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Sample records for bone flow-induced mechanotransduction

  1. BONE MECHANOTRANSDUCTION: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Joana; Capela e Silva, Fernando; Queiroga, Cristina; Lucena, Sónia; Potes, José

    2011-01-01

    This review focus on the bone physiology and mechanotransduction elements and mechanisms. Bone biology and architecture is deeply related to the mechanical environment. Orthopaedic implants cause profound changes in the biomechanics and electrophysiology of the skeleton. In the context of biomedical engineering, a deep reflexion on bone physiology and electromechanics is needed. Strategic development of new biomaterials and devices that respect and promote continuity with bone str...

  2. The molecular basis of bone mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavropoulou, M P; Yovos, J G

    2016-01-01

    The skeleton has the ability to perfectly adapt to external forces of the operating environment, by altering its morphology and metabolism in order to meet different needs. This unique adaptive capacity of the skeleton creates an interesting range of biological questions concerning the perception of mechanical or other kinds of signals, the type of receptor, and the molecular pathways involved in this adaptation. Studies of the characteristics of the cellular engineering provide a host of new information that confers to osteocytes the role of the protagonist in the perception and regulation of mechanical effects on the skeleton. The identity of mechanoreceptors is manifold and concerns ion channels, integrins, cell membrane, the cytoskeleton, and other systems. A similar multiplicity characterizes the intracellular signaling. This review describes recent data concerning the outward force reception systems and intracellular transduction pathways of information transfer leading to the continuous adaptation of bone tissue. Increased appreciation of the importance of the mechanical environment in regulating and determining the effectiveness of structural adjustment of the skeleton defines new horizons for the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to diseases associated with bone loss. PMID:27609037

  3. Roles for GP IIb/IIIa and αvβ3 integrins in MDA-MB-231 cell invasion and shear flow-induced cancer cell mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fenglong; Li, Li; Guan, Liuyuan; Yang, Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Liu, Yiyao

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of cancer cell to endothelial cells and the subsequent trans-endothelial migration are key steps in hematogenous metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of cancer cell/endothelial cell interaction under hemodynamic shear flow and how shear flow-induced cancer cell mechanotransduction are yet to be fully defined. In this study, we identified that the integrins of both platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa) and αvβ3 were crucial for hematogenous metastasis of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells. The cell migration and invasion were studied by using Millicell cell culture insert system. The numbers of invaded MDA-MB-231 cells significantly increased by thrombin-activated platelets and reduced by eptifibatide, a platelet inhibitor. Meanwhile, RGDWE peptides, a specific inhibitor of αvβ3 integrin, also inhibited MDA-MB-231 cell invasion. We further used a parallel-plate flow chamber to investigate MDA-MB-231 cell adhesion under flow conditions. Alike in static condition, the adhesion capability of MDA-MB-231 cells to endothelial monolayer was also significantly affected by GP IIb/IIIa and αvβ3 integrins. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and αvβ3 integrin in MDA-MB-231 cells were up-regulated after low shear stress exposure (1.84 dynes/cm(2), 2 h). Moreover, we also demonstrated that low shear stress induced a sustained activation of p85 (a regulatory subunit of PI3K) and Akt. Pre-treating MDA-MB-231 cells with the specific PI3K inhibitor of LY294002 abolished the shear stress induced-Akt activation, and the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and αvβ3 integrin were also down-regulated. Immunofluorescence assay showed that low shear stress also induced αvβ3 integrin clustering and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Interestingly, shear stress-induced activation of Akt and NF-κB was attenuated by LM609, a specific antibody of αvβ3 integrin. It suggests that αvβ3

  4. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  5. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristen L; Hoey, David A; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-03-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study, we determined whether AC6 deletion impairs loading-induced bone formation in vivo. Skeletally mature mice with a global knockout of AC6 exhibited normal bone morphology and responded to osteogenic chemical stimuli similar to wild-type mice. Following ulnar loading over 3 consecutive days, bone formation parameters were assessed using dynamic histomorphometry. Mice lacking AC6 formed significantly less bone than control animals (41% lower bone formation rate). Furthermore, there was an attenuated flow-induced increase in COX-2 mRNA expression levels in primary bone cells isolated from AC6 knockout mice compared to controls (1.3±0.1- vs. 2.6±0.2-fold increase). Collectively, these data indicate that AC6 plays a role in loading-induced bone adaptation, and these findings are consistent with our previous studies implicating primary cilia and AC6 in a novel mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24277577

  6. The role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Chao; Han, Elizabeth S; Yu, Xue; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; You, Lidan

    2015-10-01

    Osteocytes are proposed to be the mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical loading into biochemical signals during the process of bone adaptation. The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play a role in the mechanotransduction process of blood vessels and also in the dynamic control of bone mineral homeostasis. Nevertheless, the potential role of S1P in bone mechanotransduction has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that a S1P cascade is involved in the activation of osteocytes in response to loading-induced oscillatory fluid flow (OFF) in bone. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells express the necessary components of a functional S1P cascade. To examine the involvement of S1P signaling in osteocyte mechanotransduction, we applied OFF (1 Pa, 1 Hz) to osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells under conditions where the S1P signaling pathway was modulated. We found that decreased endogenous S1P levels significantly suppressed the OFF-induced intracellular calcium response. Addition of extracellular S1P to MLO-Y4 cells enhanced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) under static cells and amplified OFF-induced PGE2 release. The stimulatory effect of OFF on the gene expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) was S1P dependent. Furthermore, the S1P2 receptor subtype was shown to be involved in OFF-induced PGE2 synthesis and release, as well as down-regulation of RANKL/OPG gene expression ratio. In summary, our data suggest that S1P cascade is involved in OFF-induced mechanotransduction in MLO-Y4 cells and that extracellular S1P exerts its effect partly through S1P2 receptors. PMID:25988659

  7. Mechanical Signaling for Bone Modeling and Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Robling, Alexander G.; Turner, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Proper development of the skeleton in utero and during growth requires mechanical stimulation. Loading results in adaptive changes in bone that strengthen bone structure. Bone’s adaptive response is regulated by the ability of resident bone cells to perceive and translate mechanical energy into a cascade of structural and biochemical changes within the cells — a process known as mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction pathways are among the most anabolic in bone, and consequently, there is g...

  8. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate interstitial flow mechanotransduction regulating MMP-13 expression and cell motility via FAK-ERK in 3D collagen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Dong Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interstitial flow directly affects cells that reside in tissues and regulates tissue physiology and pathology by modulating important cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and migration. However, the structures that cells utilize to sense interstitial flow in a 3-dimensional (3D environment have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we have shown that interstitial flow upregulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts via activation of an ERK1/2-c-Jun pathway, which in turn promotes cell migration in collagen. Herein, we focused on uncovering the flow-induced mechanotransduction mechanism in 3D. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cleavage of rat vascular SMC surface glycocalyx heparan sulfate (HS chains from proteoglycan (PG core proteins by heparinase or disruption of HS biosynthesis by silencing N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase 1 (NDST1 suppressed interstitial flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, interstitial collagenase (MMP-13 expression, and SMC motility in 3D collagen. Inhibition or knockdown of focal adhesion kinase (FAK also attenuated or blocked flow-induced ERK1/2 activation, MMP-13 expression, and cell motility. Interstitial flow induced FAK phosphorylation at Tyr925, and this activation was blocked when heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs were disrupted. These data suggest that HSPGs mediate interstitial flow-induced mechanotransduction through FAK-ERK. In addition, we show that integrins are crucial for mechanotransduction through HSPGs as they mediate cell spreading and maintain cytoskeletal rigidity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose a conceptual mechanotransduction model wherein cell surface glycocalyx HSPGs, in the presence of integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesions and cytoskeleton organization, sense interstitial flow and activate the FAK-ERK signaling axis, leading to upregulation of MMP expression and cell motility in 3D

  9. Fine-tuned ATP signals are acute mediators in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringelbach, Tina M; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana; Ellegaard, Maria; Syberg, Susanne; Andersen, Christina K B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Vang, Ole; Schwarz, Peter; Jørgensen, Niklas R

    2015-12-01

    Osteocytes are considered the primary mechanosensors of bone, but the signaling pathways they apply in mechanotransduction are still incompletely investigated and characterized. A growing body of data strongly indicates that P2 receptor signaling among osteoblasts and osteoclasts has regulatory effects on bone remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesized that ATP signaling is also applied by osteocytes in mechanotransduction. We applied a short fluid pulse on MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells during real-time detection of ATP and demonstrated that mechanical stimulation activates the acute release of ATP and that these acute ATP signals are fine-tuned according to the magnitude of loading. ATP release was then challenged by pharmacological inhibitors, which indicated a vesicular release pathway for acute ATP signals. Finally, we showed that osteocytes express functional P2X2 and P2X7 receptors and respond to even low concentrations of nucleotides by increasing intracellular calcium concentration. These results indicate that in osteocytes, vesicular ATP release is an acute mediator of mechanical signals and the magnitude of loading. These and previous results, therefore, implicate purinergic signaling as an early signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:26327582

  10. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  11. Response Of Mineralizing And Non-Mineralizing Bone Cells To Fluid Flow: An In Vitro Model For Mechanotransruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Lauren A.

    2004-01-01

    Humans reach peak bone mass at age 30. After this point, we lose 1 to 2 percent of bone mass each decade. In the microgravity environment of space, astronauts lose bone mass at an accelerated rate of 1 to 2 percent each month. When astronauts travel to Mars, they may be in space for as long as 3 years. During this time, they may lose about half of their bone mass from weight-bearing bones. This loss may be irreversible. The drastic loss in bone that astronauts experience in space makes them much more vulnerable to fractures. In addition, the corresponding removal of calcium from bone results in higher levels of calcium in the blood, which increases the risk of developing kidney stones. Currently, studies are being conducted which investigate factors governing bone adaptation and mechanotransduction. Bone is constantly adapting in response to mechanical stimuli. Increased mechanical loading stimulates bone formation and suppresses bone resorption. Reduction in mechanical loading caused by bedrest, disuse, or microgravity results in decreased bone formation and possibly increased bone resorption. Osteoblasts and osteoclasts are the two main cell types that participate in bone remodeling. Osteoblasts are anabolic (bone-forming) cells and osteoclasts are catabolic (bone-resorbing) cells. In microgravity, the activity of osteoblasts slows down and the activity of osteoclasts may speed up, causing a loss of bone density. Mechanotransduction, the molecular mechanism by which mechanical stimuli are converted to biochemical signals, is not yet understood. Exposure of cells to fluid flow imposes a shear stress on the cells. Several studies have shown that the shear stress that results from fluid flow induces a cellular response similar to that induced by mechanical loading. Thus, fluid flow can be used as an in vitro model to simulate the mechanical stress that bone cells experience in vivo. Previous in vitro studies have shown that fluid flow induces several responses in

  12. Mechanotransduction pathways in skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, André Katayama; Verlengia, Rozangela; Bueno Junior, Carlos Roberto

    2012-02-01

    In the last decade, molecular biology has contributed to define some of the cellular events that trigger skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Recent evidence shows that insulin like growth factor 1/phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (IGF-1/PI3K/Akt) signaling is not the main pathway towards load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. During load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy process, activation of mTORC1 does not require classical growth factor signaling. One potential mechanism that would activate mTORC1 is increased synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PA). Despite the huge progress in this field, it is still early to affirm which molecular event induces hypertrophy in response to mechanical overload. Until now, it seems that mTORC1 is the key regulator of load-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy. On the other hand, how mTORC1 is activated by PA is unclear, and therefore these mechanisms have to be determined in the following years. The understanding of these molecular events may result in promising therapies for the treatment of muscle-wasting diseases. For now, the best approach is a good regime of resistance exercise training. The objective of this point-of-view paper is to highlight mechanotransduction events, with focus on the mechanisms of mTORC1 and PA activation, and the role of IGF-1 on hypertrophy process. PMID:22171534

  13. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  14. From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  15. TRPA1 modulates mechanotransduction in cutaneous sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kwan, Kelvin Y.; Glazer, Joshua M.; David P Corey; Rice, Frank L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2009-01-01

    TRPA1 is expressed by nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia, but its roles in cold and mechanotransduction are controversial. To determine the contribution of TRPA1 to cold and mechanotransduction in cutaneous primary afferent terminals, we used the ex-vivo skin-nerve preparation from Trpa1+/+, Trpa1+/− or Trpa1−/− adult mouse littermates. Cutaneous fibers from TRPA1-deficient mice showed no deficits in acute cold sensitivity, but they displayed striking ...

  16. Transient bioimpedance monitoring of mechanotransduction in artificial tissue during indentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheneler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is of fundamental importance in cell physiology, facilitating sensing in touch and hearing as well as tissue development and wound healing. This study used an impedance sensor to monitor the effective resistance and permittivity of artificial tissues, alginate hydrogel with encapsulated fibroblasts, which were kept viable through the use of a bespoke microfluidic system. The observed transient impedance responses upon the application of identical compressive normal loads differed between acellular hydrogels and hydrogels in which fibroblasts were encapsulated. These differences resulted from changes in the conductivity and permeability of the hydrogel due to the presence of the encapsulated fibroblasts, and transient changes in ion concentrations due to mechanotransduction effects.

  17. "Feeling the force" in reproduction: Mechanotransduction in reproductive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janice P; Leppert, Phyllis C

    2016-05-01

    Reproductive biologists are well-versed in many types of biochemical signaling, and indeed, there are almost innumerable examples in reproduction, including steroid and peptide hormone signaling, receptor-ligand and secondary messenger-mediated signaling, signaling regulated by membrane channels, and many others. Among reproductive scientists, a perhaps lesser-known but comparably important mode of signaling is mechanotransduction: the concept that cells can sense and respond to externally applied or internally generated mechanical forces. Given the cell shape changes and tissue morphogenesis events that are components of many phenomena in reproductive function, it should be no surprise that mechanotransduction has major impacts in reproductive health and pathophysiology. The conference on "Mechanotransduction in the Reproductive Tract" was a valuable launch pad to bring this hot issue in development, cell biology, biophysics, and tissue regeneration to the realm of reproductive biology. The goal of the meeting was to stimulate interest and increased mechanotransduction research in the reproductive field by presenting a broad spectrum of responses impacted by this process. The meeting highlighted the importance of convening expert investigators, students, fellows, and young investigators from a number of research areas resulting in cross-fertilization of ideas and suggested new avenues for study. The conference included talks on tissue engineering, stem cells, and several areas of reproductive biology, from uterus and cervix to the gametes. Specific reproductive health-relevant areas, including uterine fibroids, gestation and parturition, and breast tissue morphogenesis, received particular attention. PMID:27070825

  18. Novel mechanisms of endothelial mechano-transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Berk, Bradford C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a focal disease that develops preferentially where non-laminar, disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurs such as branches, bifurcations, and curvatures of large arteries. Endothelial cells sense and respond differently to d-flow compared to steady laminar flow (s-flow). D-flow that occurs in so-called athero-prone areas activates pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling, and this results in endothelial dysfunction and leads to subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In contrast, s-flow as “athero-protective flow” promotes expression of many anti-inflammatory genes such as Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibits endothelial inflammation and athrogenesis. Here we will discuss that d-flow and s-flow induce pro- and anti-atherogenic events via flow type-specific “mechanotransduction” pathways. We will focus on five mechano-sensitive pathways: MEK5 (MAPK/ERK kinase 5)-ERK5-KLF2 signaling, ERK5-PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) signaling, and mechano-signaling pathways involving SUMOylation, protein kinase C-ζ, (PKCζ), and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK). We believe that clarifying regulation mechanisms between these two flow types will provide new insights into therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25301843

  19. Fine-tuned ATP signals are acute mediators in osteocyte mechanotransduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringelbach, Tina M.; Aslan, Derya; Novak, Ivana;

    2015-01-01

    effects on bone remodeling. Therefore, we hypothesized that ATP signaling is also applied by osteocytes in mechanotransduction. We applied a short fluid pulse on MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells during real-time detection of ATP and demonstrated that mechanical stimulation activates the acute release of ATP...... and that these acute ATP signals are fine-tuned according to the magnitude of loading. ATP release was then challenged by pharmacological inhibitors, which indicated a vesicular release pathway for acute ATP signals. Finally, we showed that osteocytes express functional P2X2 and P2X7 receptors and...... respond to even low concentrations of nucleotides by increasing intracellular calcium concentration. These results indicate that in osteocytes, vesicular ATP release is an acute mediator of mechanical signals and the magnitude of loading. These and previous results, therefore, implicate purinergic...

  20. Flow induced vibration in pump impellers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex nature of flow-induced vibration (FIV) has led prominent researchers in the field to conclude that it is extremely important to understand the flow-induced vibration mechanism in order to design out of the problem (DOP), rather than to attempt to design the problem area on the basis of analysis with a high degree of certitude (i.e., predicting system response). Designing out of the problem may not be affected by addressing one parameter but rather several: structural contour, material selection, flow properties, structural stiffness, damping, and fluid-structure coupling In this paper the mechanism of flow induced vibration fatigue failure of large circulating water pumps is discussed. This paper provides an overview of the inter-relationship of finite element and theoretical analysis, component and material testing, operational data, fabrication, and repair practices

  1. Fluid flow induced calcium response in osteoblasts: mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J H; Xu, F; Lu, X L; Lu, T J

    2011-07-28

    Fluid flow in the bone lacuno-canalicular network can induce dynamic fluctuation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in osteoblasts, which plays an important role in bone remodeling. There has been limited progress in the mathematical modeling of this process probably due to its complexity, which is controlled by various factors such as Ca(2+) channels and extracellular messengers. In this study we developed a mathematical model to describe [Ca(2+)](i) response induced by fluid shear stress (SS) by integrating the major factors involved and analyzed the effects of different experimental setups (e.g. [Ca(2+)](i) baseline, pretreatment with ATP). In this model we considered the ATP release process and the activities of multiple ion channels and purinergic receptors. The model was further verified quantitatively by comparing the simulation results with experimental data reported in literature. The results showed that: (i) extracellular ATP concentration has more significant effect on [Ca(2+)](i) baseline (73% increase in [Ca(2+)](i) with extracellular ATP concentration varying between 0 and 10 μM), as compared to that induced by SS (25% variation in [Ca(2+)](i) with SS varying from 0 to 3.5 Pa); (ii) Pretreatment with ATP-medium results in different [Ca(2+)](i) response as compared to the control group (ATP-free medium) under SS; (iii) Relative [Ca(2+)](i) fluctuation over baseline is more reliable to show the [Ca(2+)](i) response process than the absolute [Ca(2+)](i) response peak. The developed model may improve the experimental design and facilitate our understanding of the mechanotransduction process in osteoblasts. PMID:21665208

  2. Transient bioimpedance monitoring of mechanotransduction in artificial tissue during indentation

    OpenAIRE

    David Cheneler; James Bowen; Georgia Kaklamani

    2014-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is of fundamental importance in cell physiology, facilitating sensing in touch and hearing as well as tissue development and wound healing. This study used an impedance sensor to monitor the effective resistance and permittivity of artificial tissues, alginate hydrogel with encapsulated fibroblasts, which were kept viable through the use of a bespoke microfluidic system. The observed transient impedance responses upon the application of identical compressive normal loads d...

  3. Mechanotransduction mechanisms for coordinating uterine contractions in human labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roger C

    2016-08-01

    This review presents evolving concepts of how the human uterus contracts in pregnancy, with emphasis on the mechanisms of long-distance signaling. Action potential propagation has historically been assumed to be the sole mechanism for signaling and tissue recruitment over both short and long distances. However, data in animals and humans indicate that a single action potential does not travel distances greater than a few centimeters. To address this enigma, a long-distance signaling mechanism based on hydraulic signaling and mechanotransduction is developed. By combining this mechanism for long-distance signaling with the action potential propagation mechanism for signaling over short distances, a comprehensive dual mechanism model (or 'dual model') of uterine function is formulated. Mechanotransduction is an accepted phenomenon of myometrium, but the dual model identifies mechanotransduction as relevant to normal labor. For hydraulic signaling, a local contraction slightly increases intrauterine pressure, which globally increases wall tension. Increased wall tension then mechanically induces additional local contractions that further raise pressure. This leads to robust, positive feedback recruitment that explains the emergence of consistently strong contractions of human labor. Three key components of the dual model - rapid long-distance signaling, mechanical triggering, and electrical activity - converge with the concept of mechanically sensitive electrogenic pacemakers distributed throughout the wall. The dual model retains excitation-contraction coupling and action potential propagation for signaling over short distances (<10cm) and hence is an extension of the action potential model rather than a replacement. PMID:27165050

  4. Cellular mechanotransduction: putting all the pieces together again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of cellular mechanotransduction, the mechanism by which cells convert mechanical signals into biochemical responses, has focused on identification of critical mechanosensitive molecules and cellular components. Stretch-activated ion channels, caveolae, integrins, cadherins, growth factor receptors, myosin motors, cytoskeletal filaments, nuclei, extracellular matrix, and numerous other structures and signaling molecules have all been shown to contribute to the mechanotransduction response. However, little is known about how these different molecules function within the structural context of living cells, tissues, and organs to produce the orchestrated cellular behaviors required for mechanosensation, embryogenesis, and physiological control. Recent work from a wide range of fields reveals that organ, tissue, and cell anatomy are as important for mechanotransduction as individual mechanosensitive proteins and that our bodies use structural hierarchies (systems within systems) composed of interconnected networks that span from the macroscale to the nanoscale in order to focus stresses on specific mechanotransducer molecules. The presence of isometric tension (prestress) at all levels of these multiscale networks ensures that various molecular scale mechanochemical transduction mechanisms proceed simultaneously and produce a concerted response. Future research in this area will therefore require analysis, understanding, and modeling of tensionally integrated (tensegrity) systems of mechanochemical control. PMID:16675838

  5. Lung heparan sulfates modulate Kfc during increased vascular pressure: evidence for glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction

    OpenAIRE

    Dull, Randal O.; Cluff, Mark; Kingston, Joseph; Hill, Denzil; Chen, Haiyan; Hoehne, Soeren; Malleske, Daniel T.; Kaur, Rajwinederjit

    2011-01-01

    Lung endothelial cells respond to changes in vascular pressure through mechanotransduction pathways that alter barrier function via non-Starling mechanism(s). Components of the endothelial glycocalyx have been shown to participate in mechanotransduction in vitro and in systemic vessels, but the glycocalyx's role in mechanosensing and pulmonary barrier function has not been characterized. Mechanotransduction pathways may represent novel targets for therapeutic intervention during states of ele...

  6. Optic flow induced self-tilt perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Roll optic flow induces illusory self-tilt in humans. As far as the mechanism underlying this visual-vestibular interaction is understood, larger angles of self-tilt are predicted than observed. It is hypothesized that the discrepancy can be explained by idiotropic (i.e., referring to a personal hea

  7. Fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration was studied by using a newly developed small wind tunnel. The necessary conditions of flow-induced vibration for a carbon steel specimen attached to a larger styrofoam cylinder were first investigated. Possible methods to detect indications of fatigue crack initiation and propagation were sought. A fatigue life prediction method was also developed. The change in natural frequency and amplitude of the test cylinder and strain history at the prospective crack initiation sites were measured. The 0.45 C steel specimen contained an artificial small hole which is expected to become the crack initiation site. A small portable service strain histogram recorder (Mini Rainflow Corder, MRC) developed in another project was used to monitor the variation of strains due to crack growth from the small hole. Fatigue damage accumulation based on Miner's rule was calculated and compared with the experimental results. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of flow induced airfoil vibrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sváček, P.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír

    Vol. II. Paříž : Ecole Polytechnique, Paris, 2004 - (Langre, E.; Axisa, F.), s. 57-62 ISBN 2-7302-1141-1. [International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration - FIV 2004 /8./. Paříž (FR), 06.07.2004-09.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/02/0391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : unsteady Navier-Stokes equations * nonlinear aeroelasticity * postcritical vibrations Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. Flow-induced crystallization in isotactic polypropylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Fawzi Ghassan

    Brief intervals of strong flow stretch chains in a semicrystalline polymer melt, which results in an increase in the nuclei number density and a transformation of the crystal structure. This flow-induced crystallization (FIC) phenomenon is explored in this study using highly isotactic polypropylene (iPP) samples. Using one synthesized and five commercial linear isotactic polypropylene samples, we investigate the FIC behavior by imposing shear onto these samples in a rotational rheometer. Equipped with a good temperature control and flexible shear protocol, we apply different temperature and flow conditions. The magnitude of the FIC effect varies with basic processing parameters (shear rate, specific work, crystallization temperature, and shearing temperature) and material properties (totalistic, molecular weight distribution, and particle concentration in the polymer). The scope of this study is to systematically investigate the influences of these parameters on FIC. The FIC effects that are investigated in this dissertation are: crystallization kinetics, persistence time of flow-induced nuclei, and crystal morphology. The crystallization time was measured in the rheometer by monitoring the onset of crystallization after quenching samples sheared above Tm. These samples were subsequently used to study their flow-induced nuclei persistence time and crystal morphology. The lifetime of flow-induced nuclei was determined by measuring the time required to return from FIC back to quiescent crystallization using a differential scanning calorimeter. The crystal morphology was imaged using polarized optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We investigated the influence of specific work on the three FIC characteristics, and found three regimes that are separated by the critical work ( Wc) and the saturation work (Wsat) thresholds. Below the critical work threshold, the morphology is composed of mostly spherulite crystals, which keep a constant volume, and a small

  10. Flow-induced oscillation of free reeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchak, Peter; Bush, John

    2009-11-01

    We present an investigation of the mechanism by which air flow induces oscillation in free reeds, which produce sound in several musical instruments. In this system, a thin strip of metal is clamped at one end to the top of a plate above a slot large enough for it to pass through. This geometry allows a uniform flow to induce and sustain large-amplitude oscillations of the reed. We investigate experimentally the conditions under which oscillation occurs and formulate a theoretical model, informed by the work of St. Hilaire et al. [JFM, 1971], to explain our observations.

  11. Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scanning provides information on the extent of primary bone tumors, on possible metastatic disease, on the presence of osteomyelitis prior to observation of roentgenographic changes so that earlier therapy is possible, on the presence of collagen diseases, on the presence of fractures not disclosed by x-ray films, and on the evaluation of aseptic necrosis. However, the total effect and contribution of bone scanning to the diagnosis, treatment, and ultimate prognosis of pediatric skeletal diseases is, as yet, unknown. (auth)

  12. The role of integrin α(V)β(3) in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugh, Matthew G; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-02-01

    Recent in vivo studies have proposed that integrin αvβ3 attachments between osteocyte cell processes and the extracellular matrix may facilitate mechanosensation in bone. However the role of these attachments in osteocyte biochemical response to mechanical stimulus has yet to be investigated. With this in mind, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of blocking integrin αvβ3 function on the biochemical response of osteocytes to mechanical stimulus. Antagonists specific to integrin subunit β3 were used to block integrin αvβ3 on MLO-Y4 mouse osteocytes. After treatment, cells were subjected to laminar oscillatory fluid flow stimulus (1 Pa, 1 Hz) for one hour. Fluorescent staining was performed to visualise cell morphology. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release was assayed using an enzyme immunoassay and qRT-PCR was used to analyse the relative expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Our results show that blocking integrin αvβ3 disrupts osteocyte morphology, causing a reduction in spread area and process retraction. Integrin αvβ3 blocking also disrupted COX-2 expression and PGE2 release in response to fluid shear stress. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that integrin αvβ3 is essential for the maintenance of osteocyte cell processes and also for mechanosensation and mechanotransduction by osteocytes. A better understanding of this process may lead to the development of novel treatments for bone pathologies where mechanosensitivity is thought to be compromised. PMID:25460927

  13. An investigation of the most Flow Inducing Genres

    OpenAIRE

    Behzad Ghonsooly; Seyyedeh Mina Hamedi

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at examining the extent to which three discourse genres of descriptive, expository, and narrative would be flow inducing. In other words, it attempts to testify the role of the text in promoting optimal experience on the one hand, and to identify which discourse genre would be the most flow inducing, on the other hand. To this end, a community sample of 60 participants comprising of 16 males and 44 females from various English language institutes in Mashhad, volunteered...

  14. Flow-induced dynamic surface tension effects at nanoscale

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyanov, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate flow-induced dynamic surface tension effects, similar to the well-known Marangoni phenomena, but solely generated by the nanoscale topography of the substrates. The flow-induced surface tension effects are examined on the basis of a sharp interface theory. It is demonstrated how nanoscale objects placed at the boundary of the flow domain result in the generation of substantial surface forces acting on the bulk flow.

  15. Flow-induced vibration -- 1994. PVP-Volume 273

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-induced vibration is a subject of practical interest to many engineering disciplines, including the power generation, process, and petrochemical industries. In the nuclear industry, flow-induced vibration reaches a higher level of concern because of safety issues and the huge cost associated with down time and site repair. Not surprisingly, during the last 25 years a tremendous amount of effort has been spent in the study of flow-induced vibration phenomena related to nuclear plant components, notably nuclear steam generator tube banks and nuclear fuel bundles. Yet, in spite of this concentrated effort, the industry is still not free from flow-induced vibration-related problems. This explains why in this volume almost half of the papers address the issue of cross-flow induced vibration in tube bundles, with applications to the nuclear steam generator and nuclear fuel bundles in mind. Unlike 10 or 15 years ago, when flow-induced vibration studies almost always involved experimentation and empirical studies, the advent of high-speed computers has enabled numerical calculation and simulation of this complex phenomenon to take place. Separate abstracts were prepared for 27 papers in this volume

  16. Flow Induced Electrification of Liquid Insulated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, Andrew Patrick

    1995-01-01

    The transport or motion of semi-insulating liquids has led to flow induced static electrification and catastrophic failures in several industries. While techniques for reducing the hazard have been developed, the roles of seemingly important parameters are poorly understood. The objective of this thesis was to measure and understand the fundamental parameters of the flow electrification process that, together with the laws of electroquasistatics and physicochemical hydrodynamics, can be used to predict the performance of complex flow systems, with particular attention to transformer applications. A rotating cylindrical electrode apparatus, which provided cylindrical Couette flow, was used to simulate flow electrification in an electric power transformer. The apparatus had Shell Diala A transformer oil filling the annulus between coaxial cylindrical stainless steel electrodes that were either bare metal, or covered by a thin copper sheet and/or EHV-Weidmann HiVal pressboard insulation. Extensive experiments characterized the time transient and steady state behavior of the electrification through measurements of the volume charge density, the terminal voltage, and the terminal current as the system was driven out of equilibrium by changes in the flow rate (inner cylinder rotation rates of 100-1400 rpm, Reynolds numbers of 5 times 10^3-5 times 10^5), temperature (15-70 ^circ), insulation moisture content (0.5-20 ppm in the oil), applied voltage (0-2 kV DC), and concentration of the non-ionizable anti-static additive 1,2,3 benzotriazole (BTA, 0-60 ppm). Generally, the electrification increased with flow rate and temperature but the BTA appeared to cause competing effects: it decreased the volume charge density on the liquid side of the interface (by a factor of 4), which reduces the electrification, but also decreased the oil conductivity (by a factor of 10), which enhances the electrification. A critical oil BTA concentration of 5 -8 ppm minimized the electrification

  17. Mechanotransduction in mouse inner ear hair cells requires transmembrane channel-like genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Geleoc, Gwenaelle S. G.; Kurima, Kiyoto; Labay, Valentina; Lelli, Andrea; Asai, Yukako; Makishima, Tomoko; Wu, Doris K.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Holt, Jeffrey R.; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells convert the mechanical stimuli of sound, gravity, and head movement into electrical signals. This mechanotransduction process is initiated by opening of cation channels near the tips of hair cell stereocilia. Since the identity of these ion channels is unknown, and mutations in

  18. Scale modeling flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similitude relationships currently employed in the design of flow-induced vibration scale-model tests of nuclear reactor components are reviewed. Emphasis is given to understanding the origins of the similitude parameters as a basis for discussion of the inevitable distortions which occur in design verification testing of entire reactor systems and in feature testing of individual component designs for the existence of detrimental flow-induced vibration mechanisms. Distortions of similitude parameters made in current test practice are enumerated and selected example tests are described. Also, limitations in the use of specific distortions in model designs are evaluated based on the current understanding of flow-induced vibration mechanisms and structural response

  19. Flow-induced vibration analysis of nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excessive flow-induced vibration may lead to fretting-wear or fatigue problems in nuclear components. Some recent vibration problems and their solution are reviewed. The analytical and experimental techniques used to solve or preferably avoid flow-induced vibration problems are emphasized in this paper. Vibration excitation mechanisms in parallel and cross-flow and in both liquid and two-phase steam-water flow will be discussed. These vibration excitation mechanisms and the structural dynamics of nuclear components are formulated in analytical models. This is illustrated by the application of a computer model to analyse steam generator designs. Current studies related to flow-induced vibration are reviewed. Among these are: 1) the in-reactor vibration behaviour of nuclear fuel elements, 2) the prediction of vibration-fretting damage for heat exchanger tube materials and 3) the damping of wind-induced vibration of heavy water plant structures. (author)

  20. Quiescent and flow-induced transitional behavior of hydroxypropylcellulose solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzuti, Nino; Maffettone, Pier Luca

    2003-03-01

    The flow-induced transition of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) is studied by rheological techniques. Aqueous solutions of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) in water are adopted as a model LCP system. Nonisothermal oscillatory tests are first used to quantitatively determine the "rheological" phase diagram of the HPC/water system under quiescent conditions. The phase diagram compares well with those obtained by other, more conventional techniques. Superposition of oscillatory and steady shear flow is then used to describe the nonisothermal flow-induced transition. In this case, it is shown that a critical shear stress must be reached to effectively induce the isotropic/mesophase transition. Stress-loop experiments are also used to identify the isothermal flow-induced transition, and to provide information on the transition kinetics.

  1. Flow Induced segregation in full scale castings with SCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Stang, Henrik; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2007-01-01

    Though promising, pioneering work has been carried out with rheological characterization and numerical modelling of form filling with SCC, the approach is far from standard in the concrete industry and clearly the approach does not yet hold all the answers to relevant questions. In particular flow...... patterns during form filling. Results show that the flow patterns have a major influence on the risk of flow induced segregation and the surface finish of the hardened concrete. A hypothesis for the mechanism of flow induced segregation is put forth....

  2. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.

    1985-06-01

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs. (JDB)

  3. Flow-induced vibration of circular cylindrical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the flow-induced vibration of circular cylinders in quiescent fluid, axial flow, and crossflow, and applications of the analytical methods and experimental data in design evaluation of various system components consisting of circular cylinders. 219 figs., 30 tabs

  4. Flow-induced vibration study in the LOFT steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, C.F.

    1977-10-18

    The consequences of flow induced vibration in the LOFT steam generator were studied. Tube-baffle contact and fretting wear are expected to occur while tube-tube contact is not predicted. The LOFT steam generator is, in all probability adequate from a fluid induced viewpoint for the scheduled service of the LOFT facility at power. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Analysis of flow induced vibration in heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description will be given of three different types of heat exchangers developed by the Dutch Nuclear Industry Group ''Neratoom'' in cooperation with TNO for the sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor SNR-300 at Kalkar. Moreover, the research related with flow induced vibrations carried out by TNO (Organization for Applied Scientific Research) will be presented. The flow induced forces on the tubes of the straight-tube steam generators were measured at the inlet and outlet section where partial crossflow occurs. With the measured flow induced forces the response of a tube was calculated as a function of the tube-to-supportbush clearances taking into account the non-linear damping effects from the sodium. The theoretical results showed that for this particular design no tube impact damage is to be expected which was confirmed later by a full scale experiment. Special attention will be devoted to the steam generator with helical-coil tube-bundles, where the sodium flows in a counter cross-flow over the tube-bundle. Extensive measurements of the power spectra of the flow induced forces were carried out since no information could be found in the literature. The vibration analysis will be presented and vibration modes of the entire bundle will be compared with experimentally obtained results. Finally a description of the vibration tests to be carried out on the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) will be presented. (author)

  6. Analysis of flow-induced vibrations in the PEC design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the studies performed for the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility with regard to flow-induced vibration problems. Reference is made to the reactor-block, the primary and secondary coolant loops and the emergency loops. Studies in progress and future developments foreseen are also mentioned. (author)

  7. Specialists meeting on LMFBR flow induced vibrations. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Specialists' Meeting on LMFBR Flow-Induced Vibrations was held at ANL in the United States which was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR). It was attended by participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States and the IAEA. The purpose of the meeting was to provide, for the first time, a common forum for the exchange of information on flow-induced vibration programs of the member countries. As this was a first meeting, information was sought in the broad areas of: 1. Design Criteria and Problem Areas in LMFBR Design; 2. Current Design Procedures; and 3. Ongoing Research. A session was devoted to each of the above topics wherein papers were presented and discussed followed by open discussions on the session topic. The objective of the open discussions was to identify, from a review of specific reactor designs, (a) flow induced vibration problem areas (expected and observed) and their potential for occurrence; (b) failure modes and associated design criteria; (c) specific components that are susceptible to flow induced vibration; and (d) probable excitation mechanisms. It was aimed to assess the current state-of-the-art in designing to avoid flow induced vibration with consideration of licensing requirements; to evaluate existing methods of analysis, testing, and surveillance, along with their limitations and to identify areas requiring research and review ongoing research programmes relative to these research needs

  8. Peripheral sensitisation of nociceptors via G-proteindependent potentiation of mechanotransduction currents

    OpenAIRE

    Lechner, Stefan G; Lewin, Gary R.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical stimuli impinging on the skin are converted into electrical signals by mechanically gated ion channels located at the peripheral nerve endings of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Under inflammatory conditions sensory neurons are commonly sensitised to mechanical stimuli; a putative mechanism that may contribute to such sensitisation of sensory neurons is enhanced responsiveness of mechanotransduction ion channels. Here we show that the algogens UTP and ATP potentiate mechanosens...

  9. Evidence for the involvement of ASIC3 in sensory mechanotransduction in proprioceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shing-Hong; Cheng, Yuan-Ren; Banks, Robert W; Min, Ming-Yuan; Bewick, Guy S; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is involved in acid nociception, but its possible role in neurosensory mechanotransduction is disputed. We report here the generation of Asic3-knockout/eGFPf-knockin mice and subsequent characterization of heterogeneous expression of ASIC3 in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). ASIC3 is expressed in parvalbumin (Pv+) proprioceptor axons innervating muscle spindles. We further generate a floxed allele of Asic3 (Asic3(f/f)) and probe the role of ASIC3 in mechanotransduction in neurite-bearing Pv+ DRG neurons through localized elastic matrix movements and electrophysiology. Targeted knockout of Asic3 disrupts spindle afferent sensitivity to dynamic stimuli and impairs mechanotransduction in Pv+ DRG neurons because of substrate deformation-induced neurite stretching, but not to direct neurite indentation. In behavioural tasks, global knockout (Asic3(-/-)) and Pv-Cre::Asic3(f/f) mice produce similar deficits in grid and balance beam walking tasks. We conclude that, at least in mouse, ASIC3 is a molecular determinant contributing to dynamic mechanosensitivity in proprioceptors. PMID:27161260

  10. Mechanotransduction-Induced Lipid Production System with High Robustness and Controllability for Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Kwon; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae lipids are a promising energy source, but current biochemical methods of lipid-inductions such as nitrogen deprivation have low process robustness and controllability. Recently, use of mechanotransduction based membrane distortion by applying compression stress in a 2D-microsystem was suggested as a way to overcome these limitations of biochemical induction. However, reproduction in large numbers of cells without cell death has been difficult to overcome because compression for direct membrane distortion reduces culture volume and leads to cell death due to nutrient deprivation. In this study, a mechanotransduction-induced lipid production (MDLP) system that redirects elastic microbeads to induce membrane distortion of microalgae with alleviating cell death was developed. This system resulted in accumulation of lipid in as little as 4 hr. Once compressed, porous microbeads absorb media and swell simultaneously while homogeneously inducing compression stress of microalgae. The absorbed media within beads could be supplied to adjacent cells and could minimize cell death from nutrient deficiency. All mechanotransduction was confirmed by measuring upregulation of calcium influx and Mat3 genes. The microbeads ensured robustness and controllability in repeated compression/de-compression processes. Overall, the MDLP system has potential for use as a fundamental biodiesel process that requires robustness and controllability. PMID:27609701

  11. Numerical study on multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myong, Hyon Kook [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    The present paper presents a numerical study on multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion. The continuum surface force (CSF) model with the wall adhesion boundary condition model is used for calculating the surface tension force; this model is implemented in an in house solution code (PowerCFD). The present method (code) employs an unstructured cell centered method based on a conservative pressure based finite volume method with a volume capturing method (CICSAM) in a volume of fluid (VOF) scheme for phase interface capturing. The effects of wall adhesion are then numerically simulated by using the present method for a shallow pool of water located at the bottom of a cylindrical tank with no external forces such as gravity. Two different cases are computed, one it which the water wets the wall and one in which the water does not wet the wall. It is found that the present method efficiently simulates the surface tension dominant multiphase flows induced by wall adhesion.

  12. Flow induced migration in polymer melts - Theory and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorgan, John Robert; Rorrer, Nicholas Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms.

  13. Flow induced migration in polymer melts – Theory and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorgan, John Robert, E-mail: jdorgan@mines.edu; Rorrer, Nicholas Andrew, E-mail: nrorrer@mines.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms.

  14. Flow induced migration in polymer melts – Theory and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow induced migration, whereby polymer melts are fractionated by molecular weight across a flow field, represents a significant complication in the processing of polymer melts. Despite its long history, such phenomena remain relatively poorly understood. Here a simple analytical theory is presented which predicts the phenomena based on well-established principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. It is unambiguously shown that for purely viscous materials, a gradient in shear rate is needed to drive migration; for purely viscometric flows no migration is expected. Molecular scale simulations of flow migration effects in dense polymer melts are also presented. In shear flow the melts exhibit similar behavior as the quiescent case; a constant shear rate across the gap does not induce chain length based migration. In comparison, parabolic flow causes profound migration for both unentangled and entangled melts. These findings are consistent with the analytical theory. The picture that emerges is consistent with flow induced migration mechanisms predominating over competing chain degradation mechanisms

  15. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Study of the Flow Induced by a Sliding Discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Sosa, Roberto; Arnaud, Elise; Memin, Etienne; Artana, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    International audience In this work, we report on electrical and fluid-dynamics studies concerning the flow induced by a sliding discharge (SD). This kind of discharge was created with a three electrode system configuration: one excited with ac and the others with a dc negative voltage. The SD was activated on a quiescent fluid at atmospheric pressure. The flow field induced by the SD was analysed by measurements undertaken with Pitot probes and Schlieren Image Velocimetry. Under the condi...

  17. Flow Induced Failures of Copper Drinking Water Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Coyne, Jeffrey Michael

    2009-01-01

    Excessive water flow velocities can contribute to rapid failures of copper premise plumbing systems. This is the first fundamental study to scientifically isolate mechanistic impacts from distinct flow induced failure mechanisms that include concentration cell corrosion, cavitation, particle/bubble impingement and high velocity impingement. Concentration cell effects resulting from exposing different copper surfaces to different flow regimes created a strong electrochemical cell that caused...

  18. Flow-induced vibrations of a rotating cylinder

    OpenAIRE

    Bourguet, Rémi; Lo Jacono, David

    2014-01-01

    International audience The flow-induced vibrations of a circular cylinder, free to oscillate in the cross-flow direction and subjected to a forced rotation about its axis, are analysed by means of two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. The impact of the symmetry breaking caused by the forced rotation on the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) mechanisms is investigated for a Reynolds number equal to 100, based on the cylinder diameter and inflow velocity. The cylinder is found to osc...

