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Sample records for bone cement material

  1. Material Mismatch Effect on the Fracture of a Bone-Composite Cement Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, M; Tarantini, S

    2012-12-01

    The interfacial mechanics at the bone-implant interface is a critical issue for implant fixation and the filling of bone defects created by tumors and/or their excision. Our previous study found that micron and nano sizes MgO particles improved the fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces under tension loading. The strength of bonding of different types of bone with different types of implants may not be the same. The aims of this research were to determine the influences of material mismatch due to bone orientation and a magnesium oxide (MgO) filler material for PMMA bone cement on the mechanical strength between bone and bone cement specimens. This research studied the longitudinal and transverse directions bovine cortical bone as different bone materials and poly Methyl MethAcrylate (PMMA) bone cement with and without MgO additives as different implant materials. The scope of work for this study was: (1) to determine the bending strength and modulus of different bone and bone cement specimens, (2) to determine whether inclusion of MgO particles on PMMA has any influence on these mechanical properties of PMMA, and (3) to determine whether bone orientation and inclusion of MgO particles with PMMA has any influence on the interface strength between bone and PMMA. This study showed that bone orientation has statistically significant effect on the bonding strength between bone and bone cement specimens (P value0.05).

  2. The sealing ability of novel Kryptonite adhesive bone cement as a retrograde filling material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, İsmail; Keskin, Cangül; Güler, Buğra

    2016-01-01

    Background. This study evaluated the ability of Kryptonite bone cement in sealing retrograde cavities. Methods. The root canals of one hundred extracted human maxillary incisor teeth were instrumented up to master apical file #40 using Mtwo rotary system and obturated with gutta-percha and AHPlus sealer by cold lateral compaction method. The specimens were assigned to one control group and four experimental groups based on the retrograde filling materials (n=20). The specimens were immersed in 0.5% Rhodamine B solution for 48h. Then the specimens were divided longitudinally into two parts and the depth of dye penetration was assessed under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results. There were statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P0.05). Conclusion. Kryptonite cement provided optimal apical seal in a manner similar to MTA, amalgam and IRM when used as a retrograde filling cement. PMID:27651886

  3. Osteotransductive bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessens, F C; Planell, J A; Boltong, M G; Khairoun, I; Ginebra, M P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bone cements (CPBCs) are osteotransductive, i.e. after implantation in bone they are transformed into new bone tissue. Furthermore, due to the fact that they are mouldable, their osteointegration is immediate. Their chemistry has been established previously. Some CPBCs contain amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and set by a sol-gel transition. The others are crystalline and can give as the reaction product dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), carbonated apatite (CA) or hydroxyapatite (HA). Mixed-type gypsum-DCPD cements are also described. In vivo rates of osteotransduction vary as follows: gypsum-DCPD > DCPD > CDHA approximately CA > HA. The osteotransduction of CDHA-type cements may be increased by adding dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCP) and/or CaCO3 to the cement powder. CPBCs can be used for healing of bone defects, bone augmentation and bone reconstruction. Incorporation of drugs like antibiotics and bone morphogenetic protein is envisaged. Load-bearing applications are allowed for CHDA-type, CA-type and HA-type CPBCs as they have a higher compressive strength than human trabecular bone (10 MPa).

  4. Porous surface modified bioactive bone cement for enhanced bone bonding.

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    Qiang He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement cannot provide an adhesive chemical bonding to form a stable cement-bone interface. Bioactive bone cements show bone bonding ability, but their clinical application is limited because bone resorption is observed after implantation. Porous polymethylmethacrylate can be achieved with the addition of carboxymethylcellulose, alginate and gelatin microparticles to promote bone ingrowth, but the mechanical properties are too low to be used in orthopedic applications. Bone ingrowth into cement could decrease the possibility of bone resorption and promote the formation of a stable interface. However, scarce literature is reported on bioactive bone cements that allow bone ingrowth. In this paper, we reported a porous surface modified bioactive bone cement with desired mechanical properties, which could allow for bone ingrowth. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The porous surface modified bioactive bone cement was evaluated to determine its handling characteristics, mechanical properties and behavior in a simulated body fluid. The in vitro cellular responses of the samples were also investigated in terms of cell attachment, proliferation, and osteoblastic differentiation. Furthermore, bone ingrowth was examined in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model by using micro-CT imaging and histological analysis. The strength of the implant-bone interface was also investigated by push-out tests. RESULTS: The modified bone cement with a low content of bioactive fillers resulted in proper handling characteristics and adequate mechanical properties, but slightly affected its bioactivity. Moreover, the degree of attachment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblast cells was also increased. The results of the push-out test revealed that higher interfacial bonding strength was achieved with the modified bone cement because of the formation of the apatite layer and the osseointegration after implantation in the bony

  5. PMMA-based composite materials with reactive ceramic fillers: IV. Radiopacifying particles embedded in PMMA beads for acrylic bone cements.

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    Abboud, M; Casaubieilh, L; Morvan, F; Fontanille, M; Duguet, E

    2000-01-01

    New acrylic bone cements were prepared from alumina particles previously treated by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (gamma-MPS) and embedded in poly(methylmethacrylate-co-ethylacrylate) beads with about 7 mol% of ethyl acrylate repeating units. The encapsulation was performed through a conventional suspension polymerization process. The influence of (i) the concentration of the dispersion stabilizer and (ii) the alumina content upon the shape, size, and size distribution of the acrylic beads was studied. Cements were prepared from each batch by hand-mixing alumina-filled acrylic beads with a liquid monomer mixture containing methyl methacrylate, n-butyl methacrylate, and N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine. Benzoyl peroxide was previously added to the solid part. The powder-to-liquid ratio was equal to 2 for each formulation. Compressive strength of cured cement decreases with alumina content, whereas compressive modulus remains roughly constant. These results are in contradiction to those obtained for cements based on a mixture of gamma-MPS-treated alumina and unfilled acrylic beads. Nevertheless, they are interpreted in terms of alumina arrangement in the cement. In the first case, alumina particles contribute to the reinforcement of the dispersed acrylic phase, with poor benefits for the whole materials. In the second case, they allow the reinforcement of the continuous acrylic phase and, therefore, the cement's one.

  6. The Use of Micro and Nano Particulate Fillers to Modify the Mechanical and Material Properties of Acrylic Bone Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua A.

    Acrylic bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate) is widely used in total joint replacements to provide long-term fixation of implants. In essence, bone cement acts as a grout by filling in the voids left between the implant and the patient's bone, forming a mechanical interlock. While bone cement is considered the `gold standard' for implant fixation, issues such as mechanical failure of the cement mantle (aseptic loosening) and the development of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) still plague joint replacement procedures and often necessitate revision arthroplasty. In an effort to address these failures, various modifications are commonly made to bone cement such as mechanical reinforcement with particles/fibers and the addition of antibiotics to mitigate PJI. Despite these attempts, issues such as poor particle interfacial adhesion, inadequate drug release, and the development of multidrug resistant bacteria limit the effectiveness of bone cement modifications. Therefore, the overall goal of this work was to use micro and nanoparticles to enhance the properties of acrylic bone cement, with particular emphasis placed on improving the mechanical properties, cumulative antibiotic release, and antimicrobial properties. An acrylic bone cement (Palacos R) was modified with three types of particles in various loading ratios: mesoporous silica nanoparticles (for mechanical reinforcement), xylitol microparticles (for increased antibiotic release), and silver nanoparticles (as an antimicrobial agent). These particles were used as sole modifications, not in tandem with one another. The resulting cement composites were characterized using a variety of mechanical (macro to nano, fatigue, fracture, and dynamic), imaging, chemical, thermal, biological, and antimicrobial testing techniques. The primary outcomes of this dissertation demonstrate that: (1) mesoporous silica, as used in this work, is a poor reinforcement phase for acrylic bone cement, (2) xylitol can significantly

  7. Material properties and in vitro biocompatibility of a newly developed bone cement

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    Elke Mitzner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties and biocompatibility (In Vitro of a new bone cement were investigated. A new platform technology named COOL is a variable composite of dissolved, chemically modified PMMA and different bioceramics. COOL cures at body temperature via a classical cementation reaction. Compressive strengths ranging from 3.6 ± 0.8 to 62.8 ± 1.3 MPa and bending strengths ranging from 9.9 ± 2.4 to 26.4 ± 3.0 MPa were achieved with different COOL formulations. Porosity varied between 31 and 43%. Varying the components of each formulation mechanical properties and porosity could be adjusted. In Vitro biocompatibility studies with primary human osteoblasts (pHOB in direct contact with different COOL formulations, did not reveal any signs of toxicity. In contrast to Refobacin® R, cells incubated with COOL showed similar density, viability and ALP activity compared to control, if specimen were added immediately to the cell monolayer after preparation. In conclusion, COOL has promising mechanical properties in combination with high biocompatibility In Vitro and combines different advantages of both CPCs and PMMA cements by avoiding some of the respective shortcomings.

  8. 21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888... Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device...: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Bone Cement.”...

  9. PMMA-based composite materials with reactive ceramic fillers: part III: radiopacifying particle-reinforced bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, M; Vol, S; Duguet, E; Fontanille, M

    2000-05-01

    New acrylic bone cements were prepared from alumina particles previously treated by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (gamma-MPS), able to act both as radiopacifying and reinforcing agents. The present study deals with the handling characteristics and the compressive behavior of such cements. The influence of the particles morphology, their surface-modification by gamma-MPS bonding agent, their concentration in the cement, the powder-to-liquid ratio and the benzoyl peroxide concentration are reported. The role of grafted gamma-MPS molecules as coupling agent was confirmed. For several formulations, compressive strength and modulus reached 150 MPa and 3400 MPa respectively. Limitations in the use of such formulations are also comprehensively discussed.

  10. Minimally invasive maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation using brushite based cements.

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    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Bassett, David C; Habibovic, Pamela; Luceron, Elena; Barralet, Jake E

    2009-01-01

    An ideal material for maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation procedures should not only be osteoconductive, biocompatible and mechanically strong, but should also be applied using minimally invasive procedures and remain stable with respect to the original bone surfaces. This way, implant exposure and infection might be reduced and good mechanical stability may be achieved. Calcium phosphate cements are proven biocompatible and osteoconductive materials that can be injected using minimally invasive procedures. Among these cements, brushite based cements have the added advantage of being biodegradable in vivo. Therefore, this material has the potential for use in the aforementioned procedures. An in vivo study was performed in rabbits to evaluate the potential use of brushite cements in minimally invasive maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation procedures. In this study, we injected self-setting brushite cements on the subperiosteal bone surface using a minimally invasive tunnelling technique. The cement pastes were stable on the bone surface and hardened soon after they were injected thereby negating the need for additional supports such as membranes or meshes. The animals were sacrificed 8 weeks after the intervention and histological observations revealed signs of successful vertical bone augmentation. Therefore, we have demonstrated a minimally invasive vertical bone augmentation procedure that is an attractive alternative to current surgical procedures in terms of increased simplicity, reduced trauma, and lower cost of surgery.

  11. The effect of cement creep and cement fatigue damage on the micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The cement-bone interface provides fixation for the cement mantle within the bone. The cement-bone interface is affected by fatigue loading in terms of fatigue damage or microcracks and creep, both mostly in the cement. This study investigates how fatigue damage and cement creep separately affect

  12. Characteristics of Bone Tissue and Composite Materials on the Basis of Natural Hydroxyapatite and Endodontic Cement for Replacement of the Tissue

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    Filipenkov, V. V.; Rupeks, L. E.; Vitins, V. M.; Knets, I. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    New biocomposites and the cattle bone tissue were investigated. The composites were made from an endodontic cement (EC) and natural hydroxyapatite (NHAp.) The results of experiments performed by the method of infrared spectroscopy showed that protein was removed from the heat-treated specimens of bone tissue practically completely. The structure of bone tissue before and after deproteinization and the structure of the composite materials based on NHAp and EC (with different percentage) were investigated by the method of optical microscopy. The characteristics of mechanical properties (the initial elastic modulus, breaking tensile and compressive stresses, and breaking strain) and the density and porosity of these materials were determined. The new composite materials were implanted in the live tissue of rat. Biocompatibility between the live tissue and the new biocomposites was estimated.

  13. Injectable calcium phosphate cement for bone repair and implant fixation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Ooms, E.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Wolke, J.G.C.

    2005-01-01

    The studies as described are aimed at determining the efficacy of newly developed calcium phosphate cement when this material is used as a bone defect filler or gap filler around metal implants. An overview is provided about bone graft substitutes and methods of metal implant fixation.

  14. Modelling and simulation of acrylic bone cement injection and curing within the framework of vertebroplasty

    CERN Document Server

    Landgraf, Ralf; Kolmeder, Sebastian; Lion, Alexander; Lebsack, Helena; Kober, Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    The minimal invasive procedure of vertebroplasty is a surgical technique to treat compression fractures of vertebral bodies. During the treatment liquid bone cement gets injected into the affected vertebral body and therein cures to a solid. In order to investigate the treatment and the impact of injected bone cement on the vertebra, an integrated modelling and simulation framework has been developed. The framework includes (i) the generation of computer models based on microCT images of human cancellous bone, (ii) CFD simulations of bone cement injection into the trabecular structure of a vertebral body as well as (iii) non-linear FEM simulations of the bone cement curing. Thereby, microstructural models of trabecular bone structures are employed. Furthermore, a detailed description of the material behaviour of acrylic bone cements is provided. More precisely, a non-linear fluid flow model is chosen for the representation of the bone cement behaviour during injection and a non-linear viscoelastic material mo...

  15. Bone-Cement: The new medical quick fix

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    Dinesh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone Cement is being widely used in vertebroplasty, a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat spinal frac-tures and collapsed vertebrae. It is being labeled as a concrete success in medical field. It is being used to treat fractures due to osteoporosis, menopause, steroids, hyperthyroidism and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. In this technique a needle with bone cement (PMMA, polymethylmethacrylate is injected into the collapsed verte-bra after administering local anesthesia to patient. It solidifies within few minutes and provides support to damaged bone resulting in relief to the patient. It also prevents the movement between different parts of the broken bone. Hence it requires a short hospital stay for the patient and the procedure can be performed with much ease and at significant lower costs. Patient can resume normal activity within a day or so. Bone cement is now being referred to as the quick medical fix material for early repair of fractures.

  16. A New Biphasic Dicalcium Silicate Bone Cement Implant

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    Fausto Zuleta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the processing parameters and biocompatibility of a novel biphasic dicalcium silicate (C2S cement. Biphasic α´L + β-C2Sss was synthesized by solid-state processing, and was used as a raw material to prepare the cement. In vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility studies were assessed by soaking the cement samples in simulated body fluid (SBF and human adipose stem cell cultures. Two critical-sized defects of 6 mm Ø were created in 15 NZ tibias. A porous cement made of the high temperature forms of C2S, with a low phosphorous substitution level, was produced. An apatite-like layer covered the cement’s surface after soaking in SBF. The cell attachment test showed that α´L + β-C2Sss supported cells sticking and spreading after 24 h of culture. The cement paste (55.86 ± 0.23 obtained higher bone-to-implant contact (BIC percentage values (better quality, closer contact in the histomorphometric analysis, and defect closure was significant compared to the control group (plastic. The residual material volume of the porous cement was 35.42 ± 2.08% of the initial value. The highest BIC and bone formation percentages were obtained on day 60. These results suggest that the cement paste is advantageous for initial bone regeneration.

