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Sample records for bone diseases developmental

  1. [Bone diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2016-01-13

    Calcium intake shows a small impact on bone mineral density and fracture risk. Denosumab is a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption than zoledronate. Abaloparatide, PTHrP analog, increases bone mineral density and decreases fracture incidence. Teriparatide could be delivered via a transdermic device. Romosozumab and odanacatib improve calculated bone strength. Sequential or combined treatments with denosumab and teriparatide could be of interest, but not denosumab followed by teriparatide. Fibrous dysplasia, Paget disease and hypophosphatasia are updated, as well as atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:26946704

  2. Developmental orthopaedic diseases in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases (DOD) is seen frequently in horses which completed their maturity. Osteochondrosis, physitis, angular limb deformities, flexural deformities, juvenil arthritis, cervical vertebral anomalies, cuboidal bone abnormalities are problems investigated under Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases title. This diseases can develop single or some together in fast growing, heavy animals (especially Arabian and English Thoroughbreds). Multifactorial causes of this diseases etiopathogenesis can be listed as genetic predisposition, trauma, nutrition, vitamins/minerals and endocrine disorders. But the exact causes of these diseases are not known. In this review detailed information are given about the diseases mentioned above

  3. Bone Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your bones help you move, give you shape and support your body. They are living tissues that rebuild constantly ... childhood and your teens, your body adds new bone faster than it removes old bone. After about ...

  4. Bone Marrow Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains stem cells. The stem cells can ... the platelets that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem ...

  5. [Metabolic bone disease osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuss-Borst, M A

    2014-05-01

    Osteomalacia is a rare disorder of bone metabolism leading to reduced bone mineralization. Underlying vitamin D deficiency and a disturbed phosphate metabolism (so-called hypophosphatemic osteomalacia) can cause the disease. Leading symptoms are dull localized or generalized bone pain, muscle weakness and cramps as well as increased incidence of falls. Rheumatic diseases, such as polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, myositis and fibromyalgia must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is typically elevated in osteomalacia while serum phosphate and/or 25-OH vitamin D3 levels are reduced. The diagnosis of osteomalacia can be confirmed by an iliac crest bone biopsy. Histological correlate is reduced or deficient mineralization of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix. Treatment strategies comprise supplementation of vitamin D and calcium and for patients with intestinal malabsorption syndromes vitamin D and calcium are also given parenterally. In renal phosphate wasting syndromes substitution of phosphate is the treatment of choice, except for tumor-induced osteomalacia when removal of the tumor leads to a cure in most cases. PMID:24811356

  6. Investigations of Diabetic Bone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Jakob Starup

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of fracture with and current fracture predictors underestimate fracture risk in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Thus, further understanding of the underlying causes of diabetic bone disease may lead to better fracture predictors and preventive...... measures in patients with diabetes. This PhD thesis reports the results of two systematic reviews and a meta-analysis, a state-of-the-art intervention study, a clinical cross-sectional study and a registry-based study all examining the relationship between diabetes, glucose, and bone. Patients with type 2...... diabetes had lower bone turnover markers compared to patients with type 1 diabetes and bone mineral density and tissue stiffness were increased in patients with type 2 diabetes. The bone turnover markers were inversely associated with blood glucose in patients with diabetes and both an oral glucose...

  7. Metastatic Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... concern for patients with MBD is the general loss in quality of life. How much of an effect MBD has on ... to be most effective in maintaining quality of life. A technetium bone scan ... blood count, because loss of red blood cells (anemia) is a frequent ...

  8. Bone disease in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Anastasia D; Lyritis, George P; Tournis, Symeon

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder accompanied by high morbidity and mortality. It is characterized by emaciation due to self-starvation and displays a unique hormonal profile. Alterations in gonadal axis, growth hormone resistance with low insulin-like growth factor I levels, hypercortisolemia and low triiodothyronine levels are almost universally present and constitute an adaptive response to malnutrition. Bone metabolism is likewise affected resulting in low bone mineral density, reduced bone accrual and increased fracture risk. Skeletal deficits often persist even after recovery from the disease with serious implications for future skeletal health. The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying bone disease are quite complicated and treatment is a particularly challenging task. PMID:24722126

  9. Bone scan in dental diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone images of the jaws and related dental structures were obtained in 25 patients undergoing skeletal surveys. The upper and lower jaws were divided into eight quadrants to facilitate comparisons between scintigraphic image findings and the results of dental examination. Fourteen of these 25 patients had at least one jaw quadrant with a positive image. The areas of positive uptake correlated well with dental examination findings, which included healing extraction sites and common dental diseases, such as pulpal and periodontal infections and irritations from ill-fitting dentures. The potential usefulness of bone imaging as an adjunct in dental diagnosis is discussed

  10. Bone disease in haemoglobin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersi Voskaridou

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with thalassaemia and other haemoglobin disorders. The delay in sexual maturation, the presence of diabetes and hypothyroidism, the parathyroid gland dysfunction, the haemolytic anaemia, the progressive marrow expansion, the iron toxicity on osteoblasts, the iron chelators, and the deficiency of growth hormone or insulin growth factors have been identified as major causes of osteoporosis in thalassaemia. Adequate hormonal replacement, effective iron chelation, improvement of hemoglobin levels, calcium and vitamin D administration, physical activity, and smoking cessation are the main to-date measures for the management of the disease. During the last decade, novel pathogenetic data suggest that the reduced osteoblastic activity, which is believed to be the basic mechanism of bone loss in thalassemia, is accompanied by a comparable or even greater increase in bone resorption. Therefore, potent inhibitors of osteoclast activation, such as the aminobisphosphonates, arise as key drugs for the management of osteoporosis in thalassaemia patients and other haemoglobin disorders.

  11. Pain and Paget's Disease of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Paget’s Disease of Bone Paget’s Disease Management Pain and Paget’s Disease of Bone Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page May 2015 Types of Pain Paget’s disease can cause several different kinds of ...

  12. Developmental Programming of Hypertension and Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euming Chong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence supports the concept that changes in the intrauterine milieu during “sensitive” periods of embryonic development or in infant diet after birth affect the developing individual, resulting in general health alterations later in life. This phenomenon is referred to as “developmental programming” or “developmental origins of health and disease.” The risk of developing late-onset diseases such as hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD, obesity or type 2 diabetes is increased in infants born prematurely at <37 weeks of gestation or in low birth weight (LBW infants weighing <2,500 g at birth. Both genetic and environmental events contribute to the programming of subsequent risks of CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW individuals. A number of observations suggest that susceptibility to subsequent CKD and hypertension in premature or LBW infants is mediated, at least in part, by reduced nephron endowment. The major factors influencing in utero environment that are associated with a low final nephron number include uteroplacental insufficiency, maternal low-protein diet, hyperglycemia, vitamin A deficiency, exposure to or interruption of endogenous glucocorticoids, and ethanol exposure. This paper discusses the effect of premature birth, LBW, intrauterine milieu, and infant feeding on the development of hypertension and renal disease in later life as well as examines the role of the kidney in developmental programming of hypertension and CKD.

  13. Myeloma bone disease: Pathophysiology and management

    OpenAIRE

    Silbermann, Rebecca; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma bone disease is marked by severe dysfunction of both bone formation and resorption and serves as a model for understanding the regulation of osteoblasts (OBL) and osteoclasts (OCL) in cancer. Myeloma bone lesions are purely osteolytic and are associated with severe and debilitating bone pain, pathologic fractures, hypercalcemia, and spinal cord compression, as well as increased mortality. Interactions within the bone marrow microenvironment in myeloma are responsible for the ...

  14. Cellular Mechanisms of Multiple Myeloma Bone Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Oranger; Claudia Carbone; Maddalena Izzo; Maria Grano

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy of differentiated plasma cells that accumulates and proliferates in the bone marrow. MM patients often develop bone disease that results in severe bone pain, osteolytic lesions, and pathologic fractures. These skeletal complications have not only a negative impact on quality of life but also a possible effect in overall survival. MM osteolytic bone lesions arise from the altered bone remodeling due to both increased osteoclast activation and d...

  15. Photodynamic therapy of diseased bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisland, Stuart K.; Yee, Albert; Siewerdsen, Jeffery; Wilson, Brian C.; Burch, Shane

    2005-08-01

    Objective: Photodynamic therapy (PDT) defines the oxygen-dependent reaction that occurs upon light-mediated activation of a photosensitizing compound, culminating in the generation of cytotoxic, reactive oxygen species, predominantly, singlet oxygen. We are investigating PDT treatment of diseased bone. Methods: Using a rat model of human breast cancer (MT-1)-derived bone metastasis we confirmed the efficacy of benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid (BPD-MA)-PDT for treating metastatic lesions within vertebrae or long bones. Results: Light administration (150 J) 15 mins after BPDMA (2.5 mg/Kg, i.v.) into the lumbar (L3) vertebra of rats resulted in complete ablation of the tumour and surrounding bone marrow 48 hrs post-PDT without paralysis. Porcine vertebrae provided a model comparable to that of human for light propagation (at 150 J/cm) and PDT response (BPD-MA; 6 mg/m2, i.v.) in non-tumour vertebrae. Precise fibre placement was afforded by 3-D cone beam computed tomography. Average penetration depth of light was 0.16 +/- 0.04 cm, however, the necrotic/non-necrotic interface extended 0.6 cm out from the treatment fiber with an average incident fluence rate of 4.3 mW/cm2. Non-necrotic tissue damage was evident 2 cm out from the treatment fiber. Current studies involving BPD-MA-PDT treatment of primary osteosarcomas in the forelimbs of dogs are very promising. Magnetic resonance imaging 24 hr post treatment reveal well circumscribed margins of treatment that encompass the entire 3-4 cm lesion. Finally, we are also interested in using 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) mediated PDT to treat osteomyelitis. Response to therapy was monitored as changes in bioluminescence signal of staphylococcus aureus (SA)-derived biofilms grown onto 0.5 cm lengths of wire and subjected to ALA-PDT either in vitro or in vivo upon implant into the intramedullary space of rat tibia. Transcutaneous delivery of PDT (75 J/cm2) effectively eradicated SAbiofilms within bone. Conclusions: Results support

  16. Developmental Programming, a Pathway to Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Cardoso, Rodolfo C; Puttabyatappa, Muraly

    2016-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that insults occurring during the perinatal period alter the developmental trajectory of the fetus/offspring leading to long-term detrimental outcomes that often culminate in adult pathologies. These perinatal insults include maternal/fetal disease states, nutritional deficits/excess, stress, lifestyle choices, exposure to environmental chemicals, and medical interventions. In addition to reviewing the various insults that contribute to developmental programming and the benefits of animal models in addressing underlying mechanisms, this review focuses on the commonalities in disease outcomes stemming from various insults, the convergence of mechanistic pathways via which various insults can lead to common outcomes, and identifies the knowledge gaps in the field and future directions. PMID:26859334

  17. Developmental origin of immune diseases - Environmental influences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strom, M.; Halldorsson, T. I.; Hansen, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that developmental exposures to environmental chemicals may have long lasting adverse consequences for the development of the immune system. In humans such findings have mostly been explored for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls...... (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, andmorerecently perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Developmental exposures to PCBs have, for example, been associated with both otitis media and lower respiratory infections. Evidence regarding asthma and allergic disease is less well established, partly due to lack of...... years of age we have examined the long term consequences of in utero exposure to POPs on offspring use of asthma medication and biomarkers of allergic airway disease. Using registry based information on offspring use of asthma medication until 20 years of age, prenatal exposures to PCB-118 and...

  18. Epigenetics and the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease#

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epigenetic programming is likely to be an important mechanism underlying the lasting influence of the reproductive and developmental environment on lifelong health, a concept known as the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD). Environmental exposures including paren...

  19. Cat-Scratch Disease With Bone Involvemnet

    OpenAIRE

    Maia, R; Brito, MJ; Sousa, R.; Gouveia, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bartonella henselae infection typically presents as a self-limiting regional lymphadenopathy. Bone involvement is a very rare form of the disease. Aims: To describe bone infection associated to cat-scratch disease (CSD) in a portuguese pediatric hospital. Methods: Clinical records of children admitted at the hospital with the diagnosis of CSD associated bone infection, during 2010, were reviewed. Diagnosis was confirmed by serology using indirect fluorescence assay ...

  20. How Is Paget's Disease of Bone Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease of bone. Blood test (measurement of serum alkaline phosphatase) . Sometimes blood test results are what first alert ... usual level of a chemical substance called serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP), it is a sign that the disease ...

  1. Histologic diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases: bone histomorphometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dalle Carbonare

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Histomorphometry or quantitative histology is the analysis on histologic sections of bone resorption parameters, formation and structure. It is the only technique that allows a dynamic evaluation of the activity of bone modelling after labelling with tetracycline. Moreover, the new measurement procedures through the use of the computer allow an assessment of bone microarchitecture too. Histomorphometric bone biopsy is a reliable and well-tolerated procedure. Complications are reported only in 1% of the subjects (hematoma, pain, transient neuralgia. Histomorphometry is used to exclude or confirm the diagnosis of osteomalacia. It is employed in the evaluation of bone damage associated with particular treatments (for example, anticonvulsants or in case of rare bone diseases (osteogenesis imperfecta, systemic mastocytosis. It is also an essential approach when clinical, biochemical and other diagnostic data are not consistent. Finally, it is a useful method to understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms of drugs. The bone sample is taken at the level of iliac crest under local anesthesia. It is then put into methyl-metacrilate resin where the sections are prepared for the microscopic analysis of the various histomorphometric parameters.

  2. Bone Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonediseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Bone changes in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism has been associated with growth impairment,osteomalacia, delayed fracture healing, and asepticnecrosis (primarily necrosis of the femoral head), butthe main alterations observed in the bones of alcoholicpatients are osteoporosis and an increased risk offractures. Decreased bone mass is a hallmark of osteoporosis,and it may be due either to decreased bone synthesis and/or to increased bone breakdown. Ethanolmay affect both mechanisms. It is generally acceptedthat ethanol decreases bone synthesis, and most authorshave reported decreased osteocalcin levels (a "marker" ofbone synthesis), but some controversy exists regardingthe effect of alcohol on bone breakdown, and, indeed,disparate results have been reported for telopeptideand other biochemical markers of bone resorption.In addition to the direct effect of ethanol, systemicalterations such as malnutrition, malabsorption, liverdisease, increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines,alcoholic myopathy and neuropathy, low testosteronelevels, and an increased risk of trauma, play contributoryroles. The treatment of alcoholic bone disease should beaimed towards increasing bone formation and decreasingbone degradation. In this sense, vitamin D and calciumsupplementation, together with biphosphonates areessential, but alcohol abstinence and nutritional improvementare equally important. In this review we study thepathogenesis of bone changes in alcoholic liver diseaseand discuss potential therapies.

  4. Oral Health and Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for periodontitis and tooth loss. Role of the Dentist and Dental X Rays Research supported by the ... normal bone density. Because many people see their dentist more regularly than their doctor, dentists are in ...

  5. Glutamate signalling in healthy and diseased bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EricP.Seidlitz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone relies on multiple extracellular signalling systems to maintain homeostasis of its normal structure and functions. The amino acid glutamate is a fundamental extracellular messenger molecule in many tissues, and is used in bone for both neural and non-neural signalling. This review focuses on the non-neural interactions, and examines the evolutionarily ancient glutamate signalling system in the context of its application to normal bone functioning and discusses recent findings on the role of glutamate signalling as they pertain to maintaining healthy bone structure. The underlying mechanisms of glutamate signalling and the many roles glutamate plays in modulating bone physiology are featured, including those involved in osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and mature cell functions. Moreover, the relevance of glutamate signalling systems in diseases that affect bone, such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, is discussed, and will highlight how the glutamate system may be exploited as a viable therapeutic target. We will identify novel areas of research where knowledge of glutamate communication mechanisms may aid in our understanding of the complex nature of bone homeostasis. By uncovering the contributions of glutamate in maintaining healthy bone, the reader will discover how this complex molecular signalling system may advance our capacity to treat bone pathologies.

  6. Bone scan in inflammatory osseous disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate bone scan has become a sensitive, reliable, and safe method for evaluating the patient with suspected inflammatory disease of bone. The scan may become positive as early as the first 24 hr after the symptoms and 10-14 days before roentgenographic changes occur. It can be used to differentiate successfully a variety of diseases from osteomyelitis, and in conjunction with 67Ga-citrate scan has become a mainstay in the work-up of the patient with infectious disease. Applications of the bone scan to infectious diseases in pediatric practice are especially helpful, since these diseases are common problems in this age group. Increased experience with the /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate bone scan has already defined several areas of ''limitations'' in evaluating inflammatory disease. ''Cold'' defects, negative scans in early stages of osteomyelitis, and ''extended uptake'' may all pose problems in interpretation, but careful correlation of the bone scan results with clinical history and physical findings, blood cultures, and roentgenography will significantly reduce these problems

  7. Sex Differences in the Developmental Origins of Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Intapad, Suttira; Ojeda, Norma B.; Dasinger, John Henry; Alexander, Barbara T.

    2014-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) proposes that adverse events during early life program an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Experimental models provide proof of concept but also indicate that insults during early life program sex differences in adult blood pressure and cardiovascular risk. This review will highlight the potential mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of sex differences in the developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

  8. [The new bone formation and bone metabolism in Forestier disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrych, Daniel; Bohatyrewicz, Andrzej; Woźniak, Wojciech; Zietek, Paweł; Kołodziej, Łukasz; Karaczun, Maciej; Grzegorczyk, Wojciech; Antoniak, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    The study was performed on 36 male patients between 65 and 83 years who were either hospitalised or treated in the out-patients clinic due to Forestier's disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the advance of ectopic bone formation process in cervical spine and bony metabolic changes in treated patients. The study showed reverse corelation between the degree of advance of cervical hyperostosis and the prevalence of osteoporosis and metabolic disorders in the tested group. The authors have emphasized the need of precise evaluation and differentiation of Forestier's disease and degenerative spine disease. PMID:18847002

  9. Primary extra nodal Hodgkin disease: Bone presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extra nodal and extra lymphatic propagation of Hodgkin’s disease is a characteristic of the fourth stage of disease when the organs are affected. Primary appearances of the disease outside the lymph node is a rare event. Therefore, it makes diagnostic problem. Skeletal system is possible localization of primary extra nodal Hodgkin’s disease. Women, 42-years-old, was admitted to hospital because of swelling and pain in the right shoulder. After imaging and histological examination diagnosed Hodgkin’s nodular sclerosing histological subtype disease has been established. The patient starts to receive chemotherapy. Primary extra nodal Hodgkin’s disease of bone is manifested with painful swelling in geared area. Imaging method shows destruction of the affected bone, with swelling of the soft tissues. Propagation in soft tissue is not accompanied by their destruction, but rather manifested swelling of the surrounding soft tissue

  10. Radiopharmacons for bone diseases diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some essential pharmacological and physical characteristics of several osteospecific radiopharmaceuticals are discussed. It is shown that among the osteotrophyc isotope products tested and partly already marketed in Hungary, 99mTc-HEDSPA and 99mTc-pyrophosphate have the most advantageous characteristics. Both are suitable for the detection of pathologic processes causing reactive bone proliferation or increased turnover. Their excellent detectability is only matched by 153Sm-EDTA, which is inferior in other respects. Owing to their low radiation doses they can be used for the examination of young patients too. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  11. The Pathogenesis of the Bone Disease of Multiple Myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Claire M; Zhuang, Junling; Mundy, Gregory R.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a fatal hematologic malignancy associated with clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells within the bone marrow and the development of a destructive osteolytic bone disease. The principal cellular mechanisms involved in the development of myeloma bone disease are an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption, and a reduction in bone formation. Myeloma cells are found in close association with sites of active bone resorption, and the interactions between myeloma cells, and o...

  12. What Is Paget's Disease of Bone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Paget’s disease do not need a special diet. But, to maintain strong bones, you should get 1,200 mg of calcium and at least 400 IU of vitamin D every day. After age 70, you should take 600 IU of vitamin D each day. If you have had kidney stones, talk with your doctor about how much calcium ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Paget disease of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic cause of classic Paget disease of bone , accounting for 10 to 50 percent of cases that ... familial ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (4 links) ...

  14. Diabetes mellitus related bone metabolism and periodontal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Ying Wu; E Xiao; Dana T Graves

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are chronic diseases affecting a large number of populations worldwide. Changed bone metabolism is one of the important long-term complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Alveolar bone loss is one of the main outcomes of periodontitis, and diabetes is among the primary risk factors for periodontal disease. In this review, we summarise the adverse effects of diabetes on the periodontium in periodontitis subjects, focusing on alveolar bone loss. Bone remodelling begins with osteoclasts resorbing bone, followed by new bone formation by osteoblasts in the resorption lacunae. Therefore, we discuss the potential mechanism of diabetes-enhanced bone loss in relation to osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  15. A case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experienced a case of osteomyelitis of mandibular bone in Kimura's disease. The patient received radiation therapy to head and neck area against the same disease. Bone tissue which received radiation therapy had developed malnutrition as side effect of radiation, and osteomyelitis was induced by infection from the teeth. Even in the benign soft tissue disease like Kimura's disease, especially after radiation therapy, pathologic fracture of bone may happen due to bone damage caused by radiation. (author)

  16. Impact of bone marrow on respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Sara M

    2008-06-01

    The bone marrow is not only a site of haematopoiesis but also serves as an important reservoir for mature granulocytes and stem cells, including haematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and fibrocytes. In respiratory diseases, such as asthma and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis these cells are mobilised from the bone marrow in response to blood-borne mediators and subsequently recruited to the lungs. Although the granulocytes contribute to the inflammatory reaction, stem cells may promote tissue repair or remodelling. Understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms that regulate the mobilisation of granulocytes and stem cells from the bone marrow may lead to the identification of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of a wide range of respiratory disorders. PMID:18372214

  17. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cannata, J.B. (Jorge); Rodríguez, Minerva; Gómez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone format...

  18. Fracture, aging and disease in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ager, J.W.; Balooch, G.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2006-02-01

    fracture resistance, whereas regulating the level of the cytokine TGF-beta can offer significant improvements in the stiffness, strength and toughness of bone, and as such may be considered as a therapeutic target to treat increased bone fragility induced by aging, drugs, and disease.

  19. A murine model of human myeloma bone disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, I.R.; Dallas, S.; Radl, J.; Mundy, G.R.

    1997-01-01

    Myeloma causes a devastating and unique form of osteolytic bone disease. Although osteoclast activation is responsible for bone destruction, the precise mechanisms by which myeloma cells increase osteoclast activity have not been defined. An animal model of human myeloma bone disease mould help in c

  20. Adult renal cystic disease: a genetic, biological, and developmental primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Kota, Gopi; Dasyam, Anil K; Shanbhogue, Alampady K P; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2010-10-01

    Renal cystic diseases in adults are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of multiple cysts in the kidneys. These diseases may be categorized as hereditary, acquired, or developmental on the basis of their pathogenesis. Hereditary conditions include autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, medullary cystic kidney disease, von Hippel-Lindau disease, and tuberous sclerosis. Acquired conditions include cystic kidney disease, which develops in patients with end-stage renal disease. Developmental cystic diseases of the adult kidney include localized renal cystic disease, multicystic dysplastic kidney, and medullary sponge kidney. In recent years, many molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal cystic diseases have been identified. Hereditary renal cystic diseases are characterized by genetic mutations that lead to defects in the structure and function of the primary cilia of renal tubular epithelial cells, abnormal proliferation of tubular epithelium, and increased fluid secretion, all of which ultimately result in the development of renal cysts. A better understanding of these pathophysiologic mechanisms is now providing the basis for the development of more targeted therapeutic drugs for some of these disorders. Cross-sectional imaging provides useful information for diagnosis, surveillance, prognostication, and evaluation of treatment response in renal cystic diseases. PMID:21071372

  1. Developmental mechanisms underlying variation in craniofacial disease and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jennifer L

    2016-07-15

    Craniofacial disease phenotypes exhibit significant variation in penetrance and severity. Although many genetic contributions to phenotypic variation have been identified, genotype-phenotype correlations remain imprecise. Recent work in evolutionary developmental biology has exposed intriguing developmental mechanisms that potentially explain incongruities in genotype-phenotype relationships. This review focuses on two observations from work in comparative and experimental animal model systems that highlight how development structures variation. First, multiple genetic inputs converge on relatively few developmental processes. Investigation of when and how variation in developmental processes occurs may therefore help predict potential genetic interactions and phenotypic outcomes. Second, genetic mutation is typically associated with an increase in phenotypic variance. Several models outlining developmental mechanisms underlying mutational increases in phenotypic variance are discussed using Satb2-mediated variation in jaw size as an example. These data highlight development as a critical mediator of genotype-phenotype correlations. Future research in evolutionary developmental biology focusing on tissue-level processes may help elucidate the "black box" between genotype and phenotype, potentially leading to novel treatment, earlier diagnoses, and better clinical consultations for individuals affected by craniofacial anomalies. PMID:26724698

  2. Gender differences in developmental programming of cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasinger, John Henry; Alexander, Barbara T

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Although multiple factors contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension, studies by Dr David Barker reporting an inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure led to the hypothesis that slow growth during fetal life increased blood pressure and the risk for cardiovascular disease in later life. It is now recognized that growth during infancy and childhood, in addition to exposure to adverse influences during fetal life, contributes to the developmental programming of increased cardiovascular risk. Numerous epidemiological studies support the link between influences during early life and later cardiovascular health; experimental models provide proof of principle and indicate that numerous mechanisms contribute to the developmental origins of chronic disease. Sex has an impact on the severity of cardiovascular risk in experimental models of developmental insult. Yet, few studies examine the influence of sex on blood pressure and cardiovascular health in low-birth weight men and women. Fewer still assess the impact of ageing on sex differences in programmed cardiovascular risk. Thus, the aim of the present review is to highlight current data about sex differences in the developmental programming of blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26814204

  3. Celiac disease: A missed cause of metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Celiac disease (CD is a highly prevalent autoimmune disease. The symptoms of CD are varied and atypical, with many patients having no gastrointestinal symptoms. Metabolic bone disease (MBD is a less recognized manifestation of CD associated with spectrum of musculoskeletal signs and symptoms, viz. bone pains, proximal muscle weakness, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fracture. We here report five patients who presented with severe MBD as the only manifestation of CD. Materials and Methods: Records of 825 patients of CD diagnosed during 2002-2010 were retrospectively analyzed for clinical features, risk factors, signs, biochemical, and radiological parameters. Results: We were able to identify five patients (0.6% of CD who had monosymptomatic presentation with musculoskeletal symptoms and signs in the form of bone pains, proximal myopathy, and fragility fractures without any gastrointestinal manifestation. All the five patients had severe MBD in the form of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and fragility fractures. Four of the five patients had additional risk factors such as antiepileptic drugs, chronic alcohol consumption, malnutrition, and associated vitamin D deficiency which might have contributed to the severity of MBD. Conclusion: Severe metabolic disease as the only presentation of CD is rare. Patients show significant improvement in clinical, biochemical, and radiological parameters with gluten-free diet, calcium, and vitamin D supplementation. CD should be looked for routinely in patients presenting with unexplained MBD.

  4. Progress in the clinical imaging research of bone diseases on ankle and foot sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaozhong; Shi, Lenian; Liu, Taiyun; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles are research focuses of foot and ankle surgery. Pains of the foot and ankle are related to sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles. The specific anatomical and functional relationship of sesamoid bones and accessory ossicles can cause such bone diseases as the dislocation of sesamoid bones and accessory bones, infection, inflammation and necrosis of sesamoid bones, cartilage softening, tenosynovitis of sesamoid bones and the sesamoid bone syndrome. However,...

  5. Effects of developmental exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on long bone morphology and bone cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, A; Finnilä, M A; Korkalainen, M; Spulber, S; Koponen, J; Håkansson, H; Tuukkanen, J; Viluksela, M

    2016-06-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a ubiquitous and persistent environmental chemical, which has been used extensively due to its stability and surface tension-lowering properties. Toxicological effects include induction of neonatal mortality and reproductive toxicity. In this study, pregnant C57BL/6 mice were exposed orally to 0.3mg PFOA/kg/day throughout pregnancy, and female offspring were studied at the age of 13 or 17months. Morphometrical and biomechanical properties of femurs and tibias were analyzed with micro-computed tomography and 3-point bending, and bone PFOA concentrations were determined by mass spectrometry. The effects of PFOA on bone cell differentiation were studied in osteoclasts from C57BL/6 mice and in the MC3T3 pre-osteoblast cell line. PFOA exposed mice showed increased femoral periosteal area as well as decreased mineral density of tibias. Biomechanical properties of these bones were not affected. Bone PFOA concentrations were clearly elevated even at the age of 17months. In osteoblasts, low concentrations of PFOA increased osteocalcin (OCN) expression and calcium secretion, but at PFOA concentrations of 100μM and above osteocalcin (OCN) expression and calcium secretion were decreased. The number of osteoclasts was increased at all PFOA concentrations tested and resorption activity dose-dependently increased from 0.1-1.0μM, but decreased at higher concentrations. The results show that PFOA accumulates in bone and is present in bones until the old age. PFOA has the potential to influence bone turnover over a long period of time. Therefore bone is a target tissue for PFOA, and altered bone geometry and mineral density seem to persist throughout the life of the animal. PMID:27068293

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging diagnosis in infectious bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    Infectious and inflammatory bone diseases include a wide range of disease process, depending on the patient's age, location of infection, various causative organisms, duration from symptom onset, accompanied fracture or prior surgery, prosthesis insertion, and underlying systemic disease such as diabetes, etc. Bone infection may induce massive destruction of bones and joints, results in functional reduction and disability. The key to successful management is early diagnosis and proper treatment. Various radionuclide imaging methods including three phase bone scan, Ga-67 scan, WBC scan, and combined imaging techniques such as bone/Ga-67 scan, WBC/bone marrow scan add complementary role to the radiologic imaging modalities including plain radiography, CT and MRI. F-18 FDG PET imaging also has recently been introduced in diagnosis of infected prosthesis and chronic active osteomyelitis. Selection of proper nuclear medicine imaging method will improve the diagnostic accuracy of infections and inflammatory bone diseases, based on understanding of pathogenesis and radiologic imaging findings.

  7. Polyphosphate bone scanning on non-malignant bone disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, D.J.; Gilday, D.L.

    1975-12-01

    The advent of /sup 99m/technetium phosphate bone scanning radiopharmaceuticals has opened new methods of investigation of pediatric bone diseases. In axial skeleton pain, suspected osteomyelitis, evaluation of vascular integrity and suspected but undetected fractures, the bone scan has proved to be a highly complementary study to the radiologic examination.

  8. Orthopantomographic study of the alveolar bone level on periodontal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author had measured the alveolar bone level of periodontal disease on 50 cases of orthopantomogram to detect the degree of alveolar bone resorption of both sexes of Korean. The results were obtained as follows; 1. Alveolar bone resorption of mesial and distal portion was similar in same patient. 2. The order of alveolar bone resorption was mandibular anterior region, posterior region, canine and premolar region of both jaws. 3. The degree of alveolar bone destruction was severe in shorter root length than longer one. 4. The degree of alveolar bone resorption was severe in fourth decades.

  9. Re-evaluation of bone pain in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease suggests that bone crises occur in small bones as well as long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baris, Hagit N; Weisz Hubshman, Monika; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Kornreich, Liora; Shkalim Zemer, Vered; Cohen, Ian J

    2016-09-01

    Bone crises in type 1 Gaucher disease are reported in long bones and occasionally in weight bearing bones and other bones, but rarely in small bones of the hands and feet. We retrospectively examined the incidence of bone pain in patients followed at the Rabin Medical Center, Israel, before and following the initiation of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and evaluated them for bone crises. Of 100 type I Gaucher disease patients, 30 (30%) experienced one or more bone crises. Small bone crises represented 31.5% of all bone crises and were always preceded by crises in other bones. While the incidence of long bone crises reduced after the initiation of ERT, small bone crises increased. Almost 60% of patients with bone crises were of the N370S/84GG genotype suggesting a greater susceptibility of N370S/84GG patients to severe bone complications. These patients also underwent the greatest number of splenectomies (70.6% of splenectomised patients). Splenectomised patients showed a trend towards increased long and small bone crises after surgery. Active investigation of acute pain in the hands and feet in patients in our cohort has revealed a high incidence of small bone crises. Physicians should consider imaging studies to investigate unexplained pain in these areas. PMID:26051481

  10. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodriguez García, Minerva; Gómez Alonso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone formation and bone resorption, and less new bone is formed to replace bone losses. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization as "a disease characterized by low bone mineral density and micro architectural deterioration leading to low bone strength and increased risk of fractures." In the general population, there is a good correlation between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements and bone fractures, but this is not the case with CKD patients. Despite the fact that we have a great number of active antiosteoporotic drugs, the experience in CKD patients is limited. Adynamic bone is suspected based on biochemical parameters, mainly parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone alkaline phosphatase, but it needs to be proven using a bone biopsy, where a low or zero bone formation rate and a reduction or absence of osteoblasts and osteoclasts should be found. The clinical management of adynamic bone has important limitations and currently does not allow taking many active measures. Treatment is mainly based on the prevention of risk factors known to induce PTH oversuppression, such as aluminium and calcium load and very high doses of vitamin D receptor activators. Due to the limitations in the treatment of both conditions, prevention plays a key role in the management of these disorders. PMID:23023723

  11. Bone scintigraphy in non-neoplastic diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of 99mTc labeled polyphosphates bone scintigraphy has become a widely accepted method for the evaluation of non-neoplastic bone diseases in children. High quality images require the child's immobilisation and a correct positioning as well as an optimized technical equipment. Two or three phase scintigraphy is the routinely procedure but additional techniques like pinhole images or SPECT can be very helpful for special indications and localizations. Due to the age and sex dependent differences of bone metabolism in the developing skeleton the interpretation of the bone scan in children is more difficult than in adults and requires more experience. Infections, trauma and aseptic necrosis are the most important non-neoplastic diseases requiring bone scintigraphy. Bone scan has a high sensitivity in the early detection of pathological bone metabolism indicating bone disease; other investigations, which are describing morphological changes like X-ray are less sensitive especially at the beginning of the disease. Negative bone scan rools out significant bone disorders with a high certainty. Follow-up studies can give additional information about the response to therapeutical regimes and about the prognosis. To improve the specificity of a bone scan a combined interpretation of scintigraphy and X-ray is recommended

  12. Asymptomatic Paget's disease of bone presenting with complete atrioventricular block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Rauoof Malik; Nazir A.Lone; Hilal A.Rather; Vicar M Jan; Javid A.Malik; Khursheed A.Khan; S.Jalal

    2008-01-01

    @@ Paget's disease of bone is a deforming bone disease (osteitis deformans) characterized by increased bone remodeling,bone hypertrophy,and abnormal bone structure,leading to bone expansion,deformities,easy fractures,and occasionally,neoplastic transformation.It is the second most common bone disorder after osteoporosis.1 The disease is relatively rare in Asia but is common in Europe and North America,affecting approximately 2% of the population over 50 years,although lately,a decline in the prevalence has been reported.2 Paget's disease commonly affects people in or past their middle age and is slightly more common in men than in women.1 The exact cause of Paget's disease is not known.Environmental agents,particularly paramyxoviral infections (measles and canine distemper viruses) have been postulated as potential etiological factors.3 Recently,a strong genetic component has been described,with candidate loci suggested at 18q,5q35-QTER,and particularly,the squestosome 1/p62.2,3 The pathological process in Paget's disease consists of one or more areas of aggressive and relentless osteoclastic activity,coupled with deposition of structurally abnormal excessive bone and matrix tissues.1,4 Most of the cases involve only one (monostotic) or few bones,particularly skull,vertebrae,pelvis,femur,and tibia.

  13. Bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scanning provides information on the extent of primary bone tumors, on possible metastatic disease, on the presence of osteomyelitis prior to observation of roentgenographic changes so that earlier therapy is possible, on the presence of collagen diseases, on the presence of fractures not disclosed by x-ray films, and on the evaluation of aseptic necrosis. However, the total effect and contribution of bone scanning to the diagnosis, treatment, and ultimate prognosis of pediatric skeletal diseases is, as yet, unknown. (auth)

  14. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wenyi Gu,1,2 Chengtie Wu,3 Jiezhong Chen,1 Yin Xiao1 1Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. Keywords: nanoparticles, nanostructured scaffold, cancer bone metastasis, bone diseases, target drug delivery, bone regeneration

  15. Zoledronic acid in the management of metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Polascik

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Thomas J Polascik, Vladimir MouravievDuke Prostate Center and Division of Urologic Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Many patients with advanced cancer experience decreased bone strength due to metastatic foci, underlying osteoporosis and/or cancer treatment induced bone loss. The clinical consequences of metastatic disease involving the skeleton are widespread. This review focuses on the efficacy, pharmacology, and safety when using intravenous biphosphonate such a zoledronic acid for cancer bone metastases. Zoledronic acid is the gold standard for the medical management of metastatic bone disease. The indications for treatment include prevention of skeletal relevant events (SRE, osteoporotic complications, and palliation of bone pain, among others. Zoledronic acid is the only bisphosphonate effective in decreasing SREs associated with bone metastases from advanced renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer. Regarding prostate cancer, zoledronic acid effectively prevents both bone loss in patients with locally advanced disease receiving androgen deprivation therapy and SREs in men with hormone-refractory or hormonesensitive metastatic disease. Zoledronic acid has an acceptable safety profile and tolerability, and has been effective at significantly decreasing the incidence, delaying the onset, and reducing the overall risk of experiencing an SRE compared to placebo. It is the only bisphosphonate currently approved for the prevention and treatment of skeletal complications in patients with bone metastases due to all solid tumors.Keywords: zoledronic acid, metastatic bone disease, osteoporosis, skeletal relevant events, advanced prostate cancer

  16. Bone trauma and related benign disease: assessment by bone scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclide investigation of skeletal trauma in the past was confined generally to scintimetry and an occasional bone scan. The development of improved radiopharmaceuticals, including /sup 99m/Tc-labeled compounds with their enhanced sensitivity, and the refinement of imaging devices offering superior resolution and speed have allowed a more detailed assessment of conditions resulting from trauma. Practical approaches to the diagnosis of subtle bone injury resulting in stress fracture, the differentiation between delayed healing and nonunion, and early recognition of avascular necrosis and osteomyelitis are now available. The changing pattern of radionuclide uptake in bone following damage by radiation and other abnormalities as a consequence of trauma also can be easily studied

  17. Developmental basis of limb length in rodents: evidence for multiple divisions of labor in mechanisms of endochondral bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolian, Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Mammals are remarkably diverse in limb lengths and proportions, but the number and kind of developmental mechanisms that contribute to length differences between limb bones remain largely unknown. Intra- and interspecific differences in bone length could result from variations in the cellular processes of endochondral bone growth, creating differences in rates of chondrocyte proliferation or hypertrophy, variation in the shape and size of chondrocytes, differences in the number of chondrocytes in precursor populations and throughout growth, or a combination of these mechanisms. To address these questions, this study compared cellular mechanisms of endochondral bone growth in cross-sectional ontogenetic series of the appendicular skeleton of two rodent species: the mouse (Mus musculus) and Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus). Results indicate that multiple cellular processes of endochondral bone growth contribute to phenotypic differences in limb bone length. The data also suggest that separate developmental processes contribute to intraspecific length differences in proximal versus distal limb bones, and that these proximo-distal mechanisms are distinct from mechanisms that contribute to interspecific differences in limb bone length related to body size. These developmental "divisions of labor" are hypothesized to be important features of vertebrate limb development that allow (1) morphology in the autopods to evolve independently of the proximal limb skeleton, and (2) adaptive changes in limb proportions related to locomotion to evolve independently of evolutionary changes in body size. PMID:18184354

  18. Developmental diseases and the hypothetical Master Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, George E

    2010-03-01

    Small deletions and duplications frequently occur in the pericentromeric region of chromosomes and many of these are associated with developmental abnormalities. These developmental syndromes are conventionally attributed to abnormal expression of protein-coding genes in the affected region. A hypothesis has recently been published concerning a Master Development Program based on noncoding transcripts from these regions (Parris GE. A hypothetical Master Development Program for multi-cellular organisms: Ontogeny and phylogeny. Biosci Hypotheses 2009;2:3-12.). This paper summarizes and expands the recently published hypothesis to include it application to developmental diseases. The author proposes that development of multi-cellular organisms is guided by a Master Development Program (MDP) located primarily in the pericentromeric heterochromatin. The MDP is believed to consist of a series of Generation-Specific Control Keys (GSCK) transcribed in sequence by Ikaros family transcription factors unless the GSCKs are suppressed by Sall1-family or Dnmt3b-family proteins. The MDP is proposed to increment with each cell cycle to the next GSCK resulting in development of the clone. A clone may be programmed to split into two clones as necessary through a two-cycle mitosis processes. The transcripts of the GSCKs presumably yield noncoding nuclear messenger RNAs (nmRNAs, 8-30 nt units) that act directly (e.g., as primers for RNA polymerase II) and indirectly to regulate HOX and other high-level transcription factor and developmental genes. As envisioned, the MDP would evolve by terminal addition of new GSCKs. The new GSCKs are produced by evolutionary consolidation of retro-transcripts into pyknons that collect and evolve at the end of the pericentromeric heterochromatin and are eventually incorporated into the MDP. The retro-transcripts are though to be produced during episodic retrovirus epidemics and account for punctuated equilibrium in species evolution. PMID:19833446

  19. Cancer treatment-related bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Sue A.; Guise, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    Bone health may be impaired in many patients being treated for cancer. Primary tumors that reside in or form metastases to bone can result in compromised skeletal integrity. It has also been increasingly recognized that patients undergoing therapies for treatment of cancer are at higher risk of bone loss. These include androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer among others. Hypogonadism induced by many of these cancer treatments results...

  20. Measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content using dual photon absorptiometry. Usefulness in metabolic bone diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of bone density using an accurate, non-invasive method is a crucial step in the clinical investigation of metabolic bone diseases, especially osteoporosis. Among the recently available techniques, measurement of lumbar spine bone mineral content (BMC) using dual photon absorptiometry appears as the primary method because it is simple, inexpensive, and involves low levels of radiation exposure. In this study, we measured the BMC in 168 normal adults and 95 patients. Results confirmed the good reproducibility and sensitivity of this technique for quantifying bone loss in males and females with osteoporosis. Significant bone loss was found in most females with primary hyperparathyroidism. Dual photon absorptiometry can also be used for quantifying increases in bone mass in Paget disease of bone and diffuse osteosclerosis. Osteomalacia is responsible for a dramatic fall in BMC reflecting lack of mineralization of a significant portion of the bone matrix, a characteristic feature in this disease. Furthermore, in addition to being useful for diagnostic purposes and for evaluation of the vertebral fracture risk, lumbar spine absorptiometry can be used for monitoring the effectiveness of bone-specific treatments

  1. Developmental Origins of Chronic Renal Disease: An Integrative Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Boubred

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality. Hypertension (HT is one of the principal risk factors associated with death. Chronic kidney disease (CKD, which is probably underestimated, increases the risk and the severity of adverse cardiovascular events. It is now recognized that low birth weight is a risk factor for these diseases, and this relationship is amplified by a rapid catch-up growth or overfeeding during infancy or childhood. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the “early programming” of CKD are multiple and partially understood. It has been proposed that the developmental programming of arterial hypertension and chronic kidney disease is related to a reduced nephron endowment. However, this mechanism is still discussed. This review discusses the complex relationship between birth weight and nephron endowment and how early growth and nutrition influence long term HT and CKD. We hypothesize that fetal environment reduces moderately the nephron number which appears insufficient by itself to induce long term diseases. Reduced nephron number constitutes a “factor of vulnerability” when additional factors, in particular a rapid postnatal growth or overfeeding, promote the early onset of diseases through a complex combination of various pathophysiological pathways.

  2. Radionuclide imaging of bone marrow in hematologic systemic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessel, F.; Hahn, K.; Gamm, H.

    1987-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging studies of the bone marrow were carried out in 164 patients suffering from hematologic systemic disease. One third of 90 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) displayed a pathological distribution pattern representing bone marrow expansion. In HL there were 17% accumulation defects caused by metastases in contrast to only 7% in NHL. Among 30 patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia bone marrow expansion was found in 60%, bone marrow displacement and aplasia 10%. Focal bone marrow defects were found in 3 patients. All patients with primary polycythemia rubra vera displayed a pathologic bone marrow distribution pattern as well as splenomegaly. All patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) and one patient with an acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) had a pathological distribution pattern with bone marrow expansion and displacement. Focal bone marrow defects were not seen. Multiple myeloma with bone marrow expansion was found in 6 of 12 patients and focal accumulation defects were found in 40%, the latter lesions being not visible or equivocal on skeletal imaging studies. Pathological changes in liver and spleen were found in a high percentage of the total collective. The results document the important clinical value of bone marrow scintigraphy among the hematologic diseases studied.

  3. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  4. New Developmental Evidence Clarifies the Evolution of Wrist Bones in the Dinosaur–Bird Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, João Francisco; Ossa-Fuentes, Luis; Soto-Acuña, Sergio; Smith-Paredes, Daniel; Nuñez-León, Daniel; Salinas-Saavedra, Miguel; Ruiz-Flores, Macarena; Vargas, Alexander O.

    2014-01-01

    From early dinosaurs with as many as nine wrist bones, modern birds evolved to develop only four ossifications. Their identity is uncertain, with different labels used in palaeontology and developmental biology. We examined embryos of several species and studied chicken embryos in detail through a new technique allowing whole-mount immunofluorescence of the embryonic cartilaginous skeleton. Beyond previous controversy, we establish that the proximal–anterior ossification develops from a composite radiale+intermedium cartilage, consistent with fusion of radiale and intermedium observed in some theropod dinosaurs. Despite previous claims that the development of the distal–anterior ossification does not support the dinosaur–bird link, we found its embryonic precursor shows two distinct regions of both collagen type II and collagen type IX expression, resembling the composite semilunate bone of bird-like dinosaurs (distal carpal 1+distal carpal 2). The distal–posterior ossification develops from a cartilage referred to as “element x,” but its position corresponds to distal carpal 3. The proximal–posterior ossification is perhaps most controversial: It is labelled as the ulnare in palaeontology, but we confirm the embryonic ulnare is lost during development. Re-examination of the fossil evidence reveals the ulnare was actually absent in bird-like dinosaurs. We confirm the proximal–posterior bone is a pisiform in terms of embryonic position and its development as a sesamoid associated to a tendon. However, the pisiform is absent in bird-like dinosaurs, which are known from several articulated specimens. The combined data provide compelling evidence of a remarkable evolutionary reversal: A large, ossified pisiform re-evolved in the lineage leading to birds, after a period in which it was either absent, nonossified, or very small, consistently escaping fossil preservation. The bird wrist provides a modern example of how developmental and paleontological

  5. Magnetic resonance in hematological diseases. Imaging of bone marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.E.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive alternative to plain radiography, CT, and radionuclide studies for the imaging of normal and abnormal bone marrow. The cellularity and the corresponding fat/water ratio within the bone marrow show clear changes in haematological diseases. Thi...

  6. Disease-specific clinical problems associated with the subchondral bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Pape; G. Filardo; E. Kon; C.N. van Dijk; H. Madry

    2010-01-01

    The subchondral bone is involved in a variety of diseases affecting both the articular cartilage and bone. Osteochondral defects in distinct locations and of variable sizes are the final results of different etiologies. These include traumatic osteochondral defects, osteochondritis dissecans, osteon

  7. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  8. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors

  9. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  10. MANAGEMENT OF DISEASES OF LONG BONES WITH KUNTSCHER NAILS

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant; Vibha; Singh,, G.; Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: AIMS: SETTINGS AND DESIGN : The aim of this study was, to devise economical, easy, simple, quick method of fixation of diseased long bones, so that pathological fracture could be prevented and to provide rigid fixation, in those cases which have already developed pathological fractu re, and to achieve arthrodesis. Ten, cases of long bone diseases were managed with the help of K nails, in the Department of Orthopaedics, in CIMS, between, December 2002 ...

  11. Unexplained Fractures: Child Abuse or Bone Disease? A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Nirav K.; Baldwin, Keith; Kamath, Atul F.; Wenger, Dennis R.; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2010-01-01

    Background Child abuse and neglect (CAN) is a serious problem that has major implications for the welfare of the child involved. Unexplained fractures are of particular concern to the orthopaedic surgeon, who must often consider alternative diagnoses to CAN. Questions/purposes We therefore (1) determined which bone diseases most commonly mimic CAN; (2) what types of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) are most commonly confused with CAN and why; and (3) what specific findings in OI and bone disease ...

  12. Natural History of Malignant Bone Disease in Renal Cancer: Final Results of an Italian Bone Metastasis Survey

    OpenAIRE

    D. Santini; Procopio, G; Porta, C; Ibrahim, T; Barni, S.; Mazzara, C; Fontana, A.; Berruti, A; R. Berardi; Vincenzi, B; Ortega, C; Ottaviani, D; Carteni, G; Lanzetta, G; Virzì, V

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. Patients and methods Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs), and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female) with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. Results Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months ...

  13. Bone mineral content measurement in metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective determinations of BMC are seldom required for the diagnosis of the metabolic and hormonal disorders which may result in osteoporosis. They are, however, required to document the osteoporosis itself as this is usually subclinical until late in the natural history of the disease process. Measurement of BMC in these disease processes is an important research tool in determining the effect of the disorder on the skeleton at different stages of the natural history and in investigating the effects of therapy and other interventions. Measurements of BMC may be useful in clinical practice in deciding whether to intervene in certain circumstances (e.g. asymptomatic hyperparathyroidism) or to withhold certain therapies (e.g. glucocorticoids) or to alter therapy (e.g. change from glucocorticoids to nonsteroidal immunosuppressives in autoimmune diseases). It may also play a role in monitoring the responses to therapeutic interventions. (orig.)

  14. The Potential Application of Pulsed Ultrasound on Bone Defect Repair via Developmental Engineering: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue; Tang, Na; Xiao, Qiang; Zhao, Lixing; Li, Yu; Li, Juan; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Zhihe; Tan, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    Repairing bone defect by recapitulation of endochondral bone formation, known as developmental engineering, has been a promising approach in bone tissue engineering. The critical issue in this area is how to effectively construct the hypertrophic cartilaginous template in vitro and enhance in vivo endochondral ossification process after implantation. Pulsed ultrasound stimulation has been widely used in the clinic for accelerating bone healing in fractures and nonunions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ultrasound (US) could accelerate in vitro chondrogenesis and the hypertrophic process in certain microenvironments. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were chondrogenic or hypertrophic differentiated in a three-dimensional pellet culture system with different media, and treated with different intensities of US. US exposure promoted chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells and inhibited their transition into the hypertrophic stage in a chondrogenic-friendly microenvironment. US significantly advanced hypertrophic differentiation of bone marrow stem cell pellets in hypertrophic medium after chondrogenesis. Our data indicated that pulsed US promoted in vitro chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation of stem cell pellets in specific culture conditions. The present study proves the potential application of US in the in vitro stage of "developmental engineering" for bone development and repair. PMID:26526417

  15. Bone Markers Status in Graves’ disease before and after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Tofighi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground:  Bone turnover is reported to increase in favor of resorption in overt hyperthyroidism and the rate of resorp­tion is associated with the levels of thyroid hormones. As persistent increase in bone turn over is responsible for accelerated bone loss, patients with Graves' disease may have increased risk for osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to determine relationship between Graves' disease and bone markers."nMethods: The subjects of our study were 31 consecutive untreated GD patients and 37 normal volunteers who were matched on sex proportion and age ranging was diagnosed by suppressed levels of TSH and elevated level of free T3 and free T4 and positive thyroid receptor antibody. Through a clinical trial study executed in endocrinology and metabolism research center, we investigated the relationship between serum osteocalcin & cross-laps with Graves' disease and then kinds of treatment with PTU and methimazole after 8 weeks follow up."nResults: No significant differences in age and sex between patients and controls were found. Significant differences in se­rum bone markers and thyroid hormones were detected between patients and controls before therapy (p< 0.001. After treatment we found a significant improvement and returning to normal range in all serum lab tests. There were not any dif­ferences in the effect of treatment on thyroid hormones and bone markers between two groups."nConclusion: We found close relationship between Graves' disease and bone markers. So that treatment of Graves' disease can improve bone turn over. These findings indicated that early diagnosis and management of Graves' disease can be effec­tive for osteoporosis prevention in these patients.

  16. Celiac Disease Presenting with Bone Pain: Two Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Nural Albayrak Aydın; Kamil Yazıcıoğlu

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation of the small-bowel mucosa. As can be asymptomatic, involvement of the hematologic, gastrointestinal system, musculosceletal system, nervous system or endocrine system may occur as well. The presence of osteoporosis in celiac disease, may be the only sign of patients who have not been diagnosed yet. The direct effect of celiac disease on bones happens secondary to decreased absorbsion of calci...

  17. Bone disease in multiple myeloma and precursor disease: novel diagnostic approaches and implications on clinical management

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y.; Minter, Alex R; Korde, Neha; TAN, ESTHER; Landgren, Ola

    2011-01-01

    The manifestations of bone involvement in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) can have devastating clinical effects and increase mortality. Recent studies demonstrate that patients with the precursor conditions smoldering MM (SMM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) show evidence of bone disease and increased risk of fractures. The understanding of the pathogenesis of bone disease in MM has expanded in recent years. The traditional skeletal survey will probably be re...

  18. Intractable Diseases Treated with Intra-Bone Marrow-Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming eLi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow transplantation (BMT is used to treat hematological disorders, autoimmune diseases and lymphoid cancers. Intra bone marrow-BMT (IBM-BMT has been proven to be a powerful strategy for allogeneic BMT due to the rapid hematopoietic recovery and the complete restoration of T cell functions. IBM-BMT not only replaces hematopoietic stem cells but also mesenchymal stem cells (MSMCs. MSMCs are multi-potent stem cells that can be isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, and adipose tissue. MSMCs play an important role in the support of hematopoiesis, and modify and influence the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSMCs also differentiate into mesodermal, endodermal and ectodermal lineage cells to repair tissues. This review aims to summarize the functions of bone marrow-derived- MSMCs, and the treatment of intractable diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors with IBM-BMT.

  19. Lipids and Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Luis Pérez-Castrillón

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the relationship between cholesterol and triglycerides and bone mineral density in patients with vascular disease (hypertension and acute coronary syndrome.Methods: The study included 217 patients (83 men and 134 women, aged between 36 and 76 (mean age 59 ± 10, with hypertension and acute coronary syndrome. Information obtained included anthropometric measurements, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides; bone mineral density (BMD was recorded at the lumbar spine.Results: BMD was significantly lower in patients in the higher tertiles of cholesterol (p = 0.041. The effect was maintained after adjustment for age and Body Mass Index (BMI. However, there was no association between the range of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and bone mass.Conclusions: A relationship was found between total cholesterol and bone mineral density in patients with vascular disease.

  20. New aspects of radionuclide therapy of bone and joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whereas in developing countries P-32 is widely used for radionuclide therapy of painful bone metastases, in Europe three radionuclides or radiopharmaceutical agents are available for pain palliation: Sr-89, Sm-153-EDTMP, and Re-186-HEDP. Radionuclide therapy for pain palliation is indicated for bone pain due to metastatic malignancy that has involved multiple skeletal sites and has evoked an osteoblastic response on bone scintigraphy. Response rates of about 70-80% in patients with breast or prostate cancer is reported in the literature, less in metastatic lesions of other primary malignancies. Sm-153-EDTMP may also be used for curative treatment of primary bone tumours or their metastases. Radiosynovectomy as therapeutic procedure or rheumatoid arthritis, other inflammatory joint diseases, persistent synovial perfusion, and other joint diseases is widely used. Using Y-90 for the knee joint, Re-186 for middle sized joints, and Er-169 for small joints an improvement of symptoms may be observed in about 70-80%. (author)

  1. [Insights into cystic fibrosis-related bone disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, C; Bacchetta, J; Reix, P

    2016-08-01

    With the increasing life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), prevalence of late complications such as CF-related bone disease (CFBD) has increased. It was initially described in 24% of the adult population with CF and has also been reported in the pediatric population. CFBD is multifactorial and progresses in different steps. Both decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption (in different amounts) are observed. CFBD is likely primitive (directly related to the CFTR defect itself), but is also worsened by acquired secondary factors such as lung infections, chronic inflammation, denutrition, vitamin deficiency, and decreased physical activity. CFBD may be clinically apparent (i.e., mainly vertebral and costal fractures), or clinically asymptomatic (therefore corresponding to abnormalities in bone density and architecture). CFBD management mainly aims to prevent the occurrence of fractures. Prevention and regular monitoring of bone disease as early as 8 years of age is of the utmost importance, as is the control of possible secondary deleterious CFBD factors. New radiological tools, such as high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, allow an accurate evaluation of cortical and trabecular bone micro-architecture in addition to compartmental density; as such, they will likely improve the assessment of the bone fracture threat in CF patients in the near future. PMID:27345551

  2. LRP4 in neuromuscular junction and bone development and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengyong; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-11-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family. Recent studies have revealed multiple functions and complex signaling mechanisms of LRP4 in different organs and tissues. LPR4 mutation or malfunction has been implicated in neurological disorders including congenital myasthenic syndrome, myasthenia gravis, and diseases of bone or kidney. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions". PMID:26071838

  3. Bone Diseases - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) ... osseuse - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Bone Scan हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual ...

