentially modifiable perioperative factors that may improve postoperative outcomes. These

  16. Association of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region genotype with lower bone mineral density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, M I; Kung, S; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M; Geske, J R; Drake, M T; Jankowski, M D; Clarke, B L

    2017-08-22

    The serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) S allele is linked to pathogenesis of depression and slower response to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs); depression and SSRIs are independently associated with bone loss. We aimed to determine whether 5-HTTLPR was associated with bone loss. This cross-sectional study included psychiatric patients with both 5-HTTLPR analysis and bone mineral density (BMD) assessment (hip and spine Z-scores if age <50 years and T-scores if ⩾50 years). BMD association with 5-HTTLPR was evaluated under models with additive allele effects and dominant S allele effects using linear regression models. Patients were stratified by age (<50 and ⩾50 years) and sex. Of 3016 patients with 5-HTTLPR genotyping, 239 had BMD assessments. Among the younger patients, the S allele was associated with lower Z-scores at the hip (P=0.002, dominant S allele effects; P=0.004, additive allele effects) and spine (P=0.0006, dominant S allele effects; P=0.01, additive allele effects). In sex-stratified analyses, the association of the S allele with lower BMD in the younger patients was also significant in the subset of women (P⩽0.003 for both hip and spine BMD under the additive allele effect model). In the small group of men younger than 50 years, the S allele was marginally associated with higher spine BMD (P=0.05). BMD T-scores were not associated with 5-HTTLPR genotypes in patients 50 years or older. The 5-HTTLPR variants may modify serotonin effects on bone with sex-specific effects.

  17. Determination of bone mineral density of the distal extremity of the radio in Rottweiller, by radiographic optic densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, Jefferson Douglas Soares; Sterman, Franklin de Almeida

    2010-01-01

    This study allowed the standardization of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the distal extremity of the radio of 36 dogs adults in Rottweiler breed by radiographic optic densitometry. The limbs of the animals were radiographed with scale of aluminum that served as a reference. The radiographs images were digitalized and analyzed by a computer program for comparison of gray tones between the standard image and the image of the reference scale radiographed with the bone. Afterwards the values of density were expressed in millimeters of aluminum. Also studied the correlations between BMD and the sex, weight and external measures as the length of spine, height of the animal and circumference the distal extremity of the limb in study. The mean values and standard deviations of the bone mineral density of the distal extremity of the radio were: for the metaphyseal region the average of BMD of 7,88±0,89 mmAl, the diaphyseal region 1 the average of BMD of 8,58±0,80 mmAl and for diaphyseal region 2 of BMD of 9,00±0,74 mmAl. (author)

  18. Development of a lower extremity wearable exoskeleton with double compact elastic module: preliminary experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Long

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a double compact elastic module is designed and implemented in the lower extremity exoskeleton. The double compact elastic module is composed of two parts, i.e., physical human robot interaction (pHRI measurement and the elastic actuation system (EAS, which are called proximal elastic module (PEM and distal elastic module (DEM respectively. The PEM is used as the pHRI information collection device while the DEM is used as the compliance device. A novel compact parallelogram-like structure based torsional spring is designed and developed. An iterative finite element analysis (FEA based optimization process was conducted to find the optimal parameters in the search space. In the PEM, the designed torsional spring has an outer circle with a diameter of 60 mm and an inner hole with a diameter of 12 mm, while in the DEM, the torsional spring has the outer circle with a diameter of 80 mm and the inner circle with a diameter of 16 mm. The torsional spring in the PEM has a thickness of 5 mm and a weight of 60 g, while that in the DEM has a thickness of 10 mm and a weight of 80 g. The double compact elastic module prototype is embedded in the mechanical joint directly. Calibration experiments were conducted on those two elastic modules to obtain the linear torque versus angle characteristic. The calibration experimental results show that this torsional spring in the PEM has a stiffness of 60.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 4 Nm, while that in the DEM has a stiffness of 80.2 Nm rad−1, which is capable of withstanding a maximum torque of 30 Nm. The experimental results and the simulation data show that the maximum resultant errors are 6 % for the PEM and 4 % for the DEM respectively. In this paper, an assumed regression algorithm is used to learn the human motion intent (HMI based on the pHRI collection. The HMI is defined as the angular position of the human limb joint. A

  19. The clinical efficacy observation of fluoroscopy-guided foam sclerotherapy with lauromacrogol for varicose veins of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yongqiang; Xu Jingxuan; Chen Junying; Wu Yan; Zhang Chuanhong; Li Liang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical efficacy of foam sclerotherapy with lauromacrogol for varicose veins of the lower extremities. Methods: During the period from February to July 2011, we retrospectively analyzed 20 patients with varicose veins of the lower extremities, who were treated with lauromacrogol foam sclerosing agent injected directly at varicose veins, and in 5 extremities injected at the great saphenous vein (GSV) through a catheter at the same time. Elastic bandages were applied at the site of the injected varicosities after the therapy. The clogging of the varicose veins, the improvement of the clinical symptoms and the adverse reaction were observed. Results: Lauromacrogol foam sclerosing agent was successfully injected under the guidance of fluoroscopy in 20 patients with 28 affected extremities. The average volume of foam sclerosing agent in each affected extremity was 7.8 ml. All patients presented self limiting minor complications, including swelling and pain, which was obviously alleviated by the externally applied Mucopolysaccharide Polysulfate Cream. Two patients presented cough that was relieved after inhaling oxygen. Most of treated varicosities demonstrated pigmentation after the first week, which gradually disappeared after the four-month use of vitamin E capsule. A second foam sclerotherapy was carried out for 3 affected extremities of 3 patients two months after the first therapy. Two cases of leg venous ulcer were healed within a few weeks. All patients could walk immediately with no deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, anaphylaxis, or transient visual disturbance. Obvious abnormal varicose veins as well as the soreness and fatigue of the lower extremities disappeared in all patients at the 10th-month follow-up. The grading of the disease was significantly improved by the treatment (Z=5.103, P<0.01). Conclusions: The efficacy of lauromacrogol foam sclerosing agent in the treatment of varicose veins of the lower extremities is

  20. Outflow protection filters during percutaneous recanalization of lower extremities' arterial occlusions: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siablis, Dimitrios; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Ravazoula, Panagiota; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Kagadis, George C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Filter devices are already employed for the protection of carotid, coronary and renal distal vascular bed during endovascular procedures. This is a pilot study investigating their feasibility, safety and distal emboli protection capability during recanalization of lower extremities' acute and subacute occlusions. Materials and methods: Study population included 16 patients, 11 with a subacute arterial occlusion and 5 with an acute episode. The Trap filter (Microvena, USA) and its successor the Spider filter (EV3, USA) were utilized. Subacute occlusions were dealt with standard angioplasty and stenting procedures, while acute ones were managed primarily with Angiojet rheolytic thrombectomy. Outflow arterial tree was checked angiographically in-between consequent procedural steps. Embolic material collected after filter recovery was analyzed histopathologically. Patients' follow-up was scheduled at 1 month. Results: Seventeen filter baskets were applied in the recanalization of 16 target lesions in total. Mean length of the occluded segments was 6.1 (range: 2-15 cm; S.D. = 3.7 cm). Mean in situ time of the filters was 38.75 min (range: 20-60 min; S.D. 12.71 min). Technical success rate of deployment and utilization of the filtration devices was 100% (17/17). Procedural success rate of the recanalization was 100% (16/16) without any clinical or angiographic evidence of periprocedural distal embolization. Macroscopic particulate debris was extracted from all the filters (17/17) containing fresh thrombus, calcification minerals, cholesterol and fibrin. Mean diameter of the largest particle per specimen was 1702.80 (range: 373.20-4680.00 μm; S.D. 1155.12 μm). No adverse clinical events occurred at 1-month follow-up with 100% limb salvage (16/16). Conclusion: The application of outflow protection filters is safe, feasible and efficacious in hindering distal embolization complications and safeguarding the distal capillary bed. Nevertheless, this is a pilot study

  1. Outcomes of infrageniculate retrograde versus transfemoral access for endovascular intervention for chronic lower extremity ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ashraf G; Abou Ali, Adham N; Al-Khoury, George; Singh, Michael J; Makaroun, Michel S; Avgerinos, Efthymios D; Chaer, Rabih A

    2018-03-31

    Retrograde infrageniculate access is an alternative treatment strategy for patients who have failed to respond to antegrade endovascular intervention. This study compares the outcomes of infrageniculate retrograde arterial access with the conventional transfemoral access for the endovascular management of chronic lower extremity ischemia. This was a retrospective single-center review of retrograde endovascular intervention (REI) from 2012 to 2016. Indications for intervention, comorbidities, complications, procedural success, limb outcomes, and mortality were analyzed. Technical failure was defined as the inability to complete the procedure because of failed access or unsuccessful recanalization. Infrageniculate access and transfemoral access were obtained with ultrasound or angiographic roadmap guidance. Patency rates were calculated for technically successful interventions. There were 47 patients (85% presenting with critical limb ischemia) who underwent sheathless REI after failed antegrade recanalization of TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus class D infrainguinal lesions, whereas 93 patients (83% with critical limb ischemia) underwent standard transfemoral access. There were 16 (34%) femoropopliteal, 14 (30%) tibial, and 17 (36%) multilevel interventions in the retrograde group compared with 41 (41%) femoropopliteal, 20 (20%) tibial, and 39 (39%) multilevel interventions in the transfemoral group. Access sites for the retrograde group included the dorsalis pedis (26%), midcalf peroneal (24%), anterior tibial (22%), posterior tibial (26%), and popliteal (2%) arteries. Overall technical success was achieved in 57% of the retrograde group compared with 78% of the transfemoral group. Mean follow-up was 20 months (range, 1-45 months). There were no significant differences in the primary patency rates between the two groups at 1 year and 2 years. The primary assisted patency rates were significantly better in the transfemoral group at 1 year (66% vs 46%; P

  2. [Treatment of postoperative nonunion of fracture of lower limb with bone grafting by intervertebral disc endoscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianlin; Tan, Yu'e; Ye, Jun; Han, Fangmin

    2012-02-01

    To explore the effectiveness of bone grafting by intervertebral disc endoscope for postoperative nonunion of fracture of lower limb. Between August 2004 and August 2008, 40 patients (23 males and 17 females) with postoperative nonunion of femoral and tibial fracture, aged 20-63 years (mean, 41.5 years) were treated. Nonunion of fracture occurred at 10-16 months after internal fixation. During the first operation, the internal fixation included interlocking intramedullary nailing of femoral fracture in 12 cases and plate in 16 cases, and interlocking intramedullary nailing of tibial fractures in 9 cases and plate in 3 cases. The X-ray films showed hypertrophic nonunion in 24 cases, common nonunion in 3 cases, and atrophic nonunion in 13 cases. The average operation time was 61 minutes (range, 40-80 minutes), and the blood loss was 80-130 mL (mean, 100 mL). The hospitalization time were 6-11 days (mean, 8.1 days). Incisions healed by first intention in all patients with no complication of infection or neurovascular injury. Forty patients were followed up 10-16 months (mean, 12.3 months). The X-ray films showed that all patients achieved healing of fracture after 4-10 months (mean, 6.8 months). No pain, disfunction, or internal fixation failure occurred. Bone grafting by intervertebral disc endoscope is an effective method for treating postoperative nonunion of femoral and tibial fracture.

  3. Lower extremity kinetics in tap dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Lester; Bronner, Shaw; Agraharasamakulam, Sujani; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2010-01-01

    Tap dance is a unique performing art utilizing the lower extremities as percussion instruments. In a previous study these authors reported decreased injury prevalence among tap dancers compared to other dance and sports participants. No biomechanical analyses of tap dance exist to explain this finding. The purpose of the current pilot study was to provide a preliminary overview of normative peak kinetic and kinematic data, based on the hypothesis that tap dance generates relatively low ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments. Six professional tap dancers performed four common tap dance sequences that produced data captured by the use of a force platform and a five-camera motion analysis system. The mean vertical ground reaction force for all sequences was found to be 2.06+/-0.55 BW. Mean peak sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane joint moments (hip, knee, and ankle) ranged from 0.07 to 2.62 N.m/kg. These small ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments support our hypothesis, and may explain the relatively low injury incidence in tap dancers. Nevertheless, the analysis is highly complex, and other factors remain to be studied and clarified.

  4. Accuracy and consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy in upper and lower extremity fracture treatment: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerekamp, M. S. H. Suzan; Sulkers, George S. I.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Maas, Mario; Schep, Niels W. L.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this systematic review was to compare the diagnostic accuracy, subjective image quality and clinical consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy with standard imaging modalities (2D-fluoroscopy, X-ray or CT) during reduction and fixation of intra-articular upper and lower extremity

  5. THE COMPARISON OF HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE AND ROPIVACAINE USAGE IN SPINAL ANESTHESIA AT HIP AND LOWER EXTREMITY SURGERY

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    Aynur sahin

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: Ropivacaine and bupivacaine usage in hip and lower extremity surgery may provide hemodynamic stability, therefore we suggest that ropivacaine and bupivacaine are safe to use in spinal anesthesia for this kind of processes. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 36-41

  6. Prevalence, incidence and course of lower extremity injuries in runners during a 12-month follow-up period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppel van, D.; Scholten-Peeters, G G M; van Middelkoop, M.; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2014-01-01

    To describe the incidence, 12-month prevalence, and course of lower extremity injuries that occurred during and after the Amgen Singelloop Breda in 2009. The design was based on a prospective cohort study with a population-based setting. In total, 3605 registered runners received a web-based

  7. Assessment of coagulation function and ultrasound features after reteplase and recombinant streptokinase thrombolysis of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

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    Wei Xiong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess coagulation function and ultrasound features after reteplase and recombinant streptokinase thrombolysis of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. Methods: A total of 78 cases of patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombosis who were treated in our hospital were selected as research subjects and divided into observation group 39 cases and control group 39 cases according to different treatment regimens. Control group received recombinant streptokinase thrombolysis, observation group received reteplase thrombolysis, and then the effect of the two thrombolytic ways was evaluated by color Doppler ultrasonography and circulating blood test. Results: Ultrasound showed that complete recanalization rate of thrombus of observation group after treatment was higher than that of control group; plasma PT, APTT and TT values of observation group after thrombolysis were higher than those of control group, FIB, D-D, NO, ET, E-selectin, P-selectin, Hcy, CRP, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-毩 values were lower than those of control group, and WBC, Nc and Mc cell number were less than those of control group. Conclusion: Reteplase for thrombolysis of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis has more distinguished effect on dissolving thrombus as well as optimizing body’s coagulation, inflammatory system state and other aspects, and is a more ideal thrombolytic drug.

  8. [Possibilities of endoscopic surgery in treatment of chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarenko, V A; Okhotnikov, O I; Prokopov, V A; Kopeĭko, I L; Bobrovskaia, E A; Es'kov, V P; Tulupova, L N

    2005-01-01

    The authors present their experiences with endoscopic dissection of perforating veins in patients with severe forms of chronic venous insufficiency with special reference to the peculiarities of blood supply of the extremity superficial tissue. The generalized morphological description of the perforating arteriovenous structures of the leg is presented as a vascular formation including the arteries and veins put in the general connective-tissue vagina and beginning from the profound or/and muscular veins and arteries. Operations were made on 56 patients aged 25-76 years, 40 of them had postthrombotic disease, 16 - varicose disease. The endoscopic subfascial dissection of the perforating veins was conducted using the standard set of tools for laparoscopic surgery of K. Storz Company. During the surgical procedure the perforating vascular bunch in the subfascial space was isolated, the veins were intersected electrosurgically, the other parts of the vascular bunch were preserved. On the average, the patients were in the hospital for 7+/-2 days. Trophic ulcers healed up during 7-30 days. Long-term results were good in 30%, satisfactory in 64%, unsatisfactory - in 6%. So, the selective endoscopical dissection of perforating veins is thought to be a radical, minimally invasive, anatomically and functionally reasonable method of elimination of the horizontal venous blood regurgitation. This technique resulted in a considerably decreased number of postoperative complications and less time of hospital treatment.

  9. Ultrasonographic, quantitative comparison of lower extremity lymphedema versus normal control. Technical note with case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lôbo de Carvalho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of tissue by ultrasonography (CATUS is a modern-day research endeavor intended to improve visual perception and image quantification. Visual perception increases with color. Quantification focuses on pixel echo brightnesses. A previously presented case report demonstrated reappearance of lymphatic channels a few days after manual drainage. Ultrasonographic images (US of lymphatic leg and foot were quantitated and compared to a normal extremity based on proportions of pixels in specific brightness intervals. Anatomy evaluated included control- subcutaneous and lymphatic compartments. US with 256 brightness levels were obtained at the proximal, mid and distal leg and foot. Control and lymphatic Gray Scale Medians (GSM and histograms were compared using t-test and Chi-square statistics. Average GSM was 97±9 (SD (82-114, n=12 images for control, greater than 51±15 (24-69, n=12 for lymphedematous leg/foot (P99% of pixels with brightness in the muscle-fiber range (41-196, in contrast to 62% for the lymphatic extremity (P<0.001. Lymphedema averaged 7%, 3%, 15% and 14% of pixels in blood, blood/fat, fat and fat/muscle-like regions (0-4, 5-7, 8-26, 27- 40 brightness intervals. Such regions were visually interpreted as lymphatic channels or lakes. Visual perception by colorization is subjective, but most people perceives details better, for example, during the day than at night. Furthermore, US images have 16 times more shades of gray, 256, than that perceived by the human visual system, 16 on average. Colorization improved perception of lymphatic channels and lakes by transforming blood echoes into red and lymphatic liquid with echoes similar to fat into yellow. Pixel proportions in low brightness intervals were higher in the lymphatic than in the normal extremity. Lymphedema severity was quantified. The CATUS technique may be used to monitor treatment effects or disease evolution.