  19. Recent results and persisting problems in modeling flow induced coalescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Jůza, Josef

    Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2014, Roč. 1593, s. 646-649. ISSN 0094-243X. [International Conference of the Polymer Processing Society /29./ - PPS-29. Nuremberg (DE), 15.07.2013-19.07.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/1069 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : flow induced coalescence * polymer blends * viscoelasticity Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  20. An investigation of the most Flow Inducing Genres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Ghonsooly

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at examining the extent to which three discourse genres of descriptive, expository, and narrative would be flow inducing. In other words, it attempts to testify the role of the text in promoting optimal experience on the one hand, and to identify which discourse genre would be the most flow inducing, on the other hand. To this end, a community sample of 60 participants comprising of 16 males and 44 females from various English language institutes in Mashhad, volunteered to take part in the study by reading three texts of TOEFL containing the expository, narrative, and descriptive genres. After each reading the respondents were asked to reflect on their flow experience through filling in the Flow Perception Questionnaire (Egbert, 2003. The researchers investigated flow differences across genres by employing repeated measures ANOVA. The results revealed that flow occurred during the reading of descriptive, narrative, and expository genres; however, there were significant differences in terms of the flow scores engendered by the variations across these genres. The results of the data analysis reported the descriptive genre as the most flow inducing discourse genre.

  1. Measurements of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-Li; Huang, Hung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of a microscopic circular polariscope to measure the flow-induced birefringence in a microfluidic device that represents the kinematics of fluid motion optically. Unlike the commercial birefringence microscope employed in the previous studies, our approach is able to provide direct measurement of retardance, which quantifies the difference in refractive index of the fluid experienced by the ordinary and extraordinary rays, from one single image frame. This capability facilitates unsteady full-field quantitation of flow-induced birefringence in microfluidics that has never been achieved before. At low flow rates, we find that the value of the retardance is independent of the microfluidic design and proportional to the nominal strain rates. This linearity bridges the measurement of birefringence and the deformation rate in the microflow environment, which yields the stress information of the fluid flow. In addition, the μPIV results confirm that both extensional and shear strain rates contribute to the flow-induced birefringence so that the retardance distribution can be used to represent the field of the principal strain rate in a microfluidic device. The outcome of this study proves that our approach provides a non-invasive method that enables an intuitive full-field representation of stress in the instantaneous flow field in a microfluidic device. PMID:26858809

  2. Flow induced vibrations in liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow induced vibrations are well known phenomena in industry. Engineers have to estimate their destructive effects on structures. In the nuclear industry, flow induced vibrations are assessed early in the design process, and the results are incorporated in the design procedures. In many cases, model testing is used to supplement the design process to ensure that detrimental behaviour due to flow induced vibrations will not occur in the component in question. While these procedures attempt to minimize the probability of adverse performance of the various components, there is a problem in the extrapolation of analytical design techniques and/or model testing to actual plant operation. Therefore, sodium tests or vibrational measurements of components in the reactor system are used to provide additional assurance. This report is a general survey of experimental and calculational methods in this area of structural mechanics. The report is addressed to specialists and institutions in industrialized and developing countries who are responsible for the design and operation of liquid metal fast breeder reactors. 92 refs, 90 figs, 8 tabs

  3. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  4. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse

  5. Flow Induced Vibration Program at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has had a Flow Induced Vibration Program since 1967; the Program currently resides in the Laboratory's Components Technology Division. Throughout its existence, the overall objective of the program has been to develop and apply new and/or improved methods of analysis and testing for the design evaluation of nuclear reactor plant components and heat exchange equipment from the standpoint of flow induced vibration. Historically, the majority of the program activities have been funded by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), and Department of Energy (DOE). Current DOE funding is from the Breeder Mechanical Component Development Division, Office of Breeder Technology Projects; Energy Conversion and Utilization Technology (ECUT) Program, Office of Energy Systems Research; and Division of Engineering, Mathematical and Geosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Testing of Clinch River Breeder Reactor upper plenum components has been funded by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) Project Office. Work has also been performed under contract with Foster Wheeler, General Electric, Duke Power Company, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Westinghouse.

  6. Interfering with the connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton affects nuclear rotation, mechanotransduction and myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosig, Michaela; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Gelman, Laurent; Chiquet, Matthias; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical stress controls a broad range of cellular functions. The cytoskeleton is physically connected to the extracellular matrix via integrin receptors, and to the nuclear lamina by the LINC complex that spans both nuclear membranes. We asked here how disruption of this direct link from the cytoskeleton to nuclear chromatin affects mechanotransduction. Fibroblasts grown on flexible silicone membranes reacted to cyclic stretch by nuclear rotation. This rotation was abolished by inhibition of actomyosin contraction as well as by overexpression of dominant-negative versions of nesprin or sun proteins that form the LINC complex. In an in vitro model of muscle differentiation, cyclic strain inhibits differentiation and induces proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interference with the LINC complex in these cells abrogated their stretch-induced proliferation, while stretch increased p38 MAPK and NFkappaB phosphorylation and the transcript levels of myogenic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. We found that the physical link from the cytoskeleton to the nuclear lamina is crucial for correct mechanotransduction, and that disruption of the LINC complex perturbs the mechanical control of cell differentiation. PMID:20621196

  7. Flow-induced properties of nanotube-filled polymer materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Semen B; Douglas, Jack F; Obrzut, Jan; Grulke, Eric A; Migler, Kalman B

    2004-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are under intense investigation in materials science owing to their potential for modifying the electrical conductivity sigma, shear viscosity eta, and other transport properties of polymeric materials. These particles are hybrids of filler and nanoscale additives because their lengths are macroscopic whereas their cross-sectional dimensions are closer to molecular scales. The combination of extended shape, rigidity and deformability allows CNTs to be mechanically dispersed in polymer matrices in the form of disordered 'jammed' network structures. Our measurements on representative network-forming multiwall nanotube (MWNT) dispersions in polypropylene indicate that these materials exhibit extraordinary flow-induced property changes. Specifically, sigma and eta both decrease strongly with increasing shear rate, and these nanocomposites exhibit impressively large and negative normal stress differences, a rarely reported phenomenon in soft condensed matter. We illustrate the practical implications of these nonlinear transport properties by showing that MWNTs eliminate die swell in our nanocomposites, an effect crucial for their processing. PMID:15273745

  8. Two-dimensional streaming flows induced by resonating, thin beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açikalin, Tolga; Raman, Arvind; Garimella, Suresh V

    2003-10-01

    Miniaturized resonating slender beams are finding increased applications as fluidic actuators for portable electronics cooling. Piezoelectric and ultrasonic "fans" drive a flexural mode of the beam into resonance thus inducing a streaming flow, which can be used to cool microelectronic components. This paper presents analytical, computational, and experimental investigations of the incompressible two-dimensional streaming flows induced by resonating thin beams. Closed-form analytical streaming solutions are presented first for an infinite beam. These are used to motivate a computational scheme to predict the streaming flows from a baffled piezoelectric fan. Experiments are conducted to visualize the asymmetric streaming flows from a baffled piezoelectric fan and the experimental results are found to be in close agreement with the predicted results. The findings are expected to be of relevance in the optimal design and positioning of these solid-state devices in cooling applications. PMID:14587580

  9. Flow-induced channelization in a porous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Amala

    2010-01-01

    We propose a theory for erosional channelization induced by fluid flow in a saturated granular porous medium. When the local fluid flow-induced stress is larger than a critical threshold, grains are dislodged and carried away so that the porosity of the medium is altered by erosion. This in turn affects the local hydraulic conductivity and pressure in the medium and results in the growth and development of channels that preferentially conduct the flow. Our multiphase model involves a dynamical porosity field that evolves along with the volume fraction of the mobile and immobile grains in response to fluid flow that couples the spatiotemporal dynamics of the three phases. Numerical solutions of the resulting initial boundary value problem show how channels form in porous media and highlights how heterogeneity in the erosion threshold dictates the form of the patterns and thus the ability to control them.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ENHANCED HEAT TRANSFER BY FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION OF ELASTIC TUBE BUNDLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new concept of heat transfer enhancement by flow-induced vibration was put forward, and a novel heat transfer element called elastic tube bundles was designed. The experimental investigation was performed on its characteristics of flow-induced virbration in out-tube or in-tube flow. Under the conditions of fixed heat flux and steam-water heat transfer, the regularity of heat transfer enhancement by flow-induced vibration was examined.

  11. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  12. Exploring the Role of Mechanotransduction Activation and Adaptation Kinetics in Hair Cell Filtering Using a Hodgkin-Huxley Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Gregg B.; Ricci, Anthony J.

    2011-11-01

    In the auditory system, mechanotransduction occurs in the hair cell sensory hair bundle and is the first major step in the translation of mechanical energy into electrical. Tonotopic variations in the activation kinetics of this process are posited to provide a low pass filter to the input. An adaptation process, also associated with mechanotransduction, is postulated to provide a high pass filter to the input in a tonotopic manner. Together a bandpass filter is created at the hair cell input. Corresponding mechanical components to both activation and adaptation are also suggested to be involved in generating cochlear amplification. A paradox to this story is that hair cells where the mechanotransduction properties are most robust possess an intrinsic electrical resonance mechanism proposed to account for all required tuning and amplification. A simple Hodgkin-Huxley type model is presented to attempt to determine the role of the activation and adaptation kinetics in further tuning hair cells that exhibit electrical resonance. Results further support that steady state mechanotransduction properties are critical for setting the resting potential of the hair cell while the kinetics of activation and adaptation are important for sharpening tuning around the characteristic frequency of the hair cell.

  13. Bone Adaptation and Regeneration - New Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bacabac, Rommel Gaud

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is constantly renewed and adapts to its local loading environment. Mechanical loading results in adaptive changes in bone size and shape that strengthen bone structure. The mechanisms for adaptation involve a multistep process called mechanotransduction, which is the ability of resident bone cells to perceive and translate mechanical energy into a cascade of structural and biochemical changes within the cells. The transduction of a mechanical signal to a biochemical response involves pathways within the cell membrane and cytoskeleton of the osteocytes, the professional mechansensor cells of bone. During the last decade the role of mechanosensitive osteocytes in bone metabolism and turnover, and the lacuno-canalicular porosity as the structure that mediates mechanosensing, is likely to reveal a new paradigm for understanding the bone formation response to mechanical loading, and the bone resorption response to disuse. Strain-derived fluid flow of interstitial fluid through the lacuno-canalicular porosity seems to mechanically activate the osteocytes, as well as ensures transport of cell signaling molecules, nutrients and waste products. Cell-cell signaling from the osteocyte sensor cells to the effector cells (osteoblasts or osteoclasts), and the effector cell response - either bone formation or resorption, allow an explanation of local bone gain and loss as well as remodeling in response to fatigue damage as processes supervised by mechanosensitive osteocytes. The osteogenic activity of cultured bone cells has been quantitatively correlated with varying stress stimulations highlighting the importance of the rate of loading. Theoretically a possible mechanism for the stress response by osteocytes is due to strain amplification at the pericellular matrix. Single cell studies on molecular responses of osteocytes provide insight on local architectural alignment in bone during remodeling. Alignment seems to occur as a result of the

  14. Numerical prediction of flow induced fibers orientation in injection molded polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oumer, A. N.; Hamidi, N. M.; Mat Sahat, I.

    2015-12-01

    Since the filling stage of injection molding process has important effect on the determination of the orientation state of the fibers, accurate analysis of the flow field for the mold filling stage becomes a necessity. The aim of the paper is to characterize the flow induced orientation state of short fibers in injection molding cavities. A dog-bone shaped model is considered for the simulation and experiment. The numerical model for determination of the fibers orientation during mold-filling stage of injection molding process was solved using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software called MoldFlow. Both the simulation and experimental results showed that two different regions (or three layers of orientation structures) across the thickness of the specimen could be found: a shell region which is near to the mold cavity wall, and a core region at the middle of the cross section. The simulation results support the experimental observations that for thin plates the probability of fiber alignment to the flow direction near the mold cavity walls is high but low at the core region. It is apparent that the results of this study could assist in decisions regarding short fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  15. Response characteristics and suppression of flow-induced vibrations of rectangular prisms with rotary oscillation. 1st report, response characteristics and generation mechanism of flow-induced vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response characteristics and suppression of flow-induced vibration of rectangular prisms with various width-to-height ratios were experimentally investigated. The present study focused on rotary oscillation, which is one of flow-induced vibrations generated in a rectangular prism. In this paper, the response characteristics on elastically supported prism were first examined in detail by free-vibration test. Next, flow-induced vibrations obtained by the free-vibration test were reproduced by forced-vibration test, and then the generation mechanism of flow-induced vibrations was examined on the basis of the visualized flow patterns, fluctuating pressure distributions of the surface of prism and characteristics of flow-induced vibrations by the flow control. The main findings were that (1) there are three types of flow-induced vibrations, i.e., vortex excitation, low-speed torsion flutter and high-speed torsion flutter, (2) flow-induced vibrations can be classified into six patterns depending on the width-to-height ratio, (3) flow-induced vibrations occur due to change in fluctuating pressure on the surface of the prism based on the difference of the behavior of the shear layer separating from the leading edge, the impinging leading-edge vortex, and the wake vortices, and (4) generation of low-speed torsion flutter and vortex excitation is completely suppressed by adopting large values of the reduced mass-damping factor, however, high-speed torsion flutter occurs regardless of the reduced mass-damping factor. (author)

  16. Numerical simulation of flow-induced vibrations in tube bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In many industrial components mechanical structures like rod cluster control assembly, fuel assembly and heat exchanger tube bundles are submitted to complex flows causing possible vibrations and damage. Fluid forces are usually split into two parts: structure motion independent forces and fluid-elastic forces coupled with tube motion and responsible for possible dynamic instability development leading to possible short term failures through high amplitude vibrations. Most classical fluid force identification methods rely on structure response experimental measurements associated with convenient data processes. Owing to recent improvements in Computational Fluid Dynamics (C.F.D.), numerical fluid force identification is now practicable in the presence of industrial configurations. The present paper is devoted to numerical simulation of flow-induced vibrations of tube bundles submitted to single-phase cross flows by using C.F.D. codes. Direct Numerical Simulation (D.N.S.), Arbitrary Lagrange Euler formulation (A.L.E.) and code coupling process are involved to predict fluid forces responsible for tube bundle vibrations in the presence of fluid structure and fluid-elastic coupling effects. In the presence of strong multi-physics coupling, simulation of flow-induced vibrations requires a fluid structure code coupling process. The methodology consists in solving in the same time thermohydraulics and mechanics problems by using an A.L.E. formulation for the fluid computation. The purpose is to take into account coupling between flow and structure motions in order to be able to capture coupling effects. From a numerical point of view, there are three steps in the computation: the fluid problem is solved on the computational domain; fluid forces acting on the moving tube are estimated; finally they are introduced in the structure solver providing the tube displacement that is used to actualize the fluid computational domain. Specific

  17. A critical role for Piezo2 channels in the mechanotransduction of mouse proprioceptive neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Paz, Danny; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Kuner, Rohini; Gomis, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptors are responsible for the conscious sensation of limb position and movement, muscle tension or force, and balance. Recent evidence suggests that Piezo2 is a low threshold mechanosensory receptor in the peripheral nervous system, acting as a transducer for touch sensation and proprioception. Thus, we characterized proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus that are involved in processing proprioceptive information from the face and oral cavity. This is a specific population of neurons that produce rapidly adapting mechanically-activated currents that are fully dependent on Piezo2. As such, we analyzed the deficits in balance and coordination caused by the selective deletion of the channel in proprioceptors (conditional knockout). The data clearly shows that Piezo2 fulfills a critical role in a defined homogeneous population of proprioceptor neurons that innervate the head muscles, demonstrating that this ion channel is essential for mammalian proprioceptive mechanotransduction. PMID:27184818

  18. An electromagnetic cell-stretching device for mechanotransduction studies of olfactory ensheathing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harshad, Kamble; Jun, Myeongjun; Park, Sungsu; Barton, Matthew J; Vadivelu, Raja K; St John, James; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-06-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are primary candidates for cell transplantation therapy to repair spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the post transplantation survival of these cells remains a major hurdle for a success using this therapy. Mechanical stimuli may contribute to the maintenance of these cells and thus, mechanotransduction studies of OECs may serve as a key benefit to identify strategies for improvement in cell transplantation. We developed an electromagnetic cell stretching device based on a single sided uniaxial stretching approach to apply tensile strain to OECs in culture. This paper reports the design, simulation and characterisation of the stretching device with preliminary experimental observations of OECs in vitro. The strain field of the deformable membrane was investigated both experimentally and numerically. Heterogeneity of the device provided an ideal platform for establishing strain requirement for the OEC culture. The cell stretching system developed may serve as a tool in exploring the mechanobiology of OECs for future SCI transplantation research. PMID:27194027

  19. A critical role for Piezo2 channels in the mechanotransduction of mouse proprioceptive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez-Paz, Danny; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Kuner, Rohini; Gomis, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Proprioceptors are responsible for the conscious sensation of limb position and movement, muscle tension or force, and balance. Recent evidence suggests that Piezo2 is a low threshold mechanosensory receptor in the peripheral nervous system, acting as a transducer for touch sensation and proprioception. Thus, we characterized proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus that are involved in processing proprioceptive information from the face and oral cavity. This is a specific population of neurons that produce rapidly adapting mechanically-activated currents that are fully dependent on Piezo2. As such, we analyzed the deficits in balance and coordination caused by the selective deletion of the channel in proprioceptors (conditional knockout). The data clearly shows that Piezo2 fulfills a critical role in a defined homogeneous population of proprioceptor neurons that innervate the head muscles, demonstrating that this ion channel is essential for mammalian proprioceptive mechanotransduction. PMID:27184818

  20. Mechanotransduction by intraganglionic laminar endings of vagal tension receptors in the guinea-pig oesophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodnyuk, Vladimir P; Chen, Bao Nan; Costa, Marcello; Brookes, Simon J H

    2003-12-01

    Vagal mechanoreceptors to the guinea-pig oesophagus, recorded extracellularly, in vitro, fired spontaneously at 3.3 +/- 0.2 Hz, (n = 75, from 57 animals), and had low thresholds to circumferential stretch. In this study, we have investigated whether mechanotransduction by intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) directly relies on mechano-gated ion channels, or whether it is due to chemical activation by neurotransmitters (glutamate or ATP) released from other cells during mechanical distortion. Rapid distortion of focal transduction sites (IGLEs) evoked action potentials with a latency of MPPG)) did not affect mechano-transduction. Glutamate, NMDA and the selective mGluR group II and III agonists, (2R, 4R)-APDC and L-AP4, had no effect on spontaneous or stretch-induced firing. The P2X purinoreceptor agonist, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, caused concentration-dependent excitation of vagal mechanoreceptors (EC50 = 22.2 microM) which was blocked by the non-selective P2 antagonist PPADS (30 microM). On its own, PPADS affected neither stretch-induced firing nor spontaneous firing. Neither Ca(2+)-free solution (1 mM EDTA, 3.6 mM Mg(2+)) solution nor Cd(2+) (100 microM) blocked stretch-induced firing. Thus chemical transmission is not involved in activation of vagal mechanoreceptors. The blocker of stretch-activated channels, Gd(3+) (300 microM), did not inhibit stretch-induced firing. However, benzamil (100 microM) significantly inhibited spontaneous and distension-evoked firing in a stretch-dependent manner; proportionally greater inhibition was seen with larger stretches. The results suggest that IGLEs of vagal tension receptors directly transduce mechanical stimuli probably via benzamil-sensitive, Gd3+-insensitive, stretch-activated ion channels, and that chemical transmission is not involved in transduction. PMID:14500769

  1. Flow induced vibration analysis for preventing PWR fuel rods from excessive fretting wear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prevent PWR fuel rods excessive fretting wear, the author analysed flow induced vibration. The methods developed and used by FRAMATOME to analyze and to justify the fuel rod behaviour with respect to flow induced vibrations and wear at grid support locations were presented

  2. Flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, Pintu; Sen, Abhijit

    2015-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of particle flow induced large amplitude shock waves in a dusty plasma. These dust acoustic shocks (DAS) are observed for strongly supersonic flows and have been studied in a U-shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for charged kaolin dust in a background of Argon plasma. The strong flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of the dust density near the potential hill is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks. The dynamics of the shocks are captured by fast video pictures of the structures that are illuminated by a laser sheet beam. The physical characteristics of the shock are delineated from a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of plasma parameters and flow speeds. Details of these observations and a physical explanation based on model calculations will be presented.

  3. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  4. Flow-Induced Crystallization of Poly(ether ether ketone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Behzad; Rhoades, Alicyn; Colby, Ralph

    The effects of an interval of shear above the melting temperature Tm on subsequent isothermal crystallization below Tm is reported for the premier engineering thermoplastic, poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK). The effect of shear on the crystallization rate of PEEK is investigated by means of rheological techniques and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under a protocol of imposing shear in a rotational cone and plate rheometer and monitoring crystallization after quenching. The rate of crystallization at 320 °C was not affected by shear for shear rates <7 s-1 at 350 °C, whereas intervals of adequate shear at higher shear rates prior to the quench to 320 °C accelerated crystallization significantly. As the duration of the interval of shear above 7 s-1 is increased, the crystallization time decreases but at each shear rate eventually saturates once the applied specific work exceeds ~120 MPa. The annealing of the flow-induced precursors was also investigated. The nuclei were fairly persistent at temperatures close to 350 °C, however very unstable at temperatures above 375 °C. This suggests that the nanostructures formed under shear might be akin to crystalline lamellae of greater thickness, compared to quiescently crystallized lamellae.

  5. Flow-Induced Crystallization and Nucleation in Isotactic Polypropylenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Flow-induced crystallization (FIC) occurs when a brief interval of strong flow precedes a temperature quench; many more nuclei form, resulting in a much more fine-grained solid morphology and better material properties. Common industrial polymer processing (injection molding) depends on FIC, which has been the subject of many experimental studies, most commonly on isotactic polypropylene (iPP). The prevailing hypothesis is that FIC results from flow aligning chains in the melt, increasing the melt free energy with respect to the crystal, hence acting like undercooling. Here, I combine experimental results for FIC and homogeneous nucleation with theoretical estimates for critical nuclei, to assess the prevailing hypothesis. Current best information supports the view that chain stretching (not just alignment) is necessary and sufficient to explain the observed increase in nucleation rate. Important puzzles remain: 1) shear applied at temperatures well above the equilibrium melting temperature Tm = 187 C is effective for FIC, and 2) a sheared sample may be held for hours above Tm, and still crystallize faster when quenched.

  6. Flow-induced pruning of branched systems and brittle reconfiguration

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Diego; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Whereas most plants are flexible structures that undergo large deformations under flow, another process can occur when the plant is broken by heavy fluid-loading. We investigate here the mechanism of such possible breakage, focusing on the flow-induced pruning that can be observed in plants or aquatic vegetation when parts of the structure break under flow. By computation on an actual tree geometry, a 20-yr-old walnut tree (Juglans Regia L.) and comparison with simple models, we analyze the influence of geometrical and physical parameters on the occurrence of branch breakage and on the successive breaking events occurring in a tree-like structure when the flow velocity is increased. We show that both the branching pattern and the slenderness exponent, defining the branch taper, play a major role in the breakage scenario. We identify a criterion for branch breakage to occur before breakage of the trunk. In that case, we show that the successive breakage of peripheral branches allows the plant to sustain higher...

  7. Combined effects of flow-induced shear stress and electromagnetic field on neural differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascotte-Cruz, Juan Uriel; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neural phenotype has been induced by either flow-induced shear stress (FSS) or electromagnetic fields (EMF). However, procedures are still expensive and time consuming. In the present work, induction for 1 h with the combination of both forces showed the presence of the neural precursor nestin as early as 9 h in culture after treatment and this result lasted for the following 6 d. In conclusion, the use of a combination of FSS and EMF for a short-time renders in neurite-like cells, although further investigation is required to analyze cell functionality. PMID:26325339

  8. Design of CAP1400 reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the first CAP1400 reactor internals is defined as a 'prototype', it is necessary to carry out the reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test for verifying the structure integrity of reactor internals and providing data for vibration assessment of CAP1400 reactor internals. The reactor internals flow-induced vibration simulation test is usually a reduced scale model test. This paper describes in detail the main factors of model scale, similarity criterion and the simplification of test model. The simplification of model will not only reduce the fabrication cost, but also obtain more accurate test data from the flow-induced vibration simulation test. (authors)

  9. NADPH oxidase 4 mediates flow-induced superoxide production in thick ascending limbs

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Nancy J.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that luminal flow stimulates thick ascending limb (TAL) superoxide (O2−) production by stretching epithelial cells and increasing NaCl transport, and reported that the major source of flow-induced O2− is NADPH oxidase (Nox). However, the specific Nox isoform involved is unknown. Of the three isoforms expressed in the kidney—Nox1, Nox2, and Nox4—we hypothesized that Nox4 is responsible for flow-induced O2− production in TALs. Measurable flow-induced O2− production at physi...

  10. Two-phase flow induced vibrations in CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U-Bend region of nuclear steam generators tube bundles have suffered from two-phase cross flow induced vibrations. Tubes in this region have experienced high amplitude vibrations leading to catastrophic failures. Turbulent buffeting and fluid-elastic instability has been identified as the main causes. Previous investigations have focused on flow regime and two-phase flow damping ratio. However, tube bundles in steam generators have vapour generated on the surface of the tubes, which might affect the flow regime, void fraction distribution, turbulent intensity levels and tube-flow interaction, all of which have the potential to change the tube vibration response. A cantilevered tube bundle made of electric cartridges heaters was built and tested in a Freon-11 flow loop at McMaster University. Tubes were arranged in a parallel triangular configuration. The bundle was exposed to two-phase cross flows consisting of different combinations of void from two sources, void generated upstream of the bundle and void generated at the surface of the tubes. Tube tip vibration response was measured optically and void fraction was measured by gamma densitometry technique. It was found that tube vibration amplitude in the transverse direction was reduced by a factor of eight for void fraction generated at the tube surfaces only, when compared to the upstream only void generation case. The main explanation for this effect is a reduction in the correlation length of the turbulent buffeting forcing function. Theoretical calculations of the tube vibration response due to turbulent buffeting under the same experimental conditions predicted a similar reduction in tube amplitude. The void fraction for the fluid-elastic instability threshold in the presence of tube bundle void fraction generation was higher than that for the upstream void fraction generation case. The first explanation of this difference is the level of turbulent buffeting forces the tube bundle was exposed to

  11. Dynamic Characteristics of Flow Induced Vibration in a Rotor-Seal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow induced vibration is an important factor affecting the performance of the rotor-seal system. From the point of view of flow induced vibration, the nonlinear models of the rotor-seal system are presented for the analysis of the fluid force, which is induced by the interaction between the unstable fluid flow in the seal and the vibrating rotor. The nonlinear characteristics of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system are analyzed, and the nonlinear phenomena in the unbalanced rotor-seal system are investigated using the nonlinear models. Various nonlinear phenomena of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system, such as synchronization phenomenon and amplitude mutation, are reproduced.

  12. Zyxin Is Involved In Regulation Of Mechanotransduction In Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eSun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Zyxin is a focal adhesion protein that has been implicated in the modulation of cell adhesion and motility, and is hypothesized to be a mechano-sensor in integrin-mediated responses to mechanical force. To test the functional role of zyxin in the mechanotransduction of microvascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC, we utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM to apply localized pulling forces to VSMC through a fibronectin (FN focal adhesion induced by a FN-coated bead on cell surface. Application of force with the AFM induced an increase of zyxin accumulation at the site of the FN-bead focal adhesion that accompanied the VSMC contractile response. Whereas, reduction of zyxin expression by using a zyxin-shRNA construct abolished the VSMC contractile response to AFM pulling forces, even though the zyxin-silenced VSMCs displayed increased adhesion to FN in both AFM adhesion assays and cell adhesion assays. The reduced zyxin expression significantly impaired cell spreading and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton that could indicate a possible underlying reason for the loss of a contractile response to mechanical force. Consistent with these observations, zyxin silencing also resulted in reduced expression of Rac1, which plays an important role in the actin reorganization in VSMC, but increased TRIP6 and FAK expression, the latter being a major protein that promote cell adhesion. In conclusion, these data support an important enabling role for zyxin in VSMCs ability to mechanically respond to applied force.

  13. Flow induced noise calculations for non-axially distributed hydrophones in towed arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; TANG Weilin; FAN Jun

    2009-01-01

    Two improvements are put forward on the analyses of flow induced noise in towed arrays. First, the differences between Corcos/Carpenter pressure fluctuation models have been discussed at length, as well as flow induced noise calculated with these two models. Second, flow induced noise received by the finite hydrophones distributed non-axially is discussed and the relevant power spectrum is deduced. The results show that there are some disparities between the wavenumber spectrums and the responses of flow induced noise of these two models. Flow induced noise is closely related with the tow speed, the tube radius and the off-axis distance. The numerical analyses with Carpenter model indicate that the power spectrum of flow induced noise will increase 24 dB approximately with the tow speed doubled, decrease with the radius of the tube, and increase with the off-axis distance. The tube radius and the off-axis distance have greater influence on the high-frequency components than on the low-frequency components.

  14. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  15. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  16. Regulation of Piezo2 Mechanotransduction by Static Plasma Membrane Tension in Primary Afferent Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ikeda, Ryo; Ling, Jennifer; Viatchenko-Karpinski, Viacheslav; Gu, Jianguo G

    2016-04-22

    The Piezo2 channel is a newly identified mammalian mechanical transducer that confers rapidly adapting mechanically activated (RA-MA) currents in primary afferent neurons. The Piezo2 channels sense rapid membrane displacement, but it is not clear whether they are sensitive to osmotic swelling, which slowly increases static plasma membrane tension (SPMT). Here, we show that SPMT exerts a profound impact on the mechanical sensitivity of RA-MA channels in primary afferent neurons. RA-MA currents are greatly enhanced, and the mechanical threshold was reduced in both primary afferent neurons of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2 when these cells undergo osmotic swelling to increase SPMT. Osmotic swelling switches the kinetics of RA-MA currents to the slowly adapting type in both cultured DRG neurons and HEK293 cells heterologously expressing Piezo2. The potentiation of RA-MA currents is abolished when cultured DRG neurons are treated with cytochalasin D, an actin filament disruptor that prevents SPMT of cultured DRG neurons from an increase by osmotic swelling. Osmotic swelling significantly increases DRG neuron mechano-excitability such that a subthreshold mechanical stimulus can result in action potential firing. Behaviorally, the mechanical hind paw withdrawal threshold in rats is reduced following the injection of a hypotonic solution, but this osmotic effect is abolished when cytochalasin D or Gd(3+) is co-administered with the hypo-osmotic solution. Taken together, our findings suggest that Piezo2-mediated mechanotransduction is regulated by SPMT in primary afferent neurons. Because SPMT can be changed by multiple biological factors, our findings may have broad implications in mechanical sensitivity under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26929410

  17. Pannexin 1 channels play essential roles in urothelial mechanotransduction and intercellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Negoro

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells respond to bladder distension with ATP release, and ATP signaling within the bladder and from the bladder to the CNS is essential for proper bladder function. In other cell types, pannexin 1 (Panx1 channels provide a pathway for mechanically-induced ATP efflux and for ATP-induced ATP release through interaction with P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs. We report that Panx1 and P2X7R are functionally expressed in the bladder mucosa and in immortalized human urothelial cells (TRT-HU1, and participate in urothelial ATP release and signaling. ATP release from isolated rat bladders induced by distention was reduced by the Panx1 channel blocker mefloquine (MFQ and was blunted in mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Hypoosmotic shock induced YoPro dye uptake was inhibited by MFQ and the P2X7R blocker A438079 in TRT-HU1 cells, and was also blunted in primary urothelial cells derived from mice lacking Panx1 or P2X7R expression. Rinsing-induced mechanical stimulation of TRT-HU1 cells triggered ATP release, which was reduced by MFQ and potentiated in low divalent cation solution (LDPBS, a condition known to enhance P2X7R activation. ATP signaling evaluated as intercellular Ca2+ wave radius was significantly larger in LDPBS, reduced by MFQ and by apyrase (ATP scavenger. These findings indicate that Panx1 participates in urothelial mechanotransduction and signaling by providing a direct pathway for mechanically-induced ATP release and by functionally interacting with P2X7Rs.

  18. TACE release of TNF-α mediates mechanotransduction-induced activation of p38 MAPK and myogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Mei; Jin, Bingwen; Chen, Shuen-Ei; James M Reecy; Li, Yi-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to mechanical stimulation by activating p38 MAPK, a key signal for myogenesis. However, the mechanotransduction mechanism that activates p38 is unknown. Here we show that mechanical stimulation of myoblasts activates p38 and myogenesis through stimulating TNF-α release by TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE). In C2C12 or mouse primary myoblasts cultured in growth medium, static stretch activated p38 along with ERK1/2, JNK and AKT. Disrupting TNF-α signaling by TNF-α-neutral...

  19. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging guidance ... limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided procedure ...

  20. Study on flow induced vibration evaluation for a large scale JSFR piping. (1) Current status of flow induced vibration evaluation for hot-leg piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the current status of flow-induced vibration evaluation for the primary cooling piping in Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR), with particular emphasis on research and development activities for the hot-leg piping characterized by a short-elbow piping. Important factors were discussed in evaluating the flow-induced vibration for the hot-leg piping, to which the coolant flows from the reactor upper sodium plenum. To investigate a complex flow near the inlet of the hot-leg piping, a reactor scale numerical analysis was carried out for the reactor upper plenum flow, which was simulated in a 1/10-scale reactor upper plenum experiment. Based on this analysis, experimental conditions on swirl inflow and deflected inflow that were identified as important factors were determined for flow-induced vibration experiments simulating only the hot-leg piping. In this study, the effect of the swirl inflow on flow pattern and pressure fluctuation onto the pipe wall was investigated in a 1/3-scale hot-leg pipe experiment. (author)

  1. Flow-Induced Deformation of a Flexible Thin Structure as Manifestation of Heat Transfer Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Soti, Atul Kumar; Sheridan, John

    2015-01-01

    Flow-induced deformation of thin structures coupled with convective heat transfer has potential applications in energy harvesting and is important for understanding functioning of several biological systems. We numerically demonstrate large-scale flow-induced deformation as an effective passive heat transfer enhancement technique. An in-house, strongly-coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) solver is employed in which flow and structure solvers are based on sharp-interface immersed boundary and finite element method, respectively. In the present work, we validate convective heat transfer module of the in-house FSI solver against several benchmark examples of conduction and convective heat transfer including moving structure boundaries. The thermal augmentation is investigated as well as quantified for the flow-induced deformation of an elastic thin plate attached to lee side of a rigid cylinder in a heated channel laminar flow. We show that the wake vortices past the plate sweep higher sources of vorticity...

  2. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Program final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Flow-Induced Vibrations for Light Water Reactors Program was a five-year effort to develop basic knowledge and understanding needed to improve the flow-induced vibration design of light water reactors. Major tasks included analytical and test investigations of the flow-induced vibration of cylinders in isolation and arrays in smooth and turbulent single-vibration testing of reactor components including reactor inlet plenum components, jet pumps, low-pressure coolant injection coupling, and fuel rods. Cases of self-excited limit cycle response were encountered which required design modifications. The fuel rod tests were made in axially flowing water and steam/water mixtures under adiabatic and boiling conditions

  3. Flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tube and shell heat exchange components such as steam generators, heat exchangers and condensers are essential parts of CANDU nuclear power stations. Excessive flow-induced vibration may cause tube failures by fatigue or more likely by fretting-wear. Such failures may lead to station shutdowns that are very undesirable in terms of lost production. Hence good performance and reliability dictate a thorough flow-induced vibration analysis at the design stage. This paper presents our approach and techniques in this respect. (author)

  4. Flow-induced coalescence: arbitrarily mobile interface model and choice of its parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Jůza, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 10 (2015), s. 628-635. ISSN 0032-2725 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/1069 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : flow-induced coalescence * polymer blends * interface mobility Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.633, year: 2014

  5. Modeling of interface mobility in the description of flow-induced coalescence in immiscible polymer blends

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fortelný, Ivan; Jůza, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 291, č. 8 (2013), s. 1863-1870. ISSN 0303-402X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/11/1069 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : flow-induced coalescence * polymer blends * matrix drainage Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2013

  6. Flow-Induced Vibrations in a Steam Blow-0ut Line of a Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider in this work the large amplitude flow-induced vibrations in a steam blow-out line of a power plant. A low-order, parametrically excited, coupled nonlinear dynamical system is formulated 1iom the describing boundary value problem. Analysis of system response enables identification of governing mechanisms of: instability and complex aperiodic vibrations

  7. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  8. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2f/f) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2WT/WT) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process

  9. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    OpenAIRE

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompress...

  10. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  11. Flow induced vibration of an airfoil with three degrees of freedom

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, M.; Feistauer, M.; Horáček, Jaromír; Sváček, Petr

    Praha : Institute of Thermomechanics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v. v. i., 2008 - (Zolotarev, I.; Horáček, J.), s. 507-512 ISBN 80-87012-12-7. [International Conference on Flow Induced Vibration /9./ FIV2008. Praha (CZ), 30.06.2008-03.07.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200760613 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : aeroelasticity * flutter * finite element method Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  12. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  13. Effects of Flow-Induced Shear Stress on Limbal Epithelial Stem Cell Growth and Enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yun Gyeong; Shin, Ji Won; Park, So Hee; Oh, Min-Jae; Park, Hyo Soon; Shin, Jung-Woog; Kim, Su-Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The roles of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs) are widely recognized, but for these cells to be utilized in basic research and potential clinical applications, researchers must be able to efficiently isolate them and subsequently maintain their stemness in vitro. We aimed to develop a biomimetic environment for LESCs involving cells from their in vivo niche and the principle of flow-induced shear stress, and to subsequently demonstrate the potential of this novel paradigm. LESCs, together ...

  14. Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem cylinders in a channel

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Ren-Jie

    2012-01-01

    We numerically studied flow-induced vibrations of two tandem cylinders in transverse direction between two parallel walls. The effect of the horizontal separation between two cylinders, ranging from 1.1 to 10, on the motions of the cylinders and the flow structures were investigated and a variety of periodic and non-periodic vibration regimes were observed. The results show that when two cylinders are placed in close proximity to each other, compared with the case of an isolated cylinde...

  15. Segmentation of nanotomographic cortical bone images for quantitative characterization of the osteoctyte lacuno-canalicular network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciani, A.; Kewish, C. M. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’Orme des Merisiers, 91192 Saint-Aubin (France); Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Diaz, A.; Holler, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pallu, S.; Achiou, Z.; Jennane, R.; Toumi, H.; Lespessailles, E. [Univ Orléans, I3MTO, Ea 4708, 45000 Orléans (France)

    2016-01-28

    A newly developed data processing method able to characterize the osteocytes lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is presented. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in the bone, living in spaces called lacunae embedded inside the bone matrix and connected to each other with an extensive network of canals that allows for the exchange of nutrients and for mechanotransduction functions. The geometrical three-dimensional (3D) architecture is increasingly thought to be related to the macroscopic strength or failure of the bone and it is becoming the focus for investigating widely spread diseases such as osteoporosis. To obtain 3D LCN images non-destructively has been out of reach until recently, since tens-of-nanometers scale resolution is required. Ptychographic tomography was validated for bone imaging in [1], showing clearly the LCN. The method presented here was applied to 3D ptychographic tomographic images in order to extract morphological and geometrical parameters of the lacuno-canalicular structures.

  16. Segmentation of nanotomographic cortical bone images for quantitative characterization of the osteoctyte lacuno-canalicular network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly developed data processing method able to characterize the osteocytes lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is presented. Osteocytes are the most abundant cells in the bone, living in spaces called lacunae embedded inside the bone matrix and connected to each other with an extensive network of canals that allows for the exchange of nutrients and for mechanotransduction functions. The geometrical three-dimensional (3D) architecture is increasingly thought to be related to the macroscopic strength or failure of the bone and it is becoming the focus for investigating widely spread diseases such as osteoporosis. To obtain 3D LCN images non-destructively has been out of reach until recently, since tens-of-nanometers scale resolution is required. Ptychographic tomography was validated for bone imaging in [1], showing clearly the LCN. The method presented here was applied to 3D ptychographic tomographic images in order to extract morphological and geometrical parameters of the lacuno-canalicular structures

  17. Flow-induced decentering and tube support interaction for steam generator tubes: experiment and physical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintaining PWR components under reliable operating conditions requires a complex design to prevent various damaging processes including flow-induced vibration and wear mechanisms. To improve the prediction of tube/support interaction and wear in PWR components, EDF has undertaken a comprehensive program oriented to both experimental and computational studies. The present paper illustrates one aspect of this program, related to the determination of contact forces between steam generator tubes and anti-vibration bars (AVBs). The dynamic, nonlinear behavior of a U-tube excited by an air cross-flow is investigated on the CLAVECIN experiment. Interesting and rather unexpected results have been obtained, by varying clearances and flow velocities. The paper is focused on four main points: (i) the originality of the experiment with a force measurement device located in flow; (ii) the importance of a refined data processing for accurately measuring contact forces; (iii) the presentation of the unexpected phenomena revealed in the CLAVECIN experiment, i.e. a flow-induced decentering of the tube which changed the initial tube/AVB clearance, and the consequences on tube/support interaction; (iv) the influence of the actual tube/support clearance in flow on wear mechanisms. The work, presented in the second part of this paper, concentrates exclusively on the physical interpretation of the flow-induced decentering phenomenon and on the theoretical analysis of its consequences on dynamic tube/support interaction. We show that the flow-induced decentering phenomenon can be generated by an unstable quasi-static coupling between the flexible tube and the confined flow, in the vicinity of the support system. This phenomenon is not specific to the CLAVECIN tests and it can be expected every time that a movable obstacle is subjected to confined flow. Moreover, in single-sided impacting conditions, the theoretical analysis confirms the linear relation, found in the CLAVECIN tests

  18. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  19. Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another part of the body is more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 ...

  20. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  1. Flow induced vibration characteristics of two circular cylinders in a side by side arrangement and the vibration mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This experimental study investigated the characteristics of flow induced vibration of two elastically supported circular cylinders in a side by side arrangement. In particular, the characteristics of the flow induced vibration of the two cylinders are investigated by changing the flow speed at each spacing ratio L/D (L is the space between two cylinders and D is the diameter of the cylinder). To clarify the mechanism generating the flow induced vibration of the cylinders, the flow patterns around the two vibrating cylinders are also investigated using a flow visualization test that reproduces the flow induced vibration of the cylinders with a forced vibration apparatus. As a result, it is clarified that the flow induced vibration characteristics of the two cylinders arranged side by side switch among four patterns as the flow between the two cylinders is switched. Among the three arrangements considered (tandem, staggered, and side by side), the arrangement that generates flow induced vibration of the two cylinders most easily is the side by side arrangement

  2. An advanced tube wear and fatigue workstation to predict flow induced vibrations of steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow induced tube vibration damage is a major concern for designers and operators of nuclear power plant steam generators (SG). The operating flow-induced vibrational behaviour has to be estimated accurately to allow a precise evaluation of the new safety margins in order to optimize the maintenance policy. For this purpose, an industrial 'Tube Wear and Fatigue Workstation', called 'GEVIBUS Workstation' and based on an advanced methodology for predictive analysis of flow-induced vibration of tube bundles subject to cross-flow has been developed at Electricite de France. The GEVIBUS Workstation is an interactive processor linking modules as: thermalhydraulic computation, parametric finite element builder, interface between finite element model, thermalhydraulic code and vibratory response computations, refining modelling of fluid-elastic and random forces, linear and non-linear dynamic response and the coupled fluid-structure system, evaluation of tube damage due to fatigue and wear, graphical outputs. Two practical applications are also presented in the paper; the first simulation refers to an experimental set-up consisting of a straight tube bundle subject to water cross-flow, while the second one deals with an industrial configuration which has been observed in some operating steam generators i.e., top tube support plate degradation. In the first case the GEVIBUS predictions in terms of tube displacement time histories and phase planes have been found in very good agreement with experiment. In the second application the GEVIBUS computation showed that a tube with localized degradation is much more stable than a tube located in an extended degradation zone. Important conclusions are also drawn concerning maintenance. (author)

  3. Flow Induced Spring Coefficients of Labyrinth Seals for Application in Rotor Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benckert, H.; Wachter, J.