  17. Optimization of a novel two-solution poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement: Effect of composition on material properties and polymerization kinetics

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    Hasenwinkel, Julie Miller

    A novel two-solution poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement was developed as an alternative to powder/liquid cements, which are used clinically for the fixation of total joint replacements. This material polymerizes via a free radical mechanism, initiated by the redox reaction of benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and N,N dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT). The two-solution concept is advantageous over powder/liquid formulations because it minimizes sources of porosity, produces a homogeneous microstructure, simplifies the mixing and delivery process, and reduces the dependence of material properties on surgical techniques. Experiments were performed to determine the effect of initiation chemistry on the material properties and polymerization kinetics of twelve cement compositions. Select material properties were also evaluated with respect to polymer/monomer ratio and initial polymer molecular weight. The results confirm the hypothesis that initiation chemistry affects material properties via the polymerization kinetics and resulting microstructural properties. The exotherm, setting time, flexural mechanical properties, fracture toughness, fatigue behavior, and residual monomer were evaluated, with respect to initiation chemistry. The flexural strength, modulus, and exotherm were maximized, while the residual monomer was minimized at a BPO:DMPT molar ratio of 1:1. High DMPT concentrations resulted in sub-optimal properties, with short setting times and reduced ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue strength. Initial polymer molecular weight had no significant effect on the material properties. Polymer conversion and free radical concentration were measured by infrared (FTIR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. These data were used to calculate the polymerization reaction rates and kinetic rate constants for each composition. Stoichiometric concentrations of BPO and DMPT maximized the radical concentration and conversion. The BPO and DMPT concentrations

  18. Osteogenesis Capacity of a Novel BMP/α-TCP Bioactive Composite Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wei-zhong; ZHOU Da-li; YIN Shao-ya; YIN Guang-fu; GAO Li-da; ZHANG Yun

    2004-01-01

    To improve the osteogenesis ability of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) bone cement,a novel BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement was prepared.By measuring the setting time and compressive strength,the hydration characteristic of bone cement was evaluated.Animal experiments including histological observation,radiographic investigation as well as digital image analyses reveal the difference of osteogenesis ability among BMP,α-TCP bone cement and BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement.Results show that α-TCP bone cement possesses excellent hydration and setting properties as well as high mechanical property.Comparison experiments show that BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement has a stronger osteogenesis ability.The gross observation of the implant site does not exhibit any inflammation or necrosis.Histological analyses reveal that the material has good osteointegration with host bone,and new bone formation is detected within the materials,which are degrading.Strong osteogenesis ability of the composite is due to not only the excellent osteoconductive potential but also the osteoinductive potential contributed by active BMP releasing and the material degradation.Large skull defect could be well-healed by filling BMP/α-TCP composite bone cement.This novel material proves itself to be an absorbable and bioactive bone cement with an osteogenesis ability.

  19. Bone cements for percutaneous vertebroplasty and balloon kyphoplasty: Current status and future developments

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    Zhiwei He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs have gradually evolved into a serious health care problem globally. In order to reduce the morbidity of OVCF patients and improve their life quality, two minimally invasive surgery procedures, vertebroplasty (VP and balloon kyphoplasty (BKP, have been developed. Both VP and BKP require the injection of bone cement into the vertebrae of patients to stabilize fractured vertebra. As such, bone cement as the filling material plays an essential role in the effectiveness of these treatments. In this review article, we summarize the bone cements that are currently available in the market and those still under development. Two major categories of bone cements, nondegradable acrylic bone cements (ABCs and degradable calcium phosphate cements (CPCs, are introduced in detail. We also provide our perspectives on the future development of bone cements for VP and BKP.

  20. Cemented total hip arthroplasty with Boneloc bone cement.

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    Markel, D C; Hoard, D B; Porretta, C A

    2001-01-01

    Boneloc cement (WK-345, Biomet Inc, Warsaw, Ind) attempted to improve cement characteristics by reducing exotherm during polymerization, lowering residual monomer and solubility, raising molecular weight, and lowering airborne monomer and aromatic amines. To study the efficacy of this cement, a selected group of 20 patients were prospectively enrolled and followed up after hip arthroplasty. All components were cemented. During the enrollment period, approximately 70 other hip arthroplasties were performed. Clinical evaluation was based on the Harris hip score. Radiographic evaluation was based on assessment of position of the components, subsidence, and/or presence of radiolucencies. Patients had follow-up for an average of 42 months (11 to 58 months); 1 was lost to follow-up. Of these, 7 (35%) had failure at last follow-up. Despite its initial promise, Boneloc cement had an unacceptably high failure rate over a relatively short follow-up period and is not recommended for use. Despite the longevity and odor toxicity problems with conventional bone cement, new cement technologies must be approached with caution.

  1. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements for enhanced bone tissue regeneration.

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    Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Rueda, Carmen; Torres, Jesús; Blanco, Luis; López-Cabarcos, Enrique

    2014-10-01

    We have synthesized calcium phosphate cements doped with different amounts of magnesium (Mg-CPC) with a twofold purpose: i) to evaluate in vitro the osteoblast cell response to this material, and ii) to compare the bone regeneration capacity of the doped material with a calcium cement prepared without magnesium (CPC). Cell proliferation and in vivo response increased in the Mg-CPCs in comparison with CPC. The Mg-CPCs have promoted higher new bone formation than the CPC (p<0.05). The cytocompatibility and histomorfometric analysis performed in the rabbit calvaria showed that the incorporation of magnesium ions in CPC improves osteoblasts proliferation and provides higher new bone formation. The development of a bone substitute with controllable biodegradable properties and improved bone regeneration can be considered a step toward personalized therapy that can adapt to patient needs and clinical situations.

  2. 复合α-TCP透磷灰石骨水泥材料的生物相容性研究%Biocompatibility of α-TCP brushite bone cement material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马建敏; 杨洪; 王凯; 刘璨; 赵慧娟

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察复合α-TCP透磷灰石骨水泥的生物相容性,为该复合骨水泥的临床应用提供动物组织学实验依据.方法:在β-TCP+ MCPM骨水泥的基础上添加α-TCP,得到一种改进型透磷灰石骨水泥.以传统的透磷灰石骨水泥为对照组,对其进行体外溶血试验、热源试验、急性毒性试验、皮肤过敏试验、肌内植入试验.结果:α-TCP透磷灰石骨水泥的溶血率<5%,无热源性、无毒性、无皮肤过敏,植入肌肉后无明显炎症反应.结论:α-TCP的透磷灰石骨水泥具有良好的生物相容性和安全性,可作为体内骨替换材料.%AIM: To investigate the biocompatibility of α-TCP brushite bone cement. METHOD; a-TCP was introduced to β-TCP + MCPM bone cement to obtain α-TCP brashite bone cement. The material was evaluated by hemulysis test, pyrogen test, acute toxicity test, skin allergy test and muscle implant test. The bioeompatibility of α-TCP brushite bone cement was compared with traditional brushite bone cement. RESULTS: The hemolysis rate of α-TCP brushite bone cement was below 5 percent. No pyrogenic, no toxic, no skin allergic, and no obvious inflammatory reaction were observs. CONCLUSION: The α-TCP brushite bone cement shows excellent biocompatibilily and safety, tence can be used in vivo as a bone substitute material.

  3. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Floyd, III, William C.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Vericella, John J.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2017-03-14

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  4. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  5. Cementing a wellbore using cementing material encapsulated in a shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Cowan, Kenneth Michael

    2016-08-16

    A system for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a pipe extends. A cement material is positioned in the space between the wellbore and the pipe by circulated capsules containing the cement material through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The capsules contain the cementing material encapsulated in a shell. The capsules are added to a fluid and the fluid with capsules is circulated through the pipe into the space between the wellbore and the pipe. The shell is breached once the capsules contain the cementing material are in position in the space between the wellbore and the pipe.

  6. Biological Evaluation of α-TCP/TTCP Composite Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    α-tricalcium phosphate(α-TCP)/tetracalcium phosphate(TTCP) composite bone cement had good hydration characteristic.In our system,α-TCP/TTCP powder mixture was mixed with water at a powder/liquid (P/L) ratio of 1.50g*mL-1.The setting time could be adjusted,the maximum compressive strength was 45.36MPa,and the hydration product was hydroxyapatite (HAP).In vitro biological simulated experiments indicate that α-TCP/TTCP bone cement has α certain dissolubility.The hardened product is mainly HAP after soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 10 weeks.The results of in vitro test and animal experiments and SEM analyses show that no local or general toxicity response,no muscle stimulation,no haemolysis,no cruor,no inflammatory reaction and no exclusion response are caused by α-TCP/TTCP cement, which can be contributed to bone tissue spreading and impinging.α-TCP/TTCP cement hydrated and hardened continually in vivo.The materials fused with host bone together with implanting time prolonging.Therefore,it is believed that α-TCP/TTCP composite bone cement has a high biocompatibility and bioactivity,a certain biodegradation and good osteogenesis as well.

  7. In-situ polymerization behaviour of bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffezzoli, A; Ronca, D; Guida, G; Pochini, I; Nicolais, L

    1997-02-01

    The polymerization behaviour of bone cements during total hip replacements is characterized by a fast and highly non-isothermal bulk reaction. In the first part of this paper the reaction kinetics are analysed by calorimetric analysis in order to determine the rates of polymerization in isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. A phenomenological kinetic model, accounting for the effects of autoacceleration and vitrification, is presented. This model, integrated with an energy balance, is capable of predicting the temperature across the prosthesis, the cement and the bone and the degree of reaction in the cement, during in situ polymerization. The temperature and the degree of reaction profiles are calculated, as a function of the setting time, taking into account the system geometry, the thermal diffusivity of bone, prosthesis and cement, and the heat rate generated by the reaction according to the kinetic model. Material properties, boundary and initial conditions are the input data of the heat transfer model. Kinetic and heat transfer models are coupled and a numerical solution method is used. The model is applied in order to study the effects of different application procedures on temperature and degree of reaction profiles across the bone-cement-prosthesis system.

  8. Calcium phosphate cement augmentation of cancellous bone screws can compensate for the absence of cortical fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Vincent A; Bretton, Elise; Terrier, Alexandre; Procter, Philip; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2010-11-16

    An obvious means to improve the fixation of a cancellous bone screw is to augment the surrounding bone with cement. Previous studies have shown that bone augmentation with Calcium Phosphate (CaP) cement significantly improves screw fixation. Nevertheless, quantitative data about the optimal distribution of CaP cement is not available. The present study aims to show the effect of cement distribution on the screw fixation strength for various cortical thicknesses and to determine the conditions at which cement augmentation can compensate for the absence of cortical fixation in osteoporotic bone. In this study, artificial bone materials were used to mimic osteoporotic cancellous bone and cortical bone of varying thickness. These bone constructs were used to test the fixation strength of cancellous bone screws in different cortical thicknesses and different cement augmentation depths. The cement distribution was measured with microCT. The maximum pullout force was measured experimentally. The microCT analysis revealed a pseudo-conic shape distribution of the cement around the screws. While the maximum pullout strength of the screws in the artificial bone only was 30±7N, it could increase up to approximately 1000N under optimal conditions. Cement augmentation significantly increased pullout force in all cases. The effect of cortical thickness on pullout force was reduced with increased cement augmentation depth. Indeed, cement augmentation without cortical fixation increased pullout forces over that of screws without cement augmentation but with cortical fixation. Since cement augmentation significantly increased pullout force in all cases, we conclude that the loss of cortical fixation can be compensated by cement augmentation.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Cytocompatibility Improvement of Vertebroplasty PMMA Bone Cements by Incorporating Mineralized Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jiang Jiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cement is a commonly used bone adhesive and filling material in percutaneous vertebroplasty and percutaneous kyphoplasty surgeries. However, PMMA bone cements have been reported to cause some severe complications, such as secondary fracture of adjacent vertebral bodies, and loosening or even dislodgement of the set PMMA bone cement, due to the over-high elastic modulus and poor osteointegration ability of the PMMA. In this study, mineralized collagen (MC with biomimetic microstructure and good osteogenic activity was added to commercially available PMMA bone cement products, in order to improve both the mechanical properties and the cytocompatibility. As the compressive strength of the modified bone cements remained well, the compressive elastic modulus could be significantly down-regulated by the MC, so as to reduce the pressure on the adjacent vertebral bodies. Meanwhile, the adhesion and proliferation of pre-osteoblasts on the modified bone cements were improved compared with cells on those unmodified, such result is beneficial for a good osteointegration formation between the bone cement and the host bone tissue in clinical applications. Moreover, the modification of the PMMA bone cements by adding MC did not significantly influence the injectability and processing times of the cement.

  10. Vertical bone augmentation with granulated brushite cement set in glycolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, F Tamimi; Torres, J; Tresguerres, I; Jerez, L Blanco; Cabarcos, E López

    2007-04-01

    Brushite cements are a biocompatible materials that are resorbed in vivo. A new cement composed of a mixture of monocalcium phosphate (MCP) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) that sets using glycolic acid (GA) was synthesized and characterized. After setting, the cement composition, derived from X-ray diffraction, was 83 wt % brushite and 17 wt % beta-TCP with an average brushite crystal size of about 2.6 +/- 1.4 microm. The cement has a diametral tensile strength of 2.9 +/- 0.7 MPa. Granules prepared from the set-cement were used as grafting material in bone defects on rabbit calvaria for evaluating in vivo its bone regeneration capacity. Considerable cement resorption, improvement in the bone mineral density, and bone neoformation was observed after 4 weeks of the granules' implantation.

  11. Novel bioactive composite bone cements based on the beta-tricalcium phosphate-monocalcium phosphate monohydrate composite cement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Zhiguang; Chang, Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Bioactive composite bone cements were obtained by incorporation of tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5, C3S) into a brushite bone cement composed of beta-tricalcium phosphate [beta-Ca3(PO4)2, beta-TCP] and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate [Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O, MCPM], and the properties of the new cements were studied and compared with pure brushite cement. The results indicated that the injectability, setting time and short- and long-term mechanical strength of the material are higher than those of pure brushite cement, and the compressive strength of the TCP/MCPM/C3S composite paste increased with increasing aging time. Moreover, the TCP/MCPM/C3S specimens showed significantly improved in vitro bioactivity in simulated body fluid and similar degradability in phosphate-buffered saline as compared with brushite cement. Additionally, the reacted TCP/MCPM/C3S paste possesses the ability to stimulate osteoblast proliferation and promote osteoblastic differentiation of the bone marrow stromal cells. The results indicated that the TCP/MCPM/C3S cements may be used as a bioactive material for bone regeneration, and might have significant clinical advantage over the traditional beta-TCP/MCPM brushite cement.

  12. Performance of Cement Containing Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bukhari, Z. S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of different industrial waste, by-products or other materials such as ground granulated blast furnace slag, silica fume, fly ash, limestone, and kiln dust, etc. as supplemen- tary cementing materials has received considerable attention in recent years. A study has been conducted to look into the performance of laterite as Supplementary Cementing Materials (SCM. The study focuses on compressive strength performance of blended cement containing different percentage of laterite. The cement is replaced accordingly with percentage of 2 %, 5 %, 7 % and 10 % by weight. In addition, the effect of use of three chemically different laterites have been studied on physical performance of cement as in setting time, Le-Chatlier expansion, loss on ignition, insoluble residue, free lime and specifically compressive strength of cement cubes tested at the age of 3, 7, and 28 days. The results show that the strength of cement blended with laterite as SCM is enhanced. Key words: Portland cement, supplementary cementing materials (SCM, laterite, compressive strength KUI – 6/2013 Received January 4, 2012 Accepted February 11, 2013

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Injectable Brushite Filled-Poly (Methyl Methacrylate Bone Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C. Rodriguez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Powder-liquid poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA bone cements are widely utilized for augmentation of bone fractures and fixation of orthopedic implants. These cements typically have an abundance of beneficial qualities, however their lack of bioactivity allows for continued development. To enhance osseointegration and bioactivity, calcium phosphate cements prepared with hydroxyapatite, brushite or tricalcium phosphates have been introduced with rather unsuccessful results due to increased cement viscosity, poor handling and reduced mechanical performance. This has limited the use of such cements in applications requiring delivery through small cannulas and in load bearing. The goal of this study is to design an alternative cement system that can better accommodate calcium-phosphate additives while preserving cement rheological properties and performance. In the present work, a number of brushite-filled two-solution bone cements were prepared and characterized by studying their complex viscosity-versus-test frequency, extrusion stress, clumping tendency during injection through a syringe, extent of fill of a machined void in cortical bone analog specimens, and compressive strength. The addition of brushite into the two-solution cement formulations investigated did not affect the pseudoplastic behavior and handling properties of the materials as demonstrated by rheological experiments. Extrusion stress was observed to vary with brushite concentration with values lower or in the range of control PMMA-based cements. The materials were observed to completely fill pre-formed voids in bone analog specimens. Cement compressive strength was observed to decrease with increasing concentration of fillers; however, the materials exhibited high enough strength for consideration in load bearing applications. The results indicated that partially substituting the PMMA phase of the two-solution cement with brushite at a 40% by mass concentration provided the best

  14. Development of monetite/phosphorylated chitosan composite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroujeni, Nariman Mansouri; Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we report the development of a biodegradable monetite [dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), CaHPO4 ]/phosphorylated chitosan (p-chitosan) composite orthopedic cement. The cement pastes showed desirable handling properties, injectability, and washout resistance. The incorporation of p-chitosan powders at 5 wt % shortened the setting time of DCPA and significantly improved the mechanical performance of DCPA cement, increasing the compressive strength almost twice from 11.09 ± 1.85 MPa at 0% chitosan to 23.43 ± 1.47 MPa at 5 wt % p-chitosan. On the other hand, higher p-chitosan content or untreated chitosan incorporation lowered the performance of DCPA cements. The cytocompatibility of the composite cement was investigated in vitro using the preosteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. An increase in cell proliferation was observed in both DCPA and DCPA-p-chitosan. The results show that both the materials are as cytocompatible as hydroxyapatite. Based on these results, DCPA-p-chitosan composite cement can be considered as potential bone repair material.