  10. Anatomy of the subcutaneous tissue of the trunk and lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, B; Barton, F E

    1987-08-01

    Dissections on 8 fresh and 10 embalmed cadavers were used to determine the anatomy of the subcutaneous adipose tissue in the trunk and extremities. These dissections, along with CT scans, confirmed Gray's original description of the subcutaneous tissue consisting of a superficial and deep adipose layer. The superficial adipose layer is contained within organized, compact fascial septa. The deep adipose layer demonstrated regional variations with respect to its fascial framework, but was contained within a relatively loose, less organized, and more widely spaced fascial septa. We observed that the adipose layers are partitioned by a discrete subcutaneous fascia which fuses with the underlying muscle fascia at particular anatomic locations. The deep layer is thus contained by the subcutaneous fascia above and the muscle fascia below to form what we termed the deep adipose compartments. The deep adipose compartments contributed significantly to overall adipose thickness, are bilateral, and are found in the abdomen and paralumbar and gluteal-thigh regions.

  11. The application of bilateral femoral vein approaches in interventional treatment of deep venous thrombosis of left lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiuping; Liu Jian; Wang Bin; Yao Zhongqiang; Zhang Yan; Li Chen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of interventional catheterization with bilateral femoral vein approaches for performing the thrombolytic treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis of left lower extremity. Methods: Antegrade puncturing into the left femoral vein was carried out in eighteen patients with acute deep vein thrombosis in the left lower extremity after left iliac-femoral vein catheterization via the right femoral vein or the right jugular vein access failed. When the puncturing of the left femoral vein was successfully done and was confirmed by angiography, the guide wire was inserted into the inferior vena cava and was pulled out through the right femoral vein or right jugular vein, and a wire track was thus established. Then, retrograde insertion of the catheter was conducted along the wire from the right to the left until the catheter was placed into the left iliac-femoral vein for thrombolysis. Results: Of 18 cases,successful puncturing into the left femoral vein was achieved in 16, and an effective wire track was established between the left and right femoral veins, based on which the catheter was smoothly inserted into the left iliac-femoral vein via the right femoral vein or jugular vein. Catheter thrombolysis was employed for 3 to 14 days, the thrombus was completely dissolved and the lower extremity swelling subsided. During the course of thrombolysis, no obvious congestion or hematoma occurred at the puncturing site of the left femoral vein. Conclusion: For patients with deep vein thrombosis of left lower extremity, when left iliac-femoral vein catheterization via the right femoral vein or the right jugular vein access failed, the establishment of wire track by using bilateral femoral vein approaches for further catheterization of left iliac-femoral vein and subsequent thrombolysis is feasible in clinical practice. This technique is safe and minimally-invasive with higher success rate. (authors)

  12. In-111 platelet scintigraphy for detection of lower-extremity deep venous thrombophlebitis: Are 4-hour delayed images sufficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Ponto, J.A.; Kimball, D.A.; Frey, E.E.; Coughlan, J.D.; Ahmed, F.; Jensen, K.C.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-one nonheparinized patients suspected of having lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis underwent 4- and 24-hour In-111-labeled platelet scintigraphy (PS) and lower-extremity contrast venography (CV). Eleven of the 21 patients (52%) had one or more intraluminal filling defects on CV, indicating active thrombophlebitis. In seven of these 11 patients (64%) In-PS was abnormal at 4 hours, and in ten (91%) at 24 hours. All patients with abnormal studies at 4 hours showed greater uptake of more abnormal sites at 24 hours. Of the ten patients with CV-negative studies, two had abnormal bilateral lower pelvis/upper thigh uptake in In-PS at 24 hours. These two In-PS studies were considered to be false positive. Twenty-four-hour In-PS images are necessary if 4-hour images show faint focal uptake of asymmetric blood pool activity, or are normal

  13. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  14. Application of sub-regional analysis to bone mineral density of the lower limb from whole body DXA scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddaway, Michael J; Davie, Michael W J; Davies, Helen L; Sharp, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral density at spine and hip is widely used to diagnose osteoporosis. Certain conditions cause changes in bone density at other sites, particularly in the lower limb, with fractures occurring in non-classical locations. Bone density changes at these sites would be of interest for diagnosis and treatment. We describe an application, based on an existing software option for Hologic scanners, which allows reproducible measurement of bone density at six lower limb sites (upper femur, mid-femur, lower femur; upper leg, mid-leg, lower leg). In 30 unselected subjects, referred for bone density, precision (CV%) measured on 2 occasions, separated by repositioning, ranged from 1.7% (mid-femur) to 4.5% at the lowest leg site. Intra-operator precision, measured by three operators on ten subjects on three occasions, was between 1.0% and 2.9%, whilst inter-operator precision was between 1.0% and 3.6%, according to region. These values compare well with those at the spine and upper femur, and in the literature. There was no evidence that this operator agreement improved between occasions 1 and 3. This technique promises to be useful for assessing bone changes at vulnerable sites in the lower limb, in diverse pathological states and in assessing response to treatment. (paper)

  15. Multiple myeloma of an extremity: must the whole bone be irradiated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catell, Donna; Kogen, Zeev; Donahue, Bernadine; Steinfeld, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radiation of the entire shaft of a long bone affected by multiple myeloma is often advocated to prevent recurrent disease in the bone remote from the symptomatic site. Our standard of care has been to irradiate only the symptomatic area. We investigated the pattern of recurrence in patients treated in this manner. Materials and Methods: 163 patients with multiple myeloma were treated between 1971 and 1994. Twenty-seven patients received treatment to a long bone with 43 sites irradiated (17 humeri, 24 femurs, 1 radius, 1 ulna.) The most common long bone treated was the femur. All patients were treated with megavoltage therapy. The symptomatic lesion, plus a margin of 1-2 cm was treated with no attempt to treat the entire shaft. Mean radiation dose was 2782 cGy (range 600-4480 cGy). The length of the field was measured in centimeters and expressed as both an absolute (AL) and relative (RL) length (i.e. percentage of total length of bone). Results: The mean total AL and RL for femur fields was 18 cm and 42% respectively. For the humerus, the AL and RL were 20 cm and 68% respectively. Only 4 patients developed progressive disease in the same bone but outside the previously irradiated field. In 3 of the 4 patients the RL was between 20 and 30%. The dose of radiation given to these patients was 1250, 2100, 3000 and 3500 cGy. In all of these 4 cases, treatment of progressive disease in adjacent sites provided effective palliation of symptoms. Conclusion: Radiation therapy to the symptomatic portion of a long bone affected by MM is effective for palliation. Symptomatic recurrence out of the irradiated field is uncommon and can be effectively treated. Potential benefits of this approach include irradiation of less normal marrow and elimination of use of pairs of fields or extended distance treatment to cover the entire femur

  16. [Multiple fractures of the lower extremities (a propos of 50 patients)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzard, R C; Kudela, I

    1975-04-01

    According to a study of 50 multiple fractures of the lower limbs, the frequency of associated lesions justifies the creation of new multiple injury units, well equipped in which may be found specialists of all branches of surgery. Although internal fixation in one stage as an emergency, is ideal in all fractures, one should in fact be circumspect for the danger of infection should lead one to avoid carrying out internal fixation if this is not absolutely necessary.

  17. Effects of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis on Kinematics and Kinetics of the Lower Extremities Call for Consequences in Physical Activities Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, M.; Kreuzpointner, F.; Haefner, R.; Michels, H.; Schwirtz, A.; Haas, J. P.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients (n = 36) with symmetrical polyarticular joint involvement of the lower extremities and healthy controls (n = 20) were compared concerning differences in kinematic, kinetic, and spatio-temporal parameters with 3D gait analysis. The aims of this study were to quantify the differences in gait between JIA patients and healthy controls and to provide data for more detailed sport activities recommendations. JIA-patients showed reduced walking speed and s...

  18. Lower trabecular volumetric BMD at metaphyseal regions of weight-bearing bones is associated with prior fracture in young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Tomás, Rita; Chen, Zhao; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Lohman, Timothy G; Going, Scott B

    2011-02-01

    Understanding the etiology of skeletal fragility during growth is critical for the development of treatments and prevention strategies aimed at reducing the burden of childhood fractures. Thus we evaluated the relationship between prior fracture and bone parameters in young girls. Data from 465 girls aged 8 to 13 years from the Jump-In: Building Better Bones study were analyzed. Bone parameters were assessed at metaphyseal and diaphyseal sites of the nondominant femur and tibia using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess femur, tibia, lumbar spine, and total body less head bone mineral content. Binary logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between prior fracture and bone parameters, controlling for maturity, body mass, leg length, ethnicity, and physical activity. Associations between prior fracture and all DXA and pQCT bone parameters at diaphyseal sites were nonsignificant. In contrast, lower trabecular volumetric BMD (vBMD) at distal metaphyseal sites of the femur and tibia was significantly associated with prior fracture. After adjustment for covariates, every SD decrease in trabecular vBMD at metaphyseal sites of the distal femur and tibia was associated with 1.4 (1.1-1.9) and 1.3 (1.0-1.7) times higher fracture prevalence, respectively. Prior fracture was not associated with metaphyseal bone size (ie, periosteal circumference). In conclusion, fractures in girls are associated with lower trabecular vBMD, but not bone size, at metaphyseal sites of the femur and tibia. Lower trabecular vBMD at metaphyseal sites of long bones may be an early marker of skeletal fragility in girls. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Asymmetry of magnetic motor evoked potentials recorded in calf muscles of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olex-Zarychta, Dorota; Koprowski, Robert; Sobota, Grzegorz; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2009-08-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of magnetic stimulation and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in motor asymmetry studies by obtaining quantitative and qualitative measures of efferent activity during low intensity magnetic stimulation of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremities. Magnetic stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa was performed in 10 healthy male right-handed and right-footed young adults. Responses were recorded from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscles of the right and left lower extremities. Response characteristics (duration, onset latency, amplitude) were analyzed in relation to the functional dominance of the limbs and in relation to the direction of the current in the magnetic coil by use of the Wilcoxon pair sequence test. The CCW direction of coil current was related to reduced amplitudes of recorded MEPs. Greater amplitudes of evoked potentials were recorded in the non-dominant extremity, both in the CW and CCW coil current directions, with the statistical significance of this effect (p=0.005). No differences in duration of response were found in the CW current direction, while in CCW the time of the left-side response was prolonged (p=0.01). In the non-dominant extremity longer onset latencies were recorded in both current directions, but only for the CW direction the side asymmetries showed a statistical significance of p=0.005. In the dominant extremity the stimulation correlated with stronger paresthesias, especially using the CCW direction of coil current. The results indicate that low intensity magnetic stimulation may be useful in quantitative and qualitative research into the motor asymmetry.

  20. [Symmetrical phlebothrombosis of lower extremities resulting from congenital malformation of vena cava inferior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcín, A; Kovácová, E; Mikla, F; Reptová, A; Bedeová, J

    2009-12-01

    Agenesis/atresia ofvena cava inferior is a rare congenital anomaly, caused by an aberrance of embryonal venous system development. This is in most cases asymptomatic, because of well developed collateral venous circulation. However, in some cases, it can be manifested with occurence of deep thrombosis in area of pelvis and lower limbs. In this case report, we repon a 21 year old male with painful swelling of both lower limbs. Ultrasonographic examination revealed a bilateral thrombosis in deep venous system of lower limbs and pelvis. Subsequent CT angiography showed atresia ofinfrarenal segment ofvena cava inferior. According to the CT image thrombotic proces affected also collateral venous system, that joined mostly to vena azygos and hemiazygos. Examination of coagulation system didn't reveal a procuring cause ofthrombotic occurrence. We realized a systemic trombolysis with streptokinase during 5 days. Starting from the fifth day we administered a low molecular weight heparin in anticoagulant dose. This treatment showed a good clinical effect. Pacient was discharged with a long-term oral warfarin therapy in combination with acetylsalicylic acid. In next four months of taking recommended therapy no relapse of thrombotic process nor evolvement of bleeding complication was observed.

  1. Incomplete palmar fracture of the proximal extremity of the third metacarpal bone in horses: ten cases (1981-1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, K.C.K.; Koblik, P.; Ragle, C.; Wheat, J.D.; Lakritz, J.

    1988-01-01

    In 4 adult horses, simple, non displaced, incomplete fracture of the proximal extremity of the third metacarpal bone (MC3) was identified radiographically only on the dorsopalmar projection. Lameness was slight to moderate. Although nerve blocks of the foot and fetlock did not alter the lameness, high palmar regional nerve block improved the gait in 1 of the 2 horses on which it was performed. Pain on palpation or swollen distal accessory (inferior check) ligament, flexor tendons, and suspensory ligament were not found in any horse. The fracture was localized to the palmar surface of the proximal extremity of the MC3 on the basis of the intense uptake of radiopharmaceutical (99MTc-labeled sodium medronate) observed in that area during the soft tissue and delayed bone phases of a nuclear scintigraphic examination (nuclear scan) performed concurrently with radiography. Of 4 horses evaluated 6 months after the initial diagnosis, 3 had medullary sclerosis without radiographic evidence of fracture; results of follow-up nuclear scintigraphy performed in one of these horses at the same time were normal. Incomplete fracture also was suspected in another 6 adult horses with clinical lameness referable to the proximal extremity of the MC3. Although a fracture line could not be seen radiographically, trabecular hypertrophy and/or medullary sclerosis of the proximal extremity of the MC3 were detected on the dorsopalmar projection. Further, during nuclear scintigraphy, an intense uptake of the radiopharmaceutical was observed on the palmar aspect of the proximal extremity of the MC3 in all 6 horses

  2. Comparative measurements of mineral salt concentrations in the calcaneus by 125I γ-absorption measurement in the course of fractures of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrlich, P.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of 52 patients aged between 16 and 78 years, all with fractures of the lower extremities, BMC concentrations were determined in a period from 10 weeks to 50 month after the accident in both calcaneal bones and the right ulna. The gamma absorption measurements were carried out in a single-isotope technique in a water bath, using a 125 I source as radionuclides. The results were evaluated by planimetrisation of the absorption curve. The patients were divided in groups according to clinically complicated, clinically uncomplicated, radiologically demineralized, and radiologically and clinically uncomplicated healing. In 11 patients, up to 4 measurements were also carried out as course control measures. The results differed in dependence of the patients' age. The localisation of the fracture had no effect on the degree of demineralisation. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Pyogenic Arthritis of the Ankle Joint Following a High-Voltage Electrical Burn in the Lower Extremity: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kuk Seon; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Lee, Eil Seong; Min, Seon Jung; Han, You Mie [Dept. of Radiology, Hangang Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eil Seong [Dept.of Radiology, Gyeongju Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    A high-voltage electrical burn caused extensive deep muscle injuries beneath a relatively small skin wound at the contact point. Hidden, undetected deep muscle injuries have a tendency for progressive tissue necrosis, which can lead to major amputations or sepsis. The radiologic features of this rare, sometimes life-threatening injury have occasionally been described in the literature. However, to the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports on a case of pyogenic arthritis of the ankle joint following a high-voltage electrical burn involving the lower extremity. We report a case of the pyogenic arthritis of the ankle joint following a high-voltage electrical burn involving the lower extremity.

  4. A new concept for evaluating muscle function in the lower extremities in cases of low back pain syndrome in anamnesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Lisiński

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available introduction. There are difficulties in objective evaluation of activity of the muscles in the lower extremities of patients after successful treatment of sciatica and pseudosciatica, when no clear clinical symptoms are detected. However, the existence of some muscle dysfunction can be hypothesised and its detection was the aim of the study. objective. Recordings from chosen lower extremity muscles during standing were performed as supplementary differential diagnosis in evaluation of these patients. EMG in standing positions constitutes a new methodological approach not described in detail. methods. Twenty patients (11 after sciatica and 9 after sciatica-like episodes were enrolled into the study. On the day of examination, clinical and electroneurographical (ENG; M and F waves tests studies showed no pathology. The percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC defined muscle activity during standing. Mean amplitude and number of changes in muscle activity (fluctuations were measured in surface electromyography recordings (sEMG during normal standing and tandem positions. results and conclusions. Activity of proximal lower extremity muscles expressed as percentage of MVC was bilaterally increased in patients after sciatica in normal standing position, compared with results from the group of healthy volunteers (N=9. Patients after sciatica were also characterized with a significant increase of mean sEMG amplitude, recorded especially in distal muscles on the affected side during tandem position. This pathological change was related to decrease in ‘fluctuations’ frequency in patients after sciatica (P<0.001 more than after pseudosciatica (P<0.01 groups in both standing positions, compared to parameters of healthy volunteers. Sciatica and pseudosciatica in anamnesis cause different abnormal patterns of lower extremity muscle activity during standing positions when recorded with surface EMG.