    1980-01-01

    Flow induced aerodynamic spring coefficients of labyrinth seals are discussed and the restoring force in the deflection plane of the rotor and the lateral force acting perpendicularly to it are also considered. The effects of operational conditions on the spring characteristics of these components are examined, such as differential pressure, speed, inlet flow conditions, and the geometry of the labyrinth seals. Estimation formulas for the lateral forces due to shaft rotation and inlet swirl, which are developed through experiments, are presented. The utilization of the investigations is explained and results of stability calculations, especially for high pressure centrifugal compressors, are added. Suggestions are made concerning the avoidance of exciting forces in labyrinths.

  4. Mathematical model for cross-flow-induced vibrations of tube rows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mathematical model is presented for cross-flow-induced vibrations of tube banks including the effects of vortex shedding, fluidelastic coupling, drag force, fluid inertia coupling, and others. The model can predict the details of complex tube-fluid interactions: (1) natural frequencies and mode shapes of coupled vibrations; (2) critical flow velocities; (3) responses to vortex shedding, drag force, and other types of excitations; and (4) the dominant excitation mechanism at a given flow velocity. The analytical results are in good agreement with the published experimental results

  5. Flow-Induced Beam Steering in a Single Laser Hot Spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmitted angular distribution of a 527 nm nearly diffraction-limited laser is measured after it propagates through a plasma with supersonic transverse flow. The laser beam is deflected by as much as 10 degree sign and exhibits bowlike features in the flow direction, which is attributed to flow-induced beam steering. The finite interaction volume allows for direct comparison with a 3D hydrodynamic simulation, which is in good agreement with details of the experiment. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. Fast reactor flow induced vibration with particular reference to PFR and conceptual CDFR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes development work and basic design criteria as applied to vibration induced by fluid flow for the United Kingdom LMFBR programme. Possible harmful effects that could result from excessive vibration levels are highlighted with the associated excitation mechanisms. Instances of flow-induced vibration encountered in development models and in PFR are described. Basic design requirements and the overall philosophy are considered with respect to PFR and notional CDFRs. Ongoing research objectives are outlined giving some insight into the broad strategy involved. Finally, details are given concerning projects presently in progress along with more long term proposals. (author)

  7. A scalable concept for micropower generation using flow-induced self-excited oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, D.; Bibo, A.; Sennakesavababu, V. R.; Daqaq, M. F.; Li, G.

    2010-04-01

    Inspired by music-playing harmonicas that create tones via oscillations of reeds when subjected to air blow, this paper entails a concept for microwind power generation using flow-induced self-excited oscillations of a piezoelectric beam embedded within a cavity. Specifically, when the volumetric flow rate of air past the beam exceeds a certain threshold, the energy pumped into the structure via nonlinear pressure forces offsets the system's intrinsic damping setting the beam into self-sustained limit-cycle oscillations. The vibratory energy is then converted into electricity through principles of piezoelectricity. Experimental and theoretical results are presented demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  8. Leakage flow-induced vibrations for variations of a tube-in-tube slip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variations in the design of a specific slip joint separating two cantilevered, telescoping tubes conveying water were studied to determine their effect upon the leakage flow-induced vibration self-excitation mechanism known to exist for the original slip joint geometry. The important parameters controlling the self-excitation mechanism were identified, which, along with previous results, allowed the determination of a comprehensive set of design rules to avoid unstable vibrations. This was possible even though a new self-excitation mechanism was found when the engagement of the two tubes was small. 9 refs

  9. Flow-Induced Vibration Analysis of Supported Pipes Conveying Pulsating Fluid Using Precise Integration Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic analysis of supported pipes conveying pulsating fluid is investigated in Hamiltonian system using precise integration method (PIM. First, symplectic canonical equations of supported pipes are deduced with state variable vectors composed of displacement and momentum. Then, PIM with linear interpolation formula is proposed to solve these equations. Finally, this approach's precision is testified by several numerical examples of pinned-pinned pipes with different fluid velocities and frequencies. The results show that PIM is an efficient and rapid approach for flow-induced dynamic analysis o f supported pipes.

  10. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  11. Changes in muscle cell metabolism and mechanotransduction are associated with myopathic phenotype in a mouse model of collagen VI deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara De Palma

    Full Text Available This study identifies metabolic and protein phenotypic alterations in gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice, a model of human collagen VI myopathies. All three muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice show some common changes in proteins involved in metabolism, resulting in decreased glycolysis and in changes of the TCA cycle fluxes. These changes lead to a different fate of α-ketoglutarate, with production of anabolic substrates in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior, and with lipotoxicity in diaphragm. The metabolic changes are associated with changes of proteins involved in mechanotransduction at the myotendineous junction/costameric/sarcomeric level (TN-C, FAK, ROCK1, troponin I fast and in energy metabolism (aldolase, enolase 3, triose phosphate isomerase, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase 1, parvalbumin, IDH1 and FASN. Together, these change may explain Ca(2+ deregulation, impaired force development, increased muscle-relaxation-time and fiber damage found in the mouse model as well as in patients. The severity of these changes differs in the three muscles (gastrocnemius

  12. Simulation of cross-flow-induced vibration of tube bundle by surface vorticity method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fenghao WANG; Gedong JIANG; Jong Zhang Lin

    2008-01-01

    A fluid-structure interaction model based on Surface Vorticity Method (SVM) was used to study flow-induced vibrations of tube bundles in medium space ratio. The flow-induced vibrations of four tubes in a rotated square and a staggered tube bundle in three-row and five-column arrangements were simulated in the high sub-critical Reynolds number (Re) range. The results on fluid forces, tube responses and vorticity maps were pre-sented. The vorticity maps of the four rotated-square tubes changed dramatically when the rigid tubes were replaced by the flexible tubes. From the vorticity maps and vibration responses of the staggered tube bundle of different structural parameters, it was found that with the decrease of tube natural frequency, the maximal vibration response moved from the third row to the first. The results also showed that when more flexible tubes are used, the flow pattern changed drastically and the fluid-structure interaction imposed a dominant impact on the flow.

  13. Experimental investigation of a flow-induced oscillating cylinder with two-degree-of-freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibration induced by flow, called flow-induced vibration, causes abnormal driving and machinery-related noise. Although the phenomenon of flow-induced vibration of bluff bodies has been studied extensively, the vast majority of these studies have concentrated solely on one-degree-of-freedom oscillation as in-line or cross-flow. Moreover, there are only three studies have carried out for two-degree-of-freedom oscillation tests, especially, these three studies have done with elastically mounted cylinder. In the present study, the experiment focuses on two-degree-of-freedom free-oscillation tests in a water channel. The circular cylinder is cantilever in shape with same mass ratio and small natural frequency (typically 65Hz) between in-line and cross-flow direction. Raynolds number is range from 1.17x103 to 2.6x104. The frequency of circular cylinder vibration and the flow vibration around the circular cylinder were measured simultaneously using DynamicPIV measurement techniques, which are non-intrusive with respect to the flow and have high spatial and time resolutions. In the results, the vibration phenomenon was found to have anisotropy. There was a discrepancy between the vibration frequency in the flow direction and the vibration frequency perpendicular thereto, and it was found that the difference was function of the reduced velocity. In order to observe the mechanism of the vibration anisotropy, modeling was carried out. (author)

  14. A theoretical investigation of flow induced vibration instabilities of steam generator tubes in cross-flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early 1970s, extensive studies of flow induced vibration in cross flow, especially, fluid-elastic instability, have been reported. Determination of fluid-elastic stability thresholds in tube arrays is very important for design basis. Once large amplitude whirling motions are initiated, the system often does not retrace the response curve as flow velocity is reduced. This is so called hysteresis and is one of the considerations that we must take into account. The objective of this paper is to analyze the hysteresis and determine the critical flow velocity for the flow induced vibrations (FIV). A simple semi-empirical linear model has been developed to determine critical flow velocity. The results of present linear model were compared with those of other theories. These results were better than those of Gorman's theory in low mass damping parameter region. In addition, nonlinear model has been developed to analyze the hysteresis behavior. As results of the present the nonlinear model for two flexible tubes, the regions of hysteresis behavior were shown. These results were also compared with experimental data which was obtained by Lever and Rzentkowski. The region of hysteresis is an important factor for more conservative design

  15. Flow-induced Crystallization of Long Chain Aliphatic Polyamides under a Complex Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xia; Gao, Yunyun; Wang, Lili; Wang, Dujin

    The present work deals with the flow-induced multiple orientations and crystallization structure of polymer melts under a complex flow field. This complex flow field is characteristic of the consistent coupling of extensional ``pulse'' and closely followed shear flow in a narrow channel. Utilizing an ingenious combination of an advanced micro-injection device and long chain aliphatic polyamides, the flow-induced crystallization morphology was well preserved for ex-situ synchrotron micro-focused wide angle X-ray scattering as well as small angle X-ray scattering. The experimental results clearly indicate that the effect of extensional pulse on the polymer melt is restrained and further diminished due to either the transverse tumble of fountain flow or the rapid retraction of stretched high molecular weight tails. However, the residual shish-kebab structures in the core layer of the far-end of channel suggest that the effect of extensional pulse should be considered in the small-scaled geometries or under the high strain rate condition. The authors thank the financial support from MOST (2013BAE02B02, 2014CB643600) and NSFC(21574140).

  16. Experimental Investigation on Flow-Induced Vibration of Fuel Rods in Supercritical Water Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licun Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR is one of the most promising Generation IV reactors. In order to make the fuel qualification test for SCWR, a research plan is proposed to test a small scale fuel assembly in a supercritical water loop. To ensure the structure safety of fuel assembly in the loop, a flow-induced vibration experiment was carried out to investigate the vibration behavior of fuel rods, especially the vibration caused by leakage flow. From the experiment result, it can be found that: the vibration of rods is mainly caused by turbulence when flow rate is low. However, the effects of leakage flow become obvious as flow rate increases, which could changes the distribution of vibrational energy in spectrum, increasing the vibrational energy in high-frequency band. That is detrimental to the structure safety of fuel rods. Therefore, it is more reasonable to improve the design by using the spacers with blind hole, which can eliminate the leakage flow, to assemble the fuel rods in supercritical water loop. On the other hand, the experimental result could provide a benchmark for the theoretical studies to validate the applicability of boundary condition set for the leakage-flow-induced vibration.

  17. Fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration. Effect on initial defect size on cumulative fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of fatigue life prediction is presented for structures which suffer from flow-induced vibration. A small wind tunnel was made and used to reproduce fatigue failure by flow-induced vibration. A medium carbon steel specimen attached to a larger styrofoam cylinder was fixed to the experimental equipment. A small artificial hole was introduced onto the specimen surface. Fatigue crack initiated from the artificial hole. A small portable strain histogram recorder (Mini Rainflow Corder, MRC) developed in another project of the authors' team was used to acquire the service strain histogram at a critical point of the specimen and to measure the variation of natural frequency. Fatigue damage D defined by the Modified Miner Rule was calculated by using the strain histogram at the initial stage of the operation of the wind turbine. The values of D were all smaller than 1.0 and ranged approximately from 0.2 to 0.8. The reason for small values of D is explained from the behaviour of small crack growth. (author)

  18. Study on flow-induced vibration of the fuel rod in HTTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed in order to investigate flow-induced vibration characteristics of a fuel rod in HTTR (High Temperature engineering Test Reactor) from both an experiment and a numerical simulation. Two kinds of fuel rods were used in this experiment: one was a graphite rod which simulated a specification of the HTTR's fuel rod and the other was an aluminum rod whose weight was a half of the graphite one. The experiment was carried out up to Re = 31000 using air at room temperature and pressure. Air flowed downstream in an annular passage which consisted of the fuel rod and the graphite channel. Numerical simulations by fluid and frequency equations were also carried out. Numerical and experimental results were then compared. The following conclusions were drived: (1) The fuel rod amplitudes increase with the flow rate and with a decrease of the fuel rod weight. (2) The fuel rod amplitudes are obtained by δ/De = 2.22 x 10-10Re1.43, 9000 ≤ Re ≤ 31000, where δ is a vibration amplitude, De is a hydraulic diameter and Reis Reynolds number. (3) The fuel rod frequencies shift from lower natural frequency to higher as the flow rate increases. (4) The flow-induced vibration behavior of the fuel rod can simulate well by simultaneous equations which used the turbulence model for fluid and the mass model for vibration of the fuel rod. (author)

  19. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Preclinical models for in vitro mechanical loading of bone-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Delaine-Smith, Robin; Javaheri, Behzad; Helen Edwards, Jennifer; Vazquez, Marisol; Rumney, Robin Mark Howard

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that bone responds to mechanical stimuli whereby physical forces are translated into chemical signals between cells, via mechanotransduction. It is difficult however to study the precise cellular and molecular responses using in vivo systems. In vitro loading models, which aim to replicate forces found within the bone microenvironment, make the underlying processes of mechanotransduction accessible to the researcher. Direct measurements in vivo and predictive modeling have been used to define these forces in normal physiological and pathological states. The types of mechanical stimuli present in the bone include vibration, fluid shear, substrate deformation and compressive loading, which can all be applied in vitro to monolayer and three-dimensional (3D) cultures. In monolayer, vibration can be readily applied to cultures via a low-magnitude, high-frequency loading rig. Fluid shear can be applied to cultures in multiwell plates via a simple rocking platform to engender gravitational fluid movement or via a pump to cells attached to a slide within a parallel-plate flow chamber, which may be micropatterned for use with osteocytes. Substrate strain can be applied via the vacuum-driven FlexCell system or via a four-point loading jig. 3D cultures better replicate the bone microenvironment and can also be subjected to the same forms of mechanical stimuli as monolayer, including vibration, fluid shear via perfusion flow, strain or compression. 3D cocultures that more closely replicate the bone microenvironment can be used to study the collective response of several cell types to loading. This technical review summarizes the methods for applying mechanical stimuli to bone cells in vitro. PMID:26331007

  1. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  2. Development of evaluation method on flow-induced vibration and corrosion of components in two-phase flow by coupled analysis. 1. Evaluation of effects of flow-induced vibration on structural material integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems in major components and structural materials in nuclear power plants have often been caused by flow induced vibration, corrosion and their overlapping effects. In order to establish safe and reliable plant operation, it is necessary to predict future problems for structural materials based on combined analyses of flow dynamics and corrosion and to mitigate them before they become serious issues for plant operation. An innovative method for flow induced vibration of structures in two phase flow by combined analyses of three dimensional flow dynamics and structures is to be introduced. (author)

  3. From cellular mechanotransduction to biologically inspired engineering: 2009 Pritzker Award Lecture, BMES Annual Meeting October 10, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E

    2010-03-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  4. Estimation of flow-induced loads on a down-scaled model of SMART reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) is a small and medium-sized integrated reactor to produce an electric power and desalination simultaneously. SMART should be designed to withstand flow-induced loads generated by the coolant flow under both normal and transient operations during the design period. In this study, we evaluated the flow-induced loads and flow characteristics in the axial and the circumferential directions of reactor internals using a down-scaled model of SMART prototype. This paper shows that the simulated results in the axial direction are in good agreement with the experimental data in the reactor coolant system. The flow-induced loads are irregularly distributed in the circumferential direction of the reactor internals. (author)

  5. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Final progress report, July 1981-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, and general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and through the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the final period from July 1981 to September 1981. This is the last quarterly progress report to be issued for this program

  6. Parametric study on parallel flow induced damping of PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a mechanism of parallel flow-induced changes in vibrational characteristics of PWR fuel assemblies that has been studied through a series of hydraulic tests using reduced-and full-scale prototype mockups. Measured data and analytical evaluations showed the phenomenon stands on essentially the same basis as the dynamics and stability of flexible cylinders subjected to a parallel flow. In the mathematical model, the effects of rod bundle geometries and boundaries formed by walls or adjacent bundles can be exactly incorporated in the form of added mass coefficients, velocity coupling coefficients and other fluid forces. From a full scale test, it has been shown that coolant temperature has little effect up to reactor operating conditions. The updated FEM model has been verified to be applicable in describing the vibrational characteristics of from an isolated cylinder to a full scale fuel assembly in terms of the consistent properties

  7. Scale-model characterization of flow-induced vibrational response of FFTF reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Test Reactor core internal and peripheral components were assessed for flow-induced vibrational characteristics under scaled and simulated prototype flow conditions in the Hydraulic Core Mockup as an integral part of the Fast Test Reactor Vibration Program. The Hydraulic Core Mockup was an 0.285 geometric scale model of the Fast Test Reactor internals designed to simulate prototype vibrational and hydraulic characteristics. Using water to simulate sodium coolant, vibrational characteristics were measured and determined for selected model components over the scaled flow range of 36 to 110%. Additionally, in-situ shaker tests were conducted on selected Hydraulic Core Mockup outlet plenum components to establish modal characteristics. Most components exhibited resonant response at all test flow rates; however, the measured dynamic response was neither abnormal nor anomalously flow-rate dependent, and the predicted prototype components' response were deemed acceptable

  8. Unsteady elbow pipe flow to develop a flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology for JSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (named Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor: JSFR) a two-loop cooling system is designed by adopting a large-diameter piping system with high coolant velocity. The high-velocity piping system brings a flow-induced-vibration issue. To address this issue, experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to grasp flow-induced vibration characteristics in the piping. A flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology that was preliminarily verified with the experimental data tentatively indicated positive feasibility of the JSFR piping.This paper describes the current status of flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology development for primary cooling pipes in JSFR, in particular emphasizing on recent R and D activities that investigate unsteady elbow pipe flow. Experimental efforts have been made using 1/3-scale and 1/10-scale single-elbow test sections for the hot-leg pipe.First of all, experiments with water for the hot-leg piping were carried out using the 1/3-scale test section under rectified-flow conditions. The 1/10-scale experiment indicated no effect of pipe scale by comparison to the 1/3-scale experiment. The next experiment using the 1/3-scale test section was performed to investigate the effect of swirl flow at the inlet. Although the flow separation region was distorted at the downstream from the elbow, the experiment clarified that the effect of swirl flow on pressure fluctuation onto the pipe wall was not significant as shown. An additional experiment was intended to study the effect of elbow curvature. The experiments with water clarified that turbulence is weakened in an elbow with larger curvature than that of the JSFR. For cold-leg pipe experiments, a test section with triple elbows is necessary to simulate the JSFR pipe. Since the interference of multiple elbows should be investigated to understand turbulent flow in the cold-leg pipe geometry, 1/15-scale experiments with double elbows were carried out

  9. Modeling and control of flow-induced vibrations of a flexible hydrofoil in viscous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caverly, Ryan James; Li, Chenyang; Chae, Eun Jung; Forbes, James Richard; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a reduced-order model (ROM) of the flow-induced vibrations of a flexible cantilevered hydrofoil is developed and used to design an active feedback controller. The ROM is developed using data from high-fidelity viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations and includes nonlinear terms to accurately capture the effect of lock-in. An active linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller is designed based on a linearization of the ROM and is implemented in simulation with the ROM and the high-fidelity viscous FSI model. A controller saturation method is also presented that ensures that the control force applied to the system remains within a prescribed range. Simulation results demonstrate that the LQG controller successfully suppresses vibrations in both the ROM and viscous FSI simulations using a reasonable amount of control force.

  10. Experiments on flow induced vibrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most structure and equipment used in nuclear power plant and process plant, such as reactor internals, fuel rod bundles, steam generator tubes and heat exchanger tubes are sub-merged in the fluid. These structures are subjected to flow-induced vibration. An experimental study has been carried out for Reynolds number (7.15 x 103 3) and reduced velocities (1 r < 19) on a research heat exchanger tube bundle to simulate the real conditions. Effect of thermal loading has also been considered. Experimental natural frequencies have been compared to existing literature. Effect of flow rate and pressure on tube drag, lift and axial forces has been analyzed. It has been shown that temperature increase results favorably with respect to stability against vibration as indicated by decrease in volumetric fretting wear loss at loose supports which is due to increase in damping with temperature (thermal damping). (authors)

  11. First international symposium on Flow Induced Noise and Vibration Issues and Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa, Sergio; Franco, Francesco; Guyader, Jean-Louis; Hambric, Stephen; Flinovia - Flow Induced Noise and Vibration Issues and Aspects

    2015-01-01

    Flow induced vibration and noise (FIVN) remains a critical research topic. Even after over 50 years of intensive research, accurate and cost-effective FIVN simulation and measurement techniques remain elusive. This book gathers the latest research from some of the most prominent experts in the field. It describes methods for characterizing wall pressure fluctuations, including subsonic and supersonic turbulent boundary layer flows over smooth and rough surfaces using computational methods like Large Eddy Simulation;
for inferring wall pressure fluctuations using inverse techniques based on panel vibrations or holographic pressure sensor arrays;
for calculating the resulting structural vibrations and radiated sound using traditional finite element methods, as well as advanced methods like Energy Finite Elements;
for using scaling approaches to universally collapse flow-excited vibration and noise spectra; and for computing time histories of structural response, including alternating stresses. This book p...

  12. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šidlof, Petr

    2016-03-01

    Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge) coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  13. Formation of air-entraining vortices at horizontal intakes without approach flow induced circulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa GOGUS; Mete KOKEN; Ali BAYKARA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study is to investigate the effects of hydraulic parameters on the formation of air-entraining vortices at horizontal intake structures without approach flow induced circulation. Six intake pipes of different diameters were tested in the study. The intake pipe to be tested was horizontally mounted to the front side of a large reservoir and then for a wide range of discharges experiments were conducted and critical submergences were detected with adjustable approach channel sidewalls. Empiri- cal equations were derived for the dimensionless critical submergence as a function of the relevant dimensionless parameters. Availa- ble data is also checked for the possible scale effect. Then, these obtained equations were compared with the similar ones in the literature which showed a quite good agreement.

  14. CFD simulation of flow-induced vibration of an elastically supported airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šidlof Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced vibration of lifting or control surfaces in aircraft may lead to catastrophic consequences. Under certain circumstances, the interaction between the airflow and the elastic structure may lead to instability with energy transferred from the airflow to the structure and with exponentially increasing amplitudes of the structure. In the current work, a CFD simulation of an elastically supported NACA0015 airfoil with two degrees of freedom (pitch and plunge coupled with 2D incompressible airflow is presented. The geometry of the airfoil, mass, moment of inertia, location of the centroid, linear and torsional stiffness was matched to properties of a physical airfoil model used for wind-tunnel measurements. The simulations were run within the OpenFOAM computational package. The results of the CFD simulations were compared with the experimental data.

  15. A novel concept of measuring mass flow rates using flow induced stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P I Jagad; B P Puranik; A W Date

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of mass flow rate is important for automatic control of the mass flow rate in many industries such as semiconductor manufacturing and chemical industry (for supply of catalyst to a reaction). In the present work, a new concept for direct measurement of mass flow rates which does not depend on the volumetric flow rate measurement and obviates the need for the knowledge of density is proposed from the measurement of the flow induced stresses in a substrate. The concept is formulated by establishing the relationship between the mass flow rate and the stress in the substrate. To this end, the flow field and the stress field in the substrate are evaluated simultaneously using a numerical procedure and the necessary correlations are derived. A least squares based procedure is used to derive the mass flow rate from the correlations as a function of the stress in the substrate.

  16. Development of the two-phase flow induced force fluctuation predictive tool using artificial void signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, fluctuating force acting on pipe turning section due to two-phase flow is considered. A novel tool to predict upward two-phase flow induced force fluctuations is developed. In order to eliminate tool's dependencies on experimental measurement input, creation of artificial void signal (AVS) was considered by carefully analyzing area-averaged void fraction properties, including probability density and frequency spectra from 36 flow conditions. Generated AVS was successfully coupled with the predictive tool, and as a result, it is capable of predicting fluctuating force magnitude and dominant force frequency from the inlet superficial velocities alone. The tool is applicable for small inner diameter pipe (<∼10 cm) consist of 0-90 degree turning element, and covers two-phase flow regime up to churn-turbulent flow. (author)

  17. Inhibition of rho kinase attenuates high flow induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fu-hai; XIA Wei; LI Ai-wu; ZHAO Cui-fen; SUN Ruo-peng

    2007-01-01

    Background The RhoA/Rho kinase pathway may participate in the pathogenesis of hypoxia and monocrotaline induced pulmonary hypertension. This study tested whether RhoA/Rho kinase pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of high flow induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.Methods Male Wistar rats (4 weeks) were randomly divided into 4 shunt groups, 4 treated groups and 4 control groups.Shunt and treated groups underwent left common carotid artery/external jugular vein shunt operation. Control groups underwent sham operation. Treated groups received fasudil treatment and the others received same dose of saline. At weeks 1, 2, 4 and 8 of the study, right ventricular systolic pressure was measured and blood gases were analysed to calculate Qp/Qs. The weight ratio of right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum and the mean percentage of medial wall thickness in moderate sized pulmonary arteries were obtained. RhoA activity in pulmonary arteries was detected using Rho activity assay reagent. Rho kinase activity was quantified by the extent of MYPT1 phosphorylation with Western blot.Proliferating cells were evaluated using proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistological staining.Results Carotid artery/jugular vein shunt resulted in high pulmonary blood flow, both an acute and a chronic elevation of right ventricular systolic pressure, significant medial wall thickening characterized by smooth muscle cells proliferation,right ventricular hypertrophy and increased activation of RhoA and Rho kinase. Fasudil treatment lowered pulmonary artery systolic pressure, suppressed pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation, attenuated pulmonary artery medial wall thickening and inhibited right ventricular hypertrophy together with significant suppression of Rho kinase activity but not Rho activity.Conclusions Activated RhoA/Rho kinase pathway is associated with both the acute pulmonary vasoconstriction and the chronic pulmonary artery remodelling of high flow induced

  18. Advanced non-linear flow-induced vibration and fretting-wear analysis capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fretting wear is a potentially significant degradation mechanism in nuclear steam generators and other shell and tube heat transfer equipment as well. This paper presents an overview of the recently developed code FIVDYNA which is used for the non-linear flow-induced vibration and fretting wear analysis for operating steam generators (OTSG and RSG) and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. FIVDYNA is a non-linear time-history Flow-Induced Vibration (FIV) analysis computer program that has been developed by Babcock and Wilcox Canada to advance the understanding of tube vibration and tube to tube-support interaction. In addition to the dynamic fluid induced forces the program takes into account other tube static forces due to axial and lateral tube preload and thermal interaction loads. The program is capable of predicting the location where the fretting wear is most likely to occur and its magnitude taking into account the support geometry including gaps. FIVDYNA uses the general purpose finite element computer code ABAQUS as its solver. Using ABAQUS gives the user the flexibility to add additional forces to the tube ranging from tube preloads and the support offsets to thermal loads. The forces currently being modeled in FIVDYNA are the random turbulence, steady drag force, fluid-elastic forces, support offset and pre-strain force (axial loads). This program models the vibration of tubes and calculates the structural dynamic characteristics, and interaction forces between the tube and the tube supports. These interaction forces are then used to calculate the work rate at the support and eventually the predicted depth of wear scar on the tube. A very good agreement is found with experiments and also other computer codes. (author)

  19. Numerical and experimental investigation of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Eun Jung; Akcabay, Deniz Tolga; Lelong, Alexandra; Astolfi, Jacques Andre; Young, Yin Lu

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this work is to present combined numerical and experimental studies of natural flow-induced vibrations of flexible hydrofoils. The focus is on identifying the dependence of the foil's vibration frequencies and damping characteristics on the inflow velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. Experimental results are shown for a cantilevered polyacetate (POM) hydrofoil tested in the cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy Research Institute (IRENav). The foil is observed to primarily behave as a chordwise rigid body and undergoes spanwise bending and twisting deformations, and the flow is observed to be effectively two-dimensional (2D) because of the strong lift retention at the free tip caused by a small gap with a thickness less than the wall boundary layer. Hence, the viscous fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model is formulated by coupling a 2D unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) model with a two degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) model representing the spanwise tip bending and twisting deformations. Good agreements were observed between viscous FSI predictions and experimental measurements of natural flow-induced vibrations in fully turbulent and attached flow conditions. The foil vibrations were found to be dominated by the natural frequencies in absence of large scale vortex shedding due to flow separation. The natural frequencies and fluid damping coefficients were found to vary with velocity, angle of attack, and solid-to-fluid added mass ratio. In addition, the numerical results showed that the in-water to in-air natural frequency ratios decreased rapidly, and the fluid damping coefficients increased rapidly, as the solid-to-fluid added mass ratio decreases. Uncoupled mode (UM) linear potential theory was found to significantly over-predict the fluid damping for cases of lightweight flexible hydrofoils, and this over-prediction increased with higher velocity and lower solid-to-fluid added mass ratio.

  20. Flow-induced acoustic resonance at the mouth of one or two side branches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the flow-induced acoustic resonance. ► In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. ► In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. ► In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes. - Abstract: In the case of flow-induced acoustic resonance with multiple side branches, the pulsation amplitude may be significantly enhanced compared to the case of a single branch. However, few studies have been presented on the effects of the distance between tandem branches or side branches on fluctuating pressure amplitude. In this study, we carried out several air flow experiments at ordinary temperatures and pressures to investigate the effect of the geometrical and flow parameters on the general acoustic resonance. In the case of a single branch, the dimensionless acoustic pressure amplitude at resonance increases as the cross-sectional ratio of the main and branch pipes is decreased. This is attributed to the acoustic radiation loss from the branch pipe to the main pipe increasing at higher values of the cross-sectional ratio. In the case of coaxial branches, the pressure amplitude shows a counter tendency to that in the case of a single branch. This is because the two branches strongly couple and form a standing wave with negligible radiation losses. In the case of tandem branches, peak pressure and frequency change cyclically as the distance between tandem branches changes.

  1. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical exam. Tests that may be done include: Alkaline phosphatase blood level Bone biopsy Bone scan Chest x- ... also affect the results of the following tests: Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme Blood calcium level Parathyroid hormone Blood phosphorus ...

  2. A theory for bone resorption based on the local rupture of osteocytes cells connections: A finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridha, Hambli; Almitani, Khalid H; Chamekh, Abdessalem; Toumi, Hechmi; Tavares, Joao Manuel R S

    2015-04-01

    In this work, a bone damage resorption finite element model based on the disruption of the inhibitory signal transmitted between osteocytes cells in bone due to damage accumulation is developed and discussed. A strain-based stimulus function coupled to a damage-dependent spatial function is proposed to represent the connection between two osteocytes embedded in the bone tissue. The signal is transmitted to the bone surface to activate bone resorption. The proposed model is based on the idea that the osteocyte signal reduction is not related to the reduction of the stimulus sensed locally by osteocytes due to damage, but to the difficulties for the signal in travelling along a disrupted area due to microcracks that can destroy connections of the intercellular network between osteocytes and bone-lining cells. To check the potential of the proposed model to predict the damage resorption process, two bone resorption mechano-regulation rules corresponding to two mechanotransduction approaches have been implemented and tested: (1) Bone resorption based on a coupled strain-damage stimulus function without ruptured osteocyte connections (NROC); and (2) Bone resorption based on a strain stimulus function with ruptured osteocyte connections (ROC). The comparison between the results obtained by both models, shows that the proposed model based on ruptured osteocytes connections predicts realistic results in conformity with previously published findings concerning the fatigue damage repair in bone. PMID:25640868

  3. Flow-induced noise control behind bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z. B.; Halim, D.; Cheng, L.

    2016-05-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation on the flow-induced noise control downstream of bluff bodies with various leading edges using the surface perturbation technique. Four typical leading edges used in various engineering applications were studied in this work: the semi-circular, square, 30° symmetric trapezoid and 30° asymmetric trapezoid leading edges. The surface perturbation was created by piezo-ceramic actuators embedded underneath the surface of a bluff body placed in a cross flow. To suppress the flow-induced noise downstream bluff bodies with those leading edges, the surface perturbation technique was implemented. Based on the experiments, a noise reduction in the duct of more than 14.0 dB has been achieved for all leading-edge cases. These results indicated that the vortex shedding and its flow-induced noise have been successfully suppressed by the proposed control scheme. The flow structure alteration around the bluff bodies and the shear layer shift phenomenon observed on the trailing edges were then investigated for interpreting the control mechanism for this flow-induced noise suppression, which were based on the vortex shedding strength suppression and vortex shedding frequency shift phenomenon. The effective control position for various leading edges was also studied for developing optimal control strategies for practical engineering applications.

  4. Open access to novel dual flow chamber technology for in vitro cell mechanotransduction, toxicity and pharamacokinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knothe Tate Melissa L

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major stumbling block for researchers developing experimental models of mechanotransduction is the control of experimental variables, in particular the transmission of the mechanical forces at the cellular level. A previous evaluation of state of the art commercial perfusion chambers showed that flow regimes, applied to impart a defined mechanical stimulus to cells, are poorly controlled and that data from studies in which different chambers are utilized can not be compared, even if the target stress regimes are comparable. Methods This study provides a novel chamber design to provide both physiologically-based flow regimes, improvements in control of experimental variables, as well as ease of use compared to commercial chambers. This novel design achieves controlled stresses through five gasket designs and both single- and dual-flow regimes. Results The imparted shear stress within the gasket geometry is well controlled. Fifty percent of the entire area of the 10 × 21 mm universal gasket (Gasket I, designed to impart constant magnitude shear stresses in the center of the chamber where outcome measures are taken, is exposed to target stresses. In the 8 mm diameter circular area at the center of the chamber (where outcome measures are made, over 92% of the area is exposed to the target stress (± 2.5%. In addition, other gasket geometries provide specific gradients of stress that vary with distance from the chamber inlet. Bench-top testing of the novel chamber prototype shows improvements, in the ease of use as well as in performance, compared to the other commercial chambers. The design of the chamber eliminates flow deviations due to leakage and bubbles and allows actual flow profiles to better conform with those predicted in computational models. Conclusion The novel flow chamber design provides predictable and well defined mechanical forces at the surface of a cell monolayer, showing improvement over previously tested

  5. Mutations in protocadherin 15 and cadherin 23 affect tip links and mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar N Alagramam

    Full Text Available Immunocytochemical studies have shown that protocadherin-15 (PCDH15 and cadherin-23 (CDH23 are associated with tip links, structures thought to gate the mechanotransducer channels of hair cells in the sensory epithelia of the inner ear. The present report describes functional and structural analyses of hair cells from Pcdh15(av3J (av3J, Pcdh15(av6J (av6J and Cdh23(v2J (v2J mice. The av3J and v2J mice carry point mutations that are predicted to introduce premature stop codons in the transcripts for Pcdh15 and Cdh23, respectively, and av6J mice have an in-frame deletion predicted to remove most of the 9th cadherin ectodomain from PCDH15. Severe disruption of hair-bundle morphology is observed throughout the early-postnatal cochlea in av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mice. In contrast, only mild-to-moderate bundle disruption is evident in the av6J/av6J mice. Hair cells from av3J/av3J mice are unaffected by aminoglycosides and fail to load with [(3H]-gentamicin or FM1-43, compounds that permeate the hair cell's mechanotransducer channels. In contrast, hair cells from av6J/av6J mice load with both FM1-43 and [(3H]-gentamicin, and are aminoglycoside sensitive. Transducer currents can be recorded from hair cells of all three mutants but are reduced in amplitude in all mutants and have abnormal directional sensitivity in the av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mutants. Scanning electron microscopy of early postnatal cochlear hair cells reveals tip-link like links in av6J/av6J mice, substantially reduced numbers of links in the av3J/av3J mice and virtually none in the v2J/v2J mice. Analysis of mature vestibular hair bundles reveals an absence of tip links in the av3J/av3J and v2J/v2J mice and a reduction in av6J/av6J mice. These results therefore provide genetic evidence consistent with PCDH15 and CDH23 being part of the tip-link complex and necessary for normal mechanotransduction.

  6. Methodological advances in predicting flow-induced dynamics of plants using mechanical-engineering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Langre, Emmanuel

    2012-03-15

    The modeling of fluid-structure interactions, such as flow-induced vibrations, is a well-developed field of mechanical engineering. Many methods exist, and it seems natural to apply them to model the behavior of plants, and potentially other cantilever-like biological structures, under flow. Overcoming this disciplinary divide, and the application of such models to biological systems, will significantly advance our understanding of ecological patterns and processes and improve our predictive capabilities. Nonetheless, several methodological issues must first be addressed, which I describe here using two practical examples that have strong similarities: one from agricultural sciences and the other from nuclear engineering. Very similar issues arise in both: individual and collective behavior, small and large space and time scales, porous modeling, standard and extreme events, trade-off between the surface of exchange and individual or collective risk of damage, variability, hostile environments and, in some aspects, evolution. The conclusion is that, although similar issues do exist, which need to be exploited in some detail, there is a significant gap that requires new developments. It is obvious that living plants grow in and adapt to their environment, which certainly makes plant biomechanics fundamentally distinct from classical mechanical engineering. Moreover, the selection processes in biology and in human engineering are truly different, making the issue of safety different as well. A thorough understanding of these similarities and differences is needed to work efficiently in the application of a mechanistic approach to ecology. PMID:22357585

  7. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves (DASW) in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi$ shaped DC glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change of gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a m...

  8. Experimental investigation of flow induced dust acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report on experimental observations of flow induced large amplitude dust-acoustic shock waves in a complex plasma. The experiments have been carried out in a Π shaped direct current glow discharge experimental device using kaolin particles as the dust component in a background of Argon plasma. A strong supersonic flow of the dust fluid is induced by adjusting the pumping speed and neutral gas flow into the device. An isolated copper wire mounted on the cathode acts as a potential barrier to the flow of dust particles. A sudden change in the gas flow rate is used to trigger the onset of high velocity dust acoustic shocks whose dynamics are captured by fast video pictures of the evolving structures. The physical characteristics of these shocks are delineated through a parametric scan of their dynamical properties over a range of flow speeds and potential hill heights. The observed evolution of the shock waves and their propagation characteristics are found to compare well with model numerical results based on a modified Korteweg-de-Vries-Burgers type equation.

  9. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed

  10. Single droplet-level understanding of flow-induced phase inversion of emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ankit; Li, Shigeng; Cheng, Chieh-Min; Lee, Daeyeon

    Phase inversion emulsification (PIE) is a process of generating emulsions by inverting the continuous and dispersed phases of a pre-existing emulsion. It is particularly useful when it is challenging to generate the target emulsions by conventional emulsification methods. Phase inversion of emulsions by flowing them through precisely engineered conduits is called flow-induced phase inversion emulsification (FIPIE). In this study a fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanism of FIPIE is developed. Phase inversion of monodisperse oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions into water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions is achieved by flowing them through specifically designed microfluidic channels. Based on in situ observation of single droplet-level events which lead to phase inversion, a mechanism of the process has been proposed. The outcome of the process is shown to depend on two dimensionless groups - Capillary number (relative importance of viscous and surface tension effects) and dimensionless droplet deformation (D/w, ratio of droplet size to channel width). It can be concluded from a state-plot between Ca and D/w that lower Ca and higher (D/w) facilitate FIPIE.

  11. Test for Jet Flow Induced by Steam Jet Condensation Using the GIRLS Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the characteristics of the turbulent jet induced by steam jet condensation in a water tank through a single-hole sparger an experimental investigation was performed using the GIRLS facility. The experiments were conducted with respect to two cases, e.g. horizontal and vertical upward injections. For the measurements, pitot tube and thermocouples were used for turbulent flow velocity and temperatures, respectively. Overall flow shapes of the turbulent jet by the steam jet condensation are similar to those of axially symmetric turbulent jet flows. The angular coefficients of turbulent rays are quantitatively comparable between the traditional turbulent jet flows and the turbulent jet flows induced by the steam jet condensation in this work. Although the turbulent flows were induced by the horizontally injected steam jet condensation, general theory of turbulent jets was found to be applicable to the turbulent flows of this work. But for the vertically upward injection case, experimental data were quite deviated from the theoretical ones, which is considered due to the buoyancy effect

  12. Corrsin Award Talk - Collide and conquer: flow-induced segregation in blood and other multicomponent suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Blood is a suspension of objects of various shapes, sizes and mechanical properties, whose distribution during flow is important in many contexts. Red blood cells tend to migrate toward the center of a blood vessel, leaving a cell-free layer at the vessel wall, while white blood cells and platelets are preferentially found near the walls, a phenomenon called margination that is critical for the physiological responses of inflammation and hemostasis. Additionally, drug delivery particles in the bloodstream will also undergo segregation - the influence of these phenomena on the efficacy of such particles is unknown. This talk describes efforts to gain a systematic understanding of flow-induced segregation phenomena in blood and other complex mixtures, using a combination of theory and direct simulations. Contrasts in size, deformability and shape can all lead to segregation. A kinetic theory model based on pair collisions and wall-induced hydrodynamic migration can capture the key effects observed in direct simulations, including a ``drainage transition'' in which one component is completely depleted from the bulk of the flow. Experiments performed in the laboratory of Wilbur Lam indicate the physiological and clinical importance of these observations. This talk is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. CBET- 1132579 and No. CBET-1436082.

  13. Use of a plane jet for flow-induced noise reduction of tandem rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Zhao; Xi-xiang, Yang; Patrick, N. Okolo; Wei-hua, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Unsteady wake from upstream components of landing gear impinging on downstream components could be a strong noise source. The use of a plane jet is proposed to reduce this flow-induced noise. Tandem rods with different gap widths were utilized as the test body. Both acoustic and aerodynamic tests were conducted in order to validate this technique. Acoustic test results proved that overall noise emission from tandem rods could be lowered and tonal noise could be removed with use of the plane jet. However, when the plane jet was turned on, in some frequency range it could be the subsequent main contributor instead of tandem rods to total noise emission whilst in some frequency range rods could still be the main contributor. Moreover, aerodynamic tests fundamentally studied explanations for the noise reduction. Specifically, not only impinging speed to rods but speed and turbulence level to the top edge of the rear rod could be diminished by the upstream plane jet. Consequently, the vortex shedding induced by the rear rod was reduced, which was confirmed by the speed, Reynolds stress as well as the velocity fluctuation spectral measured in its wake. This study confirmed the potential use of a plane jet towards landing gear noise reduction. Project partially supported by the European Union FP7 CleanSky Joint Technology Initiative “ALLEGRA” (Grant No. 308225).

  14. Flow induced vibration and stability analysis of multi wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Kyung Jae [Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Woon [Korean Intellectual Property Office, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Kyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Oh Seop [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The free vibration and flow induced flutter instability of cantilever multi wall carbon nanotubes conveying fluid are investigated and the nanotubes are modeled as thin-walled beams. The non-classical effects of the transverse shear, rotary inertia, warping inhibition, and van der Waals forces between two walls are incorporated into the structural model. The governing equations and associated boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. A numerical analysis is carried out by using the extended Galerkin method, which enables us to obtain more accurate solutions compared to the conventional Galerkin method. Cantilevered carbon nanotubes are damped with decaying amplitude for a flow velocity below a certain critical value. However, beyond this critical flow velocity, flutter instability may occur. The variations in the critical flow velocity with respect to both the radius ratio and length of the carbon nanotubes are investigated and pertinent conclusions are outlined. The differences in the vibration and instability characteristics between the Timoshenko beam theory and Euler beam theory are revealed. A comparative analysis of the natural frequencies and flutter characteristics of MWCNTs and SWCNTs is also performed.