  4. Radiologic aspects of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the human body, metastases are the most frequently found bone tumors. We can distinguish between lytic, blastic and mixed forms. The authors recall the radiologic aspects of these last ones, and describe even so the imagery with magnetic resonance. they also recall that major differences between a compressive benign osteoporotic tumor and a malignant one remains an every day diagnostic problem. Finally, magnetic resonance is proven to be a better diagnostic tool in comparison with the radiologic standard examination. (author)

  5. Developmental origins of health and disease: reducing the burden of chronic disease in the next generation

    OpenAIRE

    Gluckman, Peter D.; Hanson, Mark A.; Mitchell, Murray D

    2010-01-01

    Despite a wealth of underpinning experimental support, there has been considerable resistance to the concept that environmental factors acting early in life (usually in fetal life) have profound effects on vulnerability to disease later in life, often in adulthood. This has resulted in an unwillingness among public health decision makers to implement relatively simple approaches, based upon an understanding of developmental plasticity and intergenerational influences, to reducing the burden o...

  6. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Bariatric Surgery Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proven to be a life-saving measure for some, but for others it has precipitated a plethora of metabolic complications ranging from mild to life-threatening, sometimes to the point of requiring surgical revision. Obesity was previously thought to be bone protective, but this is indeed not the case. Morbidly obese individuals are at risk for metabolic bone disease (MBD due to chronic vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, chronic dieting, underlying chronic diseases, and the use of certain medications used to treat those diseases. After bariatric surgery, the risk for bone-related problems is even greater, owing to severely restricted intake, malabsorption, poor compliance with prescribed supplements, and dramatic weight loss. Patients presenting for bariatric surgery should be evaluated for MBD and receive appropriate presurgical interventions. Furthermore, every patient who has undergone bariatric surgery should receive meticulous lifetime monitoring, as the risk for developing MBD remains ever present.

  7. BONE IN OSTEOPETROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteopetrosis, a generalized developmental bone disease due to genetic disturbances, characterized by failure of bone re sorption and continuous bone formation making the bone hard, dense and brittle. Bones of intramembranous ossification and enchondrial ossification are affected genetically and symmetrically. During the process of disease the excess bone formation obliterates the cranial foramina and presses the optic, auditory and facial nerves resulting in defective vision, impaired hearing and facial paralysis. The bone formation in osteopetrosis affects bone marrow function leading to severe anemia and deficient of blood cells. The bone devoid of blood supply due to compression of blood vessels by excess formation of bone are prone to osteomyelitic changes with suppuration and pathological fracture if exposed to infection. Though the condition is chronic progressive, it produces changes leading to fatal condition, it should be studied thoroughly by everyone and hence this article presents a classical case of osteopetrosis with detailed description and discussion for the benefit of readers

  8. Developmentally arrested structures preceding cerebellar tumors in von Hippel–Lindau disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shively, Sharon B; Falke, Eric A; Li, Jie; Tran, Maxine G B; Thompson, Eli R; Maxwell, Patrick H; Roessler, Erich; Oldfield, Edward H; Lonser, Russell R.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that suggests that knockout of tumor-suppressor gene function causes developmental arrest and protraction of cellular differentiation. In the peripheral nervous system of patients with the tumor-suppressor gene disorder, von Hippel–Lindau disease, we have demonstrated developmentally arrested structural elements composed of hemangioblast progenitor cells. Some developmentally arrested structural elements progress to a frank tumor, hemangioblastoma. However, in von...

  9. RECENT ADVANCES IN PATHO-BIOLOGY OF MYELOMA BONE DISEASE: CLINICOPATHOLOGY AND LITERATURE OF REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Lohit Kumar; Bhubaneswar

    2016-01-01

    Bone disease is a hallmark of multiple myeloma, presenting as lytic lesions associated with bone pain, pathological fractures requiring surgery and/or radiation to bone, spinal cord compression and hypercalcaemia. Increased osteoclastic activity unaccompanied by a compensatory increase in osteoblast function, leading to enhanced bone resorption results in bone disease. The interaction of plasma cells with the bone marrow microenvironment has been shown to play a vital role. Also,...

  10. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jacques P.

    2011-01-01

    Laëtitia Michou, Jacques P BrownLaval University, Department of Medicine, CHUQ (CHUL) Research Centre and Division of Rheumatology, Quebec City, QC, CanadaAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone d...

  11. Bone loss in inflammatory Bowel disease: our multicentric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Geraci

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are at increased risk of developing disorder in bone and mineral metabolism The study was aimed to determine if inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a risk factor for osteoporosis in 103 adult patients. We included 103 IBD patients, 67 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD and 36 with ulcerative colitis (UC. Bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. We used T score to express bone loss (osteopenia: -2.5 SD <-1 SD, osteoporosis: T <-2.5 SD. Plain x-rays were examined to search for vertebral compression or spontaneous fractures before DEXA. Among the 103 patients, 47.7% exhibited osteopenia of the femoral neck and 62.3% of the lumbar spine, with no significant difference between CD and UC. The prevalence of osteoporosis of the lumbar spine was significantly higher in CD patients (41.2% versus 8.7%. Osteoporosis is frequent in IBD patients, especially in CD patients. Female gender, malnutrition (body mass index <20 kg/m2, disease course (>2 years and active disease would be risk factors of bone mineral loss in IBD.

  12. Alcoholic liver disease and changes in bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán López-Larramona

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis and osteopenia are alterations in bone mineral density (BMD that frequently occur in the context of chronic liver disease (CLD. These alterations have been studied predominantly in chronic cholestatic disease and cirrhosis of the liver. Alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for the onset of osteoporosis, whose estimated prevalence in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD ranges between 5 % and 40 %. The loss of BMD in ALD is the result of an imbalance between bone formation and resorption. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes the toxic effects of alcohol on bone and endocrine and nutritional disorders secondary to alcoholism and a deficiency of osteocalcin, vitamin D and insulin growth factor-1. The diagnosis of BMD alterations in ALD is based on its measurement using bone densitometry. Treatment includes smoking and alcohol cessation and general measures such as changes in nutrition and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are recommended in all patients with ALD and osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the specific treatment of this condition. Alternatives include raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin. This review will address the most important aspects involved in the clinical management of abnormal BMD in the context of ALD, including its prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis. We will also review the treatment of osteoporosis in CLD in general, focusing on specific aspects related to bone loss in ALD.

  13. Radiological diagnostic in cat stratch disease and bone lesions - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is not a common disease in immunocompetent patients. Its association with bone lesions is rare. A patient with bone complain and radiologic alterations of bone lesion must be investigated for this disease. A simple story can make the differential diagnosis with more complex disease like Ewing sarcoma or eosinophilic granuloma. (author)

  14. Bone scintigraphy in Erdheim-chester disease: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, V.L.; Soares, L.M.M.; Ribeiro, V.P.B.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Sapienza, M.T.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Costa, P.L.A.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, of unknown etiology, characterized by infiltration of foamy histiocytes. Clinically, patients usually present with bone pain, and various extraskeletal manifestations. ECD differs from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) by radiologic and immunohistochemistry features. Case report: A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of intense pain on her left hand, besides eyelid xanthelasmas and xanthoms on frontal area ten years ago. Four years late she presented with pain on hips, legs and feet. Xanthoms spread to perioral area, mento and neck. Radiographs of the hands showed osteolysis of carpal bones bilaterally, osteolysis of fifth left metacarpal bone, osteosclerosis of all metacarpal bones bilaterally, except the fifth, and osteosclerosis of the second and third proximal falanges bilaterally. The legs showed bilateral diaphyseal and metaphyseal osteosclerosis. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake on face bone (maxilla), and symmetric intense uptake on elbows, distal radii and ulnae, hands, distal area of femurs, tibias particularly on proximal and distal area, and feet. A tibia biopsy and a biopsy of neck lesion were made. The analysis of histology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with ECD. She has been treated with a-interferon for 1,5 year, and she reports delay in xanthoms progression and bone pain remission. Discussion: ECD is an adult multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltrative disease of unknown etiology. It may be confused with LCH, however ECD have distinctive immunohistochemistry and radiologic findings. LCH shows typically lytic bone lesions on axial skeleton, whereas symmetrical long-bone osteosclerosis is the radiologic sign for ECD. LCH stain positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, and the electron microscopy of cytoplasm discloses Biberck granules. ECD stain positive for CD68, negative for CD1a and S-100 protein, shows absent of

  15. Bone scintigraphy in Erdheim-chester disease: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, of unknown etiology, characterized by infiltration of foamy histiocytes. Clinically, patients usually present with bone pain, and various extraskeletal manifestations. ECD differs from Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) by radiologic and immunohistochemistry features. Case report: A 57-year-old woman presented with a history of intense pain on her left hand, besides eyelid xanthelasmas and xanthoms on frontal area ten years ago. Four years late she presented with pain on hips, legs and feet. Xanthoms spread to perioral area, mento and neck. Radiographs of the hands showed osteolysis of carpal bones bilaterally, osteolysis of fifth left metacarpal bone, osteosclerosis of all metacarpal bones bilaterally, except the fifth, and osteosclerosis of the second and third proximal falanges bilaterally. The legs showed bilateral diaphyseal and metaphyseal osteosclerosis. Bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake on face bone (maxilla), and symmetric intense uptake on elbows, distal radii and ulnae, hands, distal area of femurs, tibias particularly on proximal and distal area, and feet. A tibia biopsy and a biopsy of neck lesion were made. The analysis of histology and immunohistochemistry were consistent with ECD. She has been treated with a-interferon for 1,5 year, and she reports delay in xanthoms progression and bone pain remission. Discussion: ECD is an adult multisystemic xanthogranulomatous infiltrative disease of unknown etiology. It may be confused with LCH, however ECD have distinctive immunohistochemistry and radiologic findings. LCH shows typically lytic bone lesions on axial skeleton, whereas symmetrical long-bone osteosclerosis is the radiologic sign for ECD. LCH stain positive for CD1a and S-100 protein, and the electron microscopy of cytoplasm discloses Biberck granules. ECD stain positive for CD68, negative for CD1a and S-100 protein, shows absent of

  16. Cardiovascular implications of endodontic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dessì, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have a complex etiology determined by risk factors, which are in turn associated to a strong genetic component and to environmental factors. In the biological background for the development of CVD, low-grade chronic inflammation plays a role as a pathogenetic determinant of atherosclerosis. Dental infections have been associated with CVD. Periodontal disease is a chronic infection of the supporting tissues of the tooth that can lead to teeth loss. In recent years...

  17. Paget’s Disease of Bone among Various Ethnic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Mira Merashli; Ali Jawad

    2015-01-01

    Paget’s disease of bone (PDB) is a relatively benign disease common among many European populations, including those in the UK, Italy and Spain. However, it appears to be rare among Scandinavians and non-European immigrants living in Europe. The prevalence among Asian populations may be underestimated because a large number of reported cases were discovered incidentally. There is a need for surveys addressing the prevalence rate and consequences of PDB to be carried out in various parts of th...

  18. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan; Karthik Balachandran; Ramesh Ananthakrishnan; Abdoul Hamide

    2012-01-01

    Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  19. Turner's syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Balachandran, Karthik; Ananthakrishnan, Ramesh; Hamide, Abdoul

    2012-07-01

    Turner's syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner's syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy. PMID:22837932

  20. Brittle bone disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pace Lasmar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female patient, 27 years old, with several episodes of fractures after low energy trauma and the first documented episode only to 18 years of age. Extensive research has not found the exact etiology of the disease. The orthopedic monitoring has targeted prevention and treatment of fractures.

  1. Bone histomorphometry after treatment with teriparatide (PTH 1-34) in a patient with adynamic bone disease subsequent to parathyroidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Gabriele; Ott, Undine; Maiwald, Jörg; Wolf, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    A 33-year-old male patient suffered from adynamic bone disease because of parathyroidectomy due to tertiary hyperparathyroidism. Histomorphometric analysis of bone biopsies taken before and 8 months after treatment with teriparatide (human parathyroid hormone 1-34 of recombinant DNA origin) for 18 months is demonstrated. A considerable increase in mineralized bone volume and also stimulated bone remodelling were detected after treatment with teriparatide. Although teriparatide is currently on...

  2. Comparison of diagnostic significance of scintigraphy of bone marrow and bones in Hodgkin's disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnostic value of the bone marrow scintigraphy (BMS) and osteoscintigraphy (OSG) is studied and their potentialities as compared to common diagnostic methods-trepanobiopsy, magnetic-resonance tomography (MRT) of bone marrow are analysed. Data on 155 patients examined are presented. BMS was made using the emission computer Apex-SP6 (Elscint) tomograph using domestic colloid Koren radiopharmaceutical labelled with 99mTc. It is shown that sensitivity, specificity and total accuracy of BMS in patients with Hodgkin's disease are 91.4%, 94.8% and 92.9% correspondingly. Potentialities of BMS are comparable with MRT, while sensitivity and total accuracy are considerably higher then those of trepanobiopsy method

  3. Treatment of polyosseous paget's disease of bone with EHDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13 patients with polyosseous Paget's disease were treated for a mean period of 7 months with disodium etidronate (EHDP, ethylidene-1-hydroxy-1,1-diphosphonate); the average daily dosage was 5 mg/kg body weight. Subjectively, all patients reported a considerable improvement, in particular with regard to pain. Objectively, a significant decrease in plasma alkaline phosphatase activity and in urinary hydroxyproline excretion was observed. Bone scintigraphy showed a decreased activity of bone lesions after therapy, but no clear-cut regression was found radiologically. No serious side-effects were observed during treatment with EHDP and oral administration of the drug proved to be advantageous. (Author)

  4. Correlation of multimodality imaging in Paget's disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. The aim of this study is double: 1. to review the known and less known radiographic patterns of Paget's disease of bone, employing the most recent imaging techniques; 2. to propose a rationale algorithm for the diagnosis and management of the disease. considering its inconsistency and clinical variability. Materials and methods. Forty-eight patients with Paget's disease of bone (30 males and 18 females, aged 45 and 88 years, mean age 71) were examined in the period 1999-2003. The patients were classified into two groups: symptomatic and asymptomatic. The first group, comprising 32 patients with generic low back pain with or without sciatica, or coxarthritis underwent conventional radiography. In the second group (16 patients), bone disease was discovered in course of radiological and/or scintigraphic examinations performed for other conditions. Subsequently, all the patients completed the diagnostic algorithm, consisting of radiographs of the remaining skeletal areas and those segments with abnormal scintigraphic uptake. Results. Monostotic Paget's disease was observed in 31 cases (64.6%), of whom 20 males (64.6%) and 11 females (35.4%), whereas polyostotic disease was found in 17 cases (35.4%), of whom 10 males (58.8%) and 7 females (41.2%). The sites most frequently affected in the monostotic form were: pelvis, 13 cases (43.3%); femur, 5 cases (16.7%); lumbar spine, 5 cases (16.7%); humerus, 2 cases (6.7%); tibia, 2 cases (6.7%); dorsal spine, skull, radius, patella, 1 case respectively (3.3%). In the polyostotic disease (17 cases), the affected bones were predominantly the skull, vertebral spine and pelvis (see text for their variable association). Pathologic fractures of the femur were found in two males. Osteogenic sarcoma (histological diagnosis) developed in the proximal femur in a 81 year-old male. Conclusions. Paget's disease is asymptomatic in the majority of affected individuals, and may be discovered incidentally with diagnosis being made on

  5. Kimura's disease involving a long bone

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    Chung, Yang-Guk; Kang, Yong-Koo; Bahk, Won-Jong; Cho, Hyun-Min [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Jee, Won-Hee [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Chan-Kwon; Park, Gyeong-Sin; Lee, An-hi [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Hospital Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Park, Jong-Won [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-05-15

    Kimura's disease is a rare, benign lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It occurs most often in Asian men, usually in the second or third decade of life. Most lesions occur in the head and neck followed by the axilla, groin, popliteal region, and arm. The lesions are commonly found in soft tissues. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only one case report of bone involvement in Kimura's disease presented on plain radiography. We report a case of Kimura's disease that involved the proximal meta-diaphysis of the humerus and adjacent soft tissue shown on radiography and MR imaging. (orig.)

  6. Occupational diseases of skeleton and bone joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essence of roentgeno-morphological features of locomotor system occupational diseases lies in development of dystrophic, degenerative and necrotic processes. Pathological changes take place during vibration, recoil and strain as well as under the effect of unfavourable microclimate (high humidity, cold), vibration being the most important as compared to other harmful factors. Detailed sanitary-and-hygienic and labour characteristics of working conditions of personnel, subjected to the effect of those factors as well as roentgenological characteristics of locomotor system occupational changes are given

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 in the pro-mature complex form enhances bovine oocyte developmental competence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Sudiman

    Full Text Available Developmental competence of in vitro matured (IVM oocytes needs to be improved and this can potentially be achieved by adding recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15 or growth differentiation factor (GDF9 to IVM. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a purified pro-mature complex form of recombinant human BMP15 versus the commercially available bioactive forms of BMP15 and GDF9 (both isolated mature regions during IVM on bovine embryo development and metabolic activity. Bovine cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs were matured in vitro in control medium or treated with 100 ng/ml pro-mature BMP15, mature BMP15 or mature GDF9 +/- FSH. Metabolic measures of glucose uptake and lactate production from COCs and autofluorescence of NAD(PH, FAD and GSH were measured in oocytes after IVM. Following in vitro fertilisation and embryo culture, day 8 blastocysts were stained for cell numbers. COCs matured in medium +/- FSH containing pro-mature BMP15 displayed significantly improved blastocyst development (57.7±3.9%, 43.5±4.2% compared to controls (43.3±2.4%, 28.9±3.7% and to mature GDF9+FSH (36.1±3.0%. The mature form of BMP15 produced intermediate levels of blastocyst development; not significantly different to control or pro-mature BMP15 levels. Pro-mature BMP15 increased intra-oocyte NAD(PH, and reduced glutathione (GSH levels were increased by both forms of BMP15 in the absence of FSH. Exogenous BMP15 in its pro-mature form during IVM provides a functional source of oocyte-secreted factors to improve bovine blastocyst development. This form of BMP15 may prove useful for improving cattle and human artificial reproductive technologies.

  8. Bone disease in newly diagnosed lupus nephritis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Lázara Resende

    Full Text Available Bone loss in Lupus Nephritis (LN patients is common and multifactorial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone status of newly diagnosed LN patients and their correlation with inflammatory factors involved in LN physiopathology.We studied 15 pre-menopausal patients with ≤2 months of diagnosed SLE and LN. Patients with prior kidney or bone disease were excluded. In addition to biochemical evaluation (including 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OHD] and Monocyte Chemotactic Protein (MCP1 dosage, we performed bone biopsies followed by osteoblast culture, histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis.LN patients presented a mean age of 29.5±10 years, a proteinuria of 4.7±2.9 g/day and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR of 37(31-87 ml/min/1,73 m2. They were on glucocorticoid therapy for 34±12 days. All patients presented vitamin D insufficiency (9.9±4.4 ng/ml, range 4-20. Urinary MCP1 correlated negatively with 25(OHD (r = -0.53, p = 0.003 and positively with serum deoxypyridinoline (r = 0.53, p = 0.004. Osteoblasts isolated from LN bone biopsies presented a significantly higher expression of MCP-1 when compared to controls (32.0.±9.1 vs. 22.9±5.3 mean fluorescence intensities, p = 0.01. LN patients presented a significantly reduced osteoid volume, osteoid thickness, osteoid surface, mineralization surface and bone formation rate, associated with an increased eroded surface and osteoclast surface. Patient's bone specimens demonstrated a reduced immunostaining for osteoprotegerin (0.61±0.82 vs. 1.08±0.50%, p = 0.003, and an increased expression of Receptor Activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL (1.76±0.92 vs. 0.41±0.28%, p<0.001 when compared to controls.Newly diagnosed LN patients presented a significant disturbance in bone metabolism, characterized by an impaired bone formation and mineralization, associated with an increase in resorption parameters. Glucocorticoid use, vitamin D insufficiency and

  9. Bone Loss Triggered by the Cytokine Network in Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Amarasekara, Dulshara Sachini; Yu, Jiyeon; Rho, Jaerang

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is a lifelong process in vertebrates that relies on the correct balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Bone loss and fracture risk are implicated in inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The network of inflammatory cytokines produced during chronic inflammation induces an uncoupling of bone formation and resorption, resulting...

  10. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone graft transplants bone tissue. Surgeons use bone grafts to repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some ...

  11. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carla P; Rankin, Sara M

    2011-07-01

    Adult bone marrow contains a number of discrete populations of progenitor cells, including endothelial, mesenchymal, and epithelial progenitor cells and fibrocytes. In the context of a range of diseases, endothelial progenitor cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells are potent immunosuppressors but can also contribute directly to tissue regeneration, and fibrocytes have been shown to induce tissue fibrosis. This article provides an overview of the basic biology of these different subsets of progenitor cells, reporting their distinct phenotypes and functional activities. The differences in their secretomes are highlighted, and the relative role of cellular differentiation vs paracrine effects of progenitor cells is considered. The article reviews the literature examining the contribution of progenitor cells to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, and discusses recent studies using bone marrow progenitor cells as stem cell therapies in the context of pulmonary hypertension, COPD, and asthma. PMID:21729891

  12. RECENT ADVANCES IN PATHO-BIOLOGY OF MYELOMA BONE DISEASE: CLINICOPATHOLOGY AND LITERATURE OF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohit Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone disease is a hallmark of multiple myeloma, presenting as lytic lesions associated with bone pain, pathological fractures requiring surgery and/or radiation to bone, spinal cord compression and hypercalcaemia. Increased osteoclastic activity unaccompanied by a compensatory increase in osteoblast function, leading to enhanced bone resorption results in bone disease. The interaction of plasma cells with the bone marrow microenvironment has been shown to play a vital role. Also, interactions of myeloma cells with osteoclasts enhance myeloma growth and survival, and thereby create a vicious cycle leading to extensive bone destruction and myeloma cell expansion.

  13. MANAGEMENT OF DISEASES OF LONG BONES WITH KUNTSCHER NAILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AIMS: SETTINGS AND DESIGN : The aim of this study was, to devise economical, easy, simple, quick method of fixation of diseased long bones, so that pathological fracture could be prevented and to provide rigid fixation, in those cases which have already developed pathological fractu re, and to achieve arthrodesis. Ten, cases of long bone diseases were managed with the help of K nails, in the Department of Orthopaedics, in CIMS, between, December 2002 to January 2005, and cases were followed for about ten years for recurrence, relapse and complications or deterioration of the underlying disease process. METHODS AND MATERIAL : K nailing was done by standard procedure of nailing, applying A O Principles of internal fixation with due emphasis on exact length and thickness of the nail, so as to span the whole length of the bone and should occupy the entire medullary cavity at isthmus, and should achieve three point fixation of the nail in the bone, in order to provide complete rotational stability of the bone and fracture. RESULT : All the cases healed within three to six months of operation. The results were similar to internal fixation done with interlocking nailing or plating, in all the parameters including, knee and hip range of movement, both active and passive, thigh and leg girth, muscle wasting, extensor lag and time of union, but the operative time was half that of interlocking. CONCLUSION : By this study we came to the conclusion that, K nailing is still indispensable implant, and should not be discarded completely. It shou ld be an important inclusion in the inventory of implants in Orthopaedic surgeon basket. Especially in management diseases of long bones, a surgeon has to take care of so many surgical steps that the surgeon is left with very little, anaesthesia and surgic al time to put in complicated lengthy processed implant. In such a situation a K nail serves the purpose. Therefore it should be the most preferred

  14. An Unusual Developmental Profile of Salla Disease in a Patient with the SallaFIN Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Paavola, Liisa E.; Remes, Anne M.; Sonninen, Pirkko H.; Vesa V. Kiviniemi; Korhonen, Tapio T.; Kari Majamaa

    2012-01-01

    Salla disease (SD) is a disorder caused by defective storage of free sialic acid and results from mutations in the SLC17A5 gene. Early developmental delay of motor functions, and later cognitive skills, is typical. We describe a developmental profile of an unusual homozygous patient, who harboured the SallaFIN (p.R39C) mutation gene. The study involved neurological examination, neuropsychological investigation, and brain imaging. The neurocognitive findings were atypical in comparison with ot...

  15. Uremic bone diseases - Clinical laboratorial, scintigraphic and radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluated the uremic bone disease in 10 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 10 on hemodialysis and 10 submited to renal transplantation. According to biochemical evaluation we observed hypocalcemia in some patients on dialysis and hipercalcemia in a renal transplanted and in another on peritoneal dialysis. However, there was no significative difference in the serum calcium concentration between the groups and the control group. Hiperphosphatemia occured in 8 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 9 on hemodialysis and slight hiperphosphatemia occured in 2 renal transplanted patient. The product calcium X phosphorus was elevated in 2 patients on peritoneal dialysis and in 2 on hemodialysis. The magnesium serum concentration were hight in all patients on dialysis and the alkaline phosphatase serum levels were hight in 3 patients dialysis peritoneal and 4 on hemodialysis. A skeleton curvey showed abnormalities in 3 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 5 on hemodialysis and of 5 renal transplanted patients. However there was no significant difference between these results. The bone scanning was abnormal in 6 patients on peritoneal dialysis, 9 patients on hemodialysis and in 8 renal transplanted. The positive results of bone scanning compared with X ray were statistically significative. Bone scanning was the most sensitive method used to detect early abnormalities. (author)

  16. Bone mineral density and biochemical markers of bone metabolism in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidan, Nuri; Inci, Ayca; Coban, Melahat; Ulman, Cevval; Kursat, Seyhun

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of serum bone turnover markers (BTM) and bone mineral density (BMD) determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in predialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We enrolled 83 patients with CKD, 41 (49.4%) males, 42 (50.6%) females, with mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 23.90±12 (range=6.0-56.0). BMD of the lumbar spine (LS) (anteroposterior, L2 through L4), femoral neck (FN) and femoral trochanter (FT) were measured by DEXA. Biochemical BTM, including calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum specific alkaline phosphatase (serum AP), bone-specific AP (BSAP), plasma bicarbonate and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25hD) were used for the prediction of BMD loss. T score results of LS and FN were worse than FT. BMD levels were lower in females than in males (all palkaline phosphatase (AP) and BSAP was considered to be negative. No statistically significant association was found between BMD of all the measured skeletal sites and eGFR. Loss of BMD was identified mostly in females over ≥65 years of age and after menopause. Higher serum levels of BSAP and AP can be determined in the advanced stages of renal failure and they reflect fracture risk of the femur, but not spine. Measurements of BMD by DEXA are useful to demonstrate bone loss, but not technical enough to distinguish the quantity of bone loss between different stages of CKD. PMID:26969749

  17. Bone marrow stroma in idiopathic myelofibrosis and other haematological diseases. An immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I; Hasselbalch, H; Junker, P

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow stroma was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 patients with haematological diseases, mainly idiopathic myelofibrosis (n = 8) and related chronic myeloproliferative disorders (n = 14). The bone marrow from patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis and some CML patients showed marked....... As in normal bone marrow, argyrophilic fibres and type III collagen displayed a close co-distribution, which was also demonstrated for type IV collagen and laminin. While normal bone marrow sinusoids had discontinuous basement membranes, fibrosing bone marrow was characterized by endothelial cell...

  18. Differential diagnosis of metastatic bone disease and benign bone disease on spine SPECT in patients with low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One or more abnormal vertebrae detected on bone scintigraphy is a common finding in clinical practice, and it could pose a diagnostic dilemma especially in cancer patients, as either metastasis or benign disease may cause scintigraphic abnormality. The purpose of this study was to determine whether additional spine SPECT has a role in differentiating malignant from benign lesions in patients with back pain. We reviewed spine SPECT studies obtained over a three-year period in 108 patients. Among them, forty-five patients with abnormal SPECT and clinically followed records were evaluated (20 cancer patients were included). Uptake patterns were classified as follows: 1. Body: diffusely increased uptake, linear increased uptake of end plate, segmental increased uptake, and cold defect, 2 Posterior element; posterior to body (pedicle), posterior to intervertebral disc space (facet joint), and spinous process. Lesions were correlated with radiological findings and with final diagnosis. Sixty-nine bone lesions were detected on SPECT images, including 18 metastases, 28 degenerative diseases and 21 compression fractures. Cold defect (6) and segmental increased uptake (5) were dominant findings in metastasis: linear increased uptake (12), and facet joint uptake (15) were in degenerative change; and diffuse increased uptake (9), and linear increased uptake (9) were in compression fracture. Cold defect and segmental increased uptake of body were characteristic findings of metastasis, but care should be taken because compression fracture also shows segmental increased uptake in some cases. Degenerative disease was easily diagnosed because of the typical finding of linear increased uptake of end plate and facet joint. Therefore, additional bone SPECT after planar bone scan would be helpful for differentiating metastasis from benign condition in cancer patients

  19. Bilateral orbital bone infarction in sickle-cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Roya H; Lee, Irene; Freitag, Suzanne K; Pira, Tony N

    2011-01-01

    This is a case of a 2-year-old boy with sickle cell disease who presented with bilateral eyelid swelling, limited extraocular motility, and lateral subperiosteal fluid collection associated with bilateral lateral orbital wall infarctions on MRI. The patient was managed medically with intravenous fluids, analgesics, broad-spectrum antibiotics, systemic steroids, and clinically improved. Patients with sickle cell disease are susceptible to infarction of the orbital bones during vaso-occlusive crises. Orbital wall infarction can lead to acute proptosis and restricted extraocular motility. Orbital wall infarction should be considered in sickle cell patients with orbital diseases so that appropriate treatment can be instituted promptly to prevent the serious sequelae of orbital compression syndrome. PMID:20577135

  20. The effect of maternal nutrition on the developmental origins of respiratory disease

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental challenges during early life have been shown to result in greater risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes and coronary disease in later life. Factors such as unbalanced nutrition before birth result in metabolic and structural adaptations that lead to persistent modifications to offspring phenotype. There is evidence that respiratory disease is influenced by developmental environment. Reduced fetal growth is associated with impaired lung development, increasing risk of develop...

  1. Circulating microRNAs as novel biomarkers for bone diseases - Complex signatures for multifactorial diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Heilmeier, Ursula; Weilner, Sylvia; Grillari, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Biomarkers are essential tools in clinical research and practice. Useful biomarkers must combine good measurability, validated association with biological processes or outcomes, and should support clinical decision making if used in clinical practice. Several types of validated biomarkers have been reported in the context of bone diseases. However, because these biomarkers face certain limitations there is an interest in the identification of novel biomarkers for bone diseases, specifically in those that are tightly linked to the disease pathology leading to increased fracture-risk. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant RNA species to be found in cell-free blood. Encapsulated within microvesicles or bound to proteins, circulating miRNAs are remarkably stable analytes that can be measured using gold-standard technologies such as quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction (qPCR). Nevertheless, the analysis of circulating miRNAs faces several pre-analytical as well as analytical challenges. From a biological view, there is accumulating evidence that miRNAs play essential roles in the regulation of various biological processes including bone homeostasis. Moreover, specific changes in miRNA transcription levels or miRNA secretory levels have been linked to the development and progression of certain bone diseases. Only recently, results from circulating miRNAs analysis in patients with osteopenia, osteoporosis and fragility fractures have been reported. By comparing these findings to studies on circulating miRNAs in cellular senescence and aging or muscle physiology and sarcopenia, several overlaps were observed. This suggests that signatures observed during osteoporosis might not be specific to the pathophysiology in bone, but rather integrate information from several tissue types. Despite these promising first data, more work remains to be done until circulating miRNAs can serve as established and robust diagnostic tools for bone diseases in clinical research, clinical

  2. Measurement of bone mineral content by dual photon absorptiometry in patients with metabolic bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtani, Masami; Hino, Megumu; Ikekubo, Katsuji (Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)) (and others)

    1991-12-01

    Dual photon absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral content in 225 patients with metabolic bone diseases (84 males and 102 females) and 186 healthy subjects (25 males and 200 females). Mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae tended to rapidly decrease after the age of 40 in healthy female subjects. For males, gradual decrease in mineral content was associated with aging. Bone mineral content showed a correlation with the severity of osteoporosis as shown on X-ray films. Mineral content tended to be decreased in the lumbar vertebrae in patients with vertebral compression fracture, and in the femur in patients with vertebral or femoral fracture. For hyperthyroidism, mineral content of the lumbar vertebrae was decreased in some females, but was within normal limit in males. Hyperparathyroidism and hypoparathyroidism tended to be associated with decrease and increase in mineral content, respectively. Two each patients with osteomalacia or Cushing syndrome had a decreased mineral content. In these patients, it was increased after the treatment. (N.K.).

  3. [Graves-Basedow disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubas, Beata; Kostecka-Matyja, Marta; Darczuk, Andrzej; Gil, Justyna

    2006-01-01

    One severe aplastic anaemia case who presented autoimmune thyroid disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is described. A 19 year old Polish girl developed Graves' hyperthyroidisms 19 months after allogeneic BMT for severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) donated from her brother. Her serum was positive for thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (aTPO) while her brother remained euthyroid, seronegative for TSAb, and showed no clinical signs of thyroid pathology. The genetic studies of lymphocytes FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analysis of STR (short tandem repeated) fragments suggested, that lymphocytes responsible for hyperthyroidisms were of donor origin. PMID:17133320

  4. Graves-Basedow disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One severe aplastic anaemia case who presented autoimmune thyroid disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (alloBMT) is described. A 19 year old Polish girldeveloped Graves' hyperthyroidisms 19 months after allogeneic BMT for severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) donated from her brother. Her serum was positive for thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (aTPO) while her brother remained euthyroid, seronegative for TSAb, and showed no clinical signs of thyroid pathology. The genetic studies of lymphocytes FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and analysis of STR (short tandem repeated) fragments suggested, that lymphocytes responsible for hyperthyroidisms were of donor origin. (author)

  5. MRI for response assessment in metastatic bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, F.E.; Larbi, A.; Pasoglou, V.; Omoumi, P.; Michoux, N.; Malghem, J.; Berg, B.C. vande [UCL, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, IREC, Institut de Recherche Clinique, Centre du Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Tombal, B. [UCL, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Service d' Urologie, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, IREC, Institut de Recherche Clinique, Centre du Cancer, Brussels (Belgium); Lhommel, R. [UCL, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, IREC, Institut de Recherche Clinique, Centre du Cancer, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-07-15

    Beyond lesion detection and characterisation, and disease staging, the quantification of the tumour load and assessment of response to treatment are daily expectations in oncology. Bone lesions have been considered ''non-measurable'' for years as opposed to lesions involving soft tissues and ''solid'' organs like the lungs or liver, for which response evaluation criteria are used in every day practice. This is due to the lack of sensitivity, specificity and measurement capabilities of imaging techniques available for bone assessment, i.e. skeletal scintigraphy (SS), radiographs and computed tomography (CT). This paper reviews the possibilities and limitations of these techniques and highlights the possibilities of positron emission tomography (PET), but mainly concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Practical morphological and quantitative approaches are proposed to evaluate the treatment response of bone marrow lesions using ''anatomical'' MRI. Recent developments of MRI, i.e. dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), are also covered. (orig.)

  6. Natural history of malignant bone disease in renal cancer: final results of an Italian bone metastasis survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Santini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs, and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months for patients without bone metastasis at diagnosis. Median time to diagnosis of bone metastasis by MSKCC risk was 24 months for good, 5 months for intermediate, and 0 months for poor risk. Median number of SREs/patient was one, and 71% of patients experienced at least one SRE. Median times to first, second, and third SRE were 2, 5, and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 12 months after bone metastasis diagnosis and 10 months after first SRE. Among 181 patients who received zoledronic acid (ZOL, median time to first SRE was significantly prolonged versus control (n = 186 (3 months vs 1 month for control; P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: RCC patients with bone metastasis are at continuous risk of SREs, and in this survey ZOL effectively reduced this risk.

  7. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progres...

  8. Hyperhomocysteinemia: a biochemical link between bone and cardiovascular system diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petramala, L; Acca, M; Francucci, C M; D'Erasmo, E

    2009-01-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a sulfur-containing amino acid involved in two metabolic pathways, catalized by cystathionine-B-synthase and methionine synthase, depending on vitamin (vit) B6, B12, and folate levels and enzymatic activity of methylenetetrahydrofolate. High HCY levels (HHCY) are associated with cardiovascular (CV) and bone diseases, in particular osteoporosis (OP)/hip fracture. As regards the mechanisms involved in the link between HHCY, CV diseases (CVD), and OP, it has been proposed the role of lysyl-oxydase inhibition that might interfere with collagen crosslink formation. Some studies suggested the dysregulation of the osteoprotegerin/receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (RANK) ligand/RANK axis, others the involvement of oxidative stress. These mechanisms may act both on bone and CV system, but whether the common denominator is HCY itself or HCY is merely a marker, remains to be clearly established. Folate, vit B6, and B12 supplementation is associated with HCY reduction, but is unable to certainly reduce the incidence of OP/fracture and CVD, probably because, in the majority of patients, HCY is only moderately increased. PMID:19724160

  9. Samarium-153 Oksabifor in the treatment of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Aim. Bone metastases (BM) are one of the most common complications of solid cancers. Frequency of metastatic bone breast cancer (BC) at different stages of the disease ranges from 47 to 85%, for prostate cancer (PC) - from 33 to 85%, for lung cancer - from 30 to 60%, kidneys - from 33 to 40%, thyroid cancer - from 28 to 60%. Initial stages of BM are often clinically asymptomatic, but later manifested with fractures and pain which greatly reduces patients' quality of life. In world practice for palliative treatment of BM are widely used isotopes 32P, 89Sr, 186Re, 188Re, 153Sm, and 177Lu. Materials and methods. The results of examination and treatment with 153Sm of 25 BM patients were analyzed. Among them 5 men and 20 women, mean age 61.2 ± 7.9 (min - 51.1, max 73.0). In 4 patients PC was diagnosed, 2 - lung cancer, 17 - BC, 1 - kidney cancer, 1 - cervical cancer. All patients after preliminary survey (bone scan, blood count, blood biochemical analysis) have got administration of 153Sm Oksabifor in doses of 1 mCi (37 MBq) per 1 kg of weight. To determine the dynamics of BM re-scan with 99mTc Tehnefor carried out in 1.5 and 3 months after starting treatment. Results. Reduction of pain intensity appeared at 6 + 4.6 days (min 2, max-18). There was a decline consumption of analgetics. According to the assessment of bone pain scales and efficiency, we can say that the therapy was effective and 90% of patients have got pain relief for 3 months and only in 2 patients pain-free period lasted 70 days. Quality of life was assessed by Karnofsky scale and improved statistically significantly. Most patients return to normal life. Only one patient's quality of life did not change (remained at 50%) and one - has changed slightly (from 50% to 60% on the Karnofsky scale). However, this is due to progression of primary disease and not related to pain symptoms. According to our data, 10 patients had stabilization process, in 15 patients

  10. Effects of renal failure and metabolic diseases upon bone scanning in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic disorders of bone most commonly affect the entire skeleton but also lead to focal abnormalities. Bone scintigraphy provides useful data on the presence, severity and response to therapy of the underlying systemic bone disease by visually grading of easily recognizable metabolic features and even more by quantitative assessment of bone turnover. This can be done by measurement of the 24-hr whole-body retention of Tc-99m diphosphonate or, more accurately in patients with renal failure, by evaluation of bone clearance of Tc-99m MDP. As far as combined with quantitative measurements bone scintigraphy is more sensitive but less specific in the detection of metabolic bone disease than conventional radiography. However, assessment of metabolic activity is more complicated in children than in adults, because of an inhomogeneous and age dependent tracer uptake in bone

  11. Bone grafting: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Joshi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Bone grafting is the process by which bone is transferred from a source (donor to site (recipient. Due to trauma from accidents by speedy vehicles, falling down from height or gunshot injury particularly in human being, acquired or developmental diseases like rickets, congenital defects like abnormal bone development, wearing out because of age and overuse; lead to bone loss and to replace the loss we need the bone grafting. Osteogenesis, osteoinduction, osteoconduction, mechanical supports are the four basic mechanisms of bone graft. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. An ideal bone graft material is biologically inert, source of osteogenic, act as a mechanical support, readily available, easily adaptable in terms of size, shape, length and replaced by the host bone. Except blood, bone is grafted with greater frequency. Bone graft indicated for variety of orthopedic abnormalities, comminuted fractures, delayed unions, non-unions, arthrodesis and osteomyelitis. Bone graft can be harvested from the iliac crest, proximal tibia, proximal humerus, proximal femur, ribs and sternum. By adopting different procedure of graft preservation its antigenicity can be minimized. The concept of bone banking for obtaining bone grafts and implants is very useful for clinical application. Absolute stability require for successful incorporation. Ideal bone graft must possess osteogenic, osteoinductive and osteocon-ductive properties. Cancellous bone graft is superior to cortical bone graft. Usually autologous cancellous bone graft are used as fresh grafts where as allografts are employed as an alloimplant. None of the available type of bone grafts possesses all these properties therefore, a single type of graft cannot be recomm-ended for all types of orthopedic abnormalities. Bone grafts and implants can be selected as per clinical problems, the equipments available and preference of

  12. Paget's disease diagnosed on bone scintigraphy: Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paget's disease of bone is a chronic bone remodeling disorder. Although most patients are asymptomatic, a variety of symptoms and complications may develop directly from bone involvement or secondarily due to compression by the expanded bone. It is usually diagnosed from radiological and biochemical abnormalities or in advanced cases it becomes clinically evident due to the expanded bone. We report a case of Paget's disease which was detected incidentally during evaluation of nephrolithiasis and polyarthritis but had normal radiographs and normal biochemical markers

  13. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging in autologous bone marrow transplantation for Hodgkin's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S. R.; Williams, C E; Edwards, R H; Davies, J M

    1989-01-01

    Fifteen consecutive patients with refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease (HD) referred for autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) underwent quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) studies of the lumbar vertebral bone marrow. Markedly elevated lumbar vertebral marrow T1 values suggestive of bone marrow involvement with HD were seen in four patients, two of whom had no evidence of HD on bilateral iliac crest bone marrow biopsy. Serial studies showed normalisation of T1 values in the post-...

  14. Clinical relevance of changes in bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pal; Miheller; Katalin; Lrinczy; Peter; Laszlo; Lakatos

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density is an established, frequent, but often neglected complication in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Data regarding the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of low bone mass in IBD has been partially extrapolated from postmenopausal osteoporosis; however, the pathophysiology of bone loss is altered in young patients with IBD. Fracture, a disabling complication, is the most important clinical outcome of low bone mass. Estimation of fracture risk in IBD is difficult. Numerous ...

  15. Physiology and molecular characterization of metabolism related mouse models for bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Shen

    2015-01-01

    Bone disorders are commonly associated with various metabolic diseases. Two ENU- induced mutant mouse lines were analyzed to explore the relationship between bone and metabolic phenotypes. SATB2 was proven to regulate bone development. In addition, a previously unknown role of the gene in energy metabolism was uncovered. Only a minor influence on bone homeostasis and energy metabolism could be attributed to the T720A mutation of DLL1.

  16. Current options for the treatment of Paget’s disease of the bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Merlotti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Daniela Merlotti, Luigi Gennari, Giuseppe Martini, Ranuccio NutiDepartment of Internal Medicine, Endocrine-Metabolic Sciences and Biochemistry, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a chronic bone remodeling disorder characterized by increased osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, with subsequent compensatory increases in new bone formation, resulting in a disorganized mosaic of woven and lamellar bone at affected skeletal sites. This disease is most often asymptomatic but can be associated with bone pain or deformity, fractures, secondary arthritis, neurological complications, deafness, contributing to substantial morbidity and reduced quality of life. Neoplastic degeneration of pagetic bone is a relatively rare event, occurring with an incidence of less than 1%, but has a grave prognosis. Specific therapy for PDB is aimed at decreasing the abnormal bone turnover and bisphosphonates are currently considered the treatment of choice. These treatments are associated with a reduction in plasma alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and an improvement in radiological and scintigraphic appearance and with a reduction in bone pain and bone deformity, Recently, the availability of newer, more potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates has improved treatment outcomes, allowing a more effective and convenient management of this debilitating disorder.Keywords: Paget’s disease of bone, bisphosphonates, aminobisphosphonates, bone remodeling

  17. Treatment of Niemann-Pick disease type B by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Vellodi, A.; Hobbs, J. R.; O'Donnell, N M; Coulter, B S; Hugh-Jones, K.

    1987-01-01

    Allogenic bone marrow transplantation was carried out on a 3 year old girl with Niemann-Pick disease type B. Successful engraftment was achieved, and nine months after the procedure there was definite clearing of the sphingomyelin from the liver and pronounced clearing from the bone marrow. Any patient with Niemann-Pick disease type B complicated by early or severe hepatic impairment should be considered for bone marrow transplantation.

  18. [Dental caries of the developmental age as a civilization disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcicka, Anna; Zalewska, Magdalena; Czerech, Ewa; Jabłoński, Robert; Grabowska, Stanisława Zyta; Maciorkowska, Elzbieta

    2012-01-01

    According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO), dental caries is a local pathological process of the extrasomatic background, leading to enamel decalcification, decomposition of dental hard tissue, and in consequence to formation of a dental cavity. Morbidity of dental caries increases with age, reaching 100% of children, aged from 6 to 7. Poland is one of few European countries where the incidence of dental caries in children did not decrease, despite recommendations of WHO for 2000 year, aimed at the decrease in the incidence of dental caries among 6-year-old children to the level of 50%. The recommendation of WHO for 2015 year is to reduce the incidence of dental caries to 30% among 6-year-olds, i.e., 70% of 6 year-old children should be free of dental caries. Apart from genetic conditioning, inappropriate health behaviors, nutritional habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease influence the development of dental caries. Consumption of 'fast food' and drinking sweetened beverages of low pH contribute markedly to the development of dental caries, decreasing simultaneously consumption of pro healthy foods, including milk and cereals. Taking into consideration perspective clinical examinations of children and adolescents, evaluating the relationship between dental caries and nutritional habits as well as environmental conditioning, the study shows current data about factors, contributing to the incidence of dental caries in children, collected from the literature. The attention was paid to the relationship between dental caries and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the necessity of its early diagnostics and proper treatment. PMID:23484402

  19. The role of biochemical of bone turnover markers in osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease: a consensus paper of the Belgian Bone Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier, E; Bergmann, P; Bruyère, O; Delanaye, P; Durnez, A; Devogelaer, J-P; Ferrari, S L; Gielen, E; Goemaere, S; Kaufman, J-M; Toukap, A Nzeusseu; Reginster, J-Y; Rousseau, A-F; Rozenberg, S; Scheen, A J; Body, J-J

    2016-07-01

    The exact role of biochemical markers of bone turnover in the management of metabolic bone diseases remains a topic of controversy. In this consensus paper, the Belgian Bone Club aimed to provide a state of the art on the use of these biomarkers in different clinical or physiological situations like in postmenopausal women, osteoporosis in men, in elderly patients, in patients suffering from bone metastasis, in patients with chronic renal failure, in pregnant or lactating women, in intensive care patients, and in diabetics. We also gave our considerations on the analytical issues linked to the use of these biomarkers, on potential new emerging biomarkers, and on the use of bone turnover biomarkers in the follow-up of patients treated with new drugs for osteoporosis. PMID:27026330

  20. Developmentally regulated monocyte recruitment and bone resorption are modulated by functional deletion of the monocytic chemoattractant protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, D T; Alsulaimani, F; Ding, Y; Marks, S C

    2002-08-01

    Tooth eruption involves the movement of a tooth from its site of development within the alveolar bone to its functional position in the oral cavity. Because this process is dependent upon monocytes and formation of osteoclasts, it represents an excellent model for examination of these processes under developmental regulation. We investigated the functional role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in monocyte recruitment and its impact on bone resorption by examining each parameter in MCP-1(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type controls during tooth eruption. The peak number of monocytes occurred on day 5 in the MCP-1(-/-) mice and on day 9 in the wild-type mice. The peak number of osteoclasts followed the same pattern, occurring sooner in the MCP-1(-/-) (day 5) than in wild-type mice (day 9). Consistent with this, MCP-1(-/-) mice had an accelerated rate of tooth eruption in the early phase when the teeth first entered the oral cavity as compared with the wild-type mice. However, there was accelerated eruption in the wild-type group in the later phase of tooth eruption. When examined at the molecular level, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-11 and -6 were expressed at considerably higher levels in the experimental group with accelerated tooth eruption. This is the first report identifying these factors as potential modulators of bone resorption that can accelerate the rate of tooth eruption. We conclude that, at early timepoints, monocyte recruitment occurs by MCP-1-independent mechanisms. However, at a later timepoint, MCP-1 may play a contributory role in the recruitment of monocytic cells, allowing the wild-type animals to catch up. PMID:12151080

  1. The blood supply of normal and diseased navicular bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast medium was used to fill the sesamoidian canal through the coffin joint as well as the arterial blood supply to the navicular bone in 90 navicular bone-coffin bone specimens. The radiological examinations of the arterial blood supply was done with a new technique (fine-focus) which allows enlargements of up to 200 fold. The material was divided into the following 4 groups on radiological and pathomorphological grounds: 1. normal navicular bones (46), 2. navicular bones with changed sesamoidian canals (33), 3. navicular bones with central collapse (9) and 4. navicular bones after a penetrating injury (2). The characteristic radiological picture of the arterial blood vessel distribution is described for each group. By comparing and differentiating the radiological arterial blood supply of the different groups, it can be concluded that the blood supply to the navicular bone changes with radiological and patho-morphological changes

  2. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K.; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions. PMID:27187611

  3. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hytönen, Marjo K; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-05-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO), a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant), SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion) and FAM20C (missense variant) genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease), for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions. PMID:27187611

  4. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjo K Hytönen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined genome-wide association and next generation sequencing, to investigate the clinico-pathological features and genetic causes of three developmental syndromes in dogs, including craniomandibular osteopathy (CMO, a previously undescribed skeletal syndrome, and dental hypomineralization, for which we identified pathogenic variants in the canine SLC37A2 (truncating splicing enhancer variant, SCARF2 (truncating 2-bp deletion and FAM20C (missense variant genes, respectively. CMO is a clinical equivalent to an infantile cortical hyperostosis (Caffey disease, for which SLC37A2 is a new candidate gene. SLC37A2 is a poorly characterized member of a glucose-phosphate transporter family without previous disease associations. It is expressed in many tissues, including cells of the macrophage lineage, e.g. osteoclasts, and suggests a disease mechanism, in which an impaired glucose homeostasis in osteoclasts compromises their function in the developing bone, leading to hyperostosis. Mutations in SCARF2 and FAM20C have been associated with the human van den Ende-Gupta and Raine syndromes that include numerous features similar to the affected dogs. Given the growing interest in the molecular characterization and treatment of human rare diseases, our study presents three novel physiologically relevant models for further research and therapy approaches, while providing the molecular identity for the canine conditions.

  5. MicroRNAs in the control of metastatic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Gillian; Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Stein, Gary S.; Stein, Janet L.; Lian, Jane B.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a common and devastating complication of late stage breast and prostate cancer. Complex interactions between tumor cells, bone cells and a milieu of components in their microenvironment contribute to the osteolytic, osteoblastic or mixed lesions present in patients with metastasis to bone. In the last decade, miRNAs have emerged as key players in cancer progression yet the importance of miRNAs in regulating cancer metastasis to bone is now being appreciated. Here, we emphas...

  6. Hirschsprung disease: a developmental disorder of the enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Sonja J; Stamp, Lincon; Hao, Marlene M; Young, Heather M

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), which is also called congenital megacolon or intestinal aganglionosis, is characterized by an absence of enteric (intrinsic) neurons from variable lengths of the most distal bowel. Because enteric neurons are essential for propulsive intestinal motility, infants with HSCR suffer from severe constipation and have a distended abdomen. Currently the only treatment is surgical removal of the affected bowel. HSCR has an incidence of around 1:5,000 live births, with a 4:1 male:female gender bias. Most enteric neurons arise from neural crest cells that emigrate from the caudal hindbrain and then migrate caudally along the entire gut. The absence of enteric neurons from variable lengths of the bowel in HSCR results from a failure of neural crest-derived cells to colonize the affected gut regions. HSCR is therefore regarded as a neurocristopathy. HSCR is a multigenic disorder and has become a paradigm for understanding complex factorial disorders. The major HSCR susceptibility gene is RET. The penetrance of several mutations in HSCR susceptibility genes is sex-dependent. HSCR can occur as an isolated disorder or as part of syndromes; for example, Type IV Waardenburg syndrome is characterized by deafness and pigmentation defects as well as intestinal aganglionosis. Studies using animal models have shown that HSCR genes regulate multiple processes including survival, proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Research into HSCR and the development of enteric neurons is an excellent example of the cross fertilization of ideas that can occur between human molecular geneticists and researchers using animal models. WIREs Dev Biol 2013, 2:113-129. doi: 10.1002/wdev.57 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:23799632

  7. PPTOX III: Environmental Stressors in the Developmental Origins of Disease - Evidence and Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schug, Thaddeus T; Barouki, Robert; Gluckman, Peter D;

    2013-01-01

    Fetal and early postnatal development constitutes the most vulnerable time period of human life in regard to adverse effects of environmental hazards. Subtle effects during development can lead to functional deficits and increased disease risk later in life. The hypothesis stating that...... environmental exposures leads to altered programming and, thereby, to increased susceptibility to disease or dysfunction later in life has garnered much support from both experimental and epidemiological studies. Similar observations have been made on the long-term impact of nutritional unbalance during early...... development. In an effort to bridge the fields of nutritional and environmental developmental toxicity, the Society of Toxicology sponsored this work. This report summarizes novel findings in developmental toxicity as reported by select invited experts and meeting attendees. Recommendations for the...

  8. Subperiosteal ganglion associated with Paget's disease of bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumoral lesions related to Paget's disease may be classified as malignant, benign or pseudotumoral. While sarcomatous degeneration is the most feared complication, awareness of benign and pseudotumoral lesions is essential for assisting in accurate histological interpretation of the biopsy sample, which may avoid unnecessary repeat biopsies. We present the first case of a juxta-articular subperiosteal ganglion associated with Paget's disease, with classic imaging characteristics, especially on CT examination. The well-defined soft tissue mass at the medial aspect of the obturator rim, adjacent to a small fracture in pagetic quadrilateral plate, showed an ossified rim and internal gas lucencies, these being the hallmarks of a juxta-articular subperiosteal ganglion. On MRI, the lesion was of intermediate signal intensity on T1-weighted sequences, increased signal intensity on T2-weighted sequences, with rim enhancement after gadolinium contrast injection and preservation of fatty marrow signal of the underlying pagetic bone. Identification of the entity avoided an unnecessary biopsy or surgical intervention. (orig.)

  9. Questions from the clinician to the radiologist regarding the diagnosis of metabolic bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, W.; Schmidt, M.

    1986-12-01

    Macromorphological X-ray findings in metabolic bone diseases can be established only in advanced stages. Micromorphological X-ray diagnostic procedures will support the diagnosis even in early stages. Mineralometric examinations are adjuvant methods for early diagnosis and survey of therapy in metabolic bone diseases. The synopsis of parameters of calcium phosphate metabolism, bone histology (histomorphometry) and radiological morphology enables the type and stage of osteopathy to be diagnosed. The supplementary diagnostic methods are helpful in distinguishing bone diseases with increased turnover, inpaired bone modelling and absorption, disturbed mineralization and ectopic calcification. Within the metabolic osteopathies, osteoporosis is gaining more and more importance as a socioeconomic problem; therefore, early diagnosis and treatment are of significant relevance. Hyper-, hypoparathyroidism and osteoidosis are diseases at can be cured if diagnosed early.