  5. Uncontacted tire explosion causing trauma to bilateral lower extremities: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming-Yang; Su, Yun; Meng, Xiang-Jun; Luan, Bo-Wu; Gu, Gui-Shan; Sun, Qiang; Zhao, De-Wei

    2017-06-01

    It is uncommon for tire explosion related injuries on the lower extremity. The bilateral lower extremities were injured by tire explosion when the patient was seated in a bus. She sustained an open fracture with partial bone loss in the right calcaneus (a comminuted fracture in the right ankle joint) and a closed comminuted fracture in the left tibia and fibula. This damage was caused by uncontacted tire explosion, thanks to a thick floor between the exploded tire and the patient's feet. This type of injury on lower extremity caused by uncontacted tire explosion was uncommon. Copyright © 2017 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and psychometric properties of the Basic Amputee Mobility Score for use in patients with a major lower extremity amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Tange; Nielsen, Anni Østergaard; Topp, Ulla Madsen

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To develop and examine the psychometric properties, including responsiveness and interrater reliability, of a new outcome measure for the evaluation of basic mobility activities after a major lower extremity amputation - The Basic Amputee Mobility Score (BAMS). METHODS: The four following es...... a large responsiveness, excellent interrater reliability and with a change of 1 point indicating a real change in performances. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••....

  7. The application of DSA bolus chase technology in diagnosing the vascular disorders of lower extremities due to diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Chongyang; Di Zhenhai; Mao Xuequn; Zou Rong; Zhang Jian; Wang Meirong; Li Quan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively evaluate the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) bolus chase technology in diagnosing the vascular disorders of lower extremities due to diabetes mellitus. Methods: From January 2004 to March 2010, DSA was performed in forty-five diabetes patients with suspicious vascular diseases of lower extremities. Among them, 24 cases (31 lower limbs)were examined with DSA bolus chase technology and the remaining 21 cases (21 lower limbs)were examined with traditional segmentational technique. The contrast dosage used in angiography, the total exposure time, the examination time and the imaging value for making diagnosis were analyzed and compared between two techniques. Results: For DSA bolus chase technology group, the contrast dosage used in angiography, the total exposure time and the examination time were 25.26 ml, 13.23 s and 37.26 min, respectively,with an average exposure of 101.65 pictures. For traditional segmentational technique group, the contrast dosage used in angiography, the total exposure time and the examination time were 130.00 ml, 52.38 s and 50.48 min, respectively, with an average exposure of 118.33 pictures. The percentage of high quality images in bolus chase technology group and in traditional segmentational technique group were 90.3% and 90.5%, respectively. All the images could meet the requirements for making a reliable diagnosis. Conclusion: Digital subtraction angiography by using bolus-chase technology can well demonstrate the vascular pathology of lower extremities caused by diabetes mellitus, obtain sufficient imaging information necessary for making a reliable diagnosis. DSA bolus chase technology is superior to traditional segmentational technique in shortening procedure time, reducing contrast medium dosage and decreasing radiation dose. (authors)

  8. Should fractures in massive intercalary bone allografts of the lower limb be treated with ORIF or with a new allograft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-Tinao, Luis A; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, D Luis; Farfalli, Germán L

    2015-03-01

    Massive bone allografts have been used for limb salvage of bone tumor resections as an alternative to endoprostheses, although they have different outcomes and risks. There is no general consensus about when to use these alternatives, but when it is possible to save the native joints after the resection of a long bone tumor, intercalary allografts offer some advantages despite complications, such as fracture. The management and outcomes of this complication deserve more study. The purposes of this study were to (1) analyze the fracture frequency in a group of patients treated with massive intercalary bone allografts of the femur and tibia; (2) compare the results of allografts treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with those treated with resection and repeat allograft reconstruction; and (3) determine the likelihood that treatment of a fracture resulted in a healed intercalary reconstruction. We reviewed patients treated with intercalary bone allografts between 1991 and 2011. During this period, patients were generally treated with intercalary allografts when after tumor resection at least 1 cm of residual epiphysis remained to allow fixation of the osteotomy junction. To obtain a homogeneous group of patients, we excluded allograft-prosthesis composites and osteoarticular and hemicylindrical intercalary allografts from this study. We analyzed the fracture rate of 135 patients reconstructed with segmental intercalary bone allografts of the lower extremities (98 femurs and 37 tibias). In patients whose grafts fractured were treated either by internal fixation or a second allograft, ORIF generally was attempted but after early failures in femur fractures, these fractures were treated with a second allograft. Using a chart review, we ascertained the frequency of osseous union, complications, and reoperations after the treatment of fractured intercalary allografts. Followup was at a mean of 101 months (range, 24-260 months); of the original 135

  9. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    OpenAIRE

    Gozani, Shai

    2016-01-01

    Shai N Gozani NeuroMetrix, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be ...

  10. Permissive weight bearing in trauma patients with fracture of the lower extremities: prospective multicenter comparative cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmet, Pishtiwan H S; Meys, Guido; V Horn, Yvette Y; Evers, Silvia M A A; Seelen, Henk A M; Hustinx, Paul; Janzing, Heinrich; Vd Veen, Alexander; Jaspars, Coen; Sintenie, Jan Bernard; Blokhuis, Taco J; Poeze, Martijn; Brink, Peter R G

    2018-02-02

    The standard aftercare treatment in surgically treated trauma patients with fractures around or in a joint, known as (peri)- or intra-articular fractures of the lower extremities, is either non-weight bearing or partial weight bearing. We have developed an early permissive weight bearing post-surgery rehabilitation protocol in surgically treated patients with fractures of the lower extremities. In this proposal we want to compare our early permissive weight bearing protocol to the existing current non-weight bearing guidelines in a prospective comparative cohort study. The study is a prospective multicenter comparative cohort study in which two rehabilitation aftercare treatments will be contrasted, i.e. permissive weight bearing and non-weight bearing according to the AO-guideline. The study population consists of patients with a surgically treated fracture of the pelvis/acetabulum or a surgically treated (peri)- or intra-articular fracture of the lower extremities. The inclusion period is 12 months. The duration of follow up is 6 months, with measurements taken at baseline, 2,6,12 and 26 weeks post-surgery. ADL with Lower Extremity Functional Scale. Outcome variables for compliance, as measured with an insole pressure measurement system, encompass peak load and step duration. This study will investigate the (cost-) effectiveness of a permissive weight bearing aftercare protocol. The results will provide evidence whether a permissive weight bearing protocol is more effective than the current non-weight bearing protocol. The study is registered in the Dutch Trial Register ( NTR6077 ). Date of registration: 01-09-2016.

  11. Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluys, Kerstin Prignitz; Shults, Justine; Richmond, Therese S

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impact on health related quality of life (HRQL) during the first year after minor extremity injury and to determine whether there is a difference in recovery patterns and return to work between upper extremity injuries (UEI) and lower extremity injuries (LEI). A total of 181 adults' age 18 years or older randomly selected from patients admitted to an emergency department with minor injuries were studied. HRQL was measured using the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ) at 1-2 weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months post-injury. Pre-injury FSQ scores were measured retrospectively at admission. A quasi-least square (QLS) model was constructed to examine differences of FSQ scores at each measuring point for UEI and LEI. Fractures of the knee/lower leg (25%) were the most frequently injured body area. Slips or falls (57%) and traffic-related events (22%) were the most common injury causes. The mean ISS was 4.2 (SD 0.86). Both groups had significant declines in the FSQ scores physical and social functioning at 1-2 weeks after injury. Patients with UEI made larger improvements in the first 3 months post-injury versus patients with LEI whose improvements extended over the first 6 months. None of the groups reached the pre-injury FSQ scores during the first post-injury year except in the subscale work performance where UEI exceeded the pre-injury scores. At 12 months post-injury, significant lower FSQ scores remained in the LEI group compared to the UEI group in intermediate activities of daily living (p=0.036, d 0.4) and work performance (p=0.004, d 0.7). The return to work at 3 months and 12 months were 76% and 88% for UEI and 58% and 77% for LEI. No significant differences were found between groups in the FSQ scale mental health and social interaction. LEI had the highest impact on HRQL and return to work during the first year which exceeded the consequences of UEI. These findings contribute to the information about the consequences of injury in order to give

  12. Defining the Lower Limit of a "Critical Bone Defect" in Open Diaphyseal Tibial Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Nikkole M; Lack, William D; Seymour, Rachel B; Bosse, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    To determine healing outcomes of open diaphyseal tibial shaft fractures treated with reamed intramedullary nailing (IMN) with a bone gap of 10-50 mm on ≥50% of the cortical circumference and to better define a "critical bone defect" based on healing outcome. Retrospective cohort study. Forty patients, age 18-65, with open diaphyseal tibial fractures with a bone gap of 10-50 mm on ≥50% of the circumference as measured on standard anteroposterior and lateral postoperative radiographs treated with IMN. IMN of an open diaphyseal tibial fracture with a bone gap. Level-1 trauma center. Healing outcomes, union or nonunion. Forty patients were analyzed. Twenty-one (52.5%) went on to nonunion and nineteen (47.5%) achieved union. Radiographic apparent bone gap (RABG) and infection were the only 2 covariates predicting nonunion outcome (P = 0.046 for infection). The RABG was determined by measuring the bone gap on each cortex and averaging over 4 cortices. Fractures achieving union had a RABG of 12 ± 1 mm versus 20 ± 2 mm in those going on to nonunion (P gaps have a higher probability of nonunion. Research investigating interventions for RABGs should use a predictive threshold for defining a critical bone defect that is associated with greater than 50% risk of nonunion without supplementary treatment. Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. Manipulating the fidelity of lower extremity visual feedback to identify obstacle negotiation strategies in immersive virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Zhou, Zixuan; Kretch, Kari S; Finley, James M

    2017-07-01

    The ability to successfully navigate obstacles in our environment requires integration of visual information about the environment with estimates of our body's state. Previous studies have used partial occlusion of the visual field to explore how information about the body and impending obstacles are integrated to mediate a successful clearance strategy. However, because these manipulations often remove information about both the body and obstacle, it remains to be seen how information about the lower extremities alone is utilized during obstacle crossing. Here, we used an immersive virtual reality (VR) interface to explore how visual feedback of the lower extremities influences obstacle crossing performance. Participants wore a head-mounted display while walking on treadmill and were instructed to step over obstacles in a virtual corridor in four different feedback trials. The trials involved: (1) No visual feedback of the lower extremities, (2) an endpoint-only model, (3) a link-segment model, and (4) a volumetric multi-segment model. We found that the volumetric model improved success rate, placed their trailing foot before crossing and leading foot after crossing more consistently, and placed their leading foot closer to the obstacle after crossing compared to no model. This knowledge is critical for the design of obstacle negotiation tasks in immersive virtual environments as it may provide information about the fidelity necessary to reproduce ecologically valid practice environments.

  14. Effect of vibration on muscle strength imbalance in lower extremity using multi-control whole body vibration platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chang Ho; Seo, Shin Bae; Kang, Seung Rok; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study shows the improvement of muscle activity and muscle strength imbalance in the lower extremities through independent exercise loads in vibration platform. Twenty females of age 20 participated in this study. The subjects were divided into WBV group, with more than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities, and control group, with less than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities. As the prior experiment showed, different exercise postures provide different muscular activities. As a result, the highest muscular activity was found to be in the low squat posture. Therefore, the LS posture was selected for the exercise in this experiment. Vibration intensities were applied to dominant muscle and non-dominant muscle, and the vibration frequency was fixed at 25Hz for the WBV group. The control group was asked to perform the same exercise as the WBV group, without stimulated vibration. This exercise was conducted for a total of 4 weeks. As a result, the WBV group which showed an average deviation of 16% before the experiment, tended to decrease approximately to 5%. In this study, vibration exercise using load deviation is shown to be effective in improving the muscle strength imbalance.

  15. Reliability and validity of a low load endurance strength test for upper and lower extremities in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Legaz-Arrese, Alejandro

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the reliability, standard error of the mean (SEM), clinical significant change, and known group validity of 2 assessments of endurance strength to low loads in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS). Cross-sectional reliability and comparative study. University Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain. Middle-aged women with FS (n=95) and healthy women (n=64) matched for age, weight, and body mass index (BMI) were recruited for the study. Not applicable. The endurance strength to low loads tests of the upper and lower extremities and anthropometric measures (BMI) were used for the evaluations. The differences between the readings (tests 1 and 2) and the SDs of the differences, intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) model (2,1), 95% confidence interval for the ICC, coefficient of repeatability, intrapatient SD, SEM, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine reliability. A Mann-Whitney U test was used to analyze the differences in test values between the patient group and the control group. We hypothesized that patients with FS would have an endurance strength to low loads performance in lower and upper extremities at least twice as low as that of the healthy controls. Satisfactory test-retest reliability and SEMs were found for the lower extremity, dominant arm, and nondominant arm tests (ICC=.973-.979; P.05 for all). The Bland-Altman plots showed 95% limits of agreement for the lower extremity (4.7 to -4.5), dominant arm (3.8 to -4.4), and nondominant arm (3.9 to -4.1) tests. The endurance strength to low loads test scores for the patients with FS were 4-fold lower than for the controls in all performed tests (P<.001 for all). The endurance strength to low loads tests showed good reliability and known group validity and can be recommended for evaluating endurance strength to low loads in patients with FS. For individual evaluation, however, an improved score of at least 4 and 5 repetitions for the upper and lower extremities

  16. Ischemic preconditioning of the lower extremity attenuates the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Gary P; Westerdahl, Daniel E; Foster, Laura A; Hsu, Jeffrey V; Anholm, James D

    2011-12-15

    Ischemic pre-condition of an extremity (IPC) induces effects on local and remote tissues that are protective against ischemic injury. To test the effects of IPC on the normal hypoxic increase in pulmonary pressures and exercise performance, 8 amateur cyclists were evaluated under normoxia and hypoxia (13% F(I)O(2)) in a randomized cross-over trial. IPC was induced using an arterial occlusive cuff to one thigh for 5 min followed by deflation for 5 min for 4 cycles. In the control condition, the resting pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) increased from a normoxic value of 25.6±2.3 mmHg to 41.8±7.2 mmHg following 90 min of hypoxia. In the IPC condition, the PASP increased to only 32.4±3.1 mmHg following hypoxia, representing a 72.8% attenuation (p=0.003). No significant difference was detected in cycle ergometer time trial duration between control and IPC conditions with either normoxia or hypoxia. IPC administered prior to hypoxic exposure was associated with profound attenuation of the normal hypoxic increase of pulmonary artery systolic pressure. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Greater milk intake is associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and higher bone microarchitecture index in a population of elderly Japanese men with relatively low dietary calcium intake: Fujiwara-kyo Osteoporosis Risk in Men (FORMEN) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Iki, M; Fujita, Y; Tamaki, J; Kouda, K; Yura, A; Moon, J-S; Winzenrieth, R; Iwaki, H; Ishizuka, R; Amano, N; Tomioka, K; Okamoto, N; Kurumatani, N

    2015-05-01

    The effects of milk intake on bone health are not clear in elderly Asian men with low dietary calcium intake. This study showed that greater milk intake is associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and higher bone microarchitecture index in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men. The consumption of milk or dairy products is widely recommended for maintaining bone health regardless of gender or age. However, little evidence exists on the beneficial effects of milk intake on bone health in elderly Japanese men characterized with relatively low dietary calcium intake. Here we examined whether or not greater milk intake was associated with lower bone turnover, higher bone density, and stronger bone microarchitecture in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men. Interviews were conducted to obtain information on medical history and lifestyle, including the amount of habitual milk intake, nutrient intake calculations based on a 1-week food diary, and measurements of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the lumbar spine (LS), total hip (TH), and femoral neck (FN) by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), trabecular bone score (TBS) using DXA images at LS, and biochemical markers of bone turnover in sera. Participants with a history of diseases or medications that affect bone metabolism, or with missing data, were excluded from the analysis. The median intake of milk in the 1479 participants (mean age, 73.0 ± 5.1 years) was one glass of milk per day. Bone turnover markers showed a decreasing trend (p turnover, higher aBMD, and higher TBS in community-dwelling elderly Japanese men.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Japanese version of the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS) for patients with malignant musculoskeletal tumors in the lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Koichi; Uehara, Kosuke; Akiyama, Toru; Iwata, Shintaro; Shinoda, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Saita, Kazuo; Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Kawano, Hirotaka; Chuman, Hirokazu; Davis, Aileen M; Kawai, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Before this work a Japanese version of the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), a disease-specific patient-completed questionnaire widely used to assess the physical function of patients with musculoskeletal tumors, had not been developed. The purpose of this study was cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the English-language version of the TESS to facilitate international comparisons of treatment results. The TESS was translated into Japanese, back-translated into English, and reviewed by a committee to develop a consensus Japanese version of the TESS. One hundred and two patients were assessed by use of this Japanese version to examine its reliability and validity. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency determined by using the intraclass correlation coefficient (0.941) and Cronbach's alpha test (0.978), respectively, were excellent. Factor analysis showed that the structure consisted of a three-item cluster; the Akaike information criterion (AIC) network also demonstrated that the items could be divided into three domains in accordance with their content. The Japanese version of the TESS correlated with the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society rating scale (r = 0.811; P TESS is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring patient-reported functional outcome for patients with lower extremity sarcoma, and that it enables international comparisons of treatment results. The spatial association of each item demonstrated by using the AIC network also suggested that the underlying structure of the TESS reflected its coverage of a wide range of physical functions.