  15. FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION IN PIPES: CHALLENGESS AND SOLUTIONS - A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SIBA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Flow-induced vibration has recently been the topic of experimental, numerical, and theoretical studies. It was intended to implement better applications for controlling the flow using orifice technique. Having the flow under control, the orifice becomes an instrument for measuring the flow. The flow of all fluid such as water, oil, gas and vapours through an orifice was tested and mathematical models were developed adequately. The basic theme for these enormous studies was the need for the very accurate flow measurements through orifices. All experimental, theoretical, numerical, and analytical studies have agreed that there is more than one avenue to develop, modify, and enhance such measurements. However, one factor that affects the flow measurements is the vibration which was not treated as required until the mid-20th century due to enormous discoveries that damages could be rooted to vibration. Researchers have studied vibration and then proposed mathematical models in conjunction with the pressure and velocity measurements of the flowing fluids and then the effect of the vibration, induced or not induced, has been under continuous investigation. This paper is an attempt to review the previous studies regarding understanding the nature of the vibration and the possible effects of vibration on the flow and on the piping structure in order to limit the damage caused by the vibration. This study shows that the need for more experimental studies and more comprehensive analytical approaches are, in particular, very essential to develop better results.

  16. Flow induced dispersion analysis rapidly quantifies proteins in human plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Andersen, Nina Z; Østergaard, Jesper; Zhuang, Guisheng; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Jensen, Henrik

    2015-07-01

    Rapid and sensitive quantification of protein based biomarkers and drugs is a substantial challenge in diagnostics and biopharmaceutical drug development. Current technologies, such as ELISA, are characterized by being slow (hours), requiring relatively large amounts of sample and being subject to cumbersome and expensive assay development. In this work a new approach for quantification based on changes in diffusivity is presented. The apparent diffusivity of an indicator molecule interacting with the protein of interest is determined by Taylor Dispersion Analysis (TDA) in a hydrodynamic flow system. In the presence of the analyte the apparent diffusivity of the indicator changes due to complexation. This change in diffusivity is used to quantify the analyte. This approach, termed Flow Induced Dispersion Analysis (FIDA), is characterized by being fast (minutes), selective (quantification is possible in a blood plasma matrix), fully automated, and being subject to a simple assay development. FIDA is demonstrated for quantification of the protein Human Serum Albumin (HSA) in human plasma as well as for quantification of an antibody against HSA. The sensitivity of the FIDA assay depends on the indicator-analyte dissociation constant which in favourable cases is in the sub-nanomolar to picomolar range for antibody-antigen interactions. PMID:26031223

  17. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. A second program suspension occurred from March 29, 1980 through May 16, 1980, due to funding limits. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from Janury 1980 to June 1980

  18. Flow-Induced Changes in Dimensions and Mechanical Properties of Rabbit Common Carotid Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takeo; Okumura, Eijiro; Shirono, Takahiro; Sho, Eiketsu; Masuda, Hirotake; Sato, Masaaki

    Flow-induced changes in dimensions and mechanical properties of blood vessel wall were studied in the rabbit left common carotid arteries connected directly to the left external jugular vein via an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) to increase its blood flow by >10-fold for 4 weeks. Contralateral artery was used as control. We found significant increase not only in diameter, but also in thickness and length of unloaded artery exposed to increased flow, indicating the increase in wall volume. The increase in diameter and thickness but not in longitudinal length correlated significantly with the volumetric increase of the wall. Pressure-imposed test showed that the wall became less distensible in response to flow increase. Fluid shear stress estimated for physiological condition was significantly higher in AVF side than control, indicating that 10-fold increase in flow was not compensated in 4 weeks. Circumferential strain in a physiological pressure range was significantly lower in AVF side, while hoop stress was similar in both sides. These results may indicate that circumferential stress but not strain is maintained constant, and longitudinal change is not regulated in flow-imposed arteries.

  19. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. PMID:23419169

  20. Prediction of flow- induced dynamic stress in an axial pump impeller using FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial pumps play an important role in water supply and flood control projects. Along with growing requirements for high reliability and large capacity, the dynamic stress of axial pumps has become a key problem. Unsteady flow is a significant reason which results structural dynamic stress of a pump. This paper reports on a flow-induced dynamic stress simulation in an axial pump impeller at three flow conditions by using FEM code. The pressure pulsation obtained from flow simulation using CFD code was set as the force boundary condition. The results show that the maximum stress of impeller appeared at joint between blade and root flange near trailing edge or joint between blade and root flange near leading edge. The dynamic stress of the two zones was investigated under three flow conditions (0.8Qd, 1.0Qd, 1.1Qd) in time domain and frequency domain. The frequencies of stress at zones of maximum stress are 22.9Hz and 37.5Hz as the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. The fundamental frequencies are nearly equal to vane passing frequency (22.9 Hz) and 3 times blade passing frequency (37.5Hz). The first dominant frequency at zones of maximum stress is equal to the vane passing frequency due to rotor-stator interaction between the vane and the blade. This study would be helpful for axial pumps in reducing stress, improving structure design and fatigue life

  1. Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders in a parallel-wall channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong; Ku, Xiao-Ke

    2014-10-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of one and two tandem circular cylinders in the flow around cylinders in a parallel-wall channel are numerically studied by the lattice Boltzmann method. Within a range of Reynolds number Re = [1, 160], the effects of streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.25, 3], mass ratio M = [0.05, 5], and blockage ratio β = [1/2, 1/8] on the motions of cylinders and fluids are investigated, respectively. For the case of an isolated cylinder, as the mass ratio is 1, no large-amplitude oscillation is observed, and as the mass ratio is 0.1, the cylinder motion translates from the steady regime to the biased periodic vibration with a large oscillation amplitude gradually as Reynolds number is increased from 1 to 160. For the case of two cylinders in tandem, two steady regimes and a variety of distinct oscillation regimes with the corresponding flow structures are observed. The critical mass ratio of the two tandem cylinders in the strong coupling regime is about an order of magnitude larger than that of an isolated cylinder. For blockage ratio is more than 1/5, the vibration type of the cylinders is exclusive, while for blockage ratio is less than 1/6, the cylinder oscillation state is bistable. The mechanisms of the observed phenomena are also discussed.

  2. Flow-induced oscillations of a prism with triangular cross-section placed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel; Seyed-Aghazadeh, Banafsheh; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    Flow-induced oscillations of a prism with a triangular cross-section was studied experimentally. The cylinder had one-degree-of-freedom to oscillate in the crossflow direction. The response of the cylinder in terms of the amplitudes of oscillations as well as the flow forces were studied at varying angles of attack in the range of α = 0° -60° and a reduced velocity range of U* =4-22. Depending on the angle of attack and the reduced velocity, the cylinder experienced either VIV or galloping. For small angles of attack of α35°, the amplitude of oscillations increased monotonically with increasing reduced velocity and the cylinder underwent galloping. Several different vortex shedding patterns were observed in the wake of the cylinder at different angles of attack and flow velocities. New, high-frequency shedding patterns with their corresponding high harmonic shedding frequencies in the flow force FFTs were observed in the regions where galloping occurred. This work is partially supported by the NSF-sponsored IGERT: Offshore Wind Energy Engineering, Environmental Science, and Policy (Grant Number 1068864).

  3. Poiseuille flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ren-Jie; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of two tandem circular cylinders with different mass ratios confined between two parallel walls are numerically studied via a lattice Boltzmann method. With fixed Reynolds number Re = 100 and blockage ratio β = 1/4, the effects of mass ratio m* = [0.0625, 16] and streamwise separation between two cylinders S/D = [1.125, 10] on the cylinder motions and vortex wake modes are investigated. A variety of distinct cylinder motion regimes involving the symmetric periodic vibration, biased quasi-periodic vibration, beating vibration, and steady regimes, with the corresponding wake structures, e.g., two rows of alternately rotating vortices, a single row of same-sign vortices, and steady wake, are observed. For each current case, the cylinder motion type is exclusive and in the binary oscillation regime, both cylinders always vibrate at a common primary frequency. The lighter cylinder usually oscillates at a larger amplitude than the heavier one, while the heavier cylinder undergoes larger lift force than the lighter one. The lift force and cylinder displacement always behave as an out-of-phase state. In the gap-interference region, large-amplitude oscillations could be produced extensively and in the wake-interference region, the cylinder motions and fluid flows are mainly dependent on the upstream cylinder. When the separation is large enough, both cylinders behave as two isolated ones. The mechanisms for the excitations of cylinder vibrations have also been analysed.

  4. Experimental study on flow-induced acoustic resonance in square closed side branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-induced acoustic resonance is a phenomenon caused by the interaction of flow and acoustic fields in special structure. Acoustic resonance characteristic experiments were carried out on square closed side branch. The influences of the velocity in main pipe and the length of the side branch on acoustic resonance were studied. The range of occurrence and characteristics of pressure pulsation were analyzed. Three lengths of side branches (L/d=5.6 and 7) were experimentally studied and the Reynolds number in the experiment was 2.74 X 104-2.429 X 105 while the Mach number was 0.025-0.218. The results show that the resonance frequency shows a lock-in phenomenon with the increase of velocity. As the length of the side branch increasing, the amplitude of the acoustic pressure and the resonance frequency decrease. In the considered structure, the acoustic resonance occurs when Strouhal number is 0.3-0.6 and 0.7-1.0. (authors)

  5. Prediction of flow- induced dynamic stress in an axial pump impeller using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y Gao, J.; Hou, Y. S.; Xi, S. Z.; Cai, Z. H.; Yao, P. P.; Shi, H. L.

    2013-12-01

    Axial pumps play an important role in water supply and flood control projects. Along with growing requirements for high reliability and large capacity, the dynamic stress of axial pumps has become a key problem. Unsteady flow is a significant reason which results structural dynamic stress of a pump. This paper reports on a flow-induced dynamic stress simulation in an axial pump impeller at three flow conditions by using FEM code. The pressure pulsation obtained from flow simulation using CFD code was set as the force boundary condition. The results show that the maximum stress of impeller appeared at joint between blade and root flange near trailing edge or joint between blade and root flange near leading edge. The dynamic stress of the two zones was investigated under three flow conditions (0.8Qd, 1.0Qd, 1.1Qd) in time domain and frequency domain. The frequencies of stress at zones of maximum stress are 22.9Hz and 37.5Hz as the fundamental frequency and its harmonics. The fundamental frequencies are nearly equal to vane passing frequency (22.9 Hz) and 3 times blade passing frequency (37.5Hz). The first dominant frequency at zones of maximum stress is equal to the vane passing frequency due to rotor-stator interaction between the vane and the blade. This study would be helpful for axial pumps in reducing stress, improving structure design and fatigue life.

  6. Shellside flow-induced tube vibration in typical heat exchanger configurations: Overview of a research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J. M.; Wambsganss, M. W.

    A comprehensive research program is being conducted to develop the necessary criteria to assist designers and operators of shell-and-tube heat exchangers to avoid detrimental flow-induced tube vibration. This paper presents an overview of the insights gained from shellside water-flow testing on a horizontal, industrial-sized test exchanger that can be configured in many ways using interchangeable tube bundles and replaceable nozzles. Nearly 50 different configurations have been tested representing various combinations of triangular, square, rotated-triangular, and rotated-square tubefield layouts; odd and even numbers of crosspasses; and both single- and double-segmental baffles with different cut sizes and orientations. The results are generally consistent with analytical relationships that predict tube vibration response by the combined reinforcing effect of the vibration mode shape and flow velocity distribution. An understanding of the vibration and instability performance is facilitated by recognizing that the excitation is induced by three separate, though sometimes interacting, flow conditions. These are the crossflows that generate classic fluidelastic instabilities in the interior of the tube bundle, the entrance and exit bundle flow from and into the shell nozzles, and the localized high velocity bypass and leakage stream flows. The implications to design and/or possible field remedies to avoid vibration problems are discussed.

  7. [Bone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  8. Prediction of flow induced damping of a PWR fuel assembly in case of seismic and LOCA load case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical strength of a fuel assembly must be justified under accidental conditions with respect to the different lateral loads and, in particular, seismic loads. This justification is done by means of time-history analyses using dynamic models of an assembly row in the core, allowing for assembly deformations, impacts at the grid locations and reactor coolant effects. One key parameter of such analyses is the damping coefficient of the first mode of the assembly used to compute its dynamic response. This damping coefficient may be very important due to core coolant flow velocity (up to 50 % of critical). Previous studies have shown that flow induced damping comes from a lift phenomenon due to the relative motion between (axial) flow and lateral displacement of the fuel assembly. The objective of this paper was to predict the flow-induced damping of a fuel assembly using the MEFISTEAU model, developed by EDF. This analytical model, based on the perturbation method, predicts the fluid-elastic forces applied to the assembly subjected to the uniform axial coolant flow. The modal characteristics of the fuel assembly (i.e. modal frequencies and mode shapes) used as the input by the model have first to be evaluated. These characteristics are computed using the CodeAster finite element code, developed by EDF. This code is able, in particular, to account for the effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties of the fuel assembly and especially the softening of the fuel assembly due to relaxation effects. The MEFISTEAU model is then used to predict the flow-induced damping from the beginning to end of life of the fuel assembly. This paper describes the method used to predict the flow induced damping and its validation and shows the evolution of the flow induced damping along the life of the assembly, for different designs (in particular 12 ft, 14 ft) and flow conditions for the in-core situation. Some recommendations are made concerning the flow induced damping

  9. Tensegrity and Mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Anyone who is skilled in the art of physical therapy knows that the mechanical properties, behavior and movement of our bodies are as important for human health as chemicals and genes. However, only recently have scientists and physicians begun to appreciate the key role that mechanical forces play in biological control at the molecular and cellular levels. This article provides a brief overview of a lecture presented at the 1st International Fascia Research Congress that convened at Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA on October 4, 2007. (see figure 1) In this lecture, I described what we have learned over the past thirty years as a result of our research focused on the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into changes in intracellular biochemistry and gene expression – a process called “mechanotransduction”. This work has revealed that molecules, cells, tissues, organs, and our entire bodies use “tensegrity” architecture to mechanically stabilize their shape, and to seamlessly integrate structure and function at all size scales. Through use of this tension-dependent building system, mechanical forces applied at the macroscale produce changes in biochemistry and gene expression within individual living cells. This structure-based system provides a mechanistic basis to explain how application of physical therapies might influence cell and tissue physiology. PMID:19083675

  10. Talking Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jaclyn; Kassing, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Describes cooperation with the Saint Louis Zoo to provide opportunities for elementary school students to learn about bones, how animals move, what they eat, and how much they grow. Uses biofacts which include bones, skulls, and other parts to make the laboratory a hands-on experience for students. (YDS)

  11. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker for bone resorption. It is ... resorption include: N-telopeptide (N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTx)) – a peptide fragment from the amino terminal ...

  12. Effects of Neuropeptides and Mechanical Loading on Bone Cell Resorption in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-Min Yoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuropeptides such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP are present in nerve fibers of bone tissues and have been suggested to potentially regulate bone remodeling. Oscillatory fluid flow (OFF-induced shear stress is a potent signal in mechanotransduction that is capable of regulating both anabolic and catabolic bone remodeling. However, the interaction between neuropeptides and mechanical induction in bone remodeling is poorly understood. In this study, we attempted to quantify the effects of combined neuropeptides and mechanical stimuli on mRNA and protein expression related to bone resorption. Neuropeptides (VIP or CGRP and/or OFF-induced shear stress were applied to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells and changes in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB ligand (RANKL and osteoprotegerin (OPG mRNA and protein levels were quantified. Neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress similarly decreased RANKL and increased OPG levels compared to control. Changes were not further enhanced with combined neuropeptides and OFF-induced shear stress. These results suggest that neuropeptides CGRP and VIP have an important role in suppressing bone resorptive activities through RANKL/OPG pathway, similar to mechanical loading.

  13. Proceedings of the 8. international conference on Flow-induced vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FIV2004, the eighth of the series of International Conferences on Flow-Induced Vibration initiated at Keswick in 1973, evidences the sustained interest of the scientific and engineering international community for a subject area which incorporates at least two major disciplines: fluid mechanics and structural dynamics. Flow induced vibration (FIV) occur whenever a structure is in contact with a flowing fluid; which is a very common occurrence indeed. FIV can be rightly perceived as very useful and agreeable, in musical instruments, or at the opposite as annoying and even disastrous, in mechanical engineering. In both cases, the subject motivates a large and highly diversified amount of research work, driven either by scientific curiosity or engineering concerns, or both. In this field, empirical knowledge and experience are a precious asset but a certain breadth of perspective gained through a thorough background in theoretical mechanics is also necessary. In other words, to deal successfully with FIV problems, theoretical and pragmatic knowledge must be skillfully interwoven. Having also in mind the impressive progress achieved since the early seventies both in experimental techniques and computer science, it is rather fascinating to realize that we have still to learn so much about so 'elementary' systems as a pipe conveying air or water, or cylindrical rods subjected to cross-flow, to mention just two archetypical systems which are in fact extremely complex and which motivated so many studies already at the time of the first Keswick Conference and which still do at FIV2004. Though such systems are encountered in many industrial components and are rather easily accessible to experiment, they still give rise to many challenging questions concerning the extremely varied dynamical behavior they can display, which remain often insufficiently amenable to prediction. By no means this is to say that the research work devoted to FIV up to now has been made in vain. First

  14. Application of flow-induced vibration predictive techniques to operating steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical techniques for flow-induced vibration (FIV), such as those incorporated in available design tools, are routinely applied to process equipment at the initial design stage. Unfortunately, this does not always apply to the situation when problems, related to FIV, develop in crucial operating equipment, since design uses conservative methods, whereas in-service applications require more realistic assessments. Usually these problems appear in the form of severe through wall fret flaws or fatigue cracks that compromise the integrity of the tubes and possibly the complete unit. It is here where a somewhat different approach must be taken in the evaluation of tube response to FIV. Tube damage from fretting wear or fatigue crack growth must be estimated from actual in situ operating conditions. In this paper, an overview of the predictive methods used in the development and/or qualification of remedial measures for problems that occur in operating process equipment along with applications are described. The steps in the evaluation procedure, from the prediction of flow regimes, the development of the nonlinear computer models and associated fluid forcing functions through to the estimates of tube damage in operating heat exchangers and steam generators are presented. A probabilistic (i.e. Monte Carlo simulation) FIV approach that readily accommodates uncertainties associated with damage predictions is summarized. The efficacy of this approach comes from the fact that probabilistic methods facilitate the incorporation of field data, and that a large number of tubes and possible variations in geometry, process and support conditions, usually present in such equipment, can be addressed effectively. (author)

  15. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, December 1976--May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the program objectives, overall work plans, and progress achieved. A description is also given of the related state-of-the-art flow-induced vibration (FIV) technology which represents the starting point of the program. The program has been developed to increase plant availability through substantially reducing downtime caused by FIV failure of components. It is a four-year balanced effort of fundamental studies, analyses, tests of idealized conditions, and realistic tests of reactor components, all leading to the preparation of design guides and criteria for LWR's. The specific goals of the program are to: (1) produce improved FIV design criteria; (2) provide improved analytical methods for predicting behavior of components; (3) provide general scaling laws which will improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests (required for those situations where it is impossible to predict the FIV response analytically or through full-scale testing); and (4) identify high FIV risk areas. To achieve these goals, the program has been divided into four major tasks: (1) fundamental studies; (2) model and full-size tests; (3) design methods, guides and criteria; and (4) program administration. Task 1 will provide a better understanding of FIV phenomena through a combination of fundamental tests and analyses of geometries common in LWR's and mechanisms which can cause FIV. The studies will systematically vary parameters using relatively small-scale idealized geometries and controlled flow fields. Task 2 will verify and extend the results of Task 1 through the testing of realistic LWR component geometries. Task 3 will develop analytical methods, as well as utilize the results of Tasks 1 and 2 to produce design guides, predictive models, and scaling laws. Task 4 will administrate the program, as well as insure that pressure water reactor (PWR) needs are given proper consideration

  16. Do column frits contribute to the on-column, flow-induced degradation of macromolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striegel, André M

    2014-09-12

    Flow-induced, on-column degradation is a major hindrance to the accurate characterization of ultra-high molar mass macromolecules and colloids. This degradation is a direct result of the large shear rates which are generated within the column, which cause chain scission to occur both in the interstitial medium and, it has been postulated, at the packing particle pore boundary. An additional putative source of degradation has been the column frits, though little experimental evidence exists to either support or refute this claim. To this effect, the present experiments examine the role of the frits in the degradation of high molar mass macromolecules. Two narrow dispersity polystyrene standards, the molar mass of which differs by a factor of two, were analyzed on three different size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) columns, each with frits of different pore size, at various flow rates. In the smallest pore size column, which also contained the smallest frits and which was packed with the smallest diameter particles, the larger standard was forced to degrade by increasing the flow rate of the mobile phase. During the course of the latter portion of the study, the inlet and the outlet frits were removed from the column, in stepwise fashion. It was concluded that neither frit played any appreciable role in the degradation. Results of our studies were applied to explain previously observed degradation in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography of polymers. The general conclusion arrived at herein is that the column frits are likely to have a secondary role (as compared to interstitial and pore boundary stresses), or no role at all, in polymer degradation for cases where the frit radius is larger than or equal to the hydraulic radius rcof the column. PMID:25085820

  17. Sheared-flow induced confinement transition in a linear magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Boehmer, H.; McWilliams, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Carter, T. A.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.; Schaffner, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    A magnetized plasma cylinder (12 cm in diameter) is induced by an annular shape obstacle at the Large Plasma Device [W. Gekelman, H. Pfister, Z. Lucky, J. Bamber, D. Leneman, and J. Maggs, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)]. Sheared azimuthal flow is driven at the edge of the plasma cylinder through edge biasing. Strong fluctuations of density and potential ({delta}n/n{approx}e{delta}{phi}/kT{sub e}{approx}0.5) are observed at the plasma edge, accompanied by a large density gradient (L{sub n}={nabla}lnn{sup -1}{approx}2cm) and shearing rate ({gamma}{approx}300kHz). Edge turbulence and cross-field transport are modified by changing the bias voltage (V{sub bias}) on the obstacle and the axial magnetic field (B{sub z}) strength. In cases with low V{sub bias} and large B{sub z}, improved plasma confinement is observed, along with steeper edge density gradients. The radially sheared flow induced by ExB drift dramatically changes the cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations, which causes the wave-induced particle flux to reverse its direction across the shear layer. In cases with higher bias voltage or smaller B{sub z}, large radial transport and rapid depletion of the central plasma density are observed. Two-dimensional cross-correlation measurement shows that a mode with azimuthal mode number m=1 and large radial correlation length dominates the outward transport in these cases. Linear analysis based on a two-fluid Braginskii model suggests that the fluctuations are driven by both density gradient (drift wave like) and flow shear (Kelvin-Helmholtz like) at the plasma edge.

  18. Flow induced motion and energy harvesting of bluff bodies with different cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Code for FIM and power harvesting of different cross-section cylinders is developed. • VIV appears combined with galloping for PTC-cylinder and quasi-trapezoid cylinder. • Vortex structures of cylinder in VIV and galloping are predicted accurately. • Power can be harnessed over the high-lift TrSL3 regime when Re > 30,000. - Abstract: The flow induced motion (FIM) and energy conversion of cylinders with different cross sections are investigated using two-dimensional unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes simulations in the Reynolds number range of 10,000 < Re < 130,000. The model for energy harvesting in FIM is established and verified by experimental measurements. For the PTC-cylinder (circular cylinder with passive turbulence control), square cylinder, Q-trapezoid I (quasi-trapezoid cylinder with the long edge as the windward side), and triangular prism, energy can be obviously harvested when Re > 30,000. The initial and upper branches of vortex induced vibration (VIV), transition from VIV to galloping, and galloping branch are clearly observed in the amplitude and frequency responses. The FIM responses of PTC-cylinder and Q-trapezoid I are stronger than the other cylinders. The maximum amplitude of 3.5D is achieved and 16 vortices are captured in one cycle in the fully-developed galloping branch. The optimum regime for energy harvesting is the VIV upper branch. And the PTC-cylinder and Q-trapezoid I have better performance on energy harvesting in FIM than other cylinders. The maximum energy efficiencies of 45.7% and 37.9% are achieved for Q-trapezoid I and PTC-cylinder respectively. Contrarily, the vibration of Q-trapezoid II (quasi-trapezoid cylinder with the short edge as the windward side) displays a quite different character with low amplitude and high frequency, and the vortex pattern is a constant 2S in the test Re range

  19. Numerical investigation on flow-induced vibration of a triangular cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huakun; Zhao, Dongliang; Yang, Wenyu; Yu, Guoliang, E-mail: yugl@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Ocean Engineering, School of Naval Architecture, Ocean and Civil Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China (China)

    2015-02-01

    Flow-induced vibration (FIV) of a triangular cylinder is numerically investigated at a Reynolds number of Re = 100. The four-step fractional finite element method is employed to solve the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. The cylinder is endowed with a two-degree-of-freedom motion with the reduced mass ratio of M{sub r} = 2. Three typical flow incidence angles, α = 0°, 30° and 60°, are examined to identify the effect of incidence angle on the vibration characteristics of the cylinder. For each α, computations are conducted in a wide range of reduced velocities 2 U{sub r} ≤ 18. The numerical results show that at α = 0° and 30°, the responses of the cylinder are dominated by vortex-induced vibration which resembles that of a circular cylinder. At α = 0°, the peak amplitude of transverse vibration is the smallest among the three investigated α, and most of the cylinder motions exhibit a regular figure-eight trajectory. Some single-loop trajectories are observed at α = 30°, where the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is always identical to that in the transverse direction. At α = 60°, the triangular cylinder undergoes a typical transverse galloping with large amplitude and low frequency, and the vibration trajectories appear to be regular or irregular figure-eight patterns, which are strongly affected by the reduced velocity. (paper)

  20. Assessment of flow induced vibration limits in preliminary I2S-LWR fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR) is a novel PWR concept being developed by a multi-institutional team, led by Georgia Tech, under the auspices of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs Integrated Research Projects (DOE NEUP IRP). The I2S-LWR aims at delivering an electric power of ∼1 GW while, simultaneously, achieving an overall level of safety that is enhanced with respect to GW-class Generation III+ LWRs, including considerations for “accident tolerant fuels”. The adoption of inherent safety features and unconventional materials for the main core components are key design features intended to permit the I2S-LWR to achieve the design objectives. This work summarizes a preliminary approach to identify Flow Induced Vibration (FIV) limits for new fuel designs proposed for the I2S-LWR. While not a substitute for a detailed, system-level Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis, the approach presented here provides a methodology assembled from “best practices” documented in the literature to establish design thresholds and enable designs that resist FIV damage. This is an essential task to evaluate early in the design process, simply because the best designs considering other perspectives may inherently fail due to FIV related causes. Because different fuels behave differently, we identify the essential design considerations and focus on the main fuel candidates for the I2S-LWR, i.e. UO2 and U3Si2, augmenting the fuel material selection process and the fuel rod design in general. (author)

  1. Effects of flow-induced shear stress on limbal epithelial stem cell growth and enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gyeong Kang

    Full Text Available The roles of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs are widely recognized, but for these cells to be utilized in basic research and potential clinical applications, researchers must be able to efficiently isolate them and subsequently maintain their stemness in vitro. We aimed to develop a biomimetic environment for LESCs involving cells from their in vivo niche and the principle of flow-induced shear stress, and to subsequently demonstrate the potential of this novel paradigm. LESCs, together with neighboring cells, were isolated from the minced limbal tissues of rabbits. At days 8 and 9 of culture, the cells were exposed to a steady flow or intermittent flow for 2 h per day in a custom-designed bioreactor. The responses of LESCs and epithelial cells were assessed at days 12 and 14. LESCs and epithelial cells responded to both types of flow. Proliferation of LESCs, as assessed using a BrdU assay, was increased to a greater extent under steady flow conditions. Holoclones were found under intermittent flow, indicating that differentiation into transient amplifying cells had occurred. Immunofluorescent staining of Bmi-1 suggested that steady flow has a positive effect on the maintenance of stemness. This finding was confirmed by real-time PCR. Notch-1 and p63 were more sensitive to intermittent flow, but this effect was transient. K3 and K12 expression, indicative of differentiation of LESCs into epithelial cells, was induced by flow and lasted longer under intermittent flow conditions. In summary, culture of LESCs in a bioreactor under a steady flow paradigm, rather than one of intermittent flow, is beneficial for both increasing proliferation and maintaining stemness. Conversely, intermittent flow appears to induce differentiation of LESCs. This novel experimental method introduces micro-mechanical stimuli to traditional culture techniques, and has potential for regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LESCs in vitro, thereby

  2. Numerical investigation on flow-induced vibration of a triangular cylinder at a low Reynolds number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-induced vibration (FIV) of a triangular cylinder is numerically investigated at a Reynolds number of Re = 100. The four-step fractional finite element method is employed to solve the two-dimensional (2D) incompressible Navier–Stokes equations. The cylinder is endowed with a two-degree-of-freedom motion with the reduced mass ratio of Mr = 2. Three typical flow incidence angles, α = 0°, 30° and 60°, are examined to identify the effect of incidence angle on the vibration characteristics of the cylinder. For each α, computations are conducted in a wide range of reduced velocities 2 Ur ≤ 18. The numerical results show that at α = 0° and 30°, the responses of the cylinder are dominated by vortex-induced vibration which resembles that of a circular cylinder. At α = 0°, the peak amplitude of transverse vibration is the smallest among the three investigated α, and most of the cylinder motions exhibit a regular figure-eight trajectory. Some single-loop trajectories are observed at α = 30°, where the vibration frequency in the in-line direction is always identical to that in the transverse direction. At α = 60°, the triangular cylinder undergoes a typical transverse galloping with large amplitude and low frequency, and the vibration trajectories appear to be regular or irregular figure-eight patterns, which are strongly affected by the reduced velocity. (paper)

  3. Bone densitometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Alexandersen, P; Møllgaard, A

    1999-01-01

    The bisphosphonates have been introduced as alternatives to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment and prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The expected increasing application in at clinical practice demands cost-effective and easily handled methods to monitor the effect on bone....... The weak response at the distal forearm during antiresorptive treatment has restricted the use of bone densitometry at this region. We describe a new model for bone densitometry at the distal forearm, by which the response obtained is comparable to the response in other regions where bone densitometry...... is much more expensive and technically complicated. By computerized iteration of single X-ray absorptiometry forearm scans we defined a region with 65% trabecular bone. The region was analyzed in randomized, double-masked, placebo- controlled trials: a 2-year trial with alendronate (n = 69), a 1-year...

  4. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 2: Turbulence-induced structural response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1/9-scale model flow-induced vibration test of a proposed advanced water reactor (AWR) was performed. The main objectives of the test program were: (1) to derive an empirical equation for the turbulence-induced forcing function that can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) to study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence forcing function generation and dissipation and to verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; (3) to measure the shell response due to turbulence-induced excitation so that the data can be used to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration design analysis of the prototype. This paper describes Objective (3) of the test program

  5. Design evaluation of flow-induced vibrations for a large shell and tube type nuclear heat exchanger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased flow requirements for a large sized shell and tube type nuclear heat exchanger during advanced stage of manufacturing required re-evaluation of the Design to withstand flow-induced vibrations and suggest suitable Design alternatives within the constraints imposed at this advanced stage of manufacturing. Detailed flow-induced vibration analysis was done and two design alternatives offered. The first one consisted in attaching a wire-netted grid mounted alongside the baffle supports and the second considered removal of tubes from the vibration prone double span window region, which was counter-checked for heat-transfer adequacy requirement. Of the two alternatives, the second one was accepted due to its easy application at the advanced manufacturing stage. While the application of the wire-netted grid was not considered in the specific case, this might find application wherever the vibration prone double span tubes cannot be removed due to heat transfer requirements of Design

  6. Controlling flow-induced vibrations of flood barrier gates with data-driven and finite-element modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Erdbrink, C.D.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P. M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Operation of flood barrier gates is sometimes hampered by flow-induced vibrations. Although the physics is understood for specific gate types, it remains challenging to judge dynamic gate behaviour for unanticipated conditions. This paper presents a hybrid modelling system for predicting vibrations by combining machine learning with physics-based modelling so that critical situations can be avoided. In the outlined data-driven approach gate response data is acquired by sensors and stored in a...

  7. Effect of smoothing by spectral dispersion on flow induced laser beam deflection: The random phase modulation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical results are presented for the effect of random phase modulated smoothing by spectral dispersion on flow induced laser beam deflection. It is shown that in the limit of a large number of color cycles, Ncc, the effect is identical to that of the induced spatial incoherence method of temporal smoothing. For small Ncc, the beam deflection rate may be significantly larger in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, than in the parallel direction. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  8. Relationship Analysis of Debris Flow-inducing Factors in Typhoon Morakot Affected Area By Using Data Mining Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Che-Wei; Hsiao, Cheng-Yang; Ku, Bing-Huan; Tsao, Ting-Chi; Cheng, Chin-Tung; Lo, Wen-Chun; Chen, Chen-Yu

    2013-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot lashed Taiwan during Aug. 7 to 9, 2009. It dumped heavy rainfall in southern Taiwan, especially around the Central Mountain Range in Pingtung, Chia-Yi, and Kaohsiung County. In view of this, Comprehensive field investigation was carried out by government and private organizations after Typhoon Morakot, useful information of debris flow was gathered. Besides, after Typhoon Morakot, the debris flow-inducing factors become more challenging in Taiwan, many aspects had to be considered. The scope of this study was mainly discussed in debris flow-inducing factors in serious damaged areas which including Nantou, Chia-Yi, Tainan, Kaohsiung, Pingtung, Taitung County. Totally 218 torrents were included. Field investigation data and disaster records of Typhoon Morakot were utilized to analyze debris flow-inducing factors in three aspects: terrain, rainfall and sediment source. First, by using Principle Component Analysis(PCA) and Pearson Product Moment Correlation Analysis(CA) to select significant factors, 101 factors were reduced to the most important 18. Then through descriptive statistics and scatter diagram were selected to discuss the correlation among "Average slope gradient of watershed", "Landslide rate along the stream within 50m buffer zone" as well as the "rainfall intensity during Typhoon Morakot". The above charts were used to summarize the range of factor value which tend to occur phenomenon of debris flow in Typhoon Morakot. Besides, Random Forest Algorithm (RF) was utilized to research the relationship toward multi-variables. The significant factors which tend to affect the debris flow-inducing factor were "effective accumulated rainfall", "hourly rainfall", "landslide rate along the stream within 50m buffer zone", "average elevation value of effective watershed area higher than 10 degree", sequentially. By the results, the most significant factor is the rainfall factor during Typhoon Morakot. The results can be utilized in improving debris

  9. CFD simulations of flow erosion and flow-induced deformation of needle valve: Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A combined FSI–CFD and DPM computational method is used to investigate flow erosion and deformation of needle valve. • The numerical model is validated with the comparison of measured and predicted erosion rate. • Effects of operation, structure and fluid parameters on flow erosion and flow-induced deformation are discussed. • Particle diameter has the most significant effect on flow erosion. • Inlet rate has the most obvious effect on flow-induced deformation. - Abstract: A three-dimensional fluid–structure interaction (FSI) computational model coupling with a combined continuum and discrete model has been used to predict the flow erosion rate and flow-induced deformation of needle valve. Comparisons with measured data demonstrate good agreement with the predictions of erosion rate. The flow field distribution of gas-particle flow and the erosion rate and deformation of valve core are captured under different operating and structural conditions with different fluid parameters. The effects of inlet velocity, valve opening and inlet valve channel size, particle concentration, particle diameter and particle phase components are discussed in detail. The results indicate that valve tip has the most severe erosion and deformation, and flow field, erosion rate and deformation of valve are all sensitive to inlet condition changes, structural changes and fluid properties changes. The effect of particle diameter on erosion is the most significant, while the influence of inlet rate on deformation is the greatest one

  10. Flow-induced noise and vibration analysis of a piping elbow with/without a guide vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yong'ou; Ouyang, Huajiang; Guo, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The effect of a guide vane installed at the elbow on flow-induced noise and vibration is investigated in the range of Reynolds numbers from 1.70×105 to 6.81×105, and the position of guide vane is determined by publications. The turbulent flow in the piping elbow is simulated with large eddy simulation (LES). Following this, a hybrid method of combining LES and Lighthill's acoustic analogy theory is used to simulate the hydrodynamic noise and sound sources are solved as volume sources in code Actran. In addition, the flow-induced vibration of the piping elbow is investigated based on a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) code. The LES results indicate that the range of vortex zone in the elbow without the guide vane is larger than the case with the guide vane, and the guide vane is effective in reducing flow-induced noise and vibration in the 90° piping elbow at different Reynolds numbers.

  11. Operational modal analysis of flow-induced vibration of nuclear fuel rods in a turbulent axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We describe an analysis technique to evaluate nuclear fuel pins. • We test a single fuel pin mockup subjected to turbulent axial flow. • Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA). • The accuracy and precision of our method is higher compared to traditional methods. • We demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins can result in mechanical noise and lead to failure of the reactor's fuel assembly. This problem can be exacerbated in the new generation of liquid heavy metal fast reactors that use a much denser and more viscous coolant in the reactor core. An investigation of the flow-induced vibration in these particular conditions is therefore essential. In this paper, we describe an analysis technique to evaluate flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins subjected to a turbulent axial flow of heavy metal. We deal with a single fuel pin mockup designed for the lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled MYRRHA reactor which is subjected to similar flow conditions as in the reactor core. Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA) techniques. We show that the accuracy and precision of our OMA technique is higher compared to traditional methods and that it allows evaluating the evolution of modal parameters in operational conditions. We also demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability by tracking the modal parameters with increasing flow velocity

  12. Operational modal analysis of flow-induced vibration of nuclear fuel rods in a turbulent axial flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pauw, B., E-mail: bdepauw@vub.ac.be [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Weijtjens, W.; Vanlanduit, S. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Department of Mechanical Engineering (AVRG), Brussels (Belgium); Van Tichelen, K. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, Mol (Belgium); Berghmans, F. [Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Brussels Photonics Team (B-Phot), Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • We describe an analysis technique to evaluate nuclear fuel pins. • We test a single fuel pin mockup subjected to turbulent axial flow. • Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA). • The accuracy and precision of our method is higher compared to traditional methods. • We demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins can result in mechanical noise and lead to failure of the reactor's fuel assembly. This problem can be exacerbated in the new generation of liquid heavy metal fast reactors that use a much denser and more viscous coolant in the reactor core. An investigation of the flow-induced vibration in these particular conditions is therefore essential. In this paper, we describe an analysis technique to evaluate flow-induced vibration of nuclear reactor fuel pins subjected to a turbulent axial flow of heavy metal. We deal with a single fuel pin mockup designed for the lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled MYRRHA reactor which is subjected to similar flow conditions as in the reactor core. Our analysis is based on operational modal analysis (OMA) techniques. We show that the accuracy and precision of our OMA technique is higher compared to traditional methods and that it allows evaluating the evolution of modal parameters in operational conditions. We also demonstrate the possible onset of a fluid-elastic instability by tracking the modal parameters with increasing flow velocity.

  13. High-resolution 3D imaging of osteocytes and computational modelling in mechanobiology: insights on bone development, ageing, health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, P M; Zygalakis, K C; Oreffo, R O; Schneider, P

    2016-01-01

    Osteocytes are involved in mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in bone and hence, are key to bone adaptation in response to development, ageing and disease. Thus, detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the osteocyte network (ON) and the surrounding lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is essential. Enhanced understanding of the ON&LCN will contribute to a better understanding of bone mechanics on cellular and sub-cellular scales, for instance through improved computational models of bone mechanotransduction. Until now, the location of the ON within the hard bone matrix and the sub-µm dimensions of the ON&LCN have posed significant challenges for 3D imaging. This review identifies relevant microstructural phenotypes of the ON&LCN in health and disease and summarises how light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray imaging techniques have been used in studies of osteocyte anatomy, pathology and mechanobiology to date. In this review, we assess the requirements for ON&LCN imaging and examine the state of the art in the fields of imaging and computational modelling as well as recent advances in high-resolution 3D imaging. Suggestions for future investigations using volume electron microscopy are indicated and we present new data on the ON&LCN using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. A correlative approach using these high-resolution 3D imaging techniques in conjunction with in silico modelling in bone mechanobiology will increase understanding of osteocyte function and, ultimately, lead to improved pathways for diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27209400

  14. Experimental and computational study of the flow induced by a plasma actuator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new plasma-actuator (PA) model is proposed to simulate flow manipulation. • The new model is calibrated according to a complementary PIV experiment. • A comparative analysis of different volume-force estimation strategies is provided. • All PA models were applied in conjunction with a near-wall RSM model. • Afterwards the new model was applied to a separated flow in a 3D diffuser. -- Abstract: A complementary experimental and computational study of the flow field evoked by a plasma actuator mounted on a flat plate was in focus of the present work. The main objective of the experimental investigation was the determination of the vector force imparted by the plasma actuator to the fluid flow. The force distribution was presently extracted from the Navier–Stokes equations directly by feeding them with the velocity field measured by a PIV technique. Assuming a steady-in-mean, two-dimensional flow with zero-pressure gradient, the imbalance between the convective term and the momentum equation’s right-hand-side terms reveals the desired resulting force. This force-distribution database was used afterwards as the source term in the momentum equation. Furthermore, an empirical model formulation for the volume-force determination parameterized by the underlying PIV-based model is derived. The model is tested within the RANS framework in order to predict a wall jet-like flow induced by a plasma actuator. The Reynolds equations are closed by a near-wall second-moment closure model based on the homogeneous dissipation rate of the kinetic energy of turbulence. The computationally obtained velocity field is analysed along with the experimental data focussing on the wall jet flow region in proximity of the plasma actuator. For comparison purposes, different existing phenomenological models were applied to evaluate the new model’s accuracy. The comparative analysis of all applied models demonstrates the strength of the new empirical model

  15. A simple model for two-phase slug flow induced damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-phase flows are prevalent in various industrial fields such as nuclear engineering, chemical engineering and the petroleum industry. At high speeds, flows through piping may generate significant excitation forces, particularly at joints and bends in piping systems. Interestingly, the flows may also generate significant damping forces which can be desirable from a vibration damping point of view. The question of exactly how internal two-phase flows generate damping remains largely unanswered. Indeed so is the question for external two-phase flows, which are even more complex. The problem addressed in this study is related to the behavior of tubular structures subjected to internal two-phase slug flow or nearly slug flow. The observation of slug flow subjected to transverse vibration led to consideration of the effects of sloshing liquid slugs due to the external vibration. Indeed, in flow visualization tests, the upper free surface of the slugs in vertical flow was found to deform significantly as the tube vibrated. This suggested a possible mechanism for energy transfer from the structure to the fluid which could be (at least partially) responsible for the observed two-phase flow-induced damping. An analytical model is developed aimed at incorporating the most basic sloshing effects of liquid slugs travelling through a tube at low speed. The first part of the work demonstrates that considering slugs as as simple points masses travelling through the tube leads only to low energy transfer from the tube to the flow and thus cannot explain the level of energy transfer observed in experimental damping tests. In the second part of the work, the flow dynamics within the slug are modeled to account for linear order free surface oscillations related to first mode sloshing. Numerical solution of the resulting equations shows that the energy transfer is much higher and results in damping levels of the same order as found in experimental measurements. The results

  16. New knowledge and experiences of flow induced fretting in PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important demands for a fretting free nuclear fuel assembly design is to verify that the fuel assembly is able to resist any fretting damages during its lifetime. The reactor experience and laboratory investigations have made clear to distinguish between 2 types of flow induced excitation: Turbulent Excitation (TE) and Self Induced Excitation (SIE). The former is the 'Conventional' flow excitation which is traditionally verified through integral endurance test; the latter, for which the rod (or assembly) vibration influences significantly the flow excitation and which may lead to a resonance for given flow conditions, requires a specific test protocol which allows to identify this phenomenon safely. For this purpose, an improved experimental approach to investigate the behavior of a fuel assembly design towards SIE has been developed: an integral fuel assembly flow test is performed using an assembly 'optimized' in terms of vibratory characteristics and a specially designed loop (PETER loop), able to simulate different flow boundary conditions, such as different inlet flow conditions, neighboring fuel assembly influence (different grid or bottom nozzle pressure loss coefficients, intermediate flow mixing grids), fuel assembly bow, baffle shaking or vibrations of neighboring fuel assembly. During this flow test, the resulting fuel rod and fuel assembly vibration behavior are measured under many parameterized flow conditions and the verifications of 'non resonance' or instability are done. Moreover, the maximum rod vibration amplitudes are recorded for the conditions of a flow bounding those expected for the reactor. In a second step, the design can be verified towards TE through two different approaches which are considered as complementary or alternative: 1)The conventional approach which consists of introducing a fuel assembly prototype into a flow loop for 1000 hours under bounding flow conditions and then to inspect the fuel rods for potential

  17. Bone Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the knee in either the femur (thigh) or tibia (shinbone). Other common locations include the hip and ... bone that is weakened by a tumor to fracture, or break. This may be severely painful. Occasionally, ...