  15. The mechanical effects of different levels of cement penetration at the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical effects of varying the depth of cement penetration in the cement-bone interface were investigated using finite element analysis (FEA) and validated using companion experimental data. Two FEA models of the cement-bone interface were created from micro-computed tomography data and the p

  16. Center for Cement Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-31

    pastes have shown that the matrix is microporous; mesopores are absent unless the material is allowed to dry out. This results in water adsorption at low...only to water. When subsequently dried a portion of3 the porosity is converted to larger mesopores . • Only about one third of the cement reacts in a...Frictional sliding, in this case was characterized by a decreasing slope in the loading curve followed by hysteresis in the unload/reloading curves

  17. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements for enhanced bone tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue, E-mail: jacaza@farm.ucm.es [Departamento de Química-Física II, Facultad de Farmacia, UCM, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Estomatología III, Facultad de Odontología UCM, Madrid (Spain); Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Rueda, Carmen [Departamento de Química-Física II, Facultad de Farmacia, UCM, Madrid (Spain); Torres, Jesús [Facultad de Ciencias de la salud URJC, Alcorcón, Madrid (Spain); Blanco, Luis [Departamento de Estomatología III, Facultad de Odontología UCM, Madrid (Spain); López-Cabarcos, Enrique [Departamento de Química-Física II, Facultad de Farmacia, UCM, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-01

    We have synthesized calcium phosphate cements doped with different amounts of magnesium (Mg-CPC) with a twofold purpose: i) to evaluate in vitro the osteoblast cell response to this material, and ii) to compare the bone regeneration capacity of the doped material with a calcium cement prepared without magnesium (CPC). Cell proliferation and in vivo response increased in the Mg-CPCs in comparison with CPC. The Mg-CPCs have promoted higher new bone formation than the CPC (p < 0.05). The cytocompatibility and histomorfometric analysis performed in the rabbit calvaria showed that the incorporation of magnesium ions in CPC improves osteoblasts proliferation and provides higher new bone formation. The development of a bone substitute with controllable biodegradable properties and improved bone regeneration can be considered a step toward personalized therapy that can adapt to patient needs and clinical situations. - Highlights: • The Mg-CPCs promote higher new bone formation than the CPC. • The incorporation of magnesium ions in CPC improves osteoblasts proliferation. • Mg-CPC is a bone substitute with controllable biodegradable properties. • We suggest that the use of Mg ions could improve the clinical efficiency of CPCs.

  18. Bone-Cement: The New Medical Quick Fix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Bone Cement is being widely used in vertebroplasty, a minimally invasive surgical procedure to treat spinal fractures and collapsed vertebrae. It is being labeled as a concrete success in medical field. It is being used to treat fractures due to osteoporosis, menopause, steroids, hyperthyroidism and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases.  In this technique a needle with bone cement (PMMA, polymethylmethacrylate is injected into the collapsed vertebra after administering local anesthesia to patient. It solidifies within few minutes and provides support to damaged bone resulting in relief to the patient. It also prevents the movement between different parts of the broken bone. Hence it requires a short hospital stay for the patient and the procedure can be performed with much ease and at significant lower costs. Patient can resume normal activity within a day or so. Bone cement is now being referred to as the quick medical fix material for early repair of fractures.

  19. Effect of process variables on the preparation of artificial bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Junior, J.G.F.; Melo, P.A.; Pinto, J.C., E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: jjunior@peq.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: melo@peq.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Pita, V.J.R.R., E-mail: vjpita@ima.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas; Nele, M., E-mail: nele@eq.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2013-10-15

    The present work concerns the preparation of bone cements based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), used mainly for prosthesis fixation and cavity filling for correction of human bone failures. A typical bone cement recipe contains methyl methacrylate, which polymerizes in situ during cement application. An inherent problem of this reaction is the large amount of heat released during the cement preparation, which may lead to irreparable damage of living tissues. Optimization of PMMA-based bone cement recipes is thus an important step towards safe and reliable clinical usage of these materials. Important process variables related to the reaction temperature profile and the mixing of the recipe constituents were studied in order to allow for the adequate production of bone cements. It is shown that the average molar mass and size of the PMMA particles used in the production of the bone cement, as well as incorporation of radiopaque contrast, co-monomers and fillers into the bone recipe play fundamental roles in the course of the polymerization reaction. Furthermore, the injection vessel geometry may interfere dramatically with the temperature profile and the time for its occurrence. Finally, it has been observed that the morphology of the PMMA particles strongly affects the mixing of the bone cement components. (author)

  20. Bone Cement Solidifiliation Influence the Limb Alignment and Gap Balance during TKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongquan Shi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mechanical alignment deviation after total knee arthroplasty is a major reason for early loosening of the prosthesis. Achieving optimum cement penetration during fixation of the femoral and tibial component is an essential step in performing a successful total knee arthroplasty. Bone cement is used to solidify the bone and prosthesis. Thickness imbalance of bone cement leads to the deviation of mechanical alignment. To estimate the influence of bone cement, a retrospective study was conducted. Materials and Methods. A total of 36 subjects were studied. All the TKA were performed following the standard surgical protocol for navigated surgery by medial approach with general anaesthesia. Prostheses were fixed by bone cement. Results. We compared the mechanical axis, flexion/extension, and gap balance before and after cementation. All the factors were different compared with those before and after cementation. Internal rotation was reached with statistical significance (P=0.03. Conclusion. Bone cement can influence the mechanical axis, flexion/extension, and gap balance. It also can prompt us to make a change when poor knee kinematics were detected before cementation.

  1. [Removal of bone cement with laser].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, C; Matthes, M; Kar, H; Boenick, U

    1991-05-01

    In operations requiring replacement of cemented endoprothesis, the removal of both the prosthesis and the cement is often difficult as the cement adheres strongly to the bone. Mechanical removal frequently results in fenestration or traumatisation of the bone. The aim of non-contact removal of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with the laser, is to access normally inaccessible regions while inflicting a minimum amount of damage to the bone substance. The much cited cw or superpulsed CO2-laser cannot be used clinically, due to the thermal stressing of the bone. The paper shows spectra of PMMA with and without dopants, e.g. Tinuvin as UV absorber, optical staining with a high-pressure mercury lamp at lambda = 275 +/- 25 nm, lambda = 350 +/- 25 nm and various radiation times, as well as with an excimer laser lambda = 248 nm, FWHM 20 ns, and ablation measurements were made with the following lasers: excimer laser, Lambda Physics, EMG 102, FWHM 25 ns, lambda = 351 nm, excimer laser, Technolas, MAX 10, FWHM 60 ns, lambda = 308 nm, and a pulsed CO2 laser from PSI, lambda = 9.2 and 10.6 microns, FWHM 130 and 65 microseconds, pulse peak power 3.8 and 7.7 kW. The excimer laser, pulse length less than 100 ns, is unsuitable for clinical use because the required removal rate cannot be achieved either with doped PMMA or with pure PMMA. More promising results have been obtained with the pulsed (microseconds range) CO2 laser which has a removal rate of up to 30 times that of the above-mentioned excimer laser, with significantly lower thermal stressing of the bone than with the cw or super pulsed CO2 laser.

  2. Apatite bone cement reinforced with calcium silicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motisuke, Mariana; Santos, Verônica R; Bazanini, Naiana C; Bertran, Celso A

    2014-10-01

    Several research efforts have been made in the attempt to reinforce calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) with polymeric and carbon fibers. Due to their low compatibility with the cement matrix, results were not satisfactory. In this context, calcium silicate fibers (CaSiO3) may be an alternative material to overcome the main drawback of reinforced CPCs since, despite of their good mechanical properties, they may interact chemically with the CPC matrix. In this work CaSiO3 fibers, with aspect ratio of 9.6, were synthesized by a reactive molten salt synthesis and used as reinforcement in apatite cement. 5 wt.% of reinforcement addition has increased the compressive strength of the CPC by 250% (from 14.5 to 50.4 MPa) without preventing the cement to set. Ca and Si release in samples containing fibers could be explained by CaSiO3 partial hydrolysis which leads to a quick increase in Ca concentration and in silica gel precipitation. The latter may be responsible for apatite precipitation in needle like form during cement setting reaction. The material developed presents potential properties to be employed in bone repair treatment.

  3. Development and clinical trial of a novel bioactive bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Strontium(Sr)and related compounds have become more attractive in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.Previously,we developed a novel bioactive bone cement which is mainly composed of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite(Sr-HA)filler and bisphenol A diglycidylether dimethacrylate(Bis-GMA)resin.This bone cement is superior to conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)bone cement in bioactivity,biocompatibility,and osseointegration.It also has shown sufficient mechanical strength properties for its use in percutaneous vertebroplasty(PVP)and total hip replacement(THR).In this paper,we review the in vitro,in vivo and clinical evidence for the effectiveness of this bioactive bone cement.

  4. Microindentation of Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA Based Bone Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zivic

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA based bone cement subjected to cyclical loading using microindentation technique is presented in this paper. Indentation technique represents flexible mechanical testing due to its simplicity, minimal specimen preparation and short time needed for tests. The mechanical response of bone cement samples was studied. Realised microindentation enabled determination of the indentation testing hardness HIT and indentation modulus EIT of the observed bone cement. Analysis of optical photographs of the imprints showed that this technique can be effectively used for characterization of bone cements.

  5. Exploration of electric properties of bone compared to cement: streaming potential and piezoelectirc properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry, Carolyn

    2015-03-01

    Bone is a material after which to model construction materials for many reasons, including its great strength, toughness, and adaptability. This paper focuses on bone's intrinsic ability to adapt to its environment, namely loading conditions. Research on bone's electrical properties reveals that two phenomena occur in bone to allow it to adapt to environmental changes; they are the inherent piezoelectric property of bone and the streaming potential of bone [1]. Together they create charge differences that attract ions to specific regions of the bone, namely those under greatest stress, in order to build up the region to handle the applied load. Research on the utilization of these properties in cement in order to increase adaptability was studied along with 1) the inherent electric properties of the cement itself and 2) considered the introduction of a different polymer or ceramic within the cement to impart piezoelectricity and streaming potential.

  6. Chemical and physical properties of bone cement for vertebroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Liang Lai

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Vertebral compression fracture is the most common complication of osteoporosis. It may result in persistent severe pain and limited mobility, and significantly impacts the quality of life. Vertebroplasty involves a percutaneous injection of bone cement into the collapsed vertebrae by fluorescent guide. The most commonly used bone cement in percutaneous vertebroplasty is based on the polymerization of methylmethacrylate monomers to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA polymers. However, information on the properties of bone cement is mostly published in the biomaterial sciences literature, a source with which the clinical community is generally unfamiliar. This review focuses on the chemistry of bone cement polymerization and the physical properties of PMMA. The effects of altering the portions and contents of monomer liquid and polymer powders on the setting time, polymerization temperature, and compressive strength of the cement are also discussed. This information will allow spine surgeons to manipulate bone cement characteristics for specific clinical applications and improve safety.

  7. [The pulsed water jet for selective removal of bone cement during revision arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honl, Matthias; Schwieger, Karsten; Carrero, Volker; Rentzsch, Reemt; Dierk, Oliver; Dries, Sebastian; Pude, Frank; Bluhm, Andrea; Hille, Ekkehard; Louis, Hartmut; Morlock, Michael

    2003-10-01

    Conventional tools used in prosthetic revision surgery have a limited range of action within the narrow cement mantle. Water jet cutting technology permits tiny and precisely controlled cuts, and may therefore be an alternative method of bone cement removal. Our study compares the cutting performance on bone cement (PMMA) and bone of a pulsed water jet and a continuous water jet. The aim of the study was to establish whether selective removal of PMMA is possible. 55 bone specimens (bovine femora) and 32 specimens of PMMA were cut with a continuous and a pulsed water jet at different pressures (40 MPa, 60 MPa) and pulse frequencies (0Hz, 50Hz, 250Hz). To ensure comparability of the results, the depths of cut were related to the hydraulic power of that part of the jet actually impinging on the material. While for PMMA the power-related depth of cut increased significantly with the pulse frequency, this did not apply to bone. The cuts produced in bone were sharp-edged. Since PMMA is more brittle than bone, the water jet caused cracks that enlarged further until particles of bone broke away. Although selective removal of PMMA without doing damage to the bone was not possible at the investigated settings of the jet parameters, the results do show that a pulsed water jet can cut bone cement much more effectively than bone. This is an important advantage over conventional non-selective tools for the removal of bone cement.

  8. CT evaluation of local leakage of bone cement after percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Jae; Choi, A. Lam; Yie, Mi-Yeon; Yoon, Ji Young; Jeon, Eui Yong; Koh, Sung Hye; Yoon, Dae Young; Lim, Kyung Ja (Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea)), e-mail: ijlee2003@medimail.co.kr; Im, Hyoung June (Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Percutaneous injection of bone cement (acrylic cement) during percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty can cause symptomatic or asymptomatic complications due to leakage, extravasation or vascular migration of cement. Purpose: To investigate and to compare the incidence and site of local leakage or complications of bone cement after percutaneous kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty using bone cement. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 473 cases of percutaneous kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty performed under fluoroscopic guidance. Of the 473 cases, follow-up CT scans that covered the treated bones were available for 83 cases (59 kyphoplasty and 24 vertebroplasty). Results: The rate of local leakage of bone cement was 87.5% (21/24) for percutaneous vertebroplasty and 49.2% (29/59) for kyphoplasty. The most common site of local leakage was perivertebral soft tissue (n=8, 38.1%) for vertebroplasty. The most common site of local leakage was a perivertebral vein (n=7, 24.1%) for kyphoplasty. Two cases of pulmonary cement embolism developed: one case after kyphoplasty and one case after vertebroplasty. Conclusion: Local leakage of bone cement was more common for percutaneous vertebroplasty compared with kyphoplasty (P<0.005). The most common sites of local leakage were perivertebral soft tissue and perivertebral vein.

  9. Experimental micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, K.A.; Miller, M.A.; Cleary, R.J.; Janssen, D.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of cement as a means of fixation of implants to bone, surprisingly little is known about the micromechanical behavior in terms of the local interfacial motion. In this work, we utilized digital image correlation techniques to quantify the micromechanics of the cement-bone

  10. The use of RANKL-coated brushite cement to stimulate bone remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Nihouannen, Damien; Hacking, S Adam; Gbureck, Uwe; Komarova, Svetlana V; Barralet, Jake E

    2008-08-01

    Calcium phosphate cements were first proposed as synthetic bone substitutes over two decades ago, however, they are characterised by slow chemical or cellular resorption and a slow osteointegration. In contrast, bone autograft has been shown to stimulate osteoclastogenesis and angiogenesis resulting in active bone remodelling and rapid graft incorporation. Therefore, we aimed to develop a biomaterial able to release a key stimulator of the bone remodelling process, cytokine RANKL. Cylinders of brushite cement, hydroxyapatite cement and sodium alginate were loaded with RANKL either by incorporation into the cement or by coating the material with soluble RANKL. To test the biological activity of these formulations, we assessed their effectiveness in inducing osteoclast formation from RAW 264.7 monocytic cell line. Only brushite and hydroxyapatite cements coated with RANKL allowed for retaining sufficient biological activity to induce osteoclast formation. Most efficient was coating 40 mg cylinder of brushite cement with 800 ng RANKL. We have found that RANKL-coated brushite cement exhibits osteoclastogenic activity for at least 1 month at 37 degrees C. Thus, we developed a formulation of brushite cement with RANKL - a synthetic bone graft that is similar to autografts in its ability to actively induce osteoclastogenesis.