  19. Factors Associated with Lower Extremity Dysmorphia Caused by Lower Extremity Lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Yamamoto, N; Yoshimatsu, H; Narushima, M; Koshima, I

    2017-07-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography has been reported to be useful for the early diagnosis of lymphoedema. However, no study has reported the usefulness of ICG lymphography for evaluation of lymphoedema with lower extremity dysmorphia (LED). This study aimed to elucidate independent factors associated with LED in secondary lower extremity lymphoedema (LEL) patients. This was a retrospective observational study of 268 legs of 134 secondary LEL patients. The medical charts were reviewed to obtain data of clinical demographics and ICG lymphography based severity stage (leg dermal backflow [LDB] stage). LED was defined as a leg with a LEL index of 250 or higher. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with LED. LED was observed in 106 legs (39.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that independent factors associated with LED were higher LDB stages compared with LDB stage 0 (LDB stage III; OR 17.586; 95% CI 2.055-150.482; p = .009) (LDB stage IV; OR 76.794; 95% CI 8.132-725.199; p < .001) (LDB stage V; OR 47.423; 95% CI 3.704-607.192; p = .003). On the other hand, inverse associations were observed in higher age (65 years or older; OR 0.409; 95% CI 0.190-0.881; p = .022) and higher body mass index (25 kg/m 2 or higher; OR 0.408; 95% CI 0.176-0.946; p = .037). Independent factors associated with LED were elucidated. ICG lymphography based severity stage showed the strongest association with LED, and was useful for evaluation of progressed LEL with LED. Copyright © 2017 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of Lower-Extremity Venous Thrombolysis in the Setting of Congenital Absence or Atresia of the Inferior Vena Cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguli, Suvranu; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Oklu, Rahmi; Walker, T. Gregory; Datta, Neil; Grabowski, Eric F.; Wicky, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A rare but described risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), predominately in the young, is congenital agenesis or atresia of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The optimal management for DVT in this subset of patients is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT) followed by systemic anticoagulation in the treatment of acute lower-extremity DVT in the setting of congenital IVC agenesis or atresia. Materials and Methods: Between November of 2005 and May of 2010, six patients (three women [average age 21 years]) were referred to our department with acute lower-extremity DVT and subsequently found to have IVC agenesis or atresia on magnetic resonance imaging. A standardized technique for PCDT (the Angiojet Rheolytic Thrombectomy System followed by the EKOS Microsonic Accelerated Thrombolysis System) was used for all subjects. Successful thrombolysis was followed by systemic heparinization with transition to Coumadin or low molecular-weight heparin and compression stockings. Subjects were followed-up at 1, 3, and then every 6 months after the procedure with clinical assessment and bilateral lower-extremity venous ultrasound. Results: All PCDT procedures were technically successful. No venous stenting or angioplasty was performed. The average thrombolysis time was 28.6 h (range 12–72). Two patients experienced heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and one patient developed a self-limited knee hemarthrosis, No patients were lost to follow-up. The average length of follow-up was 25.8 ± 20.2 months (range 3.8–54.8). No incidence of recurrent DVT was identified. There were no manifestations of postthrombotic syndrome. Conclusions: PCDT followed by systemic anticoagulation and the use of compression stockings appears to be safe and effective in relatively long-term follow-up treatment of patients who present with acute DVT and IVC agenesis or atresia.

  1. Playground slide-related injuries in preschool children: increased risk of lower extremity injuries when riding on laps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennissen, Charles A; Koos, Maggie; Denning, Gerene

    2018-04-10

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the factors associated with playground slide-related injuries in preschool children and to test the hypothesis that riding on laps increases the likelihood of lower extremity injuries. Playground slide-related injuries (product code 1242) in children ≤5 years of age treated in emergency departments from 2002 to 2015 were identified (N = 12,686) using the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Descriptive and comparative analyses, including chi-square testing and binary logistic regression, were performed. Based on NEISS stratified national sampling estimates, over 350,000 children ≤5 years of age were injured on slides from 2002 to 2015. Overall, 59% of the children were male, and 65% were white. Almost 60% of injuries occurred in parks or other public areas. The most frequent diagnosis was a fracture (36%); lacerations were 19% of the injuries. A higher proportion of musculoskeletal injuries were seen in toddlers < 3 years old as compared to those 3-5 years of age (p < 0.001). Injuries to the lower extremities increased in frequency as age decreased, whereas injuries to the upper extremities and head/neck/face were more common in older preschoolers. Children < 3 years of age were 12 times more likely to be identified from narratives as being on another person's lap at the time of injury. Children identified as being on a lap had an increased odds of injury to the lower extremity than to other body parts (OR 43.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 32.0-58.0), and of lower leg/ankle fracture than fractures elsewhere (OR 49.5, 95% CI 31.7-77.4). Decreasing age was associated with a higher likelihood of being identified as sliding down on another person's lap and a higher likelihood of lower extremity injuries. Healthcare providers should be mindful of the potential for these slide-related injuries as they can result in a toddler's fracture of

  2. Physiotherapy in the physical rehabilitation of patients with sequelae of injuries of the lower extremities in Zhitomir of rehabilitation facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelezniy O.D.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to study the physical properties and therapeutic effect of mechanical factors in the pathogenetic treatment in traumatology. Material : 622 patients were studied with the consequences of injuries of the lower extremities (age 18-64 years. Observations carried out since 2005 in hospitals and medical health institutions of Zhitomir. Selected physiotherapy factors that are mainly used for the physical rehabilitation of patients in trauma. Results : identified the factors that were intended to eliminate the consequences of injuries of the lower extremities. Analyzed their effect in the author's method of complex rehabilitation of patients. Performed systematization selected physiotherapy factors in a table to read and understand forms. In the medical health institutions in the city of Zhytomyr investigated and established the effectiveness of the recommendations. Conclusions : physical factors cause the body general, non-specific and specific response to each type of impact. This allows you to selectively influence the pathogenic elements of the disease. Should strictly adhere to the indications and contraindications to the use of physiotherapy factor. It is necessary to take into account age, sex, and comorbidity.

  3. Use of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy and Embolization Before Limb Salvage Surgery for Osteosarcoma of the Lower Extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huojun; Yang Jijin; Lu Jianping; Lai Chaojen; Sheng Jin; Li Yuxiao; Hao Qiang; Zhang Shunmin; Gupta, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    We report our experience with the use of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before limb salvage surgery in patients with osteosarcoma of the lower extremity. We evaluated the effect of this procedure on the degree of tumor necrosis and on the amount of blood loss during surgery. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who received intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before undergoing limb salvage surgery for osteosarcoma of the lower extremity at our institution between January 2003 and April 2008. Patient demographic, tumor characteristics, treatment details, postembolization complications, and surgical and pathological findings were recorded for each patient. We evaluated the operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), and volume of blood transfusion during surgery and in the postoperative period in all patients in the study group. The same parameters were recorded for 65 other patients with lower extremity osteosarcoma who underwent limb salvage operation at our institution without undergoing preoperative intervention. The study included 47 patients (25 males and 22 females). Angiography showed that the tumors were hypervascular. Intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization were performed successfully, resulting in a substantial reduction or complete disappearance of tumor stain in all patients. No major complications were encountered. At the time of surgery, performed 3-7 days after embolization, a fibrous edematous band around the tumor was observed in 43 of the 47 patients, facilitating surgery. The goal of limb salvage was achieved successfully in all cases. Percentage tumor necrosis induced by treatment ranged from 70.2% to 94.2% (average, 82.9%). EBL during surgery, EBL from drains in the postoperative period, total EBL, and transfusion volumes were significantly lower in the 47 study patients compared to the 65 patients who underwent surgery without preoperative treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization. The

  4. Association Between Concussion and Lower Extremity Injuries in Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Frances C; Burdette, G Trey; Joyner, A Barry; Llewellyn, Tracy A; Buckley, Thomas A

    Concussions have been associated with elevated musculoskeletal injury risk; however, the influence of unreported and unrecognized concussions has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between concussion and lower extremity musculoskeletal injury rates across a diverse array of sports among collegiate student-athletes at the conclusion of their athletic career. The hypothesis was that there will be a positive association between athletes who reported a history of concussions and higher rates of lower extremity injuries. Cross-sectional study. Level 3. Student-athletes (N = 335; 62.1% women; mean age, 21.2 ± 1.4 years) from 13 sports completed a reliable injury history questionnaire. Respondents indicated the total number of reported, unreported, and potentially unrecognized concussions as well as lower extremity injuries including ankle sprains, knee injuries, and muscle strains. Chi-square analyses were performed to identify the association between concussion and lower extremity injuries. There were significant associations between concussion and lateral ankle sprain ( P = 0.012), knee injury ( P = 0.002), and lower extremity muscle strain ( P = 0.031). There were also significant associations between reported concussions and knee injury ( P = 0.003), unreported concussions and knee injury ( P = 0.002), and unrecognized concussions and lateral ankle sprain ( P = 0.001) and lower extremity muscle strains ( P = 0.006), with odds ratios ranging from 1.6 to 2.9. There was a positive association between concussion history and lower extremity injuries (odds ratios, 1.6-2.9 elevated risk) among student-athletes at the conclusion of their intercollegiate athletic careers. Clinicians should be aware of these elevated risks when making return-to-participation decisions and should incorporate injury prevention protocols.

  5. Prevention and nursing care of the complications occurred in interventional therapy for arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yang; Qi Yuchun; Wang Hua; Han Yajun; Fu Wenli; Fan Rui; Lv Xiaoying

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the prevention and nursing care of the perioperative complications occurred in interventional therapy for arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity. Methods: During the period of July 2006 to June 2009, interventional treatment for the arteriosclerosis obliterans of lower extremity was performed in 380 cases. The clinical data and complications were reviewed and analyzed, and the prevention and nursing care of the complications were summarized. Results: Complications occurred in 41 cases. During the surgery, vascular rupture or arterial dissection occurred in 5 cases, hypoglycemia reaction in 3 cases and elevation of blood pressure in 2 cases. The complications,which occurred after the treatment,included acute arterial thrombosis (n=3), deep vein thrombosis (n=2), bleeding of different tissues or organs (n=17), acute myocardial infarction (n=2), pseudoaneurysm (n=2), excessive lower limb perfusion syndrome (n=4) and compression sores (n=1). Conclusion: Detailed information of medical history, careful observation of clinical condition, intensive care of patient, adequate preparation of medical materials, seriously handing over the duty to the next shift and taking one's turn on duty, etc. are all the effective measures to prevent and to reduce the occurrence of complications. (authors)

  6. Older women with dementia can perform fast alternating forearm movements and performance is correlated with tests of lower extremity function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bramell-Risberg E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Eva Bramell-Risberg,1 Gun-Britt Jarnlo,2 Sölve Elmståhl11Division of Geriatric Medicine, 2Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, SwedenBackground: The purpose of this work was to study the performance and reliability of a test of fast alternating forearm movements and its relationship with measures of lower extremity function in older women with dementia.Methods: Fast alternating movements was studied in 26 female patients (mean age 81.7 ± 5.9 years with dementia and 34 controls (mean age 87.5 ± 4.7 years. Subgroup analyses for those aged 80–89 years were performed due to significant differences in the mean ages of the study groups. Test–retest reliability for alternating forearm movements was studied in 11 patients (mean age 80.3 ± 6.7 years and 10 controls (mean age 87.4 ± 1.6 years. Pulses generated were transformed to an analog signal shown on a modified electrocardiogram. Numbers of cycles at 10 and 15 seconds were calculated for the right and left hand. Walking 2 × 15 m and the Get-Up-and Go (GUG test were performed at self-selected and maximal speed. Associations between tests of upper and lower extremity function were sought in eight patients (mean age 85 ± 2.7 years and 16 controls (mean age 85.1 ± 2.8 years and also according to types of dementia in nine patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and 10 patients with other types of dementia.Results: Patients with dementia could perform the test and had significantly fewer cycles (P = 0.02–0.006 at both 10 and 15 seconds compared with controls after age adjustment. A higher number of cycles was associated with higher self-selected walking speeds in patients (r = -0.79. Test–retest reliability for alternating forearm movements was high for both patients (intraclass correlation 0.88–0.94 and controls (intraclass correlation 0.74–0.94.Conclusion: Alternating forearm movements at fast speed can be used as a reliable test in both

  7. Three-phase bone scanning in reflex sympathetic dystrophy of the extremities: a semi-quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier, P.; Manicourt, D.H.; Pauwels, S.; Nagant de Deuxchaisnes, C.; Beckers, C.

    1994-01-01

    Three-phase bone scanning of the extremities (foot or hand) was performed in 40 normal subjects and in 56 patients with an unequivocal clinical diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. The scintigraphic parameters studied were the ratios of tracer (SUPD SUPG Tc) activity in the affected side over the healthy side established for blood flow, blood pool, early vasculo-tissular fixation, and late bone fixation. In the controls, blood flow, blood pool, and early fixation showed considerable interindividual variation and only the variation of late fixation remained within narrow limits. Statistical analysis revealed that late fixation was most closely correlated with early fixation, which in turn was most close correlated with blood pool. The clinical and pathophysiological significance of these data is discussed. (authors). 33 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozani SN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Shai N Gozani NeuroMetrix, Inc., Waltham, MA, USA Objective: The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods: Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results: One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9% were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1 pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80

  9. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non

  10. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non-responders. FS-TENS is a safe and effective

  11. Effect of programmed strength training on explosive strength of lower extremities in children aged 11 to 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanasković Andrija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical jumps are an integral part of many sport activities. There are several factors that affect the athlete's jumping ability: strength, force and acceleration that occur when we jump. The jump is a complex and more articulated activity that requires not only strength, but great power as well. The main types of training to increase explosive strength are plyometric training and myogenic training with weight load on the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of myogenic training with weight load on explosive strength of the lower extremities. The first group is the control group (K, while the second group is an experimental group (E, each consisting of eighteen respondents. By Using the Myotest and performing the squat jump (SJ, the Height, Power, Force and Velocity were determined. The programme of power lasted for six weeks, twice a week for up to 60 minutes. We conclude that there is a statistically significant difference between the final and initial measurements in the experimental group, the multivariate level sig = 0.000. Increase in jump height ΔHeight = 3.28 in cm, force ΔForce = 4.68 in N/kg, the strength ΔPower = 6.18 in W/kg, the acceleration ΔVelocity = 21.8 in cm/s. The results of this study show that myogenic training with weight load has a positive impact on the explosive power of the lower extremities. This research was carried out against children aged 11 to 14 years, so we cannot say with certainty that this type of programme can have identical effects on athletes.

  12. Kinematics of the trunk and the lower extremities during restricted and unrestricted squats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Renate; Gülay, Turgut; Stoop, Mirjam; Lorenzetti, Silvio

    2013-06-01

    Squatting is a common strength training exercise used for rehabilitation, fitness training, and in preparation for competition. Knowledge about the loading and the motion of the back during the squat exercise is crucial to avoid overuse or injury. The aim of this study was the measurement and comparison of the kinematics of the lower leg, trunk, and spine during unrestricted and restricted (knees are not allowed beyond toes) squats. A total of 30 subjects performed unrestricted and restricted barbell squats with an extra load of 0, 25, and 50% bodyweight. Motion was tracked using a 12-camera Vicon system. A newly developed marker set with 24 trunk and 7 pelvic markers allowed us to measure 3D segmental kinematics between the pelvic and the lumbar regions, between the lumbar and the thoracic segments, and the sagittal curvatures of the lumbar and the thoracic spine. In an unrestricted squat, the angle of the knee is larger and the range of motion (ROM) between the lumbar and the thoracic segments is significantly smaller compared with a restricted squat (p squats. The unrestricted execution of a squat leads to a larger ROM in the knee and smaller changes in the curvature of the thoracic spine and the range of smaller segmental motions within the trunk. This execution in turn leads to lower stresses in the back. To strengthen the muscles of the leg, the unrestricted squat may be the best option for most people. Thus, practitioners should not be overly strict in coaching against anterior knee displacement during performance of the squat.