  18. Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a fall! If you play sports like football, soccer, lacrosse, or ice hockey, always wear all the ... to strengthen your bones is through exercise like running, jumping, dancing, and playing sports. Take these steps ...

  19. Involvement of periostin-sclerostin-Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the prevention of neurectomy-induced bone loss by naringin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jianwei; Sun, Xiaolei; Ma, Jianxiong; Ma, Xinlong; Xing, Guosheng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Lei; Wang, Jianbao; Li, Fengbo; Li, Yanjun

    2015-12-25

    Periostin has an essential role in mechanotransduction in bone. Naringin, a natural flavonoid, has been evidenced for its osteoprotective role in osteoporosis, while its mechanism is far from clear. Here we show that down-regulation of periostin, and up-regulation of its downstream sclerostin and inactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling were implicated in neurectomy-induced bone loss. Naringin could up-regulate periostin and prevent neurectomy-induced deterioration of BMD, trabecular microstructure and bone mechanical characteristics. In conclusion, naringin could prevent progress of disuse osteoporosis in rats, which may be mediated by increased periostin expression and subsequently inhibition of sclerostin and activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. PMID:26541456

  20. Bone densitometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an x-ray bone densitometer, special calibration techniques are employed to accommodate variations. In one aspect, a bone-like calibration material is interposed and the system determines the calibration data from rays passing only through flesh. In another aspect, a rotating device carries the calibration material through the beam. The specific densitometer shown uses an x-ray tube operated at two different voltages to generate a pencil beam, the energy levels of the x-ray photons being a function of the voltage applied. An integrating detector is timed to integrate the detected signal of the patient-attenuated beam over each pulse, the signals are converted to digital values and a digital computer converts the set of values produced by the raster scan into a representation of the bone density of the patient. Multiple reference detectors with differing absorbers are used by the system to continuously correct for variation in voltage and current of the x-ray tube. Calibration is accomplished by the digital computer on the basis of passing the pencil beam through known bone-representing substance as the densitometer scans portions of the patient having bone and adjacent portions having only flesh. A set of detected signals affected by the calibration substance in regions having only flesh is compared by the computer with a set of detected signals unaffected by the calibration material

  1. A Study on the Uncertainty of Flow-Induced Vibration in a Cross Flow over Staggered Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross-flow in many support columns of very high temperature reactor (VHTR) lower plenum would have FIV issues under high speed flow jetting from the core. For a group of multiple circular cylinders subjected to a cross-flow, three types of potential vibration mechanisms may exist: (1) Vortex-induced vibration (VIV), (2) Fluid-elastic vibration (FEV) and (3) Turbulence-induced vibration (TIV). Kevalahan studied the free vibration of circular cylinders in a tightly packed periodic square inline array of cylinders. Pandey et al. studied the flue gas flow distribution in the Low Temperature Super Heater (LTSH) tube bundles situated in second pass of a utility boiler and the phenomenon of flow induced vibration. Nakamura et al. studied flow instability of cylinder arrays resembling U-bend tubes in steam generators. The FIV evaluation is usually performed with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to obtain unknown frequency of oscillation of the multiple objects under turbulent flow and thus the uncertainty residing in the turbulence model used should be quantified. In this paper, potential FIV uncertainty arising from the turbulence phenomena are evaluated for a typical cross flow through staggered tube bundles resembling the VHTR lower plenum support columns. Flow induced vibration (FIV) is one of the important mechanical and fatigue issues in nuclear systems. Especially, cross-flow in many support structures of VHTR lower plenum would have FIV issues under highly turbulent jet flows from the core. The results show that the effect of turbulence parameters on FIV is not negligible and the uncertainty is 5 to 10%. Present method can be applied to future FIV evaluations of nuclear systems. More extensive studies on flow induced vibration in a plant scale by using more rigorous computational methods are under way

  2. Numerical and experimental study on flow-induced noise at blade-passing frequency in centrifugal pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Yuan, Shouqi; Yuan, Jianping; Si, Qiaorui; Pei, Ji

    2014-05-01

    With the increasing noise pollution, low noise optimization of centrifugal pimps has become a hot topic. However, experimental study on this problem is unacceptable for industrial applications due to unsustainable cost. A hybrid method that couples computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with computational aeroacoustic software is used to predict the flow-induced noise of pumps in order to minimize the noise of centrifugal pumps in actual projects. Under Langthjem's assumption that the blade surface pressure is the main flow-induced acoustic source in centrifugal pumps, the blade surface pressure pulsation is considered in terms of the acoustical sources and simulated using CFX software. The pressure pulsation and noise distribution in the near-cutoff region are examined for the blade-passing frequency (BPF) noise, and the sound pressure level (SPL) reached peaks near the cutoff that corresponded with the pressure pulsation in this region. An experiment is performed to validate this prediction. Four hydrophones are fixed to the inlet and outlet ports of the test pump to measure the flow-induced noise from the four-port model. The simulation results for the noise are analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The variation in the calculated noise with changes in the flow agreed well with the experimental results. When the flow rate was increased, the SPL first decreased and reached the minimum near the best efficient point (BEP); it then increased when the flow rate was further increased. The numerical and experimental results confirmed that the BPF noise generated by a blade-rotating dipole roughly reflects the acoustic features of centrifugal pumps. The noise simulation method in current study has a good feasibility and suitability, which could be adopted in engineering design to predict and optimize the hydroacoustic behavior of centrifugal pumps.

  3. Numerical Research about Influence of Blade Outlet Angle on Flow-Induced Noise and Vibration for Centrifugal Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Ailing Yang; Dapeng Lang; Guoping Li; Eryun Chen; Ren Dai

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid numerical method was used to calculate the flow-induced noise and vibration of the centrifugal pump in the paper. The unsteady flows inside the centrifugal pumps with different blade outlet angles were simulated firstly. The unsteady pressure on the inner surface of the volute and the unsteady force applied on the impeller were analyzed. Then the vibration of the volute and sound field were calculated based on an acoustic-vibro-coupling method. The results show that the pump head has...

  4. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  5. What Is Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by your browser. Home Bone Basics What Is Bone? Publication available in: PDF (57 KB) Related Resources ... Men, and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis Prevention For Your Information Bone Remodeling Throughout life, bone is constantly renewed through ...

  6. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  7. Facts about Broken Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... White House Lunch Recipes The Facts About Broken Bones KidsHealth > For Kids > The Facts About Broken Bones ... through the skin . continue What Happens When a Bone Breaks? It hurts to break a bone! It's ...

  8. Bone biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  9. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia to ... remove the bone can be done if the biopsy exam shows that there is an abnormal growth ...

  10. A comprehensive flow-induced vibration model to predict crack growth and leakage potential in steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bouzidi, Salim [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Hassan, Marwan, E-mail: mahassan@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Riznic, Jovica [Operational Engineering Assessment Division, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Comprehensive flow induced vibrations time domain model was developed. • Simulations of fluidelastic instability and turbulence were conducted. • Nonlinear effect due to the clearances at the supports was studied. • Prediction of stresses due to fluid excitation was obtained. • Deterministic and stochastic analyses for crack and leakage rate were conducted. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations (FIVs) are a major threat to the operation of nuclear steam generators. Turbulence and fluidelastic instability are the two main excitation mechanisms leading to tube vibrations. The consequences to the operation of steam generators are premature wear of the tubes, as well as development of cracks that may leak hazardous fluids. This paper investigates the effect of tube support clearance on the integrity of tube bundles within steam generators. Special emphasis will be placed on crack propagation and leakage rates. A crack growth model is used to simulate the growth of surface flaws and through-wall cracks of various initial sizes due to a wide range of support clearances. Leakage rates are predicted using a two-phase flow leakage model. Nonlinear finite element analysis is used to simulate a full U-bend subjected to fluidelastic and turbulence forces. Monte Carlo simulations are then used to conduct a probabilistic assessment of steam generator life due to crack development.

  11. A comprehensive flow-induced vibration model to predict crack growth and leakage potential in steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Comprehensive flow induced vibrations time domain model was developed. • Simulations of fluidelastic instability and turbulence were conducted. • Nonlinear effect due to the clearances at the supports was studied. • Prediction of stresses due to fluid excitation was obtained. • Deterministic and stochastic analyses for crack and leakage rate were conducted. - Abstract: Flow-induced vibrations (FIVs) are a major threat to the operation of nuclear steam generators. Turbulence and fluidelastic instability are the two main excitation mechanisms leading to tube vibrations. The consequences to the operation of steam generators are premature wear of the tubes, as well as development of cracks that may leak hazardous fluids. This paper investigates the effect of tube support clearance on the integrity of tube bundles within steam generators. Special emphasis will be placed on crack propagation and leakage rates. A crack growth model is used to simulate the growth of surface flaws and through-wall cracks of various initial sizes due to a wide range of support clearances. Leakage rates are predicted using a two-phase flow leakage model. Nonlinear finite element analysis is used to simulate a full U-bend subjected to fluidelastic and turbulence forces. Monte Carlo simulations are then used to conduct a probabilistic assessment of steam generator life due to crack development

  12. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 1: Turbulence-induced forcing function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1/9 scale model of a proposed advanced water reactor was tested for flow-induced vibration. The main objectives of this test were to (1) derive an empirical equation for the turbulence forcing function which can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence; (3) verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; and (4) measure the shell responses to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration analysis of the prototype. This paper describes objectives (1), (2), and (3). Objective (4) will be discussed in a companion paper. The turbulence-induced fluctuating pressure was measured at 49 locations over the surface of a thick-walled, non-responsive scale model of the reactor vessel/core support cylinders. An empirical equation relating the fluctuating pressure, the frequency, and the distance from the inlet nozzle center line was derived to fit the test data. This equation involves only non-dimensional, fluid mechanical parameters that are postulated to represent the full-sized, geometrically similar prototype. While this postulate cannot be verified until similar measurements are taken on the full-sized unit, a similar approach using a 1/6 scale model of a commercial pressurized water reactor was verified in the mid-seventies by field measurements on the full-sized reactor

  13. Osteoclasts prefer aged bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K; Leeming, Diana Julie; Byrjalsen, I;

    2007-01-01

    We investigated whether the age of the bones endogenously exerts control over the bone resorption ability of the osteoclasts, and found that osteoclasts preferentially develop and resorb bone on aged bone. These findings indicate that the bone matrix itself plays a role in targeted remodeling of...... aged bones....

  14. Human osteoblast-like cells respond to mechanical strain with increased bone matrix protein production independent of hormonal regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, L. V.; Hruska, K. A.; Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of osteosarcoma cell lines to chronic intermittent strain increases the activity of mechano-sensitive cation (SA-cat) channels. The impact of mechano-transduction on osteoblast function has not been well studied. We analyzed the expression and production of bone matrix proteins in human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells, OHS-4, in response to chronic intermittent mechanical strain. The OHS-4 cells exhibit type I collagen production, 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-inducible osteocalcin, and mineralization of the extracellular matrix. The matrix protein message level was determined from total RNA isolated from cells exposed to 1-4 days of chronic intermittent strain. Northern analysis for type I collagen indicated that strain increased collagen message after 48 h. Immunofluorescent labeling of type I collagen demonstrated that secretion was also enhanced with mechanical strain. Osteopontin message levels were increased several-fold by the application of mechanical load in the absence of vitamin D, and the two stimuli together produced an additive effect. Osteocalcin secretion was also increased with cyclic strain. Osteocalcin levels were not detectable in vitamin D-untreated control cells. However, after 4 days of induced load, significant levels of osteocalcin were observed in the medium. With vitamin D present, osteocalcin levels were 4 times higher in the medium of strained cells compared to nonstrained controls. We conclude that mechanical strain of osteoblast-like cells is sufficient to increase the transcription and secretion of matrix proteins via mechano-transduction without hormonal induction.

  15. Experimental determination of the permeability in the lacunar-canalicular porosity of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed; Mahamud, Rashal; Cowin, Stephen C; Cardoso, Luis

    2009-10-01

    Permeability of the mineralized bone tissue is a critical element in understanding fluid flow occurring in the lacunar-canalicular porosity (PLC) compartment of bone and its role in bone nutrition and mechanotransduction. However, the estimation of bone permeability at the tissue level is affected by the influence of the vascular porosity in macroscopic samples containing several osteons. In this communication, both analytical and experimental approaches are proposed to estimate the lacunar-canalicular permeability in a single osteon. Data from an experimental stress-relaxation test in a single osteon are used to derive the PLC permeability by curve fitting to theoretical results from a compressible transverse isotropic poroelastic model of a porous annular disk under a ramp loading history (2007, "Compressible and Incompressible Constituents in Anisotropic Poroelasticity: The Problem of Unconfined Compression of a Disk," J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 55, pp. 161-193; 2008, "The Unconfined Compression of a Poroelastic Annular Cylindrical Disk," Mech. Mater., 40(6), pp. 507-523). The PLC tissue intrinsic permeability in the radial direction of the osteon was found to be dependent on the strain rate used and within the range of O(10(-24))-O(10(-25)). The reported values of PLC permeability are in reasonable agreement with previously reported values derived using finite element analysis (FEA) and nanoindentation approaches. PMID:19831477

  16. Hierarchical poroelasticity: movement of interstitial fluid between porosity levels in bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, Stephen C; Gailani, Gaffar; Benalla, Mohammed

    2009-09-13

    The governing equations for the theory of poroelastic materials with hierarchical pore space architecture and compressible constituents undergoing small deformations are developed. These equations are applied to the problem of determining the exchange of pore fluid between the vascular porosity (PV) and the lacunar-canalicular porosity (PLC) in bone tissue due to cyclic mechanical loading and blood pressure oscillations. The result is basic to the understanding of interstitial flow in bone tissue that, in turn, is basic to understanding of nutrient transport from the vasculature to the bone cells buried in the bone tissue and to the process of mechanotransduction by these cells. A formula for the volume of fluid that moves between the PLC and PV in a cyclic loading is obtained as a function of the cyclic mechanical loading and blood pressure oscillations. Formulas for the oscillating fluid pore pressure in both the PLC and the PV are obtained as functions of the two driving forces, the cyclic mechanical straining and the blood pressure, both with specified amplitude and frequency. The results of this study also suggest a PV permeability greater than 10(-9) m(2) and perhaps a little lower than 10(-8) m(2). Previous estimates of this permeability have been as small as 10(-14) m(2). PMID:19657006

  17. Probing the mystery of Chinese medicine meridian channels with special emphasis on the connective tissue interstitial fluid system, mechanotransduction, cells durotaxis and mast cell degranulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article hypothesizes that the Chinese medicine meridian system is a special channel network comprising of skin with abundant nerves and nociceptive receptors of various types, and deeper connective tissues inside the body with the flowing interstitial fluid system. These meridian channels provide efficient migratory tracks mainly due to durotaxis (also including chemotaxis for mast cells, fibroblasts and other cells to migrate and carry out a number of physiological functions. Acupuncture acting on meridian channel causes cytoskeletal remodeling through mechanotransduction, leading to regulation of gene expression and the subsequent production of related proteins. Also, stimulation on cell surface can trigger Ca2+ activities, resulting in a cascade of intra- and inter-cellular signaling. Moreover, nerve endings in the meridian channels interact with mast cells and induce the degranulation of these cells, leading to the release of many specific biomolecules needed for homeostasis, immune surveillance, wound healing and tissue repair. Acupoint along a meridian channel is a functional site to trigger the above functions with specificity and high efficiency.

  18. Flow-induced vibration and acoustic behaviour of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles in a Bruce B NGS fuel channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequency/temperature sweep tests were performed in a high-temperature/high-pressure test channel to determine the acoustic and flow-induced vibration characteristics of the CANFLEX-LVRF bundle. The vibratory response of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles was compared with that of 37-element fuel bundles under Bruce B NGS fuel channel normal operating conditions. The tests were performed with a 12-bundle string of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles as well as a mixed string for the transition core. The tests showed that the LVRF bundles performed as required without failure or gross geometry changes. The mixed fuel strings behaved in a manner similar to that of a string of CANFLEX-LVRF bundles. (author)

  19. Flow-Induced Pulsation and Vibration in Hydroelectric Machinery Engineer’s Guidebook for Planning, Design and Troubleshooting

    CERN Document Server

    Dörfler, Peter; Coutu, André

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1970’s, an increasing amount of specialized research has focused on the problems created by instability of internal flow in hydroelectric power plants. However, progress in this field is hampered by the inter­disciplinary nature of the subject, between fluid mechanics, structural mechanics and hydraulic transients. Flow-induced Pulsation and Vibration in Hydroelectric Machinery provides a compact guidebook explaining the many different underlying physical mechanisms and their possible effects.   Typical phenomena are described to assist in the proper diagnosis of problems and various key strategies for solution are compared and considered with support from practical experience and real-life examples. The link between state-of the-art CFD computation and notorious practical problems is discussed  and quantitative data is provided on  normal levels of vibration and pulsation so realistic limits can be set for future projects. Current projects are also addressed as the possibilities and limitatio...

  20. IAEA specialist meeting on flow induced vibrations in fast breeder reactors, Paris, France, 22-24 October 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Flow Induced Vibrations in FBRs for LMFBR Applications'' was held in Paris under the auspices of the French CEA on 21-24 October 1982. The meeting was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the 14th Meeting of the IWGFR and was attended by 31 participants from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United States of America and one international organization (IAEA). The meeting was presided over by Pr. R.J. Gibert of France. After the first session on review of national positions in the subject field (7 papers), the meeting was divided into five technical sections as follows: fluid-structures interaction, calculation methods (3 papers); tubes bundles vibration and weir (4 papers); instability (6 papers); induced vibrations in the pumps (2 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  1. Tissue Strain Reorganizes Collagen With a Switchlike Response That Regulates Neuronal Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Phosphorylation In Vitro: Implications for Ligamentous Injury and Mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sijia; Cao, Xuan; Stablow, Alec M; Shenoy, Vivek B; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2016-02-01

    Excessive loading of ligaments can activate the neural afferents that innervate the collagenous tissue, leading to a host of pathologies including pain. An integrated experimental and modeling approach was used to define the responses of neurons and the surrounding collagen fibers to the ligamentous matrix loading and to begin to understand how macroscopic deformation is translated to neuronal loading and signaling. A neuron-collagen construct (NCC) developed to mimic innervation of collagenous tissue underwent tension to strains simulating nonpainful (8%) or painful ligament loading (16%). Both neuronal phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is related to neuroplasticity (R2 ≥ 0.041; p ≤ 0.0171) and neuronal aspect ratio (AR) (R2 ≥ 0.250; p element based discrete fiber network (DFN) model predicted that at bulk strains above the transition point, heterogeneous fiber strains were both tensile and compressive and increased, with strains in some fibers along the loading direction exceeding the applied bulk strain. The transition point identified for changes in collagen fiber realignment was consistent with the measured strain threshold (11.7% with a 95% confidence interval of 10.2-13.4%) for elevating ERK phosphorylation after loading. As with collagen fiber realignment, the greatest degree of neuronal reorientation toward the loading direction was observed at the NCC distraction corresponding to painful loading. Because activation of neuronal ERK occurred only at strains that produced evident collagen fiber realignment, findings suggest that tissue strain-induced changes in the micromechanical environment, especially altered local collagen fiber kinematics, may be associated with mechanotransduction signaling in neurons. PMID:26549105

  2. Bone marrow biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may be taken from the pelvic or breast bone. Sometimes, other areas are used. Marrow is removed ...

  3. Bone marrow aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003658.htm Bone marrow aspiration To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps ...

  4. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors...

  5. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia, E-mail: mgascenzi@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rehabilitation Bldg, Room 22-69, 1000 Veteran Avenue, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kawas, Neal P., E-mail: nealkawas@ucla.edu [UCLA/Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rehabilitation Bldg, Room 22-69, 1000 Veteran Avenue, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lutz, Andre, E-mail: andre.lutz@hotmail.de [Institute of Biomechanics and Numerical Mechanics, Leibniz University Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Kardas, Dieter, E-mail: kardas@ibnm.uni-hannover.de [ContiTech Vibration Control, Jaedekamp 30 None, 30419 Hannover (Germany); Nackenhorst, Udo, E-mail: nackenhorst@ibnm.uni-hannover.de [Institute of Biomechanics and Numerical Mechanics, Leibniz University Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Keyak, Joyce H., E-mail: jhkeyak@uci.edu [Department of Radiological Sciences, Medical Sciences I, Bldg 811, Room B140, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-5000 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual’s (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method’s development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications – varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient’s femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model’s micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing.

  6. Individual-specific multi-scale finite element simulation of cortical bone of human proximal femur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an innovative method to perform multi-scale finite element analyses of the cortical component of the femur using the individual’s (1) computed tomography scan; and (2) a bone specimen obtained in conjunction with orthopedic surgery. The method enables study of micro-structural characteristics regulating strains and stresses under physiological loading conditions. The analysis of the micro-structural scenarios that cause variation of strain and stress is the first step in understanding the elevated strains and stresses in bone tissue, which are indicative of higher likelihood of micro-crack formation in bone, implicated in consequent remodeling or macroscopic bone fracture. Evidence that micro-structure varies with clinical history and contributes in significant, but poorly understood, ways to bone function, motivates the method’s development, as does need for software tools to investigate relationships between macroscopic loading and micro-structure. Three applications – varying region of interest, bone mineral density, and orientation of collagen type I, illustrate the method. We show, in comparison between physiological loading and simple compression of a patient’s femur, that strains computed at the multi-scale model’s micro-level: (i) differ; and (ii) depend on local collagen-apatite orientation and degree of calcification. Our findings confirm the strain concentration role of osteocyte lacunae, important for mechano-transduction. We hypothesize occurrence of micro-crack formation, leading either to remodeling or macroscopic fracture, when the computed strains exceed the elastic range observed in micro-structural testing

  7. Mechanical stimulation orchestrates the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells by regulating HDAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Wang, C D; Zhang, N; Tong, W X; Zhang, Y F; Shan, S Z; Zhang, X L; Li, Q F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation and histone deacetylases (HDACs) have essential roles in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and bone formation. However, little is known regarding what regulates HDAC expression and therefore the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs during osteogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether mechanical loading regulates HDAC expression directly and examined the role of HDACs in mechanical loading-triggered osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. We first studied the microarrays of samples from patients with osteoporosis and found that the NOTCH pathway and skeletal development gene sets were downregulated in the BMSCs of patients with osteoporosis. Then we demonstrated that mechanical stimuli can regulate osteogenesis and bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. NOTCH signaling was upregulated during cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS)-induced osteogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC1 protein expression was downregulated. The perturbation of HDAC1 expression also had a significant effect on matrix mineralization and JAG1-mediated Notch signaling, suggesting that HDAC1 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Notch signaling in the mechanotransduction of BMSCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results suggest that HDAC1 modulates the CMS-induced histone H3 acetylation level at the JAG1 promoter. More importantly, we found an inhibitory role of Hdac1 in regulating bone formation in response to hindlimb unloading in mice, and pretreatment with an HDAC1 inhibitor partly rescued the osteoporosis caused by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation orchestrates genes expression involved in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs via the direct regulation of HDAC1, and the therapeutic inhibition of HDAC1 may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical stimulation. PMID:27171263

  8. Bone strength: more than just bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The following bone density measurements have limited utility in determining bone strength because they do not include bone quality: microarchitecture, mineralization, ability to repair damage, collagen structure, crystal size, or marrow composition. Patients with kidney disease have poor bone quality. Newman et al. now describe beneficial effects with raloxifene in an animal model of progressive kidney disease. These biomechanical measurements will be important in the development of medications to decrease fractures in patients. PMID:26759040

  9. Proposed guideline of flow-induced vibration evaluation for hot-leg piping of primary cooling system in sodium-cooled fast reactor. Supplemental interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been conducting conceptual study of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor (named Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor: JSFR) under the framework of Fast reactor Cycle Technology development (FaCT) project. The JSFR design adopts a two-loop cooling system that enables the scale merit to be significantly enhanced, thereby leading to reduction in the capital cost of the plant. Since the two-loop cooling system increases the primary coolant flow rate per loop, a large-diameter piping system is designed with high coolant velocity (9m/s) . To reduce thermal stress, the primary hot-leg piping with large diameter in JSFR is designed to be have thin wall. JSFR adopts an L-shaped short elbow, the curvature radius of which is equivalent to the piping diameter, for the hot-leg piping system in order to compact the reactor building volume. The turbulence generated by flow separation in the short elbow is predicted to be more severe than that in the long elbow. Such a turbulent flow, may raise a flow-induced vibration issue. It is necessary for designers to select appropriate design and suppress the flow-induced vibration as well as to evaluate and confirm the integrity of piping against the flow-induced vibration. JAEA has been developing a flow-induced vibration methodology applied to the JSFR piping under the FaCT project. As part of this development, flow pattern in the single-elbow pipe has been investigated with the measurements of fluid force induced by turbulent flow and of the flow-induced vibration response. The experimental results have been served to the development and vibration of the flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology. Based on these outcomes, JAEA has established a working group on a guideline of large-diameter piping flow-induced vibration evaluation under the JAEA's Thermal-Hydraulic Research Committee for creating the JAEA internal guideline. The first proposal of the guideline was summarized from the achievements

  10. Bone development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatara, M.R.; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Sawa-Wojtanowicz, B.;

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effect of alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) administration during early neonatal life on skeletal development and function, with emphasis on bone exposed to regular stress and used to serve for systemic changes monitoring, the rib. Shropshire ram...... at 146 days of life and five left and right ribs (fourth to eighth) were removed for analysis. The influence of AKG on skeletal system development was evaluated in relation to both geometrical and mechanical properties, as well as quantitative computed tomography (QCT). No significant differences between...... has a long-term effect on skeletal development when given early in neonatal life, and that changes in rib properties serve to improve chest mechanics and functioning in young animals. Moreover, neonatal administration of AKG may be considered as an effective factor enhancing proper development...

  11. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  12. Characteristics of Debris Flow-inducing Factors in Typhoon Morakot Affected Area- An Examination of the Topographic factors, rainfall intensity and Landslide Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C.-W.; Lo, W.-C.; Hsiao, C.-Y.; Ku, B.-H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2012-04-01

    Typhoon Morakot lashed Taiwan during Aug. 7 to 9, 2009. It dumped heavy rainfall in southern Taiwan, especially around the Central Mountain Range in Pingtung, Chia-Yi, and Kaohsiung County. In view of this, Comprehensive field investigation was carried out by government and private organizations after Typhoon Morakot, useful information of debris flow was gathered. Besides, after Typhoon Morakot, the debris flow-inducing factors become more challenging in Taiwan, many aspects had to be considered. The scope of this study was mainly discussed in debris flow-inducing factors in serious damaged areas which including Nantou, Chia-Yi, Tainan, Kaohsiung, Pingtung, Taitung County. Totally 218 torrents were included. Field investigation data and disaster records of Typhoon Morakot were utilized to analyze debris flow-inducing factors in three aspects: terrain, rainfall and sediment source. First, by using Principle Component Analysis(PCA) and Pearson Product Moment Correlation Analysis(CA) to select significant factors, 101 factors were reduced to the most important 18 factors. Then through descriptive statistics and scatter diagram were selected to discuss the correlation among "Average slope gradient of watershed", "Landslide rate along the stream within 50m buffer zone" as well as the "rainfall intensity during Typhoon Morakot". The above charts of characteristics analysis were used to summarize the range of factor value which tend to occur phenomenon of debris flow in Typhoon Morakot. Besides, Random Forest Algorithm (RF) was utilized to research the relationship toward multi-variables. The significant factors which tend to affect the debris flow-inducing factor were "effective accumulated rainfall", "hourly rainfall", "landslide rate along the stream within 50m buffer zone", "average elevation value of effective watershed which higher than 10 degree", sequentially. By the results, the most significant factor is the rainfall factor during Typhoon Morakot. The results

  13. Application of L.E.S. and D.N.S. to prediction of tube bundle flow-induced vibrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many industrial applications, mechanical structures like heat exchanger tube bundles, fuel assemblies and rod cluster control assemblies are submitted to complex flows causing possible vibrations and damage. Fluid forces acting on these components are usually split into two parts: forces independent of structure motion and forces coupled with tube motion and called fluid-elastic forces. In specific configurations it was observed that these forces may be responsible for possible dynamic instability development leading to possible short term failures of tubes through high amplitude vibrations. Therefore, for safety reasons, the prediction of fluid forces is a major problem to overcome. Most classical fluid force identification methods rely on experimental measurements associated with convenient data processing and dimensionless laws allow extrapolation in real conditions of fluid forces measured on experimental devices. Methods relying on numerical simulation rise up expectations because they could help to better understand physical mechanisms involved and thereafter complete classical methods. Due to recent improvements of Computational Fluid Dynamics (C.F.D.) codes, numerical simulation of fluid loading is now practicable in the presence of industrial configurations. Under specific assumptions it is possible to predict flow-induced vibrations of tubes and tube bundles submitted to single phase flows. The present paper gives an overview of problems that can be solved numerically by using Large Eddy Simulation (L.E.S.) and Direct Numerical Simulation (D.N.S.) in the presence of weak or strong fluid structure coupling effects. (authors)

  14. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF UNSTEADY TURBULENT FLOW INDUCED BY TWO-DIMENSIONAL ELEVATOR CAR AND COUNTER WEIGHT SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of unsteady turbulent flow induced by high-speed elevator system was established in the present study. The research was focused on the instantaneous variation of the aerodynamic force on the car structure during traversing motion of the counter weight in the hoistway. A dynamic meshing method was employed to treat the multi-body motion system to avoid poor distortion of meshes. A comprehensive understanding of this significant aspect was obtained by varying the horizontal gap (δ=0.1m, 0.2m, and 0.3m) between the elevator car and the counter weight, and the moving speed (U0=2m/s, 6m/s, and 10m/s) of the elevator system. A pulsed intensification of the aerodynamic force on the elevator car and subsequent appearance of large valley with negative aerodynamic force were clearly observed in the numerical results. In parameters studied (δ=0.1m, U0=2m/s, 6m/s, 10m/s), the peaked horizontal and vertical forces are respectively 7-11 and 4.3-5.65 times of that when the counter weight is far from the car. These results demonstrated the prominent influence of the traversing counter weight on aerodynamic force on the elevator car, which is of great significance to designers of high-speed elevator system.

  15. Computational modelling of blood-flow-induced changes in blood electrical conductivity and its contribution to the impedance cardiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have shown that blood-flow-induced change in electrical conductivity is of equal importance in assessment of the impedance cardiogram (ICG) as are volumetric changes attributed to the motion of heart, lungs and blood vessels. To better understand the sole effect of time-varying blood conductivity on the spatiotemporal distribution of trans-thoracic electric fields (i.e. ICG), this paper presents a segmented high-resolution (1 mm3) thoracic cardiovascular system, in which the time-varying pressures, flows and electrical conductivities of blood in different vessels are evaluated using a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations, red blood cell orientation and cardiac cycle functions. Electric field and voltage simulations are performed using two and four electrode configurations delivering a small alternating electric current to an anatomically realistic and electrically accurate model of modelled human torso. The simulations provide a three-dimensional electric field distribution and show that the time-varying blood conductivity alters the voltage potential difference between the electrodes by a maximum of 0.28% for a cardiac output of about 5 L min−1. As part of a larger study, it is hoped that this initial model will be useful in providing improved insights into blood-flow-related spatiotemporal electric field variations and assist in the optimal placement of electrodes in impedance cardiography experiments

  16. Investigation of unsteady flow-induced impeller oscillations of a single-blade pump under off-design conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, J.; Dohmen, H. J.; Yuan, S. Q.; Benra, F.-K.

    2012-11-01

    The periodically unsteady flow-induced impeller oscillations for a single-blade pump are investigated both numerically and experimentally under off-design conditions. A partitioned strategy with load transfer method is selected for achieving successful fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations with strong two-way coupling. Three-dimensional, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved with a shear stress transport turbulence model for the fluid side, while a transient structure dynamic analysis with the finite element method is employed for the structure side. Radial deflections of the pump impeller are successfully measured using proximity sensors to validate the FSI results. The comparison of the deflection results focuses on both phase and amplitude aspects under different operational conditions. The FSI calculation results are confirmed by the experiment, but deviations are still observed for about half of an impeller rotation. Therefore, a rigorous analysis of the comparison between the angles of the obtained x and y components is carried out to understand the cause of the deviation. Meanwhile, the transient pressure measured at the casing by both computational fluid dynamics and experimental methods is qualitatively analyzed. Furthermore, hydrodynamic forces are also analyzed considering a strong FSI effect in both the rotating and stationary coordinate frame under off-design conditions to understand the behavior of the transient excitation forces, which directly lead to the rotor deflection.

  17. Probing the Flow-Induced Shish-Kebab Structure in Entangled Polyethylene Melts by Synchrotron X-ray Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ rheo small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and rheo wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques were used to investigate the flow-induced crystalline structure in entangled melts of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE)/low-molecular-weight polyethylene (LMWPE) blends (0, 2 and 5 wt% of UHMWPE). Immediately after a step shear at 415 K, SAXS and WAXD results confirmed that only the shish structure was formed in the melts without kebabs. The topological deformation of entangled UHMWPE chains in the blend was responsible for the formation of shish. The missing kebab growth in the presence of shish indicated that secondary nucleation of coiled chains on the shish surface was frustrated at high temperatures close to the equilibrium melting temperature (418.5 K). When the temperature was quenched to 407 K, both blends (but not pure LMWPE) clearly exhibited oriented kebab growth. An Avrami analysis was applied to investigate the nucleation and growth of kebabs. Results indicated that kebabs were probably grown under athermal nucleation and diffusion-controlled conditions. In addition, the crystallization rate under predetermined nucleation was strongly governed by the concentration of shish

  18. A self-resonant micro flow velocity sensor based on a resonant frequency shift by flow-induced vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a self-resonant flow sensor based on a resonant frequency shift due to flow-induced vibrations. The vibration of a microcantilever beam, induced by a turbulent flow, is modulated with its own natural frequency, and the resonant frequency is shifted by a surface stress on the beam due to fluid drag force. The vibration induced by air flow is measured by using a piezoelectric PZT material on a silicon cantilever beam. The theoretical resonant frequencies of two cantilever beams (lengths: 610 µm and 2000 µm) are 12416 Hz and 1155 Hz, respectively. For the air flow velocities of 2.8 m s−1 and 9.7 m s−1, the shifted resonant frequencies of the cantilever beam whose length is 610 µm are 12 810 Hz and 15 602 Hz, respectively. Sensitivities of the two self-resonant flow sensors with the 610 and 2000 µm long beams are approximately 384 ± 15 Hz/(m/s) and 20.4 ± 0.6 Hz/(m/s), respectively.

  19. Flow-Induced Vibration Measurement of an Inner Cladding Tube in a Simulated Dual-Cooled Fuel Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To create an internal coolant flow passage in a dual cooled fuel rod, an inner cladding tube cannot have intermediate supports enough to relieve its vibration. Thus it can be suffered from a flow-induced vibration (FIV) more severely than an outer cladding tube which will be supported by series of spacer grids. It may cause a fatigue failure at welding joints on the cladding's end plug or fluid elastic instability of long, slender inner cladding due to decrease of a critical flow velocity. This is one of the challenging technical issues when a dual cooled fuel assembly is to be realized into a conventional reactor core To study an actual vibration phenomenon of a dual cooled fuel rod, FIV tests using a small-scale test bundle are being carried out. Measurement results of inner cladding tube of two typically simulated rods are presented. Causes of the differences in the vibration amplitude and response spectrum of the inner cladding tube in terms of intermediate support condition and pellet stacking are discussed

  20. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  1. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  2. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  3. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  4. Bone grafts in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Prasanna Kumar; Belliappa Vinitha; Ghousia Fathima

    2013-01-01

    Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  5. Bone grafts in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafts are used as a filler and scaffold to facilitate bone formation and promote wound healing. These grafts are bioresorbable and have no antigen-antibody reaction. These bone grafts act as a mineral reservoir which induces new bone formation.