  11. Synthesization and characterization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) / calcium phosphate bone cement from crab shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, M. R. Abdul; Daud, N. M.; Ismail, L. H.; Saidin, S.

    2017-05-01

    An injectable calcium phosphate (CaP) bone cement has been widely used for musculoskeletal and bone disorder due to its biocompatible and osteoconductive properties. In this study, CaP was successfully synthesized from crab shells by a wet chemical route. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which have been produced through a double emulsion technique were incorporated into the CaP mixture for the purpose of bone cement solidification. The ratio of both compounds, CaP and PLGA, were set at 8:2. The CaP and PLGA/CaP bone cement were analyzed by ATR-FTIR, FESEM-EDX and contact angle analyses. The bone cement was composed of CaP and PLGA where the micro-powders of CaP were agglomerated on the PLGA microspheres. Addition of the PLGA has increased the hydrophilicity of the bone cement which will be beneficial for materials degradation and bone integration.

  12. The behavior of the micro-mechanical cement-bone interface affects the cement failure in total hip replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, the effects of different ways to implement the complex micro-mechanical behavior of the cement-bone interface on the fatigue failure of the cement mantle were investigated. In an FEA-model of a cemented hip reconstruction the cement-bone interface was modeled and numerically im

  13. Low-modulus PMMA bone cement modified with castor oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro; Hoess, Andreas; Thersleff, Thomas; Ott, Marjam; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    Some of the current clinical and biomechanical data suggest that vertebroplasty causes the development of adjacent vertebral fractures shortly after augmentation. These findings have been attributed to high injection volumes as well as high Young's moduli of PMMA bone cements compared to that of the osteoporotic cancellous bone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of castor oil as a plasticizer for PMMA bone cements. The Young's modulus, yield strength, maximum polymerization temperature, doughing time, setting time and the complex viscosity curves during curing, were determined. The cytotoxicity of the materials extracts was assessed on cells of an osteoblast-like cell line. The addition of up to 12 wt% castor oil decreased yield strength from 88 to 15 MPa, Young's modulus from 1500 to 446 MPa and maximum polymerization temperature from 41.3 to 25.6°C, without affecting the setting time. However, castor oil seemed to interfere with the polymerization reaction, giving a negative effect on cell viability in a worst-case scenario.

  14. The water jet as a new tool for endoprosthesis revision surgery--an in vitro study on human bone and bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honl, Matthias; Rentzsch, Reemt; Schwieger, Karsten; Carrero, Volker; Dierk, Oliver; Dries, Sebastian; Louis, Hartmut; Pude, Frank; Bishop, Nick; Hille, Ekkehard; Morlock, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In revision surgeries of endoprostheses, the interface between implant and bone cement or bone must be loosened. Conventional tools have many disadvantages because of their size and limited range. Taking advantage of the selective and athermic cutting process, a plain water jet is already used in order to cut soft tissues. This study investigates the possibilities of both a plain and an abrasive water jet as cutting tools for revision surgery. Samples of the mid-diaphysis of human femora and bone cement (CMW3) were cut with a plain water jet (PWJ) and an abrasive water jet (AWJ) at two different jet-to-surface angles (30 degrees,90 degrees ) and at five different pressure levels (30, 40, 50, 60, 70 MPa). For a PWJ a selective pressure range was identified, where only bone cement was cut. Injecting a bio-compatible abrasive (lactose) to the jet stream resulted in significantly higher cut depths in both materials. Material removal in bone was significantly less at the smaller jet-to-surface angle for both techniques. No clear selectivity between bone and bone cement was observed for application of the AWJ. However, the material removal rate was significantly higher for bone cement than for bone at all pressure levels. The results indicate that an AWJ might be an alternative tool for cement removal. The possibility for localised cutting at interfaces could be an advantage for revision of a non-cemented prosthesis.

  15. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement–bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element

  16. Development of monetite-nanosilica bone cement: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Luchini, Timothy J F; Agarwal, Anand K; Goel, Vijay K; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we reported the results of our efforts in developing DCPA/nanosilica composite orthopedic cement. It is motivated by the significances of DCPA and silicon in bone physiological activities. More specifically, this paper examined the effects of various experimental parameters on the properties of such composite cements. In this work, DCPA cement powders were synthesized using a microwave synthesis technique. Mixing colloidal nanosilica directly with synthesized DCPA cement powders can significantly reduce the washout resistance of DCPA cement. In contrast, a DCPA-nanosilica cement powder prepared by reacting Ca(OH)2 , H3 PO4 and nanosilica together showed good washout resistance. The incorporation of nanosilica in DCPA can improve compressive strength, accelerate cement solidification, and intensify surface bioactivity. In addition, it was observed that by controlling the content of NaHCO3 during cement preparation, the resulting composite cement properties could be modified. Allowing for the development of different setting times, mechanical performance and crystal features. It is suggested that DCPA-nanosilica composite cement can be a potential candidate for bone healing applications.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perni, Stefano; Thenault, Victorien; Abdo, Pauline; Margulis, Katrin; Magdassi, Shlomo; Prokopovich, Polina

    2015-01-01

    Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite) and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial activity; furthermore, lower concentrations are needed in calcium phosphate (brushite and hydroxyapatite) than in acrylic (PMMA) bone cements. These nanoparticles are effective against a wide spectrum of bacteria, including those already resistant to the antibiotics routinely employed in orthopedic applications, such as gentamicin. PMID:26487803

  18. Interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, J.

    2006-01-01

    Conventionally, the bonding strength of bone-cement interface is obtained by mechanical strength testing which tends to produce large variability between specimens and test methods. In this work, interfacial fracture toughness of synthetic bone-cement interface has been determined using sandwiched Brazilian disk specimens. Experiments were carried out under selected loading angles from 0 to 25 degrees to achieve full loading conditions from mode I to mode II. Solutions for complex stress inte...

  19. Control of in vivo mineral bone cement degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Britta; Geffers, Martha; Ignatius, Anita; Gbureck, Uwe

    2014-07-01

    The current study aimed to prevent the formation of hydroxyapatite reprecipitates in brushite-forming biocements by minimizing the availability of free Ca(2+) ions in the cement matrix. This was achieved by both maximizing the degree of cement setting to avoid unreacted, calcium-rich cement raw materials which can deliver Ca(2+) directly to the cement matrix after dissolution, and by a reduction in porosity to reduce Ca(2+) diffusion into the set cement matrix. In addition, a biocement based on the formation of the magnesium phosphate mineral struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) was tested, which should prevent the formation of low-solubility hydroxyapatite reprecipitates due to the high magnesium content. Different porosity levels were fabricated by altering the powder-to-liquid ratio at which the cements were mixed and the materials were implanted into mechanically unloaded femoral defects in sheep for up to 10 months. While the higher-porosity brushite cement quantitatively transformed into crystalline octacalcium phosphate after 10 months, slowing down cement resorption, a lower-porosity brushite cement modification was found to be chemically stable with the absence of reprecipitate formation and minor cement resorption from the implant surface. In contrast, struvite-forming cements were much more degradable due to the absence of mineral reprecipitates and a nearly quantitative cement degradation was found after 10 months of implantation.

  20. Development of LiCl-containing calcium aluminate cement for bone repair and remodeling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Gutiérrez, I O; Escobedo-Bocardo, J C; Almanza-Robles, J M; Cortés-Hernández, D A; Saldívar-Ramírez, M M G; Reséndiz-Hernández, P J; Zugasti-Cruz, A

    2017-01-01

    The effect of LiCl additions on the in vitro bioactivity, hemolysis, cytotoxicity, compressive strength and setting time of calcium aluminate cements was studied. Calcium aluminate clinker (AC) was obtained via solid state reaction from reagent grade chemicals of CaCO3 and Al2O3. Calcium aluminate cements (CAC) were prepared by mixing the clinker with water or aqueous LiCl solutions (0.01, 0.0125 or 0.015M (M)) using a w/c ratio of 0.4. After 21days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at physiological conditions of temperature and pH, a Ca-P rich layer, identified as hydroxyapatite (HA), was formed on the cement without LiCl and on the cement prepared with 0.01M of LiCl solution. This indicates the high bioactivity of these cements. The cements setting times were significantly reduced using LiCl. The measured hemolysis percentages, all of them lower than 5%, indicated that the cements were not hemolytic. The compressive strength of the cements was not negatively affected by the LiCl additions. The obtained cement when a solution of LiCl 0.010M was added, presented high compressive strength, appropriated bioactivity, no cytotoxicity and low setting time, making this material a potentially bone cement.

  1. Finite element modelling of rheological and penetration characteristics of curing PMMA bone cement in total hip replacement

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the study of the rheological properties of PMMA bone cement that is used as a grout for bone and prosthesis in THR and TKR Interdigitation of bone cement through porous cancellous bone depends on the rheological characteristics of bone cement and porosity of the cancellous bone. The rheological characteristics of the bone cement are thus an important factor effecting the optimum penetration of bone cement through cancellous bone. In this project the rheologic...

  2. Preclinical evaluation of strontium-containing bioactive bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhaoyang, E-mail: lizy@hku.hk [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yuan, Ning [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Tianjin Chest Hospital, Tianjin 300051 (China); Lam, Raymond Wing Moon [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin 300072 (China); Lu, William Weijia, E-mail: wwlu@hku.hk [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-12-01

    Strontium (Sr) has become more attractive for orthopaedic applications as they can simultaneously stimulate bone formation and prevent bone loss. A Sr-containing bioactive bone cement (Sr-BC) has been designed to fix osteoporotic bone fracture. Sr is a trace element, so the safety of containing Sr is concerned when Sr-BC is implanted in human body. The preclinical assessment of biocompatibility of Sr-BC was conducted according to ISO 10993 standards. MTT assay showed that this bioactive bone cement was non-toxic to mouse fibroblasts, and it met the basic requirement for the orthopaedic implant. The three independent genetic toxicity studies including Ames, chromosome aberration and bone marrow micronucleus assays demonstrated absence of genotoxic components in Sr-BC, which reassured the safety concerns of this novel bone cement. The muscle implantation results in present study were also encouraging. The acute inflammation around the cement was observed at 1 week post-implantation; however, no significant difference was observed between control and Sr-BC groups. These responses may be attributed to the presence of the foreign body, but the tissue healed after 12 weeks implantation. In summary, the above preclinical results provide additional assurance for the safety of this implant. Sr-BC can be used as a potential alternative to the traditional bone cement. - Highlights: • Strontium-containing bioactive bone cement (Sr-BC) was designed. • The biocompatibility of Sr-BC was evaluated according ISO 10993 standards. • Preclinical results provide additional assurance for the safety of Sr-BC.

  3. Failure of total hip arthroplasty with Boneloc bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebuhr, P; Stentzer, K; Thomsen, F; Levi, N

    2000-12-01

    Early failure of Boneloc cemented total hip arthroplasty is well documented. However, information regarding the long term prognosis is scanty. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the long term failure rate of total hip replacement with Boneloc bone cement. Between January 1991 and March 1992, Boneloc bone cement (Polymers Recontructive A/S, Farum, Denmark) was used in 42 consecutive total hip replacements in 42 patients. The average age of the patients was 75 years. There were 25 women and 17 men. The diagnosis at operation was osteoarthritis in all cases. A cemented Muller Taperloc femoral stem was used with a cemented Muller acetabular cup (Biomet, Warsaw, USA). The follow-up time was 9 years. All patients underwent radiographic control the first postoperative year and annually after 1995. To date 21 patients have been revised for aseptic loosening at a mean of 5 years (range: one year to 8 years). Three other patients have definite radiographic evidence of loosening. The overall failure rate is therefore 24/42 = 57%. Our results confirm the previously reported poor results of Boneloc bone cement for hip arthroplasty and support the recommendation of indefinite follow-up for surviving prostheses. New prosthesis designs and new cements should have documentation, including laboratory tests and randomized clinical studies with radiostereometric evaluation. However, the ethical responsibility rests heavily on the shoulders of the clinician to make a correct analysis of the need for a new product before he begins to use it.

  4. Effect of vacuum-treatment on deformation properties of PMMA bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivic, Fatima; Babic, Miroslav; Grujovic, Nenad; Mitrovic, Slobodan; Favaro, Gregory; Caunii, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Deformation behavior of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is explored using microindentation. Two types of PMMA bone cement were prepared. Vacuum treated samples were subjected to the degassing of the material under vacuum of 270 mbar for 35 s, followed by the second degassing under vacuum of 255 mbar for 35 s. Air-cured samples were left in ambient air to cool down and harden. All samples were left to age for 6 months before the test. The samples were then subjected to the indentation fatigue test mode, using sharp Vickers indenter. First, loading segment rise time was varied in order to establish time-dependent behavior of the samples. Experimental data showed that viscous part of the deformation can be neglected under the observed test conditions. The second series of microindentation tests were realized with variation of number of cycles and indentation hardness and modulus were obtained. Approximate hardness was also calculated using analysis of residual impression area. Porosity characteristics were analyzed using CellC software. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that air-cured bone cement exhibited significant number of large voids made of aggregated PMMA beads accompanied by particles of the radiopaque agent, while vacuum treated samples had homogeneous structure. Air-cured samples exhibited variable hardness and elasticity modulus throughout the material. They also had lower hardness values (approximately 65-100 MPa) than the vacuum treated cement (approximately 170 MPa). Porosity of 5.1% was obtained for vacuum treated cement and 16.8% for air-cured cement. Extensive plastic deformation, microcracks and craze whitening were produced during indentation of air-cured bone cement, whereas vacuum treated cement exhibited no cracks and no plastic deformation.

  5. Transient and residual stresses and displacements in self-curing bone cement - Part II: thermoelastic analysis of the stem fixation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A M; Nair, R; Burke, D L; Miller, J

    1982-02-01

    In this second part of a two-part report, an idealized model of the stem fixation system is analyzed to determine the adverse effects of the thermal stresses and displacements of bone cement during its curing process. The Shaffer-Levitsky stress-rate strain-rate law for chemically hardening material has been used. The results show that if the cement is surrounded by cancellous bone, as opposed to cortical bone, then transient tensile circumferential stresses in the cement and similar radial stresses at the stem/cement interface are generated. The former may cause flaws and voids within the still cement, while the latter may cause gaps at the interface.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of bone cements embedded with organic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perni S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Perni,1,2 Victorien Thenault,1 Pauline Abdo,1 Katrin Margulis,3 Shlomo Magdassi,3 Polina Prokopovich1,2 1School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 2Center for Biomedical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Casali Institute, Institute of Chemistry, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Infections after orthopedic surgery are a very unwelcome outcome; despite the widespread use of antibiotics, their incidence can be as high as 10%. This risk is likely to increase as antibiotics are gradually losing efficacy as a result of bacterial resistance; therefore, novel antimicrobial approaches are required. Parabens are a class of compounds whose antimicrobial activity is employed in many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. We developed propylparaben nanoparticles that are hydrophilic, thus expanding the applicability of parabens to aqueous systems. In this paper we assess the possibility of employing paraben nanoparticles as antimicrobial compound in bone cements. The nanoparticles were embedded in various types of bone cement (poly(methyl methacrylate [PMMA], hydroxyapatite, and brushite and the antimicrobial activity was determined against common causes of postorthopedic surgery infections such as: Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Acinetobacter baumannii. Nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 1% w/w in brushite bone cement were capable of preventing pathogens growth, 5% w/w was needed for hydroxyapatite bone cement, while 7% w/w was required for PMMA bone cement. No ­detrimental effect was determined by the addition of paraben nanoparticles on bone cement compression strength and cytocompatibility. Our results demonstrate that paraben nanoparticles can be encapsulated in bone cement, providing concentration-dependent antimicrobial

  7. Production of bone cement composites: effect of fillers, co-monomer and particles properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Junior, J.G.F.; Melo, P.A.; Pinto, J.C., E-mail: jjunior@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: melo@peq.coppe.ufrj.b, E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. (PEQ/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Quimica; Pita, V.J.R.R., E-mail: vjpita@ima.ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas Eloisa Mano; Nele, M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (EQ/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica

    2011-04-15

    Artificial bone cements (BCs) based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) powders and methyl methacrylate (MMA) liquid monomer also present in their formulation small amounts of other substances, including a chemical initiator compound and radiopaque agents. Because inadequate mixing of the recipe components during the manufacture of the bone cement may compromise the mechanical properties of the final pieces, new techniques to incorporate the fillers into the BC and their effect upon the mechanical properties of BC pieces were investigated in the present study. PMMA powder composites were produced in situ in the reaction vessel by addition of X-ray contrasts to the reacting MMA mixture. It is shown that this can lead to much better mechanical properties of test pieces, when compared to standard bone cement formulations, because enhanced dispersion of the radiopaque agents can be achieved. Moreover, it is shown that the addition of hydroxyapatite (HA) and acrylic acid (AA) to the bone cement recipe can be beneficial for the mechanical performance of the final material. It is also shown that particle morphology can exert a tremendous effect upon the performance of test pieces, indicating that the suspension polymerization step should be carefully controlled when optimization of the bone cement formulation is desired. (author)

  8. Effect of BaSO4 on the fatigue crack propagation rate of PMMA bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, L N; Topoleski, L D

    1996-05-01

    To determine the effect of BaSO4 on the fatigue crack growth rate, da/dN = C(delta K)n, of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement, radiopaque bone cement, radiolucent bone cement, and commercial PMMA (Plexiglas) were tested using a methodology based on ASTM E647. The crack growth rate of radiopaque bone cement was one order of magnitude less than that of radiolucent. Fractographic analysis showed that the regions of rapid catastrophic fracture were smooth for all materials tested. The radiopaque fatigue surface was rough and characterized by ragged-edged stacked plateaus, a morphology consistent with the model of crack propagation through the interbead matrix. Voids were visible in the interbead matrix on the order of the size of BaSO4 particles. The fatigue surface of radiolucent bone cement was relatively smooth, a morphology consistent with crack propagation through both the PMMA beads and interbead matrix. Fatigue striations were visible, and their spacing correlated well with crack propagation rates. The striations indicated an increased crack growth rate through the PMMA beads.