  10. Lumbar gibbus in storage diseases and bone dysplasias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The objective of this study was to review the problem of lumbar gibbus in children with storage diseases and bone dysplasias utilizing plain films and MR imaging. Materials and methods. Clinical histories and radiographic images in five patients with storage diseases [four mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and one mucolipidosis[ and two with achondroplasia were reviewed. The International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (Los Angeles, Calif.), surveyed for all patients with lumbar gibbus and skeletal dysplasias, provided 12 additional cases. Results. All patients had localized gibbus of the upper lumbar spine, characterized by anterior wedging and posterior displacement of the vertebrae at the apex of the curve, producing a beaked appearance. The curve, exaggerated in the sitting or standing position, was most severe in the two patients with MPS-IV (one of whom died). Both developed severe neurologic signs and symptoms requiring surgical intervention. In four patients, MR images demonstrated the apex of the curve to be at or below the conus. Two patients demonstrated anterior herniation of the intervertebral discs at the apex of the curve, though the signal intensity of the intervertebral discs was normal. Conclusion. Lumbar gibbus has important neurologic and orthopedic implications, and is most severe in patients with MPS. The etiology of the gibbus with vertebral beaking is multifactorial and includes poor truncal muscle tone, weight-bearing forces, growth disturbance and anterior disc herniation. The curve is generally at or below the conus. Neurologic complications are unusual, although orthopedic problems can arise. Due to their longer survival, patients with achondroplasia or Morquio's disease are more vulnerable to eventual gibbus-related musculoskeletal complications. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Lumbar gibbus in storage diseases and bone dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Lachman, R.S. [International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Anyane-Yeboa, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States); Roye, D.P. Jr. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, NY (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to review the problem of lumbar gibbus in children with storage diseases and bone dysplasias utilizing plain films and MR imaging. Materials and methods. Clinical histories and radiographic images in five patients with storage diseases [four mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) and one mucolipidosis] and two with achondroplasia were reviewed. The International Skeletal Dysplasia Registry (Los Angeles, Calif.), surveyed for all patients with lumbar gibbus and skeletal dysplasias, provided 12 additional cases. Results. All patients had localized gibbus of the upper lumbar spine, characterized by anterior wedging and posterior displacement of the vertebrae at the apex of the curve, producing a beaked appearance. The curve, exaggerated in the sitting or standing position, was most severe in the two patients with MPS-IV (one of whom died). Both developed severe neurologic signs and symptoms requiring surgical intervention. In four patients, MR images demonstrated the apex of the curve to be at or below the conus. Two patients demonstrated anterior herniation of the intervertebral discs at the apex of the curve, though the signal intensity of the intervertebral discs was normal. Conclusion. Lumbar gibbus has important neurologic and orthopedic implications, and is most severe in patients with MPS. The etiology of the gibbus with vertebral beaking is multifactorial and includes poor truncal muscle tone, weight-bearing forces, growth disturbance and anterior disc herniation. The curve is generally at or below the conus. Neurologic complications are unusual, although orthopedic problems can arise. Due to their longer survival, patients with achondroplasia or Morquio`s disease are more vulnerable to eventual gibbus-related musculoskeletal complications. (orig.). With 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in Paget's disease of bone-correlation of regional microcirculation and bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate regional microcirculation in Paget's disease of bone (PD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI). Additionally, we correlated regional bone perfusion with alkaline phosphatase as serum marker of bone turnover. We examined 71 patients with PD (27 men, 44 women, 67±10 years) localized at the axial and appendicular skeleton. Contrast uptake was analyzed using a two-compartment model with the output variables amplitude A and exchange rate constant kep. Color-coded parametric images were generated to visualize microcirculation. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (AP) were compared with DCE-MRI parameters. Amplitude A and exchange rate constant kep were significantly increased in PD compared to unaffected bone (APD 0.81±0.24 vs. Acontrol 0.34±0.1 and kepPD 4.0 ±2.86 vs. kepcontrol 1.73 ±0.88, p s=0.5-0.7) of DCE-MRI parameters and AP at the axial (pelvis, spine) and appendicular skeleton (femur, tibia). The long bones showed increased circulation of the advancing peripheral zones and no vascularization of the central part, which had been replaced by fatty tissue. Regional microcirculation in PD is inhomogeneous with focal areas of excessive hypervascularity, especially in the advancing peripheral zone. There is a significant correlation of bone circulation and bone turnover in PD. DCE-MRI might therefore be a diagnostic tool for monitoring therapeutic effects of bisphoshonates in Paget's disease of bone. (orig.)

  13. Autologous bone marrow cell therapy for peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botti C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available C Botti, C Maione, A Coppola, V Sica, G CobellisDepartment of General Pathology, Second University of Naples, Naples, ItalyAbstract: Inadequate blood supply to tissues caused by obstruction of arterioles and/or capillaries results in ischemic injuries – these injuries can range from mild (eg, leg ischemia to severe conditions (eg, myocardial infarction, stroke. Surgical and/or endovascular procedures provide cutting-edge treatment for patients with vascular disorders; however, a high percentage of patients are currently not treatable, owing to high operative risk or unfavorable vascular involvement. Therapeutic angiogenesis has recently emerged as a promising new therapy, promoting the formation of new blood vessels by the introduction of bone marrow–derived stem and progenitor cells. These cells participate in the development of new blood vessels, the enlargement of existing blood vessels, and sprouting new capillaries from existing blood vessels, providing evidence of the therapeutic utility of these cells in ischemic tissues. In this review, the authors describe peripheral arterial disease, an ischemic condition affecting the lower extremities, summarizing different aspects of vascular regeneration and discussing which and how stem cells restore the blood flow. The authors also present an overview of encouraging results from early-phase clinical trials using stem cells to treat peripheral arterial disease. The authors believe that additional research initiatives should be undertaken to better identify the nature of stem cells and that an intensive cooperation between laboratory and clinical investigators is needed to optimize the design of cell therapy trials and to maximize their scientific rigor. Only this will allow the results of these investigations to develop best clinical practices. Additionally, although a number of stem cell therapies exist, many treatments are performed outside international and national regulations and many

  14. Carryover effect of postpartum inflammatory diseases on developmental biology and fertility in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, E S; Gomes, G; Greco, L F; Cerri, R L A; Vieira-Neto, A; Monteiro, P L J; Lima, F S; Bisinotto, R S; Thatcher, W W; Santos, J E P

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this series of studies was to investigate the effects of inflammatory diseases occurring before breeding on the developmental biology and reproductive responses in dairy cows. Data from 5 studies were used to investigate different questions associating health status before breeding and reproductive responses. Health information for all studies was composed of the incidence of retained fetal membranes, metritis, mastitis, lameness, and respiratory and digestive problems from parturition until the day of breeding. Retained placenta and metritis were grouped as uterine disease (UTD). Mastitis, lameness, digestive and respiratory problems were grouped as nonuterine diseases (NUTD). Study 1 evaluated the effect of disease before artificial insemination (AI), anovulation before synchronization of the estrous cycle, and low body condition score at AI on pregnancy per AI, as well as their potential interactions or additive effects. Study 2 investigated the effect of site of inflammation (UTD vs. NUTD) and time of occurrence relative to preantral or antral stages of ovulatory follicle development, and the effect of UTD and NUTD on fertility responses of cows bred by AI or by embryo transfer. Study 3 evaluated the effect of disease on fertilization and embryonic development to the morula stage. Study 4 evaluated the effect of disease on preimplantation conceptus development as well as secretion of IFN-τ and transcriptome. Study 5 investigated the effect of diseases before AI on the transcript expression of interferon-stimulated genes in peripheral blood leukocytes during peri-implantation stages of conceptus development after first AI postpartum. Altogether, these studies demonstrated that inflammatory disease before breeding reduced fertilization of oocytes and development to morula, and impaired early conceptus development to elongation stages and secretion of IFN-τ in the uterine lumen. Diseases caused inflammation-like changes in transcriptome of

  15. The clinical and the X-ray diagnosis of the bone yaws disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the clinical and the X-ray characteristics of the yaws disease in bone. Methods: The clinical features and X-ray imaging appearances of 12 cases with bone yaws were analyzed and summarized, and discussed with related cultural heritage. Results: Nine patients were period II yaws, whose skin of all extremities were detected multiple symmetry or no-symmetry papulas and nodes, with systematic toxic symptom. There patients were period III yaws, with multiple brown abscess in and under the skin of all extremities, multiple bayberry-like nodes up and down surrounding the ulcer. In the 9 patients with period II yaws, the bone lesions were predominantly periosteal proliferation and hyperostosis. In the 3 patients with period III yaws, the bone lesions were hyperostosis with destruction of bone. Conclusion: The X-ray characteristics of bone yaws are: (1) multiple bones are involved; (2) the pathological change is mainly located in the long bone diaphysis; (3) local irregular periosteal proliferation and cortical hyperplassia, medullary canal blurring or disappearing; (4)diffusing long bone sclerosis with cortical bone destruction and cancellated bone erosion; (5)the bones involved has no sequestra. (authors)

  16. Bone Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... repair and rebuild diseased bones in your hips, knees, spine, and sometimes other bones and joints. Grafts can also repair bone loss caused by some types of fractures or cancers. Once your body accepts the bone ...

  17. Bones and Crohn's: Estradiol deficiency in men with Crohn's disease is not associated with reduced bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm BO

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced bone mineral density (BMD and osteoporosis are frequent in Crohn's disease (CD, but the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Deficiency of sex steroids, especially estradiol (E2, is an established risk factor in postmenopausal osteoporosis. Aim To assess if hormonal deficiencies in male CD patients are frequent we investigated both, sex steroids, bone density and bone metabolism markers. Methods 111 male CD patients underwent osteodensitometry (DXA of the spine (L1–L4. Disease related data were recorded. Disease activity was estimated using Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI. Testosterone (T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT, estradiol (E2, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG, Osteocalcin and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptids (ICTP were measured in 111 patients and 99 age-matched controls. Results Patients had lower T, E2 and SHBG serum levels (p 10 g had lower BMD. 32 (28.8% patients showed osteoporosis, 55 (49.5% osteopenia and 24 (21.6% had normal BMD. Patients with normal or decreased BMD showed no significant difference in their hormonal status. No correlation between markers of bone turnover and sex steroids could be found. ICTP was increased in CD patients (p Conclusion We found an altered hormonal status – i.e. E2 and, to a lesser extent T deficiency – in male CD patients but failed to show an association to bone density or markers of bone turnover. The role of E2 in the negative skeletal balance in males with CD, analogous to E2 deficiency in postmenopausal females, deserves further attention.

  18. Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here our initial observations on the growth and morphology, and developmental radiosensitivity of giant, multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells (MN-OS) generated through in vitro cultivation of hematopoietic progenitor-enriched canine bone marrow samples. Maximum cell densities of 5.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(3) MN-OS per cm2 of growth area were achieved following 10 to 14 days of culture at 37 degrees C. Acute gamma irradiation of the initial marrow inocula resulted in significant, dose-dependent perturbations of MN-OS formation, growth, and development. Attempts to estimate radiosensitivity of MN-OS progenitors from canine marrow yielded a range of Do values from a low of 212 cGy measured at six days of culture to higher values of 405 to 542 cGy following 10 to 22 days of culture. At the intermediate times of culture (10 to 14 days), the radiation-induced responses were clearly biphasic, reflecting either (a) the presence of multiple subpopulations of MN-OS progenitors with varying degrees of radiosensitivity or (b) the inherent biphasic nature of MN-OS development involving early progenitor cell proliferation followed by maturation and subsequent fusion. Morphologically, MN-OS generated from irradiated marrow inocula appeared only marginally altered, with alterations expressed largely in a biphasic, dose-dependent fashion in terms of smaller cell size, reduced number of nuclei, increased expression of both surface microprojections, and a unique set of crystalloid cytoplasmic inclusions. Functionally, MN-OS appeared to be impaired by irradiation of marrow progenitors, as evidenced by failure to initiate resorptive attachments to devitalized bone spicules in vitro

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor pathway upregulation in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma is associated with lytic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida B; Christensen, Jacob H; Lyng, Maria Bibi;

    2013-01-01

    Lytic bone disease (LBD) in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by osteoclast hyperactivation and osteoblast inhibition. Based on in vitro studies, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) pathway is thought to be central in osteoblast inhibition. We evaluated the gene expression of the HGF pathway in vivo...

  20. Pathogenesis of Bone Alterations in Gaucher Disease: The Role of Immune System

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Marcos Mucci; Paula Rozenfeld

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher, the most prevalent lysosomal disorder, is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder due to a deficiency of glucocerebrosidase. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency leads to the accumulation of glucosylceramide primarily in cells of mononuclear-macrophage lineage. Clinical alterations are visceral, hematological, and skeletal. Bone disorder in Gaucher disease produces defects on bone metabolism and structure and patients suffer from bone pain and crisis. Skeletal problems include osteopenia,...

  1. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Beth J; Kaandorp, Joepe J; Kane, Andrew D; Camm, Emily J; Lusby, Ciara; Cross, Christine M; Nevin-Dolan, Rhianon; Thakor, Avnesh S; Derks, Jan B; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Ozanne, Susan E; Giussani, Dino A

    2016-05-01

    Aging and developmental programming are both associated with oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, suggesting common mechanistic origins. However, their interrelationship has been little explored. In a rodent model of programmed cardiovascular dysfunction we determined endothelial function and vascular telomere length in young (4 mo) and aged (15 mo) adult offspring of normoxic or hypoxic pregnancy with or without maternal antioxidant treatment. We show loss of endothelial function [maximal arterial relaxation to acetylcholine (71 ± 3 vs. 55 ± 3%) and increased vascular short telomere abundance (4.2-1.3 kb) 43.0 ± 1.5 vs. 55.1 ± 3.8%) in aged vs. young offspring of normoxic pregnancy (P compared with aged offspring of untreated hypoxic pregnancy had lower levels of short telomeres (vascular short telomere length abundance 35.1 ± 2.5 vs. 48.2 ± 2.6%) and of plasma proinflammatory chemokine (24.6 ± 2.8 vs. 36.8 ± 5.5 pg/ml, P cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease, and aging being decelerated by antioxidants even prior to birth.-Allison, B. J., Kaandorp, J. J., Kane, A. D., Camm, E. J., Lusby, C., Cross, C. M., Nevin-Dolan, R., Thakor, A. S., Derks, J. B., Tarry-Adkins, J. L., Ozanne, S. E., Giussani, D. A. Divergence of mechanistic pathways mediating cardiovascular aging and developmental programming of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26932929

  2. Bone marrow scintigraphy and computed tomography in myloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, S.J.; Gilbert, H.S.; Hermann, G.

    1985-05-01

    Peripheral bone marrow (BM) expansion in myeloproliferative disease (MPD) is demonstrated by scintigraphy (scint) with Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (TSC) or Indium III chloride (In). Computed tomography (CT) of the normal adult medullary cavity yields negative attenuation coefficients (AC) which become positive when BM fat is replaced. BM scint and CT of the medullary cavity are obtained in 23 studies in 21 pts: 6 polycythemia vera (PCV), 6 post PCV myeloid metaplasis (MyM), 4 agnogenic MyM, 3 myelodysplasia with refractory anemia, 1 acute myelocytic leukemia and 1 chronic myelocytic with acute leukemic transformation. AC were measured for BM cavity of lower extremities at each third of the femur and tibia. Values ranged from -89 to +289 Hounsfield units. The results are presented in this paper. There was agreement between SCINT and CT in 83% pts and segments. 80% of MB segments with + AC had scint identified BM. BM biopsy of the iliac crest demonstrated fibrosis or blast proliferation in pts with +AC rather than hypercellularity or osteosclerosis. The highest AC values (>200) were seen in pts with blast proliferation and fibrosis. Decreased BM scint visualization and +CT AC correlated with BM fibrosis and may reflect replacement of BM elements or decreased RES function. BM scint and CT are useful to monitor MPD and select BM sites for biopsy.

  3. Clinical application of high resolution computed tomography of temporal bone diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanzaki, J.; Saito, S.; Shiga, H. (Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-11-01

    Using CT/T 8800 with high spatial resolution, target imaging of the various temporal bone diseases was performed. Coronal and axial scans were made. Target imaging is an effective means of studying patients with cholesteatomas, semicircular canal fistula, diseases of the internal auditory canal (acoustic neuroma, or stenosis) and inner ear anomaly (hypoplasia, or distension of the vestibulum). The results of the comparison of CT and polytomography of the temporal bone were as follows: 1. In most cases, the pathological process was demonstrated with CT scans better than or same as with polytomograms. 2. The radiation dose of CT scan is low. 3. The axial images of the temporal bone were easily obtained with CT. 4. CT is more effective than polytomography in the diagnosis and evaluation of the temporal bone involved by tumor and cholesteatoma, especially attic cholesteatoma. 5. In cases with temporal bone fracture, acoustic neuroma or other intracranial diseases, contrast-enhanced CT can be done.

  4. Combined bone scintigraphy and indium-111 leukocyte scans in neuropathic foot disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Park, H.M.; Burt, R.W.; Mock, B.H.; Wellman, H.N.

    1988-10-01

    It is difficult to diagnose osteomyelitis in the presence of neurotrophic osteoarthropathy. We performed combined (99mTc)MDP bone scans and indium-111 (111In) leukocyte studies on 35 patients who had radiographic evidence of neuropathic foot disease and clinically suspected osteomyelitis. The (111In)leukocyte study determined if there was an infection and the bone scan provided the anatomic landmarks so that the infection could be localized to the bone or the adjacent soft tissue. Seventeen patients had osteomyelitis and all showed increased (111In)leukocyte activity localized to the bone, giving a sensitivity of 100%. Among the 18 patients without osteomyelitis, eight had no accumulation of (111In)leukocytes, seven had the (111In)leukocyte activity correctly localized to the soft tissue, two had (111In)leukocyte activity mistakenly attributed to the bone, and one had (111In)leukocyte accumulation in a proven neuroma which was mistakenly attributed to bone. These three false-positive results for osteomyelitis reduced the specificity to 83%. Considering only the 27 patients with a positive (111In)leukocyte study, the combined bone scan and (111In)leukocyte study correctly localized the infection to the soft tissues or bone in 89%. Uninfected neurotrophic osteoarthropathy does not accumulate (111In)leukocytes. We found the combined bone scan and (111In) leukocyte study useful for the detection and localization of infection to soft tissue or bone in patients with neuropathic foot disease.

  5. An Unusual Developmental Profile of Salla Disease in a Patient with the SallaFIN Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa E. Paavola

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Salla disease (SD is a disorder caused by defective storage of free sialic acid and results from mutations in the SLC17A5 gene. Early developmental delay of motor functions, and later cognitive skills, is typical. We describe a developmental profile of an unusual homozygous patient, who harboured the SallaFIN (p.R39C mutation gene. The study involved neurological examination, neuropsychological investigation, and brain imaging. The neurocognitive findings were atypical in comparison with other patients with the SallaFIN mutation. Interestingly, there was no deterioration in the patient's neurological condition during adulthood. Her neurocognitive skills were remarkably higher than those of other patients with a conventional phenotype of SD. Our results suggest that the phenotype of SD is broad. Unidentified genetic or environmental variation might explain the unique SD type of this case.

  6. Petroleum ether extract of Cissus quadrangularis (LINN) stimulates the growth of fetal bone during intra uterine developmental period: a morphometric analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhagath Kumar Potu; Rao, Muddanna S.; N. Gopalan Kutty; Kumar MR Bhat; Mallikarjuna Rao Chamallamudi; Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect Cissus quadrangularis plant petroleum ether extract on the development of long bones during the intra-uterine developmental stage in rats. METHODS: Pregnant rats (n=12) were randomly assigned into either a control group (n=6) or a Cissus quadrangularis treatment (n=6) group. Pregnant rats in the Cissus quadrangularis group were treated with Cissus quadrangularis petroleum ether extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight from ge...

  7. Scedosporium apiospermum in chronic granulomatous disease treated with an HLA matched bone marrow transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Gompels, M M; Bethune, C A; Jackson, G; Spickett, G P

    2002-01-01

    A patient with chronic granulomatous disease who was being treated with steroids was diagnosed with a soft tissue Scedosporium apiospermum infection. Despite extensive treatment with antifungals progression to involve solid tissue (bone) occurred. Treatment required an HLA matched bone marrow transplant, which led to complete clearance of the fungal infection, although the patient subsequently died.

  8. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a novel target for the control of osteolytic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Anandi; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) from mice bearing bone metastases differentiate into functional osteoclasts in vitro and in vivo, through a signaling pathway that relies on nitric oxide. In addition, MDSC-targeting drugs have been shown to robustly inhibit osteolysis. Thus, MDSC stand out as novel osteoclast progenitors and hence as candidate targets for the control of osteolytic bone disease.

  9. Inflammatory diseases of the petrous portion of the temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammatory lesions of the petrous portion of the temporal bone are very common and can be followed by cerebral complications. Thin layer computed tomography (CT) is useful for detecting bony changes of the temporal bone and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE MRI) is a sensitive method for detecting cerebral complications. (orig.)

  10. Risk Factors for Low Bone Mineral Density in Institutionalized Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Vice

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Follow-up studies should focus on how supplementation and medication changes may or may not alter BMD. Persons with IDD are experiencing longer life expectancies, and therefore, studies ascertaining information on diseases associated with this aging population are warranted.

  11. Analysis on Developmental Factors of the Liver Diseases in Ultrasound Diagnosis of Healthcare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study found out developmental factors of the liver diseases in 29, 531 cases of the healthy adults who were diagnosed by using ultrasound at domestic healthcare centers in 6 cities. The results are as follows. Based on the result of the study, the liver diseases diagnosed by using ultrasound was revealed to show 43.1% of prevalence, and the occurrence was significantly higher in male (23.3%) than in female (19.8%). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the BMI was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in obese group (BMI 25) by recording 44.3%. Smoking contributed to the high prevalence of all liver diseases. Although the fatty liver was the most frequently occurred form of liver diseases by recording the prevalence of 49.1% (22.2% in male, 26.9% in female), the significant difference was found only in female (p 0.05). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the hypertension was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in hypertension group by recording 67.7%. The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the diabetes was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in diabetes group by recording 66.2%. The high prevalence of all hepatic diseases was related to diabetes mellitus with statistical significance (p 0.05).

  12. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mine Araz; Gülseren Aras; Özlem N. Küçük

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of 18F–NaF PET/CT and compare it with 99m Tc-MDP whole body bone scintigraphy and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting the extent of metastatic bone disease and to present our first experience with 18F–NaF PET/CT in our country. Materials and methods: A total of 37 histopathologically proven cancer patients (22 male, 15 female) with bone metastasis detected on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan were prospectively enrolled Cebeci, following ethics committee approval. 18F–Na...

  13. The clinical significance of bone lesions in primary patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis of 2450 case histories of primary Hodgkin's disease established bone lesions incidence at 3.8%. They occured in case of general symptoms (6%) rather than otherwise (1.6%). Bone involvement came about chiefly with several bones being involved in most cases. Both radiation and polychemotherapy caused local healing effect which would lead to full recovery of bone structure in some cases. Therefore, combined (polychemotherapy + radiation) treatment shoul be recommended in cases of single lesions whereas treatment for multiple lesions may be limited to medication

  14. Emerging strategies and therapies for treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown JP

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Laëtitia Michou, Jacques P BrownLaval University, Department of Medicine, CHUQ (CHUL Research Centre and Division of Rheumatology, Quebec City, QC, CanadaAbstract: Paget’s disease of bone (PDB is a progressive monostotic or polyostotic metabolic bone disease characterized by focal abnormal bone remodeling, with increased bone resorption and excessive, disorganized, new bone formation. PDB rarely occurs before middle age, and it is the second most frequent metabolic bone disorder after osteoporosis, affecting up to 3% of adults over 55 years of age. One of the most striking and intriguing clinical features is the focal nature of the disorder, in that once the disease is established within a bone, there is only local spread within that bone and no systemic dissemination. Despite many years of intense research, the etiology of PDB has still to be conclusively determined. Based on a detailed review of genetic and viral factors incriminated in PDB, we propose a unifying hypothesis from which we can suggest emerging strategies and therapies. PDB results in weakened bone strength and abnormal bone architecture, leading to pain, deformity or, depending on the bone involved, fracture in the affected bone. The diagnostic assessment includes serum total alkaline phosphatase, total body bone scintigraphy, skull and enlarged view pelvis x-rays, and if needed, additional x-rays. The ideal therapeutic option would eliminate bone pain, normalize serum total alkaline phosphatase with prolonged remission, heal radiographic osteolytic lesions, restore normal lamellar bone, and prevent recurrence and complications. With the development of increasingly potent bisphosphonates, culminating in the introduction of a single intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid 5 mg, these goals of treatment are close to being achieved, together with long-term remission in almost all patients. Based on the recent pathophysiological findings, emerging strategies and therapies are

  15. What is the optimal bone-preserving strategy for patients with Addison's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul; Greenfield, Jerry R

    2015-08-01

    Addison's disease is associated with low bone mineral density and increased risk of hip fractures. Causes are multifactorial, contributed by underlying adrenocortical hormonal deficiency, associated autoimmune endocrinopathies, electrolyte disturbances and, in some patients, supraphysiologic glucocorticoid replacement. Recent realization of physiologic cortisol production rate has revised downwards glucocorticoid replacement dosages. Meanwhile, new research has emerged suggesting complex interplay between sodium and calcium homoeostasis under the influence of mineralocorticoid and parathyroid hormone that may impact bone health. As the prevalence of Addison's disease is rising, and osteoporosis and fractures are associated with significant morbidity and increased mortality, attention to bone preservation in Addison's disease is of clinical relevance and importance. We suggest an approach to bone health in Addison's disease integrating physiologic adrenocortical hormonal replacement with electrolyte and mineral homoeostasis optimization. PMID:25640730

  16. Sacro-iliac joint disease in drug abusers: The role of bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scintigrams demonstrated increased uptake in the sacroiliac joint in twenty drug addicts with low back pain and signs of localized sepsis. The localization of the disease was decisive for the orthopedist in the aspiration of the affected joint. (orig.)

  17. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  18. Moderate chronic kidney disease impairs bone quality in C57Bl/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heveran, Chelsea M; Ortega, Alicia M; Cureton, Andrew; Clark, Ryan; Livingston, Eric W; Bateman, Ted A; Levi, Moshe; King, Karen B; Ferguson, Virginia L

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) increases bone fracture risk. While the causes of bone fragility in CKD are not clear, the disrupted mineral homeostasis inherent to CKD may cause material quality changes to bone tissue. In this study, 11-week-old male C57Bl/6J mice underwent either 5/6th nephrectomy (5/6 Nx) or sham surgeries. Mice were fed a normal chow diet and euthanized 11weeks post-surgery. Moderate CKD with high bone turnover was established in the 5/6 Nx group as determined through serum chemistry and bone gene expression assays. We compared nanoindentation modulus and mineral volume fraction (assessed through quantitative backscattered scanning electron microscopy) at matched sites in arrays placed on the cortical bone of the tibia mid-diaphysis. Trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture and whole bone strength were also evaluated. We found that moderate CKD minimally affected bone microarchitecture and did not influence whole bone strength. Meanwhile, bone material quality decreased with CKD; a pattern of altered tissue maturation was observed with 5/6 Nx whereby the newest 60μm of bone tissue adjacent to the periosteal surface had lower indentation modulus and mineral volume fraction than more interior, older bone. The variance of modulus and mineral volume fraction was also altered following 5/6 Nx, implying that tissue-scale heterogeneity may be negatively affected by CKD. The observed lower bone material quality may play a role in the decreased fracture resistance that is clinically associated with human CKD. PMID:26860048

  19. Adenovirus Type F Subtype 41 Causing Disseminated Disease following Bone Marrow Transplantation for Immunodeficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Slatter, Mary A.; Read, Steven; Taylor, Clive E.; Crooks, Bruce N. A.; Abinun, Mario; Flood, Terence J.; Cant, Andrew J; Wright, Christopher; Gennery, Andrew R.

    2005-01-01

    Adenovirus causes disseminated disease following bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We report a child who underwent T-cell-depleted BMT. Adenovirus subgenus F serotype 41 was detected antemortem by PCR in cerebrospinal fluid and postmortem in other tissues. Serotypes 40 and 41, associated with gastrointestinal disease, have not previously been implicated in disseminated disease.

  20. The complications of radionuclide treatment of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone metastases comprise 50-75% cancer complications, in particular ones of breast and prostate. Radionuclide therapy of painful bone metastases has progressed in last decade, but still it is not commonly applied, also due to the clinicians' fears of side effects. This paper overviews the complications of this treatment modality, with particular emphasis to myelotoxicity. It may be concluded that the potential complications should be born in mind by the referring clinician, but it should be stated that radioisotope therapy of bone metastases is a relatively safe modality, safer than external sealed source therapy. (author)

  1. Upper airway obstruction and pulmonary abnormalities due to lymphoproliferative disease following bone marrow transplantation in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report three patients who developed severe supraglottic airway obstruction due to Epstein-Barr virus lymphoproliferative disease following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. In addition to enlarged pharyngeal lymphoid tissue seen in all three patients, two had supraglottic airway narrowing and two developed pulmonary lymphoproliferative disease. They were treated with unmanipulated T cells or EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Life-threatening upper airway obstruction is a radiologically detectable complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in children. (orig.)

  2. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Post-transplant Population: Preventative and Therapeutic Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Johan Daniël; Epstein, Sol

    2016-05-01

    Post-transplant bone disease contributes significantly to patients' morbidity and mortality after transplantation and has an impact on their quality of life. This article discusses the major contributors to mechanisms causing bone loss, highlighting the role of preexisting disease in both kidney and liver failure and contributions from glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors. Suggested monitoring and investigations are reviewed as well as treatment as far as the current literature supports, emphasizing the difference between kidney and liver recipients. PMID:27095646

  3. Petroleum ether extract of Cissus quadrangularis (LINN stimulates the growth of fetal bone during intra uterine developmental period: a morphometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagath Kumar Potu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect Cissus quadrangularis plant petroleum ether extract on the development of long bones during the intra-uterine developmental stage in rats. METHODS: Pregnant rats (n=12 were randomly assigned into either a control group (n=6 or a Cissus quadrangularis treatment (n=6 group. Pregnant rats in the Cissus quadrangularis group were treated with Cissus quadrangularis petroleum ether extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight from gestation day 9 until delivery. The animals in the control group received an equal volume of saline. Newborn pups were collected from both groups for alizarin red S - alcian blue staining to differentiate ossified and unossified cartilage. The ossified cartilage (bone was morphometrically analyzed using Scion image software. RESULTS: Morphometric analysis revealed that the percentage of the total length of ossified cartilage (bone in pups born to treated dams was significantly higher (P<0.001- -0.0001 than that of the control group. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study suggest that maternal administration of Cissus quadrangularis petroleum ether extract during pregnancy can stimulate the development of fetal bone growth during the intra-uterine developmental period.

  4. Bone Allografts: What Is the Risk of Disease Transmission with Bone Allografts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calculated to be one in 2.8 billion [Russo 1995]. Therefore, the established exclusionary criteria combined with ... bone allograft. J Periodontol 1992;12:979–983. Russo R, Scarborough N. Inactivation of viruses in demineralized ...

  5. Crosstalk between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells through a glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper/developmental endothelial locus-1-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nianlan; Baban, Babak; Isales, Carlos M; Shi, Xing-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Bone marrow is a reservoir for regulatory T (T(reg)) cells, but how T(reg) cells are regulated in that environment remains poorly understood. We show that expression of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone marrow mesenchymal lineage cells or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increases the production of T(reg) cells via a mechanism involving the up-regulation of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), an endogenous leukocyte-endothelial adhesion inhibitor. We found that the expression of Del-1 is increased ∼4-fold in the bone tissues of GILZ transgenic (Tg) mice, and this increase is coupled with a significant increase in the production of IL-10 (2.80 vs. 0.83) and decrease in the production of IL-6 (0.80 vs. 2.33) and IL-12 (0.25 vs. 1.67). We also show that GILZ-expressing BMSCs present antigen in a way that favors T(reg) cells. These results indicate that GILZ plays a critical role mediating the crosstalk between BMSCs and T(reg) in the bone marrow microenvironment. These data, together with our previous findings that overexpression of GILZ in BMSCs antagonizes TNF-α-elicited inflammatory responses, suggest that GILZ plays important roles in bone-immune cell communication and BMSC immune suppressive functions. PMID:26038125

  6. Identification of microRNAs regulating the developmental pathways of bone marrow derived mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in leukocyte differentiation, although those utilised for specific programs and key functions remain incompletely characterised. As a global approach to gain insights into the potential regulatory role of miRNA in mast cell differentiation we characterised expression in BM cultures from the initiation of differentiation. In cultures enriched in differentiating mast cells we characterised miRNA expression and identified miRNA targeting the mRNA of putative factors involved in differentiation pathways and cellular identity. Detailed pathway analysis identified a unique miRNA network that is intimately linked to the mast cell differentiation program. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 86 unique miRNAs with expression patterns that were up- or down- regulated at 5-fold or more during bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMC development. By employing TargetScan and MeSH databases, we identified 524 transcripts involved in 30 canonical pathways as potentially regulated by these specific 86 miRNAs. Furthermore, by applying miRanda and IPA analyses, we predict that 7 specific miRNAs of this group are directly associated with the expression of c-Kit and FcεRIα and likewise, that 18 miRNAs promote expression of Mitf, GATA1 and c/EBPα three core transcription factors that direct mast cell differentiation. Furthermore, we have identified 11 miRNAs that may regulate the expression of STATs-3, -5a/b, GATA2 and GATA3 during differentiation, along with 13 miRNAs that target transcripts encoding Ndst2, mMCP4 and mMCP6 and thus may regulate biosynthesis of mast cell secretory mediators. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This investigation characterises changes in miRNA expression in whole BM cultures during the differentiation of mast cells and predicts functional links between miRNAs and their target mRNAs for the regulation of development. This information provides an important resource for further

  7. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caraceni, M.P.; Molteni, N.; Bardella, M.T.; Ortolani, S.; Nogara, A.; Bianchi, P.A.

    1988-03-01

    Bone mineral density (/sup 125/I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.

  8. Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone mineral density (125I photon absorptiometry) was lower in 20 untreated adult celiac patients than in sex- and age-matched controls (p less than 0.001), and plasma alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone, urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine levels were higher than normal (p less than 0.05, less than 0.001, less than 0.05, respectively). Gluten-free diet was started, and the patients were divided randomly into two treatment groups, one which received oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D 50 micrograms/day and one which did not. After 12 months' treatment, bone turnover markers showed a decrease, which did not reach statistical significance, and bone mineral density did not show significant modifications compared with base line in either group. It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups

  9. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Farber, Charles R; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. ...

  10. Altered interaction and distribution of glycosaminoglycans and growth factors in mucopolysaccharidosis type I bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Sandra D K; Wagemans, Tom; IJlst, Lodewijk; Bronckers, Antonius L J J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Everts, Vincent; Wijburg, Frits A; van Vlies, Naomi

    2016-07-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) comprise a group of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient degradation and subsequent accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Progressive bone and joint disease are a major cause of morbidity, and current therapeutic strategies have limited effect on these symptoms. By elucidating pathophysiological mechanisms underlying bone disease, new therapeutic targets may be identified. Longitudinal growth is regulated by interaction between GAGs and growth factors. Because GAGs accumulate in the MPSs, we hypothesized that altered interaction between growth factors and GAGs contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In this study, binding between GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was not significantly different from binding of FGF2 to GAGs from control chondrocytes. FGF2 signaling, however, was increased in MPS I chondrocytes after incubation with FGF2, as compared to control chondrocytes. Using bone cultures, we demonstrated decreased growth of WT mouse bones after incubation with FGF2, but no effect on MPS I bone growth. However, MPS I bones showed decreased growth in the presence of GAGs from MPS I chondrocytes. Finally, we demonstrate altered GAG distribution in MPS I chondrocytes, and altered GAG, FGF2 and Indian hedgehog distribution in growth plates from MPS I mice. In summary, our results suggest that altered interaction and distribution of growth factors and accumulated GAGs may contribute to the pathogenesis of MPS bone disease. In the future, targeting growth factor regulation or the interaction between in growth factors and GAGs might be a promising therapeutic strategy for MPS bone disease. PMID:27105565

  11. Analysis on Developmental Factors of the Liver Diseases in Ultrasound Diagnosis of Healthcare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Mi Yeon [Dept. of Radiology of Healthcare Center Kyobo Life Insurance Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hong Ryang; Lim, Chang Hwan [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The study found out developmental factors of the liver diseases in 29, 531 cases of the healthy adults who were diagnosed by using ultrasound at domestic healthcare centers in 6 cities. The results are as follows. Based on the result of the study, the liver diseases diagnosed by using ultrasound was revealed to show 43.1% of prevalence, and the occurrence was significantly higher in male (23.3%) than in female (19.8%). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the BMI was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in obese group (BMI 25) by recording 44.3%. Smoking contributed to the high prevalence of all liver diseases. Although the fatty liver was the most frequently occurred form of liver diseases by recording the prevalence of 49.1% (22.2% in male, 26.9% in female), the significant difference was found only in female (p < 0.05), but male group did not show significant difference (p > 0.05). The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the hypertension was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in hypertension group by recording 67.7%. The prevalence of hepatic diseases related to the diabetes was revealed to show highest prevalence of the fatty liver in diabetes group by recording 66.2%. The high prevalence of all hepatic diseases was related to diabetes mellitus with statistical significance (p < 0.001). The multiple regression analysis for the related factors which affect the prevalence of the liver diseases showed the higher prevalence by age. Sex, obesity and diabetes mellitus were positively related to the prevalence (p < 0.05) while hypertension and smoking showed no significant relationship to the prevalence of the disease (p > 0.05).

  12. Molecular Actions of Glucocorticoids in Cartilage and Bone During Health, Disease, and Steroid Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Kerstin; Koenen, Mascha; Schauer, Sebastian; Wittig-Blaich, Stephanie; Ahmad, Mubashir; Baschant, Ulrike; Tuckermann, Jan P

    2016-04-01

    Cartilage and bone are severely affected by glucocorticoids (GCs), steroid hormones that are frequently used to treat inflammatory diseases. Major complications associated with long-term steroid therapy include impairment of cartilaginous bone growth and GC-induced osteoporosis. Particularly in arthritis, GC application can increase joint and bone damage. Contrarily, endogenous GC release supports cartilage and bone integrity. In the last decade, substantial progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of GC action has been gained through genome-wide binding studies of the GC receptor. These genomic approaches have revolutionized our understanding of gene regulation by ligand-induced transcription factors in general. Furthermore, specific inactivation of GC signaling and the GC receptor in bone and cartilage cells of rodent models has enabled the cell-specific effects of GCs in normal tissue homeostasis, inflammatory bone diseases, and GC-induced osteoporosis to be dissected. In this review, we summarize the current view of GC action in cartilage and bone. We further discuss future research directions in the context of new concepts for optimized steroid therapies with less detrimental effects on bone. PMID:26842265

  13. S-MRI score: A simple method for assessing bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, M. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Mota, J. [Diagnostic Imaging Department, Medimagen, Barcelona (Spain); Alfonso, P. [Radiology (Magnetic Resonance) Instituto Aragones de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Zaragoza (Spain); Pocovi, M. [Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Zaragoza University (Spain); Giraldo, P. [Haematology Department, Miguel Servet University Hospital, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)]. E-mail: pgiraldo@salud.aragon.es

    2007-04-15

    Semi quantitative MRI is a very useful procedure for evaluating the bone marrow burden (BMB) in Gaucher disease (GD). Score systems have been applied to obtain a parameter for evaluating the severity of bone disease. Our purpose was to test a simple, reproducible and accurate score to evaluate bone marrow involvement in GD patients. MRI was performed in spine, pelvis and femora at diagnosis in 54 adult GD1 patients, 61.1% of whom were female. Three MRI patterns and punctuation in each location were defined: normal, 0; non-homogeneous infiltration subtypes reticular, 1; mottled, 2; diffuse, 3; and homogeneous infiltration, 4. This score was called Spanish-MRI (S-MRI). Two independent observers applied the S-MRI and bone marrow burden score and compared the differences using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlation rank test was calculated. In 46 patients (85.2%), bone involvement was observed. Thirty-nine (72.3%) had their spine affected, 35 (64.8%) pelvis and 33 (61.2%) femora. Fourteen patients had bone infarcts, 14 avascular necrosis, 2 vertebral fractures and 2 bone crises. Correlation analysis between S-MRI and BMB was (r {sup 2} = .675; p = .0001). No evidence of correlation was observed between CT activity and S-MRI nor between CT activity and BMB. We have found a relationship between genotype and bone infiltration according to S-MRI site and complications. S-MRI is a simple method that provides useful information to evaluate bone infiltration and detect silent complications. Our results correlated with the BMB score but offer higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for classifying the extent of bone disease.

  14. The influence of genetic variability and proinflammatory status on the development of bone disease in patients with Gaucher disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gervas-Arruga

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by β-glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Bone complications are the major cause of morbidity in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1. Genetic components strongly influence bone remodelling. In addition, chronic inflammation produced by Gaucher cells induces the production of several cytokines, which leads to direct changes in the bone remodelling process and can also affect the process indirectly through other immune cells. In this study, we analysed the association between bone mineral density (BMD, bone marrow burden score, and relevant genetic polymorphisms related to bone metabolism, as well as profiles of proinflammatory cytokines in a GD1 cohort. This study included 83 patients distributed according to bone status. BMD was measured with DXA and broadband ultrasound attenuation; bone marrow involvement was evaluated using MRI. We also analysed 26 SNPs located in 14 genes related to bone metabolism. To assess proinflammatory status, we analysed IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα in plasma samples from 71 control participants and GD1 patients. SNP genotype proportions and BMD differed significantly between ESRI c.453-397T>C and VDR c.1024+283G>A variants. We also observed significant associations between GD1 genotypes and bone affectation. When patients were stratified by spleen status, we observed significant correlations between non-/splenectomized groups and Spanish MRI (S-MRI score. Across genotype proportions of non-/splenectomized patients and S-MRI, we observed significant differences in ESRI c.453-397T>C, VDR c.-83-25988G>A, and TNFRSF11B c.9C>G polymorphisms. We observed different significant proinflammatory profiles between control participants, treatment-naïve patients, and patients on enzyme replacement therapy (ERT; between non-/splenectomized patients (between untreated and ERT-treated patients and among those with differing GBA

  15. Assessment of the serum levels of bone alkaline phosphatase with a new immunoradiometric assay in patients with metabolic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors measured serum bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) with a new immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) in a large sample of healthy controls comprising 173 women and 180 men, 20-88 yr of age, and in patients with metabolic bone disease. Using serum samples from patients with liver disease and patients with Paget's disease with elevated total alkaline phosphatase (T-ALP) as a source of, respectively, liver and bone isoenyzmes, they determined a liver cross-reactivity of the IRMA of 16% that was confirmed by electrophoresis of the circulating alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes. The IRMA was linear for serial sample dilutions, the recovery ranged from 89-110%, and the intra- and interassay variations were below 7% and 9%, respectively. B-ALP increased linearly with age in both sexes, and the mean B-ALP serum levels were not significantly different for women and men (11.3 ± 4.8 ng/mL for women; 11.0 ± 4.0 ng/mL for men). The increase in B-ALP after the menopause was significantly higher than that in T-ALP (+77% vs. +24%; P<0.001). When the values of postmenopausal women were expressed as the SD from the mean of premenopausal women, the mean Z scores were 2.2± 1.8 for B-ALP and 0.9 ± 1.3 for T-ALP (P<0.001 between the two)

  16. Sudeck-type dystrophy in Paget's disease of bone. An anatomico-radiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagier, R

    1985-03-01

    Anatomico-radiological study of a humerus with Paget's disease and unhealed fracture makes it possible to demonstrate the uneven development of the disease according to local conditions. The possible role of a bone dystrophy similar to that in Sudeck's disease which might - along with a slow virus infection - be involved in the development of Paget's disease is discussed. The discussion is based on the present case, on two previous studies as well as on data found in the literature. PMID:2580661

  17. A Small Molecule, Odanacatib, Inhibits Inflammation and Bone Loss Caused by Endodontic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Wei; McConnell, Matthew; Zhu, Zheng; Li, Sheng; Reddy, Michael; Eleazer, Paul D; Wang, Min; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Periapical disease, an inflammatory disease mainly caused by dental caries, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of humans, affecting both children and adults. The infection travels through the root, leading to inflammation, bone destruction, and severe pain for the patient. Therefore, the development of a new class of anti-periapical disease therapies is necessary and critical for treatment and prevention. A small molecule, odanacatib (ODN), which is a cathepsin K (Ctsk) inhibito...

  18. TGF-βand BMP signaling in osteoblast, skeletal development, and bone formation, homeostasis and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengrui Wu; Guiqian Chen; and Yi-Ping Li

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling has fundamental roles in both embryonic skeletal development and postnatal bone homeostasis. TGF-βs and BMPs, acting on a tetrameric receptor complex, transduce signals to both the canonical Smad-dependent signaling pathway (that is, TGF-β/BMP ligands, receptors, and Smads) and the non-canonical-Smad-independent signaling pathway (that is, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/p38 MAPK) to regulate mesenchymal stem cell differentiation during skeletal development, bone formation and bone homeostasis. Both the Smad and p38 MAPK signaling pathways converge at transcription factors, for example, Runx2 to promote osteoblast differentiation and chondrocyte differentiation from mesenchymal precursor cells. TGF-βand BMP signaling is controlled by multiple factors, including the ubiquitin–proteasome system, epigenetic factors, and microRNA. Dysregulated TGF-βand BMP signaling result in a number of bone disorders in humans. Knockout or mutation of TGF-βand BMP signaling-related genes in mice leads to bone abnormalities of varying severity, which enable a better understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in bone and the signaling networks underlying osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. There is also crosstalk between TGF-β/BMP signaling and several critical cytokines’ signaling pathways (for example, Wnt, Hedgehog, Notch, PTHrP, and FGF) to coordinate osteogenesis, skeletal development, and bone homeostasis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of TGF-β/BMP signaling in osteoblast differentiation, chondrocyte differentiation, skeletal development, cartilage formation, bone formation, bone homeostasis, and related human bone diseases caused by the disruption of TGF-β/BMP signaling.

  19. 3D image analysis and artificial intelligence for bone disease classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgundogdu, Abdurrahim; Jennane, Rachid; Aufort, Gabriel; Benhamou, Claude Laurent; Ucan, Osman Nuri

    2010-10-01

    In order to prevent bone fractures due to disease and ageing of the population, and to detect problems while still in their early stages, 3D bone micro architecture needs to be investigated and characterized. Here, we have developed various image processing and simulation techniques to investigate bone micro architecture and its mechanical stiffness. We have evaluated morphological, topological and mechanical bone features using artificial intelligence methods. A clinical study is carried out on two populations of arthritic and osteoporotic bone samples. The performances of Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) in classifying the different samples have been compared. Results show that the best separation success (100 %) is achieved with Genetic Algorithm. PMID:20703627

  20. A Case Report of Hydatid Disease in Long Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Fanian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst, caused by echinococcus granulosa, can produce tissue cyst everywhere in body. Skeletal cystic lesion is rare especially in long bones like tibia and because of its unusual presentation, its diagnosis may easily be missed, unless be kept in mind.

  1. Bone Disease in Myeloma: The Claws of CRAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rafael; Jain, Tania

    2016-03-15

    A dynamic approach to use bisphosphonates according to biomarkers of bone metabolism is presented in the Z-MARK study by Raje and colleagues. This is a major step forward toward a rational approach to bisphosphonate usage. Clin Cancer Res; 22(6); 1301-3. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Raje et al., p. 1378. PMID:26792259

  2. Chronic osteomyelitis: bone and gallium scan patterns associated with active disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone and gallium scans are used to assess osteomyelitis patients with prior bone disease. To refine the criteria for interpreting these scans, the data from 136 consecutive patients with clinically suspected osteomyelitis were reviewed. Active osteomyelitis was diagnosed with surgery or biopsy and culture in 49 patients, excluded with the same criteria in 16, and excluded by clinical follow-up for at least 6 months in 71. Five different scintigraphic patterns were found. The true-positive and false-positive ratios, the likelihood ratios, and posterior probabilities for active osteomyelitis in each pattern were calculated. Only one pattern (gallium uptake exceeding bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake) was indicative of active disease. Other patterns slightly raised or decreased the probability of disease. The extent of these changes varies directly with the prior probability of disease, determined from patient-specific factors (e.g., clinical data, laboratory data, findings on plain films) known best by the referring clinician

  3. Benign tumefactive soft tissue extension from Paget's disease of bone simulating malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteosarcoma is a frequently fatal complication of Paget's disease of bone typically manifesting radiographically as a lytic lesion with soft tissue extension. A clinically worrisome, but benign manifestation of Paget's disease simulating malignancy because of an extraosseous mass is reported. (orig.)

  4. Benign tumefactive soft tissue extension from Paget's disease of bone simulating malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNairn, J.D.K.; Landas, S.K. [SUNY Upstate Medical Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Dept. of Pathology; Damron, T.A. [SUNY Upstate Medical Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Department of Orthopedics, Syracuse, NY (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ambrose, J.L. [SUNY Upstate Medical Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2001-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is a frequently fatal complication of Paget's disease of bone typically manifesting radiographically as a lytic lesion with soft tissue extension. A clinically worrisome, but benign manifestation of Paget's disease simulating malignancy because of an extraosseous mass is reported. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuya, Tomoo; Inoue, Tomio; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Aoki, Jun; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    To clarify the contrast-enhancement pattern of the normal hematopoietic element by isolating the signal of the water fraction in vertebral bone marrow and to investigate whether this approach can be used to characterize bone marrow pathology in several diffuse bone marrow diseases. Two groups were examined: 30 normal healthy volunteers and 19 patients with primary diffuse bone marrow disease (aplastic anemia [n=8], myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) [n=5], chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML) [n=4], polycythemia vera [n=2]). Isolation of the signal of hematopoietic tissue was done by the chemical-shift misregistration effect. Twenty consecutive T1-weighted midsagittal lumber vertebral images were obtained immediately after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, and the pattern of the time-intensity curve, the peak contrast-enhancement (CE) ratio, and the washout rate (%/min) of bone marrow in normal volunteers were compared with those in patients suffering from primary diffuse bone marrow disease. The pattern of the time-intensity curve of patients with aplastic anemia showed a low peak value followed by a slow washout. However, the pattern of time-intensity curves in patients with MDS, CML, and polycythemia vera was similar to that of normal volunteers. The peak CE ratio of the water fraction in normal marrow ranged from 0.45 to 1.26 (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.87{+-}0.18). Patients with aplastic anemia showed an abnormally lower peak CE ratio of the water fraction (mean {+-}S.D.: 0.34{+-}0.19, p<0.0001). On the other hand, the peak CE ratio of the water fraction in patients with MDS was significantly higher than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D. 1.35{+-}0.39, p<0.05). In contrast, the peak CE ratio of patients with CML or polycythemia vera did not differ significantly from that of normal volunteers. The mean washout rate of patients with aplastic anemia was significantly lower than that of normal volunteers (mean {+-}S.D.: 3.50{+-}2.51 %/min

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the contrast-enhancement pattern of the normal hematopoietic element by isolating the signal of the water fraction in vertebral bone marrow and to investigate whether this approach can be used to characterize bone marrow pathology in several diffuse bone marrow diseases. Two groups were examined: 30 normal healthy volunteers and 19 patients with primary diffuse bone marrow disease (aplastic anemia [n=8], myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) [n=5], chronic myelogenic leukemia (CML) [n=4], polycythemia vera [n=2]). Isolation of the signal of hematopoietic tissue was done by the chemical-shift misregistration effect. Twenty consecutive T1-weighted midsagittal lumber vertebral images were obtained immediately after the intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight, and the pattern of the time-intensity curve, the peak contrast-enhancement (CE) ratio, and the washout rate (%/min) of bone marrow in normal volunteers were compared with those in patients suffering from primary diffuse bone marrow disease. The pattern of the time-intensity curve of patients with aplastic anemia showed a low peak value followed by a slow washout. However, the pattern of time-intensity curves in patients with MDS, CML, and polycythemia vera was similar to that of normal volunteers. The peak CE ratio of the water fraction in normal marrow ranged from 0.45 to 1.26 (mean ±S.D.: 0.87±0.18). Patients with aplastic anemia showed an abnormally lower peak CE ratio of the water fraction (mean ±S.D.: 0.34±0.19, p<0.0001). On the other hand, the peak CE ratio of the water fraction in patients with MDS was significantly higher than that of normal volunteers (mean ±S.D. 1.35±0.39, p<0.05). In contrast, the peak CE ratio of patients with CML or polycythemia vera did not differ significantly from that of normal volunteers. The mean washout rate of patients with aplastic anemia was significantly lower than that of normal volunteers (mean ±S.D.: 3.50±2.51 %/min vs. 7.13±1

  7. Objective assessment of phalangeal bone atrophy using nuclear medicine computer system in case of vibration disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the changes of phalangeal bone of those, suffering from peripheral circulatory disorder due to use of vibrating machines for a long time. And we examined the cause of changes, keeping the influence of vibrating machines, tools and circulatory disorder of fingers in mind. They were 45 in number, and all males. We measured the density of proximal part of middle phalangeal bones from both hands X-ray image using video image input function of nuclear medicine computer system (SCINTIPAC-2400, Shimazu). After we changed the counts of area unit and standardized through the agency of Alminium step wedge scale, we examined the state of atrophy of phalangeal bones among vibrating machines users. The density of middle phalangeal bones is, in general, lower on the right hand, and becomes lower, middle finger, ring finger, index finger, and little finger in order. And it becomes lower with age. The density in vibration disease group is generally lower than that in control group, but statistically, it is not significant. Moreover, the frequency of low bone density strikingly rise in case of recovery delay of skin temperature at all seasons, and frequent onset of Raynaud's phenomenon. The difference of bone density of each finger is attributable to the influence of load in human life. But major causes of the decrease of phalangeal bone density seem to be the excessive load on fingers by operating vibrating machines or by being engaged in heavy work for a long time, and seem to be poor nutrition of bones following spasmodic circulatory disorder. Moreover, it is considerably embarrassing to examine the state of phalangeal bone density by means of MCI method or MD method. So, it is useful to measure small, distorted and localized bone density using nuclear medicine computer system. And it will be more worthy to use for diagnosing diseases and for judging the effect of treatment. (author)

  8. Early-life environment, developmental immunotoxicology, and the risk of pediatric allergic disease including asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R; Zelikoff, Judith T

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of childhood allergic disease including asthma (AD-A) has risen since the mid-20th century with much of the increase linked to changes in environment affecting the immune system. Childhood allergy is an early life disease where predisposing environmental exposures, sensitization, and onset of symptoms all occur before adulthood. Predisposition toward allergic disease (AD) is among the constellation of adverse outcomes following developmental immunotoxicity (DIT; problematic exposure of the developing immune system to xenobiotics and physical environmental factors). Because novel immune maturation events occur in early life, and the pregnancy state itself imposes certain restrictions on immune functional development, the period from mid-gestation until 2 years after birth is one of particular concern relative to DIT and AD-A. Several prenatal-perinatal risk factors have been identified as contributing to a DIT-mediated immune dysfunction and increased risk of AD. These include maternal smoking, environmental tobacco smoke, diesel exhaust and traffic-related particles, heavy metals, antibiotics, environmental estrogens and other endocrine disruptors, and alcohol. Diet and microbial exposure also significantly influence immune maturation and risk of allergy. This review considers (1) the critical developmental windows of vulnerability for the immune system that appear to be targets for risk of AD, (2) a model in which the immune system of the DIT-affected infant exhibits immune dysfunction skewed toward AD, and (3) the lack of allergy-relevant safety testing of drugs and chemicals that could identify DIT hazards and minimize problematic exposure of pregnant women and children. PMID:19085948

  9. Does dermatitis herpetiformis result in bone loss as coeliac disease does?: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Lorinczy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: coeliac disease (CD and its cutaneous manifestation, dermatitis herpetiformis are both (DH gluten-sensitive diseases. Metabolic bone disease is common among patients with CD, even in asymptomatic forms. Data are scarce about bone density in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis. The aim of our study was to compare bone mineral density (BMD of celiac and dermatitis herpetiformis patients. Methods: 34 coeliac patients, 53 with dermatitis herpetiformis and 42 healthy controls were studied. The mean age was 38.0 ± 12.1, 32.18 ± 14.95, 35.33 ± 10.41 years in CD, dermatitis herpetiformis, and healthy controls, respectively. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, the left femoral neck and radius were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Low bone density, osteopenia and osteoporosis were defined as a body mass density (BMD T-score between 0 and -1, between -1 and -2.5, and under -2.5, respectively. Results: at lumbar region, consisting of dominantly trabecular compartment, a decreased BMD was detected in 49 % (n = 26 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, 62 % (n = 21 of CD patients, and 29 % (n = 12 of healthy controls, respectively. Lower BMD were measured at the lumbar region in dermatitis herpetiformis and CD compared to healthy subjects (0.993 ± 0.136 g/cm² and 0.880 ± 0.155 g/cm² vs. 1.056 ± 0.126 g/cm²; p < 0.01. Density of bones consisting of dominantly cortical compartment (femoral neck did not differ in dermatitis herpetiformis and healthy subjects. Conclusions: our results show that a low bone mass is also frequent among patients with dermatitis herpetiformis. Bone mineral content in these patients is significantly lower in those parts of the skeleton which contain more trabecular than cortical bone.