  13. Effects of whole-body vibration applied to lower extremity muscles during decline bench press exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gutiérrez, M T; Hazell, T J; Marín, P J

    2016-09-07

    To evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on skeletal muscle activity and power performance of the upper body during decline bench press exercise at different loads. Forty-seven healthy young and active male students volunteered. Each performed dynamic decline bench press repetitions with and without WBV (50 Hz, 2.2 mm) applied through a hamstring bridge exercise at three different loads of their 1-repetition maximum (1RM): 30%, 50%, and 70% 1RM. Muscle activity of the triceps brachii (TB), biceps brachii (BB), pectoralis major (PM), and biceps femoris (BF) was measured with surface electromyography electrodes and kinetic parameters of the repetitions were measured with a rotary encoder. WBV increased peak power (PP) output during the 70% 1RM condition (pbench press and this augmentation contributes to an increased peak power at higher loads and increased peak acceleration at lower loads.

  14. An Extremely Rare Case of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms: Floating Benign Mesenchymal Mass in Abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Kati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old man admitted to the urology outpatient clinic with major symptoms of right-side pain and intermittent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs such as low urine flow rate, dysuria, and frequency. Uroflowmetry showed low urine flow, and laboratory tests revealed no pathology. Ultrasound (US showed a 7 cm calcific mass above the bladder and a kidney cyst with a diameter of 5.3 cm in the upper pole of the right kidney. Enhanced computed tomography confirmed the US findings. Laparoscopic transperitoneal renal cyst decortication was performed. There was no sign of additional tumors. An independent mass in the abdomen was diagnosed, and the mass was removed. Based on the pathology, the diagnosis was a benign mesenchymal calcific mass. This is the first report of LUTSs due to a free benign mesenchymal mass in the published literature.

  15. Anesthetic effects of adding intrathecal neostigmine or magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine in patients under lower extremities surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hamid Reza Faiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regional anesthesia is widely used to perform different surgical procedures including those performed on the extremities. In this study, the anesthetic effects of adding intrathecal neostigmine or magnesium sulphate to bupivacaine in patients under lower extremities surgeries were assessed. Materials and Methods: In this double-blind randomized clinical trial, 90 patients, candidate for lower extremities surgeries in a training hospital, were recruited. The patients with ASA class I and II aging from 20 to 65 years between 2009 and 2010 were evaluated. The selected patients were randomly assigned to receive either bupivacaine alone (Group A, n=30, or bupivacaine plus magnesium sulphate 50% (Group B, n=30, or bupivacaine plus neostigmine (Group C, n=30. Then sensory and motor onset and complete block and the time of recovery were measured. Results: The sensory block onset time were 3.03 ± 0.981 in group A, 3.90 ± 2.71 in group B and 3.7 ± 1.08 in group C and knee flexion time were not significantly different among the three groups (P > 0.05, whereas the time to complete motor block was significantly longer in group C and motor recovery time were significantly different between groups (P=0.001. Conclusions: According to the obtained results, it may be concluded that magnesium sulphate is a safe and effective adjuvant for increasing the onset time of motor block.

  16. Spontaneous mutation of Dock7 results in lower trabecular bone mass and impaired periosteal expansion in aged female Misty mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong T; Bishop, Kathleen A; Maridas, David E; Motyl, Katherine J; Brooks, Daniel J; Nagano, Kenichi; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Rosen, Clifford J

    2017-12-01

    Misty mice (m/m) have a loss of function mutation in Dock7 gene, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, resulting in low bone mineral density, uncoupled bone remodeling and reduced bone formation. Dock7 has been identified as a modulator of osteoblast number and in vitro osteogenic differentiation in calvarial osteoblast culture. In addition, m/m exhibit reduced preformed brown adipose tissue innervation and temperature as well as compensatory increase in beige adipocyte markers. While the low bone mineral density phenotype is in part due to higher sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drive in young mice, it is unclear what effect aging would have in mice homozygous for the mutation in the Dock7 gene. We hypothesized that age-related trabecular bone loss and periosteal envelope expansion would be altered in m/m. To test this hypothesis, we comprehensively characterized the skeletal phenotype of m/m at 16, 32, 52, and 78wks of age. When compared to age-matched wild-type control mice (+/+), m/m had lower areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and areal bone mineral content (aBMC). Similarly, both femoral and vertebral BV/TV, Tb.N, and Conn.D were decreased in m/m while there was also an increase in Tb.Sp. As low bone mineral density and decreased trabecular bone were already present at 16wks of age in m/m and persisted throughout life, changes in age-related trabecular bone loss were not observed highlighting the role of Dock7 in controlling trabecular bone acquisition or bone loss prior to 16wks of age. Cortical thickness was also lower in the m/m across all ages. Periosteal and endosteal circumferences were higher in m/m compared to +/+ at 16wks. However, endosteal and periosteal expansion were attenuated in m/m, resulting in m/m having lower periosteal and endosteal circumferences by 78wks of age compared to +/+, highlighting the critical role of Dock7 in appositional bone expansion. Histomorphometry revealed that osteoblasts were nearly undetectable in m/m and marrow

  17. X-ray morphology of the joints and the bones of the extremities of aged people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olah, J.

    1978-01-01

    The radiograms of the healthy extremities of aged people are analyzed and the normal formations, typical at higher age, are differentiated from the pathological phenomena. The ''physiological'' decalcification can cause the following symptoms: trabecular microfractures, areas without structure, pseudoforamena, discrete spicules at the edges of the joints, periostoses, fibrous structure of the compacta. The deformations occurring in the different joints are detailed. The relationship between high age and arthrosis is also investigated. It is concluded that the occurrence of arthrosis is not inevitable and it is not seriously influenced neither by the weight nor by the profession of the patient. The thesis contains 49 radiograms. (L.E.)

  18. A clinical study on chronic arterial occlusive diseases of the lower extremities by scintiangiography of the foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yoshitaro

    1981-01-01

    Scintiangiography of the foot was performed on 210 limbs with peripheral vascular diseases of the lower extremities in comparison with 12 normal limbs. After an intravenous bolus of 10 to 20 mCi of sup(99m)Tc-human serum albumin, the arrival and distribution of activity in foot during reactive hyperemia were observed and photographed on the monitor scope of the gamma camera and recorded on video tape. The activity curve was obtained for several regions of interest and analysed to obtain the arrival time of activity Ta, the maximum counts time Tmax and the perfusion index. Those results were compared with angiography and the pressure index. The gamma camera image provided approximately the state of the peripheral circulation, and the defect or delay of the image was obtained on 93 per cent of the ischemic extremities. The pattern of the activity curves were classified into three types, I: rapid appearance with high activity peak, II: relatively rapid appearance with low activity peak, III: delayed appearance with the absence of the activity peak. In normal subjects and good run-off patients, the typical pattern of the activity curve was mainly observed being to I type, on the other hand, the pattern was generally being to III type in patients with ulcerated or cyanotic foot. The difference between the arrival time of activity of foot and toe under conditions of reactive hyperemia was longer evidently according to degree of arterial occlusion. The perfusion index was well correlated to the pressure index on foot and toe. In conclusion, scintiangiography of the foot is a simple and harmless procedure to evaluate the hemodynamic state of the lower extremities and is applicable for screening the peripheral vascular diseases and postoperative study. (author)

  19. Epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Netten, Jaap J; Baba, Mendel; Lazzarini, Peter A

    2017-05-18

    Diabetic foot disease is associated with major morbidity, mortality, costs, and reduction of a person's quality of life. Investigating the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease is the backbone of diabetic foot research and clinical practice, yet the full burden of diabetic foot disease in Australia is unknown. This study aims to describe the protocol for a systematic review of the epidemiology of diabetic foot disease and diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation in Australia. The systematic review will be performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses guidelines. PubMed and EMBASE will be searched for publications in any language and without restrictions to date. Two independent investigators will screen publications for eligibility, with publications reporting Australian population-based incidence or prevalence of diabetic foot disease or diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation to be included. Additionally, a forward literature search will be performed in Google Scholar, and a grey literature search will be performed to identify government publications. Quality assessment will be performed using customised checklists. The summary statistic used for each study will be an incidence or prevalence proportion of diabetic foot disease or diabetes-related lower-extremity amputation. The standard error for each proportion will be calculated. A meta-analysis will be performed when three or more publications of adequate quality, reporting on similar outcomes and in similar populations, are identified. The results of this systematic review can be used to adequately inform stakeholders in the field of diabetic foot disease on the extent of the problem in incidence and prevalence of diabetic foot disease in Australia, and to help guide appropriate use of resources to reduce the burden of this disease. PROSPERO CRD42016050740.

  20. Kinematic and neuromuscular relationships between lower extremity clinical movement assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauntel, Timothy C; Cram, Tyler R; Frank, Barnett S; Begalle, Rebecca L; Norcross, Marc F; Blackburn, J Troy; Padua, Darin A

    2018-06-01

    Lower extremity injuries have immediate and long-term consequences. Lower extremity movement assessments can assist with identifying individuals at greater injury risk and guide injury prevention interventions. Movement assessments identify similar movement characteristics and evidence suggests large magnitude kinematic relationships exist between movement patterns observed across assessments; however, the magnitude of the relationships for electromyographic (EMG) measures across movement assessments remains largely unknown. This study examined relationships between lower extremity kinematic and EMG measures during jump landings and single leg squats. Lower extremity three-dimensional kinematic and EMG data were sampled from healthy adults (males = 20, females = 20) during the movement assessments. Pearson correlations examined the relationships of the kinematic and EMG measures and paired samples t-tests compared mean kinematic and EMG measures between the assessments. Overall, significant moderate correlations were observed for lower extremity kinematic (r avg  = 0.41, r range  = 0.10-0.61) and EMG (r avg  = 0.47, r range  = 0.32-0.80) measures across assessments. Kinematic and EMG measures were greater during the jump landings. Jump landings and single leg squats place different demands on the body and necessitate different kinematic and EMG patterns, such that these measures are not highly correlated between assessments. Clinicians should, therefore, use multiple assessments to identify aberrant movement and neuromuscular control patterns so that comprehensive interventions can be implemented.

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography of arterial occlusive disease in lower extremity : comparison with conventional digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang June; Koh, Young Hwan; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Hyu Beom; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2000-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography with that of conventional digital subtraction angiography for the evaluation of lower extremity arterial occlusive diseases. In 26 patients with symptomatic lower extremity arterial occlusive disease, both conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA) were performed during the same week. MR angiography was performed using three-dimensional gradient-echo acquisition before, and two sequential acquisitions after, the administration of gadolinium (0.2 mmol/kg). In 23 patients, two separate, contiguous areas were scanned using additional doses. In three patients, only one field with a suspicious lesion was scanned. Three radiologists independently analyzed the CE-MRA and DSA findings of each vascular segment (20 segments per arterial tree) for the presence of obstructive lesions; the grade assigned was either mild or none (less than 50%), stenotic (50%-99%), or occlusion (100%). From among a total of 462 segments, DSA detected 99 which were significantly narrowed (stenosis, 33; occlusion, 66). Using MR angiography, 102 segments (stenosis 39; occlusion, 63) were identified, and 94 lesions (stenosis, 32; occlusion, 62) were graded correctly. Seven lesions were overestimated and four were underestimated. For the detection of hemodynamically significant stenosis or occlusions using MR angiography, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 95%, 98%, and 98% (G=3D0.995, P less than 0.001), respectively. To prove the absence of lesions, we repeated DSA in two patients with arterial spasm due to puncture. Three occluded segments seen on DSA, which revealed intact segments on MR angiography, suggested slow distal flow after reconstitution. For the evaluation of lower extremity arterial occlusive disease, the diagnostic value of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography is comparable with that of digital subtraction angiography. The advantages of the

  2. Effect of cause of iliac vein stenosis and extent of thrombus in the lower extremity on patency of iliac venous stent placed after catheter-directed thrombolysis of acute deep venous thrombosis in the lower extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sung Il; Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Lee, Min Woo; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung

    2003-01-01

    To assess the CT findings of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in a lower extremity prior to catheter-directed thrombolysis, and to evaluate their relevance to the patency of an iliac venous stent placed with the help of CT after catheter-directed thrombolysis of DVT. Fourteen patients [M:F=3:11; age, 33-68 (mean, 50.1) years] with acute symptomatic DVD of a lower extremity underwent CT before and after catheter-directed thrombolysis using an iliac venous stent. The mean duration of clinical symptoms was 5.0 (range, 1-14 days. The CT findings prior to thrombolysis were evaluated in terms of their anatomic cause and the extent of the thrombus, and in all patients, the patency of the iliac venous stent was assessed at CT performed during a follow-up period lasting 6-31 (mean, 18.9) months. All patients were assigned to the patent stent group (n=9) or the occluded stent group (n=5). In the former, the anatomic cause of patency included typical iliac vein compression (May-Thurner syndrome) (n=9), and a relatively short segmental thrombus occurring between the common iliac and the popliteal vein (n=8). Thrombi occurred in the iliac vein (n=3), between the common iliac and the femoral vein (n=3), and between the common iliac and the popliteal vein (n=2). In one case, a relatively long segmental thrombus occurred between the common iliac vein and the calf vein. In the occluded stent group, anatomic causes included atypical iliac vein compression (n=3) and a relatively long segmental thrombus between the common iliac and the calf vein (n=4). Typical iliac vein compression (May-Thurner syndrome) occurred in two cases, and a relatively short segmental thrombus between the external iliac and the common femoral vein in one. Factors which can affect the patency of an iliac venous stent positioned after catheter-directed thrombolysis are the anatomic cause of the stenosis, and the extent of a thrombus revealed at CT of acute DVT and occurring in a lower extremity prior to

  3. Effect of cause of iliac vein stenosis and extent of thrombus in the lower extremity on patency of iliac venous stent placed after catheter-directed thrombolysis of acute deep venous thrombosis in the lower extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung Il; Choi, Young Ho; Yoon, Chang Jin; Lee, Min Woo; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    To assess the CT findings of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in a lower extremity prior to catheter-directed thrombolysis, and to evaluate their relevance to the patency of an iliac venous stent placed with the help of CT after catheter-directed thrombolysis of DVT. Fourteen patients [M:F=3:11; age, 33-68 (mean, 50.1) years] with acute symptomatic DVD of a lower extremity underwent CT before and after catheter-directed thrombolysis using an iliac venous stent. The mean duration of clinical symptoms was 5.0 (range, 1-14 days. The CT findings prior to thrombolysis were evaluated in terms of their anatomic cause and the extent of the thrombus, and in all patients, the patency of the iliac venous stent was assessed at CT performed during a follow-up period lasting 6-31 (mean, 18.9) months. All patients were assigned to the patent stent group (n=9) or the occluded stent group (n=5). In the former, the anatomic cause of patency included typical iliac vein compression (May-Thurner syndrome) (n=9), and a relatively short segmental thrombus occurring between the common iliac and the popliteal vein (n=8). Thrombi occurred in the iliac vein (n=3), between the common iliac and the femoral vein (n=3), and between the common iliac and the popliteal vein (n=2). In one case, a relatively long segmental thrombus occurred between the common iliac vein and the calf vein. In the occluded stent group, anatomic causes included atypical iliac vein compression (n=3) and a relatively long segmental thrombus between the common iliac and the calf vein (n=4). Typical iliac vein compression (May-Thurner syndrome) occurred in two cases, and a relatively short segmental thrombus between the external iliac and the common femoral vein in one. Factors which can affect the patency of an iliac venous stent positioned after catheter-directed thrombolysis are the anatomic cause of the stenosis, and the extent of a thrombus revealed at CT of acute DVT and occurring in a lower extremity prior to

  4. Reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of the lower extremity functional scale in individuals affected by stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheijde, Joseph L; White, Fred; Tompkins, James; Dahl, Peder; Hentz, Joseph G; Lebec, Michael T; Cornwall, Mark

    2013-12-01

    To investigate reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) in individuals affected by stroke. The secondary objective was to test the validity and sensitivity of a single-item linear analog scale (LAS) of function. Prospective cohort reliability and validation study. A single rehabilitation department in an academic medical center. Forty-three individuals receiving neurorehabilitation for lower extremity dysfunction after stroke were studied. Their ages ranged from 32 to 95 years, with a mean of 70 years; 77% were men. Test-retest reliability was assessed by calculating the classical intraclass correlation coefficient, and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Validity was assessed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient between the instruments. Sensitivity to change was assessed by comparing baseline scores with end of treatment scores. Measurements were taken at baseline, after 1-3 days, and at 4 and 8 weeks. The LEFS, Short-Form-36 Physical Function Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Six-Minute Walk Test, Five-Meter Walk Test, Timed Up-and-Go test, and the LAS of function were used. The test-retest reliability of the LEFS was found to be excellent (ICC = 0.96). Correlated with the 6 other measures of function studied, the validity of the LEFS was found to be moderate to high (r = 0.40-0.71). Regarding the sensitivity to change, the mean LEFS scores from baseline to study end increased 1.2 SD and for LAS 1.1 SD. LEFS exhibits good reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change in patients with lower extremity impairments secondary to stroke. Therefore, the LEFS can be a clinically efficient outcome measure in the rehabilitation of patients with subacute stroke. The LAS is shown to be a time-saving and reasonable option to track changes in a patient's functional status. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lymph edema of the lower extremities after lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueller, J.; Wendt, T.G.; Guderian, D.; Koehler, C.; Schneider, A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of clinical lymph edema after lymphadenectomy and postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: From 1994-2002 192 patients with risk factors for recurrence received radiotherapy with FIGO I (58.8%), II (35.4%), III (4.2%) or IV (1.6%). RT consisted of teletherapy (10.4%), brachytherapy of the vaginal vault (20.8%) or a combination of both (68.8%). Additional chemotherapy was given in 69 patients (35.9%). Surgery comprised laparoscopically assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy (LARVH) (35.4%), radical abdominal hysterectomy (RAH) (48.4%), simple hysterectomy (HE) (11.5%) or exenteration (4.7%). Results: 73 patients had lymph node metastases, 119 had negative lymph nodes. In patients with LARVH 6-74 (median 30) lymph nodes were removed, with RAH 3-70 (median 21 lymph nodes), and after HE or exenteration 5-50 (median 13 lymph nodes). 90 patients had 25 or less lymph nodes removed, 83 patients more than 25 lymph nodes removed. Prognostic factors, such as age, FIGO stages, histologic grading and type of histology were well balanced in these cohorts. 45 (23.4%) of all patients developed clinically relevant lymph edema of the lower limb with a median latency of 11 (1-121) months. When 25 or less lymph nodes were removed 17.8% of patients developed leg edema, when more than 25 lymph nodes were removed 32.5% of patients were diagnosed with lymph edema (p = 0.025). Radiotherapy and chemotherapy had no influence on the incidence of leg edema. Overall survival at 5 (10) years was independent of number of lymph nodes removed. Conclusion: The data suggest increasing rates of leg edema with increasing number of lymph nodes dissected independent of the type of radiotherapy and chemotherapy performed. The lymph node sampling policy should be planned carefully in respect to minimize the risk of leg lymph edema. (orig.)