  9. Bone cement flow analysis by stepwise injection through medical cannulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zderic, Ivan; Steinmetz, Philipp; Windolf, Markus; Richards, R Geoff; Boger, Andreas; Gueorguiev, Boyko

    2016-12-01

    Cement leakage is a serious adverse event potentially occurring during vertebroplasty. Pre-operative in-silico planning of the cement filling process can help reducing complication rates related to leakage. This requires a better understanding of the cement flow along the whole injection path. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze bone cement flow behavior by stepwise injections through medical cannulas. Sixteen cannulas were assigned to four groups for stepwise injection of differently colored cement portions of 1ml volume. Each group differed in the amount of injected cement portions with a range of 1-4ml. After cement curing longitudinal cross-sections of the cannulas were performed and high-resolution pictures taken. Based on these pictures, quadratic polynomial interpolation was applied to the marked intersections between the last two injected cement portions to calculate the leading coefficients. Leading coefficients in the groups with three cement portions (0.287 ± 0.078), four portions (0.243 ± 0.041) and two portions (0.232 ± 0.050) were comparable and significantly higher than the group with one cement portion (0.0032 ± 0.0004), p ≤ 0.016. Based on these findings, cement flow through medical cannulas can be considered as predictable and can therefore be excluded as a source of risk for possible cement leakage complications during vertebroplasty procedures. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bone cement implantation syndrome during spinal surgery requiring cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, José A; López, Teresa; Dalmau, María J; Cuello, Rafael E

    2013-12-15

    During a posterior segmental spinal fusion procedure, a 71-year-old woman developed cardiac and pulmonary embolism characterized by nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during cement injection, rapid and severe hypoxemia, and hemodynamic instability. Management included exploratory cardiotomy under cardiopulmonary bypass and removal of the emboli from the pulmonary vessels. Postoperative recovery was successful, and the patient was discharged without sequelae. We discuss the pathophysiology of bone cement implantation syndrome during spinal fusion, possible causative factors, and treatment alternatives.

  11. Biocompatibility and other properties of acrylic bone cements prepared with antiseptic activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, B; Fernández, M; Vázquez, B; Collía, F; de Pedro, J A; López-Bravo, A; San Román, J

    2003-08-15

    Acrylic bone cements prepared with activators of reduced toxicity have been formulated with the aim of improving the biocompatibility of the final material. The activators used were N,N-dimethylaminobenzyl alcohol (DMOH) and 4,4'-dimethylamino benzydrol (BZN). The toxicity, cytotoxicity, and antiseptic action of these activators were first studied. DMOH and BZN presented LD50 values 3-4 times higher than DMT, were less cytotoxic against polymorphonuclear leucocytes, and possessed an antimicrobial character, with a high activity against the most representative microorganisms involved in postoperative infections. The properties of the acrylic bone cements formulated with DMOH and BZN were evaluated to determine the influence of these activators on the curing process and the physicochemical characteristics of the cements. A decrease of the peak temperature was observed for the curing with DMOH or BZN with respect to that of one commercially available formulation (CMW 3). However, residual monomer content and mechanical properties in tension and compression were comparable to those of CMW 3. The biocompatibility of acrylic bone cements containing DMOH or BZN was studied and compared with CMW 3. To that end, intramuscular and intraosseous implantation procedures were carried out and the results were obtained from the histological analysis of the surrounding tissues at different periods of time. Implantation of rods of cement into the dorsal muscle of rats showed the presence of a membrane of connective tissue, which increased in collagen fibers with time of implantation, for all formulations. The intraosseous implantation of the cements in the dough state in the femur of rabbits, revealed a higher and early osseous neoformation, with the presence of osteoid material surrounding the rest of the cured material, for the cement prepared with the activator BZN in comparison with that obtained following the implantation of the cement cured with DMOH or DMT (CMW 3).

  12. Benefits and drawbacks of zinc in glass ionomer bone cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauer, Delia S; Hill, Robert G [Unit of Dental Physical Sciences, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Gentleman, Eileen; Stevens, Molly M [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Farrar, David F, E-mail: d.brauer@qmul.ac.uk [Smith and Nephew Research Centre, York Science Park, Heslington YO10 5DF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Glass polyalkenoate (ionomer) cements (GPCs) based on poly(acrylic acid) and fluoro-alumino-silicate glasses are successfully used in a variety of orthopaedic and dental applications; however, they release small amounts of aluminium, which is a neurotoxin and inhibits bone mineralization in vivo. Therefore there has been significant interest in developing aluminium-free glasses containing zinc for forming GPCs because zinc can play a similar structural role in the glass, allowing for glass degradation and subsequent cement setting, and is reported to have beneficial effects on bone formation. We created zinc-containing GPCs and characterized their mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Zinc-containing cements showed adhesion to bone close to 1 MPa, which was significantly greater than that of zinc-free cements (<0.05 MPa) and other currently approved biological adhesives. However, zinc-containing cements produced significantly lower metabolic activity in mouse osteoblasts exposed to cell culture medium conditioned with the cements than controls. Results show that although low levels of zinc may be beneficial to cells, zinc concentrations of 400 {mu}M Zn{sup 2+} or more resulted in cell death. In summary, we demonstrate that while zinc-containing GPCs possess excellent mechanical properties, they fail basic biocompatibility tests, produce an acute cytotoxic response in vitro, which may preclude their use in vivo.

  13. Regulatory perspective on characterization and testing of orthopedic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, H W; McDermott, K

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a general regulatory background of acrylic bone cements, chemical composition information on several commercially available bone cements, physical and chemical methods of analyses, mechanical test methods, and risks and failure mechanisms of acrylic bone cements. Suggestions and recommendations presented in Tables 2 and 3 are not mandatory requirements but reflect data and methodologies which the FDA's Orthopedic Devices Branch (ORDB) believes to be acceptable to evaluate most pre-clinical data. FDA may require information in addition to that contained in this paper. In some instances, a sponsor may be able to sufficiently justify the omission of some tests. Although this paper describes certain administrative requirements, it does not take the place of the requirements contained in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR) Parts 801, 807, 812, and 814 or those found in the statute.

  14. Numerical simulation of thermal bone necrosis during cementation of femoral prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzullo, S; Paolini, M; Verdi, C

    1991-01-01

    The implant of a femoral prosthesis is a critical process because of the relatively high temperature values reached at the bone/cement interface during the cementation of the infibulum. In fact, the cement is actually a polymer that polymerizes in situ generating heat. Moreover, the conversion of monomer into polymer is never 100%; this is dangerous because of the toxicity of the monomer. In this paper, we present a 3-D axisymmetric mathematical model capable of taking into account both the geometry of the implant and the chemical/physical properties of the cement. This model, together with its numerical simulation, thus represents a useful tool to set up the optimal conditions for the new materials developed in this orthopaedic field. The real complex geometry is assumed to be a bone/cement/metallic system having cylindrical symmetry, thus allowing the model to be reduced to two space variables. The cementation process is described by the Fourier heat equation coupled with a suitable polymerization kinetics. The numerical approximation is accomplished by semi-implicit finite differences in time and finite elements in space with numerical quadrature. The full discrete scheme amounts to solve linear positive definite symmetric systems preceded by an elementwise algebraic computation. We present various numerical simulations which confirm some critical aspects of this orthopaedic fixing technique such as thermal bone necrosis and the presence of unreacted residual monomer.

  15. Autopsy studies of the bone-cement interface in well-fixed cemented total hip arthroplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzried, T P; Maloney, W J; Jasty, M; Kwong, L M; Harris, W H

    1993-04-01

    Although knowledge of the clinical status of the implant is important, only instrumented mechanical testing of retrieved specimens provides quantitative assessment of implant fixation. This measurement allows placement of the implant along a continuum of loosening and is the foundation for the interpretation of subsequent findings. Analysis of implants that have been proven to be well fixed by instrumented testing reveals significant differences in the initial events in the loosening of femoral and acetabular components. Although radiolucencies were observed around all of these well-fixed femoral and acetabular components, the histology (and therefore the etiology) of the radiolucency is different and variable on the two sides of the articulation. The majority of femoral radiolucencies appear to be due to age and stress-related remodeling while particulate-induced bone resorption plays an important role in acetabular radiolucencies. A finding common to both sides of the articulation in these stable components, however, was intimate contact of bone with cement without any interposed soft tissue even after 17.5 years of service. Primary incompatibility and/or failure of the cement was not identified as a factor in initiating either femoral or acetabular component loosening. These studies document the long-term compatibility of bone with cement in bulk form. Improvements in cemented femoral component fixation should focus on stem design and cementing technique. Long-term acetabular component fixation can be improved by reduction or elimination of polyethylene wear and optimization of the bone-implant interface.

  16. Improvement of in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement for bone repair by dicalcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chien-Wen [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City 701, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Nai-Shuo [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Ding, Shinn-Jyh, E-mail: sjding@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung City 402, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-05

    Highlights: • Dicalcium silicate can improve osteogenic activity of calcium sulfate cement. • The higher the calcium sulfate content, the shorter the setting time in the composite cement. • The results were useful for designing calcium-based cement with optimal properties. -- Abstract: An ideal bone graft substitute should have the same speed of degradation as formation of new bone tissue. To improve the properties of calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) featured for its rapid resorption, a low degradation material of dicalcium silicate (DCS) was added to the CSH cement. This study examined the effect of DCS (20, 40, 60 and 80 wt%) on the in vitro physicochemical properties and osteogenic activities of the calcium-based composite cements. The diametral tensile strength, porosity and weight loss of the composite cements were evaluated before and after soaking in a simulated body fluid (SBF). The osteogenic activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and mineralization, of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) seeded on cement surfaces were also examined. As a result, the greater the DCS amount, the higher the setting time was in the cement. Before soaking in SBF, the diametral tensile strength of the composite cements was decreased due to the introduction of DCS. On 180-day soaking, the composite cements containing 20, 40, 60 and 80 wt% DCS lost 80%, 69%, 61% and 44% in strength, respectively. Regarding in vitro bioactivity, the DCS-rich cements were covered with clusters of apatite spherulites after soaking for 7 days, while there was no formation of apatite spherulites on the CSH-rich cement surfaces. The presence of DCS could reduce the degradation of the CSH cements, as evidenced in the results of weight loss and porosity. More importantly, DCS may promote effectively the cell proliferation, proliferation and mineralization. The combination of osteogenesis of DCS and degradation of CSH made the calcium-based composite cements an attractive choice for

  17. Backgrounds of antibiotic-loaded bone cement and prosthesis-related infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, JGE; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2004-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded bone cement has been in use for over 30 years for the fixation of total joint arthroplasties, although its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. This review presents the backgrounds of bone cements, prosthesis-related infection and antibiotic-loaded bone cements. It is sh

  18. Thermodynamic considerations of acrylic cement implant at the site of giant cell tumors of the bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, E C; Nelson, C; Neff, J R

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of the thermodynamic aspects of a relatively new treatment method for giant cell tumors of the bone is presented in this paper. The advantages of implanting methylmethacrylate acrylic bone cement into a curetted tumor site are briefly discussed and placed in perspective relative to more prevalent surgical treatments. As the bone cement self-heats while curing, the possibility of heat necrosis in the bone exists. However, the damage due to heat may be beneficial in reducing the rate of tumor recurrence. A thermodynamic consideration of the treatment situation appears to be warranted. After a general introduction and a brief literature review, the theoretical thermodynamic equations are developed. Once the basic equations for the heat transfer from the cement or the bone are derived, there is then a discussion of the various characteristics of bone and methylmethacrylate crucial to the analysis, such as, thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat generation parameters. Finally, in order to reduce the theory to a form which may be used practically, the equations derived are written in terms of finite-difference equations, which approximate them numerically. Different equations are written for each type of heat transfer condition encountered in the cement-bone system as spacial variances in material and geometry occur. The equations derived may be used to model the system allowing one to predict the time-dependent temperature distribution in bone during the curing of acrylic cement. Using computer techniques to reduce the equations obtained from this analysis, and knowing the temperature at which adjacent cells die, a zone of necrosis may be mapped surrounding the acrylic impact.

  19. Mass spectrometric monitoring of Sr-enriched bone cements--from in vitro to in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohnke, Marcus; Henss, Anja; Kokesch-Himmelreich, Julia; Schumacher, Matthias; Ray, Seemun; Alt, Volker; Gelinsky, Michael; Janek, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a well-established technique in materials science, but is now increasingly applied also in the life sciences. Here, we demonstrate the potential of this analytical technique for use in the development of new bone implant materials. We tracked strontium-enriched calcium phosphate cements, which were developed for the treatment of osteoporotic bone, from in vitro to in vivo. Essentially, the spatial distribution of strontium in two different types of strontium-modified calcium phosphate cements is analysed by SIMS depth profiling. To gain information about the strontium release kinetics, the cements were immersed for 3, 7, 14 and 21 days in α-MEM and tris(hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane solution and analysed afterwards by ToF-SIMS depth profiling. For cements stored in α-MEM solution an inhibited strontium release was observed. By using principal component analysis to evaluate TOF-SIMS surface spectra, we are able to prove the adsorption of proteins on the cement surface, which inhibit the release kinetics. Cell experiments with human osteoblast-like cells cultured on the strontium-modified cements and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of the mineralised extracellular matrix (mECM) prove clearly that strontium is incorporated into the mECM of the osteoblast-like cells. Finally, in an animal experiment, the strontium-doped cements are implanted into the femur of osteoporotic rats. After 6 weeks, only a slight release of strontium was found in the vicinity of the implant material. By using ToF-SIMS, it is proven that strontium is localised in regions of newly formed bone but also within the pre-existing tissue.

  20. In vitro analysis of antifungal impregnated polymethylmethacrylate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, David; Kodali, Pradeep; Dipersio, Joseph; Acus, Raymond; Askew, Michael

    2002-10-01

    Fungal infection is a rare but devastating complication of total joint arthroplasty. Many patients require removal of the components and resection arthroplasty for cure; however, revision arthroplasty with medicated polymethylmethacrylate bone cement may be used to salvage the joint. Some studies have documented the efficacy of mixing antibiotics with polymethylmethacrylate, but the efficacy of antifungal drugs when mixed with polymethylmethacrylate is unknown. An in vitro agar diffusion method was used in the current study to investigate this potential, and several clinically important conclusions resulted: (1) after incorporation into bone cement, fluconazole and amphotericin B remained active whereas 5-flucytosine did not, (2) inhibitory activity improved with greater drug concentrations, and (3) more drug eluted from Palacos R than Simplex P cement.