  6. BONE IN OSTEOPETROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis, a generalized developmental bone disease due to genetic disturbances, characterized by failure of bone re sorption and continuous bone formation making the bone hard, dense and brittle. Bones of intramembranous ossification and enchondrial ossification are affected genetically and symmetrically. During the process of disease the excess bone formation obliterates the cranial foramina and presses the optic, auditory and facial nerves resulting in defective vision, impaired hearing and facial paralysis. The bone formation in osteopetrosis affects bone marrow function leading to severe anemia and deficient of blood cells. The bone devoid of blood supply due to compression of blood vessels by excess formation of bone are prone to osteomyelitic changes with suppuration and pathological fracture if exposed to infection. Though the condition is chronic progressive, it produces changes leading to fatal condition, it should be studied thoroughly by everyone and hence this article presents a classical case of osteopetrosis with detailed description and discussion for the benefit of readers

  7. Anorexia nervosa and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-06-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure, and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk. Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising additional concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, and hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiological estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age, given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  8. Anorexia Nervosa and Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a condition of severe low weight that is associated with low bone mass, impaired bone structure and reduced bone strength, all of which contribute to increased fracture risk., Adolescents with AN have decreased rates of bone accrual compared with normal-weight controls, raising addition concerns of suboptimal peak bone mass and future bone health in this age group. Changes in lean mass and compartmental fat depots, hormonal alterations secondary to nutritional factors contribute to impaired bone metabolism in AN. The best strategy to improve bone density is to regain weight and menstrual function. Oral estrogen-progesterone combinations are not effective in increasing bone density in adults or adolescents with AN, and transdermal testosterone replacement is not effective in increasing bone density in adult women with AN. However, physiologic estrogen replacement as transdermal estradiol with cyclic progesterone does increase bone accrual rates in adolescents with AN to approximate that in normal-weight controls, leading to a maintenance of bone density Z-scores. A recent study has shown that risedronate increases bone density at the spine and hip in adult women with AN. However, bisphosphonates should be used with great caution in women of reproductive age given their long half-life and potential for teratogenicity, and should be considered only in patients with low bone density and clinically significant fractures when non-pharmacological therapies for weight gain are ineffective. Further studies are necessary to determine the best therapeutic strategies for low bone density in AN. PMID:24898127

  9. Evaluations of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the reactor vessel annular gap under ERVC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Two-phase natural circulation flow induced in insulation gap was investigated. ► Half-scaled non-heating experiments were performed to evaluate flow behavior. ► The loop-integrated momentum equation was formulated and solved asymptotically. ► First-order approximate solution was obtained and agreed with experimental data. - Abstract: The process of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation under external reactor vessel cooling conditions was investigated experimentally and analytically in this study. HERMES-HALF experiments were performed to observe and quantify the induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap. A half-scaled non-heating experimental facility was designed by utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and its insulation system. The behavior of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap was observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and the void fraction distribution were measured. Direct flow visualization revealed that choking would occur under certain flow conditions in the minimum gap region near the shear keys. Specifically, large recirculation flows were observed in the minimum gap region for large air injection rates and small outlet areas. Under such conditions, the injected air could not pass through the minimum gap region, resulting in the occurrence of choking near the minimum gap with a periodical air back flow being generated. Therefore, a design modification of the minimum gap region needs to be done to facilitate steam venting and to prevent choking from occurring. To complement the HERMES-HALF experimental effort, an analytical study of the dependence of the induced natural circulation mass flow rate on the inlet area and the volumetric air injection rate was performed using a loop integration of the momentum equation. The loop

  10. Experimental validation of the design method to prevent flow-induced vibration in high Reynolds-number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incident of sodium leakage from a main pipe of the secondary heat transport system of Monju fast breeder reactor was caused by the failure of a thermometer well. 'Flow-induced vibration design guide for thermometer wells' (express as 'design guide') was proposed by PNC Working Group to prevent the same cause of the sodium leak incident in future. On this report, applicability of the 'design guide' was estimated to plant conditions in high Reynolds-number(approximately 3x105 ∼ 3x106) involving the supercritical region, by measured data on a vortex synchronized vibration and a turbulence induced vibration. Experiments were performed for cylindrical and taper shaped types of test pieces. As results, reduced velocity (Vr) at onsets of the inline synchronized vibration were evaluated to be grater than 1.0 in the range of experimental conditions. Fluctuating drag and lift coefficients, which were evaluated from power spectrum of turbulence for Vr < 1.0 condition, were 0.01 ∼ 0.05 for drag direction and 0.04 ∼ 0.13 for lift direction. The fluctuating drag and lift coefficients used in the 'design guide' were estimated to be conservative by comparison with these data. Correlation lengths for a cylinder and a taper shaped one in the high Reynolds-number region were estimated to be 1.6 times of the diameter(D) in the maximum case. The measured value of correlation length is enough smaller than the 'design guide' value of 3.0D. Displacement amplitudes of test pieces for Vr < 1.0 conditions were enough smaller (fives times) than calculated values based on the 'design guide'. Consequently, the applicability of the design guide' was confirmed in the range of experiments involving the super critical Reynolds-number region. (author)

  11. Study on flow-induced vibration of a flexible weir due to fluid discharge: Effect of weir stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluid-elastic vibration of a thermal shield induced by the coolant discharge was experienced in the reactor vessel of SPX-1, a French fast breeder reactor. Since a similar structure is considered in the design of the Japanese Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor, an experimental study was performed on the flow-induced vibration of a flexible weir due to fluid discharge from the upper plenum to the lower plenum. The purposes of this experiment are: (1) to clarify the vibration phenomena and (2) to confirm the effectiveness of several countermeasures for preventing the instability of the weir. In the experiment a 1/5-scale weir-coolant model for the thermal shield of the Japanese demonstration fast breeder reactor was employed as a test apparatus. Three cylindrical weirs were tested to study the effect of the stiffness of weirs. Those were 3mm and 6mm-thick polyvinyl chloride models and 2.5mm-thick aluminum model. Unstable vibration conditions were obtained by altering the fall height and the flow rate. The predominant frequencies and the amplitudes of the weir displacement and the sloshing were measured under the instability conditions. The phase differences between the weir displacement and the sloshing were also obtained. Moreover, several kinds of vibrational mitigation methods were investigated. Concerning the threshold of instability, the stiffness and the natural frequency of the weirs and the frequency ratio between the weir and sloshing were discussed. From this study, the effects of the weir stiffness on the unstable vibration of the flexible weir due to fluid discharge were clarified and the effectiveness of some of the vibrational mitigation methods were confirmed

  12. Experimental modeling of flow-induced vibration of multi-span U-tubes in a CANDU steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow-induced vibration of the tubes in a nuclear steam generator is a concern for designers who are trying to increase the life span of these units. The dominant excitation mechanisms are fluidelastic instability and random turbulence excitation. The outermost U-bend region of the tubes is of greatest concern because the flow is almost perpendicular to the tube axis and the unsupported span is relatively long. The support system in this region must be well designed in order to minimize fretting wear of the tubes at the support locations. Much of the previous testing was conducted on straight single-span or cantilevered tubes in cross-flow. However, the dynamic response of steam generator multi-span U-tubes with clearance supports is expected to be different. Accurate modeling of the tube dynamics is important to properly simulate the dynamic interaction of the tube and supports. This paper describes a test program that was developed to measure the dynamic response of a bundle of steam generator U-tubes with Anti-Vibration Bar (AVB) supports, subjected to Freon two-phase cross-flow. The tube bundle has similar geometrical conditions to those expected for future CANDU steam generators. Future steam generators will be larger than previous CANDU steam generators, nearly twice the heat transfer area, with significant changes in process conditions in the U-bend region, such as increased steam quality and a broader range of flow velocities. This test program was initiated at AECL to demonstrate that the tube support design for future CANDU steam generators will meet the stringent requirements associated with a 60 year design life. The main objective of the tests is to address the issue of in-plane and out-of-plane fluidelastic instability and random turbulent excitation of a U-tube bundle with Anti-Vibration Bar (AVB) supports. Details of the test rig, measurement techniques and preliminary instrumentation results are described in the paper. (author)

  13. Unsteady elbow pipe flow to develop a flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology for Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the current status of flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology development for primary cooling pipes in the Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR), with particular emphasis on recent research and development activities that investigate unsteady elbow pipe flow. Experimental efforts have been made using 1/3-scale and 1/10-scale single-elbow test sections for the hot-leg pipe. The 1/10-scale experiment simulating the hot-leg pipe indicated no effect of pipe scale in comparison with the 1/3-scale experiment under inlet-rectified-flow conditions. The next experiment using the 1/3-scale test section was performed to investigate the effect of swirl flow at the inlet. Although the flow separation region was deflected at the downstream from the elbow, the experiment clarified a less significant effect of swirl flow on pressure fluctuation onto the pipe wall. An additional experiment was intended to study the effect of elbow curvature. The experiments with water revealed no clear flow separation in a larger curvature elbow case than that of the JSFR. Since the interference of multiple elbows should be investigated to understand turbulent flow in the cold-leg pipe geometry, 1/15-scale experiments with double elbows were carried out to clarify that flow in the first elbow influenced a flow separation behavior in the second elbow. Simulation activities include Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equation (U-RANS) approach with a Reynolds stress model using a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach using an in-house code. A hybrid approach that combined with RANS and LES was also applied using a CFD code. Several numerical results appear in this paper, focusing on its applicability to the hot-leg pipe experiments. These simulations reasonably agreed with the experimental data using the 1/3-scale test section. (author)

  14. Experimental investigation on flow-induced vibration excitation in an elastically mounted circular cylinder in cylinder arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental investigation was performed in a low-speed wind tunnel in which an elastically mounted circular cylinder was fitted with two accelerometers and surrounded by from one to six identical cylinders in order to study the fluid flow characteristics and predict the possibility of suppressing flow-induced vibration excitation in the test cylinder. The spectral diagram, amplitude and orbital motion of the test cylinder were used to analyze the vibration excitation under differing free stream velocities, natural frequencies of the test cylinder, and number of surrounding cylinders. In this study, for the test cylinder with the same natural frequency as the adjacent cylinders (24 Hz) the amplitude response showed that when the fluid flow velocity exceeded a critical value, which depends on the arrangement of the cylinders, fluid elastic instability occurred. Beyond the critical velocity the cylinder became excited and vibrated in a figure-of-eight pattern along with the line-dominated spectrum, which implies that by having the same frequency along with a phase shift, the characteristic behavior of the cylinder is observed to be like an oscillator with the cross-wise and stream-wise response. From the assessment of the amplitude response of the test cylinder it was observed that the upstream cylinders had a greater influence on the amplitude response than the downstream cylinders. On the other hand, when the test cylinder had a natural frequency different to the adjacent cylinders it was observed that the frequency had a minimal effect on the critical velocity, and yet beyond the critical velocity it had a significant influence on the vibration amplitude response. (paper)

  15. [Microdestruction of the bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iankovskiĭ, V É

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was the detection of microcracks in the compact bone tissue surrounding the fracture and in deformed bone undergoing subcritical loading. The portions of deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones were obtained in the form of blocks longitudinally sawcut from the regions of primary and secondary bone rupture. A total of 300 such blocks were available for the examination. All portions of the deformed bone tissue and terminal fragments of broken bones showed up microcracks commensurate with the bone structures. They were actually hardened traces of deformation that preceded the fracture and reflected the volume of the destroyed bone tissue; moreover, in certain cases they allowed to identify the kind of the object that exerted the external action (either a blow or slow bending). PMID:25269164

  16. A study on the annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. 1st report. Stability for translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the stability of annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. The pressure distribution of fluid between a fixed outer cylinder and a vibrating inner cylinder was obtained in the case of a translationally and rotationally coupled motion of the inner cylinder. The unsteady fluid force acting on the inner cylinder in the case of translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom vibrations was then expressed in terms proportional to the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. Then the critical flow rate (at which stability was lost) was determined for an annular leakage-flow-induced vibration. Finally, the stability was investigated theoretically. It is known that instability will occur in the case of a divergent passage, but the critical flow rate depends on the passage increment in a limited range: the eccentricity of the passage and the pressure loss factor at the inlet of the passage lower the stability. (author)

  17. Flow-Induced Stiffness Enables Torsional Oscillations in a Two-Degree-of-Freedom, Flexibly-Mounted and Free-to-Rotate Rigid Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourazarm, Pariya; Modarres-Sadeghi, Yahya

    2015-11-01

    We study flow-induced oscillations of a flexibly-mounted rigid flat plate placed in water, for a plate with two degrees of freedom in the torsional and transverse directions, with no torsional spring, i.e., no structural stiffness in the torsional direction. At low flow velocities, the plate rotates in the clockwise or counterclockwise direction several times while oscillating in the transverse direction. The frequency of these full rotations converges to a constant number for the majority of flow velocities. At higher flow velocities, the full rotations stop and the plate starts to oscillate in the torsional direction as well, as if there existed a torsional spring. It is concluded that these oscillations in the torsional direction are made possible due to the flow-induced stiffness, since there is no structural stiffness in that direction. The support provided by the National Science Foundation, grant CBET-1437988 is acknowledged.

  18. Fasudil, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, prevents intima-media thickening in a partially ligated carotid artery mouse model: Effects of fasudil in flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Tao; Gao, Fu; Li, Qingle; Shen, Chenyang; Li, Yankui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in response to hemodynamic alterations is a physiological process that requires coordinated signaling between endothelial, inflammatory and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Extensive experimental and clinical studies have indicated the critical role of the Ras homolog gene family, member A/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, where ROCK activation has been demonstrated to promote inflammation and remodeling through inducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in endothelial cells and VSMCs. However, the role of ROCK in flow-induced vascular remodeling has not been fully defined. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of the ROCK signaling pathway in flow-induced vascular remodeling by comparing the responses to partial carotid artery ligation in mice treated with fasudil (a ROCK inhibitor) and untreated mice. Intima-media thickness and neointima formation were evaluated by morphology. VSMC proliferation and inflammation of the vessel wall were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the expression levels of ROCK and the downstream effectors of ROCK, myosin light chain (MLC) and phosphorylated-MLC (p-MLC), were quantified by western blot analysis. Following a reduction in blood flow, ROCK1 and p-MLC expression increased in the untreated left common carotid arteries (LCA). Fasudil-treated mice developed a significantly smaller intima-media thickness compared with the untreated mice. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of the fasudil-treated LCA indicated that there was a reduction in proliferation when compared with untreated vessels. There were fewer CD45+ cells observed in the fasudil-treated LCA compared with the untreated LCA. In conclusion, the expression of ROCK was enhanced in flow-induced carotid artery remodeling and ROCK inhibition as a result of fasudil treatment may attenuate flow-induced carotid artery remodeling. PMID:26458725

  19. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Radial Gap and Impeller Blade Exit on Flow-Induced Vibration at the Blade-Passing Frequency in a Centrifugal Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qutub, A.; KHALIFA, A.; Khulief, Y.

    2009-01-01

    It has been recognized that the pressure pulsation excited by rotor-stator interaction in large pumps is strongly influenced by the radial gap between impeller and volute diffusers/tongues and the geometry of impeller blade at exit. This fluid-structure interaction phenomenon, as manifested by the pressure pulsation, is the main cause of flow-induced vibrations at the blade-passing frequency. In the present investigation, the effects of the radial gap and flow rate on pressure fluctuations, v...

  20. Differences in Trabecular Bone of Leptin-Deficient ob/ob Mice in Response to Biomechanical Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjoerg Heep, Christian Wedemeyer, Alexander Wegner, Sebastian Hofmeister, Marius von Knoch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is known that bone mineral density (BMD and the strength of bone is predicted by body mass. Fat mass is a significant predictor of bone mineral density which correlates with body weight. This suggests that body fat regulates bone metabolism first by means of hormonal factors and second that the effects of muscle and loading are signaling factors in mechanotransduction. Leptin, a peptide hormone produced predominantly by white fat cells, is one of these hormonal factors. The aim of this study was to investigate and measure by micro-CT the different effects of weight-bearing on trabecular bone formation in mice without the stimulation of leptin. Results: Animals with an ad-libitum-diet (Group A were found to increase body weight significantly at the age of six weeks in comparison with lean mice (Group B. From this point on, the difference increased constantly. At the age of twenty weeks the obese mice were almost twice as heavy as the lean mice. Significant statistical differences are shown between the two groups for body weight and bone mineral density. Examination of trabecular bone (BV/TV, trabecular number (Tb.N., trabecular thickness (Tb.Th. revealed that the only statistically significant difference between the two groups was the Tb.N. for the proximal femur. High weight-bearing insignificantly improved all trabecular bone parameters in the obese mice. Compared with the control-diet Group B, the BV/TV and Tb.N. were slightly higher in the controlled-diet Group A, but not the Tb.Th.. However, correlation was found between Tb.N. and BMD on the one hand and body weight on the other hand. Conclusion: biomechanical loading led to decreased bone mineral density by a decrease in the number of trabeculae. Trabecular thickness was not increased by biomechanical loading in growing mice. Decreased body weight in leptin-deficient mice protects against bone loss. This finding is consistent with the principle of light-weight construction of

  1. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with bone cancer. Accurate diagnosis of a bone tumor often depends on combining information about its location (what bone is affected and even which part of the bone is involved), appearance on x-rays, and appearance under a microscope. ...

  2. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoma , and myeloma can be treated with a bone marrow transplant . This is now often called a stem cell ... are two types of bone marrow donation: Autologous bone marrow transplant is when people donate their own bone marrow. " ...

  3. Bone Graft Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cadavers. The types of allograft bone used for spine surgery include fresh frozen and lyophilized (freeze dried). The ... the most common uses of bone grafts in spine surgery is during spinal fusion. The use of autogenous ...

  4. Bone Loss in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DENSITY? Although bone seems as hard as a rock, it’s actually living tissue. Throughout your life, old ... available Bone Loss (.pdf) File: 290 KB 733 Third Avenue, Suite 510, New York, NY 10017 | 800- ...

  5. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paula FJA, Black DM, Rosen CJ. Osteoporosis and bone biology.In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg HM, eds. Williams Textbook of Endocrinology . 13th ed. Philadelphia, ... Bone-density testing interval and transition to osteoporosis in ...

  6. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  7. Smoking and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps ... stronger. Weight-bearing exercise that forces you to work against gravity is the best exercise for bone. ...

  8. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological p...

  9. Eating disorders and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Dale; Morgan, Sarah L

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is a frequent and often-overlooked consequence of eating disorders, in particular anorexia nervosa and eating disorders associated with the female athlete triad. The causes of low BMD are multifactorial and include low peak bone mass accrual, accelerated bone resorption, and changes in bone microarchitecture. Early diagnosis and interventions focused on nutritional rehabilitation and weight gain reduce the risk of further BMD deficits and fractures. PMID:24094471

  10. Bone densitometry and osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this book is to provide a perspective on the current status of bone densitometry and its relevance to osteoporosis diagnosis and management. Therefore, this book will give the reader an introduction to the nature of osteoporosis, its pathophysiology and epidemiology, and the clinical consequences of performing bone densitometry. Aside from standard bone densitometry, newer technologies such as quantitative ultrasound techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and bone structure analysis are discussed in the context of diagnosing osteoporosis. (orig.)

  11. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy. PMID:25579825

  12. Menopause and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet & Menopause Bone Loss How are bone loss and menopause related? Throughout life your body keeps a balance between the loss ... The sooner you take steps to prevent bone loss, the lower your risk of osteoporosis later in life. If you are skipping menstrual periods, have had ...

  13. What's a Funny Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help White House Lunch Recipes What's a Funny Bone? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's a Funny Bone? Print A A A Text Size Have you ... prickly kind of dull pain? That's your funny bone! It doesn't really hurt as much as ...

  14. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    afterwards macerated by one of the two methods. DNA extraction was performed to see the effect of the macerations on DNA preservation. Furthermore, the bone pieces were examined in a stereomicroscope to assess for any bone damage. The results demonstrated that both methods removed all flesh/soft tissue from...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  15. Tin in Human Bones

    OpenAIRE

    Jambor, Jaroslav; Smreka, Vâclav

    1993-01-01

    TIN IN HUMAN BONES. The tin content in the bones of 149 skeletons from the 1st - 5th centuries A.D., and of 11 individuals of the recent population was determined. The bone samples were carbonized and analyzed through emission spectroscopy with a.c. excitation. The tin content in bones of recent populations not exposed to extra tin supply is about one order of magnitude higher than is the case with the bones od some populations that lived at the beginning of our era. The distribut...

  16. Bone stress injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone stress injuries are due to cyclical overuse of the bone. They are relatively common in athletes and military recruits but also among otherwise healthy people who have recently started new or intensive physical activity. Diagnosis of bone stress injuries is based on the patient's history of increased physical activity and on imaging findings. The general symptom of a bone stress injury is stress-related pain. Bone stress injuries are difficult to diagnose based only on a clinical examination because the clinical symptoms may vary depending on the phase of the pathophysiological spectrum in the bone stress injury. Imaging studies are needed to ensure an early and exact diagnosis, because if the diagnosis is not delayed most bone stress injuries heal well without complications

  17. Study on flow induced vibration evaluation for a large scale JSFR piping. (2) Vibration analysis in 1/3 scale hot-leg piping experiments under swirl inflow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was intended to grasp flow-induced vibration characteristics in the hot-leg piping of Japan sodium-cooled fast reactor by newly taken experimental data as well as to verify a vibration analysis tool with its data. Considering reactor upper sodium plenum flow in the reactor condition, flow-induced-vibration tests were carried out to investigate the effect of swirl flow at the inlet of the hot-leg piping in this study. The parameters were a swirl flow velocity ratio, which was defined as the swirl flow velocity on the inner surface of the pipe divided by the mean velocity. The parameter range of the swirl flow velocity ratio was set 5%∼15% for the conservative evaluation. In these tests, the random force distributions along the pipe and their correlation lengths were measured with pressure sensors to evaluate the flow-induced vibrations. It was found that the influence of the pressure fluctuation due to the swirl flow was negligibly small. The power spectrum densities of pressure fluctuations and correlation lengths were classified into some sections in order to reasonably evaluate flow-induced-random vibration response for reactor power plant piping. The vibration analysis method was proposed based on the measured power spectrum densities and correlation lengths of turbulent-flow induced forces. The analysis results of vibration response showed good agreement with the flow-induced-vibration test results, thereby it can be said that the vibration analysis method is valid. (author)

  18. Computational fluid-structure interaction of axial pipe waves and application towards Bruce 'A' NGS flow-induced feeder vibration - phase I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work was completed which compared predicted fluid-structure interaction results with published experimental results. The model used an impact force to induce stress and pressure waves along a straight pipe which was sealed and filled with pressurized water. Local strain and pressure values at several locations are plotted against time and are presented for visual comparison. The predicted results compare well with the published results and many of the major interaction effects are clearly observable. Application in subsequent work towards Bruce 'A' flow-induced feeder vibration is discussed. (author)

  19. Analysis of flow-induced vibration of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles using the AECL computer code PIPEAU-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIPEAU-2 is a computer code developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories for the flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles. It can perform this analysis for straight and 'U' tubes. All the theoretical work underlying the code is analytical rather than numerical in nature. Highly accurate evaluation of the free vibration frequencies and mode shapes is therefore obtained. Using the latest experimentally determined parameters available, the free vibration analysis is followed by a forced vibration analysis. Tube response due to fluid turbulence and vortex shedding is determined, as well as critical fluid velocity associated with fluid-elastic instability

  20. Arteriovenous fistula of the thyroid gland associated with spontaneous bleeding from a flow-induced aneurysm of the inferior thyroid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, P J; Freund, M C; Seelig, M H; Knudsen, J M; Martin, J K

    1999-05-01

    A case of acute, spontaneous cervical hemorrhage caused by a ruptured aneurysm of the inferior thyroid artery is described. This lesion was accompanied by an arteriovenous fistula within the thyroid gland that caused a flow-induced aneurysm. Diagnosis and treatment were successfully performed by selective angiography with endovascular occlusion and embolization. Both diagnostic and therapeutic management are discussed, and the related literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an aneurysm of a thyroid artery in conjunction with an intraparenchymatous arteriovenous fistula of the thyroid gland. PMID:10319081

  1. Bone tumors: Nursing care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone tumors represent approximately 5% of childhood malignancies. osteosarcoma is the primary malignant bone tumor, accounting for 60% of cancer with peak incidence in the 2nd decade of life. Ewing's sarcoma is the second most common bone cancer with peak at a slightly younger age. This presentation discusses similarities and differences in the diagnosis and treatment of these two malignancies. Diagnostic procedures include plain radiographs, CT and MRI of the primary site, plain x-ray and CT of the chest, bone scan, and biopsy of the primary tumor. For patients diagnosed with Ewing's sarcoma, a bone marrow aspirate and biopsy will also be required. Our current approach to the treatment of bone tumors includes preoperative combination chemotherapy and en bloc surgical removal of the tumor followed by postoperative chemotherapy. In the case of Ewing's sarcoma, radiation therapy may be employed in addition to surgery, if margins are questionable of instead of surgery, if the tumor is not resectable

  2. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more-serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss [Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap, http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_u/bcpr/index.cfm]. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It shows that an extrapolation of the microgravity induced bone loss rates to longer time scales, such as a 2.5 year round-trip to Mars (6 months out at 0 g, 1.5 year stay on Mars at 0.38 g, 6 months back at 0 g), could severely compromise the skeletal system of such a person.

  3. Nanocomposites and bone regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Roshan; Deng, Meng; Laurencin, Cato T.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript focuses on bone repair/regeneration using tissue engineering strategies, and highlights nanobiotechnology developments leading to novel nanocomposite systems. About 6.5 million fractures occur annually in USA, and about 550,000 of these individual cases required the application of a bone graft. Autogenous and allogenous bone have been most widely used for bone graft based therapies; however, there are significant problems such as donor shortage and risk of infection. Alternatives using synthetic and natural biomaterials have been developed, and some are commercially available for clinical applications requiring bone grafts. However, it remains a great challenge to design an ideal synthetic graft that very closely mimics the bone tissue structurally, and can modulate the desired function in osteoblast and progenitor cell populations. Nanobiomaterials, specifically nanocomposites composed of hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or collagen are extremely promising graft substitutes. The biocomposites can be fabricated to mimic the material composition of native bone tissue, and additionally, when using nano-HA (reduced grain size), one mimics the structural arrangement of native bone. A good understanding of bone biology and structure is critical to development of bone mimicking graft substitutes. HA and collagen exhibit excellent osteoconductive properties which can further modulate the regenerative/healing process following fracture injury. Combining with other polymeric biomaterials will reinforce the mechanical properties thus making the novel nano-HA based composites comparable to human bone. We report on recent studies using nanocomposites that have been fabricated as particles and nanofibers for regeneration of segmental bone defects. The research in nanocomposites, highlight a pivotal role in the future development of an ideal orthopaedic implant device, however further significant advancements are necessary to achieve clinical use.

  4. Bone fractures after menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Barlow, David H.; Bouchard, Philippe; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Evers, J.L.H.; Glasier, A.; Negri, Eva; Papapoulos, Socrates E; Ralston, Stuart H; Rizzoli, Rene; Baird, D T; Collins, J.; G. Benagiano; P.G. Crosignani; La Vecchia, C.; Volpe, A

    2010-01-01

    Every year 30% of individuals above age 65 fall, and falls are the principal cause of bone fractures. To reduce fracture incidence requires both prevention of falls and maintenance of bone strength.PubMed searches were performed, for studies of the epidemiology of fractures, bone physiology, endocrine effects, osteoporosis measurement, genetics, prevention and effectiveness. Topic summaries were presented to the Workshop Group and omissions or disagreements were resolved by discussion.Ageing ...

  5. Bone Regeneration in Odontostomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, P; Duvina, M.; Brancato, L.; Delle Rose, G.; Biondi, E.; Civitelli, V.

    2010-01-01

    Maxillary edentulism, together with periodontal disease, is the condition that most frequently induces disruption of alveolar bone tissue. Indeed, the stimulus of the periodontal ligament is lost and the local bone tissue becomes subject to resorption processes that, in the six months following the loss of the tooth, result in alveolar defects or more extensive maxillary atrophy. In both cases, loss of vestibular cortical bone is followed by reduction in the vertical dimension of the alveolar...

  6. Percutaneous Bone Tumor Management

    OpenAIRE

    Gangi, Afshin; Buy, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Interventional radiology plays a major role in the management of bone tumors. Many different percutaneous techniques are available. Some aim to treat pain and consolidate a pathological bone (cementoplasty); others aim to ablate tumor or reduce its volume (sclerotherapy, thermal ablation). In this article, image-guided techniques of primary and secondary bone tumors with vertebroplasty, ethanol injection, radiofrequency ablation, laser photocoagulation, cryoablation, and radiofrequency ioniza...

  7. The importance of foetal movement for co-ordinated cartilage and bone development in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, C. A.; Rolfe, R. A.; Murphy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Construction of a functional skeleton is accomplished through co-ordination of the developmental processes of chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and synovial joint formation. Infants whose movement in utero is reduced or restricted and who subsequently suffer from joint dysplasia (including joint contractures) and thin hypo-mineralised bones, demonstrate that embryonic movement is crucial for appropriate skeletogenesis. This has been confirmed in mouse, chick, and zebrafish animal models, where reduced or eliminated movement consistently yields similar malformations and which provide the possibility of experimentation to uncover the precise disturbances and the mechanisms by which movement impacts molecular regulation. Molecular genetic studies have shown the important roles played by cell communication signalling pathways, namely Wnt, Hedgehog, and transforming growth factor-beta/bone morphogenetic protein. These pathways regulate cell behaviours such as proliferation and differentiation to control maturation of the skeletal elements, and are affected when movement is altered. Cell contacts to the extra-cellular matrix as well as the cytoskeleton offer a means of mechanotransduction which could integrate mechanical cues with genetic regulation. Indeed, expression of cytoskeletal genes has been shown to be affected by immobilisation. In addition to furthering our understanding of a fundamental aspect of cell control and differentiation during development, research in this area is applicable to the engineering of stable skeletal tissues from stem cells, which relies on an understanding of developmental mechanisms including genetic and physical criteria. A deeper understanding of how movement affects skeletogenesis therefore has broader implications for regenerative therapeutics for injury or disease, as well as for optimisation of physical therapy regimes for individuals affected by skeletal abnormalities. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:105–116 PMID:26142413

  8. Imaging of Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sopo; Ouyang, Tao; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow is the essential for function of hematopoiesis, which is vital for the normal functioning of the body. Bone marrow disorders or dysfunctions may be evaluated by blood workup, peripheral smears, marrow biopsy, plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), MRI and nuclear medicine scan. It is important to distinguish normal spinal marrow from pathology to avoid missing a pathology or misinterpreting normal changes, either of which may result in further testing and increased health care costs. This article focuses on the diffuse bone marrow pathologies, because the majority of the bone marrow pathologies related to hematologic disorders are diffuse. PMID:27444005

  9. Bone marrow fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin, Pierre; Pansini, Vittorio; Cortet, Bernard

    2014-07-01

    Bone marrow fat (BMF) results from an accumulation of fat cells within the bone marrow. Fat is not a simple filling tissue but is now considered as an actor within bone microenvironment. BMF is not comparable to other fat depots, as in subcutaneous or visceral tissues. Recent studies on bone marrow adipocytes have shown that they do not appear only as storage cells, but also as cells secreting adipokines, like leptin and adiponectin. Moreover bone marrow adipocytes share the same precursor with osteoblasts, the mesenchymal stem cell. It is now well established that high BMF is associated with weak bone mass in osteoporosis, especially during aging and anorexia nervosa. But numerous questions remain discussed: what is the precise phenotype of bone marrow adipocytes? What is the real function of BMF, and how does bone marrow adipocyte act on its environment? Is the increase of BMF during osteoporosis responsible for bone loss? Is BMF involved in other diseases? How to measure BMF in humans? A better understanding of BMF could allow to obtain new diagnostic tools for osteoporosis management, and could open major therapeutic perspectives. PMID:24703396

  10. Development of flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology based on unsteady fluid flow analysis for large diameter pipe with elbow in JSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for the large diameter pipe with elbows of Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR), the flow-induced vibration is of a concern because the coolant flows at a high velocity through a thin wall pipe. The objective of this study is to develop a flow-induced vibration evaluation methodology consisting unsteady fluid flow analysis, vibration analysis and their coupling. This paper reports the outline of this methodology. Then, the present methodology was applied to the analysis for the 1/3-scale experiment of the hot-leg pipe of JSFR, and the predicted stress values obtained from the fluid flow analysis and vibration analysis were compared with the measured stress values. The first-step predicted stress values were underestimated in the case of using the intact pressure fluctuations obtained by the unsteady fluid flow analysis. Therefore, the improvement of the prediction accuracy of the pressure fluctuations on the pipe wall was attempted in the unsteady fluid flow analysis. The developed methodology with the improved fluid flow analysis method could reasonably reproduce the experimental data. (author)

  11. Extraskeletal and intraskeletal new bone formation induced by demineralized bone matrix combined with bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilutions of fresh autogenous bone marrow cells in combination with allogeneic demineralized cortical bone matrix were tested extraskeletally in rats using roentgenographic, histologic, and 45Ca techniques. Suspensions of bone marrow cells (especially diluted 1:2 with culture media) combined with demineralized cortical bone seemed to induce significantly more new bone than did demineralized bone, bone marrow, or composite grafts with whole bone marrow, respectively. In a short-term spinal fusion experiment, demineralized cortical bone combined with fresh bone marrow produced new bone and bridged the interspace between the spinous processes faster than other transplantation procedures. The induction of undifferentiated host cells by demineralized bone matrix is further complemented by addition of autogenous, especially slightly diluted, bone marrow cells

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  13. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and ... to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to no special ...

  14. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of bone cancer . locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones. top of page How ... bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

  15. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no special ... to 10 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? A bone ...

  16. Bone marrow (stem cell) donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000839.htm Bone marrow (stem cell) donation To use the sharing ... stem cells from a donor's blood. Types of Bone Marrow Donation There are two types of bone ...

  17. Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Examination Formal name: Bone Marrow Aspiration; Bone Marrow Biopsy Related tests: Complete Blood Count ; WBC Differential ; Reticulocyte ...

  18. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  19. Numerical simulation of osteocyte cell in response to directional mechanical loadings and mechanotransduction analysis: Considering lacunar-canalicular interstitial fluid flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukar, Amin; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh; Ghalichi, Farzan

    2016-09-01

    The osteocyte cell is a bone cell that also functions as a bone mechanosensor. In this work, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model of an osteocyte cell under different mechanical loading conditions was used to obtain a better understanding of osteocyte cell behavior under different physiological conditions. In the current study, both fluid and solid parts of osteocyte cell were considered in order to allow for more accurate results. Five different loading conditions have been applied to the osteocyte cell, and consequently the different interstitial fluid flow velocities and shear stresses have been investigated. Furthermore, using a mathematical model, the change in the stimulus function value with shear stress and NO enzyme was revealed. This work suggests that changes in osteocyte morphology and direction of loadings affect cell stimulation. It was found that cell is mostly stimulated and expanded in the direction experiencing the most shear stress. Finally, the amount of cell stimulation was shown quantitatively and there was strong dependency between stimulus function, shear stress, calcium, and NO concentration. PMID:27393805

  20. Wnt Signaling in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuo; Michigami, Toshimi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Wnt signaling is involved not only in embryonic development but also in maintenance of homeostasis in postnatal tissues. Multiple lines of evidence have increased understanding of the roles of Wnt signaling in bone since mutations in the LRP5 gene were identified in human bone diseases. Canonical Wnt signaling promotes mesenchymal progenitor cells to differentiate into osteoblasts. The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway possibly through Lrp6, a co-receptor for Wnts as well as Lrp5, in osteoblasts regulates bone resorption by increasing the OPG/RANKL ratio. However, endogenous inhibitors of Wnt signaling including sclerostin block bone formation. Regulation of sclerostin appears to be one of the mechanisms of PTH anabolic actions on bone. Since sclerostin is almost exclusively expressed in osteocytes, inhibition of sclerostin is the most promising design. Surprisingly, Lrp5 controls bone formation by inhibiting serotonin synthesis in the duodenum, but not by directly promoting bone formation. Pharmacological intervention may be considered in many components of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, although adverse effects and tumorigenicity to other tissues are important. More studies will be needed to fully understand how the Wnt signaling pathway actually influences bone metabolism and to assure the safety of new interventions. PMID:23926379

  1. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of clinico-hematologic pattern in patients with acute leukosis when ionizing radiation is used as prepration regime for hystocompatible bone marrow transplantation are listed. Chemico-radiopreparation of patients with acute leukosis is described, different techniques of bone marrow transplantation are presented, secondary signs of the disease are shown

  2. The normal bone scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses applications of the bone scan. It is the most frequently performed nuclear medicine investigation, the commonest indication being the detection of occult metastases, for which purpose the entire skeleton should be imaged. For other purposes it is often adequate to examine only part of the skeleton. The amount of isotope taken up at any site depends primarily on the local rate of bone turnover rather than on bone mass. The scintigraphic appearance therefore does not necessarily correlate with the radiographic one; however, as there is a relationship between the rate at which bone is replaced and the quantity of bone which is present at any point, the two appearances are not entirely unrelated. Recognition of abnormality is based on a detailed knowledge of normal scintigraphic appearances

  3. Bone markers and osteoporosis therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bandeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several factors are involved in determining bone quality including bone density, bone turnover, the extent of trabecular bone connectivity, cortical porosity and geometry. Metabolically active and in a continuous process of remodeling, approximately 20% of bone tissue is renewed annually. Bone turn over markers (BTM are frequently used in clinical trials and to provide valid information about the effectiveness of osteoporosis treatment, reflecting the state of bone metabolism and its response to treatment, although they are not useful alone to estimate bone loss. In this review the behavior of BTM from different clinical trials or different osteoporotic drugs will be addressed.

  4. Effect of Fluid Flow-induced Shear Stress on Osteoclast Formation Induced by Osteocyte%机械力对骨细胞诱导破骨细胞分化作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔亮; 李小彤; 张丁

    2012-01-01

    目的 评估机械力对骨细胞诱导破骨细胞分化作用的影响.方法 对MLO-Y4骨细胞施以12 dyn/cm2流体剪切力,在加力第1、2、4、6、12、24小时,收集加力后的细胞与同源性小鼠骨髓干细胞共存培养,于第9天进行抗酒石酸磷酸酶染色,计数并比较染色阳性的破骨细胞数目.采用逆转录聚合酶链式反应(RT-PCR)检测不同加力时间点上骨细胞骨保护因子(OPG)和破骨细胞分化因子(RANKL) mRNA表达的时序性变化.结果 与未受流体剪切力刺激的骨细胞相比,受力后所有时间点MLO-Y4骨细胞诱导形成的破骨细胞数量均明显降低(P均<0.01).MLO-Y4骨细胞的OPG mRNA表达在流体剪切力作用12h内明显升高(P<0.001),RANKL mRNA在流体剪切力作用4h内明显降低(P<0.05),RANKL/OPG比值在流体剪切力作用12h内均明显降低(P<0.01);上述变化在加力24h时与加力前的差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 在12 dyn/cm2流体剪切力负载作用下,MLO-Y4骨细胞表现出抑制骨吸收的骨保护作用.随着机械负载时间延长,这种作用逐渐消失.%Objective To study the role of osteocyte in bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in vitro. Methods ML0-Y4 osteocyte-like cells were exposed to fluid (low-induced shear stress (12dyn/cm2) for 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Osteocyte exposed to shear stress at different time points were used in co-culture system for 9 days, and then the ceils were stained with tartrate-resiseant acid phosphalase on the 9th day and the amount of positively stained osteoelasts were counted and compared. The expressions of osteoprote-gerin (0PG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa ( RANKL) were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction ( semi-quantitative RT-PCR). Results Compared with bone cells without stimulation with fluid flow-induced shear stress, the amount of osteocytes significantly decreased at all time points after the

  5. Bone scanning in osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on bone scanning in osteoporosis a diagnosis of osteoporosis most often follows fracture, and clearly this should be confirmed by x-ray. The bone scan therefore does not have an important role to play in the initial diagnosis of osteoporosis. While the exact mechanism by which the 99mTc-labeled diphosphonates localize in the skeleton is not fully understood, it is believed that they adsorb onto bone surfaces most probably via the calcium of hydroxyapatite crystals. Because the major factors that affect adsorption are osteoblastic activity and to a lesser extent skeletal vascularity, it is apparent that a bone scan image presents a functional display of skeletal metabolic activity. However, osteoporosis is a disorder in which gradual change in bone mass may occur over many years and, in keeping with this minor imbalance in skeletal metabolism, the bone scan appearances are usually normal. However, the scan images may appear of poor quality because of relatively low bone uptake of tracer with, on occasion, a washed-out pattern of activity in the axial and appendicular bone. It has been suggested that such a pattern occurs in severe or end-stage osteoporosis caused by markedly reduced osteoblastic activity. If kyphosis is observed on the bone scan or if there appears to be loss of spinal height with proximity of ribs to each other or increased closeness of rib cage to pelvis, then appearances suggest vertebral collapse and would be in keeping with a diagnosis of osteoporosis. Such evidence is, however, indirect and in practice a bone scan is an extremely unreliable means of diagnosing osteoporosis

  6. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Kong Hwai Loong; Choo Hui Fen [National University Hospital (Singapore). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncology

    1996-02-01

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Bone changes in tuberous sclerosis mimicking metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sclerotic and lytic bone changes of tuberous sclerosis (TS) can mimic bone metastases. A case is reported of a patient with concomitant sclerotic bone metastases from bronchogenic carcinoma and TS bone changes, diagnosed by bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging. The increased bone uptake and abnormal magnetic resonance signal allowed distinction of TS bone lesions from bone metastases. 6 refs., 4 figs

  8. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page Print this page What is a bone marrow transplant? A bone marrow or cord blood transplant is ... with healthy bone marrow. Tweet What is a bone marrow transplant How a bone marrow transplant works Transplant process ...

  9. Bone's responses to mechanical loading are impaired in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Ashutosh; Liu, Chao; Li, Wen; Gu, Xiaoyu; Lai, Xiaohan; Pei, Shaopeng; Price, Christopher; You, Lidan; Lu, X Lucas; Wang, Liyun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes adversely impacts many organ systems including the skeleton. Clinical trials have revealed a startling elevation in fracture risk in diabetic patients. Bone fractures can be life threatening: nearly 1 in 6 hip fracture patients die within one year. Because physical exercise is proven to improve bone properties and reduce fracture risk in non-diabetic subjects, we tested its efficacy in type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that diabetic bone's response to anabolic mechanical loading would be attenuated, partially due to impaired mechanosensing of osteocytes under hyperglycemia. Heterozygous C57BL/6-Ins2(Akita)/J (Akita) male and female diabetic mice and their age- and gender-matched wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J controls (7-month-old, N=5-7 mice/group) were subjected to unilateral axial ulnar loading with a peak strain of 3500 με at 2 Hz and 3 min/day for 5 days. The Akita female mice, which exhibited a relatively normal body weight and a mild 40% elevation of blood glucose level, responded with increased bone formation (+6.5% in Ct.B.Ar, and 4 to 36-fold increase in Ec.BFR/BS and Ps.BFR/BS), and the loading effects, in terms of changes of static and dynamic indices, did not differ between Akita and WT females (p ≥ 0.1). However, loading-induced anabolic effects were greatly diminished in Akita males, which exhibited reduced body weight, severe hyperglycemia (+230%), diminished bone formation (ΔCt.B.Ar: 0.003 vs. 0.030 mm(2), p=0.005), and suppressed periosteal bone appositions (ΔPs.BFR/BS, p=0.02). Hyperglycemia (25 mM glucose) was further found to impair the flow-induced intracellular calcium signaling in MLO-Y4 osteocytes, and significantly inhibited the flow-induced downstream responses including reduction in apoptosis and sRANKL secretion and PGE2 release. These results, along with previous findings showing adverse effects of hyperglycemia on osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, suggest that failure to maintain normal glucose levels may impair bone

  10. Numerical simulation of flow induced by a pitched blade turbine. Comparison of the sliding mesh technique and an averaged source term method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majander, E.O.J.; Manninen, M.T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The flow induced by a pitched blade turbine was simulated using the sliding mesh technique. The detailed geometry of the turbine was modelled in a computational mesh rotating with the turbine and the geometry of the reactor including baffles was modelled in a stationary co-ordinate system. Effects of grid density were investigated. Turbulence was modelled by using the standard k-{epsilon} model. Results were compared to experimental observations. Velocity components were found to be in good agreement with the measured values throughout the tank. Averaged source terms were calculated from the sliding mesh simulations in order to investigate the reliability of the source term approach. The flow field in the tank was then simulated in a simple grid using these source terms. Agreement with the results of the sliding mesh simulations was good. Commercial CFD-code FLUENT was used in all simulations. (author)

  11. Pathogenetic differentiation of the bone superscan using bone marrow scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a 54-year old patient suffering from a prostatic carcinoma is presented. At the time of diagnosis multiple bone metastases were detected by bone scintigraphy. An initial improvement was observed following antiandrogenic therapy. After three years the patient presented with increasing bone pain, which was most prominent in the knee joints. A 'superscan' was found in bone scintigraphy with an unusually high uptake in the peripheral skeleton. Bone marrow scintigraphy showed a nearly complete metastatic displacement of central bone marrow and a peripheral marrow extension as explanation for the bone scan findings. (orig.)

  12. Bone cancer risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the considerable disparity in published values of the risk for bone cancers from ionising radiation, the article 'An analysis of bone and head sinus cancers in radium dial painters using a two-mutation carcinogenesis model' by Leenhouts and Brugmans in the June 2000 issue of this Journal deserves further comment and consideration. The letter concludes that radiological protection and risk estimation has acquired an extra dimension, and it is clear that the risk of bone cancer from exposure to ionising radiation needs further review. Letter-to-the-editor

  13. Periodontal bone lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of life the periodontum is subject to changes which may be physiological or pathological. Intraoral radiographs give insight into the hard structures of the dentomaxillar region and provides information on lesions in the bone of the periodontum in that they show radiopacities and radiolucencies caused by such lesions. In this thesis the relation is investigated between the true shape and dimensions of periodontal bone lesions and their radiographic images. A method is developed and tested of making standardized and reproducible radiographs suitable for longitudinal studies of periodontal lesions. Also the possibility is demonstrated of an objective and reproducible interpretation of radiographic characteristics of periodontal bone lesions. (Auth.)

  14. Enzymatic maceration of bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhre, Marie-Louise; Eriksen, Anne Marie; Simonsen, Kim Pilkjær;

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study investigates the removal of soft tissue from human ribs with the use of two common methods: boiling with a laundry detergent and using enzymes. Six individuals were autopsied, and one rib from each individual was removed for testing. Each rib was cut into pieces and...... the bones. The DNA analysis showed that DNA was preserved on all the pieces of bones which were examined. Finally, the investigation suggests that enzyme maceration could be gentler on the bones, as the edges appeared less frayed. The enzyme maceration was also a quicker method; it took three hours...

  15. Why date old bones?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods for pretreatment and purification of bone have not been accorded the same standard protocols that are applied to other sample materials. Many users lack confidence in bone dates, with some justification, and it is not clear how to proceed. With the advent of AMS dating, it is becoming easy to date very small amounts of highly purified samples such as single amino acids from bone collagen. This note serves a warning that there are dangers in the uncritical application of powerful separation and measurement techniques to uncharacterized material. (orig.)

  16. Bone scintigraphy for horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphy (bone scan) is being used approximately since 1980 in the horse under general anaesthesia. With the construction of custom-made overhead gantries for gamma-cameras scintigraphy found widespread entry in big equine referral hospitals for bone-scanning of the standing horse. Indications for the use of a bone scan in the horse are inflammatory alterations in the locomotor apparatus. It is primarily used for diagnosis of lameness of unknown origin, suspect of stress fracture or hairline fracture and for horses with bad riding comfort with suspected painful lesions in the spine. (orig.)

  17. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and periphe...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose ... limitations of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  19. Interparietal bones in Nigerian skulls.

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, S. K.; Chowdhary, D S; Jain, S P

    1986-01-01

    The study was conducted on 40 adult Nigerian skulls which were examined for the presence of interparietal and pre-interparietal bones. Only one interparietal bone was found (2.5% of the present series) while a single pre-interparietal bone was found in four skulls (10%) and multiple pre-interparietal bones in one skull (2.5%).

  20. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  1. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very ... of Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  2. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  3. Proximal Tibial Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complications Potential problems after a PTBG include infection, fracture of the proximal tibia and pain related to the procedure. Frequently Asked Questions If proximal tibial bone graft is taken from my knee, will this prevent me from being able to ...

  4. Osteomyelitis of frontal bone

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedil, V. N.; Raizada, R. M.; Singh, A. K. Kennedy; Puttewar, M. P.; Bali, S.

    2004-01-01

    A case of Osteomyelitis of the frontal bone with a subperiosteal absces s, an extrudural abscess and a frontal sinus fistula is presented here for its rarity. A brief review of literature and management of the condition is also discussed.

  5. Skull base bone hyperpneumatization

    OpenAIRE

    Houet, E J; Kouokam, L.M.; Nchimi, A L

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old male with a long standing history of compulsive Valsalva maneuvers, complaining of episodes of vertigo underwent head computed tomography. Axial CT slices at the level of the skull base (Fig. A) and the first cervical vertebrae (Fig. B) shows an extensive unusual pneumatization of both the body and lateral processes of the first cervical vertebrae (arrows), with air pouches dissecting planes between bone cortex and the periosteum around the occipital bone and the lateral process...

  6. Inca bones at asterion

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant E Natekar; Suhit E Natekar; Fatima M De Souza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid) fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, In...

  7. Uranium in fossil bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt has been made to determine the uranium content and thus the age of certain fossil bones Haritalyangarh (Himachal Pradesh), India. The results indicate that bones rich in apatite are also rich in uranium, and that the radioactivity is due to radionuclides in the uranium series. The larger animals apparently have a higher concentration of uranium than the small. The dating of a fossil jaw (elephant) places it in the Pleistocene. (Auth.)