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF A FOOT ORTHOTIC ON LOWER EXTREMITY TRANSVERSE PLANE KINEMATICS IN COLLEGIATE FEMALE ATHLETES WITH PES PLANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Carcia

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL injuries in female athletes remain prevalent. Athletes with excessive foot pronation have been identified to be at greater risk for non-contact ACL injury. Excessive foot pronation has been linked to increased medial tibial rotation. Increased medial tibial rotation heightens ACL strain and has been observed at or near the time of ACL injury. Foot orthotics have been shown to decrease medial tibial rotation during walking and running tasks. The effect of a foot orthotic on activities that simulate a non-contact ACL injury mechanism (i.e. landing however is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether a foot orthotic was capable of altering transverse plane lower extremity kinematics in female athletes during landing. Twenty uninjured collegiate female athletes participating in the sports of basketball, soccer or volleyball with pes planus volunteered. Utilizing a repeated measures counterbalanced design, subjects completed two landing tasks with and without a foot orthotic using standardized footwear. The prefabricated orthotic had a rigid shell and a 6 extrinsic rear-foot varus post. Dependent measures included initial contact angle, peak angle, excursion and time to peak angle for both the tibia and femur. Statistical analysis suggested that the selected foot orthosis had little influence over lower extremity transverse plane kinematics. Several factors including: the limitation of a static measure to predict dynamic movement, inter-subject variability and the physical characteristics of the orthotic device likely account for the results. Future research should examine the influence of different types of foot orthotics not only on lower extremity kinematics but also tibiofemoral kinetics

  7. Intrathecal Bupivacaine Monotherapy with a Retrograde Catheter for the Management of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome of the Lower Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRoberts, W Porter; Apostol, Catalina; Haleem, Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) presents a therapeutic challenge due to its many presentations and multifaceted pathophysiology. There is no approved treatment algorithm and clinical interventions are often applied empirically. In cases of CRPS where symptoms are localized to an extremity, a targeted treatment is indicated. We describe the use of intrathecal bupivacaine monotherapy, delivered through a retrograde catheter, in the treatment of CRPS affecting the lower extremity. The patient, a 57-year-old woman with a history of failed foot surgery, was seen in our office after 2 years of ineffective treatments with local blocks and neurolytic procedures. We advanced therapy to moderately invasive procedures with an emphasis on neuromodulation. A combined central and peripheral stimulation technique that initially provided 75% pain relief, failed to provide lasting analgesia. We proceeded with an intrathecal pump implant. Based on the results of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) mapping, L5-S1 was identified as the optimal target for therapy and a retrograde catheter was placed at this level. Various intrathecal medications were tested individually. An intrathecal morphine trial was ineffective (visual analog scale [VAS] 7), while intrathecal clonidine provided excellent pain relief (VAS 0) that was limited by severe side effects. Bupivacaine provided 100% analgesia with tolerable side effects (lower extremity weakness and minor bladder incontinence) and was selected for intrathecal infusion. After 14 months, bupivacaine treatment continued to control pain exacerbations. We conclude that CRPS patients benefit from early identification of the predominant underlying symptoms and a targeted treatment with moderately invasive techniques when less invasive techniques fail. Intrathecal bupivacaine, bupivacaine monotherapy, retrograde catheter, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), dual stimulation, dosal root ganglion (DRG) testing.

  8. The Influence of Ambulatory Aid on Lower-Extremity Muscle Activation During Gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Michael; Bowden, Anton E; Baker, Spencer; Jensen, Ryan; Nichols, McKenzie; Seeley, Matthew K

    2018-05-10

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and often require a nonweight-bearing period of immobilization for the involved leg. This nonweight-bearing period usually results in muscle atrophy for the involved leg. There is a dearth of objective data describing muscle activation for different ambulatory aids that are used during the aforementioned nonweight-bearing period. To compare activation amplitudes for 4 leg muscles during (1) able-bodied gait and (2) ambulation involving 3 different ambulatory aids that can be used during the acute phase of foot and ankle injury care. Within-subject, repeated measures. University biomechanics laboratory. Sixteen able-bodied individuals (7 females and 9 males). Each participant performed able-bodied gait and ambulation using 3 different ambulatory aids (traditional axillary crutches, knee scooter, and a novel lower-leg prosthesis). Muscle activation amplitude quantified via mean surface electromyography amplitude throughout the stance phase of ambulation. Numerous statistical differences (P < .05) existed for muscle activation amplitude between the 4 observed muscles, 3 ambulatory aids, and able-bodied gait. For the involved leg, comparing the 3 ambulatory aids: (1) knee scooter ambulation resulted in the greatest vastus lateralis activation, (2) ambulation using the novel prosthesis and traditional crutches resulted in greater biceps femoris activation than knee scooter ambulation, and (3) ambulation using the novel prosthesis resulted in the greatest gastrocnemius activation (P < .05). Generally speaking, muscle activation amplitudes were most similar to able-bodied gait when subjects were ambulating using the knee scooter or novel prosthesis. Type of ambulatory aid influences muscle activation amplitude. Traditional axillary crutches appear to be less likely to mitigate muscle atrophy during the nonweighting, immobilization period that often follows foot or ankle injuries. Researchers and clinicians should consider

  9. Sympathetic reflex control of resistance in collateral arteries in the lower extremities in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, K; Tønnesen, K H

    1982-01-01

    The vascular response in the lower extremities to 40 degrees head-up tilt was studied in 5 patients with occlusion of the superficial femoral artery and maturity onset diabetes mellitus with symptoms suggesting autonomic neuropathy. The pressure measurements were performed via catheters placed...... in the brachial artery, femoral artery and vein and popliteal artery and vein. Relative blood flow was calculated as the relative change in arterio-venous oxygen saturation. Absolute blood flow in the common femoral artery was measured by an indicator dilution technique. Resistance of the collateral arteries...

  10. Usefulness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography in the evaluation of pelvic and lower extremity arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kon; Han, Young Min; Lee, Jeong Min

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical usefulness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D-CE-MRA) as a screening test in the evaluation of pelvic and lower extremity arterial diseases. Forty-four patients who underwent 3D-CE-MRA were included in this study. Coronal 3-dimensional gradient-echo, pre-and post contrast image were acquired with a dedicated peripheral vascular coil and moving-bed technique on a 1.5T MR system. Timing of start of data acquisition was determined by MR fluoroscopy technique, and 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA was injected into an antecubital vein, at a rate of 1cc/sec with an autoinjector. For quantitative analysis, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and artery to soft tissue contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of lower extremities arterial system including lower abdominal aorta were calculated. For qualitative analysis, arterial systems were divided into six segments, and were evaluated in terms of conspicuity of arterial systems and the degree of venous enhancement by three- and four-point scale respectively. In eight patients who underwent both MR angiography and conventional angiography as standard reference. Imaging analysis was done by means of consensus between two experienced radiologists. The mean time for the examination was about 15 min (± 5 min). The mean SNR of arterial system was 26.5±11.6, and mean artery to soft tissue contrast to noise ratio (CNR) was 24.6±11.2. Among the total 525 arterial segments 498 arterial segments (94.5%) could be demonstrated with good delineation of entire arterial tree. Good arterial imaging without or with minimal venous enhancement were demonstrated in 98.5% (260/264) in above knee and 89% (211/261) in below knee (p<0.01). Ten of 525 segments (1.9%) demonstrated severe venous overlapping and it mostly occurred in the calf region. In comparison with DSA, the sensitivity and the specificity for MR angiography for the detection of occlusions were 96% and 98.8%, respectively, and for the detection of

  11. Prognosis of complicated clinical course of varicose veins of lower extremities on the basis of analysis of phenotypic characteristics of connective tissue dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsarev О.А.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify the phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, which help to predict the progression of varicose veins of lower extremities and disease recurrence after surgery. Material and Methods. The long-term results of surgical treatment of 60 patients with varicose veins of lower extremities in a 5-year period after phlebectomy were analyzed. The phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia were researched. 24 patients had recurrence of varicose veins of lower extremities associated with disease progression; 36 patients did not have recurrence of varicose veins of lower extremities. Results. All the patients demonstrated the signs of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, whereas their frequency was different. There were specified nine phenotypic characteristics of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia, which were significantly more frequent for patients with recurrence of varicose vein disease of lower extremities: 1 postural abnormality, 2 flat foot, 3 skin pallor, 4 hyperextension of skin, 5 positive "wrist test", 6 positive "pollex test", 7 diastasis recti abdominis, 8 myopia, 9 hematomas which form quickly. Conclusion. The determined sum of phenotypic characters of indeterminate connective tissue dysplasia allows to predict progression of varicose vein disease of lower extremities, and offers new opportunities for improving the results of surgical treatment via developing special therapeutic measures aimed at improving lifestyle and dysplasia treatment.

  12. Is prescribed lower extremity weight-bearing status after geriatric lower extremity trauma associated with increased mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitajn, Ida Leah; Connelly, Daniel; Mascarenhas, Daniel; Breazeale, Stephen; Berger, Peter; Schoonover, Carrie; Martin, Brook; O'Toole, Robert V; Pensy, Raymond; Sciadini, Marcus

    2018-02-01

    Evaluate whether mortality after discharge is elevated in geriatric fracture patients whose lower extremity weight-bearing is restricted. Retrospective cohort study SETTING: Urban Level 1 trauma center PATIENTS/PARTICIPANTS: 1746 patients >65 years of age INTERVENTION: Post-operative lower extremity weight-bearing status MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Mortality, as determined by the Social Security Death Index RESULTS: Univariate analysis demonstrated that patients who were weight-bearing as tolerated on bilateral lower extremities (BLE) had significantly higher 5-year mortality compared to patients with restricted weight-bearing on one lower extremity and restricted weight-bearing on BLE (30%, 21% and 22% respectively, p bearing as tolerated on BLE, restricted weight-bearing on one lower extremity had a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.97 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.20, p = 0.76) and restricted weight-bearing in BLE had a HR of 0.91 (95% confidence interval 0.60 to 1.36, p = 0.73). In geriatric patients, prescribed weight-bearing status did not have a statistically significant association with mortality after discharge, when controlling for age, sex, body mass index, medical comorbidities, Injury Severity Scale (ISS), mechanism of injury, nonoperative treatment and admission GCS. This remained true in when the analysis was restricted to operative injuries only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rehabilitation Trends After Lower Extremity Amputations in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayssi, Ahmed; Dilkas, Steven; Dance, Derry L; de Mestral, Charles; Forbes, Thomas L; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2017-05-01

    The heterogeneity of medical complications that lead to amputation has resulted in a diverse patient population with differing rehabilitation needs; however, the rehabilitation trends for patients with lower extremity amputations across Canada have not been studied previously. To describe trends in rehabilitation after lower extremity amputations and the factors affecting rehabilitation length of stay in Canada. Retrospective cohort analysis. Canadian inpatient rehabilitation facilities that received persons with lower extremity amputations discharged from academic or community hospitals. Patients underwent lower extremity amputations between 2006 and 2009 for nontraumatic indications and were then discharged to a rehabilitation facility. Patients were identified from the Canadian Institute for Health Information's Discharge Abstract Database that includes hospital admissions across Canada except Quebec. Inpatient rehabilitation after lower extremity amputations. Length of stay, discharge destination, and change in total and motor function scores. The analysis included 5342 persons who underwent lower extremity amputations, 1904 of whom were transferred to a rehabilitation facility (36%). Patients most commonly underwent single below-knee (74%) and above-knee (17%) amputations. The duration of rehabilitation varied by whether the amputation was performed by a vascular (median = 36 days), orthopedic (median = 38 days), or general surgeon (median = 35 days). The overall median length of stay was 36 days. Most patients (72%) subsequently were discharged home and 9% were readmitted to hospital. Predictors of longer rehabilitation included amputation by an orthopedic surgeon (beta = 5.0, P ≤ .01), older age (beta = 0.2, P ≤ .01), and a history of ischemic heart disease (beta = 3.8, P = .03) or congestive heart failure (beta = 5, P = .04). Patients who spent Canada after lower extremity amputation varies by the type of surgeon performing the amputation. Advanced age

  14. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 ± 8.3 days (mean ± SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary

  15. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H

    2014-01-01

    these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P resistance induce high levels of muscle activity in all the large muscle groups at the hip, knee, and back. Importantly, the efficiency of these exercises......Therapists commonly use elastic bands in resistance exercises during rehabilitation of smaller muscles, such as in the shoulder. However, the effectiveness has not yet been investigated for larger muscle groups. This study investigates muscle activity during lower extremity exercises....... Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg...

  16. Guideline for the management of wounds in patients with lower-extremity venous disease: an executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Johnson, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an executive summary of the lower extremity venous disease (LEVD) evidence-based guideline produced by the WOCN Wound Guidelines Task Force. The target audience for this guideline is health care professionals who specialize in, direct, or provide wound care for patients at risk for or with lower-extremity venous disease. The full guideline opens with an overview of definitions of LEVD, its prevalence, clinical relevance, etiology, related physiology and pathophysiology, and overall management goals for patients at risk for developing venous leg ulcers. A detailed assessment section describes how to conduct a full clinical history and physical examination. Two approaches to interventions are provided: one addresses prevention strategies to reduce the risk of developing LEVD with ulcers. Methods to prevent ulcer recurrence are summarized including compression therapy, adjunctive therapies, medications, and patient education. A second approach presents treatment interventions including wound cleansing, debridement, infection control, antibiotic use, along with management of the periwound skin, nutrition, pain, and edema. This section also discusses limb elevation, surgical options, adjunctive therapies, patient education, and health care provider follow-up. A comprehensive reference list, glossary of terms, and appendices on cellulitis and venous eczema, types of edema, and compression therapy are available at the end of the guideline. This article provides an executive summary of the essential features of the guideline.

  17. The Effects of Whole Body Vibration Training and Creatine Supplementation on Lower Extremity Performance and Balance in Elderly Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rahimi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration training (WBVT and creatine (Cr supplementation on lower extremity performance and balance in elderly males. Methods & Materials: In this semi-experimental study, twenty two eligible males from the members of an elderly daycare center with more than 60 years of age were enrolled and were divided into three groups randomly, WBVT+Cr(n=7, WBVT+Pgroup (n=7, and control group (n=8. In WBVT+Cr and WBVT+P groups exercises were performed on the whole body vibration device for 10 days with 30-35 Hz intensity and 5 mm amplitude. The WBVT+Cr group consumed 20g/day Crsupplement for the first 5 days followed by 5g/days for the next 5 days of protocol. The WBVT+P group consumed dexterous. The control group neither did any exercise nor consumed any supplement during the protocol. Static balance by standing time on one leg, dynamic balance by TUG test and lower extremity performance by 30-meter walking test, sit and stand test and tandem gait test weremeasured. Paired sample t-test and one way ANOVAwere used for data analysis (α=0.05. Results: Our results showed that dynamic balance, lower body performance in 30- meter walking and tandem gait improved in experimental groups. However, ANOVA did not show any significant increase in static balance (P=0.514, dynamic balance (P=0.153, lower body performance in 30-meter walking test (P=0.339, sit and stand test (P=0.578 and tandem gait (P=0.151. Conclusion: In conclusion, it seems that WBVT plus Cr supplementation improves some of the motor fitness factors in elderly males during a short time.