  1. Formation and Characterization of Bone-like Nanoscale Hydroxyapatite in Glass Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang FU; Nai ZHOU; Wenhai HUANG; Deping WANG; Liying ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Glass based bone cement (GBC) was synthesized by mixing CaO-SiO2-P2O5 based glass powder with ammonium phosphate liquid medium. Bone-like hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) was found to form after GBC was immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). HAP crystal grew with an increasing time along c axle and reached about 200 nm in length after 30 days, however, the end plane granularity remained 30~50 nm. The chemical composition, crystal structure and morphology of HAP formed from GBC were proved to have great resemblance with living HAP.It is believed that GBC was a desirable biomedical material with high bioactivity. Furthermore, the high compressive strength guaranteed the possibility of GBC in clinical application.

  2. Concepts for increasing gentamicin release from handmade bone cement beads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasyid, Hermawan N; van der Mei, Henny C; Frijlink, Henderik W; Soegijoko, Soegijardjo; Van Horn, Jim R; Busscher, Hendrik; Neut, Daniëlle

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Commercial gentamicin-loaded bone cement beads (Septopal) constitute an effective delivery system for local antibiotic therapy. These beads are not available in all parts of the world, and are too expensive for frequent use in others. Thus, orthopedic surgeons worldwide make

  3. In vitro studies of calcium phosphate silicate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuxin; Ma, Jingzhi; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus; Ruse, N Dorin; Yang, Quanzu; Troczynski, Tom

    2013-02-01

    A novel calcium phosphate silicate bone cement (CPSC) was synthesized in a process, in which nanocomposite forms in situ between calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel and hydroxyapatite (HAP). The cement powder consists of tricalcium silicate (C(3)S) and calcium phosphate monobasic (CPM). During cement setting, C(3)S hydrates to produce C-S-H and calcium hydroxide (CH); CPM reacts with the CH to precipitate HAP in situ within C-S-H. This process, largely removing CH from the set cement, enhances its biocompatibility and bioactivity. The testing results of cell culture confirmed that the biocompatibility of CPSC was improved as compared to pure C(3)S. The results of XRD and SEM characterizations showed that CPSC paste induced formation of HAP layer after immersion in simulated body fluid for 7 days, suggesting that CPSC was bioactive in vitro. CPSC cement, which has good biocompatibility and low/no cytotoxicity, could be a promising candidate as biomedical cement.

  4. On the development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Komath; H K Varma; R Sivakumar

    2000-04-01

    Development of an apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement is reported. 100 Particles of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) were mixed in equimolar ratio to form the cement powder. The wetting medium used was distilled water with Na2HPO4 as accelerator to manipulate the setting time. The cement powder, on wetting with the medium, formed a workable putty. The setting times of the putty were measured using a Vicat type apparatus and the compressive strength was determined with a Universal Testing Machine. The nature of the precipitated cement was analyzed through X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and energy dispersive electron microprobe (EDAX). The results showed the phase to be apatitic with a calcium–to–phosphorous ratio close to that of hydroxyapatite. The microstructure analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed hydroxyapatite nanocrystallite growth over particulate matrix surface. The structure has an apparent porosity of ∼ 52%. There were no appreciable dimensional or thermal changes during setting. The cement passed the in vitro toxicological screening (cytotoxicity and haemolysis) tests. Optimization of the cement was done by manipulating the accelerator concentration so that the setting time, hardening time and the compressive strength had clinically relevant values.

  5. The biocompatibility of bone cements: progress in methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Dall'Oca

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ideal bone graft substitute should have certain properties and there are many studies dealing with mixture of polymethylmetacrilate (PMMA and β-tricalciumphospate (β-TCP presenting the best characteristics of both. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, for ultra-structural data, resulted a very reliable in vivo model to better understand the bioactivity of a cement and to properly evaluate its suitability for a particular purpose. The present study aims to further improve the knowledge on osteointegration development, using both parameters obtained with the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and focused histological examination. Two hybrid bone graft substitute were designed among ceramic and polymer-based bone graft substitutes. Based on β-TCP granules sizes, they were created with theoretical different osteoconductive properties. An acrylic standard cement was chosen as control. Cements were implanted in twelve New Zealand White (NZW rabbits, which were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after cement implantation. Histological samples were prepared with an infiltration process of LR white resin and then specimens were studied by X-rays, histology and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM. Comparing the resulting data, it was possible to follow osteointegration’s various developments resulting from different sizes of β-TCP granules. In this paper, we show that this evaluation process, together with ESEM, provides further important information that allows to follow any osteointegration at every stage of develop.

  6. Effect on Hydration and Hardening of Tricalcium Phosphate Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The bioactive α-Ca3 (PO4)2 bone cement was studied by XRD , SEM and isothermal calorimetric measurements. The results showed that a mixed pattern of TCP and hydroxylapatite were obtained after hydration and hardening. The mechanism of hydration and hardening of the α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2 was dissolution-precipitation,(NH4) H2 PO4 was the best set accelerator to the α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2 cement, and the HAP powers and the(NH4) H2 PO4 concentration had a great effect on the hydration rate of α-Ca3 ( PO4 )2.

  7. Nanomechanical properties of bone around cement-retained abutment implants. A minipig study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R.M. de Barros

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim The nanomechanical evaluation can provide additional information about the dental implants osseointegration process. The aim of this study was to quantify elastic modulus and hardness of bone around cemented-retained abutment implants positioned at two different crestal bone levels. Materials and methods The mandibular premolars of 7 minipigs were extracted. After 8 weeks, 8 implants were inserted in each animal: crestally on one side of the mandible and subcrestally on the other (crestal and subcrestal groups. Functional loading were immediately provided with abutments cementation and prostheses installation. Eight weeks later, the animals euthanasia was performed and nanoindentation analyses were made at the most coronal newly formed bone region (coronal group, and below in the threaded region (threaded group of histologic sections. Results The comparisons between subcrestal and crestal groups did not achieve statistical relevance; however the elastic modulus and hardness levels were statistically different in the two regions of evaluation (coronal and threaded. Conclusions The crestal and subcrestal placement of cement-retained abutment implants did not affect differently the nanomechanical properties of the surrounding bone. However the different regions of newly formed bone (coronal and threaded groups were extremely different in both elastic modulus and hardness, probably reflecting their differences in bone composition and structure.

  8. Biological responses of brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr- substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, S; Vieira, S I; Rego, P; Torres, P M C; da Cruz e Silva, O A B; da Cruz e Silva, E F; Ferreira, J M F

    2010-09-07

    The core aim of this study was to investigate zinc (Zn)- and zinc and strontium (ZnSr)-containing brushite-forming beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) cements for their effects on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cell line) as well as for their in vivo behaviour in trabecular bone cylindrical defects in a pilot study. In vitro proliferation and maturation responses of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic-like cells to bone cements were studied at the cellular and molecular levels. The Zn- and Sr-containing brushite cements were found to stimulate pre-osteoblastic proliferation and osteoblastic maturation. Indeed, MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to the powdered cements had increased proliferative rates and higher adhesiveness capacity, in comparison to control cells. Furthermore, they exhibited higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and increased Type-I collagen secretion and fibre deposition into the extracellular matrix. Proliferative and collagen deposition properties were more evident for cells grown in cements doped with Sr. The in vivo osteoconductive propertiesof the ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements were also pursued. Histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed at 1 and 2 months after implantation, using carbonated apatite cement (Norian SRS) as control. There was no evidence of cement-induced adverse foreign body reactions, and furthermore ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements revealed better in vivo performance in comparison to the control apatite cement. Additionally, the presence of both zinc and strontium resulted in the highest rate of new bone formation. These novel results indicate that the investigated ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements are both biocompatible and osteoconductive, being good candidate materials to use as bone substitutes.

  9. Biological responses of brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr- substituted beta-tricalcium phosphate bone cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Pina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The core aim of this study was to investigate zinc (Zn- and zinc and strontium (ZnSr-containing brushite-forming beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP cements for their effects on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cell line as well as for their in vivo behaviour in trabecular bone cylindrical defects in a pilot study. In vitro proliferation and maturation responses of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic-like cells to bone cements were studied at the cellular and molecular levels. The Zn- and Sr-containing brushite cements were found to stimulate pre-osteoblastic proliferation and osteoblastic maturation. Indeed, MC3T3-E1 cells exposed to the powdered cements had increased proliferative rates and higher adhesiveness capacity, in comparison to control cells. Furthermore, they exhibited higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and increased Type-I collagen secretion and fibre deposition into the extracellular matrix. Proliferative and collagen deposition properties were more evident for cells grown in cements doped with Sr. The in vivo osteoconductive propertiesof the ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements were also pursued. Histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed at 1 and 2 months after implantation, using carbonated apatite cement (Norian SRS® as control. There was no evidence of cement-induced adverse foreign body reactions, and furthermore ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements revealed better in vivo performance in comparison to the control apatite cement. Additionally, the presence of both zinc and strontium resulted in the highest rate of new bone formation. These novel results indicate that the investigated ZnCPC and ZnSrCPC cements are both biocompatible and osteoconductive, being good candidate materials to use as bone substitutes.

  10. Novel tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate composite bone cement having high compressive strength, in vitro bioactivity and cytocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjuan; Zhai, Dong; Huan, Zhiguang; Wu, Chengtie; Chang, Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Although inorganic bone cements such as calcium phosphate cements have been widely applied in orthopaedic and dental fields because of their self-setting ability, development of high-strength bone cement with bioactivity and biodegradability remains a major challenge. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to prepare a tricalcium silicate/magnesium phosphate (C3S/MPC) composite bone cement, which is intended to combine the excellent bioactivity of C3S with remarkable self-setting properties and mechanical strength of MPC. The self-setting and mechanical properties, in vitro induction of apatite formation and degradation behaviour, and cytocompatibility of the composite cements were investigated. Our results showed that the C3S/MPC composite cement with an optimal composition had compressive strength up to 87 MPa, which was significantly higher than C3S (25 MPa) and MPC (64 MPa). The setting time could be adjusted between 3 min and 29 min with the variation of compositions. The hydraulic reaction products of the C3S/MPC composite cement were composed of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) derived from the hydration of C3S and gel-like amorphous substance. The C3S/MPC composite cements could induce apatite mineralization on its surface in SBF solution and degraded gradually in Tris-HCl solution. Besides, the composite cements showed good cytocompatibility and stimulatory effect on the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. Our results indicated that the C3S/MPC composite bone cement might be a new promising high-strength inorganic bioactive material which may hold the potential for bone repair in load-bearing site.

  11. Mechanical performance of acrylic bone cements containing different radiopacifying agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginebra, M P; Albuixech, L; Fernández-Barragán, E; Aparicio, C; Gil, F J; San, Román J; Vázquez, B; Planell, J A

    2002-04-01

    The effect that three different radiopacifying agents, two of them inorganic (BaSO4, ZrO2) and one organic (an iodine containing monomer, IHQM) have on the static and dynamic mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements was studied. Compressive and tensile strength, fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation were evaluated. The effect of the inorganic fillers depends on their size and morphology. In relation to the radiolucent cement, the addition of zirconium dioxide improved significantly the tensile strength, the fracture toughness and the fatigue crack propagation resistance. In contrast, the addition of barium sulphate produced a decrease of the tensile strength, but did not affect the fracture toughness and improved the crack propagation resistance. When the iodine containing monomer was used, although the tensile strength and the fracture toughness increased, the fatigue crack propagation resistance remained as low as it was for the radiolucent cement.

  12. Effects of adding resorbable chitosan microspheres to calcium phosphate cements for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Dan [Department of Prosthodontics, Beijing Stomatological Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China); Dong, Limin [Beijing Key Lab of Fine Ceramics, Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Energy Science Building, Beijing 100084 (China); Wen, Ying [Department of Prosthodontics, Beijing Stomatological Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China); Xie, Qiufei, E-mail: xieqiuf@163.com [Department of Prosthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been widely used as bone graft substitutes. However, the undesirable osteoinductivity and slow degradability of CPCs greatly hamper their clinical application. The aim of this study was to synthesize a type of injectable, bioactive cement. This was accomplished by incorporating chitosan microspheres into CPC. CPC containing chitosan microspheres was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). XRD showed that the hardened chitosan microsphere/CPC with different proportions of microspheres contained diffraction peaks of hydroxyapatite and chitosan. Compressive strength and dissolution in simulated body fluid were measured. The chitosan microsphere/CPC containing 10% (w/w) chitosan microspheres had a compressive strength of 14.78 ± 0.67 MPa. Cavity defects were created in both femoral condylar regions of New Zealand White rabbits. Chitosan microsphere/CPC (composite group) and α-TCP/CPC (control group) were implanted separately into the bone defects of both femurs. X-ray analysis was performed to observe the filling of these bone defects 3 days after surgery. The extent of bone substitute degradation and new bone formation were evaluated by SEM and histological examination at 8, 16, and 24 weeks after implantation. These results showed far more new bone formation and degradation of the chitosan microsphere/CPC composite in the bone defects. These data indicate that a chitosan microsphere/CPC composite might be considered as a promising injectable material for the generation of new bone tissue. - Highlights: • We synthesized an injectable, bioactive chitosan microsphere/CPC for the first time. • 100–400 μm chitosan microspheres were incorporated into the cement solid phase. • XRD showed the construct contained diffraction peaks of hydroxyapatite and chitosan. • Compressive strength of the composite was about 15 MPa comparable to cancellous bone. • The new construct shows better bone

  13. The mineralogy and chemistry of cement and cement raw materials In the united arab emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Nasir, Sobhi J. [صبحي جابر نصر; El Etr, H.

    1996-01-01

    The raw materials, clinkers and cements from different cement factories in the United Arab Emirates have been investigated using polarizing microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analyses. The chemical and mineralogical analyses indicate that the local raw materials are suitable for cement industry. Geological review shows that there is a good potential for industrial-grade local occurrences of limestone, marl, gypsum and iron oxide, that may be ...

  14. A novel bone cement impregnated with silver–tiopronin nanoparticles: its antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopovich P

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polina Prokopovich,1,2 Ralph Leech,3 Claire J Carmalt,3 Ivan P Parkin,3 Stefano Perni41School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 2Institute of Medical Engineering and Medical Physics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 3Materials Chemistry Research Centre, Department of Chemistry, University College London, London, UK; 4School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKAbstract: Post-operatory infections in orthopedic surgeries pose a significant risk. The common approach of using antibiotics, both parenterally or embedded in bone cement (when this is employed during surgery faces the challenge of the rising population of pathogens exhibiting resistance properties against one or more of these compounds; therefore, novel approaches need to be developed. Silver nanoparticles appear to be an exciting prospect because of their antimicrobial activity and safety at the levels used in medical applications. In this paper, a novel type of silver nanoparticles capped with tiopronin is presented. Two ratios of reagents during synthesis were tested and the effect on the nanoparticles investigated through TEM, TGA, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Once encapsulated in bone cement, only the nanoparticles with the highest amount of inorganic fraction conferred antimicrobial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA at concentrations as low as 0.1% w/w. No other characteristics of the bone cement, such as cytotoxicity or mechanical properties, were affected by the presence of the nanoparticles. Our work presents a new type of silver nanoparticles and demonstrates that they can be embedded in bone cement to prevent infections once the synthetic conditions are tailored for such applications.Keywords: bone cement, antimicrobial, silver nanoparticles, tiopronin, MRSA

  15. Resorption of monetite calcium phosphate cement by mouse bone marrow derived osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerolghaem, M; Karlsson Ott, M; Engqvist, H; Melhus, H; Rasmusson, A J

    2015-01-01

    Recently the interest for monetite based biomaterials as bone grafts has increased; since in vivo studies have demonstrated that they are degradable, osteoconductive and improve bone healing. So far osteoclastic resorption of monetite has received little attention. The current study focuses on the osteoclastic resorption of monetite cement using primary mouse bone marrow macrophages, which have the potential to differentiate into resorbing osteoclasts when treated with receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL). The osteoclast viability and differentiation were analysed on monetite cement and compared to cortical bovine bone discs. After seven days live/dead stain results showed no significant difference in viability between the two materials. However, the differentiation was significantly higher on the bone discs, as shown by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and Cathepsin K gene expression. Moreover monetite samples with differentiated osteoclasts had a 1.4 fold elevated calcium ion concentration in their culture media compared to monetite samples with undifferentiated cells. This indicates active resorption of monetite in the presence of osteoclasts. In conclusion, this study suggests that osteoclasts have a crucial role in the resorption of monetite based biomaterials. It also provides a useful model for studying in vitro resorption of acidic calcium phosphate cements by primary murine cells.