  10. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  11. Estimated number of prevalent cases of metastatic bone disease in the US adult population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinzone JJ

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shuling Li1, Yi Peng1, Eric D Weinhandl1, Anne H Blaes2, Karynsa Cetin3, Victoria M Chia3, Scott Stryker3, Joseph J Pinzone4, John F Acquavella3, Thomas J Arneson11Chronic Disease Research Group, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Hematology, Oncology and Transplantation, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Center for Observational Research, 4Global Development, Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USABackground: The prevalence of metastatic bone disease in the US population is not well understood. We sought to estimate the current number of US adults with metastatic bone disease using two large administrative data sets.Methods: Prevalence was estimated from a commercially insured cohort (ages 18–64 years, MarketScan database and from a fee-for-service Medicare cohort (ages ≥65 years, Medicare 5% database with coverage on December 31, 2008, representing approximately two-thirds of the US population in each age group. We searched for claims-based evidence of metastatic bone disease from January 1, 2004, using a combination of relevant diagnosis and treatment codes. The number of cases in the US adult population was extrapolated from age- and sex-specific prevalence estimated in these cohorts. Results are presented for all cancers combined and separately for primary breast, prostate, and lung cancer.Results: In the commercially insured cohort (mean age = 42.3 years [SD = 13.1], we identified 9505 patients (0.052% with metastatic bone disease. Breast cancer was the most common primary tumor type (n = 4041. In the Medicare cohort (mean age = 75.6 years [SD = 7.8], we identified 6427 (0.495% patients with metastatic bone disease. Breast (n = 1798 and prostate (n = 1862 cancers were the most common primary tumor types. We estimate that 279,679 (95% confidence interval: 274,579–284,780 US adults alive on December 31, 2008, had evidence of metastatic bone disease in the previous 5 years. Breast, prostate

  12. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis and Therapy of Bone and Joint Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concerning bone and joint diseases therapy of rheumatic synovitis (radiosynoviorthesis) was introduced in 1952 before clinically relevant diagnostic procedures were developed. Radionuclides of Sr and later on 99mTc phosphonates then started the wide use of bone scintigraphy since > 30 years. The diagnostic methods have an excellent sensitivity for detection of local abnormalities of bone metabolism, the specificity of such studies, however, is low. Modifications of the technique (3-phase-bone-scintigraphy, pinhole collimators, ROI-technique), increasing knowledge of pathological scan patterns and introduction of other radionuclide studies (67Ga, 201Tl, inflammation scans with 99mTc-leukocytes or 99mTc-HIG) as well as 18FDG-PET have increased the specificity significantly in recent years and improvements of imaging systems (SPECT) also increased the accuracy of diagnostic methods in diseases of bone and joints. Therapy of such diseases has made considerable progress: inflamed, swollen joints can effectively be treated with 90Y-, 186Re, 169Er-colloids or with 165Dy-particles by radiosynoviorthesis. Severe pain due to disseminated bone metastases of cancer or polyarthritis can be controlled by radionuclide therapy with 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re- or 188Re-HEDP and possibly 117mSn-DTPA with an acceptable risk of myelodepression. Possibilities, technical details and limitations of radionuclide applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes must be considered if optimal benefit for individual patients should be achieved. Overall Nuclear Medicine can become an essential element in management of bone and joint diseases. The relationship of Nuclear Medicine to bone and joint pathology is peculiar: In 1952 treatment of rheumatic synovitis by radiosynoviorthesis with 198Au Colloid was started by Fellinger and Schmid before diagnostic approaches to bone pathology existed. Bone scintigraphy was introduced only in 1961 using 85Sr but obviously the unfavourable radiation

  13. Chronic granulomatous disease. Expression of the metabolic defect by in vitro culture of bone marrow progenitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Newburger, P E; Kruskall, M S; Rappeport, J M; Robinson, S H; Chovaniec, M E; Cohen, H J

    1980-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an often fatal syndrome of recurrent infections results from the inability of patients' peripheral blood phagocytic leukocytes to generate superoxide despite otherwise normal phagocytic functions such as ingestion and degranulation. Circulating granulocytes and monocytes are the progeny of bone marrow progenitor cells, colony-forming units in culture. We compared the function of cells grown in two different in vitro cuture systems from the bone marrow of a...

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bone Disease in Multiple Myeloma: Spotlight on Spinal Involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Patrizia Tosi

    2013-01-01

    Bone disease is observed in almost 80% of newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma patients, and spine is the bone site that is more frequently affected by myeloma-induced osteoporosis, osteolyses, or compression fractures. In almost 20% of the cases, spinal cord compression may occur; diagnosis and treatment must be carried out rapidly in order to avoid a permanent sensitive or motor defect. Although whole body skeletal X-ray is considered mandatory for multiple myeloma staging, magnetic...

  15. Feasible Simulation of Diseases Related to Bone Remodelling and of Their Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Václav; Maršík, František

    Rijeka: InTech, 2011 - (Klika, V.), s. 187-210 ISBN 978-953-307-851-9 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/08/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : bone remodelling * biomechanics Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics http://www.intechopen.com/articles/show/title/feasible-simulation-of-diseases-related-to-bone-remodelling-and-of-their-treatment

  16. Role of periodontal pathogenic bacteria in RANKL-mediated bone destruction in periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kajiya, Mikihito; Giro, Gabriela; Taubman, Martin A.; Han, Xiaozhe; Marcia P.A. Mayer; Kawai, Toshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Accumulated lines of evidence suggest that hyperimmune responses to periodontal bacteria result in the destruction of periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone. The etiological roles of periodontal bacteria in the onset and progression of periodontal disease (PD) are well documented. However, the mechanism underlying the engagement of periodontal bacteria in RANKL-mediated alveolar bone resorption remains unclear. Therefore, this review article addresses three critical subjects. First, ...

  17. Multiple Bone and Joint Diseases in a Nigerian Sickle Cell Anaemia: a Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Olaniyi, John A.; Alagbe, Adekunle E.; Olutoogun, Toluwalase A.; Busari, Oluwasogo E.

    2012-01-01

    This case highlights the fact that bone involvement is the commonest clinical manifestation of Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) both in the acute settings such as painful vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) and as a source of chronic, progressive debility such as avascular necrosis (AVN), chronic osteomyelitis and fixed flexion deformity of joints. Protracted multiple bone involvement i.e. bilateral femoral and left humeral chronic osteomyelitis, Left elbow, Left knee and right humeral septic arthritis toge...

  18. Metabolic Bone Disease in preterm newborn: an update on nutritional issues

    OpenAIRE

    Tagliabue Paolo; Bozzetti Valentina

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Osteopenia, a condition characterised by a reduction in bone mineral content, is a common disease of preterm babies between the tenth and sixteenth week of life. Prematurely born infants are deprived of the intrauterine supply of minerals affecting bone mineralization. The aetiology is multifactorial: inadequate nutrients intake (calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D), a prolonged period of total parenteral nutrition, immobilisation and the intake of some drugs. The diagnosis of metaboli...

  19. The Seven Stages of Man: The Role of Developmental Stage on Medication Adherence in Respiratory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Richard W; Foster, Juliet M; Grigg, Jonathan; Eakin, Michelle N; Canonica, Walter; Yunus, Fasail; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    The circumstances and drivers of the decision to initiate, implement, or persist with a medication differ for individuals at each developmental stage. For school-age children with asthma, the social environment of their family's cultural beliefs and the influence of peer networks and school policies are strong determinants of medication adherence. The stage of adolescence can be a particularly challenging time because there is a reduction in parental supervision of asthma management as the young person strives to become more autonomous. To illustrate the importance of such factors, adherence interventions in children and young adults with asthma have used peer-based supports and social supports, particularly social media platforms. In older patients, it is internal rather than external factors and age-related decline that pose challenges to medication adherence. Seniors face the challenges of polypharmacy, reduced social support, increased isolation, and loss of cognitive function. Strategies to promote adherence must be tailored to the developmental stage and respective behavioral determinants of the target group. This review considers the different attitudes toward medication and the different adherence behaviors in young and elderly patients with chronic respiratory conditions, specifically asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Opportunities to intervene to optimize adherence are suggested. PMID:27587315

  20. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. (Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Olsen, N.J. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA)); Siminovitch, K.A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  1. Bone marrow transplantation for treatment of radiation disease. Problems involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transplantation of bone marrow cells still is one of the major means available for treatment of radiation injuries. The decisive indication is the diagnostic of irreversible damage to the hemopoietic stem cells, which becomes manifest about 5 or 6 days after exposure, by severe granulocytopenia and simultaneous, progressive thrombopenia. The radiation dose provoking such severe injury is estimated to be at least 9-10 Gy of homogeneous whole-body irradiation. Preparatory measures for transplantation include proof of tissue compatibility of donor and patient, sufficient immunosuppression prior to and/or after irradiation and bone marrow transplantation. The donor's marrow should be free of T-cells. In spite of preparatory treatment, complications such as immunological reactions or disturbance of organ functions are to be very probable. These are treated according to therapy protocols. (orig./MG)

  2. Developmental anomaly of the hyoid bone: an unusual cause of dysphagia; Anomalie de developpement de l'os hyoide: une cause inhabituelle de dysphagie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayadjian, A.; Marsot-Dupuch, K.; Schmitt, E.; Chouard, Ch.; Tubiana, J.M. [Hopital Saint Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-04-01

    We report the case of a hyoid syndrome caused by a developmental anomaly of the second branchial cleft, presenting at adult age by dysphagia without any abnormality detected at the barium swallow and at naso-pharyngeal endoscopy, first examinations to perform in case of dysphagia. The MRI findings of this anomaly showed a hyperintense well-limited vallecular mass syndrome. The diagnosis of hyoid bone anomaly was established at spiral CT with 3-D reconstructions showing an incurvated and elongated lesser cornua causing persistent impingement on the lateral wall of the oropharynx. CT scan performed during Valsalva maneuver showed the persistence of the compression during pharyngeal insufflation. (author)

  3. Bone diseases in rabbits with hyperparathyroidism:computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Rong-jie; CONG De-gang; SHEN Bao-zhong; HAN Ming-jun; WU Zhen-hua

    2006-01-01

    Background Hyperparathyroidism (HPT) occurs at an early age and has a high disability rate. Unfortunately,confirmed diagnosis in most patients is done at a very late stage, when the patients have shown typical symptomsand signs, and when treatment does not produce any desirable effect. It has become urgent to find a method thatwould detect early bone diseases in HPT to obtain time for the ideal treatment. This study evaluated the accuracyof high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with spiral computed tomography (SCT) scan indetecting early bone diseases in HPT, through imaging techniques and histopathological examinations on ananimal model of HPT.Methods Eighty adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups with forty in each. The control group wasfed normal diet (Ca:P = 1:0.7); the experimental group was fed high phosphate diet (Ca:P = 1:7) for 3, 4, 5, or6-month intervals to establish the animal model of HPT. The staging and imaging findings of the early bonediseases in HPT were determined by high field MRI and SCT scan at the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th month. Each rabbitwas sacrificed after high field MRI and SCT scan, and the parathyroid and bones were removed for pathologicalexamination to evaluate the accuracy of imaging diagnosis.Results Parathyroid histopathological studies revealed hyperplasia, osteoporosis and early cortical boneresorption. The bone diseases in HPT displayed different levels of low signal intensity on T1WI and low tointermediate signal intensity on T2WI in bone of stage 0, Ⅰ, Ⅱ or Ⅲ, but showed correspondingly absent, probable,osteoporotic and subperiosteal cortical resorption on SCT scan.Conclusion High field MRI combined with SCT scan not only detects early bone diseases in HPT, but alsoindicates staging, and might be a reliable method of studying early bone diseases in HPT.

  4. Nutritional models of the developmental programming of adult health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Michael E; Budge, Helen

    2009-05-01

    The ability to not only replicate but also extend the findings from both historical epidemiological studies and contemporary cohorts of the developmental programming of later disease are critical if the mechanisms by which early diet impacts on later disease are to be fully understood. To date, a plethora of models have been established, with the range including global changes in dietary input, imbalanced diets and diets deficient in single nutrients. Key factors in translating these findings to the human situation are the pronounced differences in the relative growth and development between large and small mammals from the time of conception through pregnancy, lactation and weaning. This disparity is reflected in the very different nutritional requirements between species and the substantial divergence between rodents and large animals in the ontogeny of many of the organ systems that are nutritionally regulated. For example, hypothalamic circuitry is much more developed in species with a long gestation and offspring are born with a mature hypothalamic-pituitary axis in sheep and man compared with mice and rats. Similarly, nephron number is established towards the end of gestation in large mammals compared with the lactational period in rats. These types of differences will impact on the ability of individual and combined nutritional interventions to reset developmental processes, and may be further compounded by the gender of a fetus. The challenge for future work in this exciting and dynamic area of research is to utilise these marked comparative differences to generate imaginative nutritional interventions in order to improve the viability, health and well-being of the offspring. PMID:19208271

  5. Deregulation of Bone Forming Cells in Bone Diseases and Anabolic Effects of Strontium-Containing Agents and Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Shuang Tan; Binbin Zhang; Xiaomei Zhu; Ping Ao; Huajie Guo; Weihong Yi; Guang-Qian Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Age-related bone loss and osteoporosis are associated with bone remodeling changes that are featured with decreased trabecular and periosteal bone formation relative to bone resorption. Current anticatabolic therapies focusing on the inhibition of bone resorption may not be sufficient in the prevention or reversal of age-related bone deterioration and there is a big need in promoting osteoblastogenesis and bone formation. Enhanced understanding of the network formed by key signaling pathways ...

  6. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiya, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides) RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described. PMID:27529224

  7. MicroRNAs: Potential Biomarkers and Therapeutic Targets for Alveolar Bone Loss in Periodontal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayoshi Kagiya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease caused by bacterial infection of tooth-supporting structures, which results in the destruction of alveolar bone. Osteoclasts play a central role in bone destruction. Osteoclasts are tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells. Recently, we and other researchers revealed that microRNAs are involved in osteoclast differentiation. MicroRNAs are novel, single-stranded, non-coding, small (20–22 nucleotides RNAs that act in a sequence-specific manner to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level through cleavage or translational repression of their target mRNAs. They regulate various biological activities such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, cancer development, and inflammatory responses. In this review, the roles of microRNAs in osteoclast differentiation and function during alveolar bone destruction in periodontal disease are described.

  8. Bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy in patients with adult still's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanegae, Futoshi; Tada, Yoshifumi; Ohta, Akihide; Ushiyama, Osamu; Suzuki; Noriaki; Koarada, Syuichi; Haruta, Yoshio; Yoshikai, Tomonori; Nagasawa, Kohei [Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We investigated the features and the usefulness of gallium scintigraphy in the diagnosis and the assessment of Adult Still's disease (ASD) by retrospective case review. Gallium scintigraphy have been done for 11 cases of ASD (3 males and 8 females) and 4 females were positive. Among these, 67 Ga-citrate was accumulated to the bone marrow in all 4 cases and to the major joints in 2 cases. Positive cases were rather serious and administered more immunosuppressants than negative cases. In order to characterize gallium scintigraphy findings of ASD, i.e. bone marrow accumulation, we analyzed 130 cases of collagen vascular disease. Although 101 cases (77.7%) were positive, only 7 cases (5.4%) showed the accumulation of {sup 67}Ga-citrate to the bone marrow. These include 3 cases with ASD, and 1 case with systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, Wegener's granulomatosis and Sjogren's syndrome. We also accumulated 18 patients who exhibited bone marrow accumulation of {sup 69}Ga-citrate, and found that 7 patients had collagen vascular and their related diseases. In conclusion, bone marrow accumulation in gallium scintigraphy is a specific feature of collagen vascular diseases, especially ASD, and it is suggested that cases with positive gallium scintigraphy in ASD can be serious and resistant to treatment. (author)

  9. Unbiased Stereologic Estimation of the Spatial Distribution of Paget’s Disease in the Human Temporal Bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, Sune Land; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2014-01-01

    remodeling around the inner ear space and to compare it with that of otosclerosis in a contemporary context of temporal bone dynamics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From the temporal bone collection of Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 15 of 29 temporal bones with Paget's disease were selected to obtain an......BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that Paget's disease of bone and otosclerosis may share a myxoviral etiology. However, the association between virus infection and pathologic bone remodeling is still controversial. The aim of this study was to estimate the spatial distribution of pagetic bone...... similar to the normal distribution of perilabyrinthine bone remodeling but entirely different from the spatial location of otosclerosis, which are focal and centripetally distributed around the inner ear space. CONCLUSION: In Paget's disease, the antiresorptive barrier around the inner ear space becomes...

  10. Correlation between low bone density and disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov- Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  11. Correlation Between Low Bone Density and Disease Activity in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiriani, Taghi; Besharat, Sima; Pourramezan, Zahra; Mirkarimi, Honey Sadat; Aghaei, Mehrdad; Joshaghani, Hamidreza; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Faghani, Maryam; Besharat, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Different clinical and epidemiological studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry have shown an increased prevalence of low bone mineral density in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between bone density and the disease activity in patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, 52 patients with ulcerative colitis (duration of the disease less than 5 years) were invited to our research center, Golestan province, northeast of Iran, during February 2012 up to August 2012. A demographic checklist and Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index was completed for each patients and 5 cc of blood sample was taken after obtaining the informed consent. We used colorimetry method for measuring serum calcium, UV method for serum phosphorus and ELISA for serum vitamin D. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was done to evaluate the bone density. Data analysis was done using SPSS software version 16. Normality of data was assessed using Kolmogorov– Smirnov test. T and ANOVA tests were used if data had normal distribution. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for the remaining data. Correlation between qualitative variables was evaluated by Chi-square test. RESULTS The mean (±SD) age and disease activity of the patients were 37.72 (±12.18) years and 4.78 (±1.98), respectively. There were no correlation between disease activity and mean age. Low bone density was seen in 30.8%, 11.5%, and 15.4% in spine, femur neck, and hip, respectively. There was no relationship between Z-score of total hip, spine, and femur neck with disease activity, age, and duration of disease (p>0.05). CONCLUSION Our results showed an acceptable rate of low bone density in patients with ulcerative colitis without any correlation with the disease activity index. PMID:25628850

  12. Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Infusion (AMBI therapy for Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar JS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver Cirrhosis is the end stage of chronic liver disease which may happen due to alcoholism, viral infections due to Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C viruses and is difficult to treat. Liver transplantation is the only available definitive treatment which is marred by lack of donors, post operative complications such as rejection and high cost. Autologous bone marrow stem cells have shown a lot of promise in earlier reported animal studies and clinical trials. We have in this study administered in 22 patients with chronic liver disease, autologous bone marrow stem cell whose results are presented herewith.

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient......, with its associated increased fracture risk, vascular calcification, and accelerated mortality fracture risk. Peritoneal dialysis, however, bears a lower risk than hemodialysis (HD). The approach to CKD-MBD prophylaxis and treatment in the elderly PD patient is similar to other CKD patients, with some...... to other dialysis patient groups, physicians should be aware of the special problems of the elderly group....

  14. Current perspectives on bisphosphonate treatment in Paget’s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wat WZM

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Winnie Zee Man Wat Department of Medicine, Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Chai Wan, Hong Kong Abstract: Paget’s disease of bone is a chronic metabolic bone disease with focal increase in bone turnover. The exact etiology of the disease is uncertain, although genetic and environmental factors are believed to be important. Bisphosphonate is the main class of medication being used to control disease activity via its antiresorptive effect. This review discusses the controversies concerning the use of bisphosphonates in the treatment of Paget’s disease of bone, the efficacy of different bisphosphonates in controlling disease activity, and the possible rare side effects of bisphosphonates. Symptoms are the main indication for treatment in Paget’s disease of bone. As treatment benefits in asymptomatic individuals remain controversial and nonevidence based, the decision to treat these patients should be individualized to their risk and benefit profiles. There are several trials conducted to evaluate and compare the efficacy of different regimes of bisphosphonates for treating Paget’s disease of bone. Most trials used biochemical markers rather than clinical symptoms or outcomes as parameters for comparison. Zoledronate is an attractive option as it can achieve high rates of biochemical remission and sustain long duration of suppression by a single dose. Atypical femoral fracture and osteonecrosis of the jaw are two rare and severe side effects reported, possibly related to the use of bisphosphonates in patients with osteoporosis and malignancy-induced hypercalcemia. As the regimes of bisphosphonates used for treating Paget’s disease of bone are different from those two diseases, the risks of developing these two possible side effects are expected to be very low, although this remains unknown. Vitamin D and calcium supplement should be given to patients at risk of vitamin D insufficiency when given zoledronate, as symptomatic

  15. Gaucher disease: MR evaluation of bone marrow features during treatment with enzyme replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) arrests and reverses the hematological and visceral symptoms of adult Gaucher disease, the most frequent lysosomal storage disorder. There are only a few studies available evaluating bone disease during ERT. The aim of this study was to investigate the features of bone marrow (bm) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients during ERT. Materials and Methods: MRI was performed prospectively in thirty adult type I Gaucher patients before and during ERT with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Spin-echo sequences (T1/T2) of the lower extremities were obtained and the reconversion (response) or lack of reconversion (non-response) to fatty marrow during treatment was analyzed. The morphological features of bm involvement, a homogeneous or non-homogeneous distribution of bm changes and focal bone lesions surrounded by a rim of reduced signal intensity (SI), were analyzed. Results: Infiltration of bm by Gaucher cells is characterized by a reduction of Sl on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. Bone marrow responses were seen in 19 patients (63%) during treatment. Focal bone lesions, surrounded by a rim of reduced Sl, did not respond to ERT and correlated with a non-homogenous distribution of bone involvement and splenectomy. (orig.)

  16. SPECT/CT in the assessment of bone scintigraphy in staging of patients with oncologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We aimed to assess the role of single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT/ CT) for characterizing nonconclusive lesions, observed by planar WB bone scintigraphy and to evaluate the impact of SPECT/CT on oncologic patient management. Data from 269 patients with oncologic diseases who had undergone WB BS for staging and 29 of them with nonconclusive lesions, passed SPECT/CT of a selected volume, were retrospectively analyzed. Planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT images were independently evaluated in separate sessions to minimize recall bias. Among the 269 WB BS, in 37 patients multiple bone metastases were confirmed. In 161 patients degenerative lesions in the skeleton were defined, 42 patients were with normal bone scan and in 29 patients the results were nonconclusive for bone metastases. The fused scan after SPECT/CT imaging confirmed bone metastases in 11 (38%) patients with 27 new metastatic lesions and benign degenerative lesions in 18 patients. SPECT/CT is better than planar WB BS for characterizing equivocal lesions that are observed by bone scintigraphy, thus SPECT/CT can have a significant impact on patient management in staging the oncologic disease. (authors)

  17. Surviving radiation disease with and without bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appears that the damage done by bone marrow transplantation far outweights its advantages. Victims of high radiation doses died from their injuries before they could benefit from the transplant functions. Following lower doses, the transplant was seen to take, but led to detrimental effects in the majority of patients. The few who survived the procedure did so because the graft had been rejected. It would be much wiser, if the time and energy needed for a transplantation were dedicated to an adequate cell substitution therapy carried out until such time that the patient's own stem cells are repaired. (orig./MG)

  18. SERUM YKL-40 IS ASSOCIATED WITH BONE DISEASE IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne Kjærsgaard; Abildgaard, Niels; Johansen, Julia S.;

    2007-01-01

    radiography and scored semiquantitative as a total X-ray score. Ongoing bone metabolism was assessed using biochemical markers of bone formation (S-PICP, S-PINP, S-Bone ALP, S-OC) and bone resorption (S-CTX-MMP, U-NTX-1, U-PYD, UDPD). The first 34 patients included were treated with conventional chemotherapy...... healthy adults. Patients with elevated S-YKL-40 had a higher total X-ray score (p=0.005) and higher levels of S-CTX-MMP (p=0.003), U-PYD (p=0.004) and U-DPD (p=0.002), while U-NTX-1 and the markers of bone formation did not differ from the levels seen in patients with normal S-YKL-40. During follow-up 21...... angiogenesis, and in cancer cell survival and invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between serum YKL-40 (S-YKL-40) and the degree of bone disease in MM. Materials and Methods. S-YKL-40 was measured using an ELISA in 54 MM patients at diagnosis. Bone morbidity was assessed by...

  19. Different findings in bone scintigraphy between ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: There is an ethnic variance on the length of the ulnar and radius. In Caucasian the length of the radius is relatively longer than the ulnar, but in Oriental the length of the ulnar is longer. This difference results in the different ethnic prevalence of ulnar impaction syndrome and Kienbock's disease, avascular necrosis of the lunate. It is important to differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease, because they show similar symptoms but need different treatment and different method of operation. Methods: Seventeen patients with the wrist pain were enrolled in this study (mean age: 45+/-13yrs M:F=12:5). Nine patients were diagnosed as Kienbock's disease and Eight patients were diagnosed as ulnar impaction. Three to four hours after injection of 20mCi of Tc-99m MDP, bone scintigraphy images of the both hands were obtained and analyzed visually. Results: In Kienbock's disease, 8 patients showed increased uptake in the lunate with or without other carpal bones. One patient showed photon defect in the lunate. Otherwise in all patients with ulnar impaction syndrome, increased uptakes were found in the lunate, with or without increase uptake in the triquetrum or the distal ulnar, which are related to triangular fibrocartilage complex. Pin hole scintigraphy and pin hole SPECT demonstrated more precise structure of the wrist. Conclusion: We could differentiate ulnar impaction syndrome from Kienbock's disease in bone scan. We should carefully evaluate bone scintigraphic findings in patients with wrist pain

  20. Usefulness of bone marrow magnetic resonance imaging and indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy in patients with various hematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and indium-111 chloride (In-111) scintigraphy to assess bone marrow in various hematological lesions. The subjects were 7 with aplastic anemia (AA), 4 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 3 with polycythemia (PC), 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 2 with multiple myeloma (MM), 2 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 3 with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), one with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and one with secondary anemia due to chronic inflammation (SA). Bone marrow cellularity was assessed on MR images and both uptake and tissue distribution were assessed on In-111 scintigraphy. Hypo-cellularity was seen in all AA patients, but not seen in any other patient in each group. On the other hand, hyper-cellularity was seen in 3 MDS, one PC, all 3 ET, one ALL, and one SA patients. In the group of MM, the vertebral body was seen as heterogenous signal intensity on MR images. Bone marrow was seen as iso-intensity in one MDS, 2 PC, all 2 MGUS, and all 3 ITP patients. In-111 scintigraphy showed decrease or disappearance of tracer uptake and decreased tissue distribution in all 7 AA, one MDS, one PC, and one ALL patients. Increased tracer uptake and enlarged tissue distribution were seen in one MDS, one PC, and one SA patients. One MDS, one ET, all 2 MM, all 2 MGUS, all 3 ITP patients had tracer uptake and tissue distribution that were equal to those in the normal tissues. Since MR imaging and In-111 scintigraphy provided qualitatively different information, the combination of both modalities would contribute to the understanding of bone marrow condition in hematopoietic diseases. (N.K.)

  1. Usefulness of bone marrow magnetic resonance imaging and indium-111-chloride bone marrow scintigraphy in patients with various hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yutaka; Umekawa, Tsunekazu; Chikayama, Satoshi [Osaka General Hospital of West Japan Railway Compapy (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and indium-111 chloride (In-111) scintigraphy to assess bone marrow in various hematological lesions. The subjects were 7 with aplastic anemia (AA), 4 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 3 with polycythemia (PC), 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 2 with multiple myeloma (MM), 2 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), 3 with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), one with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and one with secondary anemia due to chronic inflammation (SA). Bone marrow cellularity was assessed on MR images and both uptake and tissue distribution were assessed on In-111 scintigraphy. Hypo-cellularity was seen in all AA patients, but not seen in any other patient in each group. On the other hand, hyper-cellularity was seen in 3 MDS, one PC, all 3 ET, one ALL, and one SA patients. In the group of MM, the vertebral body was seen as heterogenous signal intensity on MR images. Bone marrow was seen as iso-intensity in one MDS, 2 PC, all 2 MGUS, and all 3 ITP patients. In-111 scintigraphy showed decrease or disappearance of tracer uptake and decreased tissue distribution in all 7 AA, one MDS, one PC, and one ALL patients. Increased tracer uptake and enlarged tissue distribution were seen in one MDS, one PC, and one SA patients. One MDS, one ET, all 2 MM, all 2 MGUS, all 3 ITP patients had tracer uptake and tissue distribution that were equal to those in the normal tissues. Since MR imaging and In-111 scintigraphy provided qualitatively different information, the combination of both modalities would contribute to the understanding of bone marrow condition in hematopoietic diseases. (N.K.).

  2. The use of bone scintigraphy to detect active Hansen's disease in mutilated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutilation of extremities was very frequent in patients affected by leprosy in the past; although it is now much less common, it is still seen, mainly in patients with long-term disease. In general, mutilation of the nose and ears is caused by the bacillus and mutilation of the hands and feet a consequence of chronic trauma. Leprosy must be chronically treated and any decision to interrupt therapy is based on laboratory tests and biopsy. Scintigraphy is a non-invasive procedure which could be of great value in to determining disease activity. We studied eight patients (five males and three females, aged 64-73 years) who presented with mutilation of the nose (2), ear (1), feet (3) or foot and hand (2). Conventional three-phase bone scintigraphy (750 MBq) and X-ray examinations of the affected areas were performed in all patients. Bone scintigraphy was abnormal in four patients (the presence of bacilli was confirmed by biopsy in two of them), and normal in the other four. In all patients except for the one with ear mutilation, radiography only showed the absence of bone. We conclude that bone scintigraphy is very useful to determine disease activity in cases of mutilation caused by leprosy. It seems to be superior to conventional radiography and may enable bone biopsies to be avoided. (orig.)

  3. Abdominal (liver, spleen) and bone manifestations of cat scratch disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cat scratch disease is usually a self-limiting illness. Patients may develop systemic complications including hepatic granulomas, splenic abscesses, mesenteric adenitis, osteolytic lesions, as well as dermatologic and CNS complications. In this paper the literature is reviewed and two cases are discussed which present the imaging findings in patients with hepatic, splenic, mesenteric, and bony manifestations of cat scratch disease. (orig.)

  4. A Framework to Address Challenges in Communicating the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winett, Liana; Wallack, Lawrence; Richardson, Dawn; Boone-Heinonen, Janne; Messer, Lynne

    2016-09-01

    Findings from the field of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) suggest that some of the most pressing public health problems facing communities today may begin much earlier than previously understood. In particular, this body of work provides evidence that social, physical, chemical, environmental, and behavioral influences in early life play a significant role in establishing vulnerabilities for chronic disease later in life. Further, because this work points to the importance of adverse environmental exposures that cluster in population groups, it suggests that existing opportunities to intervene at a population level may need to refocus their efforts "upstream" to sufficiently combat the fundamental causes of disease. To translate these findings into improved public health, however, the distance between scientific discovery and population application will need to be bridged by conversations across a breadth of disciplines and social roles. And importantly, those involved will likely begin without a shared vocabulary or conceptual starting point. The purpose of this paper is to support and inform the translation of DOHaD findings from the bench to population-level health promotion and disease prevention, by: (1) discussing the unique communication challenges inherent to translation of DOHaD for broad audiences, (2) introducing the First-hit/Second-hit Framework with an epidemiologic planning matrix as a model for conceptualizing and structuring communication around DOHaD, and (3) discussing the ways in which patterns of communicating DOHaD findings can expand the range of solutions considered and encourage discussion of population-level solutions in relation to one another, rather than in isolation. PMID:27449924

  5. Rosai-Dorfman Disease with Epidural and Spinal Bone Marrow Involvement: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oner, A.Y.; Akpek, S.; Tali, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi Univ. School of Medicine. Besevler-Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-15

    Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML), or Rosai-Dorfman disease, is a rare histiocytic disorder that typically presents with chronic, self-limiting cervical lymphadenopathy. Although this disease mainly affects histiocytes, there are a few reports of bone marrow infiltration. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a promising technology in differentiating between various bone marrow pathologies. We here present conventional magnetic resonance imaging and DWI features of a patient with SHML and bone marrow involvement.

  6. A small molecule, odanacatib, inhibits inflammation and bone loss caused by endodontic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Chen, Wei; McConnell, Matthew; Zhu, Zheng; Li, Sheng; Reddy, Michael; Eleazer, Paul D; Wang, Min; Li, Yi-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Periapical disease, an inflammatory disease mainly caused by dental caries, is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of humans, affecting both children and adults. The infection travels through the root, leading to inflammation, bone destruction, and severe pain for the patient. Therefore, the development of a new class of anti-periapical disease therapies is necessary and critical for treatment and prevention. A small molecule, odanacatib (ODN), which is a cathepsin K (Ctsk) inhibitor, was investigated to determine its ability to treat this disease in a mouse model of periapical disease. While Ctsk was originally found in osteoclasts as an osteoclast-specific lysosomal protease, we were surprised to find that ODN can suppress the bacterium-induced immune response as well as bone destruction in the lesion area. X rays and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) showed that ODN treatment had significant bone protection effects at different time points. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining show that ODN treatment dramatically decreased F4/80+ macrophages and CD3+ T cells in the lesion areas 42 days after infection. Consistent with these findings, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed low levels of proinflammatory mRNAs (for tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and interleukin 23α) and corresponding cytokine expression in the ODN-treated disease group. The levels of mRNA for Toll-like receptors 4, 5, and 9 also largely decreased in the ODN-treated disease group. Our results demonstrated that ODN can inhibit endodontic disease development, bone erosion, and immune response. These results indicate that application of this small molecule offers a new opportunity to design effective therapies that could prevent periapical inflammation and revolutionize current treatment options. PMID:25583522

  7. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong (Second Hospital Affiliated to the Medical College of Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an Shaanxi (China))

    2009-08-15

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8+-2.1 mm and 7.1+-3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  8. Suspected fetal skeletal malformations or bone diseases: how to explore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassart, Marie [Erasme Hospital, Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-06-15

    Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous and complex group of conditions that affect bone growth and development and result in various anomalies in shape and size of the skeleton. Although US has proved reliable for the prenatal detection of skeletal abnormalities, the precise diagnosis of a dysplasia is often difficult to make before birth (especially in the absence of a familial history) due to their various phenotypic presentations, the variability in the time at which they manifest and often, the lack of precise molecular diagnosis. In addition to the accuracy of the antenatal diagnosis, it is very important to establish a prognosis. This is a clinically relevant issue as skeletal dysplasias may be associated with severe disability and may even be lethal. We will therefore describe the respective role of two-dimensional (2-D) US, three-dimensional (3-D) US and CT in the antenatal assessment of skeletal malformations. (orig.)

  9. Paget's Disease of Bone and Osteoarthritis: Different Yet Related

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain relief techniques, and alternative therapies such as acupuncture and nutritional supplements. In certain cases, surgery on ... of Dental and Craniofacial Research National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases NIH Office of ...

  10. Information for Patients about Paget's Disease of Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complications of Paget’s disease: Fractures. Surgery may allow fractures to heal in better position. Severe degenerative arthritis. Hip or knee replacement may be considered if disability is severe ...

  11. NIEMANN PICK DISEASE DIAGNOSED ON BONE MARROW ASPIRATION

    OpenAIRE

    Amita; Ankit; Mahendra

    2015-01-01

    Niemann - pick disease is a rare lysosomal storage disorder affecting 1 in 2,50,000 children. We are describing here, a case of Niemann - pick disease in a 19 months old female baby, who presented with distension of abdomen for 9 months and she was not able to sit or stand u n til this age. On examina tion of abdomen there was hepatosplenomegaly. Ultrasound abdomen also revealed hepatosplenomegaly along with multiple mesenteric and periportal lymph no...

  12. Chronic kidney disease and bone fracture: a growing concern

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Leonard, Mary B.; Shane, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility to fracture is increased across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, fracture in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) results in significant excess mortality. The incidence and prevalence of CKD and ESKD are predicted to increase markedly over the coming decades in conjunction with the aging of the population. Given the high prevalence of both osteoporosis and CKD in older adults, it is of the utmost public health relevance to be able to assess fract...

  13. Soft tissue- and bone-phase scintigraphy for diagnosis of navicular disease in horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography and soft tissue- and bone-phase scintigraphy were performed on 14 clinically normal horses and 35 horses in which definite, probable, or possible navicular disease had been diagnosed. The specificity of radiography and scintigraphy in revealing signs of navicular disease were nearly equal; however, the sensitivity of scintigraphy appeared to be greater than that of radiography. The greatest sensitivity and specificity were achieved when the results of radiography and scintigraphy were evaluated together. Differences in sensitivity were greatest when scintigraphy revealed lesions not detected by radiography. Although a diagnosis of navicular disease was sometimes made when only soft tissue-phase or only bone-phase scintigraphy revealed lesions, results obtained during the 2 phases generally were similar. It was concluded that scintigraphy can be a valuable aid in diagnosing navicular disease in horses, especially when radiographic findings do not support clinical findings

  14. Bone marrow diseases in children significance of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M.; Kaiser, W.; Zeitler, E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present the study of MRI in comparison to other imaging modalities in bone marrow diseases in children. The technic turned out to be interesting, its main advantages are: high sensitivity, good contrast, visualization of vascular structures, but its disadvantages are inferior detail resolution of periosteal changes and low specificity.

  15. Genetic sharing with cardiovascular disease risk factors and diabetes reveals novel bone mineral density loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Reppe (Sjur); Y. Wang (Yunpeng); W.K. Thompson (Wesley K.); L.K. McEvoy (Linda K.); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); V. Zuber (Verena); M. Leblanc (Marissa); F. Bettella (Francesco); I.G. Mills (Ian G.); R.S. Desikan (Rahul S.); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); K.M. Gautvik (Kaare); A.M. Dale (Anders); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); Y.-H. Hsu; E.L. Duncan (Emma); E.E. Ntzani (Evangelia); L. Oei; O.M.E. Albagha (Omar M.); N. Amin (Najaf); J.P. Kemp (John); D.L. Koller (Daniel); G. Li (Guo); C.-T. Liu (Ching-Ti); R.L. Minster (Ryan); A. Moayyeri (Alireza); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); D. Willner (Dana); S.-M. Xiao (Su-Mei); L.M. Yerges-Armstrong (Laura); H.-F. Zheng (Hou-Feng); N. Alonso (Nerea); J. Eriksson (Joel); C.M. Kammerer (Candace); S. Kaptoge (Stephen); P.J. Leo (Paul); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.G. Wilson (Scott); J.F. Wilson (James F); V. Aalto (Ville); M. Alen (Markku); A.K. Aragaki (Aaron); T. Aspelund (Thor); J.R. Center (Jacqueline); Z. Dailiana (Zoe); C. Duggan; M. Garcia (Melissa); N. Garcia-Giralt (Natàlia); S. Giroux (Sylvie); G. Hallmans (Göran); L.J. Hocking (Lynne); L.B. Husted; K. Jameson (Karen); R. Khusainova (Rita); G.S. Kim (Ghi Su); C. Kooperberg (Charles); T. Koromila (Theodora); M. Kruk (Marcin); M. Laaksonen (Marika); A.Z. Lacroix (Andrea Z.); S.H. Lee (Seung Hun); P.C. Leung (Ping C.); J.R. Lewis (Joshua); L. Masi (Laura); S. Mencej-Bedrac (Simona); T.V. Nguyen (Tuan); X. Nogues (Xavier); M.S. Patel (Millan); J. Prezelj (Janez); L.M. Rose (Lynda); S. Scollen (Serena); K. Siggeirsdottir (Kristin); G.D. Smith; O. Svensson (Olle); S. Trompet (Stella); O. Trummer (Olivia); N.M. van Schoor (Natasja); J. Woo (Jean); K. Zhu (Kun); S. Balcells (Susana); M.L. Brandi; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); S. Cheng (Sulin); C. Christiansen; C. Cooper (Charles); G.V. Dedoussis (George); I. Ford (Ian); M. Frost (Morten); D. Goltzman (David); J. González-Macías (Jesús); M. Kähönen (Mika); M. Karlsson (Magnus); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); J.-M. Koh (Jung-Min); P. Kollia (Panagoula); B.L. Langdahl (Bente); W.D. Leslie (William D.); P. Lips (Paul); O.̈. Ljunggren; R. Lorenc (Roman); J. Marc (Janja); D. Mellström (Dan); B. Obermayer-Pietsch (Barbara); D. Olmos (David); U. Pettersson-Kymmer (Ulrika); D.M. Reid (David); J.A. Riancho; P.M. Ridker (Paul); M.F. Rousseau (Francois); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); N.L.S. Tang (Nelson L.S.); R. Urreizti (Roser); W. Van Hul (Wim); J. Viikari (Jorma); M.T. Zarrabeitia (María); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); E. Grundberg (Elin); L. Herrera (Lizbeth); T. Ingvarsson (Torvaldur); H. Johannsdottir (Hrefna); T. Kwan (Tony); R. Li (Rui); R.N. Luben (Robert); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); S.T. Palsson (Stefan Th); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); G. Sigurdsson (Gunnar); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); D.J. Verlaan (Dominique); F.M. Williams (Frances); A.R. Wood (Andrew); Y. Zhou (Yanhua); T. Pastinen (Tomi); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); J.A. Cauley (Jane); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); G.R. Clark (Graeme); S.R. Cummings (Steven R.); P. Danoy (Patrick); E.M. Dennison (Elaine); R. Eastell (Richard); J.A. Eisman (John); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hofman (Albert); R.D. Jackson (Rebecca); G. Jones (Graeme); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); K.T. Khaw; T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Y. Liu (Yongmei); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); E. McCloskey (Eugene); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); K. Nandakumar (Kannabiran); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); H.A.P. Pols (Huibert A. P.); R.L. Prince (Richard); O. Raitakari (Olli); I.R. Reid (Ian); J. Robbins (John); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); P.C. Sham (Pak Chung); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); F.A. Tylavsky (Frances); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); N.J. Wareham (Nicholas J.); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); M.J. Econs (Michael); D.M. Evans (David); T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); A.W.C. Kung (Annie Wai Chee); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J. Reeve (Jonathan); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C. Ohlsson (Claes); D. Karasik (David); J.B. Richards (J. Brent); M.A. Brown (Matthew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.H. Ralston (Stuart); J.P.A. Ioannidis (John P.A.); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. W

  16. Patient and implant survival following joint replacement because of metastatic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michala S; Gregersen, Kristine G; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas;

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from a pathological fracture or painful bony lesion because of metastatic bone disease often benefit from a total joint replacement. However, these are large operations in patients who are often weak. We examined the patient survival and complication rates after total joint...

  17. Tc99m-MDP bone scintigraphy in Engelmann-Camurati disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann-Camurati disease (ECD) is a rare bone disorder characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance. It usually presents in early childhood and is associated with symmetrical diaphyseal sclerosis. We report a 20-year-old female with scintigraphic findings characteristic of ECD. She was treated with corticosteroids and showed marked clinical improvement

  18. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Treatment of Multiple Myeloma–Related Bone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpos, Evangelos; Morgan, Gareth; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Drake, Matthew T.; Lentzsch, Suzanne; Raje, Noopur; Sezer, Orhan; García-Sanz, Ramón; Shimizu, Kazuyuki; Turesson, Ingemar; Reiman, Tony; Jurczyszyn, Artur; Merlini, Giampaolo; Spencer, Andrew; Leleu, Xavier; Cavo, Michele; Munshi, Nikhil; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Durie, Brian G.M.; Roodman, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practice recommendations for the management of multiple myeloma (MM) –related bone disease. Methodology An interdisciplinary panel of clinical experts on MM and myeloma bone disease developed recommendations based on published data through August 2012. Expert consensus was used to propose additional recommendations in situations where there were insufficient published data. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendations were assigned and approved by panel members. Recommendations Bisphosphonates (BPs) should be considered in all patients with MM receiving first-line antimyeloma therapy, regardless of presence of osteolytic bone lesions on conventional radiography. However, it is unknown if BPs offer any advantage in patients with no bone disease assessed by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography/computed tomography. Intravenous (IV) zoledronic acid (ZOL) or pamidronate (PAM) is recommended for preventing skeletal-related events in patients with MM. ZOL is preferred over oral clodronate in newly diagnosed patients with MM because of its potential antimyeloma effects and survival benefits. BPs should be administered every 3 to 4 weeks IV during initial therapy. ZOL or PAM should be continued in patients with active disease and should be resumed after disease relapse, if discontinued in patients achieving complete or very good partial response. BPs are well tolerated, but preventive strategies must be instituted to avoid renal toxicity or osteonecrosis of the jaw. Kyphoplasty should be considered for symptomatic vertebral compression fractures. Low-dose radiation therapy can be used for palliation of uncontrolled pain, impending pathologic fracture, or spinal cord compression. Orthopedic consultation should be sought for long-bone fractures, spinal cord compression, and vertebral column instability. PMID:23690408

  19. Turner′s syndrome presenting as metabolic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadishkumar Kamalanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turner′s syndrome is a genetic disorder with a complete or partial absence of one X chromosome with characteristic phenotypic features. The prevalence of renal anomalies in turner syndrome is 30-40%. However, the renal function is usually normal. We report a case of Turner′s syndrome presenting with chronic kidney disease and renal osteodystrophy.

  20. Contemporary management of metastatic bone disease: tips and tools of the trade for general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Randall, R Lor; Benevenia, Joseph; Berven, Sigurd H; Raskin, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease has a significant effect on a patient's mortality and health-related quality of life. An aging US population and improved survival rates of patients with cancer have led to an increase in the incidence of symptomatic bony metastatic lesions that may require orthopaedic care. Skeletal-related events in neoplastic disease include pain, pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia, and neural compression, including spinal cord compression. The clinical evaluation and diagnostic study of a patient with a skeletal lesion of unknown etiology should be approached carefully. In patients with widespread metastatic disease, the treatment of a skeletal-related event may be limited to stabilization of the pathologic fracture or local disease control. The treatment of metastatic bone disease is guided by the nature of the skeletal-related event, the responsiveness of the lesion to adjuvant care, and the overall condition and survival expectations of the patient. Impending pathologic fractures are often more easily treated, with less morbidity and easier recovery for patients, than completed fractures. Quality of life is the most important outcome measure in these patients. When surgery is indicated, the approach, choice of fixation, and use of adjuvant should allow for immediate and unrestricted weight bearing. Because metastatic lesions to the skeleton have a limited capacity for spontaneous healing, surgical fixation should be durable for the life expectancy of the patient. In the epiphyseal region of long bones, replacement arthroplasty is generally preferred over internal fixation. Metaphyseal and diaphyseal regions can generally be addressed with intramedullary nailing or plate fixation with adjuvant. The specific treatment of acetabular lesions is dictated by the anatomy and the degree of bone loss. Spinal stability and neural compromise are important considerations in choosing a strategy for managing spine tumors. Effective surgical approaches to metastatic

  1. Acute bone crises in sickle cell disease: the T1 fat-saturated sequence in differentiation of acute bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To prove the hypothesis that acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells (RBCs) in bone marrow, and to evaluate the unenhanced T1 fat-saturated (fs) sequence in the differentiation of acute bone infarction from acute osteomyelitis in patients with sickle-cell disease. Materials and methods: Two studies were undertaken: an experimental study using in-vitro packed red blood cells and normal volunteers, and a retrospective clinical study of 86 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. For the experimental study containers of packed RBCs were placed between the knees of four healthy volunteers with a saline bag under the containers as an additional control, and were scanned with the pre-contrast T1-fs sequence. Signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained for packed RBCs:skeletal muscle and packed RBCs:saline. For the clinical study, the SIs of normal bone marrow, packed RBCs, bone and/or soft-tissue lesions, and normal skeletal muscle of 74 patients (86 MRI studies) were measured using unenhanced, T1 fat-saturated MRI. The ratios of the above SIs to normal skeletal muscle were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one of 86 MRI studies were included in the final analysis. The ratios of SIs for normal bone marrow, packed red cells, bone infarction, acute osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue lesions associated with bone infarct, compared with normal skeletal muscle were (mean ± SD) 0.9 ± 0.2, 2.1 ± 0.7, 1.7 ± 0.5, 1.0 ± 0.3, and 2.2 ± 0.7, respectively. The difference in the ratio of SIs of bone infarcts and osteomyelitis was significant (p = 0.003). The final diagnoses were bone infarction (n = 50), acute osteomyelitis (n = 1), and co-existent bone infarction and osteomyelitis (n = 2). Seven patients who had suspected osteomyelitis underwent image-guided aspiration. Conclusion: Acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells in the bone marrow. The

  2. Acute bone crises in sickle cell disease: the T1 fat-saturated sequence in differentiation of acute bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, R. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)], E-mail: rajeevjn@yahoo.com; Sawhney, S. [Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman); Rizvi, S.G. [Department of Community Medicine and Public Health, College of Medicine, Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)

    2008-01-15

    Aim: To prove the hypothesis that acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells (RBCs) in bone marrow, and to evaluate the unenhanced T1 fat-saturated (fs) sequence in the differentiation of acute bone infarction from acute osteomyelitis in patients with sickle-cell disease. Materials and methods: Two studies were undertaken: an experimental study using in-vitro packed red blood cells and normal volunteers, and a retrospective clinical study of 86 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies. For the experimental study containers of packed RBCs were placed between the knees of four healthy volunteers with a saline bag under the containers as an additional control, and were scanned with the pre-contrast T1-fs sequence. Signal intensity (SI) ratios were obtained for packed RBCs:skeletal muscle and packed RBCs:saline. For the clinical study, the SIs of normal bone marrow, packed RBCs, bone and/or soft-tissue lesions, and normal skeletal muscle of 74 patients (86 MRI studies) were measured using unenhanced, T1 fat-saturated MRI. The ratios of the above SIs to normal skeletal muscle were calculated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: Fifty-one of 86 MRI studies were included in the final analysis. The ratios of SIs for normal bone marrow, packed red cells, bone infarction, acute osteomyelitis, and soft-tissue lesions associated with bone infarct, compared with normal skeletal muscle were (mean {+-} SD) 0.9 {+-} 0.2, 2.1 {+-} 0.7, 1.7 {+-} 0.5, 1.0 {+-} 0.3, and 2.2 {+-} 0.7, respectively. The difference in the ratio of SIs of bone infarcts and osteomyelitis was significant (p = 0.003). The final diagnoses were bone infarction (n = 50), acute osteomyelitis (n = 1), and co-existent bone infarction and osteomyelitis (n = 2). Seven patients who had suspected osteomyelitis underwent image-guided aspiration. Conclusion: Acute bone infarcts in sickle cell disease are caused by sequestration of red blood cells in the bone

  3. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius tendon with bone marrow edema mimicking metastatic disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ik [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor (United States); Hayes, Curtis W. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor (United States); Taubman Clinic, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, Sybil J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2002-06-01

    A case of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius is presented. This report describes a patient with a history of breast cancer who had the combination of amorphous calcifications in the gluteus medius tendon and the MR finding of conspicuous bone marrow edema in the adjacent greater trochanter, prompting concern for metastatic disease. We present images from radiography, bone scanning, CT, and MR imaging. The unusual combination of findings in these studies should be considered conclusive for calcific tendinitis, and should not be confused with malignancy. (orig.)

  4. Calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius tendon with bone marrow edema mimicking metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A case of calcific tendinitis of the gluteus medius is presented. This report describes a patient with a history of breast cancer who had the combination of amorphous calcifications in the gluteus medius tendon and the MR finding of conspicuous bone marrow edema in the adjacent greater trochanter, prompting concern for metastatic disease. We present images from radiography, bone scanning, CT, and MR imaging. The unusual combination of findings in these studies should be considered conclusive for calcific tendinitis, and should not be confused with malignancy. (orig.)

  5. Unusual case of metabolic bone disease in a common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic bone disease was diagnosed in an 11-month-old female common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). It was depressed, reluctant to move, and was cachectic and small for its age. Laboratory findings included anaemia, azotaemia and an inverse calcium to phosphorus ratio. The radiological findings showed simultaneous signs of osteomalacia and soft-tissue calcification. There was decreased bone density with lytic areas in the pelvis and femur, and severe bilateral nephrocalcinosis. Postmortem examination revealed marked focal dystrophic calcification of the epi- and myocardium. Calcium and vitamin D3 deficiency (nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism) was the most likely cause of the osteomalacia

  6. Chemical and biomechanical characterization of hyperhomocysteinemic bone disease in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howell David S

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical homocystinuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS deficiency and characterized by distinctive alterations of bone growth and skeletal development. Skeletal changes include a reduction in bone density, making it a potentially attractive model for the study of idiopathic osteoporosis. Methods To investigate this aspect of hyperhomocysteinemia, we supplemented developing chicks (n = 8 with 0.6% dl-homocysteine (hCySH for the first 8 weeks of life in comparison to controls (n = 10, and studied biochemical, biomechanical and morphologic effects of this nutritional intervention. Results hCySH-fed animals grew faster and had longer tibiae at the end of the study. Plasma levels of hCySH, methionine, cystathionine, and inorganic sulfate were higher, but calcium, phosphate, and other indices of osteoblast metabolism were not different. Radiographs of the lower limbs showed generalized osteopenia and accelerated epiphyseal ossification with distinct metaphyseal and suprametaphyseal lucencies similar to those found in human homocystinurics. Although biomechanical testing of the tibiae, including maximal load to failure and bone stiffness, indicated stronger bone, strength was proportional to the increased length and cortical thickness in the hCySH-supplemented group. Bone ash weights and IR-spectroscopy of cortical bone showed no difference in mineral content, but there were higher Ca2+/PO43- and lower Ca2+/CO32- molar ratios than in controls. Mineral crystallization was unchanged. Conclusion In this chick model, hyperhomocysteinemia causes greater radial and longitudinal bone growth, despite normal indices of bone formation. Although there is also evidence for an abnormal matrix and altered bone composition, our finding of normal biomechanical bone strength, once corrected for altered morphometry, suggests that any increase in the risk of long bone fracture in human hyperhomocysteinemic

  7. 99mTc-MDP bone imaging Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pathology of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease be can described as a vascular disturbance leading to necrosis and subsequent revascularization of the femoral epiphyseal ossification center. The regional distribution of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in the skeleton can depend on a number of factors, but bone blood flow is a major physiological determinant of regional skeletal uptake of Tc-99m polyphosphate and bone imaging may thus be used for the detection of areas with both decreased and increased vascular supply. The authors analyzed the scintigraphic findings of 14 cases of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease at Kyung Hee University Hospital from Mar. '81 to Oct. '82. The results were as follows: 1. Scintigraphy revealed area of absent radioactivity in 14 cases; lateral 2/3 portion of the femoral epiphyseal ossification center was involved in 9 cases among 14 cases, and also increased radioactivity in epiphyseal ossification center, epiphyseal plate, or proximal metaphysis of femur were associated in 7 cases. 2. Three cases had radiographically normal hip, whereas scintigraphy reviewed distinctly absent radioactivity in femoral epiphyseal ossification center. 3. Magnification of hip imaging using a pinhole collimator provided good definition of presence and extent of pathologic defect or uptake in epiphyseal ossification center, epiphyseal plate, and metaphysis. Bone imaging provided earlier and more accurate information concerning the extent of the necrotic and revascularization process of Legg-Calve'-Perthes disease than the radiographys alone

  8. Primary Hyperoxaluria Diagnosed Based on Bone Marrow Biopsy in Pancytopenic Adult with End Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, Pardis; Mohammadizadeh, Fereshteh

    2015-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism cause increase of metabolites in serum and their deposition in various organs including bone marrow. Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) is a rare inborn error in the pathway of glyoxylate metabolism which causes excessive oxalate production. The disease is characterized by widespread deposition of calcium oxalate (oxalosis) in multiple organs. Urinary tract including renal parenchyma is the initial site of deposition followed by extrarenal organs such as bone marrow. This case report introduces a 54-year-old woman with end stage renal disease presenting with debilitating fatigue and pancytopenia. The remarkable point in her past medical history was recurrent episodes of nephrolithiasis, urolithiasis, and urinary tract infection since the age of 5 years and resultant end stage renal disease in adulthood in the absence of appropriate medical evaluation and treatment. She had an unsuccessful renal transplantation with transplant failure. The patient underwent bone marrow biopsy for evaluation of pancytopenia. Microscopic study of bone marrow biopsy led to the diagnosis of primary hyperoxaluria. PMID:26634160

  9. Developmental origins of health and disease--global public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M A; Gluckman, P D

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represents a major challenge to public health and clinical medicine globally. NCDs are increasing rapidly in high-income countries, but even more rapidly in some low-middle-income countries with insufficient resources to meet the challenge. Whilst not identified in the Millennium Development Goals, there is much attention paid to NCDs in the discussions at many levels on the Sustainable Development Goals, as they underpin economic, social and environmental development in the post-2015 era. In this article, we discuss how a life-course approach to health, commencing of necessity in early development, can provide new opportunities for addressing this challenge. The approach can leverage human health capital throughout life and across generations. New insights into mechanisms, especially those processes by which the developmental environment affects epigenetic processes in the developing offspring, offer the prospect of identifying biomarkers of future risks. New interventions to promote health literacy, lifestyle and physical fitness in adolescents, young adults and their children hold great promise. In this respect, health-care professionals concerned with preconceptional, pregnancy and newborn care will have a vital role to play. PMID:25225058

  10. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease in swine: implications for animal production and biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Bulnes, A; Astiz, S; Ovilo, C; Lopez-Bote, C J; Torres-Rovira, L; Barbero, A; Ayuso, M; Garcia-Contreras, C; Vazquez-Gomez, M

    2016-07-01

    The concept of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) addresses, from a large set of epidemiological evidences in human beings and translational studies in animal models, both the importance of genetic predisposition and the determinant role of maternal nutrition during pregnancy on adult morphomics and homeostasis. Compelling evidences suggest that both overnutrition and undernutrition may modify the intrauterine environment of the conceptus and may alter the expression of its genome and therefore its phenotype during prenatal and postnatal life. In fact, the DOHaD concept is an extreme shift in the vision of the factors conditioning adult phenotype and supposes a drastic change from a gene-centric perspective, only modified by lifestyle and nutritional strategies during juvenile development and adulthood, to a more holistic approach in which environmental, parental, and prenatal conditions are strongly determining postnatal development and homeostasis. The implications of DOHaD are profound in all the mammalian species and the present review summarizes current knowledge on causes and consequences of DOHaD in pigs, both for meat production and as a well-recognized model for biomedicine research. PMID:27238437

  11. Conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy in the prognostic evaluation of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The role of conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy in predicting the outcome of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease was investigated. Material and Methods: The 75 children reviewed (86 hips) were followed up to the primary healing of the disease. The findings at conventional radiography (obtained at presentation, at the time of maximum capital head involvement, and at the end of the healing process of the disease) were compared to early bone scintigraphy features. Results and Conclusion: Bone scintigraphy provided more accurate information concerning the extent of the necrotic process than initial radiographs. Moreover if could determine revascularization and consequently the stage of the disease. The method was, however, unable to predict the outcome of the disease in some of the cases, particularly if it was performed late after the onset of symptoms. Conventional radiography provided important information about other parameters such as 'head-at'risk' signs which facilitated treatment selection. Of thse signs not only lateral subluxation but also metaphyseal changes strongly predispose to severe deformity of the hip joint. (orig.)