  8. Bone healing: little secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Einhorn, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The development of new strategies to enhance the healing of fractures continues to evolve with the introduction of both locally and systemically delivered compounds. The recent refinement in the use of autologous bone marrow as a bone graft material has brought the field of stem cell biology into orthopaedic practice. New recombinant peptides such as platelet- derived growth factor and teriparatide show promise as local and systemic enhancers respectively. Finally, recent evidence that mutati...

  9. Detecting microdamage in bone.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, T Clive; Mohsin, Sahar; Taylor, David; Parkesh, Raman; Gunnlaugsson, TThorfinnur; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Giehl, Michael; Gowin, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue-induced microdamage in bone contributes to stress and fragility fractures and acts as a stimulus for bone remodelling. Detecting such microdamage is difficult as pre-existing microdamage sustained in vivo must be differentiated from artefactual damage incurred during specimen preparation. This was addressed by bulk staining specimens in alcohol-soluble basic fuchsin dye, but cutting and grinding them in an aqueous medium. Nonetheless, some artefactual cracks are partially stained and ...

  10. Fracture Nasal Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Venkatesan, Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and u...

  11. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan; Venkatesan Ulaganathan

    2013-01-01

    Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography a...

  12. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal ...

  13. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage

    OpenAIRE

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and fu...

  14. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in ...

  15. Bone nutrients for vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Ann Reed

    2014-07-01

    The process of bone mineralization and resorption is complex and is affected by numerous factors, including dietary constituents. Although some dietary factors involved in bone health, such as calcium and vitamin D, are typically associated with dairy products, plant-based sources of these nutrients also supply other key nutrients involved in bone maintenance. Some research suggests that vegetarian diets, especially vegan diets, are associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this does not appear to be clinically significant. Vegan diets are not associated with an increased fracture risk if calcium intake is adequate. Dietary factors in plant-based diets that support the development and maintenance of bone mass include calcium, vitamin D, protein, potassium, and soy isoflavones. Other factors present in plant-based diets such as oxalic acid and phytic acid can potentially interfere with absorption and retention of calcium and thereby have a negative effect on BMD. Impaired vitamin B-12 status also negatively affects BMD. The role of protein in calcium balance is multifaceted. Overall, calcium and protein intakes in accord with Dietary Reference Intakes are recommended for vegetarians, including vegans. Fortified foods are often helpful in meeting recommendations for calcium and vitamin D. Plant-based diets can provide adequate amounts of key nutrients for bone health. PMID:24898231

  16. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein induces bone formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have purified and characterized active recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2A. Implantation of the recombinant protein in rats showed that a single BMP can induce bone formation in vivo. A dose-response and time-course study using the rat ectopic bone formation assay revealed that implantation of 0.5-115 μg of partially purified recombinant human BMP-2A resulted in cartilage by day 7 and bone formation by day 14. The time at which bone formation occurred was dependent on the amount of BMP-2A implanted; at high doses bone formation could be observed at 5 days. The cartilage- and bone-inductive activity of the recombinant BMP-2A is histologically indistinguishable from that of bone extracts. Thus, recombinant BMP-2A has therapeutic potential to promote de novo bone formation in humans

  17. Crosstalk between cancer cells and bone microenvironment in bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, as well as lung and liver, is one of the most preferential metastatic target sites for cancers including breast, prostate, and lung cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanisms underlying this preference need to be elucidated, it appears that bone microenvironments possess unique biological features that enable circulating cancer cells to home, survive and proliferate, and destroy bone. In conjunction, cancers that develop bone metastases likely have the capacity to utilize these unique bone environments for colonization and bone destruction. This crosstalk between metastatic cancer cells and bone is critical to the development and progression of bone metastases. Disruption of this interaction will allow us to design mechanism-based effective and specific therapeutic interventions for bone metastases

  18. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen L Lee; Hoey, David A.; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H. Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study...

  19. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  20. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. RESULTS: The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony

  1. Mimicking the nanostructure of bone matrix to regenerate bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert; Ma1, Peter X

    2013-11-01

    Key features of bone tissue structure and composition are capable of directing cellular behavior towards the generation of new bone tissue. Bone tissue, as well as materials derived from bone, have a long and successful history of use as bone grafting materials. Recent developments in design and processing of synthetic scaffolding systems has allowed the replication of the bone's desirable biological activity in easy to fabricate polymeric materials with nano-scale features exposed on the surface. The biological response to these new tissue-engineering scaffold materials oftentimes exceeds that seen on scaffolds produced using biological materials. PMID:24688283

  2. Virtual Temporal Bone Anatomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Background The Visible Human Project(VHP) initiated by the U.S. National Library of Medicine has drawn much attention and interests from around the world. The Visible Chinese Human (VCH) project has started in China. The current study aims at acquiring a feasible virtual methodology for reconstructing the temporal bone of the Chinese population, which may provide an accurate 3-D model of important temporal bone structures that can be used in teaching and patient care for medical scientists and clinicians. Methods A series of sectional images of the temporal bone were generated from section slices of a female cadaver head. On each sectional image, SOIs (structures of interest) were segmented by carefully defining their contours and filling their areas with certain gray scale values. The processed volume data were then inducted into the 3D Slicer software(developed by the Surgical Planning Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital and the MIT AI Lab) for resegmentation and generation of a set of tagged images of the SOIs. 3D surface models of SOIs were then reconstructed from these images. Results The temporal bone and structures in the temporal bone, including the tympanic cavity, mastoid cells, sigmoid sinus and internal carotid artery, were successfully reconstructed. The orientation of and spatial relationship among these structures were easily visualized in the reconstructed surface models. Conclusion The 3D Slicer software can be used for 3-dimensional visualization of anatomic structures in the temporal bone, which will greatly facilitate the advance of knowledge and techniques critical for studying and treating disorders involving the temporal bone.

  3. Bone scan in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1984, a survey carried out in 21 countries in Europe showed that bone scintigraphy comprised 16% of all paediatric radioisotope scans. Although the value of bone scans in paediatrics is potentially great, their quality varies greatly, and poor-quality images are giving this valuable technique a bad reputation. The handling of children requires a sensitive staff and the provision of a few simple inexpensive items of distraction. Attempting simply to scan a child between two adult patients in a busy general department is a recipe for an unhappy, uncooperative child with the probable result of poor images. The intravenous injection of isotope should be given adjacent to the gamma camera room, unless dynamic scans are required, so that the child does not associate the camera with the injection. This injection is best carried out by someone competent in paediatric venipunture; the entire procedure should be explained to the child and parent, who should remain with child throughout. It is naive to think that silence makes for a cooperative child. The sensitivity of bone-seeking radioisotope tracers and the marked improvement in gamma camera resolution has allowed the bone scanning to become an integrated technique in the assessment of children suspected of suffering from pathological bone conditions. The tracer most commonly used for routine bone scanning is 99mTc diphosphonate (MDP); other isotopes used include 99mTc colloid for bone marrow scans and 67Ga citrate and 111In white blood cells (111In WBC) for investigation of inflammatory/infective lesions

  4. Bone scintigraphy of decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Value of bone scintigraphy in decompression sickness of 42 patients was retrospectively evaluated. Bone scintigraphy was positive in 30 of 42 patients (83 lesions), while radiography and symptoms were positive in 23 patients (48 lesions), and in 29 patients (44 lesions) respectively. Bone scintigraphy was positive in many lesions with negative radiography or symptoms. However, approximately half of the lesions in which either radiography or symptoms was positive could not be detected by bone scintigraphy. These cases mostly showed radiographic abnormalities such as irregular calcified areas and ''bone island'' in the cervical regions of the humerus, femur and tibia. Both bone scintigraphy and radiography were positive in most of the patients with symptoms of the bends and there seems to be a close relationship between the bends symptoms and bone lesion. We concluded that bone scintigraphy is useful for the evaluation of decompression sickness, but it must be complemented by bone radiography to avoid a significant number of false negative cases. (author)

  5. Bone health in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman-Levin, N; Hochberg, Z; Latzer, Y

    2014-03-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) put adolescents and young adults at risk for impaired bone health. Low bone mineral density (BMD) with ED is caused by failure to accrue peak bone mass in adolescence and bone loss in young adulthood. Although ED patients diagnosed with bone loss may be asymptomatic, some suffer bone pains and have increased incidence of fractures. Adolescents with ED are prone to increased prevalence of stress fractures, kyphoscoliosis and height loss. The clinical picture of the various EDs involves endocrinopathies that contribute to impaired bone health. Anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by low bone turnover, with relatively higher osteoclastic (bone resorptive) than osteoblastic (bone formation) activity. Bone loss in AN occurs in both the trabecular and cortical bones, although the former is more vulnerable. Bone loss in AN has been shown to be influenced by malnutrition and low weight, reduced fat mass, oestrogen and androgen deficiency, glucocorticoid excess, impaired growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor 1 axis, and more. Bone loss in AN may not be completely reversible despite recovery from the illness. Treatment modalities involving hormonal therapies have limited effectiveness, whereas increased caloric intake, weight gain and resumption of menses are essential to improved BMD. PMID:24165231

  6. Inca bones at asterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant E Natekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical approach towards asterion has to be done with caution as many surgeons are unfamiliar with the anatomical variations. The asterion corresponds to the site of the posterolateral (mastoid fontanelle of the neonatal skull which closes at the end of the first year. Inca bones provide information as markers for various diseases, and can mislead in the diagnosis of fractures. Observation and Results: 150 dry skull bones from the Department of Anatomy at Goa Medical College, India and other neighboring medical colleges by examining the asterion, and its sutural articulations with parietal, temporal and occipital bones and also anatomical variations if any in adults. Discussion: The anatomical landmarks selected must be reliable and above all easy to identify. Bony structures are more suitable than soft tissue or cartilaginous landmarks because of their rigid and reliable location. Presence of these bones provides false impressions of fractures or the fractures may be interpreted for inca bones especially in the region of asterion either radiologically or clinically which may lead to complications during burr hole surgeries.

  7. Periostin action in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2016-09-01

    Periostin is a highly conserved matricellular protein that shares close homology with the insect cell adhesion molecule fasciclin 1. Periostin is expressed in a broad range of tissues including the skeleton, where it serves both as a structural molecule of the bone matrix and a signaling molecule through integrin receptors and Wnt-beta-catenin pathways whereby it stimulates osteoblast functions and bone formation. The development of periostin null mice has allowed to elucidate the crucial role of periostin on dentinogenesis and osteogenesis, as well as on the skeletal response to mechanical loading and parathyroid hormone. The use of circulating periostin as a potential clinical biomarker has been explored in different non skeletal conditions. These include cancers and more specifically in the metastasis process, respiratory diseases such as asthma, kidney failure, renal injury and cardiac infarction. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, serum levels have been shown to predict the risk of fracture-more specifically non-vertebral- independently of bone mineral density. Because of its preferential localization in cortical bone and periosteal tissue, it can be speculated that serum periostin may be a marker of cortical bone metabolism, although additional studies are clearly needed. PMID:26721738

  8. Fibrosarcoma of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general clinical-radiological description of fibrosarcoma of bone, including tumours with features of malignant fibrous histiocytoma is presented. 104 patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are analysed in terms of age and sex distribution, symptoms, duration of symptoms and tumour localization. The radiological findings obtained in patients with fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. The treatment and course of fibrosarcoma of the long bones are discussed. Data on the type of therapy given were available on 103 patients: 67 were treated by ablative surgery either immediately or within three months of preceding local surgery and/or radiotherapy. In the remaining 36 cases treatment consisted of local surgery, radiotherapy or a combination of these, or non-curative (palliative) treatment. In a few cases ablative surgery was performed at a later stage. 13 patients with fibrosarcoma of the axial skeleton and 14 with fibrosarcoma of the jaws are considered. A causistic discussion of patients with a secondary fibrosarcoma is presented. Secondary fibrosarcoma was found in a total of 19 patients (14%); 4 after irradiation. The features of significance for the course of the disease are discussed: general features such as age and sex, tumour localization in the long bones, presence or absence of a pathological fracture, and the radiological and histological characteristics of the tumour. The type of therapy and the occurrence of lung metastases in relation to the course of the disease is also discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Bone metabolism during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Jean Pierre

    2016-06-01

    During pregnancy, mineral concentrations, of calcium and phosphorus in particular, are maintained at a high level in fetal blood so that the developing skeleton may accrete adequate mineral content. The placenta actively transports minerals for this purpose. Maternal intestinal absorption increases in order to meet the fetal demand for calcium, which is only partly dependent on calcitriol. Mineral regulation is essentially dependent on parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP). The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) regulates PTH and PTHrP production. If calcium intake is insufficient, the maternal skeleton will undergo resorption due to PTHrP. After birth, a switch from fetal to neonatal homeostasis occurs through increase in PTH and calcitriol, and developmental adaptation of the kidneys and intestines with bone turnover contributing additional mineral to the circulation. Calcium absorption becomes progressively active and dependent on calcitriol. The postnatal skeleton can transiently present with osteoposis but adequate mineral diet usually allows full restoration. Cases of primary osteoporosis must be identified. Loss of trabecular mineral content occurs during lactation in order to provide calcium to the newborn. This programmed bone loss is dependent on a "brain-breast-bone" circuit. The physiological bone resorption during reproduction does not normally cause fractures or persistent osteoporosis. Women who experience fracture are likely to have other causes of bone loss. PMID:27157104

  10. Comparison between CFD and acoustic methods in calculation of flow-induced loads in a reactor vessel at a simulated steam line failure in a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Det Norske Veritas has evaluated a method to analyse the pressure transient in Boiling Water Reactors after postulated main steam line break. The pipe break is postulated to occur in the vicinity of the reactor pressure vessel. The work was initiated by a pilot study in 1999, which was reported earlier in year 2000 by two SAQ reports. The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate financed the work. At the first stage a validation of two calculation methods for flow induced dynamic loads performed. A method based on non-stationary potential flow (linear approach) was validated against Computational Fluid Dynamics (STAR-CD). The calculations were performed for a simplified geometry, the steam was considered as a perfect gas and the flow as isentropic. This report contains the description of the models, geometry, initial and boundary conditions and the medium. The theoretical background of the linear approach is presented. Calculated by the two methods oscillating pressures close to the steam dryer surface and dynamic, flow induced forces, acting on the steam dryer wall are presented and compared. Good agreement between the two methods was found concerning the pressure signal and the time dependent force acting on the steam dryer wall. The linear approach has a number of advantages comparing to the CFD-computations. Using CFD-technique requires significantly more computer resources and in addition a large amount of data needs to be transferred to the structural code. Furthermore this large amount of data makes practically impossible to use CFD-technique for calculation of non-elementary problems considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI). On the other hand it can be shown that the linear approach is connected to the acoustic pressure formulation used in commercial structural FEM-codes. This makes it possible to take FSI into consideration and reach a new, higher level of quality in calculations of the structural integrity of components and substructures in the RPV. The

  11. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  12. Bone Regeneration Using Bone Morphogenetic Proteins and Various Biomaterial Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Sheikh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma and disease frequently result in fractures or critical sized bone defects and their management at times necessitates bone grafting. The process of bone healing or regeneration involves intricate network of molecules including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs. BMPs belong to a larger superfamily of proteins and are very promising and intensively studied for in the enhancement of bone healing. More than 20 types of BMPs have been identified but only a subset of BMPs can induce de novo bone formation. Many research groups have shown that BMPs can induce differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells and stem cells into osteogenic cells which are capable of producing bone. This review introduces BMPs and discusses current advances in preclinical and clinical application of utilizing various biomaterial carriers for local delivery of BMPs to enhance bone regeneration.

  13. Radiotherapy for bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between December 1986 and January 1978, 68 patients with bone metastases were analyzed to evaluate the effect of radiation for the relief of pain. The 68 patients, who had a total of 97 lesions, complained of pain caused by their bone metastasis. The good, fair, and poor responses were found to be 18%, 60%, and 22%, respectively. With reference to the primary neoplasms, the effective response rate was 73% in lung cancer, 100% in breast cancer, 75% in gastric cancer, 100% in hepatic cancer, 100% in bladder cancer, 25% in epipharyngeal cancer, and 70% in the other neoplasms. Depending on the cell types of the lung cancer, the effective response rate was 80% for small cell carcinomas, 72% for adenocarcinomas and 40% for squamous cell carcinomas. Our results suggest that radiotherapy for bone metastases is to be recommended, since the effective response rate was 78% for the relief of pain. (author)

  14. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  15. Multiscale imaging of bone microdamage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poundarik, Atharva A; Vashishth, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Bone is a structural and hierarchical composite that exhibits remarkable ability to sustain complex mechanical loading and resist fracture. Bone quality encompasses various attributes of bone matrix from the quality of its material components (type-I collagen, mineral and non-collagenous matrix proteins) and cancellous microarchitecture, to the nature and extent of bone microdamage. Microdamage, produced during loading, manifests in multiple forms across the scales of hierarchy in bone and functions to dissipate energy and avert fracture. Microdamage formation is a key determinant of bone quality, and through a range of biological and physical mechanisms, accumulates with age and disease. Accumulated microdamage in bone decreases bone strength and increases bone's propensity to fracture. Thus, a thorough assessment of microdamage, across the hierarchical levels of bone, is crucial to better understand bone quality and bone fracture. This review article details multiple imaging modalities that have been used to study and characterize microdamage; from bulk staining techniques originally developed by Harold Frost to assess linear microcracks, to atomic force microscopy, a modality that revealed mechanistic insights into the formation diffuse damage at the ultrastructural level in bone. New automated techniques using imaging modalities, such as microcomputed tomography are also presented for a comprehensive overview. PMID:25664772

  16. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeha Razaq

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly ...

  17. Bone formation following implantation of bone biomaterials into extraction sites

    OpenAIRE

    Molly, Liene; Vandromme, Heleen; Quirynen, Marc; Schepers, Evert; Adams, Jessica L; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Background: Adequate bone volume is imperative for the osseointegration of endosseous implants, but post-extraction resorption and remodeling may challenge implant placement. The use of bone biomaterials has been advocated to fill extraction sites and to enhance primary implant stability during osseointegration. The objective of the case series was to evaluate bone formation histologically and biomechanically in extraction sites following implantation of three commercially available bone biom...

  18. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  19. Archival bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Bendik; Najmi, Laeya A; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata;

    2015-01-01

    AB Archival samples represent a significant potential for genetic studies, particularly in severe diseases with risk of lethal outcome, such as in cancer. In this pilot study, we aimed to evaluate the usability of archival bone marrow smears and biopsies for DNA extraction and purification, whole...... with samples stored for 4 to 10 years. Acceptable call rates for SNPs were detected for 7 of 42 archival samples. In conclusion, archival bone marrow samples are suitable for DNA extraction and multiple marker analysis, but WGA was less successful, especially when longer fragments were analyzed. Multiple SNP...

  20. FRACTURE NASAL BONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thaigarajan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nose is the most prominent part of the face, hence it is likely to be the most common structure to be injured in the face. Although fractures involving the nasal bones are very common, it is often ignored by the patient. Patients with fractures of nasal bone will have deformity, tenderness, haemorrhage, edema, ecchymosis, instability, and crepitation. These features may be present in varying combinations. This article discusses the pathophysiology of these fractures, role of radiography and ultrasound in their diagnosis and their management.

  1. [Cytogenetics of bone sarcomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagner-Capodano, A M; Poitout, D

    There has been much progress in the cytogenesis, and molecular biology of bone tumours such as Ewing sarcoma and osteosarcomas, greatly improving diagnostic possibilities and prognosis. Ewing's sarcoma is an indifferentiated sarcoma with round cells which usually occurs in children or adolescents. Ewing's sarcoma corresponds to 6% of all bone tumours. Histologically Ewing's sarcoma belongs to a group of small round cell tumours including neuroblastoma, embryon and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Differential diagnosis is difficult. Cytogenetic examinations can now differentiate Ewing's sarcoma from other small round cell tumours. There is a specific 11:12 translocation (q24; q12) which can be used as a marker. PMID:8785922

  2. Computerized geometric features of carpal bone for bone age estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-Wen Hsieh; Tai-Lang Jong; Yi-Hong Chou; Chui-Mei Tiu

    2007-01-01

    Background Bone age development is one of the significant indicators depicting the growth status of children.However, bone age assessment is an heuristic and tedious work for pediatricians. We developed a computerized bone age estimation system based on the analysis of geometric features of carpal bones.Methods The geometric features of carpals were extracted and analyzed to judge the bone age of children by computerized shape and area description. Four classifiers, linear, nearest neighbor, back-propagation neural network,and radial basis function neural network, were adopted to categorize bone age. Principal component and discriminate analyses were employed to improve assorting accuracy.Results The hand X-ray films of 465 boys and 444 girls served as our database. The features were extracted from carpal bone images, including shape, area, and sequence. The proposed normalization area ratio method was effective in bone age classification by simulation. Besides, features statistics showed similar results between the standard of the Greulich and Pyle atlas and our database.Conclusions The bone area has a higher discriminating power to judge bone age. The ossification sequence of trapezium and trapezoid bones between Taiwanese and the atlas of the GP method is quite different. These results also indicate that carpal bone assessment with classification of neural networks can be correct and practical.

  3. Bone lesions in early syphilis detected by bone scintigraphy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, K.; Hvid-Jacobsen, K; Lindewald, H; Sørensen, P S; Weismann, K

    1984-01-01

    We report a case of early syphilis with multiple bone lesions which all resolved after treatment with penicillin. We discuss why bone lesions may be more prevalent than generally believed and why 99m-Tc-MDP-bone scintigraphy is more sensitive than radiography in detecting syphilitic periostitis.

  4. Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the bone and the bone marrow is critical in many research fields including basic bone biology, immunology, hematology, cancer metastasis, biomechanics, and stem cell biology. Despite the importance of the bone in healthy and pathologic states, however, it is a largely under-researched organ due to lack of specialized knowledge of bone dissection and bone marrow isolation. Mice are a common model organism to study effects on bone and bone marrow, necessitating a standardized and efficient method for long bone dissection and bone marrow isolation for processing of large experimental cohorts. We describe a straightforward dissection procedure for the removal of the femur and tibia that is suitable for downstream applications, including but not limited to histomorphologic analysis and strength testing. In addition, we outline a rapid procedure for isolation of bone marrow from the long bones via centrifugation with limited handling time, ideal for cell sorting, primary cell culture, or DNA, RNA, and protein extraction. The protocol is streamlined for rapid processing of samples to limit experimental error, and is standardized to minimize user-to-user variability. PMID:27168390

  5. Qualification of control rod guide tube assembly for flow induced vibration of 700 MWe Indian PHWR-KAPP 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibrations induced in elastic structures by vortex shedding are of practical importance because of its potentially destructive effect on various power plant components in terms of displacement and stress. In 700 MWe PHWR higher thermal power is produced by allowing partial boiling of the coolant at the end of the channels compared to 540 MWe reactors of same core design. It leads to increase in heat content of the moderator due to neutron moderation and capture, attenuation of gamma radiation. To maintain equilibrium moderator temperature, flow of the moderator in the calandria is increased through the diffusers. Qualification of various internal components in the calandria is essential for increased loads generated due to fluid induced vibration and other loads. In-core component of Control Rod Mechanism called Guide Tube Assembly is one important safety components which will be subjected to high flow of moderator. Finite element model of the assembly has been developed to evaluate the natural frequency. Vortex shedding frequency is evaluated based on the moderator velocity profile in the vicinity of guide tube assembly at different elevations. Guide tube assembly is checked for its functionality to ensure free movement of control rod. Stress analysis is carried out for the additional forces generated due to flow induced vibration. (author)

  6. Numerical investigation of flow-induced vibration and fretting wear potential of multi-span U-tubes with clearance supports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed to predict the non-linear dynamic response of a steam generator multi-span U-tubes with Anti-Vibration Bar (AVB) supports and the associated fretting wear due to fluid excitations. Both the crossflow turbulence and fluidelastic instability forces are considered in the model. The finite element method is utilized to model the vibrations and impact dynamics. The tube bundle geometry is similar to the geometry used in CANDU® steam generators. Eight sets of flat bar supports are considered. Moreover, the effect of clearances between the tubes and their supports, and axial offset between the supports are investigated. The results are presented and comparisons are made for the parameters influencing the fretting-wear damage such as contact ratio, impact forces and normal work rate. It is clear that the tubes in loose flat-bar supports have complex dynamics due to the possible combinations of geometry, tube-to-support clearance, offset, and misalignment. However, the results of the numerical simulation along with the developed model provide new insight into the flow-induced vibration mechanism and fretting wear of multi-span U-tubes that can be incorporated in future design guidelines of steam generators and large heat exchangers. (author)

  7. Evaluation of Flow-Induced Dynamic Stress and Vibration of Volute Casing for a Large-Scale Double-Suction Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The transient analysis was carried out to investigate the dynamic stress and vibration of volute casing for a large double-suction centrifugal pump by using the transient fluid-structure interaction theory. The flow pulsations at flow rate ranging from 60% to 100% of the nominal flow rate (Qd were taken as the boundary conditions for FEM analysis of the pump volute casing structure. The results revealed that, for all operating conditions, the maximum stress located at the volute tongue region, whereas the maximum vibration displacement happened close to the shaft hole region. It was also found that the blade passing frequency and its harmonics were dominant in the variations of dynamic stress and vibration displacement. The amplitude of the dominant frequency for the maximum stress detected at 0.6 Qd was 1.14 times that at Qd, lower than the related difference observed for pressure fluctuations (3.23 times. This study provides an effective method to quantify the flow-induced structural dynamic characteristics for a large-scale double-suction pump. It can be used to direct the hydraulic and structural design and stable operation, as well as fatigue life prediction for large-scale pumps.

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Radial Gap and Impeller Blade Exit on Flow-Induced Vibration at the Blade-Passing Frequency in a Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Al-Qutub

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been recognized that the pressure pulsation excited by rotor-stator interaction in large pumps is strongly influenced by the radial gap between impeller and volute diffusers/tongues and the geometry of impeller blade at exit. This fluid-structure interaction phenomenon, as manifested by the pressure pulsation, is the main cause of flow-induced vibrations at the blade-passing frequency. In the present investigation, the effects of the radial gap and flow rate on pressure fluctuations, vibration, and pump performance are investigated experimentally for two different impeller designs. One impeller has a V-shaped cut at the blade's exit, while the second has a straight exit (without the V-cut. The experimental findings showed that the high vibrations at the blade-passing frequency are primarily raised by high pressure pulsation due to improper gap design. The existence of V-cut at blades exit produces lower pressure fluctuations inside the pump while maintaining nearly the same performance. The selection of proper radial gap for a given impeller-volute combination results in an appreciable reduction in vibration levels.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Flow-induced Vibration of Tandem Circular Cylinders%串列双圆柱流致振动数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    及春宁; 杨立红; 黄继露; 刘爽

    2014-01-01

    基于开源程序OpenFOAM和动网格技术,利用切应力平衡法建立水流作用下的海上风电基础局部冲刷数学模型。通过模拟结果与实验数据的对比发现,所建立的冲刷数学模型能够合理反映圆柱型单桩基础周围的水流结构,冲刷深度与实验结果吻合较好。%Numerical simulation is carried out for the flow-induced vibrations(FIV)of the elastically-mounted tandem cylinders in laminar flow by using immersed boundary method in the process of harvesting VIVACE ocean current energy (Vortex Induced Vibration Aquatic Clean Energy). The research results show the crosscurrent displacement of the upstream and downstream cylinders,vortex shedding frequency,lift-drag coefficient and the curve of the phase difference between lift force and displacement being affected by reduced flow velocity. In addition,analysis is made for the influence of cylinder’s spacing ratio on the hydrodynamic and FIV response characteristics of the tandem circular cylinders.

  10. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  11. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... around or in bones. top of page How should I prepare? Most bone x-rays require no ... might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray technologist ...

  12. Uranium concentrations in human bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural uranium content in the bone of one person has been determined by a new method. The results were obtained by quantitative analysis of fission track autoradiographs of bone from a person injected witn 239Pu

  13. Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blog Donate Now Select Page Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer Home > Understanding Children’s Cancer > Late Effects of Treatment > Limb Salvage After Bone Cancer Limb salvage is a surgical procedure that replaces ...

  14. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transmitted very efficiently through the head using bone conduction. The Baha device uses sound vibrations, and those ... changed from a normal soundwave into a bone conduction vibration, and that is what is passed then ...

  15. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  16. Vitamin A and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Vitamin A and Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... Find More Information? For Your Information What Is Vitamin A? Vitamin A is a family of compounds ...

  17. Bone Anchored Hearing Treatment Procedure

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Baha system consists of a bone-anchored titanium fixture that is implanted in the mastoid bone, ... the -- great. I'm going to grab the titanium implant. And what I want you to notice ...

  18. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities. This exam requires little to ... fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions. look for injury, infection, arthritis , abnormal bone growths and bony changes ...

  19. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... little information about muscles, tendons or joints. An MRI may be more useful in identifying bone and ... bones and the spinal cord can be evaluated). MRI can also detect subtle or occult fractures or ...

  20. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series To use the sharing features on ... slide 4 out of 4 Normal anatomy Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  1. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importantly, this low bone mass is also associated with a seven-fold increased risk of fracture. Therefore, strategies to effectively prevent bone loss and increase low bone mass are critical. We will review hormonal adaptations that contribute to bone loss in this population as well as promising new therapies that may increase bone mass and reduce fracture risk in AN. PMID:24882734

  2. Cancellous structure of tarsal bones.

    OpenAIRE

    D N Sinha

    1985-01-01

    The internal structure of the tarsal bones has been studied to investigate their cancellous architecture. It is revealed that these bones have fine and coarse meshworks and even a tendency for obliteration of the trabecular pattern in the bones lying distal to this midtarsal joint. Internal structure of the talus does not show an arched pattern of bony lamellae. An increased density of bony lamellae in the internal structure of the navicular bone could result from excessive stress, enforced b...

  3. Bone microdamage and cell apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Noble B.

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation of microdamage in bone leads to the reduced strength of our skeleton. In health, bone adapts to the prevailing mechanical needs of the organism and is also capable of self-repair, sensing, removing and replacing damaged or mechanically insufficient volumes of bone. In disease and old age these characteristics are reduced. In order to undertake both of the processes of functional adaptation and repair the bone resorbing and forming cells must be very accurately targeted to areas o...

  4. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Remodeling*

    OpenAIRE

    Raggatt, Liza J; Partridge, Nicola C

    2010-01-01

    Physiological bone remodeling is a highly coordinated process responsible for bone resorption and formation and is necessary to repair damaged bone and to maintain mineral homeostasis. In addition to the traditional bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) that are necessary for bone remodeling, several immune cells have also been implicated in bone disease. This minireview discusses physiological bone remodeling, outlining the traditional bone biology dogma in light of emerging ...

  5. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  6. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small ... X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  7. Playing with bone and fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Zvonic, Sanjin; Floyd, Z. Elisabeth;

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between bone and fat formation within the bone marrow microenvironment is complex and remains an area of active investigation. Classical in vitro and in vivo studies strongly support an inverse relationship between the commitment of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or...

  8. Chondrosarcoma of the hyoid bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demeyere, A.; Somer, F. de; Perdieus, D.; Lemmens, L.; Schillebeeckx, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Imeldaziekenhuis Bonheiden (Belgium); Hauwe, L. van den [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Antwerp (Belgium)

    2000-02-01

    The CT and MRI findings in a case of chondrosarcoma of the hyoid bone are reported. Although chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary malignant bone tumor, only 10 % of chondrosarcomas occur in the head and neck region. The hyoid bone is a rare site of involvement with only seven cases reported previously. (orig.)

  9. Bone metastases: When and how lung cancer interacts with bone

    OpenAIRE

    Roato, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and debilitating consequence of lung cancer: 30%-40% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer develop bone metastases during the course of their disease. Lung cancer cells find a favorable soil in the bone microenvironment due to factors released by the bone matrix, the immune system cells, and the same cancer cells. Many aspects of the cross-talk among lung tumor cells, the immune system, and bone cells are not clear, but this review aims to summarize the recen...

  10. Craniocervical bone pneumatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of extensive craniocervical bone pneumatisation presenting after minor trauma. The patient had neurological signs and initial radiographs showed multiple lucencies in the skull base and the atlas vertebra. CT established the true nature of this rare condition. (orig.). With 3 figs

  11. Sodium and bone health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teucher, B.; Dainty, J. R.; Spinks, C. A.;

    2008-01-01

    High salt intake is a well-recognized risk factor for osteoporosis because it induces calciuria, but the effects of salt on calcium metabolism and the potential impact on bone health in postmenopausal women have not been fully characterized. This study investigated adaptive mechanisms in response...

  12. Metastatic Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern for patients with MBD is the general loss in quality of life. How much of an effect MBD has on ... to be most effective in maintaining quality of life. A technetium bone scan ... blood count, because loss of red blood cells (anemia) is a frequent ...

  13. Healthy Bones Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... think that this is something that only older people need to worry about. BUT—you can take action right now to help make sure that as you get older your bones are as healthy as they can be. Eating a balanced diet ...

  14. Bone Marrow Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Mark; Maklad, Rania; Heaney, Emma

    2014-01-01

    As a final-year student teacher specialising in primary science, Emma Heaney faced the challenge of having to plan, organise, and conduct a small-scale, classroom-based research project. She had to teach about bones in the final block practice session and thought it would be a good idea to bring in some biological specimens obtained from the local…

  15. Are Bones Alive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravita, Silvia; Falchetti, Elisabetta

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the classification of living things. Our study deals with a different problem: the attribution of life to one component of a living organism, specifically the bones. The task involves not only specifying what we mean by "alive", but also requires "informed thinking" leading to an understanding of the concept of life…

  16. Food and Your Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Store Shopping Cart Home › Patients › Treatment › Nutrition Nutrition Food For Thought Quiz True or false: Prunes contain ... health. True False View Answers Loading ... Sponsored by: Food and Your Bones – Osteoporosis Nutrition Guidelines The food ...

  17. Bone island and leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine the incidence of bone islands in leprosy patients. Design. X-rays of feet and hands of patients with Hansen's disease (leprosy) were reviewed retrospectively. A second group of related age- and sex-matched patients who did not have Hansen's disease was used for control purposes. Controls had undergone hand or foot X-rays during diagnosis of other pathologies. The patients with Hansen's disease were compared with the control group, and were also analyzed as subgroups with different types of leprosy. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Patients. Ninety patients with Hansen's disease were randomly selected for this study. Patients who had had ulcers on hands or feet were excluded from the study. Results and conclusions. Bone islands were demonstrated in 20 patients with Hansen's disease; no bone islands were observed in the controls. This was statistically significant (P<0.01). Bone islands were only seen in patients with lepromatous leprosy and borderline types but were not demonstrated in patients with tuberculoid leprosy. There was also a statistically significant relationship for a disease duration of 15 years or more. The cause of this raised incidence of enostosis in leprosy patients is not clear, but there may be a genetic predisposition in patients with leprosy, or it may be a side effect of leprosy, especially the lepromatous form. (orig.)

  18. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, K.; Thiers, G.; Eissner, D.; Holzmann, H.

    1980-08-01

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones.

  19. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases. PMID:24811356

  20. Bone scintigraphy in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1973 bone scintigraphy using sup(99m)Tc-phosphate-complexes was carried out in 382 patients with psoriasis. For comparison with the results of nuclear medicine, roentgenologic and clinical findings a group af 121 patients with psoriasis aged between 11 and 74 years was compared to a group of 42 patients aged between 20 and 49 years without roentgenologic and clinical signs of psoriasis arthritis. We found by means of isotope investigation that an essentially greater part of the bones adjacent to the joints was involved than was expected according to X-ray and clinical findings. In addition, in 205 patients with psoriasis whole-body scintigraphy, using sup(99m)Tc-MDP, was carried out since 1977/78. In 17 patients we found an increased accumulation of activity in the region of extraarticular structures of the skull as well as of the skeletal thorax. According to these results we conclude that in addition to the clinically and roentgenologically defined psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis an osteopathy may exist, which can only be demonstrated by skeletal scintigraphy and which is localized in bones adjacent to the joints but can also be demonstrated in the region of extraarticular bones. (orig.)

  1. Super bone scans on bone scintigraphy in patients with metastatic bone tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight patients with malignant tumor (3 with gastric cancer, 4 with prostatic cancer, 1 with transitional cell carcinoma), which showed diffusely increased uptake of 99mTc labelled phosphorous compound in axial skeleton (''Super Bone Scan'') on bone scintigraphy were clinically studied. No relationship with its histological type of the tumor was recognized. All cases revealed extremely high serum ALP concentration, which might reflect increased osteoblastic activity. Furthermore, on bone roentgenograms all cases showed predominantly osteosclerotic change in the metastatic bones, while some did locally osteolytic change. In three cases with gastric cancer, although they had diffuse skeletal metastases, two had no evidence of liver metastases. Thus, it seemed that clinical study of patients with ''Super Bone Scan'' was interesting to evaluate the mechanism of accumulation of 99mTc labelled phosphorous compound to bone and bone metabolism, and the pathophysiology in the pathway of bone metastases. (author)

  2. Combined bone grafting: an alternative method for bone healing stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most provocative problem in bone grafting is the effectiveness of healing of the graft. When you use the heterogenous bone graft, it may take one or more than two years for consolidation and union depends on the graft quality and the situation of surrounding blood supply. In our preliminary report seven cases of freeze-dried heterogenous bone graft from the Bangkok Biomaterial Center were mixed with autogenous iliac bone graft from the patient in the ratio of 3:1. After that the healing was checked by clinical examination and X-ray in the periodic follow up. The causes of bone lost are post evacuation of benign bone tumor and post infection of bone after trauma. The result of bony union could be tested by clinical examination and showed in the X-ray films as early as 3 months post grafting

  3. Bone Positron Emission Tomography with or without CT Is More Accurate than Bone Scan for Detection of Bone Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Jin; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2013-01-01

    Objective Na18F bone positron emission tomography (bone PET) is a new imaging modality which is useful for the evaluation of bone diseases. Here, we compared the diagnostic accuracies between bone PET and bone scan for the detection of bone metastasis (BM). Materials and Methods Sixteen cancer patients (M:F = 10:6, mean age = 60 ± 12 years) who underwent both bone PET and bone scan were analyzed. Bone PET was conducted 30 minutes after the injection of 370 MBq Na18F, and a bone scan was perfo...

  4. CRBRP flow induced vibration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program to assure the structural adequacy of CRBRP components during its planned 30 years of operation is described. The program includes (1) an assessment of reactor components relative to their susceptibility to FIV, (2) designing to minimize component excitation due to FIV, (3) scale model tests to measure structural response during simulated operating conditions and (4) preoperational tests. An overview of the CRBRP test program is described. Additionally, details of scale model testing of reactor internals and the steam generator is described in more detail

  5. CRBRP flow induced vibration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program to assure the structural adequacy of Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBRP) components during its planned 30 years of operation is described. The program includes (1) an assessment of reactor components relative to their susceptibility to FIV, (2) designing to minimize component excitation due to Fluid induced vibrations (FIV), (3) scale model tests to measure structural response during simulated operating conditions and (4) preoperational tests. An overview of the CRBRP test program is described. Additionally, details of scale model testing of reactor internals and the steam generator is described in more detail. (author)

  6. Bone metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed, chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical comorbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  7. Bone Metabolism in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), a psychiatric disorder predominantly affecting young women, is characterized by self-imposed chronic nutritional deprivation and distorted body image. AN is associated with a number of medical co-morbidities including low bone mass. The low bone mass in AN is due to an uncoupling of bone formation and bone resorption, which is the result of hormonal adaptations aimed at decreasing energy expenditure during periods of low energy intake. Importantly, the low bone mass in AN is associated with a significant risk of fractures and therefore treatments to prevent bone loss are critical. In this review, we discuss the hormonal determinants of low bone mass in AN and treatments that have been investigated in this population. PMID:24419863

  8. Experimental study on annular-flow-induced vibrations of a simply-supported tube in a finite-length loose gap support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods to predict the dynamic behavior of a rod subjected to annular flow have been developed. These include the linearized potential flow theory based model by Mateescu, Paidoussis and Sim, and the pressure-loss model by Hobson and Langthjem. Recently, Kang, Mureithi and Pettigrew proposed a theory based on the pressure-loss model with consideration of flow friction. They showed the critical flow velocity of a simply-supported cylinder could go down to a dimensionless velocity of 2.4. The basic dynamics due to annular flow are known by virtue of these models. For heat exchanger tubes, the support causes highly confined annular flow with a divergent or convergent flow at the exit or the entrance of the support, which is due to chamfering of the support hole for manufacturing convenience. Gorman, Goden, and Planchard qualitatively reported that a finite-length diffuser caused a thimble tube in a pressurized water reactor to reach dynamic instability. Yasuo and Paidoussis tried to solve the flow induced instability problem of heat exchanger tubes subjected to axial flow in a diffuser-shaped, loose intermediate support. They suggested critical flow velocity equations either for divergence or flutter. Application of this theory to practical problems is, however, limited because of the inaccurate prediction of the critical flow velocity for flutter. The purpose of this study is to obtain experimentally the critical flow velocity of a cylinder subjected to annular flow in a finite-length narrow-gap support at the middle of the cylinder and to identify instability

  9. Influence of vocal fold stiffness and acoustic loading on flow-induced vibration of a single-layer vocal fold model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan; Neubauer, Juergen; Berry, David A.

    2009-04-01

    The flow-induced vibrations of a single-layer vocal fold model were investigated as a function of vocal fold stiffness, and subglottal and supraglottal acoustic loading. Previously, it was reported that the single-layer vocal fold model failed to vibrate when short, clinically relevant tracheal tubes were used. Moreover, it was reported that the model had a propensity to be acoustically driven, and aerodynamically driven vibration was observed only when a vertical restraint was applied superiorly to the vocal folds. However, in this study involving a wider range of source/tract conditions, the previous conclusions were shown to apply only for the special case of a stiff vocal fold model, for which self-oscillation occurred only when the vocal fold vibration synchronized to either a subglottal or supraglottal resonance. For a more general case, when vocal fold stiffness was decreased, the model did exhibit self-oscillation at short tracheal tubes, and no vertical restraint was needed to induce aerodynamically driven phonation. Nevertheless, the vocal fold vibration transitioned from aerodynamically driven to acoustically driven vibration when one of the subglottal resonance frequencies approximated one of the natural frequencies of the vocal folds. In this region, strong superior-inferior vibrations were observed, the phonation threshold pressure was significantly reduced, and the phonation onset frequency was heavily influenced by the dominant acoustic resonance. For acoustically driven phonation, a compliant subglottal system always lowered phonation threshold. However, an inertive vocal tract could either increase or decrease phonation threshold pressure, depending on the phonation frequency.

  10. Numerical Study on :Mean Flow-Induced Acoustic Oscillation%时均流诱导声振荡的数值计算研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余炎; 孙大明; 徐雅; 陈海俊; 吴珂; 敖文; 邱利民

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic oscillation induced by mean flow can be used to drive thermoaeoutic refrigerator, generator and transducer, providing a new idea for wind power exploitation, which is one of the newest research interests in thermoacoutic field. In this study, based on computational fluid dynamics, a three dimensional numerical model of mean flow engine with cross junction configuration was built. The turbulence model of large eddy simulation was applied. Computational results demonstrated the effect of mean flow-induced acoustic oscillation, revealed the acoustic field distribution in resonator, and showed the relationship between acoustic oscillation in resonator and vortex in the opening of resonator, which set up theoretical basis for experimental study.%时均流诱导的声振荡可以为热声制冷提供驱动源或驱动发电机和换能器发电,为风能利用提供了新思路,是热声领域的最新研究方向之一。本文基于计算流体动力学(CFD)方法,建立了正十字型时均流激声发动机的三维数学模型,采用大涡模拟湍流模型计算。计算结果验证了时均流诱导声振荡效应,揭示出谐振管内声场分布和谐振管内部压力与开口处涡的关系,为后续的实验研究奠定了理论基础。

  11. Influence of bone environment on ceramic osteointegration in spinal fusion: comparison of bone-poor and bone-rich sites

    OpenAIRE

    Delécrin, Joël; Deschamps, Cédric; Romih, Mostafa; Heymann, Dominique; Passuti, Norbert

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative experimental data showed differences in bone quality and ceramic incorporation between bone-rich and bone-poor implantation sites. Bone in-growth was significantly lower for ceramic implanted at a lumbar intertransverse than a laminar site. Bone-marrow enrichment of the lumbar intertransverse site (regarded as bone-poor) greatly facilitated ceramic osteointegration. The vertebral interbody site, despite theoretical richness in osteogenic precursor cells, might be bone-poor at the...