  16. Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strigáč, Július

    2015-11-01

    The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I -SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

  17. Effect of Selected Alternative Fuels and Raw Materials on the Cement Clinker Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strigáč Július

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of the effects of alternative fuels and raw materials on the cement clinker quality. The clinker quality was expressed by the content of two principal minerals alite C3S and belite C2S. The additions of alternative fuels ashes and raw materials, in principle, always increased the belite content and conversely reduced the amount of alite. The alternative fuels with high ash content were used such as the meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge and the used alternative raw materials were metallurgical slags - granulated blastfurnace slag, air cooled blastfurnace slag and demetallized steel slag, fluidized bed combustion fly ash and waste glass. Meat-bone meal, sewage sludge from sewage treatment plants and paper sludge were evaluated as moderately suitable alternative fuels which can be added in the amounts of 2.8 wt. % addition of meat-bone meals ash, 3.64 wt. % addition of sewage sludge ash and 3.8 wt. % addition of paper sludge ash to the cement raw mixture. Demetallised steel slag is suitable for production of special sulphate resistant cement clinker for CEM I –SR cement with addition up to 5 wt. %. Granulated blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4 wt. %. Air cooled blastfurnace slag is a suitable alternative raw material with addition 4.2 wt. %. Waste glass is not very appropriate alternative raw material with addition only 1.16 wt. %. Fluidized bed combustion fly ash appears not to be equally appropriate alternative raw material for cement clinker burning with less potential utilization in the cement industry and with addition 3.41 wt. %, which forms undesired anhydrite CaSO4 in the cement clinker.

  18. Osteogenesis and ototoxicity of a novel preparation of autogenous bone cement: implications for mastoid obliteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenting; Chen, Xihui

    2014-12-01

    To study the osteogenesis and ototoxicity of autogenous bone cement. A randomized, prospective, controlled animal study. University laboratory. We created a critical defect on the bulla wall of guinea pigs. Fifty-three guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups. The defects were filled with autogenous bone cement (ABC) or autogenous bone dust (ABD) on the left side while the contralateral sides were kept intact as the blank control (BC) group or a defect was induced without obliteration as the operation control (OC) group (groups 1 and 2, n = 25 each). The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Group 3 (n = 3) was the ototoxicity positive control (OPC) group. The critical defects were evaluated for bone repair by histologic observation and computed tomography (CT), and the ototoxicity of the material was assessed by measuring shifts in the hearing threshold and changes in cochlear morphology. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the material was also performed. Histologic observation and CT scans revealed complete bone repair in the ABC group at 12 weeks postoperatively, but progress was slower in the ABD group. The hearing threshold and cochlear morphology did not differ significantly between the preoperative and 12-week postoperative measurement. Autogenous bone dust inhibited some of the bacterial species commonly associated with chronic suppurative otitis media. Animals treated with ABC exhibited osteogenesis, with no ototoxicity and bacteriostasis compared with the use of ABD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  19. Bone response to fast-degrading, injectable calcium phosphate cements containing PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanao, R.P.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Jansen, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Apatitic calcium phosphate cements (CPC) are frequently used to fill bone defects due to their favourable clinical handling and excellent bone response, but their lack of degradability inhibits complete bone regeneration. In order to render these injectable CaP cements biodegradable, hollow microsph

  20. Apparent fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement: effect of test specimen configuration and sterilization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G

    1999-01-01

    The plane strain fracture toughness of Palacos R bone cement was determined using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) principles and three different test specimen configurations: single edge notched three-point (SENB), rectangular compact tension (RCT), and chevron notched short rod (CNSR). Another aspect of the study was an investigation of the effect of three methods used to sterilize the powder constituents of the cement-none, gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide--on the fracture toughness of the fully polymerized material. A detailed justification is provided for using LEFM. The fracture toughness results obtained using the CNSR specimens were, on average, 14 and 16% higher than those obtained using the SENB and RCT types, respectively. These differences are accounted for in terms of differences in four aspects of these specimen configuration (namely, residual stress effects, loading rate, material inhomogeneity, and the nature of the test). For a given specimen configuration, gamma irradiation produced a statistically significant decrease in fracture toughness which, it is suggested, is due to the concomitant depreciation in molecular weight. For a given cement type, there is no statistically significant difference in fracture toughness results obtained using SENB and RCT specimens. It is thus suggested that either of these configurations can be used to determine the fracture toughness of acrylic bone cement.

  1. An experimental approach to the study of the rheology behaviour of synthetic bone calcium phosphate cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friberg, J.; Fernandez, E.; Sarda, S.; Nilsson, M.; Ginebra, M.P.; Planell, J.A. [Universidad Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering; Martinez, S. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Mineralogia i Recursos Minerals

    2001-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements were developed to fit surgical needs in biomedical fields such as odontology or traumatology. Nowadays, a broad field of new applications have been found for this kind of materials. Drug delivery systems, tissue-engineering scaffolds and osteoporotic bone filling applications are some of the new fields that are being benefited with these materials. Looking at both, commercial and new experimental calcium phosphate cements it is found that {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate is the main reactive powder responsible for the setting and the hardening of the cement. Thus, it is important to know how {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate affects injectability of these cements. The aim of this study was to investigate the rheological behaviour of {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate slurries in order to know how the cement injectability should be modified. Factors such as liquid to powder ratio, particle size of the main reactive powder and the addition of dispersants have been considered. The results showed that viscosity decreased when particle size of reactant was increased and when liquid to powder ratio was increased. It was also found that a minimum of viscosity exists at an optimum value of the weight percentage of dispersant. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of the biphasic calcium composite (BCC), a novel bone cement, in a minipig model of pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi; Ye, Jichao; Wang, Peng; Gao, Liangbin; Jiang, Jianming; Wang, Suwei; Shen, Huiyong

    2016-01-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement, which is used as a filler material in vertebroplasty, is one of the major sources of pulmonary embolism in patients who have undergone vertebroplasty. In the present study, we established and evaluated two animal models of pulmonary embolism by injecting PMMA or biphasic calcium composite (BCC) bone cement with a negative surface charge. A total of 12 adults and healthy Wuzhishan minipigs were randomly divided into two groups, the PMMA and BBC groups, which received injection of PMMA bone cement and BBC bone cement with a negative surface charge in the circulation system through the pulmonary trunk, respectively, to construct animal models of pulmonary embolism. The hemodynamics, arterial blood gas, and plasma coagulation were compared between these two groups. In addition, morphological changes of the lung were examined using three-dimensional computed tomography. The results showed that both PMMA and BCC injections induced pulmonary embolisms in minipigs. Compared to the PMMA group, the BCC group exhibited significantly lower levels of arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, blood oxygen pressure, blood carbon dioxide pressure, blood bicarbonate, base excess, antithrombin III and D-dimer. In conclusion, BCC bone cement with a negative surface charge is a promising filler material for vertebroplasty.

  3. Calcium phosphate bone cement containing ABK and PLLA. Sustained release of ABK, the BMD of the femur in rats, and histological examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusaka, T.; Tanaka, A.; Sasaki, S.; Takano, I.; Tahara, Y.; Ishii, Y. [Kyorin Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Bone cement was prepared by mixing CPC95 (Mitsubishi Material Co., Ltd.), ABK, and PLLA at a ratio of 14 : 1 : 2. In vitro, Antibiotic sustained release tests were performed by the total amount exchange method. In animal experiments, the bone cement was infused into the right femur of 18-month-old female SD rats. After 1, 2, 4, or 6 months, the BMD was determined by DXA in the bilateral femoral bones. In addition, hard tissue specimens were prepared, and the state of bone formation was observed. The release of the antibiotic was 1.73 {mu}g/ml until 18 days after administration, maintaining a concentration over the MIC80 for MRSA. In the animal experiments, the BMD significantly increased after 2 - 4 months. In the hard tissue specimens, direct binding on the bone-cement interface and bone formation in the cement were observed after 1 month. (orig.)

  4. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear Waste Storage

    CERN Document Server

    Cau-di-Coumes, Céline; Frizon, Fabien; Lorente, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    As the re-emergence of nuclear power as an acceptable energy source on an international basis continues, the need for safe and reliable ways to dispose of radioactive waste becomes ever more critical. The ultimate goal for designing a predisposal waste-management system depends on producing waste containers suitable for storage, transportation and permanent disposal. Cement-Based Materials for Nuclear-Waste Storage provides a roadmap for the use of cementation as an applied technique for the treatment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes.Coverage includes, but is not limited to, a comparison of cementation with other solidification techniques, advantages of calcium-silicate cements over other materials and a discussion of the long-term suitability and safety of waste packages as well as cement barriers. This book also: Discusses the formulation and production of cement waste forms for storing radioactive material Assesses the potential of emerging binders to improve the conditioning of problemati...

  5. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade do Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalmazio, Ilza; Valente, Eduardo S., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: valente@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-{sup 166}Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  6. Densified ultra-light cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Luis Pedro

    2015-01-01

    be used as a “clean technology” in the production of cement-based materials for structural applications with a low carbon footprint. This paper describes the principles of this concept coupled with experimental results on the basic properties of this enhanced type of cement-based materials with combined...

  7. The progress of early phase bone healing using porous granules produced from calcium phosphate cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungbluth P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Bone grafting is a vital component in many surgical procedures to facilitate the repair of bone defects or fusions. Autologous bone has been the gold standard to date in spite of associated donor-site morbidity and the limited amount of available donor bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the progress of bone regeneration and material degradation of calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium phosphate self-setting cement powder compared to the use of autologous bone grafting in the treatment of "critical size defects" on load-bearing long bones of minipigs. Methods A critical size defect in the tibial metaphysis of 16 mini-pigs was filled either with autologous cancellous graft or with micro- and macroporous carbonated, apatic calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium phosphate self-setting cement powder. After 6 weeks, the specimens were assessed by X-ray and histological evaluation. The amount of new bone formation was analysed histomorphometrically. Results The semi-quantitative analysis of the radiological results showed a complete osseous bridging of the defect in three cases for the autograft group. In the same group five animals showed a beginning, but still incomplete bridging of the defect, whereas in the CPG group just two animals developed this. All other animals of the CPG group showed only a still discontinuous new bone formation. Altogether, radiologically a better osseous bridging was observed in the autograft group compared to the CPG group. Histomorphometrical analysis after six weeks of healing revealed that the area of new bone was significantly greater in the autograft group concerning the central area of the defect zone (p Conclusions Within the limits of the present study it could be demonstrated that autologous cancellous grafts lead to a significantly better bone regeneration compared to the application of calcium phosphate granules (CPG produced from a calcium

  8. Destruction of meat and bone meals in cement plants; Destruction des farines animales dans les cimenteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2001-10-01

    Following the crisis of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy disease ('mad cow' disease), the French cement industrialists have been requested by the government since 1996 to eliminate the forbidden meat and bone meals in cement kilns where they are used as fuel substitutes. This article presents the advantages of the cement industry file in the destruction of such wastes, the validation and the safety aspects of this process. Meat and bone meal represents a high-grade fuel that lowers the environmental impact of cement production and does not affect the quality of cement. (J.S.)

  9. Therapeutic effect of bone cement injection in the treatment of intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunlun; Shao, Xinzhong; Tian, Dehu; Bai, Jiangbo; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to treat intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bones with injectable bone cement grafting. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 4 patients (3 men and 1 woman) presenting with wrist pain and activity limitation were diagnosed with intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones by radiography. The patients were treated with minimal invasive curettage and bone cement injection surgery. All patients were followed up for a mean time of 17 months (range, 12-22 months). The wrist pain was significantly reduced in all patients following surgery. In addition, the activity range and grip strength were also improved compared with the preoperative parameters. Subsequent to treatment, the Mayo wrist score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score presented mean values of 78.8 (range, 75-80) and 11 (range, 7.7-15.0), respectively. These results suggested that the patients showed a good recovery. All patients were satisfied with the postoperative results and returned to work within 4 weeks. In conclusion, bone cement injection is an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bone.

  10. New developments in calcium phosphate bone cements: approaching spinal applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad, Maria Daniela

    2009-01-01

    La presente tesis doctoral (i.e., “New developments in calcium phosphate bone cements: approaching spinal applications”) aporta nuevos conocimientos en el campo de los cementos óseos de fosfato de calcio (CPBCs) en relación a su aplicación clínica en el campo de la cirugía vertebral mínimamente invasiva. La hipótesis central de esta investigación fue formulada en los siguientes términos: “Los cementos apatíticos pueden ser (si se optimizan) una alternativa mejor (debido a sus propiedades d...

  11. Boneloc bone-cement: experience in hip arthroplasty during a 3-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kader, K F; Allcock, S; Walker, D I; Chaudhry, S B

    2001-10-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone-cement was introduced in the 1960s for fixation of total hip arthroplasty replacement components. Long-term results of cement fixation for hip and knee arthroplasty have been extremely good. Although the use of PMMA bone-cement has enabled long-term survival of joint arthroplasty implants, there has been concern about aseptic loosening. This concern led to the introduction of Boneloc bone-cement (Biomet, Warsaw, IN) in the early 1990s. It was hoped that with the improved physical and chemical characteristics of Boneloc, there would be less aseptic loosening in the long-term. A clinical trial was conducted to evaluate Boneloc bone-cement in cementing the femoral component of the Bimetric total hip arthroplasty prosthesis in 33 hips in 32 patients. On follow-up, 7 stems (24%) developed definite loosening, and 3 stems (10%) were possibly loose. Of the 7 definite loose stems, 5 (17%) were revised because of increasing pain or progressive loosening. Despite the biologic advantages of Boneloc, this study suggests that the chemicals substituted in Boneloc bone-cement led to an alteration in its mechanical properties. These properties proved to be inferior to conventional PMMA bone-cement. There is possible time-dependent deterioration of mechanical properties leading to early aseptic loosening. The conventional PMMA bone-cement has stood the test of time. Research and experimental studies should continue to improve the mechanical properties of Boneloc before further human trials.

  12. Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of solid fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions can occur and cause decomposition of sulfates from cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2 concentration, which may cause...... deposit formation in the kiln system. SO2 release from cement raw materials during combustion of solid fuels has been studied experimentally in a high temperature rotary drum. The fuels were tire rubber, pine wood, petcoke, sewage sludge, and polypropylene. The SO2 release from the raw materials...

  13. Cement-based materials' characterization using ultrasonic attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punurai, Wonsiri

    The quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of cement-based materials is a critical area of research that is leading to advances in the health monitoring and condition assessment of the civil infrastructure. Ultrasonic NDE has been implemented with varying levels of success to characterize cement-based materials with complex microstructure and damage. A major issue with the application of ultrasonic techniques to characterize cement-based materials is their inherent inhomogeneity at multiple length scales. Ultrasonic waves propagating in these materials exhibit a high degree of attenuation losses, making quantitative interpretations difficult. Physically, these attenuation losses are a combination of internal friction in a viscoelastic material (ultrasonic absorption), and the scattering losses due to the material heterogeneity. The objective of this research is to use ultrasonic attenuation to characterize the microstructure of heterogeneous cement-based materials. The study considers a real, but simplified cement-based material, cement paste---a common bonding matrix of all cement-based composites. Cement paste consists of Portland cement and water but does not include aggregates. First, this research presents the findings of a theoretical study that uses a set of existing acoustics models to quantify the scattered ultrasonic wavefield from a known distribution of entrained air voids. These attenuation results are then coupled with experimental measurements to develop an inversion procedure that directly predicts the size and volume fraction of entrained air voids in a cement paste specimen. Optical studies verify the accuracy of the proposed inversion scheme. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of using attenuation to measure the average size, volume fraction of entrained air voids and the existence of additional larger entrapped air voids in hardened cement paste. Finally, coherent and diffuse ultrasonic waves are used to develop a direct

  14. The influence of cyclic loading on gentamicin release from acrylic bone cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, JGE; Neut, D; Hazenberg, JG; Verkerke, GJ; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cement is widely used in total joint replacement to reduce infections. Walking results in cyclic loading, which has been suggested to stimulate antibiotic release. The goal of this study is to compare antibiotic release from cyclically loaded bone cement with the relea

  15. Trabecular bone response to injectable calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Waerden, J.P.C.M. van der; Jansen, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the physicochemical, biological, and handling properties of a new developed calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cement when implanted in trabecular bone. Ca-P cement consisting of a powder and a liquid phase was implanted as a paste into femoral trabecular bone of goats

  16. The release of gentamicin from acrylic bone cements in a simulated prosthesis-related interfacial gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, JGE; Neut, D; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Gentamicin is added to polymethylmethacrylate bone cements in orthopedics as a measure against infection in total joint arthroplasties. Numerous studies have been published on gentamicin release from bone cements, but none have been able to estimate the local concentrations in the prosthesis-related

  17. Structural study of octacalcium phosphate bone cement conversion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosca, Marco; Komlev, Vladimir S; Fedotov, Alexander Yu; Caminiti, Ruggero; Rau, Julietta V

    2012-11-01

    The nature of precursor phase during the biomineralization process of bone tissue formation is still controversial. Several phases were hypothesized, among them octacalcium phosphate. In this study, an in situ monitoring of structural changes, taking place upon the octacalcium phosphate bone cement hardening, was carried out in the presence of biopolymer chitosan and simulated body fluid (SBF). Several systems with different combinations of components were studied. The energy dispersive X-ray diffraction was applied to study the structural changes in real time, while morphological properties of the systems were investigated by the scanning electron microscopy. The obtained results evidence that final hydroxyapatite phase is formed only in the presence of chitosan and/or SBF, providing new insights into the in vivo biomineralization mechanism and, consequently, favoring the development of new approaches in biomaterials technology.