  12. Detection of Unknown sites of multiple enchondroma (Ollier′s Disease mimicking like metastasis using bone scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramadai Karuppusamy Kamaleshwaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ollier′s disease characterized by multiple skeletal enchondroma is a rare noninherited disease of unknown etiology. Majority of the skeletal enchondroma are present in the metaphyses and diaphysis of tubular limb bones. Ollier′s disease has a predilection for unilateral distribution. Malignant changes in Ollier′s disease may occur in adult patients. Radionuclide bone scanning is one method used to assess lesions depicted on radiographs or magnetic resonance images that are presumed to be enchondromas. Furthermore, a bone scan may give a clue to the multifocality of the disease. We report a case of right first phalangeal enchondroma in a 23-year-old male, who underwent bone scintigraphy detected multifocal asymmetric right side involvement of radius, humerus, femur, and tibia which confirm a diagnosis of Ollier′s disease.

  13. Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Comparison of conventional radiography, MR imaging, bone scintigraphy and arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study of 22 patients (24 hips) with Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) the findings at conventional radiography, arthrography, bone scintigraphy and MR imaging, obtained at the time of diagnosis, were compared. MR was superior to conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy in the detection of the extent of involvement in the femoral head. Arthrography was as good as or better than MR imaging in determining the shape of the articular surfaces and the occurrence of lateral subluxation. Conventional radiography was less sensitive in identifying the degree of lateral subluxation and the extent of the necrosis in the femoral head. MR imaging provided anatomical and pathophysiological information about the extent and location of head involvement as well as the degree of lateral subluxation. Revascularisation was more clearly demonstrated with MR than with bone scintigraphy, irrespective of symptom duration. (orig.)

  14. Prevention and Control of Secondary Disease following Allogenic Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the various methods found to be effective in preventing or ameliorating acute secondary disease in rodents and primates. Selective physical elimination of lymphoid cells by centrifugation over a discontinuous albumin gradient, post-transplantation administration of cyclophosphamide, amethopterin or ALS and the selection of histocompatible bone-marrow donors are considered to be the most promising methods in primares. It is not known to what extent delayed secondary disease will occur in monkeys and man in cases where acute secondary disease has been successfully avoided. (author)

  15. Increased serum IgE concentrations during infection and graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, S. A.; Rogers, T. R.; Perry, D; Hobbs, J R; Riches, P G

    1984-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations estimated in 25 bone marrow transplant recipients during episodes of infection or graft versus host disease, or both, were raised not only in some patients with acute graft versus host disease but also in many patients with infection. Raised values were not seen in chronic graft versus host disease. The routine estimation of serum IgE in bone marrow transplant recipients had minimal value because of the lack of specificity of the IgE response.

  16. Bone Mineral Densitometry Findings of Children with Newly Diagnosed Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansel Ansal Balcı

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effect of Celiac Disease (CD on children’s bone is the decrease in bone mineral density (BMD. Osteoporosis is a consequence of this decrease and usually manifests in adult ages. Studies in CD patients generally show that bone density of these patients can be different at the same ages for the same duration of disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between age and bone mineral density of CD patients at first diagnosis. Material and Methods: Ninety one patients (M/F: 36/55; age range: 3-16; mean age: 9.6±3.5 with diagnosis of CD were included in the study. BMD survey from L1-L4 lumbar spine and total hip of the patients was evaluated at presentation. We evaluated the patients in 3 groups according to their ages: Group 1: pre-school (3-7 years old, Group 2: elementary school (8-11 years old and Group 3: adolescent (12-16 years old. Results were compared using Student’s t test and correlation analysis. Results: The mean disease duration of the patients was 16.4±16.3 months. Mean height and weight of the patients were 124.8±17.9 cm and 27±9.3 kg, respectively and height and weight of 37 patients were in ≤ 3. percentile according to age. The BMD values of both lumbar spine and total hip and Z-scores of lumbar region were in mild correlation with age (r>0.5. There was significant difference between mean ages of patients with low bone mass for chronological age and normal bone densitometry values (p<0.05. There were 27, 36 and 28 patients in Group 1, Group 2 and Group 3, respectively. The difference between mean BMD values of these groups were statistically significant (p<0.05. The mean values of lumbar Z- scores of patients were -1.08±1.27, -1.42±1, -1.86±1.14, respectively for these three groups. Conclusion: Bone mineral densities of CD patients in childhood were lower in elder children at the time of diagnosis. This confirms the opinion that the diagnosis at earlier age results better treatment

  17. Development of the maxillo-mandibular first molars and developmental changes in the alveolar bone morphology. Three-dimensional observation by X-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the development of the maxillo-mandibular first molars and accompanying developmental changes in the alveolar bone morphology during the period from the intra-jaw bone stage to the completion stage of tooth eruption, dry skulls were three-dimensionally observed using X-ray CT. The specimens were 34 dry skulls composed of 17 skulls in the deciduous dentition period (dental age IIA) and 17 skulls in the first half of the mixed dentition period (dental age IIC, IIIA). The following results were obtained: By observing the horizontally sectioned images, the maxillary first molars approached the area on the deciduous dentition line from the palatal side, during the period from the deciduous dentition period to the first half of the mixed dentition period. The mandibular first molars approached the area on the deciduous dentition line from the buccal side. By observing the vertically sectioned images, development of the maxillary alveolar bone was higher than that of the mandibular alveolar bone during the period from the deciduous dentition period to the first half of the mixed dentition period. Although differences in the development of the alveolar bone between the maxilla and mandible were noted in the deciduous dentition period, the size of the maxilla was similar to that of the mandible in the first half of the mixed dentition period. Furthermore, positional changes in the buccal direction were marked in the maxillary first molars, which were located on the buccal side of the mandibular teeth in the first half of the mixed dentition period. Observation of the vertically sectioned images also showed that the inclination angle of the coronal axis of the first molars was large in both the maxilla and mandible in the first half of the mixed dentition period, which was marked in the mandible in particular. These results showed that in the first half of the mixed dentition period, in which the early occlusion of the first molars is established, development

  18. Low bone mineral density in men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Charlotte E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis is common in patients with COPD but the likely multi-factorial causes contributing to this condition (e.g. sex, age, smoking, therapy mask the potential contribution from elements related to COPD. In order to study osteoporosis and bone mineral density (BMD related to COPD, we studied a well-defined group of patients and controls. Methods BMD, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1, circulating bone biomarkers and biochemistry were determined in 30 clinically stable male ex-smokers with confirmed COPD and 15 age matched "ex-smoker" male controls. None of the patients were on inhaled corticosteroids or received more than one short course of steroids. Results Mean (SD FEV1% predicted of patients was 64(6%, the majority having Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD II airflow obstruction. There were 5/30 patients and 1/15 controls who were osteoporotic, while a further 17 patients and 5 controls were osteopenic. The BMD at the hip was lower in patients than controls, but not at the lumbar spine. Mean values of procollagen type 1 amino-terminal propeptide and osteocalcin, both markers of bone formation, and Type 1 collagen β C-telopeptide, a marker of bone resorption, were similar between patients and controls. However, all bone biomarkers were inversely related to hip BMD in patients (r = -0.51, r = -0.67, r = -0.57, p Conclusions Men with COPD had a greater prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia than age matched male controls, with a marked difference in BMD at the hip. Bone biomarkers suggest increased bone turnover.

  19. Effects of dietary phosphate on adynamic bone disease in rats with chronic kidney disease--role of sclerostin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Ferrari, Guaraciaba O; Neves, Katia R; Cavallari, Raquel T; Dominguez, Wagner V; Dos Reis, Luciene M; Graciolli, Fabiana G; Oliveira, Elizabeth C; Liu, Shiguang; Sabbagh, Yves; Jorgetti, Vanda; Schiavi, Susan; Moysés, Rosa M A

    2013-01-01

    High phosphate intake is known to aggravate renal osteodystrophy along various pathogenetic pathways. Recent studies have raised the possibility that dysregulation of the osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is also involved in chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related bone disease. We investigated the role of dietary phosphate and its possible interaction with this pathway in an experimental model of adynamic bone disease (ABD) in association with CKD and hypoparathyroidism. Partial nephrectomy (Nx) and total parathyroidectomy (PTx) were performed in male Wistar rats. Control rats with normal kidney and parathyroid function underwent sham operations. Rats were divided into three groups and underwent pair-feeding for 8 weeks with diets containing either 0.6% or 1.2% phosphate: sham 0.6%, Nx+PTx 0.6%, and Nx+PTx 1.2%. In the two Nx+PTx groups, serum creatinine increased and blood ionized calcium decreased compared with sham control group. They also presented hyperphosphatemia and reduced serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels. Fractional urinary excretion of phosphate increased in Nx+PTx 1.2% rats despite lower PTH and FGF23 levels than in sham group. These biochemical changes were accompanied by a decrease in bone formation rates. The Nx+PTx 1.2% group had lower bone volume (BV/TV), higher osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis, and higher SOST and Dickkopf-1 gene expression than the Nx+PTx 0.6% group. Nx+PTx 0.6% rat had very low serum sclerostin levels, and Nx+PTx 1.2% had intermediate sclerostin levels compared with sham group. Finally, there was a negative correlation between BV/TV and serum sclerostin. These results suggest that high dietary phosphate intake decreases bone volume in an experimental model of CKD-ABD, possibly via changes in SOST expression through a PTH-independent mechanism. These findings could have relevance for the clinical setting of CKD-ABD in patients who low turnover bone disease might be attenuated

  20. Effects of dietary phosphate on adynamic bone disease in rats with chronic kidney disease--role of sclerostin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana C Ferreira

    Full Text Available High phosphate intake is known to aggravate renal osteodystrophy along various pathogenetic pathways. Recent studies have raised the possibility that dysregulation of the osteocyte Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is also involved in chronic kidney disease (CKD-related bone disease. We investigated the role of dietary phosphate and its possible interaction with this pathway in an experimental model of adynamic bone disease (ABD in association with CKD and hypoparathyroidism. Partial nephrectomy (Nx and total parathyroidectomy (PTx were performed in male Wistar rats. Control rats with normal kidney and parathyroid function underwent sham operations. Rats were divided into three groups and underwent pair-feeding for 8 weeks with diets containing either 0.6% or 1.2% phosphate: sham 0.6%, Nx+PTx 0.6%, and Nx+PTx 1.2%. In the two Nx+PTx groups, serum creatinine increased and blood ionized calcium decreased compared with sham control group. They also presented hyperphosphatemia and reduced serum parathyroid hormone (PTH and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23 levels. Fractional urinary excretion of phosphate increased in Nx+PTx 1.2% rats despite lower PTH and FGF23 levels than in sham group. These biochemical changes were accompanied by a decrease in bone formation rates. The Nx+PTx 1.2% group had lower bone volume (BV/TV, higher osteoblast and osteocyte apoptosis, and higher SOST and Dickkopf-1 gene expression than the Nx+PTx 0.6% group. Nx+PTx 0.6% rat had very low serum sclerostin levels, and Nx+PTx 1.2% had intermediate sclerostin levels compared with sham group. Finally, there was a negative correlation between BV/TV and serum sclerostin. These results suggest that high dietary phosphate intake decreases bone volume in an experimental model of CKD-ABD, possibly via changes in SOST expression through a PTH-independent mechanism. These findings could have relevance for the clinical setting of CKD-ABD in patients who low turnover bone disease might

  1. Presentation of Epilepsy in a Patient with Wilson's Disease and Developmental Venous Anomaly (Venous Angioma) in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Ammar Alobaidy; Faisal Alazri; Jacob, P. C.; Al-Kalbani, Jamila H.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), also called venous angiomas, and Wilson’s disease are both considered rare disorders with varying degrees of neurologic and systemic manifestations; yet the coexistence of the two disorders is considered extremely rare, bearing in mind the low prevalence of each disorder. Epilepsy is a recognised presentation in these disorders and will be the focus of discussion in our report of a 21-year-old male patient who, based on a clinical examinatio...

  2. Epidemiological Studies of the Developmental Origins of Adult Health and Disease in Japan: A Pediatric Perspective in Present Day Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Toru; Uchiyama, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The origins of adult disease are considered to relate to fetal undernutrition, and this concept is termed “developmental origins of adult health and disease” (DOHaD). Here, we describe several epidemiological studies performed in Japan and discuss whether DOHaD is applicable to children in present day Japan. In a study of healthy children and young adults, it was found that systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol and adiponectin were associated with birth weight. Hyperinsulinemia, high blo...

  3. On the way to building an integrated computational environment for the study of developmental patterns and genetic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Turinsky, Andrei L.; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2006-01-01

    Genetic diseases and developmental patterns should be studied on several levels: from macroscale (organs and tissues) to nanoscale (cells, genes, proteins). Due to the overwhelming complexity of the life science data, it is common that disparate data pieces are meticulously stored but never fully analyzed or correlated. We have begun to develop a novel methodology based on virtual reality techniques for the study of these phenomena. Our key approach to knowledge integration is a top-down mapp...

  4. Reduced Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 causes developmental delay, hypotonia, and cranial abnormalities associated with increased bone gene expression in Kleefstra syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balemans, Monique C M; Ansar, Muhammad; Oudakker, Astrid R; van Caam, Arjan P M; Bakker, Brenda; Vitters, Elly L; van der Kraan, Peter M; de Bruijn, Diederik R H; Janssen, Sanne M; Kuipers, Arthur J; Huibers, Manon M H; Maliepaard, Eliza M; Walboomers, X Frank; Benevento, Marco; Nadif Kasri, Nael; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Zhou, Huiqing; Van der Zee, Catharina E E M; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2014-02-15

    Haploinsufficiency of Euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1), a chromatin modifying enzyme, is the cause of Kleefstra syndrome (KS). KS is an intellectual disability (ID) syndrome, with general developmental delay, hypotonia, and craniofacial dysmorphisms as additional core features. Recent studies have been focused on the role of EHMT1 in learning and memory, linked to the ID phenotype of KS patients. In this study we used the Ehmt1(+/-) mouse model, and investigated whether the core features of KS were mimicked in these mice. When comparing Ehmt1(+/-) mice to wildtype littermates we observed delayed postnatal growth, eye opening, ear opening, and upper incisor eruption, indicating a delayed postnatal development. Furthermore, tests for muscular strength and motor coordination showed features of hypotonia in young Ehmt1(+/-) mice. Lastly, we found that Ehmt1(+/-) mice showed brachycephalic crania, a shorter or bent nose, and hypertelorism, reminiscent of the craniofacial dysmorphisms seen in KS. In addition, gene expression analysis revealed a significant upregulation of the mRNA levels of Runx2 and several other bone tissue related genes in P28 Ehmt1(+/-) mice. Runx2 immunostaining also appeared to be increased. The mRNA upregulation was associated with decreased histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) levels, the epigenetic mark deposited by Ehmt1, in the promoter region of these genes. Together, Ehmt1(+/-) mice indeed recapitulate KS core features and can be used as an animal model for Kleefstra syndrome. The increased expression of bone developmental genes in the Ehmt1(+/-) mice likely contributes to their cranial dysmorphisms and might be explained by diminished Ehmt1-induced H3K9 dimethylation. PMID:24362066

  5. Effect of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on bone disease in postmenopausal women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nanda, Kavinderjit S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Limited data are available on the contribution of chronic HCV infection to the development of bone disease in postmenopausal women. We studied whether women who acquired HCV infection through administration of HCV genotype 1b-contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin from a single source had decreased bone mineral density (BMD) or altered levels of bone turnover markers (BTMs), compared with women who spontaneously resolved infection or age-matched healthy controls. METHODS: From a cohort of postmenopausal Irish women, we compared BMD, determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and a panel of BTMs in 20 women chronically infected with HCV (PCR(+)), 21 women who had spontaneously resolved infection (PCR(-)), and 23 age-matched healthy controls. RESULTS: Levels of BTMs and BMD were similar in PCR(+) and PCR(-) women and healthy age-matched controls. However, there was an increased frequency of fractures in PCR(+) (n = 6) compared with PCR(-) women (n = 0, P = .007). PCR(+) women with fractures were postmenopausal for a longer time (median, 15.5, range, 5-20 years vs 4.5, range, 1-20 years in PCR(+) women without fractures; P = .033), had lower BMD at the hip (0.79, range, 0.77-0.9 g\\/cm(2) vs 0.96, range, 0.81-1.10 g\\/cm(2); P = .007), and had a lower body mass index (23.7, range 21.2-28.5 kg\\/m(2) vs 25.6, range 22.1-36.6 kg\\/m(2); P = .035). There was no difference in liver disease severity or BTMs in PCR(+) women with or without fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic HCV infection did not lead to discernable metabolic bone disease in postmenopausal women, but it might be a risk factor for bone fractures, so preventive measures should be introduced. To view this article\\'s video abstract, go to the AGA\\'s YouTube Channel.

  6. Three-phase bone scintigraphic analysis of radial osteotomy for Kienboeck's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-phase bone scintigraphy was performed before and after radial wedge osteotomy on 11 joints. All 11 patients were suffering from Kienboeck's disease. We analized the relations between the change of those images and the clinical courses. On blood pool images that were performed before radial wedge osteotomy, we observed decreased accumulation in the lunate bone in 4 of 9 patients in Lichtman's stage II or IIIA. Intensive accumulation in the carpal area that seemed to represent the activity of Kienboeck's disease were seen in all patients. Delayed image showed accumulation demonstrating osteoarthritic changes. Accumulation in the lunte bone on blood pool images was confirmed in all patients 6 to 12 months after operation. This appeared to suggest the increase of blood flow into the lunate bone. Compared with preoperative blood pool images, accumulation in the carpal area decreased in 8 patients who followed good postoperative course and their clinical symptoms improved relatively quickly. In the other 3 patients no decrease in this accumulation was confirmed by the initial postoperative scintigraphy. The improvement in their symptoms was delayed. The postoperative change of delayed images was visualized less sensitively than that of blood pool images. The decreased accumulation in the carpal area on blood pool images allows prediction of the subsequent clinical course prior to improvement in clinical symptoms. We consider this finding to be useful clinically. (author)

  7. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  8. Radiological features of Paget disease of bone associated with VCP myopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farpour, Farzin [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Queens Hospital Center, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiology, VA Long Beach Health Care, Irvine, CA (United States); Donkervoort, Sandra; Vanjara, Pari [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); Smith, Charles [University of Kentucky, Department of Neurology and Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, Lexington, KY (United States); Martin, Barbara [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Osann, Kathryn [University of California, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Irvine, CA (United States); Kimonis, Virginia E. [University of California, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Division of Genetics and Metabolism, Orange, CA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene cause a unique disorder characterized by classic Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy, and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Our objective was to analyze the radiographic features of PDB associated with VCP mutations since there is a dearth of literature on the PDB component of VCP disease. Radiographic bone surveys were examined in 23 individuals with VCP mutation and compared with their unaffected relatives. Laboratory testing relevant for VCP disease was performed in all individuals. Of the 17 affected individuals with clinical manifestations of VCP disease, 16 of whom had myopathy, radiographic analysis revealed classic PDB in 11 individuals (65%). The mean age of diagnosis for myopathy was 43.8 years and for PDB was 38.1 years of age. Radiological evidence of PDB was seen in one individual (16%) amongst six clinically asymptomatic VCP mutation carriers. Alkaline phosphatase was a useful marker for diagnosing PDB in VCP disease. Radiographic findings of classic PDB are seen in 52% of individuals carrying VCP mutations at a significantly younger age than conventional PDB. Screening for PDB is warranted in at-risk individuals because of the benefit of early treatment with the new powerful bisphosphonates that hold the potential for prevention of disease. (orig.)

  9. Radiological features of Paget disease of bone associated with VCP myopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutations in the Valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene cause a unique disorder characterized by classic Paget disease of bone (PDB), inclusion body myopathy, and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). Our objective was to analyze the radiographic features of PDB associated with VCP mutations since there is a dearth of literature on the PDB component of VCP disease. Radiographic bone surveys were examined in 23 individuals with VCP mutation and compared with their unaffected relatives. Laboratory testing relevant for VCP disease was performed in all individuals. Of the 17 affected individuals with clinical manifestations of VCP disease, 16 of whom had myopathy, radiographic analysis revealed classic PDB in 11 individuals (65%). The mean age of diagnosis for myopathy was 43.8 years and for PDB was 38.1 years of age. Radiological evidence of PDB was seen in one individual (16%) amongst six clinically asymptomatic VCP mutation carriers. Alkaline phosphatase was a useful marker for diagnosing PDB in VCP disease. Radiographic findings of classic PDB are seen in 52% of individuals carrying VCP mutations at a significantly younger age than conventional PDB. Screening for PDB is warranted in at-risk individuals because of the benefit of early treatment with the new powerful bisphosphonates that hold the potential for prevention of disease. (orig.)

  10. Pulmonary, Gonadal, and Central Nervous System Status after Bone Marrow Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, Mark C.; Hardy, Karen; Edwards, Sandie; Adamkiewicz, Thomas; Barkovich, James; Bernaudin, Francoise; Buchanan, George R.; Bunin, Nancy; Dickerhoff, Roswitha; Giller, Roger; Haut, Paul R.; Horan, John; Hsu, Lewis L.; Kamani, Naynesh; Levine, John E.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, multicenter investigation of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical sibling bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in children with severe sickle cell disease (SCD) between 1991 and 2000. To determine if children were protected from complications of SCD after successful BMT, we extended our initial study of BMT for SCD to conduct assessments of the central nervous system (CNS) and of pulmonary function 2 or more years after transplantation. In addition, the impact on g...

  11. Case report 496: Intraosseous gas in Proteus mirabilis osteomyelitis complicating bone infarcts in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain film radiographs showed dramatic changes of this rare complication of sickle cell disease in an adult patient, eventually resulting in bilateral amputations of the lower extremities. Cross table radiographs of the knees showed the air-fluid levels without soft tissue swelling or periosteal reaction. The balance of the studies performed confirmed and refined the initial impression that infarction and infection had occurred within the medullary spaces of four long bones. The offending organism was Proteus mirabilis. (orig.)

  12. Case report 496: Intraosseous gas in Proteus mirabilis osteomyelitis complicating bone infarcts in sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, A.C.; Hartshorne, M.F.; Stull, M.A.; Truwit, C.L.

    1988-10-01

    Plain film radiographs showed dramatic changes of this rare complication of sickle cell disease in an adult patient, eventually resulting in bilateral amputations of the lower extremities. Cross table radiographs of the knees showed the air-fluid levels without soft tissue swelling or periosteal reaction. The balance of the studies performed confirmed and refined the initial impression that infarction and infection had occurred within the medullary spaces of four long bones. The offending organism was Proteus mirabilis.

  13. ACTINOMYCES NAESLUNDII ISOLATED FROM BONE MARROW BIOPSIES OBTAINED FROM PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANT LYMPHORETICULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Mobedi

    1981-08-01

    Full Text Available Different types of Actinomyces spp isolated from the oral cavity of human in healthy as well as in pathological state. Internally it is only found in association with pathological organs. Recently Actinomyces naeslundii has been isolated from blood culture of a leukemic patient. Present studies indicate the association of this microorganism with cells obtained from bone marrow by punction in more than 40 percent of patients of patients with malignant lymphoreticular disease.

  14. ACTINOMYCES NAESLUNDII ISOLATED FROM BONE MARROW BIOPSIES OBTAINED FROM PATIENTS WITH MALIGNANT LYMPHORETICULAR DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Mobedi, I; J.Vandyoussefi; H.Rassa; HA.Fardin

    1981-01-01

    Different types of Actinomyces spp isolated from the oral cavity of human in healthy as well as in pathological state. Internally it is only found in association with pathological organs. Recently Actinomyces naeslundii has been isolated from blood culture of a leukemic patient. Present studies indicate the association of this microorganism with cells obtained from bone marrow by punction in more than 40 percent of patients of patients with malignant lymphoreticular disease.

  15. Bone Disease in Medullary Sponge Kidney and Effect of Potassium Citrate Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Fabris, Antonia; Bernich, Patrizia; Abaterusso, Cataldo; Marchionna, Nicola; Canciani, Chiara; Nouvenne, Antonio; Zamboni, Mauro; Lupo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: In medullary sponge kidney (MSK)—a common malformative renal condition in patients with calcium nephrolithiasis—hypercalciuria, incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis, and hypocitraturia are common. Clinical conditions with concomitant hypercalciuria and/or incomplete distal renal tubular acidosis are almost invariably associated with bone disease, making osteopathy highly likely in MSK, too. Patients with MSK have never been investigated for osteopathy; neither h...

  16. Vanishing bone disease of the orbital roof: now you see it, now you don't

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a rare case of vascularised orbital roof and calvarial erosions with an associated venous malformation. In the absence of infection, malignancy, trauma and eosinophillic granuloma, the closest previously described entity is vanishing bone disease. Computed tomography (CT), MRI, catheter angiography and pathology were all important in the diagnostic workup to enable surgical planning for biopsy and reconstruction. Ongoing CT and MRI follow-up imaging will determine future treatment planning.

  17. Computed tomography of the petrous bone in otosclerosis and Meniere's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this investigation was to examine if, in the case of otosclerosis and Meniere's disease, one could obtain more information with high resolution computer tomography than with conventional polytomography. In the first part of this thesis a brief survey of some principles of computer tomography is given and a computer tomographic atlas of the normal petrous bone in the otoradiologic planes used in this study. In the introduction of the second part some aspects of otosclerose are discussed (definition, clinical aspects). Subsequently a treatment is given of a part of the histopathology referring to the otospongiotic and otosclerotic changes in the labyrinthine capsule. A survey is given of preceding studies on the petrous bone in the case of otosclerosis; in these studies mostly classical planigraphic techniques were employed. In the third part some general aspects of Meniere's disease are discussed: definition, incidence, clinical aspects and pathophysiology. It is assumed that the symptoms of Meniere's disease are caused by an overpressure in the endolymphatic areas of the labyrinthum ('hydrops'), however till now a proof for this is still not given. The ductus endolympathicus, which passes through a channel in the petrous bone (the vestibular aqueduct), plays a role in the drainage of endolymph. Stagnation of this drainage could cause hydrops. (Auth.)

  18. Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) and bone pain. A case treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Systemic mast cell disease (SMCD) is a rare disease characterized by a multitopic proliferation of cytologically and/or functionally abnormal tissue mast cells. SMCD preferentially involves the skin, spleen, liver, lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The cause of SMCD is unknown. Bony pain, caused by mast cell infiltration of the marrow cavity, is present in up to 28% of cases and is frequently chronic and difficult to palliate with medical therapy. Case Report: We report one case of refractory bone pain in a 54-year-old female Caucasian patient with advanced SMCD and associated bony involvement, which was treated with radiotherapy for pain palliation. Between 1995 and 1998, the patient was irradiated at four different locations: 1) right shoulder and proximal right humerus, 2) both hands, 3) both knees, 4) left humerus with a total dose of 40 Gy in 2.0 or 2.5 Gy daily fractions. Results: Different results of pain palliation were achieved. In one location the pain was reduced for 55 months until her death due to disease progression, whereas in two other locations a pain control was maintained for 3 and 6 months after radiotherapy. In one location, no pain reduction was achieved. Severe side effects were not observed. Conclusion: Palliative radiotherapy has a role in the control of severe intractable bone pain in patients with advanced SMCD, though in some cases the effect may be short or incomplete. The observed palliation of pain can even differ in the same patient. (orig.)

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and low bone mass: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Low bone mass (osteopenia and osteoporosis is one of the effects associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is very little data from Saudi Arabia on COPD and low bone mass. This retrospective study was done to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in COPD patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University (KFHU, Alkhobar. Patients and Methods: After obtaining the ethical approval from the research committee, all patients seen between at the King Fahd Hospital of the University between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. The inclusion criteria included a follow up of a minimum 2 years, and the Medical Records should have the details of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 , blood bone profile and bone biomarkers and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan. Patients were labeled as osteopenia if the T score was -<1 to <-2.5 and osteoporosis of <-2.5 as per the WHO definition of osteopenia and osteoporosis. Results: Seventy-three patients were being followed in the clinics and 49 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The average age was 60.6 ± 10.47 years; males were 43 and females 6. Three (6.1% were normal and the remaining 46 (93.9% were with low bone mass. Thirty-two (65.3% were osteoporotic and 14 (28.57% were osteopenic. The average duration of COPD was 4.5 ± 6.2 years. Majority (n = 36, 73.4% of patients were in the Global Initiative for COPD (GOLD class II and III. FEV 1 was significantly lower in the patients with low bone mass 1.66 ± 0.60 versus 3.61 ± 0.58 (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Our study shows that over 90% of Saudi Arabian patients with COPD suffer from osteopenia and osteoporosis and unfortunately they remain under-diagnosed and undertreated.

  20. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Garcia-Gomez; Fermin; Sanchez-Guijo; M; Consuelo; del; Caizo; Jesus; F; San; Miguel; Mercedes; Garayoa

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy inwhich clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic le-sions due to increased osteoclast(OC) activity and sup-pressed osteoblast(OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma patho-physiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of my-eloma bone disease(MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients(pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts(dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibi-tory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and ac-tivity at various levels(i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncou-pling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augment-ed production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents(at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  1. Kidney bone disease and mortality in CKD: revisiting the role of vitamin D, calcimimetics, alkaline phosphatase, and minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Shah, Anuja; Duong, Uyen; Hechter, Rulin C; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2010-08-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the traditional syndromes known as renal osteodystrophy, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and vitamin D deficiency are related to mortality in persons with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). The so-called 'kidney bone disease', also known as 'mineral and bone disorders', is defined to include bone disorders, mineral disarrays, and vascular calcification. We have identified 14 common and clinically relevant conditions of contemporary nature that are related to the kidney bone disease, including calcitriol (active vitamin D) deficiency, 25(OH)-vitamin D deficiency, biochemical hyperparathyroidism, relatively low parathyroid hormone (PTH) level, increased serum alkaline phosphatase (hyperphosphatasemia), elevated fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23, high turnover bone disease, adynamic bone disease, uremic osteoporosis, vascular calcification, hyper- and hypophosphatemia, and hyper- and hypocalcemia. We present a critical review of these 14 conditions with emphasis on patient survival and other pertinent clinical outcomes. We also review unresolved controversies surrounding the management of these conditions by administration of nutritional vitamin D (ergocalciferol and cholecalciferol), vitamin D receptor activators (calcitriol, alphacalcidiol, doxercalciferol), D-mimetics (paricalcitol, maxacalcitol), calcimimetics (cinacalcet), recombinant PTH (teriparatide), and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand modulators (denosumab); compare mortality predictability of PTH and alkaline phosphatase; and examine potential risks of bone disorders and mineral disarrays in CKD patients. PMID:20671739

  2. Stemness Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Placentas According to Developmental Stage: Comparison to Those from Adult Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Hwa Jung; Hong, Soon Cheol; Yoo, Ji Hyun; Oh, Jee Hyun; Shin, Hye Jin; Choi, In Young; Ahn, Ki Hoon; Kim, Sun Haeng; Park, Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to evaluate the stemness of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from placenta according to the development stage and to compare the results to those from adult bone marrow (BM). Based on the source of hMSCs, three groups were defined: group I included term placentas, group II included first-trimester placentas, and group III included adult BM samples. The stemness was evaluated by the proliferation capacity, immunophenotypic expression, mesoderm differentiation, e...

  3. Intersystem Implications of the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: Advancing Health Promotion in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael D; Heaton, Thomas L; Goates, Michael C; Packer, Justin M

    2016-01-01

    The developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) theory and life course theory (LCT) are emerging fields of research that have significant implications for the public health and health promotion professions. Using a DOHaD/LCT perspective, social determinants of health (SDH) take on new critical meaning by which health promotion professionals can implement DOHaD/LCT guided interventions, including recommended policies. Through these interventions, public health could further address the sources of worldwide chronic disease epidemics and reduce such disease rates substantially if related policy, programs, and interdisciplinary and multi-sector collaboration are emphasized. Additional characteristics of the most effective interventions involve context-specific adaptation and societal structures that impact upstream, early life environments on a broad scale, influencing multiple locations and/or diseases. PMID:27417633

  4. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm2 in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm2 and 0.765g/cm2. Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures

  5. MR analysis of sternal bone marrow using STIR in hematologic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozawa, Eito [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) signal intensity pattern of sternal bone marrow was examined in 21 normal volunteers and 10 patients with aplastic anemia (n=4), multiple myeloma (2), AML (2), gammaglobulinemia (1) and MDS (1) using a sagittal STIR sequence. Double Echo STIR images (TR/TI/TE/NEX=2000/180/20, 100/1) were obtained with a CP body array coil. Craniocaudal phase-encoding with a handmade positioning device effectively avoided overlapping artifacts due to cardiac pulsation. In the normal volunteers, age showed a significant inverse correlation with the calculated SIR (signal intensity ratio of bone marrow relative to subcutaneous fat) using STIR with short TE. The SIR in the sternal body was significantly higher than that in the manubrium (p<0.05). Knowledge of the sternal bone marrow distribution according to age is useful for evaluating hematologic diseases. The proposed method provided high spatial resolution and an excellent bone marrow signal, and may be useful for determining site for aspiration. (author)

  6. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Meharji Arumilli; Lappalainen, Anu K; Marta Owczarek-Lipska; Vidhya Jagannathan; Sruthi Hundi; Elina Salmela; Patrick Venta; Eva Sarkiala; Tarja Jokinen; Daniela Gorgas; Juha Kere; Pekka Nieminen; Cord Drögemüller; Hannes Lohi

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined ge...

  7. Molecular Characterization of Three Canine Models of Human Rare Bone Diseases: Caffey, van den Ende-Gupta, and Raine Syndromes.

    OpenAIRE

    Hytönen, Marjo K.; Arumilli, Meharji; Lappalainen, Anu K; Owczarek, Marta; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Hundi, Sruthi; Salmela, Elina; Venta, Patrick; Sarkiala, Eva; Jokinen, Tarja; Gorgas, Daniela; Kere, Juha; Nieminen, Pekka; Drögemüller, Cord; Lohi, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    One to two percent of all children are born with a developmental disorder requiring pediatric hospital admissions. For many such syndromes, the molecular pathogenesis remains poorly characterized. Parallel developmental disorders in other species could provide complementary models for human rare diseases by uncovering new candidate genes, improving the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and opening possibilities for therapeutic trials. We performed various experiments, e.g. combined ge...

  8. A rare variant of Caffey's disease – X-rays, bone scan and FDG PET findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 18-month-old boy with history of fever of 4 months duration and with swelling of the limbs was referred for a bone scan. There were multiple swellings over his upper and lower limbs, with bowing of the lower limbs. His radiological skeletal survey revealed marked periosteal new bone formation surrounding the diaphysis of long bones. A bone scan done with 99m Tc-MDP showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in all the long bones. A fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan done to assess the metabolic activity showed patchy FDG uptake in the long bones, ankle joint and anterior ends of few ribs. His clinical and imaging findings led to the diagnosis of Caffey's disease

  9. [Limb torsion and developmental regression for one month after hand, foot and mouth disease in an infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li-Fang; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Li, Dong-Xiao; Ding, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Song, Jin-Qing; Yang, Yan-Ling

    2016-05-01

    A one-year-old girl visited the hospital due to limb torsion and developmental regression for one month after hand, foot and mouth disease. At the age of 11 months, she visited a local hospital due to fever for 5 days and skin rash with frequent convulsions for 2 days and was diagnosed with severe hand, foot and mouth disease, viral encephalitis, and status epilepticus. Brain MRI revealed symmetric abnormal signals in the bilateral basal ganglia, bilateral thalamus, cerebral peduncle, bilateral cortex, and hippocampus. She was given immunoglobulin, antiviral drugs, and anticonvulsant drugs for 2 weeks, and the effect was poor. Blood and urine screening for inherited metabolic diseases were performed to clarify the etiology. The analysis of urine organic acids showed significant increases in glutaric acid and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, which suggested glutaric aciduria type 1, but her blood glutarylcarnitine was normal, and free carnitine significantly decreased. After the treatment with low-lysine diets, L-carnitine, and baclofen for 1 month, the patient showed a significant improvement in symptoms. Hand, foot and mouth disease is a common viral infectious disease in children, and children with underlying diseases such as inherited metabolic diseases and immunodeficiency may experience serious complications. For children with hand, foot and mouth disease and unexplained encephalopathy, inherited metabolic diseases should be considered. PMID:27165592

  10. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD): Implications for health and nutritional issues among rural children in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Aihua; Wang, Lijie; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Li, Ling; Wang, Baozhen; Luo, Huiwen; Mo, Xiuting; Tobe, Ruoyan Gai

    2015-04-01

    In China, with fast economic growth, health and nutrition status among the rural population has shown significant improvement in the past decades. On the other hand, burden of non-communicable diseases and prevalence of related risk factors such as overweight and obesity has also increased. Among rural children, the double burden of malnutrition and emerging overweight and obesity has been neglected so far. According to the theory of Developmental Origin of Health and Diseases (DOHaD), malnutrition, including both undernutrition (stunting and wasting) and over-nutrition (overweight and obesity) during childhood is closely related to worsened health outcomes during adulthood. Such a neglected problem is attributable to a complicated synergy of social and environmental factors such as parental migration, financial situation of the household, child-rearing knowledge and practices of the primary caregivers, and has implications for public health. Based on literature review of lessons from the field, intervention to address malnutrition among rural children should be a comprehensive package, with consideration of their developmental environment and geographical and socioeconomic diversity. The scientific evidence on DOHaD indicates the probability and necessity of prevention of adult disease by promotion of maternal and child health and reducing malnutrition by provision of high-quality complementary foods, promotion of a well-balanced dietary pattern, and promotion of health literacy in the public would bring a potential benefit to reduce potential risk of diseases. PMID:26173293

  11. Seeking genes responsible for developmental origins of health and disease from the fetal mouse liver following maternal food restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Saito, Tomomi; Tamura, Gaku; Kuwagata, Makiko; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Low birthweight resulting from a non-optimal fetal environment is correlated epidemiologically to a higher risk of adult diseases, and which has also been demonstrated using animal models for maternal undernutrition. In this study, we subjected pregnant mice to 50% food restriction (FR), and profiled gene expression and promoter DNA methylation genome-wide using the fetal livers. The fact that effect of food restriction is opposite between before and after birth encouraged us to hunt for genes that are expressed oppositely to adult calorie restriction (CR) using the maternal livers. Among oppositely regulated genes, we identified trib1 (tribbles homolog 1). Using genetically modified mice, trib1 has been shown to have a demonstrable contribution to a risk of hypertriglyceridaemia and insulin resistance. Our data showed that the trib1 expression and its promoter DNA methylation could be affected physiologically (by maternal nutrition), and therefore might be a strong candidate gene for developmental origins of adult diseases. Furthermore, lepr (leptin receptor) gene was downregulated by maternal FR, indicating its potential role in induction of obesity and diabetes. Gene expression as well as promoter DNA methylation profiling revealed that glucocorticoid receptor target genes were regulated by maternal FR. This supports previous studies that suggest an important role of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in the mechanism of developmental origins of diseases. Our transcriptomics profiling data also suggested that maternal FR impaired development of the immune system. An inventory of candidate genes responsible for developmental origins of health and disease is presented and discussed in this study. PMID:24754856

  12. Can bone loss be reversed by antithyroid drug therapy in premenopausal women with Graves' disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belsing Tina Z

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Hyperthyroidism can lead to reduced bone mineral density (BMD and increased fracture risk particularly in postmenopausal women, but the mechanism behind is still unclear. Objective Prospective examination of the influence of thyroid hormones and/or thyroid autoantibodies on BMD in premenopause. Design We have examined 32 premenopausal women with untreated active Graves' disease from time of diagnosis, during 18 months of antithyroid drug therapy (ATD and additionally 18 months after discontinuing ATD. Variables of thyroid metabolism, calcium homeostasis and body composition were measured every 3 months. BMD of lumbar spine and femoral neck were measured at baseline, 18 ± 3 and 36 ± 3 months. Data were compared to base line, a sex- and age matched control group and a group of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis treated with non-suppressive doses of levothyroxine. Results The study showed significantly (p Conclusion The results indicated a clinically relevant impact of thyroid function on bone modulation also in premenopausal women with Graves' disease, and further indicated the possibility for a direct action of TRAb on bones.

  13. Notch pathway inhibition controls myeloma bone disease in the murine MOPC315.BM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite evidence that deregulated Notch signalling is a master regulator of multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis, its contribution to myeloma bone disease remains to be resolved. Notch promotes survival of human MM cells and triggers human osteoclast activity in vitro. Here, we show that inhibition of Notch through the γ-secretase inhibitor XII (GSI XII) induces apoptosis of murine MOPC315.BM myeloma cells with high Notch activity. GSI XII impairs murine osteoclast differentiation of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in vitro. In the murine MOPC315.BM myeloma model GSI XII has potent anti-MM activity and reduces osteolytic lesions as evidenced by diminished myeloma-specific monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)-A serum levels and quantitative assessment of bone structure changes via high-resolution microcomputed tomography scans. Thus, we suggest that Notch inhibition through GSI XII controls myeloma bone disease mainly by targeting Notch in MM cells and possibly in osteoclasts in their microenvironment. We conclude that Notch inhibition is a valid therapeutic strategy in MM

  14. Bone mineral density and disorders of mineral metabolism in chronic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Joe; Ganesh, Hosahithlu K; Acharya, Shrikrishna; Bandgar, Tushar R; Shivane, Vyankatesh; Karvat, Anjana; Bhatia, Shobna J; Shah, Samir; Menon, Padmavathy S; Shah, Nalini

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence and identify the risk factors for metabolic bone disease in patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: The study was performed on 72 Indian patients with cirrhosis (63 male, nine female; aged < 50 years). Etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholism (n = 37), hepatitis B (n = 25) and hepatitis C (n = 10). Twenty-three patients belonged to Child class A, while 39 were in class B and 10 in class C. Secondary causes for metabolic bone disease and osteoporosis were ruled out. Sunlight exposure, physical activity and dietary constituents were calculated. Complete metabolic profiles were derived, and bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual energy X ray absorptiometry. Low BMD was defined as a Z score below -2. RESULTS: Low BMD was found in 68% of patients. Lumbar spine was the most frequently and severely affected site. Risk factors for low BMD included low physical activity, decreased sunlight exposure, and low lean body mass. Calcium intake was adequate, with unfavorable calcium: protein ratio and calcium: phosphorus ratio. Vitamin D deficiency was highly prevalent (92%). There was a high incidence of hypogonadism (41%). Serum estradiol level was elevated significantly in patients with normal BMD. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 and IGF binding protein 3 levels were below the age-related normal range in both groups. IGF-1 was significantly lower in patients with low BMD. Serum osteocalcin level was low (68%) and urinary deoxypyridinoline to creatinine ratio was high (79%), which demonstrated low bone formation with high resorption. CONCLUSION: Patients with cirrhosis have low BMD. Contributory factors are reduced physical activity, low lean body mass, vitamin D deficiency and hypogonadism and low IGF-1 level. PMID:19630107

  15. Overexpression of RANKL in osteoblasts: a possible mechanism of susceptibility to bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delion, Martial; Braux, Julien; Jourdain, Marie-Laure; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Gangloff, Sophie; Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise Le; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Jacquot, Jacky; Velard, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Bone fragility and loss are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is more often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of CF-related bone disease (CFBD) is necessary to develop new therapies. Defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and chronic inflammation in bone are important components of the CFBD development. The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) drive the regulation of bone turnover. To investigate their roles in CFBD, we evaluated the involvement of defective CFTR in their production level in CF primary human osteoblasts with and without inflammatory stimulation, in the presence or not of pharmacological correctors of the CFTR. No major difference in cell ultrastructure was noted between cultured CF and non-CF osteoblasts, but a delayed bone matrix mineralization was observed in CF osteoblasts. Strikingly, resting CF osteoblasts exhibited strong production of RANKL protein, which was highly localized at the cell membrane and was enhanced in TNF (TNF-α) or IL-17-stimulated conditions. Under TNF stimulation, a defective response in OPG production was observed in CF osteoblasts in contrast to the elevated OPG production of non-CF osteoblasts, leading to an elevated RANKL-to-OPG protein ratio in CF osteoblasts. Pharmacological inhibition of CFTR chloride channel conductance in non-CF osteoblasts replicated both the decreased OPG production and the enhanced RANKL-to-OPG ratio. Interestingly, using CFTR correctors such as C18, we significantly reduced the production of RANKL by CF osteoblasts, in both resting and TNF-stimulated conditions. In conclusion, the overexpression of RANKL and high membranous RANKL localization in osteoblasts are related to defective CFTR, and may worsen bone resorption, leading to bone loss in patients with CF. Targeting

  16. Soy isoflavones avert chronic inflammation-induced bone loss and vascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lightfoot Stan A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence from epidemiological, clinical and animal studies suggests a link may exist between low bone density and cardiovascular disease, with inflammatory mediators implicated in the pathophysiology of both conditions. This project examined whether supplementation with soy isoflavones (IF, shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, could prevent tissue expression of TNF-α and the development of skeletal pathology in an animal model of chronic inflammation. Methods Eight-week old, intact, female C57BL/6J mice were used. In Phase 1, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS-dose response study (0, 0.133, 1.33 and 13.3 μg/d was conducted to determine the LPS dose to use in Phase 2. The results indicated the 1.33 μg LPS/d dose produced the greatest decrease in lymphocytes and increase in neutrophils. Subsequently, in Phase 2, mice were randomly assigned to one of six groups (n = 12–13 per group: 0 or 1.33 μg LPS/d (placebo or LPS in combination with 0, 126 or 504 mg aglycone equivalents of soy IF/kg diet (Control, Low or High dose IF. Mice were fed IF beginning 2 wks prior to the 30-d LPS study period. Results At the end of the study, no differences were detected in final body weights or uterine weights. In terms of trabecular bone microarchitecture, μCT analyses of the distal femur metaphysis indicated that LPS significantly decreased trabecular bone volume (BV/TV and number (TbN, and increased separation (TbSp. Trabecular bone strength (i.e. total force and stiffness were also compromised in response to LPS. The High IF dose provided protection against these detrimental effects on microarchitecture, but not biomechanical properties. No alterations in trabecular thickness (TbTh, or cortical bone parameters were observed in response to the LPS or IF. Immunohistomchemical staining showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α was up-regulated by LPS in the endothelium of small myocardial arteries and arterioles as well as the tibial

  17. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  18. The diphosphonate space: A useful quantitative index of disease activity in patients undergoing hexamethylene diphosphonate (HMDP) bone imaging for Paget's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison between the plasma levels of intravenously injected technetium 99m hexamethylene diphosphonate (99mTc-HMDP) and chromium 151 ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) reflects the uptake of diphosphonate into bone (the diphosphonate space). This can be used as an index of skeletal function in metabolic bone disease. In a series of 49 patients with Paget's disease the diphosphonate space (DPS) correlated well with other indicators of disease activity such as alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxyproline levels. The DPS is a good predictor of the volume of skeletal involvement as estimated from bone images. The DPS also provides a sensitive indicator of response to treatment with intravenously administered bisphosphonate. The DPS is simple to perform and is a useful adjunct to routine bone imaging. (orig.)

  19. Bone marrow transplantation in the prevention of intellectual disability due to inherited metabolic disease: ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhiala, P

    2009-07-01

    Many inherited metabolic diseases may lead to varying degrees of brain damage and thus also to intellectual disability. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been used for over two decades as a form of secondary prevention to stop or reverse the progress of the disease process in some of these conditions. At the population level the impact of BMT on the prevalence of intellectual disability is minute, but at the individual level its impact on the prognosis of the disease and the well-being of the patient can be substantial. The dark side of BMT use is the burden of side effects, complications and transplantation-related mortality in less successful cases. The ethical issues involved in this therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:19567689

  20. The importance of vitamin D in the pathology of bone metabolism in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Stawczyk-Eder, Kamila; Klimczak, Katarzyna; Linke, Krzysztof; Horst-Sikorska, Wanda

    2015-10-12

    Etiological factors of bone metabolism disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases have been the subject of interest of many researchers. One of the questions often raised is vitamin D deficiency. Calcitriol acts on cells, tissues and organs through a vitamin D receptor. The result of this action is the multi-directional effect of vitamin D. The reasons for vitamin D deficiency are: decreased exposure to sunlight, inadequate diet, inflammatory lesions of the intestinal mucosa and post-gastrointestinal resection states. This leads not only to osteomalacia but also to osteoporosis. Of significance may be the effect of vitamin D on the course of the disease itself, through modulation of the inflammatory mechanisms. It is also necessary to pay attention to the role of vitamin D in skeletal pathology in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and thus take measures aimed at preventing and treating these disorders through the supplementation of vitamin D. PMID:26528347

  1. Doença óssea em Mieloma Múltiplo Bone disease in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania T. M. Hungria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available As principais manifestações clínicas do mieloma múltiplo estão relacionadas à destruição óssea. Esta doença óssea pode levar a fraturas patológicas, compressão da medula espinhal, hipercalcemia e dor, sendo uma das principais causas de morbidade e mortalidade. Estas complicações resultam do desequilíbrio da reabsorção e formação óssea, decorrente do aumento da atividade osteoclástica. Este aumento é mediado pela liberação de fatores ativadores dos osteoclastos, que são produzidos no microambiente da medula óssea por células tumorais e não tumorais. Os bisfosfonatos são inibidores específicos da atividade osteoclástica e são eficazes no tratamento da hipercalcemia associada às neoplasias malignas e podem reduzir o aparecimento de complicações esqueléticas. Estudos recentes identificaram novas moléculas como o receptor de ativação nuclear kappa B (RANK, seu ligante (RANKL, osteoprotegerina (OPG, e a proteína inflamatória dos macrófagos-1alfa, que estão envolvidas na ativação e diferenciação dos osteoclastos, enquanto que a proteína dikkopf-1 inibe a formação óssea osteoblástica. Estas novas moléculas parecem não só interferir na biologia da destruição óssea do mieloma, mas também com a sobrevida e crescimento tumoral, sendo novos alvos para o desenvolvimento de drogas antimieloma. Estudos recentes com anticorpo monoclonal anti-RANKL são promissores. O tratamento da doença óssea do mieloma múltiplo inclui principalmente o uso de bisfosfonatos, radioterapia e procedimentos cirúrgicos.The major clinical manifestation of multiple myeloma is related to osteolytic bone destruction. Bone disease can lead to pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hypercalcemia, and pain, and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. These complications result from asynchronous bone turnover wherein increased osteoclastic bone resorption is not accompanied by a comparable increase in bone formation

  2. Premature hair greying may predict reduced bone mineral density in Graves' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leary, A C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Premature hair greying has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), and it may be more frequent in Graves\\' disease. AIMS: To determine whether premature greying is associated with reduced BMD in women with Graves\\' disease and in control women, and to examine whether premature greying is more common in Graves\\' disease. METHODS: Premature greying (> 50% grey by 40 years) and BMD were determined in 44 women with a history of Graves\\' disease and 133 female controls referred for routine BMD measurement. Exclusion criteria included diseases or drugs known to affect BMD. RESULTS: Mean Z and T scores at the lumbar spine were significantly lower (P < 0.04) in subjects with premature greying than in those not prematurely grey among women with Graves\\' disease, but not among control women. Multiple regression confirmed this difference between Graves\\' and control women (P = 0.041). There were no differences at other measurement sites. Of Graves\\' patients, 36% were prematurely grey compared with 25% of control women (P = 0.14). CONCLUSION: Premature greying may be a weak marker for reduced BMD in women with a history of Graves\\' disease, but it is not a marker in normal women.

  3. Computer tomography of the temporal bones in children with developmental anomalies of the external and middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer polypositional high-resolution tomography (CT)was provided to 45 children with dysplasia of the external acoustic meatus (EAM). The computed tomograms were analyzed in accordance with the scheme which included the evaluation of the following structures: atresia or stenosis area, pneumatized mastoid process, tympanic cavity, antrum, osteal opening of the Eustachian tube, chain of auditory ossicles, windows of the labyrinth, internal ear, facial nerve canal, and large vessels. Preoperative CT of the temporal bones allows for the evaluation of the above-listed structures, which is of paramount importance for the planning of the patient management policy. Also, CT enables the assessment of the risk of surgical intervention associated with a potential injury to the facial nerve, large vessels, and temporomandibular articulation. CT is to be an indispensable diagnostic modality for examination of children presenting with EAM dysplasia

  4. The Biomechanical Testing for the Assessment of Bone Quality in an Experimental Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Znorko, Beata; Michałowska, Małgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Mineral metabolism disturbances are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and have been classified as a new clinical entity, also known as CKD-mineral and bone disorders (CKD-MBD). A decrease in the bone strength, whose clinical manifestation is a tendency for fracture, has been recognized as an important component of CKD-MBD. Because of ethical issues, measurements of the bone strength in the human body are usually limited to noninvasive techniques, such as radiography, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and the assays of bone turnover biomarkers. However, it has been postulated recently that the evidence concerning bone strength based solely on the determination of the bone quantity may be insufficient and that bone quality should also be examined. In this regard, an animal model of CKD can represent an experimental tool to test the effectiveness of new therapeutic strategies. Despite the many available methods that are used to diagnose metabolic bone disorders and predict fracture risk especially in small rodents with CKD, it turns out that the most appropriate are biomechanical tests, which can provide information about the structural and material properties of bone. The present review summarizes and discusses the principles for carrying out selected biomechanical tests (3-point bending test and compression test) and their application in clinical practice. PMID:26680019

  5. Association of mineral composition of neonatal intravenous feeding solutions and metabolic bone disease of prematurity.

    OpenAIRE

    MacMahon, P; Blair, M E; Treweeke, P; Kovar, I Z

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of increasing the mineral content of parenteral nutrition solutions on the biochemical and radiological indicators of metabolic bone disease of prematurity 27 neonates who required parenteral nutrition were sequentially allocated to receive either a standard solution (group 1) or one with an increased mineral content (group 2). The 13 patients in group 1 received 0.68 mmol/kg/day of calcium and 0.61 mmol/kg/day of phosphorus, and the 14 in group 2 received 1.25 and 1.20 ...

  6. Genomic deletion of a long-range bone enhancer misregulatessclerostin in Van Buchem disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Kneissel, Michaela; Keller, Hansjoerg; Baptist, Myma; Chang, Jessie; Collette, Nicole M.; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-15

    Mutations in distant regulatory elements can negatively impact human development and health, yet due to the difficulty of detecting these critical sequences we predominantly focus on coding sequences for diagnostic purposes. We have undertaken a comparative sequence-based approach to characterize a large noncoding region deleted in patients affected by Van Buchem disease (VB), a severe sclerosing bone dysplasia. Using BAC recombination and transgenesis we characterized the expression of human sclerostin (sost) from normal (hSOSTwt) or Van Buchem(hSOSTvb D) alleles. Only the hSOSTwt allele faithfully expressed high levels of human sost in the adult bone and impacted bone metabolism, consistent with the model that the VB noncoding deletion removes a sost specific regulatory element. By exploiting cross-species sequence comparisons with in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays we were able to identify a candidate enhancer element that drives human sost expression in osteoblast-like cell lines in vitro and in the skeletal anlage of the E14.5 mouse embryo, and discovered a novel function for sclerostin during limb development. Our approach represents a framework for characterizing distant regulatory elements associated with abnormal human phenotypes.

  7. Early life environment and developmental immunotoxicity in inflammatory dysfunction and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leifer, Cynthia A.; Dietert, Rodney R.