  18. Non-linear sliding mode control of the lower extremity exoskeleton based on human–robot cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqiang Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a human–robot cooperation controller towards the lower extremity exoskeleton which aims to improve the tracking performance of the exoskeleton and reduce the human–robot interaction force. Radial basis function neural network is introduced to model the human–machine interaction which can better approximate the non-linear relationship than the general impedance model. A new method to calculate the inverse Jacobian matrix is presented. Compared to traditional damped least squares method, the novel method is proved to be able to avoid the orientation change of the velocity of the human–robot interaction point by the simulation result. This feature is very important in human–robot system. Then, an improved non-linear robust sliding mode controller is designed to promote the tracking performance considering system uncertainties and model errors, where a new non-linear integral sliding surface is given. The stability analysis of the proposed controller is performed using Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, the novel methods are applied to the swing leg control of the lower extremity exoskeleton, its effectiveness is validated by simulation and comparative experiments.

  19. Effects of Functional Electrical Stimulation Lower Extremity Training in Myotonic Dystrophy Type I: A Pilot Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudia, Paola; Weis, Luca; Baba, Alfonc; Kiper, Pawel; Marcante, Andrea; Rossi, Simonetta; Angelini, Corrado; Piccione, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a new rehabilitative approach that combines electrical stimulation with a functional task. This pilot study evaluated the safety and effectiveness of FES lower extremity training in myotonic dystrophy type 1. This is a controlled pilot study that enrolled 20 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 over 2 years. Eight patients (age, 39-67 years) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four participants performed FES cycling training for 15 days (one daily session of 30 minutes for 5 days a week). A control group, matched for clinical and genetic variables, who had contraindications to electrical stimulation, performed 6 weeks of conventional resistance and aerobic training. The modified Medical Research Council Scale and functional assessments were performed before and after treatment. Cohen d effect size was used for statistical analysis. Functional electrical stimulation induced lower extremity training was well tolerated and resulted in a greater improvement of tibialis anterior muscle strength (d = 1,583), overall muscle strength (d = 1,723), and endurance (d = 0,626) than conventional training. Functional electrical stimulation might be considered a safe and valid tool to improve muscle function, also in muscles severely compromised in which no other restorative options are available. Confirmation of FES efficacy through further clinical trials is strongly advised.

  20. Reliability of digital photography for assessing lower extremity alignment in individuals with flatfeet and normal feet types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashnagar, Zinat; Hadian, Mohammad Reza; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Talebian Moghadam, Saeed; Rezasoltani, Asghar; Saeedi, Hassan; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Mahmoodi, Rahimeh

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the intratester reliability of digital photographic method for quantifying static lower extremity alignment in individuals with flatfeet and normal feet types. Thirteen females with flexible flatfeet and nine females with normal feet types were recruited from university communities. Reflective markers were attached over the participant's body landmarks. Frontal and sagittal plane photographs were taken while the participants were in a standardized standing position. The markers were removed and after 30 min the same procedure was repeated. Pelvic angle, quadriceps angle, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, femur length and tibia length were measured from photographs using the Image j software. All measured variables demonstrated good to excellent intratester reliability using digital photography in both flatfeet (ICC: 0.79-0.93) and normal feet type (ICC: 0.84-0.97) groups. The findings of the current study indicate that digital photography is a highly reliable method of measurement for assessing lower extremity alignment in both flatfeet and normal feet type groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Duplex scanning in the diagnosis of acute deep vein thrombosis of the lower extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ramshorst, B.; Legemate, D. A.; Verzijlbergen, J. F.; Hoeneveld, H.; Eikelboom, B. C.; de Valois, J. C.; Meuwissen, O. J.

    1991-01-01

    In a prospective study the value of duplex scanning in the diagnosis of acute femoro-popliteal thrombosis was compared to conventional contrast venography (CV) as a gold standard. A total of 126 legs in 117 patients suspected of having deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE) were

  2. Vacuum therapy of trophic ulcer of lower extremities, presented in patients with DFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurkova R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the article has analyzed the results of treatment of 67 patients with diabetic foot syndrome (DFS, complicated by feet trophic ulcers, using the vacuum bandages. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the control group had a traditional treatment and the studied one had vacuum bandages applied to the trophic ulcers. The results confirmed an assured decrease in the duration of patients’ treatment and hospitalization in the hospital.

  3. Long bone histology of sauropterygia from the lower Muschelkalk of the Germanic basin provides unexpected implications for phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Klein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sauropterygia is an abundant and successful group of Triassic marine reptiles. Phylogenetic relationships of Triassic Sauropterygia have always been unstable and recently questioned. Although specimens occur in high numbers, the main problems are rareness of diagnostic material from the Germanic Basin and uniformity of postcranial morphology of eosauropterygians. In the current paper, morphotypes of humeri along with their corresponding bone histologies for Lower to Middle Muschelkalk sauropterygians are described and interpreted for the first time in a phylogenetic context. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nothosaurus shows a typical plesiomorphic lamellar-zonal bone type, but varying growth patterns and the occurrence of a new humerus morphotype point to a higher taxonomic diversity than was known. In contrast to the enormous morphological variability of eosauropterygian humeri not assigned to Nothosaurus, their long bone histology is relatively uniform and can be divided into two histotypes. Unexpectedly, both of these histotypes reveal abundant fibrolamellar bone throughout the cortex. This pushes the origin of fibrolamellar bone in Sauropterygia back from the Cretaceous to the early Middle Triassic (early Anisian. Histotype A is assigned to Cymatosaurus, a basal member of the Pistosauroidea, which includes the plesiosaurs as derived members. Histotype B is related to the pachypleurosaur Anarosaurus. Contrary to these new finds, the stratigraphically younger pachypleurosaur Neusticosaurus shows the plesiomorphic lamellar-zonal bone type and an incomplete endochondral ossification, like Nothosaurus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Histological results hypothetically discussed in a phylogenetical context have a large impact on the current phylogenetic hypothesis of Sauropterygia, leaving the pachypleurosaurs polyphyletic. On the basis of histological data, Neusticosaurus would be related to Nothosaurus, whereas Anarosaurus would follow

  4. Technique optimization of orbital atherectomy in calcified peripheral lesions of the lower extremities: the CONFIRM series, a prospective multicenter registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tony; Mustapha, Jihad; Indes, Jeffrey; Vorhies, Robert; Beasley, Robert; Doshi, Nilesh; Adams, George L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of CONFIRM registry series was to evaluate the use of orbital atherectomy (OA) in peripheral lesions of the lower extremities, as well as optimize the technique of OA. Methods of treating calcified arteries (historically a strong predictor of treatment failure) have improved significantly over the past decade and now include minimally invasive endovascular treatments, such as OA with unique versatility in modifying calcific lesions above and below-the-knee. Patients (3135) undergoing OA by more than 350 physicians at over 200 US institutions were enrolled on an "all-comers" basis, resulting in registries that provided site-reported patient demographics, ABI, Rutherford classification, co-morbidities, lesion characteristics, plaque morphology, device usage parameters, and procedural outcomes. Treatment with OA reduced pre-procedural stenosis from an average of 88-35%. Final residual stenosis after adjunctive treatments, typically low-pressure percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA), averaged 10%. Plaque removal was most effective for severely calcified lesions and least effective for soft plaque. Shorter spin times and smaller crown sizes significantly lowered procedural complications which included slow flow (4.4%), embolism (2.2%), and spasm (6.3%), emphasizing the importance of treatment regimens that focus on plaque modification over maximizing luminal gain. The OA technique optimization, which resulted in a change of device usage across the CONFIRM registry series, corresponded to a lower incidence of adverse events irrespective of calcium burden or co-morbidities. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity: a case report and current concept of diagnosis and management.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naqvi, G A

    2012-02-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe soft tissue infection characterized by rapidly progressing necrosis, involving subcutaneous tissues. This rare condition carries high mortality rate and require prompt diagnosis and urgent treatment with radical debridement and antibiotics. We describe a case of 21-year old man who presented with the history of trivial injury to the knee. Initially he was admitted and treated for septic arthritis but later was diagnosed as necrotizing fasciitis which was successfully treated with no ill effects what so ever from this devastating condition. This rare condition has been reported in literature but still early diagnosis, which is a key for successful treatment, remains a challenge.

  6. Lower Extremity Complaints in Runners and Other Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Middelkoop (Marienke)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractRunning is one of the most accessible sports, and probably for this reason, is practiced by many persons all over the world. However, besides the positive health effects of running there are some concerns about the high incidence of running injuries, especially to the lower extremities.

  7. Prophylactic Placement of an Inferior Vena Cava Filter During Aspiration Thrombectomy for Acute Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Se Hwan; Park, So Hyun; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Song, Myung Gyu; Seo, Tae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of an inferior vena cava (IVC) filter during aspiration thrombectomy for acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in the lower extremity. From July 2004 to December 2013, a retrospective analysis of 106 patients with acute DVT was performed. All patients received an IVC filter and were treated initially with aspiration thrombectomy. Among the 106 patients, DVT extension into the IVC was noted in 27 but was not evident in 79. We evaluated the presence of trapped thrombi in the filters after the procedure. The sizes of the trapped thrombi were classified into 2 grades based on the ratio of the maximum transverse length of the trapped thrombus to the diameter of the IVC (Grades I [≤ 50%] and II [> 50%]). A trapped thrombus in the filter was detected in 46 (43%) of 106 patients on final venograms. The sizes of the trapped thrombi were grade I in 12 (26.1%) patients and grade II in 34 (73.9%). Among the 27 patients with DVT extension into the IVC, 20 (74.1%) showed a trapped thrombus in the filter, 75% (15 of 20) of which were grade II. Among the 79 patients without DVT extension into the IVC, 26 (32.9%) showed a trapped thrombus in the IVC filter, 73% (19 of 26) of which were grade II. Thrombus migration occurred frequently during aspiration thrombectomy of patients with acute DVT in the lower extremity. However, further studies are needed to establish a standard protocol for the prophylactic placement of an IVC filter during aspiration thrombectomy. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Clinical factors useful for the differentiation of acute arterial embolism from acute arterial thrombosis of the lower extremities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Caifeng; Gu Jianping; Lou Wensheng; He Xu; Chen Liang; Chen Guoping; Su Haobo; Song Jinhua; Wang Tao

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical factors useful for the differentiation of acute arterial embolism from acute arterial thrombosis in patients with acute lower extremity ischemia. Methods: A total of 73 patients with acute arterial embolism or acute arterial thrombosis of lower extremity, who were admitted to the hospital during the period from May 2005 to June 2010, were enrolled in the study. Depending on the DSA findings, the patients were divided into arterial embolism group (n=52) and arterial thrombosis group (n=21). The clinical data, including general information, the onset of the disease, the obstructed sites, the condition of the diseased limb, the clinical manifestations and the severity of ischemia, were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups. Results: The acute arterial embolism occurred usually on the iliofemoral artery (χ 2 =5.44, P 2 =4.15, P 2 =9.42, P 2 =18.10, P 2 =10.01, P 2 =5.44, P 2 =12.37, P 2 =7.96, P = 8.18, P 2 =14.00, P 2 =4.24, P<0.05) was only seen in patients with acute arterial embolism. Conclusion: The clinical factors helpful for differentiating acute arterial embolism from acute arterial thrombosis include: clinical manifestations (dyskinesia, impaired sensation and peripheral pulse condition of the healthy limb), the obstructed sites, the history of intermittent claudication and previous arterial embolism, the severity of ischemia, and the high-risk factors of the peripheral vascular disease (atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and smoking habit). (authors)

  9. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of lower extremity trauma: review of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakaris, N K; Thanasas, C; Keramaris, N; Kontakis, G; Granick, Mark S; Giannoudis, P V

    2007-12-01

    A large number of aids have been conceived and introduced into clinical practice (nutritional supplements, local dressings, technical innovations) aimed at facilitating and optimising wound healing in both acute and chronic wound settings. Among these advances, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been introduced during the last 30 years, and has been analysed in over 400 manuscripts of the English, Russian and German literature. Until very recently, vacuum assisted closure (VAC) (KCI, TX, USA) has been the only readily available commercial device that provides localised negative pressure to the wound and is the predominant agent used to deliver NPWT featured in this review. We conducted a comprehensive review of the existing clinical evidence of the English literature on the applications of NPWT in the acute setting of trauma and burns of the lower extremity. Overall, 16 clinical studies have been evaluated and scrutinised as to the safety and the efficacy of this adjunct therapy in the specific environment of trauma. Effectiveness was comparable to the standard dressing and wound coverage methods. The existing clinical evidence justifies its application in lower limb injuries associated with soft tissue trauma.

  10. Concordance and discordance between two measures of lower extremity function: 400 meter self-paced walk and SPPB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P; Guralnik, Jack M; Newman, Anne B; Brach, Jennifer S; Fielding, Roger A

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the concurrent validity of the 400 meter self-paced walk test (400-m W) against the commonly used short physical performance battery (SPPB). A secondary purpose was to determine whether the 400-m W could better discriminate physical performance among high functioning older adults by examining the distribution of 400-m W scores. 101 men and women (80.8+/-0.4 years) were recruited to participate in the study. The 400-mW and SPPB assessed lower extremity function. Lower extremity muscle strength, power, and contraction velocity was assessed using bilateral leg press (LP). Health history was obtained with questionnaire. 400-m W demonstrated moderate correlations with SPPB (Pearson r=0.74; p400-m W performance time (n=20) had more medical conditions (2.8+/-0.4 vs 1.7+/-0.3; p=0.038), more reported falls (0.80+/-0.2 vs 0.19+/-0.1; p=0.016), more medications (3.7+/-0.4 vs 1.8+/-0.4; p=0.001), had lower LP power at 70% of the one repetition maximum (1RM) (336+/-45 W vs 663+/-78 W; p=0.001) and 40% 1RM (329+/-43 W vs 580+/-75 W; p=0.005), and had slower LP contraction velocity at 40% 1RM (77+/-5.5 m/s vs 112+/-8.4 m/s; p=0.001) compared with those below the median (n=16). A substantial number of apparently well functioning older adults demonstrated some limitations in the ability to walk 400 meters. Use of the 400-m W may be justified to obtain information to better discriminate among high functioning elderly.

  11. OBSERVER RATING VERSUS THREE-DIMENSIONAL MOTION ANALYSIS OF LOWER EXTREMITY KINEMATICS DURING FUNCTIONAL SCREENING TESTS: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclachlan, Liam; White, Steven G; Reid, Duncan

    2015-08-01

    Functional assessments are conducted in both clinical and athletic settings in an attempt to identify those individuals who exhibit movement patterns that may increase their risk of non-contact injury. In place of highly sophisticated three-dimensional motion analysis, functional testing can be completed through observation. To evaluate the validity of movement observation assessments by summarizing the results of articles comparing human observation in real-time or video play-back and three-dimensional motion analysis of lower extremity kinematics during functional screening tests. Systematic review. A computerized systematic search was conducted through Medline, SPORTSdiscus, Scopus, Cinhal, and Cochrane health databases between February and April of 2014. Validity studies comparing human observation (real-time or video play-back) to three-dimensional motion analysis of functional tasks were selected. Only studies comprising uninjured, healthy subjects conducting lower extremity functional assessments were appropriate for review. Eligible observers were certified health practitioners or qualified members of sports and athletic training teams that conduct athlete screening. The Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2) was used to appraise the literature. Results are presented in terms of functional tasks. Six studies met the inclusion criteria. Across these studies, two-legged squats, single-leg squats, drop-jumps, and running and cutting manoeuvres were the functional tasks analysed. When compared to three-dimensional motion analysis, observer ratings of lower extremity kinematics, such as knee position in relation to the foot, demonstrated mixed results. Single-leg squats achieved target sensitivity values (≥ 80%) but not specificity values (≥ 50%>%). Drop-jump task agreement ranged from poor ( 80%). Two-legged squats achieved 88% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Mean underestimations as large as 198 (peak knee flexion) were found in

  12. Comparing the Effects of Dual-Task Gait Testing in New and Established Ambulators With Lower Extremity Amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frengopoulos, Courtney; Payne, Michael W C; Holmes, Jeffrey D; Viana, Ricardo; Hunter, Susan W

    2018-04-05

    Gait is a complex process that involves coordinating motor and sensory systems through higher-order cognitive processes. Walking with a prosthesis after lower extremity amputation challenges these processes. However, the factors that influence the cognitive-motor interaction in gait among lower extremity amputees has not been evaluated. To assess the interaction of cognition and mobility, individuals must be evaluated using the dual-task paradigm. To investigate the effect of etiology and time with prosthesis on dual-task performance in those with lower extremity amputations. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient and inpatient amputee clinics at an academic rehabilitation hospital. Sixty-four individuals (aged 58.20±12.27 years; 74.5% male) were stratified into 3 groups; 1 group of new prosthetic ambulators with transtibial amputations (NewPA) and 2 groups of established ambulators: transtibial amputations of vascular etiology (TTA-vas), transtibial amputations of nonvascular etiology (TTA-nonvas). Not applicable. Time to complete the L Test measured functional mobility under single and dual-task conditions. A serial arithmetic task (subtraction by 3s) was paired with the L Test to create the dual-task test condition. Single-task performance on the cognitive arithmetic task was also recorded. Dual-task costs (DTCs) were calculated for performance on the cognitive and gait tasks. Analysis of variance determined differences between groups. A performance-resource operating characteristic (POC) graph was used to graphically display DTCs. Gait performance was worse under dual-task conditions for all groups. Gait was significantly slower under dual-task conditions for the TTA-vas (P Dual-task conditions also had a negative impact on cognitive task performance for the TTA-nonvas (P = .02) and NewPA groups (P dual-task conditions and has a positive DTCcog as a result (P = .04). However, no between-group differences were seen for DTCcog. The POC graph demonstrated that many

  13. Intra-Arterial Thrombolysis for Deep Vein Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moo Sang; Roh, Byung Suk [Dept. of Radiology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    If the appropriate catheterization of the affected vein was not possible because of a narrowed or thrombus-filled venous lumen, successful treatment gets into trouble during catheter directed regional thrombolysis for treatment of deep vein thrombosis. In this situation, intra-arterial thrombolysis can be considered as an alternative treatment, but to the best of our knowledge, only two reports have been described. We present here cases of successful intra-arterial thrombolysis in patients with deep vein thrombosis.