  12. Aging and bone. X-ray bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone mass at all ages of the individuals is the integration of genetic factors, nutrition, physical exercise, hormonal environments, and other factors influencing the bone. It is also a measurable risk factor for osteoporosis which may subsequently cause bone fractures. Thus measuring bone mass is required to predict the probability of developing bone fractures subsequent to osteoporosis, and to diagnose osteoporosis, and to manage the osteoporosis patient. This paper discusses bone mineral measurements according to their characteristics and clinical application. Methodology for measuring bone mass has rapidly progressed during the past 15 years, which covers photodensitometry, photon absorptiometry (single energy X-ray absorptiometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), quantitative CT, and ultrasound. These techniques have allowed noninvasive measurement of bone mineral density in any site of the skeleton with high accuracy and precision, although a single use of the technique cannot satisfy the complete clinical requirements. Thus the most appropriate method for measuring bone mineral density is important to monitor bone mass change and according to the specific site. (N.K.)

  13. Fluid shear stress stimulates prostaglandin and nitric oxide release in bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, T. N.; Du, T.; Frangos, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Bone is a porous tissue that is continuously perfused by interstitial fluid. Fluid flow, driven by both vascular pressure and mechanical loading, may generate significant shear stresses through the canaliculi as well as along the bone lining at the endosteal surface. Both osteoblasts and osteocytes produce signaling factors such as prostaglandins and nitric in response to fluid shear stress (FSS); however, these humoral agents appear to have more profound affects on osteoclast activity at the endosteal surface. We hypothesized that osteoclasts and preosteoclasts may also be mechanosensitive and that osteoclast-mediated autocrine signaling may be important in bone remodeling. In this study, we investigated the effect of FSS on nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), and prostacyclin (PGI(2)) release by neonatal rat bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells. These cells were tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive, weakly nonspecific esterase (NSE) positive, and capable of fusing into calcitonin-responsive, bone-resorbing, multinucleated cells. Bone marrow-derived preosteoclast-like cells exposed for 6 h to a well-defined FSS of 16 dynes/cm(2) produced NO at a rate of 7.5 nmol/mg protein/h, which was 10-fold that of static controls. This response was completely abolished by 100 microM N(G)-amino-L-arginine (L-NAA). Flow also stimulated PGE(2) production (3.9 microg/mg protein/h) and PGI(2) production (220 pg/mg protein/h). L-NAA attenuated flow-induced PGE(2) production by 30%, suggesting that NO may partially modulate PGE(2) production. This is the first report demonstrating that marrow derived cells are sensitive to FSS and that autocrine signaling in these cells may play an important role in load-induced remodeling and signal transduction in bone. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. Study on the annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. 1st Report. Stability for translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom systems; Kanjo sukimaryu reiki shindo ni kansuru kenkyu. 1. Heishin oyobi kaiten 1 jiyudokei no anteise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.W. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kaneko, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Hayama, S. [Toyama Prefectural University, Toyama (Japan)

    1999-07-25

    This study reports the stability of annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. The pressure distribution of fluid between a fixed outer cylinder and a vibrating inner cylinder was obtained in the case of a translationally and rotationally coupled motion of the inner cylinder. The unsteady fluid force acting on the inner cylinder in the case of translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom vibrations was then expressed in terms proportional to the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. Then the critical flow rate (at which stability was lost) was determined for an annular leakage-flow-induced vibration. Finally, the stability was investigated theoretically. It is known that instability will occur in the case of a divergent passage, but the critical flow rate depends on the passage increment in a limited range: the eccentricity of the passage and the pressure loss factor at the inlet of the passage lower the stability. (author)

  15. Dynamic scintigraphy of bone and bone marrow in multiple myeloma patients with bone-marrow transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether dynamic registration at bone and bone-marrow scintigraphy produces additional information compared to subsequent static registrations of bone-marrow transplants in multiple myeloma patients. Material and Methods: In a prospective study, 8 dynamic bone and 6 dynamic bone-marrow scintigraphies were performed in 10 patients. The dynamic scintigraphies were compared with conventional radiography, MR images, and static scintigraphies of bone and bone marrow. Results: No additional information was revealed by the dynamic registration method; on the contrary, 4 of the 8 known lesions were not discerned at dynamic registration. An incidental observation was that the time-activity curves of both radiopharmaceuticals had a specific pattern. (orig.)

  16. Shang Oracle Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankenier, David W.

    Astronomical observations first appear in China's archaeological record on turtle plastrons and ox scapulae from the reigns of the last few kings of the Shang Dynasty (1250-1046 BCE). A variety of meteorological and astronomical phenomena were divined about and recorded by scribes in formulaic language that is recognizably archaic Chinese. The oracle bone inscriptions record sacrifices to celestial bodies and the proper ritual response to anomalous phenomena like eclipses.

  17. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame) was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

  18. Bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Black, Cameron R. M.; Goriainov, Vitali; Gibbs, David; Kanczler, Janos; Tare, Rahul S; Richard O. C. Oreffo

    2015-01-01

    Medical advances have led to a welcome increase in life expectancy. However, accompanying longevity introduces new challenges: increases in age-related diseases and associated reductions in quality of life. The loss of skeletal tissue that can accompany trauma, injury, disease or advancing years can result in significant morbidity and significant socio-economic cost and emphasise the need for new, more reliable skeletal regeneration strategies. To address the unmet need for bone augmentation,...

  19. [Primary liposarcoma of bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatić, V; Cerović, S; Skaro-Milić, A; Jovanović, Z

    2001-01-01

    A case of 75-year-old man with extremely rare primary liposarcoma of the bone was presented. Stains for lipid, Sudan III, Sudan IV, and Oil Red "O", demonstrated the presence of intracellular lipid in the lipoblasts. Similarly, the S-100 immunoreactivity and electron microscopic findings of tumor cells confirmed the diagnosis of liposarcoma. Histochemical stains for PAS, Alcian-blue, mucikarmin, Toluidin-blue and Coloidal Iron were negative. PMID:11419292

  20. Citoesqueleto e mecanotransdução na fisiopatologia da lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador Cytoskeleton and mechanotransduction in the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Utino Taniguchi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A ventilação mecânica é uma terapia importante, mas pode resultar em complicações. Uma das mais relevantes é a lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador. Devido à hiperdistensão alveolar, o pulmão inicia um processo inflamatório, com infiltrado neutrofílico, formação de membrana hialina, fibrogênese e prejuízo de troca gasosa. Nesse processo, a mecanotransdução da hiperdistensão celular é mediada através do citoesqueleto da célula e de suas interações com a matriz extracelular e com as células vizinhas, de modo que o estímulo mecânico da ventilação se traduz em sinalização bioquímica intracelular, desencadeando ativação endotelial, permeabilidade vascular pulmonar, quimiotaxia leucocitária, produção de citocinas e, possivelmente, lesão de órgãos à distância. Estudos clínicos demonstram essa relação entre distensão pulmonar e mortalidade em pacientes com lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador. Entretanto, apesar de o citoesqueleto ter um papel fundamental na patogênese da lesão pulmonar induzida por ventilador, a literatura carece de estudos utilizando modelos in vivo sobre as alterações do citoesqueleto e de suas proteínas associadas durante esse processo patológico.Although mechanical ventilation is an important therapy, it can result in complications. One major complication is ventilator-induced lung injury, which is caused by alveolar hyperdistension, leading to an inflammatory process, with neutrophilic infiltration, hyaline membrane formation, fibrogenesis and impaired gas exchange. In this process, cellular mechanotransduction of the overstretching stimulus is mediated by means of the cytoskeleton and its cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, in such a way that the mechanical stimulus of ventilation is translated into an intracellular biochemical signal, inducing endothelial activation, pulmonary vascular permeability, leukocyte chemotaxis, cytokine production and, possibly

  1. Battling Brittle Bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The accuDEXA(R) Bone Mineral Density Assessment System, manufactured by Schick Technologies, Inc., utilizes "camera on a chip" sensor technology invented and developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Schick's accuDEXA system offers several advantages over traditional osteoporosis tests, which assess bone density loss in the hip and spine, and require specialized personnel to conduct. With accuDEXA, physicians can test the entire body's bone density at a peripheral site, such as the finger, without applying gels or having patients remove garments. Results are achieved in 30 seconds and printed out in less than a minute, compared to the estimated exam time of 15 minutes for hip and spine density analyses. Schick has also applied the CMOS APS technology to a new software product that performs dental radiography using up to 90 percent less radiation exposure than conventional X-rays. Called Computed Dental Radiography(R), the new digital imaging product utilizes an electronic sensor in place of X-ray film to generate sharp and clear images that appear on a computer screen within 3 seconds, and can be enlarged and enhanced to identify problems.

  2. Bone Metabolism on ISS Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. M.; Heer, M. A.; Shackelford, L. C.; Zwart, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight-induced bone loss is associated with increased bone resorption (1, 2), and either unchanged or decreased rates of bone formation. Resistive exercise had been proposed as a countermeasure, and data from bed rest supported this concept (3). An interim resistive exercise device (iRED) was flown for early ISS crews. Unfortunately, the iRED provided no greater bone protection than on missions where only aerobic and muscular endurance exercises were available (4, 5). In 2008, the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), a more robust device with much greater resistance capability, (6, 7) was launched to the ISS. Astronauts who had access to ARED, coupled with adequate energy intake and vitamin D status, returned from ISS missions with bone mineral densities virtually unchanged from preflight (7). Bone biochemical markers showed that while the resistive exercise and adequate energy consumption did not mitigate the increased bone resorption, bone formation was increased (7, 8). The typical drop in circulating parathyroid hormone did not occur in ARED crewmembers. In 2014, an updated look at the densitometry data was published. This study confirmed the initial findings with a much larger set of data. In 42 astronauts (33 male, 9 female), the bone mineral density response to flight was the same for men and women (9), and those with access to the ARED did not have the typical decrease in bone mineral density that was observed in early ISS crewmembers with access to the iRED (Figure 1) (7). Biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption responded similarly in men and women. These data are encouraging, and represent the first in-flight evidence in the history of human space flight that diet and exercise can maintain bone mineral density on long-duration missions. However, the maintenance of bone mineral density through bone remodeling, that is, increases in both resorption and formation, may yield a bone with strength characteristics different from those

  3. Bone Metabolism in Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, Madhusmita; Klibanski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) are at risk for low bone mass at multiple sites, associated with decreased bone turnover. Bone microarchitecture is also affected, with a decrease in bone trabecular volume and trabecular thickness, and an increase in trabecular separation. The adolescent years are typically the time when marked increases occur in bone mass accrual towards the attainment of peak bone mass, an important determinant of bone health and fracture risk in later life. AN often ...

  4. Automatic recognition of bone for x-ray bone densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepp, Larry A.; Vardi, Y.; Lazewatsky, J.; Libeau, James; Stein, Jay A.

    1991-06-01

    We described a method for automatically identifying and separating pixels representing bone from those representing soft tissue in a dual- energy point-scanned projection radiograph of the abdomen. In order to achieve stable quantitative measurement of projected bone mineral density, a calibration using sample bone in regions containing only soft tissue must be performed. In addition, the projected area of bone must be measured. We show that, using an image with a realistically low noise, the histogram of pixel values exhibits a well-defined peak corresponding to the soft tissue region. A threshold at a fixed multiple of the calibration segment value readily separates bone from soft tissue in a wide variety of patient studies. Our technique, which is employed in the Hologic QDR-1000 Bone Densitometer, is rapid, robust, and significantly simpler than a conventional artificial intelligence approach using edge-detection to define objects and expert systems to recognize them.

  5. Bone morphogenetic proteins: Periodontal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniam M Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious inflammatory disease that results in attachment loss and bone loss. Regeneration of the periodontal tissues entails de novo formation of cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Several different approaches are currently being explored to achieve complete, reliable, and reproducible regeneration of periodontal tissues. The therapeutic management of new bone formation is one of the key issues in successful periodontal regeneration. Bone morphogenetic proteins form a unique group of proteins within the transforming growth factor superfamily of genes and have a vital role in the regulation in the bone induction and maintenance. The activity of bone morphogenetic proteins was first identified in the 1960s, but the proteins responsible for bone induction were unknown until the purification and cloning of human bone morphogenetic proteins in the 1980s, because of their osteoinductive potential. Bone morphogenetic proteins have gained a lot of interest as therapeutic agents for treating periodontal defects. A systematic search for data related to the use of bone morphogenetic proteins for the regeneration of periodontal defects was performed to recognize studies on animals and human (PUBMED, MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and Google search. All the studies included showed noticeable regeneration of periodontal tissues with the use of BMP.

  6. Regenerate augmentation with bone marrow concentrate after traumatic bone loss

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Gessmann; Manfred Köller; Holger Godry; Thomas Armin Schildhauer; Dominik Seybold

    2012-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis after post-traumatic segmental bone loss of the tibia is a complex and time-consuming procedure that is often complicated due to prolonged consolidation or complete insufficiency of the regenerate. The aim of this feasibility study was to investigate the potential of bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) for percutaneous regenerate augmentation to accelerate bony consolidation of the regenerate. Eight patients (age 22-64) with an average posttraumatic bone defect ...

  7. Method for Automated Bone Shape Correction within Bone Distraction Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blynskiy, F. Yu

    2016-01-01

    The method for automated bone shape correction within bone distraction procedure is presented. High precision deformation angle measurement is provided by the software for X- Ray images processing. Special BDC v.1.0.1. application is designed. The purpose of the BDC is modeling of the bone geometry structure to calculate the appropriate distraction forces. The correction procedure control is realized by the hardware of the distraction system.

  8. Carbon nanohorns accelerate bone regeneration in rat calvarial bone defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, Takao; Iizuka, Tadashi; Kanamori, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Atsuro [Department of Oral Functional Prosthodontics, Division of Oral Functional Science, Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8586 (Japan); Matsumura, Sachiko; Shiba, Kiyotaka [Division of Protein Engineering, Cancer Institute, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31, Ariake, koutou-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio, E-mail: tkasai@den.hokudai.ac.jp [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 5, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    A recent study showed that carbon nanohorns (CNHs) have biocompatibility and possible medical uses such as in drug delivery systems. It was reported that some kinds of carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes were useful for bone formation. However, the effect of CNHs on bone tissue has not been clarified. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CNHs on bone regeneration and their possible application for guided bone regeneration (GBR). CNHs dispersed in ethanol were fixed on a porous polytetrafluoroethylene membrane by vacuum filtration. Cranial defects were created in rats and covered by a membrane with/without CNHs. At two weeks, bone formation under the membrane with CNHs had progressed more than under that without CNHs and numerous macrophages were observed attached to CNHs. At eight weeks, there was no significant difference in the amount of newly formed bone between the groups and the appearance of macrophages was decreased compared with that at two weeks. Newly formed bone attached to some CNHs directly. These results suggest that macrophages induced by CNHs are related to bone regeneration. In conclusion, the present study indicates that CNHs are compatible with bone tissue and effective as a material for GBR.

  9. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  10. Differentiation of bone marrow cells with irradiated bone in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disease transmission or infection is an important issue in bone allograft, and irradiation is used for sterilization of graft bones. One of the advantages of bone allograft over biomaterials is that graft bones have osteoinductive factors such as growth factors. Irradiation is reported to decrease the osteoinductive activity in vivo. We investigated the osteoinductive activity of irradiated bone by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in rat bone marrow cell culture. Bones (tibias and femurs of 12-week-old Wistar rats) were cleaned of adhering soft tissue, and the marrow was removed by washing. The bones were defatted, lyophilized, and cut into uniform 70 mg fragments. Then the Bone fragments were irradiated at either 10, 20, 25, 30, 40, or 50 kGy at JAERI. Bone marrow cells were isolated from tibias and femurs of 4-week-old Wistar rats. Cells were plated in tissue culture flask. When primary cultures reached confluence, cells were passaged (4 x 103 cell / cm2) to 6 wells plates. The culture medium consisted of minimum essential medium, 10% fetal bovine serum, ascorbic acid, and antibiotics. At confluence, a cell culture insert was set in the well, and an irradiated bone fragment was placed in it. Then, medium was supplemented with 10 mM ?-glycerophosphate and 1 x 10-8 M dexamethasone. Culture wells were stained by naphthol AS-MX phosphate, N,N-dimethyl formamide, Red violet LB salt on day 0, 7, 14. The density of ALP staining was analyzed by a personal computer. Without bones, ALP staining increased by 50% on day 7 and by 100% on day 14, compared with that on day 0. The other side, with bones irradiated at 30 kGy or lower, ALP staining increased by 150% on day 7, and by 180% on day 14, compared with that on day 0. In the groups of irradiated bones of 40 kGy or higher, the increase in ALP staining was less prominent compared with the groups of irradiated bones of 30 kGy or lower. In the groups of 0-30 kGy irradiation, ALP staining increased in the early period

  11. Mandibular reconstruction using bone allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further understanding of bone healing mechanisms, bone physiology and bone biology, transplantation immunology, and development of Tissue Banking procedures has enabled oral and maxillofacial surgeons to reconstruct even the most difficult bony defects successfully with the preserved allogeneic bone implant. Although it had been known that bone allografts were clinically effective, its application has not been widespread until the reports of Inclan (I 942), Hyatt and Butler (I 950), and Wilson (I 95 1). Tissue Banking provides the surgeon with a readily available, relatively inexpensive, and relatively safe selection of allogeneic bone for clinical use. Now autogenous bone and allogeneic bone implants present a wide variety of surgical options to surgeons, whether used separately or in combination. The surgeons are able to make judicious and fruitful choices, only with a thorough knowledge of the above-mentioned biological principles and skillful techniques. Many kinds of bone grafting techniques have been tried for reconstructing defective osseous tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region, though they have varying degrees of success. The osseous defects which require grafting include those of various size, shape, position, or amount. Unlike autogenous grafts, whose function is to provide osteogenic cells, allografts are purely passive, offering only a matrix for the inductive phase of bone healing. The condition of the recipient bed is of primary importance, because the host must produce all of the essential elements for the bone allograft to become incorporated. Depending on the processing methods of the allogeneic bone, the bone graft materials have different qualities, different healing potentials and different indications. Proper selection of grafts and surgical techniques requires an understanding of graft immunology and the mechanisms of graft healing. The surgeons should know about the biological principles to raise the clinical success rate

  12. Tarsal bone disintegration in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarsal bone disintegration is characterised by fragmentation and progressive collapse of one or more tarsal bones. It occurs in 10% of leprosy patients, and is responsible for many severe foot deformities associated with this disease. The main cause is micro-traumata, but sensory impairment, sepsis and osteoporosis are predisposing factors. In this series of 400 consecutive patients the talus and navicular were involved most frequently (72% of 119 tarsal lesions). Treatment, including prolonged immobilisation of the foot, results in dense sclerosis of the affected bone, and leaves a functional limb. Initial radiological features include bone fragmentation, calcified fragments in adjacent soft tissues, linear fractures, progressive compression and deformity of the affected bone, loss of density of the affected bone and flattening of the longitudinal plantar arch. Illustrative case histories are presented, and the differential diagnosis discussed. (author)

  13. Bone health in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coleman, R; Body, J J; Aapro, M;

    2014-01-01

    There are three distinct areas of cancer management that make bone health in cancer patients of increasing clinical importance. First, bone metastases are common in many solid tumours, notably those arising from the breast, prostate and lung, as well as multiple myeloma, and may cause major...... morbidity including fractures, severe pain, nerve compression and hypercalcaemia. Through optimum multidisciplinary management of patients with bone metastases, including the use of bone-targeted treatments such as potent bisphosphonates or denosumab, it has been possible to transform the course of advanced...... cancer for many patients resulting in a major reduction in skeletal complications, reduced bone pain and improved quality of life. Secondly, many of the treatments we use to treat cancer patients have effects on reproductive hormones, which are critical for the maintenance of normal bone remodelling...

  14. Distribution Principle of Bone Tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yifang; Fan, Yubo; Xu, Zongxiang; Li, Zhiyu

    2009-01-01

    Using the analytic and experimental techniques we present an exploratory study of the mass distribution features of the high coincidence of centre of mass of heterogeneous bone tissue in vivo and its centroid of geometry position. A geometric concept of the average distribution radius of bone issue is proposed and functional relation of this geometric distribution feature between the partition density and its relative tissue average distribution radius is observed. Based upon the mass distribution feature, our results suggest a relative distance assessment index between the center of mass of cortical bone and the bone center of mass and establish a bone strength equation. Analysing the data of human foot in vivo, we notice that the mass and geometric distribution laws have expanded the connotation of Wolff's law, which implies a leap towards the quantitative description of bone strength. We finally conclude that this will not only make a positive contribution to help assess osteoporosis, but will also provide...

  15. [Radiological assessment of bone quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Structural property of bone includes micro- or nano-structural property of the trabecular and cortical bone, and macroscopic geometry. Radiological technique is useful to analyze the bone structural property;micro-CT or synchrotron-CT is available to analyze micro- or nano-structural property of bone samples ex vivo, and multi-detector row CT(MDCT)or high-resolution peripheral QCT(HR-pQCT)is available to analyze human bone in vivo. For the analysis of hip geometry, CT-based hip structure analysis(HSA)is available aw sell se radiography and DXA-based HSA. These structural parameters are related to biomechanical property, and these assessment tools provide information of pathological changes or the effects of anti-osteoporotic agents on bone. PMID:26728530

  16. SWALLOWED FISH BONES IN MALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacko HB

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the different aspects, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic of 114 cases of fish bones in the upper digestive tract . Methods: One hundred fourteen patients with fish bones suspected in the upper digestive tract were admitted in our department between February 2010 and October 2012. Results: There was a predominance of the male: 66 men (58%. The average age of the patients was 26 years with extremes 3 to 62 years old. The tongue base and vallecula are constituted the principals locations 66.66%. In the majority of the cases the fish bones were removed by direct pharyngoscopy in 43.86 %. We have not notified any serious complications. Conclusion: Therefore this study shows the foreign fish bones are frequently just as well in children as adult. The fish bones are particularly lodged in tongue base. The classical methods of extraction are permit to remove the all foreign fish bones.

  17. Symmetry analysis of talus bone

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, K.; Dobbe, A.; Komeili, A.; Duke, K; EL-RICH,M; Dhillon, S.; Adeeb, S.; Jomha, N. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The main object of this study was to use a geometric morphometric approach to quantify the left-right symmetry of talus bones. Methods Analysis was carried out using CT scan images of 11 pairs of intact tali. Two important geometric parameters, volume and surface area, were quantified for left and right talus bones. The geometric shape variations between the right and left talus bones were also measured using deviation analysis. Furthermore, location of asymmetry in the geometric sh...

  18. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino

    2013-01-01

    In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of pa...

  19. Where did bone come from?

    OpenAIRE

    Obradovic Wagner, Darja; Aspenberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    Bone is specific to vertebrates, and originated as mineralization around the basal membrane of the throat or skin, giving rise to tooth-like structures and protective shields in animals with a soft cartilage-like endoskeleton. A combination of fossil anatomy and genetic information from modern species has improved our understanding of the evolution of bone. Thus, even in man, there are still similarities in the molecular regulation of skin append-ages and bone. This article gives a brief over...

  20. Bone Density in Cerebral Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Houlihan, Christine Murray; Stevenson, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength predisposing a person to an increased risk of fracture.1 Osteoporosis remains a major health problem worldwide, costing an estimated $13.8 billion in health care each year in the United States. Despite advances in treating osteoporosis in the elderly, no cure exists. Osteoporosis has its roots in childhood. Accrual of bone mass occurs throughout childhood and early adulthood, and peak bone mass is a key determinant...

  1. Issues in modern bone histomorphometry☆

    OpenAIRE

    Recker, R R; Kimmel, D. B.; Dempster, D.; Weinstein, R S; Wronski, T.J.; Burr, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    This review reports on proceedings of a bone histomorphometry session conducted at the Fortieth International IBMS Sun Valley Skeletal Tissue Biology Workshop held on August 1, 2010. The session was prompted by recent technical problems encountered in conducting histomorphometry on bone biopsies from humans and animals treated with anti-remodeling agents such as bisphosphonates and RANKL antibodies. These agents reduce remodeling substantially, and thus cause problems in calculating bone remo...

  2. Anorexia nervosa and bone metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by self-induced starvation with a lifetime prevalence of 2.2% in women. The most common medical co-morbidity in women with AN is bone loss, with over 85% of women having bone mineral density values more than one standard deviation below an age comparable mean. The low bone mass in AN is due to multiple hormonal adaptations to under nutrition, including hypothalamic amenorrhea and growth hormone resistance. Importa...

  3. Green Tea and Bone metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Yeh, James K.; Cao, Jay; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in both elderly women and men. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between tea consumption and the prevention of age-related bone loss in elderly women and men. Ingestion of green tea and green tea bioactive compounds may be beneficial in mitigating bone loss of this population and decreasing their risk of osteoporotic fractures. This review describes the effect of green tea or its bioactive components on bone health, with an emphasis on: (...

  4. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  5. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  6. Expansion of the CHR bone code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the coding system used in the Center for Human Radiobiology (CHR) to identify individual bones and portions of bones of a complete skeletal system. It includes illustrations of various bones and bone segments with their respective code numbers. Codes are also presented for bone groups and for nonbone materials

  7. Craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia, wormian bone type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaya, J M; Hall, C M; García-Miñaur, S; Delgado, A

    1998-05-18

    We report on a 4-year-old boy with craniometadiaphyseal dysplasia (CMDD), wormian bone type. Component manifestations include a large head with prominent forehead, skull changes showing multiple wormian bones, wide long tubular bones without the usual metaphyseal flare, wide and short tubular bones without the normal diaphyseal constriction, and wide ribs and clavicles. In addition to these findings, the propositus, his brother, his father, and a paternal aunt all have parietal protuberances, which seem not related to CMDD. Parental consanguineity supports the autosomal recessive transmission of the condition. PMID:9605592

  8. Dissociation of bone formation markers in bone metastasis of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Koizumi, M; Maeda, H.; Yoshimura, K; Yamauchi, T.; Kawai, T.; Ogata, E

    1997-01-01

    To clarify the meaning and clinical value of bone formation markers in bone metastasis from prostate cancer, we investigated the bone formation markers carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PICP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BA1-p) and osteocalcin, so-called bone gla protein (BGP) in 43 prostate cancer patients with and 46 patients without overt bone metastasis. Patients with bone metastasis were evaluated repeatedly by bone scan at intervals of 3-6 months. The expression...

  9. Osseointegration of subperiosteal implants using bovine bone substitute and various membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Merete; Schou, S.; Hjørting-Hansen, E.; Helbo, M.; Vikjær, D.

    Osseointegration, subperiosteal implant, bone substitute, bovine bone, guided bone, regeneration, histology, rabbits......Osseointegration, subperiosteal implant, bone substitute, bovine bone, guided bone, regeneration, histology, rabbits...

  10. The Dragon Bone Collectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Finding of a dinosaur fossil skeleton sparks excitement among paleontologists and locals in a poor Henan village Avillager’s accidental discovery four years ago has made known to the world a rich mine of dinosaur fossils in Ruyang County,central China’s Henan Province.At the same time,the fate of the small village has been changed. Li Chui,a farmer in Shaping Village, thought he had found bones of a"dragon"when he dug up stones for his new house on an April morning in 2005.

  11. Bones of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Correa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The film Bones of the Earth (Riglin, Cunninham & Correa, 2014 is an experience in collective inquiry and visual creation based on arts-based research. Starting from the meeting of different subjectivities and through dialogue, planning, shooting and editing, an audiovisual text that reconstructs a reflexive process of collective creation is built. A sense of community, on-going inquiry, connections and social commitment inform the creative process. As a result, the video’s nearly five intense minutes are a metaphor for the search for personal meaning, connection with nature and intersubjective positioning in a world that undergoes constant change.

  12. Bone-Targeted Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, J.; Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Fehm, T.

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates and denosumab are well established components of the therapy for osteoporosis and osseous metastases. Their relevance in the adjuvant situation for breast cancer patients is being discussed in part controversially due to the heterogeneous nature of the available data. In particular, it appears that post-menopausal women benefit from an adjuvant therapy with bisphosphonates. In the present contribution we discuss the clinical relevance of osteoprotective therapy in the metastatic and adjuvant settings. Above all the current AGO guidelines on osteo-oncology and bone health have been taken into consideration for recommendations to implement the available data. PMID:26166839

  13. Crosstalk between cartilage and bone: when bone cytokines matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funck-Brentano, Thomas; Cohen-Solal, Martine

    2011-04-01

    The cartilage damage which characterizes osteoarthritis is often accompanied by bone lesions. Joint integrity results from the balance in the physiological interactions between bone and cartilage. Several local factors regulate the physiological remodeling of cartilage, the disequilibrium of these leading to a higher cartilage catabolism. Several cytokines secreted by bone cells can induce chondrocyte differentiation, which suggests their role in the dialogue between both cells. Accumulative in vivo evidence shows that increased bone resorption occurs at an early stage in the development of osteoarthritis and that blocking bone-resorbing cytokines prevents cartilage damage, confirming the role of bone factors in the crosstalk of both tissues. Recently, molecules of the Wnt pathway have emerged as key regulators of bone and cartilage. Activation of Wnt/βcatenin induces an imbalance in cartilage homeostasis, and agonists/antagonists of Wnt are potential candidates for this interaction. This review will summarize what is known about the contribution of bone cytokines to the physiological remodeling of cartilage and in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis. PMID:21596615

  14. The correlation between the bone mineral density of cancellous bone and the bone quality in the jaw bone of implant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between the bone mineral density of cancellous bone in the jawbone and the grading of the bone quality by operative findings in implant patients. The jawbones of 53 implant patients (15 males and 38 females), 150 sites (maxilla 50 sites, mandible :100 sites) were analyzed by the preoperative Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) examination. The oral surgeons categorized the bone quality in four grades based on the operative findings (tactile sense). Statistical analyses were performed and the bone mineral densities of cancellous bone were compared with the grades of the bone qualities. The results were as follows: The bone mineral density of cancellous bone of males was significantly higher than that of females (p<0.05). The bone quality of females was significantly poorer than that of males (p<0.05). The bone mineral density of cancellous bone of the maxillae tended to be lower than that of the mandibles. The bone quality of the maxillae was significantly poorer than that of the mandibles (p<0.05). There was a significant correlation between the bone mineral density of cancellous bone and the bone quality in the implant patients (p<0.05, r=-0.60). These results demonstrated that the measurement of the bone mineral density of cancellous bone in the implant patients from the preoperative Quantitative Computed Tomography examination had the potential to diagnose the bone quality of the implant sites. (author)

  15. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  16. Does methamphetamine affect bone metabolism?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a close relationship between the central nervous system activity and bone metabolism. Therefore, methamphetamine (METH), which stimulates the central nervous system, is expected to affect bone turnover. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of METH in bone metabolism. Mice were divided into 3 groups, the control group receiving saline injections, and the 5 and 10 mg/kg METH groups (n = 6 in each group). All groups received an injection of saline or METH every other day for 8 weeks. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed by X-ray computed tomography. We examined biochemical markers and histomorphometric changes in the second cancellous bone of the left femoral distal end. The animals that were administered 5 mg/kg METH showed an increased locomotor activity, whereas those receiving 10 mg/kg displayed an abnormal and stereotyped behavior. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations were normal compared to the controls, whereas the serum protein concentration was lower in the METH groups. BMD was unchanged in all groups. Bone formation markers such as alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin significantly increased in the 5 mg/kg METH group, but not in the 10 mg/kg METH group. In contrast, bone resorption markers such as C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b did not change in any of the METH groups. Histomorphometric analyses were consistent with the biochemical markers data. A significant increase in osteoblasts, especially in type III osteoblasts, was observed in the 5 mg/kg METH group, whereas other parameters of bone resorption and mineralization remained unchanged. These results indicate that bone remodeling in this group was unbalanced. In contrast, in the 10 mg/kg METH group, some parameters of bone formation were significantly or slightly decreased, suggesting a low turnover metabolism. Taken together, our results suggest that METH had distinct dose-dependent effects on bone turnover and that

  17. Plug-N-Play: Mechanotransduction Goes Modular.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Nurunisa; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2016-03-16

    Mechanosensitive ion channels initiate sensory signals by converting mechanical information into electrochemical signals. In this issue of Neuron (Zhao et al., 2016), a data-rich structure-function study on mammalian mechanosensitive Piezo channels reveals a modular protein architecture that includes a central pore module surrounded by a force-sensing module. PMID:26985721

  18. Molecular mechanism of bone formation and regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Yamaguchi

    2008-01-01

    @@ Bone formation and regeneration are mediated by the coordinate action of various factors. Among these, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and runt-related gene 2 (Runx2) play crucial roles in bone formation.

  19. Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health for Lupus Patients Bone Health and Anorexia Nervosa Partner Resources Screening Tests and Immunizations Guidelines for ... calcium. Physical Activity. Girls and boys and young adults who exercise regularly generally achieve greater peak bone ...

  20. Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains KidsHealth > For Parents > Broken Bones, ... home. What to Do: For a Suspected Broken Bone: Do not move a child whose injury involves ...

  1. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Bones, Muscles, and Joints KidsHealth > For Parents > Bones, Muscles, ... able to stand, walk, run, or even sit. Bones and What They Do From our head to ...

  2. Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Bone Mass Measurement: What the Numbers Mean Publication available in: ... been one or more osteoporotic fractures. Low Bone Mass Versus Osteoporosis The information provided by a BMD ...

  3. ICTP in Bone Metastases of Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Franjević, Ana; Pavićević, Radomir; Bubanović, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases often appear in advanced stages of lung cancer. They are the result of modulation of bone metabolism by tumor cells that migrated into bone microenvironment and degraded bone organic matrix. Measurement of C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) in the serum of subjects with lung cancer with and without bone metastases and healthy population is the way to explore bone resorption. In 343 subjects included in this research ICTP level was significantly higher...

  4. Cancer to bone: a fatal attraction

    OpenAIRE

    Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Guise, Theresa A.; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-01-01

    When cancer metastasizes to bone, considerable pain and deregulated bone remodelling occurs, greatly diminishing the possibility of cure. Metastasizing tumour cells mobilize and sculpt the bone microenvironment to enhance tumour growth and to promote bone invasion. Understanding the crucial components of the bone microenvironment that influence tumour localization, along with the tumour-derived factors that modulate cellular and protein matrix components of bone to favour tumour expansion and...

  5. Porous hydroxyapatite for artificial bone applications

    OpenAIRE

    I. Sopyan et al

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been used clinically for many years. It has good biocompatibility in bone contact as its chemical composition is similar to that of bone material. Porous HA ceramics have found enormous use in biomedical applications including bone tissue regeneration, cell proliferation, and drug delivery. In bone tissue engineering it has been applied as filling material for bone defects and augmentation, artificial bone graft material, and prosthesis revision surgery. Its high surfa...

  6. Bone metabolism in thyroidectomized patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bone mineral content in the patients who had undergone operation for thyroid carcinoma was measured by quantitative CT. Thirty-eight cases were enrolled as the subjects. All cases were papillary adenocarcinoma of the thyroid. The totally thyroidectomized group consisted of 3 males and 14 females, and the non-totally thyroidectomized group (post-lobectomy) 3 males and 18 females. Thirty-eight healthy males and females were assigned to the control group. For evaluation of bone mineral content, quantitative CT was used and bone mineral content in the patient's lumbar vertebrae was measured. Concurrently, bone metabolic parameter in serum was determined. No significant difference was observed in the mean bone mineral content among the above three groups. To make correction by sex and age, BMC-index was defined as the value that the bone mineral content in each case was divided by the standard mean by the same age and sex. No significant difference was observed in BMC-index among the above three groups. No significant correlation was observed in serum calcitonin level with the bone mineral content and BMC-index. It suggests that no influence is exerted on bone metabolism if serum calcitonin is maintained in the physiological level. (author)

  7. Bone Grafting the Cleft Maxilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... systemic disease such as diabetes, or has poor oral hygiene, the risk that the graft may fail increases even more. Once the bone graft has been placed, there are three options that ... replacement (dental bridge); or 3) dental metallic bone implants. The ...

  8. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing ...

  9. Fusion of the ear bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caused by: Birth (congenital) defect Infection Injury Symptoms Fusion of the bones leads to hearing loss, because the bones are not moving and vibrating in reaction to sound waves. Images Ear anatomy Medical findings based on ear anatomy References Torres AI, ...

  10. Unusual sutural bones at pterion

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak SB; KV S

    2008-01-01

    The existence of Wormian (sutural) bones in the skull is well known. We found three unusual Wormian bones at the right pterion in an adult Indian skull. The variation noted was unilateral. This type of variation has not been reported yet.

  11. Bone healing around nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, deproteinized bovine bone mineral, biphasic calcium phosphate, and autogenous bone in mandibular bone defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broggini, Nina; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Jensen, Simon S;

    2015-01-01

    with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA-SiO), deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) with a 60/40% HA/β-TCP (BCP 60/40) ratio, or particulate autogenous bone (A) for histological and histomorphometric analysis. At 2 weeks, percent filler amongst the test groups (DBBM (35.65%), HA...

  12. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be more useful in identifying bone and joint injuries (e.g., meniscal and ligament tears in the knee, rotator cuff and labrum tears in the shoulder) and in imaging of the spine (because both the bones and the spinal cord can ... suspected spine injury or other complicated injuries, 3-D reconstructed CT ...

  13. Bone tissue engineering in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Franz; Ebert, Regina; Ignatius, Anita; Matsushita, Takashi; Watanabe, Yoshinobu; Groll, Juergen; Walles, Heike

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis is a polygenetic, environmentally modifiable disease, which precipitates into fragility fractures of vertebrae, hip and radius and also confers a high risk of fractures in accidents and trauma. Aging and the genetic molecular background of osteoporosis cause delayed healing and impair regeneration. The worldwide burden of disease is huge and steadily increasing while the average life expectancy is also on the rise. The clinical need for bone regeneration applications, systemic or in situ guided bone regeneration and bone tissue engineering, will increase and become a challenge for health care systems. Apart from in situ guided tissue regeneration classical ex vivo tissue engineering of bone has not yet reached the level of routine clinical application although a wealth of scaffolds and growth factors has been developed. Engineering of complex bone constructs in vitro requires scaffolds, growth and differentiation factors, precursor cells for angiogenesis and osteogenesis and suitable bioreactors in various combinations. The development of applications for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone faces technical challenges concerning rapid vascularization for the survival of constructs in vivo. Recent new ideas and developments in the fields of bone biology, materials science and bioreactor technology will enable us to develop standard operating procedures for ex vivo tissue engineering of bone in the near future. Once prototyped such applications will rapidly be tailored for compromised conditions like vitamin D and sex hormone deficiencies, cellular deficits and high production of regeneration inhibitors, as they are prevalent in osteoporosis and in higher age. PMID:23562167

  14. Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    4 Low Bone Mass in Thalassemia • In addition to a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D, your doctor may recommend taking calcium ... What can be done to treat low bone mass? Following all of the above prevention measures is ...

  15. Space Radiation and Bone Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Jeffrey S; Lloyd, Shane A J; Nelson, Gregory A; Bateman, Ted A

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation may negatively impact skeletal integrity during extended spaceflight missions to the moon, Mars, or near-Earth asteroids. However, our understanding of the effects of radiation on bone is limited when compared to the effects of weightlessness. In addition to microgravity, astronauts will be exposed to space radiation from solar and cosmic sources. Historically, radiation exposure has been shown to damage both osteoblast precursors and local vasculature within the irradiated volume. The resulting suppression of bone formation and a general state of low bone-turnover is thought to be the primary contributor to bone loss and eventual fracture. Recent investigations using mouse models have identified a rapid, but transient, increase in osteoclast activity immediately after irradiation with both spaceflight and clinically-relevant radiation qualities and doses. Together with a chronic suppression of bone formation after radiation exposure, this acute skeletal damage may contribute to long-term deterioration of bone quality, potentially increasing fracture risk. Direct evidence for the damaging effects of radiation on human bone are primarily demonstrated by the increased incidence of fractures at sites that absorb high doses of radiation during cancer therapy: exposures are considerably higher than what could be expected during spaceflight. However, both the rapidity of bone damage and the chronic nature of the changes appear similar between exposure scenarios. This review will outline our current knowledge of space and clinical exploration exposure to ionizing radiation on skeletal health. PMID:22826632

  16. Green Tea and Bone Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem in elderly men and women. Epidemiological evidence has shown association between tea consumption and age-related bone loss in elderly men and women. The aim of this review is to provide a systemic review of green tea and bone health to cover the following topi...

  17. Parathyroid hormone and bone healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, M; Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, P

    2010-01-01

    pharmacological treatments are available. There is therefore an unmet need for medications that can stimulate bone healing. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is the first bone anabolic drug approved for the treatment of osteoporosis, and intriguingly a number of animal studies suggest that PTH could be beneficial in the...

  18. Ethnic Differences in Bone Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse eZengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There are differences in bone health between ethnic groups in both men and in women. Variations in body size and composition are likely to contribute to reported differences. Most studies report ethnic differences in areal bone mineral density (aBMD which do not consistently parallel ethnic patterns in fracture rates. This suggests that other parameters beside aBMD should be considered when determining fracture risk between and within populations, including other aspects of bone strength: bone structure and microarchitecture as well muscle strength (mass, force generation, anatomy and fat mass. We review what is known about differences in bone-densitometry derived outcomes between ethnic groups and the extent to which they account for the differences in fracture risk. Studies are included that were published primarily between 1994 – 2014. A ‘one size fits all approach’ should not be used to understand better ethnic differences in fracture risk.

  19. Investigations of Diabetic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jakob Starup

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fracture with and current fracture predictors underestimate fracture risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Thus, further understanding of the underlying causes of diabetic bone disease may lead to better fracture predictors and preventive...... measures in patients with diabetes. This PhD thesis reports the results of two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis, a state-of-the-art intervention study, a clinical cross-sectional study and a registry-based study all examining the relationship between diabetes, glucose, and bone. Patients with type 2...... diabetes had lower bone turnover markers compared to patients with type 1 diabetes and bone mineral density and tissue stiffness were increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. The bone turnover markers were inversely associated with blood glucose in patients with diabetes and both an oral glucose...

  20. Radiodiagnosis of hemophiliac bone pseudotumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of 259 hemophiliacs bone pseudotumors were diagnosed in 11 (4.3 %); they were localised in the femur (6 cases), calcaneus (4) and in the iliac bone (3). Two cases of combined fermoral and calcaneal lesions and 4 cases of bone fracture were observed. As a rule, pseudotumors developed in hemophiliacs with severe disease. An x-ray picture of a pseudotumor depended on its site and was characterized by a large soft tissue tumor shadow, often with calcinosis, and serious destructive changes in bones in the form or round foci of 7 cm in diameter with clear-cut contours. An adge defect of the cortical layer was defined in the diaphysis of the femoral bone (15 cm long). Destructive changes were often accompanied by osteosclerosis and periostitis