    2011-01-01

    Components of the innate immune system such as macrophages and dendritic cells are instrumental in determining the fate of immune responses and are, also, among the most sensitive targets of early life environmental alterations including developmental immunotoxicity (DIT). DIT can impede innate immune cell maturation, disrupt tissue microenvironment, alter immune responses to infectious challenges, and disrupt regulatory responses. Dysregulation of inflammation, such as that observed with DIT...

  8. Developmental origins of adult diseases and neurotoxicity: Epidemiological and experimental studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Donald A; Grandjean, Philippe; de Groot, Didima;

    2012-01-01

    To date, only a small number of commercial chemicals have been tested and documented as developmental neurotoxicants. Moreover, an increasing number of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies suggest an association between toxicant or drug exposure during the perinatal period and the......, motivation and short-term memory in aged Rhesus monkeys following acute 24 h exposure to ketamine during early development. Overall, these presentations addressed fundamental issues in the emerging areas of lifetime neurotoxicity testing, differential vulnerable periods of exposure, nonmonotonic dose...

  9. Sex differences in the developmental origins of hypertension and cardiorenal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Nijland, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    The “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHAD) hypothesis derives from clinical observations, indicating long-term health consequences for persons of low birth weight. There is growing evidence, primarily from animal studies, that supports the idea that processes put in motion during development that contribute to DOHAD do not necessarily reflect as significantly compromised growth and altered birth weight. Throughout the body of work investigating the DOHAD hypothesis, several the...

  10. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  11. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  12. Role of labeled and free lanthides in the management of metastatic bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Different radiopharmaceuticals are being used for the management of metastatic bone diseases. This article relates the comparison of therapeutic beta emitter radionuclides of Lutetium-177, Samarium-153 and Holmium-166 complexes to bone seeking phosphonate ligand of ethylenediamine tetramethylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) with free chlorides of all these radionuclides. Objective: Objective of our study is to formulate and evaluate Lutetium-177, Holmium-166 and Samarium-153 labeled EDTMP and then compare the results of biodistribution free lanthides of these radionuclides. Materials and Methods: All the radionuclides were prepared by n, . reaction. Quality control was checked by paper chromatography and paper electrophoresis. Various parameters were optimized to formulate these radiopharmaceuticals with maximum labeling efficiency. Sprague-Dawley male rats were used for biodistribution and imaging study. Results: 177Lu-EDTMP showed that the complex can be prepared with radiochemical purity >96% at pH 7.5. The labeling efficiency of 153Sm-EDTMP was found to be > 98% at pH 7.5 incubated for 20 minutes at room temperature. 166Ho-EDTMP showed that the complex can be prepared with radiochemical purity >90% at pH 7.5. Among biodistribution study for all these radiopharmaceuticals, skeletal uptake was found to be maximum for 177Lu-EDTMP All the labelled radiopharmaceuticals showed good renal and rapid blood clearance. The biodistribution study of free radionuclides showed significant uptake of activity by soft tissues including lungs, liver and spleen, with minimal uptake in the skeletal system Conclusion: Therefore, it was concluded that labeled complexes of these lanthides can be used effectively in the therapy for bone pain palliation, due to the maximum affinity of skeletal system for the labeled complexes. However, chlorides of the lanthides cannot be used for bone pain palliation due to their poor skeletal localization and accumulation of radionuclides in the

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of bone marrow changes in Gaucher disease during enzyme replacement therapy: first German long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poll, L.W.; Koch, J.A.; Scherer, A.; Boerner, D.; Moedder, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Dahl, S. vom; Niederau, C.; Haeussinger, D. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet; Willers, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Rechenzentrum

    2001-09-01

    Objective:. Since 1991, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been available for patients with Gaucher disease in Germany. The aim of this study was to analyse the MR pattern of bone marrow involvement and response to ERT in Gaucher disease type I. Patients and design:. Thirty patients with Gaucher disease type I had MRI examinations prior to initiation of ERT with alglucerase/imiglucerase and during follow-up. Median MR follow-up and duration of ERT were 36 months. Coronal T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images of the lower extremities were obtained to evaluate changes in the appearance of yellow marrow. MR images were categorized as having either a homogeneous (type A) or non-homogeneous patchy (type B) appearance of bone involvement and response to ERT was assessed by two radiologists. Results:. Overall, 19 of 30 patients (63%) showed an increased signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images after 36 months of ERT, consistent with partial reconversion of fatty marrow during treatment. Focal bone lesions surrounded by a low signal intensity (SI) rim did not respond to ERT, suggesting bone infarcts. Of the 11 patients with bone infarcts (low SI rim lesion), 82% had the non-homogeneous type B pattern (P=0.0021). In 86% of patients with splenectomy, bone infarcts were seen (P<0.05). Conclusions:. MRI using T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences is a valuable, non-invasive method for monitoring bone marrow response in patients receiving ERT. A non- homogeneous patchy signal intensity of bone marrow involvement correlates with the presence of bone infarcts (P=0.0021). (orig.)

  14. Cardiovascular diseases in older patients with osteoporotic hip fracture: prevalence, disturbances in mineral and bone metabolism, and bidirectional links

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher A; Srikusalanukul W; Davis M; Smith P

    2013-01-01

    A Fisher,1,3 W Srikusalanukul,1 M Davis,1,3 P Smith2,31Departments of Geriatric Medicine, 2Orthopaedic Surgery, The Canberra Hospital, 3Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaBackground: Considerable controversy exists regarding the contribution of mineral/bone metabolism abnormalities to the association between cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and osteoporotic fractures.Aims and methods: To determine the relationships between mineral/bone metabolism biomarkers a...

  15. Patterns of bone diseases in transfusion-dependent homozygous thalassaemia major: predominance of osteoporosis and desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the radiographic skeletal changes in transfusion-dependent homozygous β-thalassaemia. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective review of radiographs of 41 homozygous β-thalassaemic patients over 3 years. These included 55 left hand radiographs for bone age, 37 chest radiographs, 7 scanograms of lower limbs, 8 knee radiographs and 3 skull radiographs. The radiographs were evaluated for the skeletal changes owing to medullary expansion, as well as for the skeletal dysplasia related to desferrioxamine therapy. The combined cortical width of the mid shaft of the second metacarpal was measured on left hand radiographs to assess osteoporosis. Results: Sixteen patients had radiographic evidence of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia. These included metaphyseal sclerosis in long bone (n=16), irregular sclerosis at the costochondral junction (n=3) and platyspondyly (n= 1). Two patients had radiographic evidence of medullary expansion with widening of medulla and marked thinning of cortex in the tubular bones. Osteoporosis, as indicated by thinning of metacarpal cortex, was noted in 17 patients (8 with and 9 without desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia). Conclusions: With provision of the modern regime of regular transfusion and desferrioxamine chelation, desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia was a much more frequently detected radiographic abnormality in β-thalassaemia major than radiographic features owing to medullary expansion. Osteoporosis, as indicated by thinned metacarpal cortices, remained a frequent feature irrespective of the status of the skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  16. Patterns of bone diseases in transfusion-dependent homozygous thalassaemia major: predominance of osteoporosis and desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yu-Leung; Pang, Lai-Man [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin (Hong Kong); Chik, Ki-Wai; Li, Chi-Kong [Department of Paediatrics, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Cheng, Jack C.Y. [Department Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2002-07-01

    Objective: To study the radiographic skeletal changes in transfusion-dependent homozygous {beta}-thalassaemia. Materials and methods: This was a retrospective review of radiographs of 41 homozygous {beta}-thalassaemic patients over 3 years. These included 55 left hand radiographs for bone age, 37 chest radiographs, 7 scanograms of lower limbs, 8 knee radiographs and 3 skull radiographs. The radiographs were evaluated for the skeletal changes owing to medullary expansion, as well as for the skeletal dysplasia related to desferrioxamine therapy. The combined cortical width of the mid shaft of the second metacarpal was measured on left hand radiographs to assess osteoporosis. Results: Sixteen patients had radiographic evidence of desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia. These included metaphyseal sclerosis in long bone (n=16), irregular sclerosis at the costochondral junction (n=3) and platyspondyly (n= 1). Two patients had radiographic evidence of medullary expansion with widening of medulla and marked thinning of cortex in the tubular bones. Osteoporosis, as indicated by thinning of metacarpal cortex, was noted in 17 patients (8 with and 9 without desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia). Conclusions: With provision of the modern regime of regular transfusion and desferrioxamine chelation, desferrioxamine-induced bone dysplasia was a much more frequently detected radiographic abnormality in {beta}-thalassaemia major than radiographic features owing to medullary expansion. Osteoporosis, as indicated by thinned metacarpal cortices, remained a frequent feature irrespective of the status of the skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  17. Expression and significance of IL-18 in the bone marrow of patients with hema tological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张斌; 饶青; 郑国光; 曹震宇; 马小彤; 李戈; 林永敏; 耿以琪; 吴克复

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the levels of IL-18 in the bone marrow of both normal subjects a nd patients with hematological diseases and to determine the possible significan ce of IL-18 in pathogenesis of some hematological malignancies. Methods The IL-18 mRNA levels in the bone marrow of 140 patients with hematological dis eases and 15 normal donors were determined by the semi-quantitative reverse tra nscriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemical method was used to detect IL-18 protein in 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The possible regulation of IL-18 for proliferation of some leukemia cells was investigated using antisense techniques.Results IL-18 mRNA levels were obviously higher in the patients with leukemia or other malignant hematological diseases (OMHD) than in normal donors. However, no sign ificant difference was found in the level of transcription between patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and normal controls. Immunohistochemical method c onfirmed the presence of IL-18 protein in 10 out of 12 AML cases with positive transcription. By 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium b romide (MTT) assay, IL-18 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASON) clearly inhibi ted the growth of J6-1 and HL-60 cells (42% and 12% inhibited, respectively) i n a dose-dependant manner.Conclusions IL-18 was detected at elevated levels in the bone marrow of patients with some hematological malignancies, and might be involved in the proliferation of certai n leukemic cells in vivo through an autocrine mechanism.

  18. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphism disease activity and bone mineral metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether interleukin-1α and 1β gene polymorphism is associated with rheumatoid arthritis disease activity and bone mineral metabolism, and whether there is any relationship between IL-1β and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) motif gene. Methods IL-1 gene polymorphisms were analyzed in 65 RA patients who met American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria and 60 controls. From genomic DNA, 2 polymorphisms in each gene for IL1α-889 and IL-1β+3953 were typed by PCR-RFLP and HLA-DRB1 allele typing was also undertaken by PCR-SSOP. Some clinical and laboratory parameters were collected. The allelic frequencies and carriage rates were compared between RA patients and controls and between patients with active and quiescent disease. Comparison was also made between IL-1 polymorphism and parameters of bone mineral metabolism and between patients with the HLA-DRB1 RA motif plus IL-1β2 and patients without the two alleles. Fisher test and the analysis of variance was used to analyze the data.Results There was no significant difference in the frequency and carriage rate of IL-1α polymorphisms between RA patients and the controls. The β2/2 genotype of IL-1β was more common in female RA patients compared with controls (P=0.001). A lower carriage rate of IL-1β2 occurred in male RA patients (P=0.001). A higher carriage rate of IL-1α2 is associated with a higher ESR (P=0.008), HAQ score (P=0.03), and vit-D3 (P<0.001), but conversely a lower SJC (p=0.002), a lower RF (P=0.002) and a lower BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.001). A higher frequency of IL-1α1 is associated with a lower CRP value (P=0.009). An increased IL-1β2 carriage is associated with active rheumatoid disease as indicated by a higher CRP (P<0.001), ESR (P<0.001) and pain score (P=0.001) and a higher BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.007), lower vit-D3 and. Udpd/Crea level The presence of the HLA DRB1 RA motif and IL-1β allele 2 at same time did not contribute to disease activity

  19. Diseases of the petrous bone - demands made on radiodiagnostics from an otosurgical viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims at explaining by means of case reports the specific otosurgical problems in typical diseases of the otobase and at presenting the ranking of the individual imaging methods from the surgeon's point of view. For example, special features in the preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumours, acoustic neurinomas. Meniere's disease, cholesteatomas and so-called petrous bone tip processes are pointed out. A special aspect of radiological and surgical collaboration is seen in highly vascularised tumours of the otobase in respect of the possibilities offered by interventional angiography. The importance of MR-tomography in preoperative diagnostics is assessed with some reservation because this does not show up surgically relevant landmarks. (orig./MG)

  20. Caloric test results in Paget ́s disease of bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De la Fuente-Cañibano R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Paget's disease, the most common neurological complication relates to the temporal bone involvement intrapetrous level. Vestibular symptoms are common in Paget's disease, but you can pass easily overlooked for its mild intensity. The literature is not clear regarding the result of caloric testing.Methods: The study comprised 50 patient s, 30 patients with PD without skull involvement, 13 patients with skull involvement and without temporal involvement and 7 patients with PD with skull and temporal involvement in scintigraphy. Results: 22% of patient s in the sample had history crises dizzying and yet 46% had deficits in vestibular caloric test result.Conclusions: We found no statistically significant differences between the groups in the analysis of EP vestibular deficit.

  1. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjur Reppe

    Full Text Available Bone Mineral Density (BMD is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity.

  2. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Its Regulation of Cartilage and Bone Development, and Role in Treating Bone Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T John

    2016-07-01

    Although parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) was discovered as a cancer-derived hormone, it has been revealed as an important paracrine/autocrine regulator in many tissues, where its effects are context dependent. Thus its location and action in the vasculature explained decades-long observations that injection of PTH into animals rapidly lowered blood pressure by producing vasodilatation. Its roles have been specified in development and maturity in cartilage and bone as a crucial regulator of endochondral bone formation and bone remodeling, respectively. Although it shares actions with parathyroid hormone (PTH) through the use of their common receptor, PTHR1, PTHrP has other actions mediated by regions within the molecule beyond the amino-terminal sequence that resembles PTH, including the ability to promote placental transfer of calcium from mother to fetus. A striking feature of the physiology of PTHrP is that it possesses structural features that equip it to be transported in and out of the nucleus, and makes use of a specific nuclear import mechanism to do so. Evidence from mouse genetic experiments shows that PTHrP generated locally in bone is essential for normal bone remodeling. Whereas the main physiological function of PTH is the hormonal regulation of calcium metabolism, locally generated PTHrP is the important physiological mediator of bone remodeling postnatally. Thus the use of intermittent injection of PTH as an anabolic therapy for bone appears to be a pharmacological application of the physiological function of PTHrP. There is much current interest in the possibility of developing PTHrP analogs that might enhance the therapeutic anabolic effects. PMID:27142453

  3. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves’ Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves’ disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves’ disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves’ disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group,...

  4. Negative correlation between bone mineral density and TSH receptor antibodies in long-term euthyroid postmenopausal women with treated Graves’ disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ercolano, Monica A; Drnovsek, Monica L; Croome, Maria C; Moos, Monica; Fuentes, Ana M; Viale, Fanny; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Gauna, Alicia T

    2013-01-01

    receptor and TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) may have an important role in bone turn-over.The aim of our study was to determine, in pre and postmenopausal euthyroidism patients with previous overt hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease the bone mineral density (BMD) as well as factors that could affect BMD......Thyrotoxicosis is a cause of secondary osteoporosis. High concentrations of triiodotironine (T3) in Graves' disease stimulate bone turnover, but it is unclear if euthyroidism will always normalize bone metabolism. Thyrotropin (TSH) is known to affect directly the bone metabolism through the TSH...

  5. The clinical research of bone scan characterized by hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy in patients with pulmonary diseases or metastatic lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The retrospective study consists of: (1) 703 patients with various pulmonary diseases were followed-up after initial bone scanning . The original hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPO) incidence and the HPO disappearing after clinical treatment, as well as different diagnostic features between bone scan and X-rays, were compared with each other. (2) 36 patients with various metastatic lung cancers were followed-up as to investigate the HPO incidence in each kind of pulmonary diseases and its relationship to the therapeutic efficacy of the pulmonary disease. Methods: The whole-body bone scanning, enhanced by regional plane imaging over the legs, was done for each patient with 99Tcm-MDP. Results: (1) The HPO incidence among the 703 patients with various pulmonary diseases was 7.4%, whereas 7.6% in patients with various lung cancers. (2) HPO disappeared in 31 of total 41 patients with lung cancers after operation or chemotherapy. (3) The HPO incidence in the patients with lung metastases from thyroid cancer or bone cancer was 0%. But there were 3 out of 4 cases of nasopharyngeal cancer were found with HPO, i.e. the rate was high up to 75%. Conclusions: The author generally compared the domestic and foreign reports about HPO incidences on bone scan imaging in patients with various pulmonary diseases. The study indicates, based on its clinical evidences, that: (1) The presence of HPO may predict the lung involvement of the disease process. (2) The HPO incidence in patients with nasopharyngeal cancers reached 75%. Thus if HPO sign is found at the bone scanning on the patients with the diagnosis of nasopharyngeal cancer, it may well indicate lung metastasis involvement

  6. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Brad A.; McNulty, Margaret A.; Martin, Matthew J.; McCracken, Michael K.; Christofferson, Rebecca C.; Mores, Christopher N.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains. PMID:27182740

  7. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Brad A; McNulty, Margaret A; Martin, Matthew J; McCracken, Michael K; Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice) to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91%) and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI). Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%), periosteal necrosis (66%), and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%). Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains. PMID:27182740

  8. Novel Lesions of Bones and Joints Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection in Two Mouse Models of Disease: New Insights into Disease Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad A Goupil

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus is an arbovirus spread predominantly by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, and causes debilitating arthralgia and arthritis. While these are common manifestations during acute infection and it has been suggested they can recur in patients chronically, gaps in knowledge regarding the pathogenesis still exist. Two established mouse models were utilized (adult IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice to evaluate disease manifestations in bones and joints at various timepoints. Novel lesions in C57BL/6J mice consisted of periostitis (91% and foci of cartilage of necrosis (50% of mice at 21 DPI. Additionally, at 21 DPI, 50% and 75% of mice exhibited periosteal bone proliferation affecting the metatarsal bones, apparent via histology and μCT, respectively. μCT analysis did not reveal any alterations in trabecular bone volume measurements in C57BL/6J mice. Novel lesions demonstrated in IRF 3/7 -/- -/- mice at 5 DPI included focal regions of cartilage necrosis (20%, periosteal necrosis (66%, and multifocal ischemic bone marrow necrosis (100%. Contralateral feet in 100% of mice of both strains had similar, though milder lesions. Additionally, comparison of control IRF 3/7 -/- -/- and wild-type C57BL/6J mice demonstrated differences in cortical bone. These experiments demonstrate novel manifestations of disease similar to those occurring in humans, adding insight into disease pathogenesis, and representing new potential targets for therapeutic interventions. Additionally, results demonstrate the utility of μCT in studies of bone and joint pathology and illustrate differences in bone dynamics between mouse strains.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 23 contributes to diminished bone mineral density in childhood inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hodhod Mostafa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diminished bone mineral density (BMD is of significant concern in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Exact etiology is debatable. The recognition of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23, a phosphaturic hormone related to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α makes it plausible to hypothesize its possible relation to this pathology. Methods In this follow up case control study, BMD as well as serum levels of FGF23, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy vitamin D3 and 1, 25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 were measured in 47 children with IBD during flare and reassessed in the next remission. Results Low BMD was frequent during IBD flare (87.2% with significant improvement after remission (44.7%. During disease flare, only 21.3% of patients had vitamin D deficiency, which was severe in 12.8%. During remission, all patients had normal vitamin D except for two patients with Crohn’s disease (CD who remained vitamin D deficient. Mean value of serum FGF23 was significantly higher among patients with IBD during flare compared to controls. It showed significant improvement during remission but not to the control values. 1, 25 dihydroxy vitamin D3, FGF23, serum calcium and urinary phosphorus were significant determinants of BMD in IBD patients. Conclusions We can conclude that diminished BMD in childhood IBD is a common multifactorial problem. Elevated FGF23 would be a novel addition to the list of factors affecting bone mineral density in this context. Further molecular studies are warranted to display the exact interplay of these factors.

  10. Negative correlation between bone mineral density and TSH receptor antibodies in long-term euthyroid postmenopausal women with treated Graves’ disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ercolano, Monica A; Drnovsek, Monica L; Silva Croome, Maria C; Moos, Monica; Fuentes, Ana M; Viale, Fanny; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Gauna, Alicia T

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyrotoxicosis is a cause of secondary osteoporosis. High concentrations of triiodotironine (T3) in Graves’ disease stimulate bone turnover, but it is unclear if euthyroidism will always normalize bone metabolism. Thyrotropin (TSH) is known to affect directly the bone metabolism through the TSH receptor and TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) may have an important role in bone turn-over. The aim of our study was to determine, in pre and postmenopausal euthyroidism patients with previous...

  11. Correlation between bone imaging and the clinical picture in two unsuspected cases of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addabbo, A; Macarini, L; Rubini, G; Rubini, D; Salzillo, F; Lauriero, F

    1993-04-01

    Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia was incidentally discovered in two patients referred for Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy (one for intense sciatica, the other for the detection of breast cancer metastases). Tracer accumulation in the diaphyses of the lower limbs and the base of the skull was accompanied by bone thickening and patency of the medullary cavity, as demonstrated by radiography, MRI, and bone marrow scanning. Comparison of the clinical pictures with the results of instrumental examinations showed that these were cases of sporadic progressive diaphyseal dysplasia of slight and average gravity, respectively. The differentiation of Ribbing's disease is explained and reference also is made to a finding not mentioned in the literature, namely frontal bone resorption lacunules in one patient. PMID:8482029

  12. Assessing the public health impact of developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Maria Luisa; Corvalan, Camila; Uauy, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Investing in the maternal and early-infancy periods (the first 1,000 days, i.e. from -1 to +2 years) is presently acknowledged as a key priority to ensure good nutrition and prevent all forms of malnutrition. The concept is to invest during this period to maximize the human development potential, and the early-life agenda includes prevention of stunting and promotion of optimal brain development as well as ensuring the quality of life of those who survive. Thus, public health assessments of specific interventions need to go beyond the traditional indices of prevention of death and disease. We need to consider including a full range of outcomes such as disability-adjusted life years (DALY) and quality-adjusted life years (QALY) and not only the number of deaths. The long-term outcomes of maternal and infant interventions to prevent obesity and related noncommunicable diseases remain uncertain in terms of their biological impact even under ideal conditions (efficacy); we need interventions with proven effectiveness under real-world conditions (effectiveness). Conversely, interventions to prevent undernutrition have already been proven effective and are considered cost-effective based on rigorous economic analyses. Continuous evaluation of interventions implemented using the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) model needs to be undertaken, as this will allow progressive improvement and thus maximize the potential impact on the health and well-being of populations. We need to consider the population-attributable risk of obesity and chronic disease and conduct an economic evaluation of the lifelong impact of chronic diseases not only in terms of lives lost but also in relation to lost DALY and QALY. This should help to prioritize preventive actions in line with patterns of disease and disability considering the existing resources and demands. PMID:25300264

  13. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Lebouvier

    2015-11-01

    SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  14. What Role Do Epigenetics and Developmental Epigenetics Play in Health and Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are affected? What causes it? Does it cause cancer? Does it offer a cure for some diseases? What are the treatments? Other ... are affected? What causes it? Does it cause cancer? Does it offer a cure for some diseases? What are the treatments? Other ...

  15. A closer look at the developmental interplay between parenting and perceived health in adolescents with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassart, Jessica; Luyckx, Koen; Goossens, Eva; Apers, Silke; Moons, Philip

    2014-12-01

    The present study examined associations between parenting and perceived health in adolescents with congenital heart disease (CHD) using a longitudinal trajectory approach. Adolescents with CHD were selected from the database of pediatric and congenital cardiology of the University Hospitals Leuven. A total of 429 adolescents (M age = 16 at T1) participated in the present study, comprising four measurement waves spanning approximately 3 years. Latent class growth analysis was used to identify trajectory classes of parenting and perceived health. Whereas adolescents from democratic households reported the most favorable health outcomes, adolescents from authoritarian, overprotective, and psychologically controlling families (all characterized by relatively high levels of psychological control) showed an increased risk for poor perceived health over time. Hence, the present study found substantial developmental associations between parenting and perceived health in adolescents with CHD. Future research should investigate whether working on the parent-adolescent relationship can foster patients' health. PMID:24819301

  16. Object analysis of bone marrow MR imaging using double echo STIR sequence in hematological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Hitomi [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    The bone marrow of 84 patients with hematological disorders was investigated using short inversion time inversion recovery sequence (STIR) on an 1.5 Tesla superconducting MRI system. Double echo times of 20 and 100 msec were applied to research the signal characteristics of the lesion and carry out quantitative analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC). The hematological diseases included 19 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 18 of multiple myeloma (MM), 18 of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML), 9 of aplastic anemia (AA), 8 of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), 3 of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 3 of myelofibrosis, and 3 others. Using STIR with double echo times, bone marrow showed high signal intensity (SI) on short TE and low SI on long TE in MDS and CML; high SI on short and long TE in myelofibrosis and CLL; high SI on short TE and high to moderately high SI on long TE in MM; and low SI on short and long TE in AA. Quantitative analysis of 33 patients showed high sensitivity and specificity in AA (81% and 94%, respectively) and moderate sensitivity and high specificity in MM (61%, 88%). CML and MDS were similar with low sensitivities (40%, 41%) and high specificities (80%, 78%). Differential diagnosis between CML and MDS was difficult using STIR with the double echo time method. (author).

  17. Combined scintigraphic and radiographic diagnosis of bone and joint diseases. Including gamma correction interpretation. 4. rev. and enl. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong-Whee [Sung Ae General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology

    2013-07-01

    In this fourth edition of Combined Scintigraphic and Radiographic Diagnosis of Bone and Joint Diseases, the text has been thoroughly amended, updated, and partially rearranged to reflect the latest advances. In addition to discussing the role of pinhole imaging in the range of disorders previously covered, the new edition pays detailed attention to the novel diagnostic use of gamma correction pinhole bone scan in a broad spectrum of skeletal disorders, including physical, traumatic, and sports injuries, infectious and non-infectious bone diseases, benign and malignant bone tumors, and soft tissue diseases. A large number of state of the art pinhole scans and corroborative CT, MRI, and/or ultrasound images are presented side by side. The book has been enlarged to encompass various new topics, including occult fractures; cervical sprain and whiplash trauma; bone marrow edema; microfractures of trabeculae; evident, gaping, and stress fractures; and differential diagnosis. This new edition will be essential reading for practitioners and researchers in not only nuclear medicine but also radiology, orthopedic surgery, and pathology.

  18. Comparison of two methods for alveolar bone loss measurement in an experimental periodontal disease model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Nique Liberman

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available There are many studies that evaluate possible risk factors for periodontal diseases in animals. Most of them have focused only on the biological aspects of disease occurrence; therefore, it has been difficult to compare studies of the different methodological approaches. The aim of the present study was to compare different methods - linear and area - of the evaluation of morphometrical alveolar bone loss. Sixty hemimaxillae, defleshed and stained with 1% methylene blue to delineate the cementoenamel junction and alveolar bone crest, were obtained from a previous study that induced periodontal disease by means of ligatures in two groups of fifteen Wistar rats during 9 weeks. Ligatures were placed around the right upper second molars, and the contra-lateral teeth remained as intra-group controls. Digital photographs were taken from the specimens and submitted to a single, calibrated, blind examiner who performed the morphometrical evaluation of alveolar bone loss using both linear and area methods. Mean values of linear and area measurements were obtained from each side - buccal and palatal - of the specimens. The degree of association between the two methods was determined by Pearson's Correlation Coefficient. An almost perfect association (0.98 was determined between the linear and area evaluations. A mathematical formula was subsequently created to estimate the total area of alveolar bone loss, from linear mean measurements. Both methods were suitable for detecting bone level alterations. The results of the present study allow for the transformation of data and better compilation of results from different studies.

  19. CT Features of Bone Flare Phenomena of Metastatic Bone Disease in Lung Cancer%肺癌骨转移骨闪烁现象的CT表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱艳芳; 文智; 许晓燕; 王永丽; 于莹莹; 赵艳萍

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThe bone flare phenomena has been well described on bone scintigraphy for efficacy monitoring up to now, but our knowledge has been rarely described on MSCT, the phenomena may be erroneously classiifed as disease progression. This article intends to evaluate the existence and CT features of bone flare phenomena of metastatic bone disease in lung cancer patients treated with ibandronate, to raise awareness of this phenomenon.Materials and Methods The clinical and image data of 45 patients with bone metastases of lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed prior to treatment and 3, 6 months after treatment, the change of CT value and CT features 3 months after treatment between bone flare phenomena group, progressive disease group 1 and progressive disease group 2 were compared.Results The incidence of bone flare phenomena was 6.7% (3/45). 3 months after treatment, CT value of the bone flare phenomena group and progressive disease group 1 changed when compared with before treatment, the differences were statistically signiifcant (t=-5.787 and-2.788,P0.05) of CT value in the progressive disease group 2 after 3 months' treatment. After 3 months' treatment, the bone flare phenomena group mostly appeared as osteogenic sclerosis of osteolytic lesions, while the cases of progressive disease group mostly appeared as new periosteal reaction of the lesion, or osteogenic/mixed lesion combined with osteolytic damages, the difference between the two groups was statistically signiifcant (χ2=10.139, 8.041 and 4.154,P0.05).Conclusion In patients treated with ibandronate, when there is therapeutic effect evaluation standard of bone metastases (disease progression) and clinical comprehensive curative effect evaluation standard (effective) discordance at 3 months after treatment, it can be interpreted as bone flare phenomena, and the change of CT features contributes to the differential diagnosis of bone flare phenomena with progressive disease.%目的:骨闪烁现象在核

  20. Bone marrow derived stem cells for the treatment of end-stage liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margini, Cristina; Vukotic, Ranka; Brodosi, Lucia; Bernardi, Mauro; Andreone, Pietro

    2014-07-21

    End-stage disease due to liver cirrhosis is an important cause of death worldwide. Cirrhosis results from progressive, extensive fibrosis and impaired hepatocyte regeneration. The only curative treatment is liver transplantation, but due to the several limitations of this procedure, the interest in alternative therapeutic strategies is increasing. In particular, the potential of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) therapy in cirrhosis has been explored in different trials. In this article, we evaluate the results of 18 prospective clinical trials, and we provide a descriptive overview of recent advances in the research on hepatic regenerative medicine. The main message from the currently available data in the literature is that BMSC therapy is extremely promising in the context of liver cirrhosis. However, its application should be further explored in randomized, controlled trials with large cohorts and long follow-ups. PMID:25083082

  1. Targeting the molecular and cellular interactions of the bone marrow niche in immunologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozowski, Jaime M; Billard, Matthew J; Tarrant, Teresa K

    2014-02-01

    Recent investigations have expanded our knowledge of the regulatory bone marrow (BM) niche, which is critical in maintaining and directing hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation. Osteoblasts, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells are niche components in close association with HSCs and have been more clearly defined in immune cell function and homeostasis. Importantly, cellular inhabitants of the BM niche signal through G protein-coupled surface receptors (GPCRs) for various appropriate immune functions. In this article, recent literature on BM niche inhabitants (HSCs, osteoblasts, MSCs, CAR cells) and their GPCR mechanistic interactions are reviewed for better understanding of the BM cells involved in immune development, immunologic disease, and current immune reconstitution therapies. PMID:24408534

  2. Chronic sole ulcerations associated with degenerative bone disease in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luikart, Kimberly A; Stover, Susan M

    2005-12-01

    Chronic foot lesions and degenerative joint disease are common causes of morbidity in elephants. Lesions may become intractable and progressive despite intensive treatment regimens. The forelimbs of two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) with chronic nonhealing sole ulcerations were examined using manual dissection and computed tomography. Both elephants had abnormal limb conformation that preceded the development of sole ulcerations. In both cases, sole ulcers were associated with remodeling and degeneration of underlying bones of the digits. Conformational abnormalities and altered weight distribution in these individuals may have induced compensatory bony degeneration and secondary ulcer formation. Sole ulcerations associated with digital abnormalities may have a guarded prognosis for resolution, even with aggressive treatment. Because limb conformational abnormalities could predispose to or result from chronic digital lesions, elephants with conformational abnormalities may have increased likelihood of having chronic sole ulcerations. PMID:17312727

  3. Osteoblast CFTR inactivation reduces differentiation and osteoprotegerin expression in a mouse model of cystic fibrosis-related bone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Stalvey

    Full Text Available Low bone mass and increased fracture risk are recognized complications of cystic fibrosis (CF. CF-related bone disease (CFBD is characterized by uncoupled bone turnover--impaired osteoblastic bone formation and enhanced osteoclastic bone resorption. Intestinal malabsorption, vitamin D deficiency and inflammatory cytokines contribute to CFBD. However, epidemiological investigations and animal models also support a direct causal link between inactivation of skeletal cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR, the gene that when mutated causes CF, and CFBD. The objective of this study was to examine the direct actions of CFTR on bone. Expression analyses revealed that CFTR mRNA and protein were expressed in murine osteoblasts, but not in osteoclasts. Functional studies were then performed to investigate the direct actions of CFTR on osteoblasts using a CFTR knockout (Cftr-/- mouse model. In the murine calvarial organ culture assay, Cftr-/- calvariae displayed significantly less bone formation and osteoblast numbers than calvariae harvested from wildtype (Cftr+/+ littermates. CFTR inactivation also reduced alkaline phosphatase expression in cultured murine calvarial osteoblasts. Although CFTR was not expressed in murine osteoclasts, significantly more osteoclasts formed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ bone marrow cultures. Indirect regulation of osteoclastogenesis by the osteoblast through RANK/RANKL/OPG signaling was next examined. Although no difference in receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (Rankl mRNA was detected, significantly less osteoprotegerin (Opg was expressed in Cftr-/- compared to Cftr+/+ osteoblasts. Together, the Rankl:Opg ratio was significantly higher in Cftr-/- murine calvarial osteoblasts contributing to a higher osteoclastogenesis potential. The combined findings of reduced osteoblast differentiation and lower Opg expression suggested a possible defect in canonical Wnt signaling. In fact, Wnt3a and PTH-stimulated canonical Wnt

  4. Genetic and Developmental Perspective of Language Abnormality in Autism and Schizophrenia: One Disease Occurring at Different Ages in Humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoran George; Jeffries, Joseph Joel; Wang, Tianren Frank

    2016-04-01

    Language and communication through it are two of the defining features of normally developed human beings. However, both these functions are often impaired in autism and schizophrenia. In the former disorder, the problem usually emerges in early childhood (~2 years old) and typically includes a lack of communication. In the latter condition, the language problems usually occur in adolescence and adulthood and presents as disorganized speech. What are the fundamental mechanisms underlying these two disorders? Is there a shared genetic basis? Are the traditional beliefs about them true? Are there any common strategies for their prevention and management? To answer these questions, we searched PubMed by using autism, schizophrenia, gene, and language abnormality as keywords, and we reconsidered the basic concepts about these two diseases or syndromes. We found many functional genes, for example, FOXP2, COMT, GABRB3, and DISC1, are actually implicated in both of them. After observing the symptoms, genetic correlates, and temporal progression of these two disorders as well as their relationships more carefully, we now infer that the occurrence of these two diseases is likely developmentally regulated via interaction between the genome and the environment. Furthermore, we propose a unified view of autism and schizophrenia: a single age-dependently occurred disease that is newly named as Systemic Integral Disorder: if occurring in children before age 2, it is called autism; if in adolescence or a later age, it is called schizophrenia. PMID:25686622

  5. Genetic polymorphisms of EPHX1, Gsk3β, TNFSF8 and myeloma cell DKK-1 expression linked to bone disease in myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Durie, BGM; Van Ness, B; Ramos, C.; Stephens, O; Haznadar, M; Hoering, A; Haessler, J; Katz, MS; Mundy, GR; Kyle, RA; Morgan, Gj; Crowley, J.; Barlogie, B.; Shaughnessy, J

    2009-01-01

    Bone disease in myeloma occurs as a result of complex interactions between myeloma cells and the bone marrow microenvironment. A custom-built DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip containing 3404 SNPs was used to test genomic DNA from myeloma patients classified by the extent of bone disease. Correlations identified with a Total Therapy 2 (TT2) (Arkansas) data set were validated with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) and Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) data sets. Univariate co...

  6. Potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in management of Alzheimer's disease in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Hanaa H; Atta, Hazem M; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Aglan, Hadeer A

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been called the disease of the century with significant clinical and socioeconomic impacts. Pharmacological treatment has limited efficacy and only provides symptomatic relief without long-term cure. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to develop novel and effective medications for AD. Stem cell-based therapy is a promising approach to handling neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore the possible therapeutic role of single intravenous injection of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) after 4 months in management of AD in the experimental model. The work also extended to compare the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs with 2 conventional therapies of AD; rivastigmine and cerebrolysin administered daily. BM-MSCs were able to home at the injured brains and produced significant increases in the number of positive cells for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and survivin expression, as well as selective AD indicator-1 (seladin-1) and nestin gene expression. Histopathological examination indicated that BM-MSCs could remove beta-amyloid plaques from hippocampus. Significant improvement in these biomarkers was similar to or better sometimes than the reference drugs, clearly showing the potential therapeutic role of BM-MSCs against AD through their anti-apoptotic, neurogenic and immunomodulatory properties. PMID:25044885

  7. Bone scintigraphy as cornerstone in the diagnosis of Erdheim-Chester disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, F J; Cambil-Molina, T; Ríos-Martín, J J; de la Riva-Pérez, P A; Calvo-Morón, C; Castro-Montaño, J

    2016-01-01

    The Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an extremely rare form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis. The main difficulty for its diagnosis lies in the wide variety of non-specific symptoms and signs that can occur in the disease process, leading, therefore, to there being no clear-cut algorithm as a guide for an optimal biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. An 81-year-old male with history of diabetes insipidus was admitted due to non-specific respiratory signs. Imaging techniques revealed osteoblastic lesions in the lumbar spine. Whole-body bone-scintigraphy (BS) was performed, in which lesions involving the axial and appendicular skeleton, with different rates of osteoblastic activity, were observed. This highlighted a symmetrical severely intense uptake in the knees, leading to an accurate biopsy specimen that enabled making the definitive diagnosis. BS is a widely available, safe, and inexpensive technique that shows a characteristic pattern of uptake for ECD, thus its use is highly recommended for screening and guiding biopsy if clinical suspicion exists. Furthermore, when the scintigraphy pattern is incidentally observed, biopsy of increased uptake areas (tibia preferably) is mandatory in order to rule out the disease. PMID:26750553

  8. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman disease of the bone treated with surgery and radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitesh N. Paryani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD is a rare, benign histiocyte disorder originally described by Rosai and Dorfman in 1969 as sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy. It most typically presents as massive, painless cervical lymphadenopathy, and it is most often found in adolescents and young adults. Extranodal involvement is a common feature of RDD and may occur in more than 40% of patients. Less commonly, the disease can be seen in the bone. There are scattered case reports discussing the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of RDD. Here, we present a case of extranodal RDD of the femur in a 49-year-old African American female. The patient underwent three surgical procedures prior to undergoing radiotherapy. Pathology was consistent with extranodal RDD. The cells stained positive for CD68 and S-100. Pathognomonic features such as emperipolesis and replacement of the bone marrow by diffuse infiltrating of histiocytes and intervening bands of plasma cells proliferation were noted. Prior to radiotherapy, the patient required a walker to assist with ambulation and was utilizing a wheelchair while in the clinic. The decision was made to proceed with 30 Gy of external beam radiotherapy in 15 fractions. After five fractions, the patient’s pain resolved entirely. She no longer required pain medication and was ambulating without assistance. She experienced no adverse events from the radiation. Extranodal RDD is a rare disorder, and evidence for treatment is derived from scattered case reports. Previous reports have indicated a dose response to radiotherapy in the 20-30 Gy range for RDD; however, our patient developed complete resolution of her symptoms after 10 Gy. While the optimal dose regimen has not yet been established, symptomatic patients appear to benefit from external beam radiotherapy for extranodal RDD.

  9. UNREMITTING EARLY STAGE HODGKIN’S DISEASE: REPORT OF 7 CASES AND BONE MARROW TISSUE IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL MARKER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tamiolakis

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow is infrequently implicated in early stages of Hodgkin’s disease. We studied the immunohistochemical bone marrow tissue of 7 out of 20 cases with early stage Hodgkin’s disease of the mixed cellularity variant, diagnosed by lymph node biopsy at initial presentation, not responding to radiotherapy alone, in order to examine possible marrow attack. A statistically significant prevalence of CD45, CD45RO, and CD4 positive infiltrates, to the advantage of unremitting hosts, was found. The predominance of CD4-positive cells in the bone marrow space might be suggestive of involvement in the process and could explain the abnormal cytokine production leading to reduced T-cell immunity and inefficient antitumor response despite the existence of a vast majority of reactive infiltrating immune cells.

  10. Regulation of Sclerostin Expression in Multiple Myeloma by Dkk-1: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy for Myeloma Bone Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Homare; Santo, Loredana; Wein, Marc N; Hu, Dorothy Z; Cirstea, Diana D; Nemani, Neeharika; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Raines, Sarah E; Kuhstoss, Stuart Allen; Munshi, Nikhil C; Kronenberg, Henry M; Raje, Noopur S

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is a potent inhibitor of osteoblastogenesis. Interestingly, newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) patients have high levels of circulating sclerostin that correlate with disease stage and fractures. However, the source and impact of sclerostin in MM remains to be defined. Our goal was to determine the role of sclerostin in the biology of MM and its bone microenvironment as well as investigate the effect of targeting sclerostin with a neutralizing antibody (scl-Ab) in MM bone disease. Here we confirm increased sclerostin levels in MM compared with precursor disease states like monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering MM. Furthermore, we found that a humanized MM xenograft mouse model bearing human MM cells (NOD-SCID.CB17 male mice injected intravenously with 2.5 million of MM1.S-Luc-GFP cells) demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of mouse-derived sclerostin, suggesting a microenvironmental source of sclerostin. Associated with the increased sclerostin levels, activated β-catenin expression levels were lower than normal in MM mouse bone marrow. Importantly, a high-affinity grade scl-Ab reversed osteolytic bone disease in this animal model. Because scl-Ab did not demonstrate significant in vitro anti-MM activity, we combined it with the proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib. Our data demonstrated that this combination therapy significantly inhibited tumor burden and improved bone disease in our in vivo MM mouse model. In agreement with our in vivo data, sclerostin expression was noted in marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts of MM patient bone marrow samples. Moreover, MM cells stimulated sclerostin expression in immature osteoblasts while inhibiting osteoblast differentiation in vitro. This was in part regulated by Dkk-1 secreted by MM cells and is a potential mechanism contributing to the osteoblast dysfunction noted in MM. Our data confirm the role of sclerostin as a potential therapeutic target in MM bone disease

  11. Coupling of porcine bone blood flow and metabolism in high-turnover bone disease measured by [15O]H2O and [18F]fluoride ion positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we identified a parathyroid hormone-related high-turnover bone disease after gastrectomy in mini pigs. Dynamic [18F]fluoride ion positron emission tomography (PET) revealed that bone metabolism was significantly increased, but that bone blood flow derived from permeability-surface area product (PS product)-corrected K1 values was not. Since bone blood flow and metabolism are coupled in normal bone tissues, we hypothesised that the capillary permeability and/or surface area might be altered in high-turnover bone disease. The ''true'' bone blood flow (fH2O) was measured in vertebral bodies by dynamic [15O]H2O PET, followed by a 120-min dynamic [18F]fluoride ion PET study, 6 months after total gastrectomy (n=5) and compared with results in sham-operated animals (n=5). Estimates for bone blood flow based on PS-corrected K1 values (f) and the net uptake of fluoride in bone tissue (Ki), representing the bone metabolic activity, were calculated using standard compartmental modelling and non-linear fitting. Gastrectomy was followed by a significant elevation of Ki and k3 (PH2O, f, the single-pass extraction fraction of [18F]fluoride (E) and the volume of distribution (DV) of [18F]fluoride were not significantly different between groups. In both groups, a coupling of the mean fH2O and Ki values was found, but the intercept with the y-axis was higher in high-turnover bone disease. It is concluded that in high-turnover bone disease following gastrectomy, the PS product for [18F]fluoride remains unchanged. Therefore, even in high-turnover bone diseases, [18F]fluoride ion PET can provide reliable blood flow estimates (f), as long as a proper PS product correction is applied. The increased bone metabolism in high-turnover bone disease after gastrectomy is mainly related to an up-regulation of the amount of ionic exchange of [18F]fluoride with the bone matrix, while tracer delivery remains unchanged. (orig.)

  12. Machine learning based analytics of micro-MRI trabecular bone microarchitecture and texture in type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gulshan B; Robertson, Douglas D; Laney, Dawn A; Gambello, Michael J; Terk, Michael

    2016-06-14

    Type 1 Gaucher disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease, affecting bone metabolism, structure and strength. Current bone assessment methods are not ideal. Semi-quantitative MRI scoring is unreliable, not standardized, and only evaluates bone marrow. DXA BMD is also used but is a limited predictor of bone fragility/fracture risk. Our purpose was to measure trabecular bone microarchitecture, as a biomarker of bone disease severity, in type 1 GD individuals with different GD genotypes and to apply machine learning based analytics to discriminate between GD patients and healthy individuals. Micro-MR imaging of the distal radius was performed on 20 type 1 GD patients and 10 healthy controls (HC). Fifteen stereological and textural measures (STM) were calculated from the MR images. General linear models demonstrated significant differences between GD and HC, and GD genotypes. Stereological measures, main contributors to the first two principal components (PCs), explained ~50% of data variation and were significantly different between males and females. Subsequent PCs textural measures were significantly different between GD patients and HC individuals. Textural measures also significantly differed between GD genotypes, and distinguished between GD patients with normal and pathologic DXA scores. PCA and SVM predictive analyses discriminated between GD and HC with maximum accuracy of 73% and area under ROC curve of 0.79. Trabecular STM differences can be quantified between GD patients and HC, and GD sub-types using micro-MRI and machine learning based analytics. Work is underway to expand this approach to evaluate GD disease burden and treatment efficacy. PMID:27109052

  13. Treatment for Progressive Hearing Loss Due to Paget's Disease of Bone - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tanahashi, Shigeaki; Mizuta, Keisuke; Kato, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Paget's disease is a common bone remodeling disorder that typically begins with excessive bone resorption in the elderly. Bilateral progressive hearing loss is the most frequently encountered complication of Paget's disease. The types of hearing loss identified by audiometry are conductive, sensorineural, or both. However, the precise mechanism of hearing loss remains unclear, and the treatment has been controversial. We present a 73-year-old man who suffered from bilateral progressive hearing loss due to Paget's disease. Potent bisphosphonates, oral risedronate in daily adjusted dosages for 6 months, did not decrease or suppress the worsening of the hearing loss. The Nucleus CI24 Contour electrode array was successfully inserted on the left side without surgical and postoperative complications. The Japanese open set monosyllable word recognition test in a sound field at 65 dB had a result of 74%. This cochlear implantation can be an indication for cases of profound hearing loss due to Paget's disease. PMID:26915163

  14. HIV and Bone Disease: A Perspective of the Role of microRNAs in Bone Biology upon HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Del Carpio-Cano, Fabiola E.; DeLa Cadena, Raul A.; Sawaya, Bassel E.

    2013-01-01

    Increased life expectancy and the need for long-term antiretroviral therapy have brought new challenges to the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. The prevalence of osteoporosis and fractures is increased in HIV-infected patients; thus optimal strategies for risk management and treatment in this group of patients need to be defined. Prevention of bone loss is an important component of HIV care as the HIV population grows older. Understanding the mechanisms by which HIV infection...

  15. The Presence of Thyroid-Stimulation Blocking Antibody Prevents High Bone Turnover in Untreated Premenopausal Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Wook; Bae, Jae Hyun; Noh, Gyeong Woon; Kim, Ye An; Moon, Min Kyong; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, Junghan; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Chung, June-Key; Cho, Bo Youn; Park, Young Joo

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis-related fractures are one of the complications of Graves' disease. This study hypothesized that the different actions of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) antibodies, both stimulating and blocking activities in Graves' disease patients might oppositely impact bone turnover. Newly diagnosed premenopausal Graves' disease patients were enrolled (n = 93) and divided into two groups: patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity (stimulating activity group, n = 83) and patients with TSHR antibodies with thyroid-stimulating activity combined with blocking activity (blocking activity group, n = 10). From the stimulating activity group, patients who had matched values for free T4 and TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) to the blocking activity group were further classified as stimulating activity-matched control (n = 11). Bone turnover markers BS-ALP, Osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide were significantly lower in the blocking activity group than in the stimulating activity or stimulating activity-matched control groups. The TBII level showed positive correlations with BS-ALP and osteocalcin levels in the stimulating activity group, while it had a negative correlation with the osteocalcin level in the blocking activity group. In conclusion, the activation of TSHR antibody-activated TSH signaling contributes to high bone turnover, independent of the actions of thyroid hormone, and thyroid-stimulation blocking antibody has protective effects against bone metabolism in Graves' disease. PMID:26650844

  16. Elevated interferon-gamma in CNS inflammatory disease: a potential complication for bone marrow reconstitution in MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan-Zahraee, M; Tran, E H; Bourbonnière, L;

    2000-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is increasingly used to treat Multiple Sclerosis (MS) a CNS inflammatory disease with elevated CNS and systemic IFNgamma levels. We wished to determine the effect of IFNgamma on BM graft survival in a transgenic mouse model for chronic MS. BM transplantation into...

  17. INFLUENCE OF VITAMIN D RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISM ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF α-D3 FOR RENAL BONE DISEASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宝春; 傅淑霞; 戴秀华

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss the effectiveness of Vitamin D receptor (VDR)gene polymorphism on renal bone disease with α-D3.Methods VDR genotype was tested in 150 patients suffering from chronic renal failure using RFLPS method meanwhile the patients’ thyroxin in wholephase blood was assessed using radioactive and immune methods, and the bone specific mass (BUA) of right heel was detected by quantitative ultrasound before and eight weeks after the medication began.Results The incidence of the disease for BB type was 80%, for Bb was 60.87%, and for bb was 50. 5%. The difference of cure rates(P<0.05) was significant, being 100% for BB, 75.03% for Bb and 81.64% for bb.Conclusion The VDR genotype has important impact upon the occurrence of renal bone disease for chronic renal filure patients. Patients with BB genotype and b-equal grade have a low incidence rate for renal bone disease and those with α-D3 have good effects.

  18. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay;

    2015-01-01

    chronic kidney disease cohort. Methods: Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6-18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10-60 ml...

  19. Imaging of bone spavin. A radiographic and scintigraphic study of degenerative joint disease in the distal tarsus in Icelandic horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiography and scintigraphy are commonly used for the diagnosis of skeletal disorders in horses. Icelandic Horses have a high prevalence of degenerative joint disease of the distal tarsus, generally known as bone spavin (BS). The purpose of this study was to evaluate and develop the use of radiography and scintigraphy for the detection of BS in Icelandic Horses

  20. Dioxin-induced up-regulation of the active form of vitamin D is the main cause for its inhibitory action on osteoblast activities, leading to developmental bone toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD) is known to cause bone toxicity, particularly during animal development, although its action mechanism to cause this toxicity has yet to be elucidated. Mouse pups were exposed to TCDD via dam's milk that were administered orally with 15 μg TCDD/kg b.w. on postnatal day 1. Here we report that TCDD causes up-regulation of vitamin D 1α-hydroxylase in kidney, resulting in a 2-fold increase in the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, in serum. This action of TCDD is not caused by changes in parathyroid hormone, a decrease in vitamin D degrading enzyme, vitamin D 24-hydroxylase, or alterations in serum Ca2+ concentration. Vitamin D is known to affect bone mineralization. Our data clearly show that TCDD-exposed mice exhibit a marked decrease in osteocalcin and collagen type 1 as well as alkaline phosphatase gene expression in tibia by postnatal day 21, which is accompanied with a mineralization defect in the tibia, lowered activity of osteoblastic bone formation, and an increase in fibroblastic growth factor-23, a sign of increased vitamin D effect. Despite these significant effects of TCDD on osteoblast activities, none of the markers of osteoclast activities was found to be affected. Histomorphometry confirmed that osteoblastic activity, but not bone resorption activity, was altered by TCDD. A prominent lesion commonly observed in these TCDD-treated mice was impaired bone mineralization that is characterized by an increased volume and thickness of osteoids lining both the endosteum of the cortical bone and trabeculae. Together, these data suggest that the impaired mineralization resulting from reduction of the osteoblastic activity, which is caused by TCDD-induced up-regulation of vitamin D, is responsible for its bone developmental toxicity.

  1. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A. van; Papazova, D.A.; Oosterhuis, N.R.; Gremmels, H.; Giles, R.H.; Fledderus, J.O.; Joles, J.A.; Verhaar, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  2. Use of denosumab in a dialysis patient with bone metastases from breast cancer and hepatorenal polycystic disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga García, Vanesa; Cirauqui Cirauqui, Beatriz; Tobey Robaina, Lyan; López Sisamon, David; Hardy-Werbin, Max; Blanca, Ana Belén; Margelí Vila, Mireia

    2016-06-01

    Cancer patients with severe renal dysfunction represent a challenge for the physician. This is the first case report on the use of denosumab in a dialysis patient with bone metastases. We present the clinical case of a 45-year-old woman who had hepatorenal polycystic disease, diagnosed during childhood, and stage IV chronic kidney failure at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Three years after surgery plus adjuvant hormonal therapy she suffered a further worsening of renal function, requiring dialysis, and very advanced bone metastasis in the hip with severe pain. As pamidronate was the only bone agent available in the center, she received it for 4 months (before a dialysis session), during which time the bone metastases stabilized. In March 2014, the patient switched to denosumab (which had become available in the center), and continued with hormone therapy. Seven months after denosumab initiation, the patient had almost complete pain relief, and the bone metastases exhibited radiological improvement. The tolerability was excellent, without any related adverse event. There were no changes in albumin-adjusted serum calcium, serum phosphorus, and intact parathyroid hormone, except for a transient and mild hypocalcemia at 3 months and an increase in intact parathyroid hormone levels, which required adjustment of vitamin D analog dose. Denosumab can be administered to prevent skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastasis from solid tumors and severely impaired renal function, even in those requiring dialysis. In this particular patient, the safety was good. PMID:26813866

  3. Reexpression of a developmentally regulated antigen in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALZ-50 is a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a protein of apparent molecular mass 68 kilodaltons (A68). The protein is present in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease but is not detectable in normal adult brain tissue. The authors report that ALZ-50-reactive neurons are found in normal fetal and neonatal human brain and in brain tissue from neonatal individuals with Down syndrome. Reactive neurons decrease sharply in number after age 2 and reappear in older individuals with Down syndrome and in patients with Alzheimer disease

  4. The value of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals and quantification methods in diagnosing the type of a skeletal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 139 patients with skeletal changes and 133 patients without changes, 2-3 hours after injecting sup(99m)Tc-Sn-methylen-diphosphonate or sup(99m)Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate, the enrichment relations between the individual vertebral bodies, the sacrum, the reiosacral joints and peripheric bones and joints were calculated. In the normal case, with increasing age the count rate ratio ISG/os sacrum was decreasing. For patients with bone metastases in the vertebral column, quotients between 0.8 and 4.0 were calculated if related to the vertebral next but one. As for degenerative diseases of the vertebral column, values of 0.8 to 1.59 were obtained. This means that, when determining the relative bone storage, 70% of the metastases could not be distinguished from benign changes in the vertebra column. The highest count rate ratios or contrasts were obtained when norming to the opposite side in peripheric bone tumours and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or arthritis urica of the smaller joints. It was not possible to differentiate arthrotic and inflammatory diseases of big joints. If quotients with values around 0.1 were calculated, floride osteoblastic processes can be excluded. Thus the quotient formation in bone scintiscanning represents a substantial support in the indication of invasive measures. (orig./MG)

  5. Bone metabolism in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Effect of disease activity and glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Halberg, P; Kollerup, G;

    1998-01-01

    The bone metabolism in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has previously been examined, but the results are conflicting. In the present study the bone mineral density (BMD) of the axial and the appendicular skeleton was examined by means of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The bone...