  14. Coagulation disorders in the patients with deep vein thrombosis of lower extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milić Dragan J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE Venous thromboembolism is a relevant social and health care problem for its high incidence, pulmonary embolism-related mortality and long-term sequelae which may be disabling (post-thrombotic syndrome and ulceration. PROCEDURES The aim of our work was to establish the presence of coagulation disorders (hypercoagulable states in the patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT of the leg. Prospectively we have analyzed a group of 30 patients with echosono-graphicaly verified DVT of the leg who were admitted to the department of vascular surgery from August 1st 2000 to July 31st 2001.The following parameters were monitored: prothrombin time (PT partial thromboplastin time (PTT, fibrinogen (Fib, alpha 2 antiplasmin (A-2 AP, D-dimer (DD, antithrombin III (AT III and factor VII. FINDINGS Activation of the coagulation process was registered. The values of monitored coagulation parameters are shown in table 1. Plasma levels of monitored parameters in the patients with DVT of the leg were significantly higher than in the control subjects. CONCLUSION In patients with a DVT a hypercoagulable state is common finding. Some parameters of coagulation activity such as D-dimer might be of great interest in the diagnostic strategy of DVT.

  15. Motor Control of the Lower Extremity Musculature in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpin, David J.; Stuberg, Wayne; Stergiou, Nicholas; Kurz, Max J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to quantify the differences in torque steadiness and variability of the muscular control in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children. Fifteen children with CP (age = 14.2 [plus or minus] 0.7 years) that had a Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) score of I-III and 15…

  16. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaric, Juraj; Klepanec, Andrej; Mistrik, Martin; Altaner, Cestmir; Vulev, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  17. [Flowmetric, thermometric and rheologic studies in obliterating arterial diseases of the lower extremities treated with buflomedil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigo, B; Raspanti, D; Trapani, M; Albanese, B; Cameli, A M; Digiesi, V

    1985-02-25

    Ten subjects with peripheral arterial occlusive disease were treated with buflomedil, analysing the effect of every single intravenous administration of the drug, and the effect of the administration repeated for a period of 5 days. This controlled study was aimed at evaluating the state of the peripheral blood flow, not just relating to the flowmetric parameters, but also to those more directly connected to the metabolic and functional conditions of the microcirculation. During every single administration, blood flow, skin and muscular temperatures were recorded. As concerned the drug's chronic effect, endurance limit, skin and muscular temperatures, whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity and red cell filterability were recorded before beginning the treatment and after 15 days. The results of this study show that during a single buflomedil infusion no modifications have been observed in blood flow and muscular temperature, whereas skin temperature showed a slight increase. On the contrary, after a 15 days treatment, muscular temperature and endurance limit significantly increased, without flowmetric changes. A significant decrease in values of blood viscosity at high shear-rate was recorded too. The overall results seem to indicate that after treatment with buflomedil there is an improvement of the metabolic muscular conditions, probably due to a stimulant effect of the drug on microcirculatory blood flow.

  18. [Diseases and overuse injuries of the lower extremities in long distance runners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, M; Brunner, F

    2017-06-01

    Running is one of the most popular sports worldwide, with running events attracting hundreds of thousands of runners of all age groups. Running is an effective way to improve health but is also associated with a high risk of injuries. Up to 50% of regular runners report having more than one injury each year. Some injuries are caused by an accident but most are caused by overuse. The most frequent diagnoses are patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress syndrome (shin splint), Achilles tendinopathy, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), plantar fasciitis and stress fractures of the metatarsals and tibia. The knee is the most frequently injured joint in runners at all distances. Hamstring injuries are typically acute resulting in a sudden, sharp pain in the posterior thigh. Hip injuries are less common but it can be more difficult to make the correct diagnosis and treatment is more complex. Clinicians confronted by runners with shin pain must distinguish between stress fractures of the tibia, tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) and chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Foot and ankle injuries are the most common injuries reported by long distance and marathon runners. Excess body weight and the number of kilometers run per week are high risk factors for injuries. The roles of other factors, such as shoes, stretching and biomechanics are less clear. A detailed anamnesis and physical examination are important for the correct diagnosis or the necessity for further diagnostic imaging and subsequent therapy.

  19. Final Report of the Lower Extremity Assessment Program (LEAP 99-2). Volume 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harris, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Research conducted by Department of Defense laboratories and facilities, collaborating with leading academic institutions, has demonstrated that currently available landmine protective footwear does...

  20. A Biomechanical Investigation of A Single-Limb Squat: Implications for Lower Extremity Rehabilitation Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jim; Thewlis, Dominic; Selfe, James; Cunningham, Andrew; Hayes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Context: Single-limb squats on a decline angle have been suggested as a rehabilitative intervention to target the knee extensors. Investigators, however, have presented very little empirical research in which they have documented the biomechanics of these exercises or have determined the optimum angle of decline used. Objective: To determine the involvement of the gastrocnemius and rectus femoris muscles and the external ankle and knee joint moments at 60° of knee flexion while performing a single-limb squat at different decline angles. Design: Participants acted as their own controls in a repeated-measures design. Patients or Other Participants: We recruited 10 participants who had no pain, injury, or neurologic disorder. Intervention(s): Participants performed single-limb squats at different decline angles. Main Outcome Measure(s): Angle-specific knee and ankle moments were calculated at 60° of knee flexion. Angle-specific electromyography (EMG) activity was calculated at 60° of knee flexion. Integrated EMG also was calculated to determine the level of muscle activity over the entire squat. Results: An increase was seen in the knee moments (P squats at an angle greater than 16° may not reduce passive calf tension, as was suggested previously, and may provide no mechanical advantage for the knee. PMID:18833310

  1. Course and predicting factors of lower-extremity injuries after running a marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Middelkoop, Marienke; Kolkman, Jelle; van Ochten, John; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Koes, Bart W

    2007-01-01

    To investigate in recreational runners the 3 month prognosis of and medical consumption caused by running injuries occurring shortly before or during a marathon. Possible prognostic factors for persistent complaints were also evaluated. Prospective cohort study. Rotterdam, the Netherlands. One hundred sixty-five recreational marathon runners who reported a new running injury in the month before or during the Rotterdam Marathon 2005 and who were available for follow-up. ASSESSMENT OF DETERMINANTS: Demographic, running (training distance, frequency and duration, experience, etc), lifestyle (other sports, smoking), and injury-related factors were collected at baseline. Persistent complaints of running injuries occurring in the month before or during the Rotterdam marathon at 3 month follow-up. Potential prognostic factors for persistent complaints were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. At 3 month follow-up, 25.5% of the 165 injured runners reported persistent complaints; they had little pain during exercise and almost no pain in rest. Of all 165 male runners, 27 (16.4%) visited a general practitioner because of their running injury and 40 (24.2%) visited a physiotherapist (218 times in total). Persistent complaints at 3 month follow-up were associated with non-musculoskeletal comorbidities [odds ratio (OR), 3.23; confidence interval (CI), 1.24-8.43], and calf injuries (OR, 0.37; CI, 0.13-1.05). One quarter of the runners had persistent complaints of their marathon-related running injury at 3 month follow-up. However, the clinical and social consequences of the injuries seem to be relatively mild. Non-musculoskeletal comorbidities at baseline are related to poor recovery, whereas recovery is also location specific.

  2. Lower extremity fatigue increases complexity of postural control during a single-legged stance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Jerry J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-linear approaches to assessment of postural control can provide insight that compliment linear approaches. Control entropy (CE is a recently developed statistical tool from non-linear dynamical systems used to assess the complexity of non-stationary signals. We have previously used CE of high resolution accelerometry in running to show decreased complexity with exhaustive exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if complexity of postural control decreases following fatiguing exercise using CE. Methods Ten subjects (5 M/5 F; 25 ± 3 yr; 169.4 ± 11.7 cm; 79.0 ± 16.9 kg consented to participation approved by Western Oregon University IRB and completed two trials separated by 2-7 days. Trials consisted of two single-legged balance tests separated by two Wingate anaerobic tests (WAnT; PreFat/PostFat, or rest period (PreRest/PostRest. Balance tests consisted of a series of five single-legged stances, separated by 30 s rest, performed while standing on the dominant leg for 15-s with the participant crossing the arms over the chest and flexing the non-dominant knee to 90 degrees. High resolution accelerometers (HRA were fixed superficial to L3/L4 at the approximate center of mass (COM. Triaxial signals from the HRA were streamed in real time at 625 Hz. COM accelerations were recorded in g's for vertical (VT, medial/lateral (ML, and anterior/posterior (AP axes. A newly developed statistic (R-test was applied to group response shapes generated by Karhunen Loeve (KL transform modes resulting from Control Entropy (CE analysis. Results R-tests showed a significant mean vector difference (p p p p Conclusions These data indicate that fatiguing exercise eliminates the differential complexity response between axes, but increases complexity in all axes compared to the non-fatigued condition. This has implications with regard to the effects of fatigue on strategies of the control system to maintain postural control.

  3. The Role of Lower Extremity Joint Powers in Successful Stair Ambulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    written informed consent, all subjects participated in a biomechanical gait assessment during stair ascent walking. A total of 55 markers were used...power generation and vertical COM acceleration (COMA) during stair ascent. Twenty-two healthy individuals underwent a biomechanical gait assessment...DA. An integrated biomechanical analysis of normal stair ascent and descent. J Biomech 1988;21:733–44. [6] Zachazewski JE, Riley PO, Krebs DE

  4. First application of hemi-body electron beam irradiation for Kaposi sarcoma at the lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platoni, Kalliopi; Diamantopoulos, Stefanos; Dilvoi, Maria; Delinikolas, Panagiotis; Kypraiou, Efrosyni; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Kouloulias, Vassilis

    2018-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a systemic neoplastic disease that can present cutaneous symptoms and is usually treated with a systematic approach due to its extent. Due to its radiosensitivity, radiotherapy is considered one of its main treatments, for palliation and local control of the skin and mucosal lesions. The aim of this paper was to report the first case of KS treated by hemi-body electron irradiation protocol in Greece. A fractionated 40 Gy hemi-body electron irradiation was prescribed to a 60-year-old male patient with KS at his legs. Dose uniformity was verified on a daily basis by thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). The treatment resulted to complete clinical response. Limited irradiation-derived side effects appeared. This is the first case ever to be treated with hemi-body electron irradiation protocol in Greece. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first time that a single field hemi-body electron beam irradiation at a total skin electron beam (TSEB)-like configuration is reported to be used for KS.

  5. Foot skin depots of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose do not enable PET/CT lymphography of the lower extremity lymphatic system in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Radmer; Simonsen, Lene; Lonsdale, Markus

    2013-01-01

    consecutive PET scans of the same region.Blood activity increased faster and to a greater extent in the great saphenous veins compared to the medial cubital vein. PET/CT images showed activity in the superficial and deep veins of the lower extremities. No lymphatic collectors or nodes were visualized....... CONCLUSION: Neither subcutaneous nor intradermal injection of 18F-FDG allows imaging of the lower extremity lymphatic system in man....

  6. Gadobutrol versus gadofosveset-trisodium in MR venography of the lower extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnoldussen, Carsten W.K.P. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); VieCuri Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Venlo (Netherlands); Lam, Yeelai [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Ito, Nobutake [National Hospital Organization Tokyo Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Keio University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Winkens, Bjorn [Maastricht University, Department of Methodology and Statistics, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kooi, M.E.; Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, CARIM - School for Cardiovascular Diseases, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wittens, Cees H.A. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Vascular Surgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    MR venography (MRV) protocols have used bloodpool contrast agents and long scan sequences to identify patients suitable for treatment and preoperatively. However, variable availability of bloodpool contrast agents, high costs and a need to shorten acquisition times for routine MR protocols hamper everyday practice. 20 patients (11 men; mean age 54 ± 11.8 years; body mass index 23.6 ± 2.5) were enrolled in this prospective study. An intra-individual comparison of image quality, interpretation and findings for two different contrast agents (regular gadolinium contrast agent gadobutrol vs. bloodpool contrast agent gadofosveset-trisodium) and two different scan protocols (long acquisition time protocol using a high-resolution fast field echo (FFE) sequence vs. short acquisition time protocol using an ultra-fast gradient echo (GE) sequence) were performed. Image quality (average of 4.94 vs. 4.92 on a five-point scale), interpretation and contrast-to-noise ratio (44 vs. 45) were equal for both contrast agents. Image findings showed no statistical significant differences between the MR protocols or contrast agents (overall p = 0.328). For high-resolution MRV, it is possible to replace gadofosveset-trisodium with gadobutrol. Furthermore, an ultra-fast GE sequence for MRV might considerably shorten acquisition time, without loss of image quality or diagnostic yield. (orig.)

  7. Ubiquitous Nature of Distal Athero/Thromboembolic Events during Lower Extremity Atherectomy Procedures Involving the Superficial Femoral Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasty, Najam; Khakwani, M. Z.; Kotev, Spas; Boiangiu, Catalin; Hasan, Omar; Anna, Manjusha; Tayal, Rajiv; Kaid, Khalil; Baker, Gail; Cohen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate occurrence, size, composition, and clinical significance of embolized debris during superficial femoral artery atherectomy using all commercially available atherectomy devices. Distal athero/thromboembolic events (DATE) are a universal phenomenon in lower extremity atherectomy procedures (LEAPs) due to the sheer volume of atheroma and the thrombus burden in peripheral arterial disease. Some of these events can be clinically significant. We prospectively gathered clinical and histopathological data on all commercially available atherectomy devices by using embolic protection devices (EPD) in every case. After intervention, the contents of EPD were examined both microscopically and macroscopically. Data from 59 consecutive patients undergoing LEAP were analyzed. DATE occurred 100% of the time. The composition of particulate debris varied with the device used. Grossly visible agglomerated debris was captured by the filter in the majority of patients 54/59 (91.5%). Clinically significant debris, defined by the Preventing Lower Extremity Distal Embolization Using Embolic Filter Protection registry as particle diameter > 0.2 cm, was found in 33/59 (56%) patients. The size of captured debris particles ranged from 0.1 to 2.4 mm. While DATE occurred in all patients, clinically significant DATE occurred in 56% patients undergoing LEAP regardless of the atherectomy device. In spite of a large fraction of the clinically significant debris occurring on our routine dual antiplatelet regimen, no patient suffered an amputation. Although DATE was prevented by the use of EPD in all 59 cases, more data are needed to determine whether the use of EPD translates into a long-term clinical benefit. Use of EPD and optimal thromboprophylaxis should be considered in patients, especially in the setting of compromised distal runoff. PMID:27867291

  8. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Du, Zhijiang; Dong, Wei; Shen, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu

    2018-03-19

    To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human-robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human-robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility.

  9. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human–robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human–robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility.

  10. Intrinsic Sensing and Evolving Internal Model Control of Compact Elastic Module for a Lower Extremity Exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Du, Zhijiang; Dong, Wei; Shen, Yi; Zhao, Guangyu

    2018-01-01

    To achieve strength augmentation, endurance enhancement, and human assistance in a functional autonomous exoskeleton, control precision, back drivability, low output impedance, and mechanical compactness are desired. In our previous work, two elastic modules were designed for human–robot interaction sensing and compliant control, respectively. According to the intrinsic sensing properties of the elastic module, in this paper, only one compact elastic module is applied to realize both purposes. Thus, the corresponding control strategy is required and evolving internal model control is proposed to address this issue. Moreover, the input signal to the controller is derived from the deflection of the compact elastic module. The human–robot interaction is considered as the disturbance which is approximated by the output error between the exoskeleton control plant and evolving forward learning model. Finally, to verify our proposed control scheme, several experiments are conducted with our robotic exoskeleton system. The experiment shows a satisfying result and promising application feasibility. PMID:29562684

  11. Final Report of the Lower Extremity Assessment Program (LEAP 99-2). Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    demonstrates a near complete traumatic amputation at the ankle level, with a 7 to 8 cm dorsal skin bridge. There i