  6. Bone mineral metabolism in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (von Recklingausen disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petramala, Luigi; Giustini, Sandra; Zinnamosca, Laura; Marinelli, Cristiano; Colangelo, Luciano; Cilenti, Giuseppina; Formicuccia, Maria Chiara; D'Erasmo, Emilio; Calvieri, Stefano; Letizia, Claudio

    2012-05-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is characterized by specific cutaneous features (neurofibromas, "café-au-lait" spots of the skin) and alterations of several tissue (nervous, vascular) and bone deformities, such as scoliosis, congenital pseudoarthrosis and bone dysplasia of tibia. Moreover, several studies have shown systemic involvement of bone tissue in NF1 patients, leading to reduced bone mass. The aim of our study was to evaluate some bone mineral metabolism parameters before and after calcium and vitamin D supplementation in NF1 patients. We evaluated in 70 NF1 consecutive patients the mineral metabolism and bone mineral density compared with 40 normal subjects. We showed bone alterations in 35% of patients and the increase of bone formation markers, such as bone isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase (41.2 ± 15.5 vs. 25.6 ± 8.7 UI; P 60%). Moreover, we revealed a significant reduction of bone mass density at spine (L1-L4) (0.935 ± 0.13 vs. 1.110 ± 0.17 g/cm(2); P mineral bone involvement, with vitamin D deficiency; calcium and vitamin D supplementation is necessary to restore these bone mineral metabolic alterations. PMID:22120694

  7. Psychological and behavioral disease during developmental age: the importance of the alliance with parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Gatta

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Michela Gatta1, Elisabetta Ramaglioni3, Jessica Lai3, Lorenza Svanellini3,  Irene Toldo1, Lara Del Col3, Cinzia Salviato3,  Andrea Spoto2,  Battistella Pier Antonio31Paediatrics Department, 2Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy; 3Neuropsychiatric Unit for Children and Adolescents, Azienda ULSS 16, Padua, ItalyAbstract: The aim of the study is to analyze the clinician’s alliance with parents during the diagnostic process in relation to therapeutic compliance and clinical evolution of individuals aged 0–11 years. The sample was formed by 84 individuals aged 0 to 11 years (18 < 6 years, 66 aged 6 to 11 years; 62 males and 22 females who came to the Neuropsychiatric Unit for Children and Adolescents for a consultation regarding psychorelational and behavioral problems. Neuropsychiatric consultation took place in five diagnostic interviews with child and parents, separately. The last session was devoted to communication of psychiatric diagnosis (according to ICD 10 and therapeutic suggestions, if any. The clinician’s relationship with parents and patients’ participation were evaluated in terms of collaboration and quality of interaction, on the basis of pre-established criteria. Data about patients’ therapeutic compliance and clinical outcome were collected during a follow-up visit eight months after the last session. Results suggest that the better the alliance between parents and clinician, the higher the therapeutic compliance and the likelihood of a positive outcome for patients. Our data suggest that good communication with parents benefits child patients, both in terms of response to the parents’ need to report their children’s worrying behavior and as a response to the discomfort expressed by children when they come in for consultation.Keywords: psychopathology, developmental age, psychotherapy, alliance relationship, parental function

  8. Detection of active alveolar bone destruction in human periodontal disease by analysis of radiopharmaceutical uptake after a single injection of 99m-Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that, following a single injection of 99m-Tc-MDP, measurement of bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake can detect ''active'' alveolar bone loss due to periodontal disease in beagle dogs, as determined by radiographs taken at the time of, and several months after, the nuclear medicine procedure. The efficacy of this diagnostic test, however, had not been assessed in human periodontal disease. The ability of a single boneseeking radiopharmaceutical uptake examination to detect ''active'' alveolar bone loss due to periodontal disease in human patients was assessed by comparing a single uptake measurement to the rate of bone loss determined from serial radiographs taken over a 6-month period. Uptake was expressed as a ratio of the cpm from the alveolar bone divided by the cpm from the non-tooth supporting bone of the nuchal crest. High uptake ratios were associated with ''active'' loss and low uptake ratios were associated with little if any change in alveolar bone height (p<0.001). The nuclear medicine examination was an accurate detector of periodontal disease activity in nearly 80% of the individual teeth studied. These data indicate that high bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical uptake ratios may be pathognomonic of active bone loss in human periodontal disease. (author)

  9. Epidemiological study of Paget's disease of bone in a zone of the Province of Salamanca (spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone Paget's disease is heterogeneously distributed and several foci of high prevalence have been reported in Spain. The aim of the present work was to determine the prevalence of the disease in a zone situated in the northwestern sector of the Province of Salamanca (Spain) using a cross sectional epidemiological study. Sample choice was based on a stratified sampling according to the residence, age and sex of the inhabitants of the zone. A sampling error of 5% and a confidence level of 95% were considered; these afforded a sample of 378 units. Final choice of the subjects was based on a random pathway method. Data collection was accomplished with a personal interview using a 31-item questionnaire and analytical screening (AP and GGT). The field work was carried out over a one-year period. The data were input onto a calculation sheet for analysis and epidemiological interpretation. Finally, clinico-radiological confirmation of the cases deemed positive in the screening was accomplished. The prevalence of PBD in the zone studied is 5.7% (95% CI: 4.5-6.9). The highest percentage of patients lies within the age group between 70-79 years; most of these patients were women. The mean residence time in the zone was 66 years. According to the findings, this geographic zone has a high prevalence of PBD

  10. Bone mineral density in patients with Parkinson's disease measured by dual photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone mineral density (BMD) in 22 patients (three females, 19 males, aged 58-76 years) with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) was measured by dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) using a M and SE OsteoTech 300 scanner. The BMDs of the 2nd to 4th lumbar vertebrae were measured and the mean density was presented as g cm-2. The BMD of the PD patients was compared with normal BMD values within the same age groups, and the patients were interpreted as normal, suffering mild osteoporosis or severe osteoporosis. The patients were divided into two groups according to (a) the Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) scale as high or low, or based on (b) the duration of the disease as long or short. The results show that the BMD of all the PD patients was lower than those of the normal controls. The PD patients with a high H-Y scale had a higher prevalence of severe osteoporosis. However, the difference between any two groups, separated by the two criteria, is not significant by Fisher's test. We find that PD patients have a higher incidence of severe osteoporosis. (author)

  11. Developmental Dyspraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Developmental Dyspraxia Information Page Synonym(s): Dyspraxia Table of Contents (click ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Developmental Dyspraxia? Developmental dyspraxia is a disorder characterized by an ...

  12. Identification of genes for bone mineral density variation by computational disease gene identification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gloria H Y; Deng, Hong-Wen; Kung, Annie W C; Huang, Qing-Yang

    2011-11-01

    We previously used five freely available bioinformatics tools (Prioritizer, Geneseeker, PROSPECTR and SUSPECTS, Disease Gene Prediction, and Endeavour) to analyze the thirteen well-replicated osteoporosis susceptibility loci and identify a subset of most likely candidate osteoporosis susceptibility genes (Huang et al. in J Hum Genet 53:644-655, 2008). In the current study, we experimentally tested the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and the 9 most likely candidate genes [LAMC2(1q25-q31), MATN3(2p24-p23), ITGAV(2q31-q32), ACVR1(2q23-q24), TDGF1(3p21.31), EGF(4q25), IGF1(12q22-q23), ZIC2(13q32), BMP2(20p12)] which were pinpointed by 4 or more bioinformatics tools. Forty tag SNPs in nine candidate genes were genotyped in a southern Chinese female case-control cohort consisting of 1643 subjects. Single- and multi-marker association analyses were performed using logistic regression analysis implemented by PLINK. Potential transcription factor binding sites were predicted by MatInspector. The strongest association was observed between rs10178256 (MATN3) and trochanter (P rs6214 (IGF1) showed consistent association with BMD at all the four measured skeletal sites (P = 0.005-0.044). Prediction of transcription factor binding suggested that the minor allele G of rs10178256 might abolish the binding of MESP1 and MESP2 which play vital roles in bone homeostasis, whereas the minor allele G of rs6214 might create an additional binding site for XBP1, a constitutive regulator of endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Our data suggested that variants in MATN3 and IGF1 were involved in BMD regulation in southern Chinese women. PMID:21638018

  13. Iron deposition in cranial bone marrow with sickle cell disease: MR assessment using a fat suppression technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing transfusion therapy and 8 control patients were examined by magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate bone marrow change due to iron deposition from hematologic marrow hyperplasia. Using T1-weighted spin echo images, only two subjects showed extremely low signal intensity marrow compatible with iron deposition. However, using T2-weighted fast spin echo images with fat suppression, cranial bone marrow in SCD patients with transfusion therapy showed considerably lower signal than that of controls. The main cause of marrow signal decrease in SCD patients with transfusion therapy was considered to be iron deposition due to repeated transfusion therapy rather than red marrow hyperplasia. (orig.)

  14. IL-11 separates graft-versus-leukemia effects from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Teshima, Takanori; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Pan, Luying; Brinson, Yani S.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Ferrara, James L.M.

    1999-01-01

    We recently showed that IL-11 prevents lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in a murine bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model of GVHD directed against MHC and minor antigens. In this study, we have investigated whether IL-11 can maintain a graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. Lethally irradiated B6D2F1 mice were transplanted with either T cell–depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) alone or with BM and splenic T cells from allogeneic B6 donors. Animals also received host-type P815 mastocytoma ce...

  15. Intracerebroventricular transplanted bone marrow stem cells survive and migrate into the brain of rats with Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Gu; Zhongxia Zhang; Dongsheng Cui; Yanyong Wang; Lin Ma; Yuan Geng; Mingwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 6-hydroxydopamine was stereotaxically injected into the right substantia nigra compact and ventral tegmental area of rats to establish Parkinson’s disease models. The rats then received a transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells that were previously isolated, cultured and labeled with 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine in vitro. Transplantation of the bone marrow stromal cells significantly decreased apomorphine-induced rotation time and the escape latency in the Morris water maze test as compared with rats with untreated Parkinson’s disease. Immunohistochemical staining showed that, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine-immunoreactive cells were present in the lateral ventricular wall and the choroid plexus 1 day after transplantation. These immunoreactive cells migrated to the surrounding areas of the lateral cerebral ventricle along the corpus callosum. The results indicated that bone marrow stromal cells could migrate to tissues surround the cerebral ventricle via the cerebrospinal fluid circulation and fuse with cells in the brain, thus altering the phenotype of cells or forming neuron-like cells or astrocytes capable of expressing neuron-specific proteins. Taken together, the present findings indicate that bone marrow stromal cells transplanted intracerebroventricularly could survive, migrate and significantly improve the rotational behavior and cognitive function of rats with experimentally induced Parkinson’s disease.

  16. A New Data Analysis System to Quantify Associations between Biochemical Parameters of Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Rodriguez

    Full Text Available In hemodialysis patients, deviations from KDIGO recommended values of individual parameters, phosphate, calcium or parathyroid hormone (PTH, are associated with increased mortality. However, it is widely accepted that these parameters are not regulated independently of each other and that therapy aimed to correct one parameter often modifies the others. The aim of the present study is to quantify the degree of association between parameters of chronic kidney disease and mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD.Data was extracted from a cohort of 1758 adult HD patients between January 2000 and June 2013 obtaining a total of 46.141 records (10 year follow-up. We used an advanced data analysis system called Random Forest (RF which is based on self-learning procedure with similar axioms to those utilized for the development of artificial intelligence. This new approach is particularly useful when the variables analyzed are closely dependent to each other.The analysis revealed a strong association between PTH and phosphate that was superior to that of PTH and Calcium. The classical linear regression analysis between PTH and phosphate shows a correlation coefficient is 0.27, p<0.001, the possibility to predict PTH changes from phosphate modification is marginal. Alternatively, RF assumes that changes in phosphate will cause modifications in other associated variables (calcium and others that may also affect PTH values. Using RF the correlation coefficient between changes in serum PTH and phosphate is 0.77, p<0.001; thus, the power of prediction is markedly increased. The effect of therapy on biochemical variables was also analyzed using this RF.Our results suggest that the analysis of the complex interactions between mineral metabolism parameters in CKD-MBD may demand a more advanced data analysis system such as RF.

  17. Functional bone histology of zebrafish reveals two types of endochondral ossification, different types of osteoblast clusters and a new bone type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A

    2016-07-01

    The zebrafish is as an important vertebrate animal model system for studying developmental processes, gene functions and signalling pathways. It is also used as a model system for the understanding of human developmental diseases including those related to the skeleton. However, surprisingly little is known about normal zebrafish skeletogenesis and osteogenesis. As in most vertebrates, it is commonly known that the bones of adult zebrafish are cellular unlike that of some other teleosts. After careful histological analyses of each zebrafish adult bone, we identified several acellular bones, with no entrapped osteocytes in addition to several cellular bones. We show that both cellular and acellular bones can even occur within the same skeletal element and transitions between these two cell types can be found. Furthermore, we describe two types of osteoblast clusters during skeletogenesis and two different types of endochondral ossification. The epiphyseal plate, for example, lacks a zone of calcification and a degradation zone with osteoblasts. A new bone type that we term tubular bone was also identified. This bone is completely filled with adipose tissue, unlike spongy bones. This study provides important insight on how osteogenesis takes place in zebrafish, and especially on the transition from cellular to acellular bones. Overall, this study leads to a deeper understanding of the functional histological composition of adult zebrafish bones. PMID:27278890

  18. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease Pathogenesis: A Role for Developmental Programming and Altered Circadian Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, R; Mouralidarane, A.; Soeda, J.; S Ray; Pombo, J.; Saraswati, R.; Novelli, M; Fusai, G.; Rappa, F.; Saracino, C; Pazienza, V; L. Poston; Taylor, PD; Vinciguerra, M Oben JA.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Emerging evidence suggests that maternal obesity (MO) predisposes offspring to obesity and the recently described non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) but involved mechanisms remain unclear. Using a pathophysiologically relevant murine model, we here investigated a role for the biological clock - molecular core circadian genes (CCG) in the generation of NAFPD. Design Female C57BL6 mice were fed an obesogenic diet (OD) or standard chow (SC) for 6 weeks, prior to pregnancy an...

  19. Bone marrow abnormalities and early bone lesions in multiple myeloma and its precursor disease: a prospective study using functional and morphologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Manisha; Turkbey, Baris; Tan, Esther; Korde, Neha; Kwok, Mary; Manasanch, Elisabet E; Tageja, Nishant; Mailankody, Sham; Roschewski, Mark; Mulquin, Marcia; Carpenter, Ashley; Lamping, Elizabeth; Minter, Alex R; Weiss, Brendan M; Mena, Esther; Lindenberg, Liza; Calvo, Katherine R; Maric, Irina; Usmani, Saad Z; Choyke, Peter L; Kurdziel, Karen; Landgren, Ola

    2016-05-01

    The incidence and importance of bone marrow involvement and/or early bone lesions in multiple myeloma (MM) precursor diseases is largely unknown. This study prospectively compared the sensitivity of several imaging modalities in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) and MM. Thirty patients (10 each with MGUS, SMM and MM) were evaluated with skeletal survey, [(18)F]FDG-PET/CT, [(18)F]NaF-PET/CT and morphologic dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI. An additional 16 SMM patients had skeletal surveys and FDG-PET/CT. Among MGUS patients, DCE-MRI found only one focal marrow abnormality; other evaluations were negative. Among 26 SMM patients, five (19%) were re-classified as MM based on lytic bone lesions on CT and six had unifocal or diffuse marrow abnormality. Among MM, marrow abnormalities were observed on FDG-PET/CT in 8/10 patients and on DCE-MRI in nine evaluable patients. Abnormal NaF uptake was observed only in MM patients with lytic lesions on CT, providing no additional clinical information. PMID:26690712

  20. Bone scan in rheumatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter a revision is made concerning different uses of bone scan in rheumatic diseases. These include reflex sympathetic dystrophy, osteomyelitis, spondyloarthropaties, metabolic bone diseases, avascular bone necrosis and bone injuries due to sports. There is as well some comments concerning pediatric pathology and orthopedics. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs

  1. 99mTc-sestamibi and 99mTc-tetrofosmin scintigraphy in myeloma bone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Evaluation of the role of scintigraphy with 99mTc-Sestamibi (99mTc-MIBI) and 99mTc-Tetrofosmin (99mTc-TF) in the detection of bone marrow involvement in patients (pts) with multiple myeloma (MM) and in follow-up. 62 pts with MM and 38 pts with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) were enrolled in this study. Forty-seven out sixty-two MM pts had active disease (AD), 10/62 were in complete remission (CR) and 5/62 in partial remission (PR) after chemotherapy. Whole-body scans were obtained 10 min after the i.v. injection of 740 MBq of 99mTc-MIBI in anterior and posterior view. The scans were scored semiquantitatively according to extension and intensity of tracer uptake. All 38 MGUS pts had a negative 99mTc-MIBI scan. As to the MM pts, 49/62 pts (44 with AD, 4 with PR and 1 with CR) had a positive 99mTc-MIBI scan, while the 99mTc-MIBI scan was negative in 13/62 pts (9 with CR, 1 with PR and 3 with AD). The overall sensitivity of the scintigraphic procedure was 92 % while specificity was 97 %. A total of 42 follow-up scans with 99mTc-MIBI were performed in 30 MM pts after high-dose chemotherapy, with an average follow-up duration of 14.6 ± 8.9. The follow-up 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy was positive in 14/15 of the AD pts, while 6/8 negative scans were observed in the CR pts; the seven PR pts exhibited in five cases a negative scan and in two a mild scintigrafic positivity. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the follow-up scan were, respectively, 86 % and 75 %. In six patients, one at the diagnosis and five showing a positive 99mTc-MIBI scan during the follow-up, 740 MBq of 99mTc-TF was administered within two days with the same acquisition protocol. The scans provided substantially identical information. 99mTc-TF provided a mildly higher contrast between lesion and background activities. The results obtained in this study provide additional evidence indicating that 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy closely reflects myeloma disease activity in

  2. Borna disease virus phosphoprotein impairs the developmental program controlling neurogenesis and reduces human GABAergic neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Scordel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that persistent viral infection may impair cellular function of specialized cells without overt damage. This concept, when applied to neurotropic viruses, may help to understand certain neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. Borna disease virus (BDV is an excellent example of a persistent virus that targets the brain, impairs neural functions without cell lysis, and ultimately results in neurobehavioral disturbances. Recently, we have shown that BDV infects human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs and impairs neurogenesis, revealing a new mechanism by which BDV may interfere with brain function. Here, we sought to identify the viral proteins and molecular pathways that are involved. Using lentiviral vectors for expression of the bdv-p and bdv-x viral genes, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein P, but not the X protein, diminishes human neurogenesis and, more particularly, GABAergic neurogenesis. We further reveal a decrease in pro-neuronal factors known to be involved in neuronal differentiation (ApoE, Noggin, TH and Scg10/Stathmin2, demonstrating that cellular dysfunction is associated with impairment of specific components of the molecular program that controls neurogenesis. Our findings thus provide the first evidence that a viral protein impairs GABAergic human neurogenesis, a process that is dysregulated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. They improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which a persistent virus may interfere with brain development and function in the adult.

  3. Femoral head vascularisation in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: comparison of dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction MRI with bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heading AbstractBackground. It has been reported that MRI using a dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction technique can allow the early identification of ischaemia and the pattern of revascularisation in Legg-Calve-Perthes (LCP) disease with increased spatial and contrast resolution. Therefore, dynamic gadolinium-enhanced subtraction (DGS) MRI may be a possible non-ionising substitute for bone scintigraphy.Objective. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare DGS MRI and bone scintigraphy in the assessment of femoral head perfusion in LCP disease.Materials and methods. Twenty-six DGS MR images and bone scintigraphies of 25 hips in 23 children were obtained at different stages of LCP disease; three stage I, 12 stage II, six stage III and five stage IV (Waldenstroem classification). The extent of necrosis, epiphyseal revascularisation pathways (lateral pillar, medial pillar, and/or transphyseal perfusion) and metaphyseal changes were analysed.Results. Total agreement between both techniques was noted in the depiction of epiphyseal necrosis (kappa=1), and metaphyseal abnormalities (kappa=0.9). DGS MRI demonstrated better revascularisation in the lateral (kappa=0.62) and medial pillars (kappa=0.52). The presence of basal transphyseal reperfusion was more conspicuous with MRI.Conclusions. DGS MRI allows early detection of epiphyseal ischaemia and accurate analysis of the different revascularisation patterns. These changes are directly related to the prognosis of LCP disease and can aid therapeutic decision making. (orig.)

  4. Predictors of bone disease in Egyptian prepubertal children with β-thalassaemia major

    OpenAIRE

    Tantawy, Azza A.G.; El-Bostany, Eman A.; Matter, Randa M; El-Ghoroury, Eman A.; Ragab, Shadia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Thalassaemic osteopathy is a multifactorial disorder and limited information exists about bone accrual and bone mineral density (BMD) in prepubertal thalassaemic children. The study aimed to investigate some potential genetic and biochemical bone markers as possible early predictors of BMD variations in children with β-thalassaemia major (TM) before puberty. Material and methods Thirt-one prepubertal children with β-TM, and 43 matched controls were subjected to BMD assessment by ...

  5. Bone pain palliation and medullary toxicity after [Sm153]-EDTMP treatment: relation to the extent of disease and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to evaluate if bone pain palliation and medullar toxicity were associated to the extent of disease and radiation absorbed dose. Methods: 73 patients (37 male, age: 60 ± 15 yo) were followed for 8 weeks after administration of 37MBq/kg of [Sm153]-EDTMP for bone pain palliation. A recent ( 20). Urinary excretion and absorbed dose in medulla were also calculated in 24 patients. Results: No change in pain scores were noted in 13 patients (18%), with a partial response in 48 (66%) and an important or complete response in 12 patients (16%). Grade I-II toxicity was observed in 55%, grade III in 15% and grade IV in 1% of patients (nadir: 4-5 weeks). No correlation was found between pain palliation and number of metastasis, or between medullar toxicity and absorbed dose. Conclusions: Bone scan pattern did not allow differentiation of patients with better results after therapy. The extension of disease and even the radiation absorbed dose were not predictors of the medullar toxicity grade when using 37MBq/kg of [Sm153], and other factors (including previous therapies and bone marrow reserve) must be considered

  6. Calcimimetics in the chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Aguilar, Armando; Baas, Juan; Reyes, Joselyne; Lloret, Maria-J; Farré, Neus; Olaya, Mayte; Canal, Cristina; Marco, Helena; Andrés, Enric; Trinidad, Pedro; Ballarin, José

    2009-02-01

    Mineral and bone disorders (MBD) are both an early and very common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is now accepted that they represent a significant risk factor, explaining the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CKD patients. During the last decade, we have been witnessing many advances in the nomenclature, classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CKD and some of its complications, such as CKD-MBD. The identification of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) involvement in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) and the availability of a new class of drugs called calcimimetics are two outstanding examples. Cinacalcet, the only available calcimimetic, has been shown to be a very effective therapeutic tool in CKD-MBD. Many clinical trials with cinacalcet in hemodialysis patients with SHPT have shown a reduction in parathyroid hormone, calcium (Ca), phosphate (P) and Ca x P product levels, allowing far greater success in reaching therapeutic goals as recommended by international guidelines. Additionally, some studies have shown that the use of cinacalcet may improve other aspects of CKD-MBD, reducing the risk of vascular calcification and parathyroidectomy, among others. Prospective studies on dialysis patients, with hard endpoint data, are currently underway. This review summarizes the most significant aspects of calcimimimetics based on both experimental and clinical results, underlining their possibilities not only for the treatment of isolated SHPT but also for other CKD-MBD related conditions. PMID:19363783

  7. Dietary phosphorus excess: a risk factor in chronic bone, kidney, and cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribarri, Jaime; Calvo, Mona S

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the nephrology literature supporting the deleterious health effect of excess dietary phosphorus intake. This issue has largely escaped the attention of nutrition experts until this symposium, which raised the question of whether the same health concerns should be extended to the general population. The potential hazard of a high phosphorus intake in the healthy population is illustrated by findings from acute and epidemiologic studies. Acute studies in healthy young adults demonstrate that phosphorus intakes in excess of nutrient needs may significantly disrupt the hormonal regulation of phosphorus contributing to disordered mineral metabolism, vascular calcification, bone loss, and impaired kidney function. One of the hormonal factors acutely affected by dietary phosphorus loading is fibroblast growth factor-23, which may be a key factor responsible for many of the cardiovascular disease (CVD) complications of high phosphorus intake. Increasingly, large epidemiological studies suggest that mild elevations of serum phosphorus within the normal range are associated with CVD risk in healthy populations. Few population studies link high dietary phosphorus intake to mild changes in serum phosphorus due to study design issues specific to phosphorus and inaccurate nutrient composition databases. The increasing phosphorus intake due to the use of phosphorus-containing ingredients in processed food and the growing consumption of processed convenience and fast foods is an important factor that needs to be emphasized. PMID:24038251

  8. Evidence that asthma is a developmental origin disease influenced by maternal diet and bacterial metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Alison N; McKenzie, Craig I; Shen, Sj; Stanley, Dragana; Macia, Laurence; Mason, Linda J; Roberts, Laura K; Wong, Connie H Y; Shim, Raymond; Robert, Remy; Chevalier, Nina; Tan, Jian K; Mariño, Eliana; Moore, Rob J; Wong, Lee; McConville, Malcolm J; Tull, Dedreia L; Wood, Lisa G; Murphy, Vanessa E; Mattes, Joerg; Gibson, Peter G; Mackay, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is prevalent in Western countries, and recent explanations have evoked the actions of the gut microbiota. Here we show that feeding mice a high-fibre diet yields a distinctive gut microbiota, which increases the levels of the short-chain fatty acid, acetate. High-fibre or acetate-feeding led to marked suppression of allergic airways disease (AAD, a model for human asthma), by enhancing T-regulatory cell numbers and function. Acetate increases acetylation at the Foxp3 promoter, likely through HDAC9 inhibition. Epigenetic effects of fibre/acetate in adult mice led us to examine the influence of maternal intake of fibre/acetate. High-fibre/acetate feeding of pregnant mice imparts on their adult offspring an inability to develop robust AAD. High fibre/acetate suppresses expression of certain genes in the mouse fetal lung linked to both human asthma and mouse AAD. Thus, diet acting on the gut microbiota profoundly influences airway responses, and may represent an approach to prevent asthma, including during pregnancy. PMID:26102221

  9. The effects of untreated and treated HIV infection on bone disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cotter, Aoife G

    2013-11-20

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in those with HIV, associated with higher bone turnover and a higher prevalence of fractures. This review explores low BMD in HIV, focusing on underlying mechanisms and relationships between low BMD and HIV infection, immune dysfunction, and antiretroviral therapy (ART).

  10. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation in Patients with Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Spahr, Laurent François Joséph; Chalandon, Yves; Terraz, Sylvain; Kindler, Vincent Lucien; Rubbia-Brandt, Laura; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Breguet, Romain; Lanthier, Nicolas; Farina, Annarita; Passweg, Jakob; Becker, Christoph; Hadengue, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Objective Impaired liver regeneration is associated with a poor outcome in patients with decompensated alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We assessed whether autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation (BMMCT) improved liver function in decompensated ALD. Design 58 patients (mean age 54 yrs; mean MELD score 19, all with cirrhosis, 81% with alcoholic steatohepatitis at baseline liver biopsy) were randomized early after hospital admission to standard medical therapy (SMT) alone (n = 30)...

  11. Osseous and Nonosseous Bone Scan Findings in Liver Transplant Candidates with end-stage Chronic Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Seval Erhamamcı; Ayşe Aktaş; Tatiana Bahçeci; Kevser Kavak

    2013-01-01

    Objective: End-stage chronic liver disease (CLD) adversely affects the function of multiple organ systems including the skeletal system. The aim of this study was to assess osseous and nonosseous bone scintigraphy (BS) findings in liver transplant (LT) candidates with end-stage CLD. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated BS findings in 50 consecutive patients with end-stage CLD who were undergoing preoperative assessment for LT from January 2006 to December 2011. All the patients were analyzed...

  12. LPS antagonism reduces graft-versus-host disease and preserves graft-versus-leukemia activity after experimental bone marrow transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Kenneth R.; Gerbitz, Armin; Crawford, James M.; Teshima, Takanori; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Tesolin, Amy; Rossignol, Daniel P.; Ferrara, James L.M.

    2001-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and leukemic relapse remain the two major obstacles to successful outcomes after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Recent studies have demonstrated that the loss of gastrointestinal tract integrity, and specifically the translocation of LPS into the systemic circulation, is critical to the induction of cytokine dysregulation that contributes to GVHD. Using a mouse BMT model, we studied the effects of direct LPS antagonism on GVHD severity and...

  13. Bone disease in patients with haemophilia A and B--where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostis, P; Karras, S N; Goulis, D G

    2015-01-01

    It is evident that haemophilia A and B are associated with decreased bone mass in both adults and children. Decreased physical activity and vitamin D deficiency are some of the major factors leading to bone loss. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection may also contribute to low bone mineral density (BMD). However, definite conclusions regarding the exact prevalence and pathogenesis of osteoporosis cannot be conducted yet, due to the small sample size and significant heterogeneity among studies. Discordant findings with regard to the skeletal site of low BMD have also been reported. Furthermore, data on fracture risk are sparse. The use of the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) for assessing fracture risk, regular BMD assessment at the age of 25 and thereafter, careful evaluation of risk factors associated with bone loss and optimal calcium and vitamin D intake are recommended. Long-term prophylactic factor replacement therapy, resistance exercise and bisphosphonates, in severe cases of increased fracture risk, can prevent bone loss. PMID:25251867

  14. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease - can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children. (orig.)

  15. Utility of unenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI in children with sickle cell disease - can it differentiate bone infarcts from acute osteomyelitis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, Jorge; Bedoya, Maria A. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Green, Abby M. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Oncology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego; Ho-Fung, Victor [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at risk of bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis. The clinical differentiation between a bone infarct and acute osteomyelitis is a diagnostic challenge. Unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images have been proposed as a potential tool to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis. To evaluate the reliability of unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MRI for differentiation between bone infarcts and acute osteomyelitis in children with SCD. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 31 children (20 boys, 11 girls; mean age 10.6 years, range 1.1-17.9 years) with SCD and acute bone pain who underwent MR imaging including unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated images from 2005 to 2010. Complete clinical charts were reviewed by a pediatric hematologist with training in infectious diseases to determine a clinical standard to define the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. A pediatric radiologist reviewed all MR imaging and was blinded to clinical information. Based on the signal intensity in T1-W fat-saturated images, the children were further classified as positive for osteomyelitis (low bone marrow signal intensity) or positive for bone infarct (high bone marrow signal intensity). Based on the clinical standard, 5 children were classified as positive for osteomyelitis and 26 children as positive for bone infarct (negative for osteomyelitis). The bone marrow signal intensity on T1-W fat-saturated imaging was not significant for the differentiation between bone infarct and osteomyelitis (P = 0.56). None of the additional evaluated imaging parameters on unenhanced MRI proved reliable in differentiating these diagnoses. The bone marrow signal intensity on unenhanced T1-W fat-saturated MR images is not a reliable criterion to differentiate bone infarcts from osteomyelitis in children. (orig.)

  16. Effects of recombinant human erythropoietin on the haemopoietic bone marrow monitored by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Stenver, D; Jensen, M;

    1990-01-01

    Volume selective magnetic resonance (MR) proton spectroscopy was used to investigate changes in the haemopoietic bone marrow in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). Significant changes could be detected in the spectra 14 days...... change in the spectrum four days after treatment began, indicating that MR spectroscopy may detect early changes in the cellular composition of the bone marrow. This noninvasive method may be useful in evaluating treatment effects of recombinant human haemopoietic growth factors in the bone marrow, as...... well as investigating bone marrow response from different modes of rHuEPO administration....

  17. Bone strength: more than just bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The following bone density measurements have limited utility in determining bone strength because they do not include bone quality: microarchitecture, mineralization, ability to repair damage, collagen structure, crystal size, or marrow composition. Patients with kidney disease have poor bone quality. Newman et al. now describe beneficial effects with raloxifene in an animal model of progressive kidney disease. These biomechanical measurements will be important in the development of medications to decrease fractures in patients. PMID:26759040

  18. Combined scintigraphic identification of acute bone marrow infarction in sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper identifies acute bone marrow infarction in symptomatic patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathy presenting with a clinical picture in which infarction and osteomyelitis were indistinguishable. The authors evaluated 25 patients, 14 females and 11 males, with a combination of Tc-99 sulfur colloid bone marrow and tc-99m MDP scintigraphy performed consecutively within a 24-h period, for a total of 36 combined studies. Sixty-seven sites of bone marrow infarction corresponding to sites of clinical symptoms were revealed by combined scintigraphy

  19. Compromised cortical bone compartment in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with microvascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shanbhogue, Vikram Vinod; Hansen, Stinus; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Rye Jørgensen, Niklas; Hermann, Pernille; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Brixen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    -resolution peripheral quantitative tomography (HR-pQCT) was used to assess bone structure at the non-dominant distal radius and tibia. Estimated bone strength was calculated using finite element analysis. Biochemical markers of bone turnover were measured in all participants. RESULTS: After adjusting for BMI, MVD......+ patients displayed lower cortical volumetric BMD (P=0.02) and cortical thickness (P=0.02) and higher cortical porosity at the radius (P=0.02) and a trend towards higher cortical porosity at the tibia (P=0.07) compared to controls. HR-pQCT parameters did not differ between MVD- and control subjects...

  20. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Araz

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Although further prospective clinical studies in specific cancer populations are indicated to set the place of 18F–NaF PET/CT in diagnostic scheme, the results of this pilot study from our country support the superiority of 18F–NaF PET/CT in investigation of bone metastasis over 99mTc-MDP bone scan and 18F-FDG PET/CT in various malignancies. 18F–NaF PET/CT is coming forward as a single step bone seeking study, considering all the advantages, but especially potential of detecting occult metastases and reliably directing patient management.

  1. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor/NAMPT/visfatin and its role in inflammation-related bone disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moschen, Alexander R.; Geiger, Sabine; Gerner, Romana [Christian Doppler Research Laboratory for Gut Inflammation and Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Tilg, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.tilg@i-med.ac.at [Christian Doppler Research Laboratory for Gut Inflammation and Department of Internal Medicine II (Gastroenterology and Hepatology), Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-08-07

    Chronic inflammation affects bone metabolism and is commonly associated with the presence of osteoporosis. Bone loss is directed by various immune mediators such as the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1-beta or interferon-gamma. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF)/nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase (NAMPT)/visfatin is a pleiotropic mediator acting as growth factor, cytokine and enzyme involved in energy and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism. PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin has been recently demonstrated to exert several pro-inflammatory functions. We studied serum levels of PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and their relation with bone mineral density (BMD). Furthermore, we were interested whether PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin affects osteoclastogenesis and involved mediators. PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin serum levels were increased in patients with IBD, correlated positively with disease activity and negatively with BMD, especially in the lumbar spine. Osteoclast precursor cells were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells after stimulation with various growth factors such as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and soluble ligand of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK). In these in vitro studies, PBEF/NAMPT/visfatin suppressed osteoclastogenesis and inhibited the differentiation of osteoclast precursors into tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive multinucleated cells. These effects were paralleled by the suppression of the osteoclast typical markers RANK, nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1 (NFATc1) and cathepsin-K. This is the first report demonstrating a potential role for this important cytokine/enzyme in inflammation-related bone disease.

  2. Autologous bone marrow concentrate: review and application of a novel intra-articular orthobiologic for cartilage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Steven; Botto-van Bemden, Angie; Aufiero, Danielle

    2013-09-01

    Younger adults, aged 65 years; however, the limited long-term durability of implanted prostheses decreases the preference of using such methods in more active patients aged cell-based orthobiologic injection therapies (pertaining to therapeutic injectables that aim to restore the biologic environment and/or structural components of diseased or damaged musculoskeletal tissue) is of tremendous interest for younger, more active patients, and is even more appealing in that such therapy can be delivered at point-of-care in the clinic during an office visit. Notably, the exponential rate of progress in biotechnology has allowed for immediate application of myriad novel therapies prior to clear evidence of benefit from randomized clinical trials. Orthobiologic intra-articular injection therapies include HA and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). We report on current, available findings for a third-generation intra-articular orthobiologic injectable therapy for cartilage disease, bone marrow concentrate (BMC). Bone marrow concentrate contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), hematopoetic stem cells, platelets (containing growth factors), and cytokines. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) can facilitate regeneration of tissue. Additionally, BMSCs enhance the quality of cartilage repair by increasing aggrecan content and tissue firmness. Following bone marrow aspiration (BMA), BMC is easily prepared using centrifugation, and is available for a same-day procedure with minimal manipulation of cells, thus complying with US Food and Drug Association (FDA) restrictions. To date, there are no published randomized controlled trials on the efficacy of use of autologous BMC intra-articular injections performed as a same-day in-office procedure for treating patients with cartilage disease; however, several publications have reported the ease of use of this method, its strong safety profile, and the fundamental science suggesting great

  3. High serum YKL-40 concentration is associated with severe bone disease in newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylin, Anne Kærsgaard; Abildgaard, N.; Johansen, J.S.;

    2008-01-01

    higher total X-ray score (P = 0.003) and higher levels of the markers of bone resorption serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (P = 0.003), urine pyridinoline (P = 0.04) and urine deoxypyridinoline (P = 0.002), while the levels of urine N-terminal telopeptide of collagen type I (NTX-1) and the...... markers of bone formation equalled those seen in patients with a normal serum YKL-40. Serum YKL-40 level (beta = 7.6; P = 0.002) and urine NTX-1 (log(2)) (beta = 3.5; P = 0.006) were independent predictors of total X-ray score at diagnosis. Patients with elevated serum YKL-40 at diagnosis had shorter time......Objectives: In multiple myeloma (MM) YKL-40 is present in the bone marrow microenvironment and is suggested to play a role in remodelling of the extracellular matrix. Here, the association between serum YKL-40 and severity of bone disease in MM is investigated. Methods: Serum YKL-40 was measured in...

  4. Myeloma bone and extra-medullary disease: Role of PET/CT and other whole-body imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Giuseppe; Niccoli-Asabella, Artor; Ferrari, Cristina; Racanelli, Vito; Maggialetti, Nicola; Dammacco, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematological malignancy. Although it can affect different organs, the bone compartment stands out both in terms of prevalence and clinical impact. Despite the striking advances in MM therapy, bone disease can remarkably affect the patient's quality of life. The occurrence and extension of bone marrow and extra-medullary involvement should be carefully assessed to confirm the diagnosis, to locate and whenever possible prevent dreadful complications such as pathological fractures and spinal cord compression, and to establish suitable therapeutic measures. Many imaging techniques have been proposed for the detection of MM skeletal involvement. With the development of more sophisticated imaging tools, it is time to use the right technique at the right time. Based on the review of the literature and our own experience, this article discusses advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging methods in the work-up of MM patients, with particular emphasis on the role that PET/CT can play. It is emphasized that whole body low-dose computed tomography should be the preferred imaging technique at baseline. However, bone marrow infiltration and extra-medullary manifestations are better detected by whole body magnetic resonance imaging. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography, on the other hand, combines the benefits of the two mentioned imaging procedures and is particularly useful not only for the detection of osteolytic lesions unrevealed by conventional X-ray, but also in the assessment of prognosis and therapeutic response. PMID:26997302

  5. Venocclusive disease of the liver after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (B.M.T.) following high-dose chemotherapy and single dose total body irradiation (T.B.I.) for hematologic malignancies between September 1980 and December 1985. All patients included in this study were treated using a 60Co beam to deliver a prescribed dose of 10 Gy to the mid-plane of the abdomen. Total body irradiation was performed the day before B.M.T. The mean instantaneous dose-rate was 3.5 cGy/min (range: 2.6 to 4.7). The real dose received was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (lithium borate). The difference between the doses delivered to the liver and to the mid-plane of the abdomen did not exceed 5%. The mean real dose delivered to the reference point was 10 Gy (range 8.3 to 11.7). Ninety five per cent of the patients received a dose ranging from 9.1 Gy to 10.9 Gy. High-dose cyclophosphamide was given to 126 patients with a standard-risk of relapse (60 mg/kg on day 5 and 4 before B.M.T.). Chemotherapy was intensified by the addition of other drugs in 25 patients with higher-risk of relapse. We analyzed the effect of the following pretransplant characteristics on the subsequent posttransplant development of V.O.D.: age, sex, ASAT and/or ALAT before conditioning regimen, diagnosis and status of malignant disease, history of liver disease, interval between diagnosis of hematologic malignancy and B.M.T., conditioning regimen (i.e., classical or intensified) and dose delivered to the liver during T.B.I. Seventeen patients were classified as having clinical V.O.D. giving a prevalence of 11.2%. In the first 2 months following B.M.T., death occurred respectively in 9 of 17 (53%) and 23 of 134 (17%) patients with and without clinical V.O.D

  6. Evaluation of CT-scanning of the temporal bone in the diagnosis of ear diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kiyotaka; Isono, Michio; Nishimae, Tadahide; Tamaki, Katsuhiko; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Ohta, Fumihiko (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan))

    1983-02-01

    CT-scanning of 96 temporal bones was carried out to reveal the extension of cholesteatoma, periossicular drainage, fracture lines, enlarged internal acoustic meatus and anomalies of labyrinthine capsules and ossicles. The clinical aspects of CT-scanning of the temporal bone (CTTB) were as follows: 1) Inner ear anomalies were observed in 17 temporal bones of unilateral deafness, high tone loss from unknown origin and fluctuant hearing loss. CTTB may explain the pathology of deafness from unknown origin; 2) Inner ear anomalies may be classified into more detailed groups than before; 3) The extension of cholesteatoma, localization and size of labyrinthine fistula can be estimated prior to surgery; 4) Cholesteatoma in a mastoidectomy cavity may be detected; 5) The malleus and incus may be visualized, although the stapes can hardly be found; 6) Fracture lines of a temporal bone, destruction of the internal acoustic meatus may be clearly detected.

  7. Evaluation of CT-scanning of the temporal bone in the diagnosis of ear diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT-scanning of 96 temporal bones was carried out to reveal the extension of cholesteatoma, periossicular drainage, fracture lines, enlarged internal acoustic meatus and anomalies of labyrinthine capsules and ossicles. The clinical aspects of CT-scanning of the temporal bone (CTTB) were as follows: 1) Inner ear anomalies were observed in 17 temporal bones of unilateral deafness, high tone loss from unknown origin and fluctuant hearing loss. CTTB may explain the pathology of deafness from unknown origin. 2) Inner ear anomalies may be classified into more detailed groups than before. 3) The extension of cholesteatoma, localization and size of labyrinthine fistula can be estimated prior to surgery. 4) Cholesteatoma in a mastoidectomy cavity may be detected. 5) The malleus and incus may be visualized, although the stapes can hardly be found. 6) Fracture lines of a temporal bone, destruction of the internal acoustic meatus may be clearly detected. (author)

  8. Effect of age and disease on bone mass in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Sugawara Norio; Yasui-Furukori Norio; Umeda Takashi; Tsuchimine Shoko; Fujii Akira; Sato Yasushi; Saito Manabu; Furukori Hanako; Danjo Kazuma; Matsuzaka Masashi; Takahashi Ippei; Kaneko Sunao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There have been a limited number of studies comparing bone mass between patients with schizophrenia and the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the bone mass of schizophrenia patients with that of healthy subjects in Japan. Methods We recruited patients (n = 362), aged 48.8 ± 15.4 (mean ± SD) years who were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV...

  9. Multiple bone and joint disease in a sickle cell anaemia patient: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    John Ayodele Olaniyi; Alagbe, Adekunle E.; Olutoogun O Toluwalase; Olorunsogo E Busari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To further highlight the fact that bone involvement is the commonest clinical manifestation of SCD both in the acute settins such painful VOC and as a source of chronic , progressive debility such as AVN, chronic osteomyelitis and fixed flexion deformity of joints. Protracted multiple bone involvement i.e. Bilateral femoral and left humeral chronic osteomyelitis, Left elbow, Left knee and right humeral septic arthritis together with aseptic necrosis of both femoral and right hum...

  10. Bone loss in thyroid disease: role of low TSH and high thyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Etsuko; Sun, Li; Mechanick, Jeffrey; Iqbal, Jameel; Yamoah, Kosj; Baliram, Ramkumarie; Arabi, Ario; Moonga, Baljit S; Davies, Terry F; Zaidi, Mone

    2007-11-01

    More than 10% of postmenopausal women in the United States receive thyroid hormone replacement therapy and up to 20% of these women are over-replaced inducing subclinical hyperthyroidism. Because hyperthyroidism and post menopausal osteoporosis overlap in women of advancing age, it is urgent to understand the effect of thyroid hormone excess on bone. We can now provide results that not thyroid hormones but also TSH itself has an equally important role to play in bone remodeling. PMID:18083940

  11. Modulation of bone marrow stromal cell functions in infectious diseases by toll-like receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Nemeth, Krisztian; Mayer, Balazs; Mezey, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs, or as they are frequently referred to as mesenchymal stem cells) have been long known to support hematopoiesis and to regenerate bone, cartilage, and adipose tissue. In the last decade, however, a vast amount of data surfaced in the literature to suggest new roles for these cells including tissue regeneration and immunomodulation. A great number of review articles appeared that summarize these new data and focus on different aspects of the physiology ...

  12. The usefulness of Tc-99m-MDP bone scintigraphy in detection of articular involvement of Behcet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Articular involvement was reported to be present in approximately 5-76% of Behcet patients. Therefore, we need a useful non-invasive method to detect articular involvement early in Behcet patients with nonspecific complaints. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (Tc-99m-MDP) bone scintigraphy in the detection of the articular involvement of Behcet's disease (BD). Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m-MDP was performed in 32 (17 male, 15 female) consecutive patients with BD. The sacroiliac (SI) joints with SI index higher than 1.34 were diagnosed as having sacroiliitis. Although joint complaints were present in only 8 (25%) patients, we detected joint involvement by scintigraphy in 27/32 (84.4%) Behcet patients mostly affecting the knees (62.5%), ankles (59.4%), SI joints (25%), wrists (21.9%), shoulders (18.7%), elbows (12.5%) and hips (3.1%). The articular involvement was monoarticular in four cases (12.5%) and was oligoarticular in the remaining. There was no correlation between joint involvement and age, gender, disease duration, drug usage or other clinical manifestations. Despite the fact that our patients were clinically asymptomatic and had normal pelvis radiography, sacroiliitis was found in 8 patients (25%). Bone scintigraphy is sensitive in the diagnosis of joint involvement allowing earlier diagnosis and showing the presence of articular involvement, especially in SI joints. (author)

  13. Treatment of Metastatic Bone Disease and the Emerging Role of Radium-223.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Bone metastases are common in advanced malignancy and, despite the developments in both anticancer and bone-targeted therapies in recent years, new therapeutic strategies are still needed. Traditionally, radioisotopes have been rarely used in part owing to concerns about bone marrow toxicity that limits retreatment and may prevent safe administration of subsequent chemotherapy. Radium-223 dichloride (Ra-223) is a calcium mimetic that binds preferentially to newly formed bone in areas of bone metastases, is the first alpha-emitting radionuclide to be developed for clinical use, and is approved for treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. In this setting, it improves overall survival and delays symptomatic skeletal complications. The high linear energy transfer of the emitted alpha particles causes predominantly nonrepairable double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid breaks in tumor cells, and the large size of the alpha particle, compared with other forms of radiation, results in a short path length and highly localized tissue destruction. As a result, Ra-223 has a highly favorable safety profile with a low level of myelosuppression. The role of Ra-223 in malignancy is discussed and the prospects for future development outlined. PMID:26897713

  14. Early diagnosis of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease: Value of bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging in comparison to radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of conventional radiology, bone scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the early diagnosis of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD) was assessed. The initial results were compared with the clinical and radiological findings of long-term follow-up in 43 children. Radiological and scintigraphic examination resulted in a relatively high number of equivocal findings (16% and 10%, respectively). MRI findings were less equivocal (3%). Depending on whether such findings were classified as normal or as pathological, the diagnostic accuracy ranged as follows: Radiography 88-93%, bone scintigraphy 88-91%, and MRI 97-99%. Therefore, MRI by itself seems to be sufficient to detect or exclude LCPD. The results of this study and the radiation exposure associated with radiography and scintigraphy raise the question whether MRI should be the diagnostic method of choice in patients with suspected LCPD. (orig.)

  15. Cardiovascular diseases in older patients with osteoporotic hip fracture: prevalence, disturbances in mineral and bone metabolism, and bidirectional links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A Fisher,1,3 W Srikusalanukul,1 M Davis,1,3 P Smith2,31Departments of Geriatric Medicine, 2Orthopaedic Surgery, The Canberra Hospital, 3Australian National University Medical School, Canberra, ACT, AustraliaBackground: Considerable controversy exists regarding the contribution of mineral/bone metabolism abnormalities to the association between cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and osteoporotic fractures.Aims and methods: To determine the relationships between mineral/bone metabolism biomarkers and CVD in 746 older patients with hip fracture, clinical data were recorded and serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium, phosphate, magnesium, troponin I, parameters of bone turnover, and renal, liver, and thyroid functions were measured.Results: CVDs were diagnosed in 472 (63.3% patients. Vitamin D deficiency was similarly prevalent in patients with (78.0% and without (82.1% CVD. The CVD group had significantly higher mean PTH concentrations (7.6 vs 6.0 pmol/L, P < 0.001, a higher prevalence of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SPTH (PTH > 6.8 pmol/L, 43.0% vs 23.3%, P < 0.001, and excess bone resorption (urinary deoxypyridinoline corrected by creatinine [DPD/Cr] > 7.5 nmol/µmol, 87.9% vs 74.8%, P < 0.001. In multivariate regression analysis, SHPT (odds ratio [OR] 2.6, P = 0.007 and high DPD/Cr (OR 2.8, P = 0.016 were independent indictors of CVD. Compared to those with both PTH and DPD/Cr in the normal range, multivariate-adjusted ORs for the presence of CVD were 17.3 (P = 0.004 in subjects with SHPT and 9.7 (P < 0.001 in patients with high DPD/Cr. CVD was an independent predicator of SHPT (OR 2.8, P = 0.007 and excess DPD/Cr (OR 2.5, P = 0.031. CVD was predictive of postoperative myocardial injury, while SHPT was also an independent predictor of prolonged hospital stay and in-hospital death.Conclusion: SHPT and excess bone resorption are independent pathophysiological mediators underlying the bidirectional associations

  16. Relationship of Dickkopf1 (DKK1 with cardiovascular disease and bone metabolism in Caucasian type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Garcia-Martín

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 is a potent inhibitor of Wnt signalling, which exerts anabolic effects on bone and also takes part in the regulation of vascular cells. Our aims were to evaluate serum DKK1 in type 2 diabetes (T2DM patients and to analyze its relationships with cardiovascular disease (CVD. We also evaluated the relationship between DKK1 and bone metabolism. DESIGN: We conducted a cross-sectional study in which we measured serum DKK1 (ELISA, Biomedica in 126 subjects: 72 patients with T2DM and 54 non-diabetic subjects. We analysed its relationship with clinical CVD, preclinical CVD expressed as carotid intima media thickness (IMT, and bone metabolism. RESULTS: T2DM patients with CVD (P = 0,026 and abnormal carotid IMT (P = 0,038 had higher DKK1 concentrations. DKK1 was related to the presence of CVD in T2DM, independently of the presence of risk factors for atherosclerosis. Therefore, for each increase of 28 pg/ml of serum DKK1 there was a 6,2% increase in the risk of CVD in T2DM patients. The ROC curve analysis to evaluate the usefulness of DKK1 as a marker for high risk of CVD showed an area under the curve of 0,667 (95% CI: 0,538-0,795; P = 0,016. In addition, there was a positive correlation between serum DKK1 and spine bone mineral density in the total sample (r =  0,183; P = 0,048. CONCLUSION: In summary, circulating DKK1 levels are higher in T2DM with CVD and are associated with an abnormal carotid IMT in this cross-sectional study. DKK1 may be involved in vascular disease of T2DM patients.

  17. SGLT2 inhibitor therapy improves blood glucose but does not prevent diabetic bone disease in diabetic DBA/2J male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M; Clay Bunn, R; Nyman, Jeffry S; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna R; Cockrell, Gael E; Wahl, Elizabeth C; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Lumpkin, Charles K; Fowlkes, John L

    2016-01-01

    Persons with type 1 and type 2 diabetes have increased fracture risk, attributed to deficits in the microarchitecture and strength of diabetic bone, thought to be mediated, in part, by the consequences of chronic hyperglycemia. Therefore, to examine the effects of a glucose-lowering SGLT2 inhibitor on blood glucose (BG) and bone homeostasis in a model of diabetic bone disease, male DBA/2J mice with or without streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia were fed chow containing the SGLT2 inhibitor, canagliflozin (CANA), or chow without drug, for 10weeks of therapy. Thereafter, serum bone biomarkers were measured, fracture resistance of cortical bone was assessed by μCT analysis and a three-point bending test of the femur, and vertebral bone strength was determined by compression testing. In the femur metaphysis and L6 vertebra, long-term diabetes (DM) induced deficits in trabecular bone microarchitecture. In the femur diaphysis, a decrease in cortical bone area, cortical thickness and minimal moment of inertia occurred in DM (p<0.0001, for all) while cortical porosity was increased (p<0.0001). These DM changes were associated with reduced fracture resistance (decreased material strength and toughness; decreased structural strength and rigidity; p<0.001 for all). Significant increases in PTH (p<0.0001), RatLAPs (p=0.0002), and urine calcium concentration (p<0.0001) were also seen in DM. Canagliflozin treatment improved BG in DM mice by ~35%, but did not improve microarchitectural parameters. Instead, in canagliflozin-treated diabetic mice, a further increase in RatLAPs was evident, possibly suggesting a drug-related intensification of bone resorption. Additionally, detrimental metaphyseal changes were noted in canagliflozin-treated control mice. Hence, diabetic bone disease was not favorably affected by canagliflozin treatment, perhaps due to insufficient glycemic improvement. Instead, in control mice, long-term exposure to SGLT2 inhibition was associated with

  18. Effect of age and disease on bone mass in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugawara Norio

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been a limited number of studies comparing bone mass between patients with schizophrenia and the general population. The aim of this study was to compare the bone mass of schizophrenia patients with that of healthy subjects in Japan. Methods We recruited patients (n = 362, aged 48.8 ± 15.4 (mean ± SD years who were diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV. Bone mass was measured using quantitative ultrasound densitometry of the calcaneus. The osteosono-assessment index (OSI was calculated as a function of the speed of sound and the transmission index. For comparative analysis, OSI data from 832 adults who participated in the Iwaki Health Promotion Project 2009 was used as representative of the general community. Results Mean OSI values among male schizophrenic patients were lower than those in the general population in the case of individuals aged 40 and older. In females, mean OSI values among schizophrenic patients were lower than those in the general community in those aged 60 and older. In an analysis using the general linear model, a significant interaction was observed between subject groups and age in males. Conclusions Older schizophrenic patients exhibit lower bone mass than that observed in the general population. Our data also demonstrate gender and group differences among schizophrenic patients and controls with regard to changes in bone mass associated with aging. These results indicate that intervention programs designed to delay or prevent decreased bone mass in schizophrenic patients might be tailored according to gender.

  19. MRI of the wrist and finger joints in inflammatory joint diseases at 1-year interval: MRI features to predict bone erosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savnik, Anette [Department of Rheumatology, Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Malmskov, Hanne; Graff, Lykke B.; Danneskiold-Samsoee, Bente; Bliddal, Henning [Department of Rheumatology, Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark); Thomsen, Henrik S. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nielsen, Henrik [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital at Herlev, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boesen, Jens [Department of Radiology, Frederiksberg Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of MRI determined synovial volumes and bone marrow oedema to predict progressions in bone erosions after 1 year in patients with different types of inflammatory joint diseases. Eighty-four patients underwent MRI, laboratory and clinical examination at baseline and 1 year later. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist and finger joints was performed in 22 patients with rheumatoid arthritis less than 3 years (group 1) who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, 18 patients with reactive arthritis or psoriatic arthritis (group 2), 22 patients with more than 3 years duration of rheumatoid arthritis, who fulfilled the ACR criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (group 3), and 20 patients with arthralgia (group 4). The volume of the synovial membrane was outlined manually before and after gadodiamide injection on the T1-weighted sequences in the finger joints. Bones with marrow oedema were summed up in the wrist and fingers on short-tau inversion recovery sequences. These MRI features was compared with the number of bone erosions 1 year later. The MR images were scored independently under masked conditions. The synovial volumes in the finger joints assessed on pre-contrast images was highly predictive of bone erosions 1 year later in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (groups 1 and 3). The strongest individual predictor of bone erosions at 1-year follow-up was bone marrow oedema, if present at the wrist at baseline. Bone erosions on baseline MRI were in few cases reversible at follow-up MRI. The total synovial volume in the finger joints, and the presence of bone oedema in the wrist bones, seems to be predictive for the number of bone erosions 1 year later and may be used in screening. The importance of very early bone changes on MRI and the importance of the reversibility of these findings remain to be clarified. (orig.)

  20. Haematological toxicity of radiotherapy following high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    17 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease received 21 courses of radiotherapy (RT) 1-23 months after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation. WHO grade III-IV haematological toxicity, of median duration 38 days (range 4-236), was observed following 10 courses of radiotherapy in 9 patients. This haematological morbidity could be predicted with an 80.0% sensitivity when the pre-RT white cell count was 9/1 or the platelet count 9/1. It occurred to 9/11 patients with initial stage III-IV disease, including all 6 given extended radiotherapy fields, but in no patients with initial stage II disease (χ2 = 9.35, P < 0.005). Age, histology, the presence of B symptoms, performance status, previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy, the interval between autologous bone marrow transplantations and radiotherapy, the high-dose regimen used, and the radiotherapy dose or field size, did not appear to affect haematological toxicity. The median survival was 18 months from the date of starting radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Inflammatory diseases of the petrous portion of the temporal bone; Entzuendliche Erkrankungen des Felsenbeins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Inflammatory lesions of the petrous portion of the temporal bone are very common and can be followed by cerebral complications. Thin layer computed tomography (CT) is useful for detecting bony changes of the temporal bone and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE MRI) is a sensitive method for detecting cerebral complications. (orig.) [German] Entzuendliche Erkrankungen des Felsenbeins sind sehr haeufig und koennen mit zerebralen Komplikationen einhergehen. Mit der Duennschicht-CT lassen sich sehr gut ossaere Veraenderungen im Felsenbein nachweisen. Die kontrastmittelgestuetzte MRT ist sensitiv fuer zerebrale Komplikationen. (orig.)

  2. The interest of radiographical investigations of bone diseases in the selection of stallions [orthopedic lesions, abnormal radiographic findings, multivariate analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breeding of sport horses requires products with qualities for performance traits. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relation between radiographical examination and descendant of sires. Foots, fetlocks of both thoracic and pelvic limbs, carpus, tarsus and stifles were examined radiographically in 225 3-year old horses descent from 25 stallions. Data were analysed by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that descendant of a stallion presents the same abnormal radiographic findings. It is concluded that bone diseases are of great importance in breeding sport horses and that these abnormalities could have a genetic component

  3. Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Male Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by DXA and Quantitative Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    George Fountoulis; Theodora Kerenidi; Constantinos Kokkinis; Panagiotis Georgoulias; Paschal Thriskos; Konstantinos Gourgoulianis; Ioannis Fezoulidis; Katerina Vassiou; Marianna Vlychou

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the prevalence of osteoporosis in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and to compare the diagnostic abilities of the above methods. Thirty-seven male patients with established COPD were examined with DXA and standard QCT in lumbar spine, including L1, L2, and L3 vertebrae. T-scores and bone mineral density values were calculated by DXA and Q...

  4. Defective Neutrophil Recruitment in Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type I Disease Causes Local IL-17-Driven Inflammatory Bone Loss.

    OpenAIRE

    Moutsopoulos, N. M.; Konkel, J.; Sarmadi, M.; Eskan, M. A.; Wild, T.; N Dutzan; L Abusleme; Zenobia, C; Hosur, K. B.; Abe, T.; Uzel, G.; Chen, W.; Chavakis, T.; Holland, S.M.; Hajishengallis, G

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency Type I (LAD-I), a disease syndrome associated with frequent microbial infections, is caused by mutations on the CD18 subunit of β2 integrins. LAD-I is invariably associated with severe periodontal bone loss, historically attributed to lack of neutrophil surveillance of the periodontal infection. Here, we challenge this dogma by showing that the cytokine IL-17 plays a major role in the oral pathology of LAD-I. Defective neutrophil recruitment in LAD-I patients, or...

  5. Dual photon absorptiometry in patients with Paget disease (bone mineral contents of lumbar spine and femoral neck)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bone mineral contents (BMC) of the lumbar spine (84 cases) and of one femoral neck (53 cases) were measured by dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) in patients suffering from Paget's disease of bone. The BMC of the patients and of 53 controls were compared, taking into account the occurrence of a scintigraphic hyperfixation, in each patient. A hyperfixation of the technetium labelled diphosphonate in the lumbar spine, more frequent in males, was associated with an elevated mean BMC value. The difference versus controls was significant in men but not in women. A hyperfixation of the femoral neck was associated with an elevated mean BMC value in both sexes. BMC values greater than the mean BMC of controls + 2 SD were observed in 83 per cent of these male patients and 50 per cent of the females. In contrast, BMC values lower than in controls were observed in non-pagetic areas. DPA allows the quantification of these abnormalities which cannot be evidenced by bone scintigraphy even if alkaline phosphatases levels are assayed

  6. Mathematical modeling of bone marrow - peripheral blood dynamics in the disease state based on current emerging paradigms, part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenya, Evans K; Ouifki, Rachid; Camara, Baba I; Mundle, Suneel D

    2016-04-01

    Stemming from current emerging paradigms related to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, an existing mathematical model is expanded and used to study cell interaction dynamics in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. The proposed mathematical model is described by a system of nonlinear differential equations with delay, to quantify the dynamics in abnormal hematopoiesis. The steady states of the model are analytically and numerically obtained. Some conditions for the local asymptotic stability of such states are investigated. Model analyses suggest that malignancy may be irreversible once it evolves from a nonmalignant state into a malignant one and no intervention takes place. This leads to the proposition that a great deal of emphasis be placed on cancer prevention. Nevertheless, should malignancy arise, treatment programs for its containment or curtailment may have to include a maximum and extensive level of effort to protect normal cells from eventual destruction. Further model analyses and simulations predict that in the untreated disease state, there is an evolution towards a situation in which malignant cells dominate the entire bone marrow - peripheral blood system. Arguments are then advanced regarding requirements for quantitatively understanding cancer stem cell behavior. Among the suggested requirements are, mathematical frameworks for describing the dynamics of cancer initiation and progression, the response to treatment, the evolution of resistance, and malignancy prevention dynamics within the bone marrow - peripheral blood architecture. PMID:26877072

  7. Smoking and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It has been called a childhood disease with old age consequences because building healthy bones in youth helps ... stronger. Weight-bearing exercise that forces you to work against gravity is the best exercise for bone. ...

  8. Reliability analysis of instrument design of noninvasive bone marrow disease detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yu; Li, Ting; Sun, Yunlong

    2016-02-01

    Bone marrow is an important hematopoietic organ, and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) may cause a variety of complications with high death rate and short survival time. Early detection and follow up care are particularly important. But the current diagnosis methods rely on bone marrow biopsy/puncture, with significant limitations such as invasion, complex operation, high risk, and discontinuous. It is highly in need of a non-invasive, safe, easily operated, and continuous monitoring technology. So we proposed to design a device aimed for detecting bone marrow lesions, which was based on near infrared spectrum technology. Then we fully tested its reliabilities, including the sensitivity, specificity, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), stability, and etc. Here, we reported this sequence of reliability test experiments, the experimental results, and the following data analysis. This instrument was shown to be very sensitive, with distinguishable concentration less than 0.002 and with good linearity, stability and high SNR. Finally, these reliability-test data supported the promising clinical diagnosis and surgery guidance of our novel instrument in detection of BMLs.

  9. Renal bone disease and extraskeletal calcification during dialysis and after transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reports 10 studies concerning the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy and extraskeletal calcification in patients on maintenance hemodialysis as well as some aspects of persistent hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation. The majority of the studies focus on the value of bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m HEDP in the diagnosis of these disorders. (Auth.)

  10. Reconversion of bone marrow in Gaucher disease treated with enzyme therapy documented by MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Skeletal complications are responsible for significant morbidity in Gaucher patients. Plain radiographs have been unreliable in assessing bone marrow infiltration and activity. A way to assess bone marrow improvement is needed during enzyme therapy. Objective. The purpose of this paper is to assess the usefulness of MR in following improvement of abnormal bone marrow in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. Materials and methods. Three patients aged 2, 7, and 24 years underwent serial MR scans of the lower extremities before and during treatment with Alglucerase (two patients) and Imiglucerase (one patient). T1-weighted, T2-weighted, STIR and FSE T2-weighted images were utilized. Two patients were imaged after 16 months of therapy, and one patient was imaged after 6 months of therapy. Results. All patients had improvement in marrow signal consistent with partial reconversion to fatty marrow during treatment. The findings were more marked after prolonged therapy. T1-weighted images demonstrated findings most clearly. Conclusion. MR consistently showed improvement in marrow signal in Gaucher patients on enzyme therapy. As smaller doses of enzyme therapy are the trend, MR can be utilized to determine if therapy is effecting a change in the bone marrow. (orig.)

  11. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  12. NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice are an ideal strain to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents used in the treatment of myeloma bone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Lawson

    Full Text Available Animal models of multiple myeloma vary in terms of consistency of onset, degree of tumour burden and degree of myeloma bone disease. Here we describe five pre-clinical models of myeloma in NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice to specifically study the effects of therapeutic agents on myeloma bone disease. Groups of 7-8 week old female irradiated NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice were injected intravenously via the tail vein with either 1x106 JJN3, U266, XG-1 or OPM-2 human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived myeloma cells. At the first signs of morbidity in each tumour group all animals were sacrificed. Tumour load was measured by histological analysis, and bone disease was assessed by micro-CT and standard histomorphometric methods. Mice injected with JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells showed high tumour bone marrow infiltration of the long bones with low variability, resulting in osteolytic lesions. In contrast, mice injected with XG-1 or patient-derived myeloma cells showed lower tumour bone marrow infiltration and less bone disease with high variability. Injection of JJN3 cells into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice resulted in an aggressive, short-term model of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 3 weeks later. Treating these mice with zoledronic acid at the time of tumour cell injection or once tumour was established prevented JJN3-induced bone disease but did not reduce tumour burden, whereas, carfilzomib treatment given once tumour was established significantly reduced tumour burden. Injection of U266, XG-1, OPM-2 and patient-derived myeloma cells resulted in less aggressive longer-term models of myeloma with mice exhibiting signs of morbidity 8 weeks later. Treating U266-induced disease with zoledronic acid prevented the formation of osteolytic lesions and trabecular bone loss as well as reducing tumour burden whereas, carfilzomib treatment only reduced tumour burden. In summary, JJN3, U266 or OPM-2 cells injected into NOD/SCID-GAMMA mice provide robust models to study anti

  13. Aspects of osteo-articular complications in sickle-cell disease on planar bone scintigraphy (infection excluded). Apropos of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeletal complications of sickle-cell anemia are multiple and can appear on the acute (osseous infarction, acute osteomyelitis) or chronic mode (osteonecrosis, chronic osteomyelitis). The radio-labelled diphosphonate bone scintigraphy remains an important tool in the early diagnosis and in the follow-up of these complications and must form part of the initial assessment of the disease. Through clinical observations, the authors undertake to sum up the bone scintigraphy aspects of these complications. (author)

  14. Non-traumatic evaluation of bone mineral by single and dual photon absorptiometry implications for medical research and diagnosis of skeletal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific requirements for the non-traumatic measurements of bone mineral mass can be defined as follows: First, for longitudinal measurements high precision or reproducibility is required. There should be few obstacles to repeated measurements such as radiation dose, cost, patient involvement, and there should be little room for systematic error such as positioning. Second, for the detection of osteopenia or bone loss, accuracy is very important and a good normal population study for comparison. Third, the method should be of sufficient sensitivity to detect clinically significant bone loss. This is about 1% per year in normal women and may be up to 10% in the postmenopausal period in women with osteoporosis. Thus, changes of bone mineral of 3% to 5% should be detected. Fourth, the method should allow separate measurements of regional, predominantly cortical, and trabecular bone sites. Radioscopy, radiographic morphometry, radiographic photo-densitometry are generally not sensitive enough for present day demands but have been used successfully in the past for the definition of marked abnormalities and disease. Radionuclide uptake or neutron activation analysis give results in the entire skeleton and do not allow separation of cortical and trabecular bone sites. CT scanning and Compton scattering methods are presently being developed. Their potential of being developed to clinically-practical tests is not clear today. At this time, single and dual photon absorptiometry are the best practical methods to study regional bone mineral mass of predominantly cortical and trabecular bone sites with good sensitivity, accuracy and precision

  15. Dose escalation of consolidation radiation therapy (involved field) following autologous bone marrow transplant for recurrent Hodgkin's disease and lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Patients with recurrent or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD) are frequently treated with intensive chemotherapy and autologous stem-cell rescue. Subsequent relapse is usually in sites of previous disease. We questioned whether radiotherapy (RT) to such sites after autologous bone marrow transplant (ABMT) might diminish such failures while not interrupting pre-ABMT chemotherapy or increasing peri-transplant morbidity. Methods: Since 11/88, 225 patients with recurrent or refractory NHL or or HD have undergone ABMT. Since 9/90, involved field (IF) RT was administered between 4-12 weeks post-ABMT to 70 of these patients who entered pre-transplant salvage chemotherapy with clinical or radiographic evidence of disease. The dose of IFRT was dependent on the disease response to induction chemotherapy and the BMT conditioning regimen. Patients demonstrating a complete response (CR) to reinduction chemo received 20 Gy IFRT. Patients with residual disease at the time of BMT but demonstrating a CR to the BMT conditioning regimen received 30 Gy. Patients with identifiable disease post BMT who showed diminution of disease after 30 Gy were boosted to 36 - 40 Gy. Patients were not irradiated if they had received TBI, previous RT to sites of concern, refused RT, relapsed too quickly to receive RT, or were in complete remission by ABMT. Patients were also analyzed according to their disease burden at ABMT defined as 2 cm disease. Field placement and design to include tumor volume was tailored to response but initially included the preBMT tumor volume with cone-down as dose was escalated in order to exclude dose limiting normal tissue. Results: The results are promising, and similar to our previously reported 3 years survival. For all patients, the 3-year actuarial event-free survival (EFS) rate (Kaplan-Meier log rank test) for 150 NHL and 75 HD patients is 45% and 50%, respectively. The 2 year EFS for NHL patients treated with or without

  16. Bone marrow oedema on MR imaging indicates ARCO stage 3 disease in patients with AVN of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Reinhard; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Munich (Germany); Kraus, Tobias M. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Tuebingen, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Tuebingen (Germany); Torka, Sebastian [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany); Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik Murnau, Department of Trauma and Orthopaedics, Murnau (Germany); Schlitter, Anna Melissa; Specht, Katja [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Pathology, Munich (Germany); Haller, Bernhard [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Rechl, Hans [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Orthopaedics, Munich (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    To test the hypothesis that bone marrow oedema (BME) observed on MRI in patients with avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head represents an indicator of subchondral fracture. Thirty-seven symptomatic hips of 27 consecutive patients (53 % women, mean age 49.2) with AVN of the femoral head and associated BME on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were included. MR findings were correlated with computed tomography (CT) of the hip and confirmed by histopathological examination of the resected femoral head. Imaging studies were analysed by two radiologists with use of the ARCO classification. On MR imaging a fracture line could be identified in 19/37 (51 %) cases, which were classified as ARCO stage 3 (n = 15) and stage 4 (n = 4). The remaining 18/37 (49 %) cases were classified as ARCO stage 2. However, in all 37/37 (100 %) cases a subchondral fracture was identified on CT, indicating ARCO stage 3/4 disease. The extent of subchondral fractures and the femoral head collapse was graded higher on CT as compared to MRI (P < 0.05). Histopathological analysis confirmed bone necrosis and subchondral fractures. In patients with AVN, BME of the femoral head represents a secondary sign of subchondral fracture and thus indicates ARCO stage 3 disease. circle BME on MRI in AVN of femoral head indicates a subchondral fracture. (orig.)

  17. The impact of bone marrow micrometastases on metastatic disease-free survival in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, O J

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: The biological relevance of bone marrow micrometastases (BMM) in colorectal cancer remains unknown. Here, we investigate their nature by examining the impact of the presence of BMM on metastatic disease-free survival in a cohort of patients with this disease. METHODS: Sixty-three consecutive patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer of any stage were studied after approval of the study protocol by the local ethics committee and with full individual informed consent. All had bilateral iliac crest bone marrow aspirates prior to operation. Aspirates were then examined for the presence of aberrant cytokeratin-18-positive cells by a blinded observer using both flow cytometric and APAAP immunohistochemical techniques. RESULTS: Mean follow-up after surgery was 4.6 years (range 1.9-6.9) for those without hepatic metastases at diagnosis. Seven of 34 patients with Dukes\\' stage A or B developed metastatic disease after a mean interval of 4.7 years (range 3.8-6.8). However, only 2 of these patients demonstrated BMM at the time of surgery. Nine of 15 patients with Dukes\\' C carcinoma at the time of surgery subsequently developed metastases after a mean interval of 4.4 years (range 1.9-6.9). Again, only two of these patients had BMM detectable initially. In only three of the 14 patients known to have metastases at the time of operation (i.e. Dukes\\'\\'D\\' disease) were BMM found. CONCLUSION: The presence of BMM as detected by this methodology was not predictive of tumour recurrence or metastasis. This study does not support the consideration of adjuvant therapy based on the presence of BMM at a single pre-operative time point in patients with colorectal cancer.

  18. Pediatric and adult MRI atlas of bone marrow. Normal appearances, variants and diffuse disease states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic Department of Radiology, OH (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This comprehensive atlas is unique in being devoted to the MRI appearances of bone marrow in the axial and appendicular skeleton of adults and children. Normal MRI findings, including common variants and degenerative changes, are first documented. MRI appearances in the entire spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic infiltrative marrow disorders are then presented, with accompanying explanatory text. Among the conditions considered are multiple myeloma, the acute and chronic leukemias, diffuse metastases, diffuse lymphomas, the anemias, polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis, storage disorders, and infections. Characteristic changes to bone marrow following various forms of treatment are also displayed and discussed. The selected images reflect the use of a variety of sequences and techniques, such as fat suppression, and contrast-enhanced imaging.

  19. Pediatric and adult MRI atlas of bone marrow. Normal appearances, variants and diffuse disease states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive atlas is unique in being devoted to the MRI appearances of bone marrow in the axial and appendicular skeleton of adults and children. Normal MRI findings, including common variants and degenerative changes, are first documented. MRI appearances in the entire spectrum of neoplastic and non-neoplastic infiltrative marrow disorders are then presented, with accompanying explanatory text. Among the conditions considered are multiple myeloma, the acute and chronic leukemias, diffuse metastases, diffuse lymphomas, the anemias, polycythemia vera, myelofibrosis, storage disorders, and infections. Characteristic changes to bone marrow following various forms of treatment are also displayed and discussed. The selected images reflect the use of a variety of sequences and techniques, such as fat suppression, and contrast-enhanced imaging.

  20. Computed tomography analysis of guinea pig bone: architecture, bone thickness and dimensions throughout development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Witkowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The domestic guinea pig, Cavia aperea f. porcellus, belongs to the Caviidae family of rodents. It is an important species as a pet, a source of food and in medical research. Adult weight is achieved at 8–12 months and life expectancy is ∼5–6 years. Our aim was to map bone local thickness, structure and dimensions across developmental stages in the normal animal. Guinea pigs (n = 23 that had died of natural causes were collected and the bones manually extracted and cleaned. Institutional ethical permission was given under the UK Home Office guidelines and the Veterinary Surgeons Act. X-ray Micro Computed Tomography (microCT was undertaken on the left and right scapula, humerus and femur from each animal to ascertain bone local thickness. Images were also used to undertake manual and automated bone measurements, volumes and surface areas, identify and describe nutrient, supratrochlear and supracondylar foramina. Statistical analysis between groups was carried out using ANOVA with post-hoc testing. Our data mapped a number of dimensions, and mean and maximum bone thickness of the scapula, humerus and femur in guinea pigs aged 0–1 month, 1–3 months, 3–6 months, 6 months–1 year and 1–4 years. Bone dimensions, growth rates and local bone thicknesses differed between ages and between the scapula, humerus and femur. The microCT and imaging software technology showed very distinct differences between the relative local bone thickness across the structure of the bones. Only one bone showed a singular nutrient foramen, every other bone had between 2 and 5, and every nutrient canal ran in an oblique direction. In contrast to other species, a supratrochlear foramen was observed in every humerus whereas the supracondylar foramen was always absent. Our data showed the bone local thickness, bone structure and measurements of guinea pig bones from birth to 4 years old. Importantly it showed that bone development continued after 1 year, the point

  1. Adseverin plays a role in osteoclast differentiation and periodontal disease-mediated bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Viniegra, Ana; Sima, Corneliu; McCulloch, Christopher A; Glogauer, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Osteoclast differentiation and function are highly dependent on the assembly and turnover of actin filaments, but little is known about the roles of actin binding proteins in these processes. Adseverin (Ads), a member of the gelsolin superfamily of actin capping and severing proteins, regulates actin filament turnover and can regulate the turnover of cortical actin filaments of chromaffin cells during exocytosis. Using a conditional Ads knockout mouse model, we confirmed our previous finding in cultured cells that Ads plays a role in osteoclastogenesis (OCG) and actin cytoskeletal organization in osteoclasts. Here we show that Ads is required for osteoclast formation and that when alveolar bone resorption is experimentally induced in mice, genetic deletion of Ads prevents osteoclast-mediated bone loss. Further, when Ads-null osteoclasts are cultured, they exhibit defective OCG, disorganized podosome-based actin filament superstructures, and decreased bone resorption. Reintroduction of Ads into Ads-null osteoclast precursor cells restored these osteoclast defects. Collectively, these data demonstrate a unique and osteoclast-specific role for Ads in OCG and osteoclast function. PMID:25681458

  2. Metabolic bone disease in the preterm infant: Current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Moghis Ur; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-09-26

    Neonatal osteopenia is an important area of interest for neonatologists due to continuing increased survival of preterm infants. It can occur in high-risk infants such as preterm infants, infants on long-term diuretics or corticosteroids, and those with neuromuscular disorders. Complications such as rickets, pathological fractures, impaired respiratory function and poor growth in childhood can develop and may be the first clinical evidence of the condition. It is important for neonatologists managing such high-risk patients to regularly monitor biochemical markers for evidence of abnormal bone turnover and inadequate mineral intake in order to detect the early phases of impaired bone mineralization. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry has become an increasingly used research tool for assessing bone mineral density in children and neonates, but more studies are still needed before it can be used as a useful clinical tool. Prevention and early detection of osteopenia are key to the successful management of this condition and oral phosphate supplements should be started as soon as is feasible. PMID:26413483

  3. Diagnostic Workup for Disorders of Bone and Mineral Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Era of KDIGO Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Francesco Morrone; Domenico Russo; Biagio Di Iorio

    2011-01-01

    KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes) is an international nonprofit organization devoted to “improve the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through promoting coordination, collaboration, and integration of initiatives to develop and implement clinical practice guidelines.” The mineral and bone disorder (MBD) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been the first area of interest of KDIGO international initiative. KDIGO guidelines on CKD-MBD were publi...

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of 6 cases with Paget′s disease of bone%畸形性骨炎六例的临床诊治分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑燕; 杜洪泉; 章振林

    2015-01-01

    6例畸形性骨炎患者(男5,女1),平均年龄为(57.7±11.8)岁,平均病程为(7.5±6.5)年。临床症状均表现为受累骨骼疼痛,病变主要累及骨盆和股骨。 X 线摄片均显示畸形性骨炎特征性的改变。骨扫描检查显示受累骨骼的核素异常浓聚。 6例患者的血清碱性磷酸酶(ALP)均有不同程度升高,中位数为235 U/ L。5例患者予唑来膦酸钠静脉滴注治疗,治疗后3个月疼痛明显缓解,活动功能改善,血清 ALP水平下降,疗效明显。%Six cases of Paget′s disease of bone, including 5 males and 1 female, aged (57. 7 ±11. 8) years old, were recruited. Mean duration of disease was (7. 5±6. 5) years. Clinical manifestations were bone pain and bone deformity. The lesions mainly reside in the pelvis and femur. X-ray film showed typical lesion of Paget′s disease of bone, such as impaired bone trabecular structure with coarseness and disorder, cortical thickening, medullary cavity narrowing and skeletal deformation. Bone scan revealed abnormal radionuclide concentration in the involved bone. Serum alkaline phosphatase ( ALP) in 6 patients was increased ( median 235 U/ L). 5 patients received zoledronic acid sodium intravenous infusion therapy. Bone pain was relieved obviously in 5 patients after treatment for 2-3 months. Physical activity was greatly improved, and serum ALP levels significantly decreased.

  5. Aortic calcification and femoral bone density are independently associated with left ventricular mass in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Chue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vascular calcification and reduced bone density are prevalent in chronic kidney disease and linked to increased cardiovascular risk. The mechanism is unknown. We assessed the relationship between vascular calcification, femoral bone density and left ventricular mass in patients with stage 3 non-diabetic chronic kidney disease in a cross-sectional observational study. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 120 patients were recruited (54% male, mean age 55 ± 14 years, mean glomerular filtration rate 50 ± 13 ml/min/1.73 m(2. Abdominal aortic calcification was assessed using lateral lumbar spine radiography and was present in 48%. Mean femoral Z-score measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry was 0.60 ± 1.06. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine left ventricular mass. One patient had left ventricular hypertrophy. Subjects with aortic calcification had higher left ventricular mass compared to those without (56 ± 16 vs. 48 ± 12 g/m(2, P = 0.002, as did patients with femoral Z-scores below zero (56 ± 15 vs. 49 ± 13 g/m(2, P = 0.01. In univariate analysis presence of aortic calcification correlated with left ventricular mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.001; mean femoral Z-score inversely correlated with left ventricular mass (r = -0.28, P = 0.004. In a multivariate regression model that included presence of aortic calcification, mean femoral Z-score, gender and 24-hour systolic blood pressure, 46% of the variability in left ventricular mass was explained (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with stage 3 non-diabetic chronic kidney disease, lower mean femoral Z-score and presence of aortic calcification are independently associated with increased left ventricular mass. Further research exploring the pathophysiology that underlies these relationships is warranted.

  6. 多学科协同治疗骨关节疾病%Multidisciplinary treatment of bone and joint diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张奉春

    2012-01-01

    The bone and joint diseases are very common, have chronic, recurrent characteristics and often lead to discomfort and disability in China. These diseases affect human health seriously. The etiology and pathogenesis are unknown. They may be related with genetic, environmental factors and autoimmune reaction. Rehabilitation exercise, health education, medical treatment and operation are the main methods in the treatment of the diseases. The expected benefits of the treatment are pain relief, improvement or prevention of further deterioration, and prevention of deformity. The types of treatments are different for various diseases. Short-term or long-term treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relive the pain of bone and joint. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are selected in the first-line treatment as soon as possible in rheumatoid arthritis, and seronegative spondylo-arthropathies can be treated with SASP and symptoms of some patients are relieved. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have fostered the development of new therapeutics (biological drugs such as TNF-a inhibitors and rituximab), with improved outcomes. However, operation for advanced stage or medicine ineffective patients is also very important. Rheumatology is very young in China, which is still facing the lack of the rheumatology physician after more than 20 years' development. The cooperation of surgeons and rheumatology physicians is very important, but it has not been recognized and emphasized so far. We should pay more attention to the cooperation in the clinical work in the future.%@@ 一、概述 世界卫生组织将2000年至2010年定为"骨与关节的十年",这一项以"增进患有肌肉与骨骼疾病患者的健康,进一步改善他们的生活质量"作为目标的活动意义重大.骨关节病的范围广泛,除了骨关节炎、类风湿关节炎等各种关节疾病外,还包括脊柱疾病、骨质疏松症以

  7. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  8. Influence of zinc on growth and bone maturation in children with end stage renal disease (ESRD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children with ESRD, age 5-19 years, were supplemented with zinc acetate (2 mg/kg BW, maximum 40 mg/da/child) to determine if zinc supplements (ZS) would improve growth and bone maturation. Twelve children completed the study. Three of the 12 did not receive ZS. Seven of the 9 ZS children were followed for 1 year pre- and 1 yr during-ZS. Two subjects were followed for shorter periods of time. Heights, weights, and hand wrist radiographs were taken at the beginning of the study, just pre-ZS, and at the end of the study. Blood was analyzed for serum alkaline phosphatase and albumin monthly. Alkaline phosphatase was elevated in 7 of 12 subjects pre-ZS and in 5 of 9 subjects post-ZS. Albumin levels were below normal in 7 subjects pre-ZS and 4 subjects post-ZS. Mean plasma Zn and Cu levels, 97+/-17 and 164+/-42 mcg/dl, pre-ZS, and 102+/-30 and 173+/-46 mcg/dl post-ZS, respectively, were similar. Growth velocity in males (4.1+/-2.2 cm/yr, 3.0+/-2.3 cm/yr) and females (3.9+/-0.7, 3.3+/-2.1 cm/yr) pre- and post-ZS, respectively, were similar. Bone maturation per chronological age improved after ZS in 4 of 6 subjects, 1 matured at the same rate, and one at a slower rate. It appears that ZS of children with ESRD increased the rate of bone maturation but not linear growth

  9. Lower bone mineral density in Patients with Parkinson’s disease: a cross-sectional study from Chinese Mainland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Although several lines of evidence have suggested that patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD have a higher risk of osteoporosis and fracture, the association between bone mineral density and severity of PD patients is unknown. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 54 patients with PD and 59 healthy age-matched controls. Multiple clinical scales were used to evaluate the severity of PD, and serum levels of calcium, phosphorus, and homocysteine were measured to determine bone mineral density’s association with PD severity. Results BMD in PD patients was significantly lower than in healthy controls. The BMD scores of the spine, femoral neck, and hip were lower in females than in males in the healthy group. In the PD group, BMD in the hip was significantly lower in females compared to males. There was a negative correlation between daily L-dopa dosage and BMD in the spine and hip in the PD group, while BMD in the spine, neck, and hip was significantly correlated with severity of PD. Besides, we found that among the lumbar spine, femoral neck and hip, bone loss in the lumbar spine was the most severe in PD patients based on the T-scores. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that patients with PD have a higher risk of osteoporosis, and that low BMD in the spine, femoral neck, and hip may indirectly reflect the severity of PD. Our findings have prompted us to pay more attention to osteoporosis in the lumbar spine in Chinese PD patients.

  10. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Attenuate Lung Injury in a Murine Model of Neonatal Chronic Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Aslam, Muhammad; Baveja, Rajiv; Liang, Olin D.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Lee, Changjin; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Neonatal chronic lung disease, known as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), remains a serious complication of prematurity despite advances in the treatment of extremely low birth weight infants.

  11. Long-term observations of autoimmune-prone mice treated for autoimmune disease by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term effects of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) across major histocompatibility complex barriers were studied in (NZB x NZW)F1 (B/W), BXSB, and MRL/Mr-lpr-lpr (MRL/lpr) mice with established autoimmune disease at the time of ABMT. In the BXSB or B/W mice, ABMT cured all aspects of autoimmune disease. Glomerular damage, revealed by histological study was dramatically improved. Serological abnormalities and immunologic functions also were normalized. Correction of autoimmune disease and advanced renal disease in BXSB and B/W mice regularly lasted greater than 5-6 mo and even 1 yr after ABMT. In the MRL/lpr mice, however, autoimmune and renal disease at first improved but then recurred after ABMT, apparently because of intolerance of mice for high doses of irradiation and a high degree of resistance of recipient stem cells to irradiation. In this model, H-2 typing revealed that by the time of relapse, immunocompetent cells of the chimeric mice had been replaced by host (MRL/lpr; H-2k) cells. B220+ Ly-1+ cells, present in increased numbers in untreated MRL/lpr mice, initially returned to normal levels after ABMT but then reappeared in the MRL/lpr mice that had received marrow from donors having few such lymphocytes. Thus, our results show that MRL/lpr mice possess abnormal radioresistant stem cells and provide impressive evidence that the origin of autoimmune diseases in this strain, as in the several other strains studied, resids in abnormalities present in stem cells

  12. The association of Tarsonemus mites (Acari: Heterostigmata) with different apple developmental stages and apple core rot diseases

    OpenAIRE

    UECKERMANN, Edward Albert; Van der Walt, Lené; Spotts, Robert A.; Smit, Francois J.; Jensen, Tamaryn; McLeod, Adéle

    2011-01-01

    Information on the role of mites in the genus Tarsonemus Canestrini and Fanzago, 1876 in the epidemiology of apple core rots (wet and dry) is limited. The aims of this study were to (1) assess the effect of different apple developmental stages (buds, blossoms, 4-cm diameter fruit, mature fruit and mummies) on the relative abundance of Tasonemus mites, (2) determine if there is a tendency of Tarsonemus mites to be associated with wet core rot (WCR) and dry core rot (DCR) apples, and (3) evalua...

  13. Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Male Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by DXA and Quantitative Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Fountoulis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the prevalence of osteoporosis in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and quantitative computed tomography (QCT and to compare the diagnostic abilities of the above methods. Thirty-seven male patients with established COPD were examined with DXA and standard QCT in lumbar spine, including L1, L2, and L3 vertebrae. T-scores and bone mineral density values were calculated by DXA and QCT method, respectively. Comparative assessment of the findings was performed and statistical analysis was applied. QCT measurements found more COPD patients with impaired bone mineral density compared to DXA, namely, 13 (35.1% versus 12 (32.4% patients with osteopenia and 16 (43.2% versus 9 (16.2% patients with osteoporosis (p=0.04. More vertebrae were found with osteoporosis by QCT compared to DXA (p=0.03. The prevalence of osteoporosis among male patients with COPD is increased and DXA may underestimate this risk. QCT measurements have an improved discriminating ability to identify low BMD compared to DXA measurements because QCT is able to overcome diagnostic pitfalls including aortic calcifications and degenerative spinal osteophytes.

  14. Assessment of Bone Mineral Density in Male Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by DXA and Quantitative Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulis, George; Kerenidi, Theodora; Kokkinis, Constantinos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Thriskos, Paschal; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Vassiou, Katerina; Vlychou, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the prevalence of osteoporosis in male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and to compare the diagnostic abilities of the above methods. Thirty-seven male patients with established COPD were examined with DXA and standard QCT in lumbar spine, including L1, L2, and L3 vertebrae. T-scores and bone mineral density values were calculated by DXA and QCT method, respectively. Comparative assessment of the findings was performed and statistical analysis was applied. QCT measurements found more COPD patients with impaired bone mineral density compared to DXA, namely, 13 (35.1%) versus 12 (32.4%) patients with osteopenia and 16 (43.2%) versus 9 (16.2%) patients with osteoporosis (p = 0.04). More vertebrae were found with osteoporosis by QCT compared to DXA (p = 0.03). The prevalence of osteoporosis among male patients with COPD is increased and DXA may underestimate this risk. QCT measurements have an improved discriminating ability to identify low BMD compared to DXA measurements because QCT is able to overcome diagnostic pitfalls including aortic calcifications and degenerative spinal osteophytes. PMID:27087809

  15. Individual Replacement of Bones and Joints the Foot in the Treatment of Degenerative Dystrophic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezhov М.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to increase the efficiency of treatment of osteoarthrosis deformans of foot and ankle joints by developing and applying new hi-tech methods of treatment – individual replacement of the foot bones and joints. Materiales and Methods. 39 patients with the specified pathology were surveyed. Standard total ankle replacement was performed in two of them (STAR, W. Link, 16 patients underwent the first MTP joint replacement with Total toe system. In five cases with the 1st MTPJ arthrosis there was observed total, subtotal and polylocal aseptic necrosis of the head of the first metatarsal bone. 10 patients had a similar picture of damage of the talus due to trauma. For these patients individual artificial implants of the talus and endoprostheses of the first MTPJ were developed. Modern techniques (CT, MRT were used to early radiodiagnosis of posttraumatic talus damage. Results and Discussion. There were developed new methods of surgical treatment of such consequences of trauma of the talus as total, subtotal and polylocal aseptic necrosis — individual total replacement of the talus by original patented technique and replacement of the first MTP joint in cases of severe aseptic necrosis of the 1st metatarsal bone’s head with the implant with the long stem (when standard joint replacement is noneffective. Pre-production models of implants and tools were made, and technical tests of designs were carried out.

  16. Transplanted Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Memory in Rat Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Babaei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs grafts on cognition deficit in chemically and age-induced Alzheimer's models of rats. In the first experiments aged animals (30 months were tested in Morris water maze (MWM and divided into two groups: impaired memory and unimpaired memory. Impaired groups were divided into two groups and cannulated bilaterally at the CA1 of the hippocampus for delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (500×103/ and PBS (phosphate buffer saline. In the second experiment, Ibotenic acid (Ibo was injected bilaterally into the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM of young rats (3 months and animals were tested in MWM. Then, animals with memory impairment received the following treatments: MSCs (500×103/ and PBS. Two months after the treatments, cognitive recovery was assessed by MWM in relearning paradigm in both experiments. Results showed that MSCs treatment significantly increased learning ability and memory in both age- and Ibo-induced memory impairment. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells show promise in treating cognitive decline associated with aging and NBM lesions.

  17. [A study on observation of bone metabolism in middle-aged and senile female Graves' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L Q; Liu, Y H; Zhou, Y B

    1996-08-01

    Sixty-nine cases of middle aged and senile female Graves' desease (GD) patients suffered from abnormal bone metabolism have been studied. They were divided randomly into group A and B, treated separately with antithyroid drugs (Tapazol and inderal, etc.) in group A, and added with Chinese herbal medicine for tonifying Kidney and promoting blood circulation in group B. Before treatment, patients of both groups showed obvious higher blood calcium (Ca) 24-hour urinary Ca, phosphorus (P) and serum clcitonin (CT) levels than that in normal subjects. These patients' serum Ca, moreover, had a parallel relationship with serum T3 levels (r = 0.6142, P < 0.01) and the serum Ca also a paralleled with serum CT levels (r = 0.5714, P < 0.05). After six months of treatment, the serum Ca, 24-hour urinary Ca, P and blood CT values were all reduced in various degree. The decrease of these bone metabolic parameters were more significant in group B than that in group A. PMID:9387746

  18. Avascular necrosis of the lunate bone (Kienböck’s disease) secondary to scapholunate ligament tear as a consequence of trauma – a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avascular necrosis of the lunate bone (Kienböck’s disease), is a condition in which lunate bone, loses its blood supply, leading to necrosis of the bone. There is probably no single cause of Kienbock’s disease. Its origin may involve multiple factors, such as the blood supply (arteries), blood drainage (veins), and skeletal variations. Trauma, either isolated or repeated, may possibly be a factor in some cases. This case presented with multifactorial etiology. In the presented case, a patient with negative ulnar variant had injured her right wrist and presented at an orthopedic clinic due to nonspecific pain 6 months later. An arthro-MRI examination revealed necrosis of the lunate bone, scapholunate ligament tear and coexisting TFCC (triangular fibrocartilage complex) tear. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent progression of necrotic lesions and bone collapse. MRI examination seems to be the key diagnostic method in the early stage of the Kienböck’s disease with negative x-ray and CT images. Arthro-MRI examination also allows us to identify the underlying ligamentous injury. In cases of traumatic etiology, an additional CT test enables stating the final diagnosis

  19. Sequential Cadaveric Lung and Bone Marrow Transplant for Immune Deficiency Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID); Immunodeficiency With Predominant T-cell Defect, Unspecified; Severe Chronic Neutropenia; Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD); Hyper IgE Syndromes; Hyper IgM Deficiencies; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease; Common Variable Immune Deficiency (CVID)

  20. The oral manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) in paediatric allogeneic bone marrow transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolatou-Galitis, O; Kitra, V; Van Vliet-Constantinidou, C; Peristeri, J; Goussetis, E; Petropoulos, D; Grafakos, S

    2001-03-01

    The oral manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) in eight allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) paediatric recipients were studied clinically, and lip biopsies were performed in seven of them. A prominent lichenoid reaction was observed in four patients, two with accompanying ulceration. Superficial mucoceles were present in three children. Clinically obvious xerostomia was seen in seven patients. Lip biopsies were positive and correlated with the clinical manifestations. Both clinical and histological findings confirmed the diagnosis of cGVHD. In three additional children, with systemic manifestations indicating cGVHD, the oral mucosa was clinically and histologically normal, and the systemic manifestations were, thus, attributed to drug reactions. The above findings indicate the high value of oral examination in diagnosing or confirming paediatric cGVHD. Superficial mucoceles, reported for the first time in paediatric recipients, seem to be important in the early diagnosis of cGVHD. PMID:11271629

  1. High-resolution 3D imaging of osteocytes and computational modelling in mechanobiology: insights on bone development, ageing, health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, P M; Zygalakis, K C; Oreffo, R O; Schneider, P

    2016-01-01

    Osteocytes are involved in mechanosensation and mechanotransduction in bone and hence, are key to bone adaptation in response to development, ageing and disease. Thus, detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the osteocyte network (ON) and the surrounding lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) is essential. Enhanced understanding of the ON&LCN will contribute to a better understanding of bone mechanics on cellular and sub-cellular scales, for instance through improved computational models of bone mechanotransduction. Until now, the location of the ON within the hard bone matrix and the sub-µm dimensions of the ON&LCN have posed significant challenges for 3D imaging. This review identifies relevant microstructural phenotypes of the ON&LCN in health and disease and summarises how light microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray imaging techniques have been used in studies of osteocyte anatomy, pathology and mechanobiology to date. In this review, we assess the requirements for ON&LCN imaging and examine the state of the art in the fields of imaging and computational modelling as well as recent advances in high-resolution 3D imaging. Suggestions for future investigations using volume electron microscopy are indicated and we present new data on the ON&LCN using serial block-face scanning electron microscopy. A correlative approach using these high-resolution 3D imaging techniques in conjunction with in silico modelling in bone mechanobiology will increase understanding of osteocyte function and, ultimately, lead to improved pathways for diagnosis and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27209400

  2. A novel and feasible way to cultivate and purify endothelial progenitor cells from bone marrow of children with congenital heart diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yong-tao; LI Jing-xing; LIU Shuo; XIN Yi; WANG Zi-jian; GAO Jin; JI Bing-yang; FAN Xiang-ming; ZHOU Qi-wen

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are used in vascular tissue engineering and clinic therapy.Some investigators get EPCs from the peripheral blood for clinic treatment,but the number of EPCs is seldom enough.We have developed the cultivation and purification of EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,to provide enough seed cells for a small calibre vascular tissue engineering study.Methods The 0.5-ml of bone marrow was separated from the sternum bone,and 5-ml of peripheral blood was collected from children with congenital heart diseases who had undergone open thoracic surgery.CD34+ and CD34+/VEGFR+cells in the bone marrow and peripheral blood were quantified by flow cytometry.CD34+NEGFR+ cells were defined as EPCs.Mononuclear cells in the bone marrow were isolated by Ficoll(R) density gradient centrifugation and cultured by the EndoCult Liquid Medium KitTM.Colony forming endothelial cells was detected.Immunohistochemistry staining for Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1 confirmed the endothelial lineage of these cells.Results CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in peripheral blood were (0.07±0.05)% and (0.05±0.02)%,respectively.The number of CD34+ and CD34+NEGFR+ cells in bone marrow were significantly higher than in blood,(4.41±1.47)% and (0.98±0.65)%,respectively (P <0.0001).Many colony forming units formed in the culture.These cells also expressed high levels of Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UEA-1.Conclusion This is a novel and feasible approach that can cultivate and purify EPCs from the bone marrow of children with congenital heart disease,and provide seed cells for small calibre vascular tissue engineering.

  3. Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, such as learning disorders. Or the problem can be both physical and mental, such as Down ...

  4. Diagnosis of bone marrow lesions in the MR tomogram in children suffering from diseases of the haematopoietic system with special reference to post-therapy changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    119 MR-examinations of both tibiae, knees and the lower part of both femura were performed in 41 children suffering from bone marrow disease (27 ALL, 4 AML, 3 NHL, 1 agranulocytosis, 6 anaemia). T1- and T2-spinecho sequences and a T2-gradientecho sequence were used. Bone marrow changes in leukaemia were diffuse before therapy and patchy after therapy. Due to their different signal in T2-weighted images, differentitation of the post-therapeutic patchy findings into infiltrations, fibrosis, necrosis and siderosis seems to be possible. In future, MRI will be the method of choice for screening and controlling bone marrow disease if the examination time is shortened by using only a T1-spinecho sequence and a T2-gradient-echo sequence. (orig.)

  5. Impact of Maternal Diet on the Epigenome during In Utero Life and the Developmental Programming of Diseases in Childhood and Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Sun Lee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental factors in early life can influence developmental processes and long-term health in humans. Early life nutrition and maternal diet are well-known examples of conditions shown to influence the risk of developing metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases, in adulthood. It is increasingly accepted that environmental compounds, including nutrients, can produce changes in the genome activity that, in spite of not altering the DNA sequence, can produce important, stable and, in some instances, transgenerational alterations in the phenotype. Epigenetics refers to changes in gene function that cannot be explained by changes in the DNA sequence, with DNA methylation patterns/histone modifications that can make important contributions to epigenetic memory. The epigenome can be considered as an interface between the genome and the environment that is central to the generation of phenotypes and their stability throughout the life course. To better understand the role of maternal health and nutrition in the initiation and progression of diseases in childhood and adulthood, it is necessary to identify the physiological and/or pathological roles of specific nutrients on the epigenome and how dietary interventions in utero and early life could modulate disease risk through epigenomic alteration.

  6. Peripheral blood minimal residual disease may replace bone marrow minimal residual disease as an immunophenotypic biomarker for impending relapse in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeijlemaker, W; Kelder, A; Oussoren-Brockhoff, Y J M; Scholten, W J; Snel, A N; Veldhuizen, D; Cloos, J; Ossenkoppele, G J; Schuurhuis, G J

    2016-03-01

    As relapses are common in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), early relapse prediction is of high importance. Although conventional minimal residual disease (MRD) measurement is carried out in bone marrow (BM), peripheral blood (PB) would be an advantageous alternative source. This study aims to investigate the specificity of leukemia-associated immunophenotypes used for MRD detection in blood samples. Consistency of PB MRD as compared with BM MRD was determined in flow cytometric data of 205 paired BM and PB samples of 114 AML patients. A significant correlation was found between PB and BM MRD (r=0.67, Pconsolidation therapy. As PB MRD appeared to be an independent predictor for response duration, the highly specific PB MRD assay may have a prominent role in future MRD assessment in AML. PMID:26373238

  7. Strategies to Target the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signalling Pathway in Lung Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Purcell, James

    2011-01-01

    Lung disease and lung injury are responsible for 20% of deaths of the Irish population every year, and the country has the 2nd highest death rate in Europe for respiratory diseases. Conditions related to the respiratory system are the second largest long term illness by young adults. Lung cancer is the largest cause of cancer related death in Europe as a whole. New and refined mechanisms of drug delivery for the prevention, cure or delayed progression of disease, represents a pathway for t...

  8. Osseous and Nonosseous Bone Scan Findings in Liver Transplant Candidates with end-stage Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seval Erhamamcı

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: End-stage chronic liver disease (CLD adversely affects the function of multiple organ systems including the skeletal system. The aim of this study was to assess osseous and nonosseous bone scintigraphy (BS findings in liver transplant (LT candidates with end-stage CLD. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated BS findings in 50 consecutive patients with end-stage CLD who were undergoing preoperative assessment for LT from January 2006 to December 2011. All the patients were analyzed with respect to clinical and laboratory parameters, and BS findings. Scintigrams were visually assessed for the presence of osseous and nonosseous abnormalities. Osseous abnormalities were classified as those indicating bone metabolism changes or metastatic bone disease. Typical scintigraphic findings denoting to changes in bone metabolism were the presence of decreased osseous uptake, increased periarticular uptake, asymmetrical or unusual uptake patterns. Nonosseous findings were classified according to the degree of soft-tissue uptake as mild and severe. Results: The group consisted of 46 adult and 4 adolescent patients. All adolescent patients had normal skeletal accumulation with growth plate uptake and one had mildly increased renal cortical activity. A total of 46 adult patients had one or more of the following osseous findings: generalized decrease in osseous uptake (n=4, 8.7%; bilateral decrease in lower extremity uptake (n=26, 56.5%; symmetrically increased periarticular uptake (n=26, 56.5%; bilateral cortical/periosteal increased uptake in the lower extremity indicating hepatic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA (n=8, 17.4%; bilateral increased sacroiliac activity (n=16, 34.8%; sacral activity (n=10, 21.7%, coccygeal activity (n=2, 4.3%, focally increased uptake suggestive of metastases (n=5, 10.9%. Three rib metastases appeared to be linear. Nonosseous findings observed in adult patients were mild diffuse liver uptake (n=4, 8.7% and bilateral

  9. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in infectious bone diseases: results of histologically confirmed cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in acute and chronic osteomyelitis and inflammatory spondylitis. The study population comprised 21 patients suspected of having acute or chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. Fifteen of these patients subsequently underwent surgery. FDG-PET results were correlated with histopathological findings. The remaining six patients, who underwent conservative therapy, were excluded from any further evaluation due to the lack of histopathological data. The histopathological findings revealed osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis in all 15 patients: seven patients had acute osteomyelitis and eight patients had chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. FDG-PET yielded 15 true-positive results. The tracer uptake correlated with the histopathological findings in each case. Bone scintigraphy performed in 11 patients yielded ten true-positive results and one false-negative result. Follow-up carried out on two patients revealed normal or clearly reduced tracer uptake, which correlated with a normalisation of clinical data. In early postoperative follow-up it was impossible to differentiate between postsurgical reactive changes and further infection using FDG-PET. It is concluded that acute and chronic osteomyelitis of the peripheral as well as the central skeleton can be detected using FDG-PET. Osteomyelitis can be differentiated from soft tissue infection surrounding the bone. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, FDG-PET is not affected by metal implants used for fixing fractures. FDG-PET demonstrated promising initial results with respect to treatment monitoring. Nevertheless, in the early postoperative phase FDG-PET seems to be of limited value owing to unspecific tracer uptake. (orig.)

  10. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in infectious bone diseases: results of histologically confirmed cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaelicke, T. [Dept. of Surgery, University of Bochum (Germany); Schmitz, A.; Schmitt, O. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, University of Bonn (Germany); Risse, J.H.; Biersack, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Arens, S.; Hansis, M. [Dept. of Trauma Surgery, University of Bonn (Germany); Keller, E. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in acute and chronic osteomyelitis and inflammatory spondylitis. The study population comprised 21 patients suspected of having acute or chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. Fifteen of these patients subsequently underwent surgery. FDG-PET results were correlated with histopathological findings. The remaining six patients, who underwent conservative therapy, were excluded from any further evaluation due to the lack of histopathological data. The histopathological findings revealed osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis in all 15 patients: seven patients had acute osteomyelitis and eight patients had chronic osteomyelitis or inflammatory spondylitis. FDG-PET yielded 15 true-positive results. The tracer uptake correlated with the histopathological findings in each case. Bone scintigraphy performed in 11 patients yielded ten true-positive results and one false-negative result. Follow-up carried out on two patients revealed normal or clearly reduced tracer uptake, which correlated with a normalisation of clinical data. In early postoperative follow-up it was impossible to differentiate between postsurgical reactive changes and further infection using FDG-PET. It is concluded that acute and chronic osteomyelitis of the peripheral as well as the central skeleton can be detected using FDG-PET. Osteomyelitis can be differentiated from soft tissue infection surrounding the bone. Unlike computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, FDG-PET is not affected by metal implants used for fixing fractures. FDG-PET demonstrated promising initial results with respect to treatment monitoring. Nevertheless, in the early postoperative phase FDG-PET seems to be of limited value owing to unspecific tracer uptake. (orig.)

  11. Hypoplasia of bone marrow and cytopenia in non-hemic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Common (stereotype) and different links in pathogenesis of hemodepressions pronounced in the form of cytopenia and/or hypoplasia of hemopoiesis are considered. Pathogenesis and signs of the diseases, as well as their diagnosis, are studied in detail

  12. Inhibition of Autoimmune Chagas-Like Heart Disease by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guimaro, M.C.; Alves, R. J. V.; Rose, E.; Sousa, A.O.; Rosa, A.D.; Hecht, M.M.; Sousa, M.V.; Andrade, R.R.; Vital, T.; Plachý, Jiří; Nitz, N.; Hejnar, Jiří; Gomes, C.C.; Teixeira, A.R.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 12 (2014). ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Chagas disease * inbred chicken * adoptive transfer of immunity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.446, year: 2014

  13. Bone regeneration in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Tonelli, Paolo; Duvina, Marco; Barbato, Luigi; Biondi, Eleonora; Nuti, Niccolò; Brancato, Leila; Rose, Giovanna Delle

    2011-01-01

    The edentulism of the jaws and the periodontal disease represent conditions that frequently leads to disruption of the alveolar bone. The loss of the tooth and of its bone of support lead to the creation of crestal defects or situation of maxillary atrophy. The restoration of a functional condition involves the use of endosseous implants who require adequate bone volume, to deal with the masticatory load. In such situations the bone need to be regenerated, taking advantage of the biological p...

  14. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Bone Remodeling*

    OpenAIRE

    Raggatt, Liza J; Partridge, Nicola C

    2010-01-01

    Physiological bone remodeling is a highly coordinated process responsible for bone resorption and formation and is necessary to repair damaged bone and to maintain mineral homeostasis. In addition to the traditional bone cells (osteoclasts, osteoblasts, and osteocytes) that are necessary for bone remodeling, several immune cells have also been implicated in bone disease. This minireview discusses physiological bone remodeling, outlining the traditional bone biology dogma in light of emerging ...

  15. Quality control of flow cytometry data analysis for evaluation of minimal residual disease in bone marrow from acute leukemia patients during treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorklund, E.; Matinlauri, I.; Tierens, A.;

    2009-01-01

    Low levels of leukemia cells in the bone marrow, minimal residual disease (MRD), are considered to be a powerful indicator of treatment response in acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL). A Nordic quality assurance program, aimed on standardization of the flow cytometry MRD analysis, has been established...... MRD detection can be reliably applied in international, multicenter treatment protocols Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6...

  16. Arresting rampant dental caries with silver diamine fluoride in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease post-bone marrow transplantation: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chun-Hung; Lee, Angeline Hui-Cheng; Zheng, Liwu; Mei, May Lei; Chan, Godfrey Chi-fung

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rampant caries is an advanced and severe dental disease that affects multiple teeth. This case describes the management of rampant caries in a young teenager suffering from chronic oral graft versus host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. CASE PRESENTATION: A 14-year-old Chinese boy suffering from beta-thalassemia major was referred to the dental clinic for the management of rampant dental caries. An oral examination revealed pale conjunctiva, bruising of lips, ...

  17. [NF-κB signaling pathways and the future perspectives of bone disease therapy using selective inhibitors of NF-κB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimi, Eijiro; Fukushima, Hidefumi

    2016-02-01

    The transcriptional factor nuclear factor κB(NF-κB)regulates the expression of a wide variety of genes that are involved in immune and inflammatory responses, proliferation, and tumorigenesis. NF-κB consists of five members, such as p65(RelA), RelB, c-Rel, p50/p105(NF-κB1), and p52/p100(NF-κB2). There are two distinct NF-κB activation pathways, termed the classical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathways. Since mice lacking both p50 and p52 subunits developed typical osteopetrosis, due to total lack of osteoclasts, NF-κB is also important osteoclast differentiation. A selective NF-κB inhibitor blocked receptor activator of NF-κB ligand(RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Recent findings have shown that inactivation of NF-κB enhances osteoblast differentiation in vitro and bone formation in vivo. NF-κB is constitutively activated in many cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma(OSCC), and is involved in the invasive characteristics of OSCC. A selective NF-κB inhibitor also prevented jaw bone destruction by OSCC by reduced osteoclast numbers in animal model. Thus the inhibition of NF-κB might useful for the treatment of bone diseases, such as arthritis, osteoporosis, periodontitis, and bone invasion by OSCC by inhibiting bone resorption and by stimulating bone formation. PMID:26813510

  18. KIT D816V-mutated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in indolent systemic mastocytosis are associated with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Montero, Andres C; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Alvarez-Twose, Ivan; Teodosio, Cristina; Sanchez-Muñoz, Laura; Muñiz, Carmen; Muñoz-Gonzalez, Javier I; Mayado, Andrea; Matito, Almudena; Caldas, Carolina; Morgado, Jose M; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto

    2016-02-11

    Multilineage involvement of bone marrow (BM) hematopoiesis by the somatic KIT D816V mutation is present in a subset of adult indolent systemic mastocytosis (ISM) patients in association with a poorer prognosis. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from ISM patients by the KIT D816V mutation and its potential impact on disease progression and outcome. This mutation was investigated in highly purified BM MSCs and other BM cell populations from 83 ISM patients followed for a median of 116 months. KIT D816V-mutated MSCs were detected in 22 of 83 cases. All MSC-mutated patients had multilineage KIT mutation (100% vs 30%, P = .0001) and they more frequently showed involvement of lymphoid plus myeloid BM cells (59% vs 22%; P = .03) and a polyclonal pattern of inactivation of the X-chromosome of KIT-mutated BM mast cells (64% vs 0%; P = .01) vs other multilineage ISM cases. Moreover, presence of KIT-mutated MSCs was associated with more advanced disease features, a greater rate of disease progression (50% vs 17%; P = .04), and a shorter progression-free survival (P ≤ .003). Overall, these results support the notion that ISM patients with mutated MSCs may have acquired the KIT mutation in a common pluripotent progenitor cell, prior to differentiation into MSCs and hematopoietic precursor cells, before the X-chromosome inactivation process occurs. From a clinical point of view, acquisition of the KIT mutation in an earlier BM precursor cell confers a significantly greater risk for disease progression and a poorer outcome. PMID:26622064

  19. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

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    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A. [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil); Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil); DeSouza, I.A., E-mail: ivanidesouza@uol.com.br [Department of Biology and Physiology, Faculty of Medicine of Jundiai (FMJ), Jundiai, SP (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  20. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and