  18. A new design of cemented stem using functionally graded materials (FGM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedia, H S; Aldousari, S M; Abdellatif, A K; Fouda, N

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequent complications of total hip replacement (THR) is aseptic loosening of femoral component which is primarily due to changes of post-operative stress distribution pattern with respect to intact femur. Stress shielding of the femur is known to be a principal factor in aseptic loosening of hip replacements. Many designers show that a stiff stem shields the surrounding bone from mechanical loading causing stress shielding. Others show that reducing stem stiffness promotes higher proximal interface shear stress which increases the risk of proximal interface failure. Therefore, the task of this investigation is to solve these conflicting problems appeared in the cemented total hip replacement. The finite element method and optimization technique are used in order to find the optimal stem material which gives the optimal available stress distribution between the proximal medial femoral bone and the cement mantle interfaces. The stem is designed using the concept of functionally graded material (FGM) instead of using the conventional most common used stem material. The results showed that there are four feasible solutions from the optimization runs. The best of these designs is to use a cemented stem graded from titanium at the upper stem layer to collagen at the lower stem layer. This new cemented stem design completely eliminates the stress shielding problem at the proximal medial femoral region. The stress shielding using the cemented functionally graded stem is reduced by 98% compared to titanium stem.

  19. HDAC inhibitor-loaded bone cement for advanced local treatment of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonak, Marcus; Becker, Marc; Graf, Claudine; Eckhard, Lukas; Theobald, Matthias; Rommens, Pol-Maria; Wehler, Thomas C; Proschek, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    The treatment of osteosarcoma, especially wide resection, is challenging. An additional local drug therapy after resection using anti-neoplastic bone cement (Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)) could help improve the outcome of therapy. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PMMA loaded with valproic acid (VPA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on the cell activity of a SaOs-2 cell culture, as well as the elution rate of the drugs out of the bone cement. In our experiments, we used the SaOs-2 osteosarcoma and the SW1353 chondrosarcoma cell line. Bone cement clots (5 g) were prepared and loaded with different drug concentrations of VPA (25 mg and 50 mg) and SAHA (1 mg, 2.5 mg and 5 mg). Two control groups were established, one with a native cement clot, the other with human mesenchymal stem cells, in order to evaluate toxicity on non tumor-cells. Cell activity was measured using an Alamar Blue assay on days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7. The cement clots were additionally examined in a material testing unit for biomechanical and structural changes. Tumor cells showed a significant and complete reduction of activity under therapy with VPA and SAHA. Drug release of VPA was extensive between days 0 and 3 and decreased progressively to day 7. Cumulative drug concentration in the medium continuously increased. Biomechanical testing of the cement clots showed no differences in stability and architecture compared to the control group. SaOs-2 and SW1353 cells with medium from native cement clots without drug therapy presented a cell activity of 100% in all groups and during all measurements. Human mesenchymal stem cells were not significantly affected during therapy with VPA and low concentrations of SAHA. In contrast, cell activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was significantly reduced under therapy with higher concentrations of SAHA, with an approximately linear decrease between days 0-3 and a rapidly decreasing activity between days 4-7. A local cytotoxic therapy in the

  20. Investigations of silk fiber/calcium phosphate cement biocomposite for radial bone defect repair in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hu, Chunjie; Chen, Yingjun; Xia, Shiqi; Yan, Jinglong

    2017-02-21

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of silk fiber (SF)/calcium phosphate cement (CPC) biocomposite on repairing radial bone defects in rabbits. Four-month-old New Zealand rabbits were selected to create a bilateral radial bone defect model and divided into four groups according to implanted material: SF/CPC, SF/CPC/particulate bone (PB), PB, and control (C). The specimens were removed at four and eight postoperative weeks for general observation, X-ray examination, tissue slicing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biomechanical testing. Postoperative X-ray showed no bone defect repair in group C and different degrees of bone defect repair in the other three groups. Imaging, histology, and SEM showed the following: group SF/CPC formed fine trabecular bone in week 4, while the maximum bending load in group SF/CPC in week 4 was significantly different from those in the other groups (P < 0.05). SF/CPC has good biocompatibility and bone-inducing ability, demonstrating its bone defect-repairing ability.

  1. Minimally invasive maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation using brushite based cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamimi, Faleh; Torres, Jesus; Lopez-Cabarcos, Enrique; Bassett, David C.; Habibovic, Pamela; Luceron, Elena; Barralet, Jake E.

    2009-01-01

    An ideal material for maxillofacial vertical bone augmentation procedures should not only be osteoconductive, biocompatible and mechanically strong, but should also be applied using minimally invasive procedures and remain stable with respect to the original bone surfaces. This way, implant exposure

  2. Optimization of a Functionally Graded Material Stem in the Femoral Component of a Cemented Hip Arthroplasty: Influence of Dimensionality of FGM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Moussa, Abdellah; Yadav, Rohan

    2017-01-01

    The longevity of hip prostheses is contingent on the stability of the implant within the cavity of the femur bone. The cemented fixation was mostly adopted owing to offering the immediate stability from cement-stem and cement-bone bonding interfaces after implant surgery. Yet cement damage and stress shielding of the bone were proven to adversely affect the lifelong stability of the implant, especially among younger subjects who tend to have an active lifestyle. The geometry and material distribution of the implant can be optimized more efficiently with a three-dimensional realistic design of a functionally graded material (FGM). We report an efficient numerical technique for achieving this objective, for maximum performance stress shielding and the rate of early accumulation of cement damage were concurrently minimized. Results indicated less stress shielding and similar cement damage rates with a 2D-FGM implant compared to 1D-FGM and Titanium alloy implants.

  3. Structure and Property Characterization of Oyster Shell Cementing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟彬杨; 周强; 单昌锋; 于岩

    2012-01-01

    Oyster shell powder was used as the admixture of ordinary portland cement.The effects of different addition amounts and grinding ways on the strength and stability of cement mortar were discussed and proper addition amount of oyster shell powder was determined.The structure and property changes of cementing samples with different oyster shell powder contents were tested by XRD and SEM means.The results revealed that compressive and rupture strengths of the sample with 10% oyster shell powder was close to those of the original one without addition.Stability experiment showed that the sample prepared by pat method had smooth surface without crack and significant expansion or shrinkage after pre-curing and boiling,which indicated that cementing material dosed with oyster shell powder had fine stability.XRD and SEM observation showed that oyster shell independently exists in the cementing material.

  4. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on the concrete corrosion control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia de Gutierrez, R.

    2003-07-01

    Failure of concrete after a period of years, less than the life expected for which it was designed, may be caused by the environment to which it has been exposed or by a variety of internal causes. The incorporation of supplementary materials has at the Portland cement the purpose of improving the concrete microstructure and also of influence the resistance of concrete to environmental attacks. Different mineral by-products as ground granulated blast furnaces slag (GGBS), silica fume (SF), meta kaolin (MK), fly ash (FA) and other products have been used as supplementary cementing materials. This paper is about the behavior of concrete in the presence of mineral additions. Compared to Portland cements, blended cements show lower heat of hydration, lower permeability, greater resistance to sulphates and sea water. These blended cements find the best application when requirements of durability are regarded as a priority specially on high performance concrete: (Author) 11 refs.

  5. Transient and residual stresses and displacements in self-curing bone cement - Part I: characterization of relevant volumetric behavior of bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A M; Pak, W; Burke, D L; Miller, J

    1982-02-01

    In this first part of a two-part report, some aspects of the volumetric behavior of bone cement during its curing process are examined as a prelude to an analysis for the transient and residual stresses and displacements in stem fixation systems. Experiments show that stress generation in the cement is associated with its temperature while curing and that during the cooling phase, the stresses are mainly due to thermal as opposed to bulk shrinkage. The appropriate coefficient of thermal expansion of bone cement has been evaluated from measurements in a simulated fixation system in conjuction with a thermoelastic analysis.

  6. High belite cement from alternative raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorab, H. Y.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three high belite laboratory clinkers were prepared from traditional and alternative raw materials. Reference clinker was obtained from 77% limestone, 11% sandy clays, 11% fatty clays and 1% iron scales. The fatty clays were replaced by red brick powder in the raw meal of the second clinker and were lowered to 2% with the replacement of 10% of the limestone by egg shells in the third clinker. The SEM examination revealed clear presence of crossed striae and twinning in the rounded belite grains of the reference clinker caused by the transformation of the α´-belite to the β polymorph. Striae were weaker in the second and third clinkers indicating a probable stabilization of the α ‘-belite polymorph. Compressive strength of the respective cements were attained first after 28 days and the early strength did not improve with increasing fineness. Higher compressive strength values were found for the cement prepared from second clinker.Se han preparado tres clinkeres de laboratorio con altos contenidos en belita a partir de materias primas tradicionales y alternativas. El clinker de referencia se obtuvo a partir de una mezcla de caliza, arcillas arenosas y grasas y limaduras de hierro. Las arcillas grasas fueron sustituidas por polvo de ladrillo rojo en la preparación del segundo clinker, y en el tercero el contenido de arcilla grasa fue de solo un 2% y parte de la caliza fue sustituida por cascara de huevo. El estudio realizado por SEM muestra superficies estriadas alrededor de los granos de belita que indican una transformación del polimorfo α´ a la forma β-C₂S, durante el enfriamiento. Esas estrías son menos marcadas en el segundo y tercer clinker, indicando, una estabilización del polimorfo α´-C₂S. Los valores de resistencias a compresión de los correspondientes cementos, a 28 días de curado, no se ven incrementados por la finura de dichos cementos. Las mayores resistencias se obtuvieron en el cemento preparado a partir del cl

  7. Kinetic study of the setting reaction of a calcium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, E; Ginebra, M P; Boltong, M G; Driessens, F C; Ginebra, J; De Maeyer, E A; Verbeeck, R M; Planell, J A

    1996-11-01

    The setting reaction of a calcium phosphate bone cement consisting of a mixture of 63.2 wt % alpha-tertiary calcium phosphate (TCP)[alpha-Ca3(PO4)2], 27.7 wt % dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (CaHPO4), and 9.1 wt % of precipitated hydroxyapatite [(PHA) used as seed material] was investigated. The cement samples were prepared at a liquid-to-powder ratio of: L/P = 0.30 ml/g. Bi-distilled water was used as liquid solution. After mixing the powder and liquid, some samples were molded and aged in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. At fixed time intervals they were unmolded and then immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen at a temperature of TN = -196 degrees C, lyofilized, and examined by X-ray diffraction as powder samples. The compressive strength versus time was also measured in setting samples of this calcium phosphate bone cement. The crystal entanglement morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that: 1) alpha-TCP reacted to a calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA), Ca9(HPO4)(PO4)5O H, whereas DCP did not react significantly; 2) the reaction was nearly finished within 32 h, during which both the reaction percentage and the compressive strength increased versus time, with a strong correlation between them; and 3) the calcium phosphate bone cement showed in general a structure of groups of interconnected large plates distributed among agglomerations of small crystal plates arranged in very dense packings.

  8. Effect of Combined Calcium Hydroxide and Accelerated Portland Cement on Bone Formation and Soft Tissue Healing in Dog Bone Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khorshidi H

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Recent literatures show that accelerated Portland cement (APC and calcium hydroxide Ca (OH2 may have the potential to promote the bone regeneration. However, certain clinical studies reveal consistency of Ca (OH2, as one of the practical drawbacks of the material when used alone. To overcome such inconvenience, the combination of the Ca (OH2 with a bone replacement material could offer a convenient solution. Objectives: To evaluate the soft tissue healing and bone regeneration in the periodontal intrabony osseous defects using accelerated Portland cement (APC in combination with calcium hydroxide Ca (OH2, as a filling material. Materials and Methods: Five healthy adult mongrel dogs aged 2-3 years old (approximately 20 kg in weight with intact dentition and healthy periodontium were selected for this study. Two one-wall defects in both mesial and distal aspects of the 3rd premolars of both sides of the mandible were created. Therefore, four defects were prepared in each dog. Three defects in each dog were randomly filled with one of the following materials: APC alone, APC mixed with Ca (OH2, and Ca (OH2 alone. The fourth defect was left empty (control. Upon clinical examination of the sutured sites, the amount of dehiscence from the adjacent tooth was measured after two and eight weeks, using a periodontal probe mesiodistally. For histometric analysis, the degree of new bone formation was estimated at the end of the eighth postoperative week, by a differential point-counting method. The percentage of the defect volume occupied by new osteoid or trabecular bone was recorded. Results: Measurement of wound dehiscence during the second week revealed that all five APCs had an exposure of 1-2 mm and at the end of the study all samples showed 3-4 mm exposure across the surface of the graft material, whereas the Ca (OH2, control, and APC + Ca (OH2 groups did not show any exposure at the end of the eighth week of the study. The most

  9. Evaluation of four biodegradable, injectable bone cements in an experimental drill hole model in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Génot, Oliver R; Nuss, Katja; Galuppo, Larry; Fulmer, Mark; Jacobson, Evan; Kronen, Peter; Zlinszky, Kati; Auer, Jörg A

    2013-09-01

    Four cement applications were tested in this investigation. Two dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD-brushite) hydraulic cements, an apatite hydraulic fiber loaded cement, and a calcium sulfate cement (Plaster of Paris) were implanted in epiphyseal and metaphyseal cylindrical bone defects in sheep. The in vivo study was performed to assess the biocompatibility and bone remodeling of four cement formulations. After time periods of 2, 4, and 6 months, the cement samples were clinically and histologically evaluated. Histomorphometrically, the amount of new bone formation, fibrous tissue, and bone marrow and the area of remaining cement were measured. In all specimens, no signs of inflammation were detectable either macroscopically or microscopically. Cements differed mainly in their resorption time. Calcium sulfate was already completely resorbed at 2 months and showed a variable amount of new bone formation and/or fibrous tissue in the original drill hole over all time periods. The two DCPD cements in contrast were degraded to a large amount at 6 months, whereas the apatite was almost unchanged over all time periods.

  10. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration. PMID:28196118

  11. Design of Digital Control System for Cement Raw Material Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ying; LI Hongsheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design of cement raw material prepared digital control system by PROFIBUS. It uses the digital technology to implement the digital control system for raw material prepared of the cement factory. This system improves the communication between the industrial system and locale instrument devices. It applies digital communication to replace the 4-20 mA or 24VDC signal between locale lever device and controller.

  12. Calcium phosphate cement delivering zoledronate decreases bone turnover rate and restores bone architecture in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Chin; Wang, Chen-Chie; Lu, Dai-Hua; Hsu, Li-Ho; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2012-06-01

    Patients sustaining bony fractures frequently require the application of bone graft substitutes to fill the bone defects. In the meantime, anti-osteoporosis drugs may be added in bone fillers to treat osteoporosis, especially in postmenopausal women and the elderly. The effects of zoledronate-impregnated calcium phosphate cement (ZLN/CPC) on ovariectomized (OVX) rats were evaluated. OVX rats were implanted with ZLN/CPC, containing 0.025 mg ZLN in the greater omentum. Afterward the clinical sign of toxicity was recorded for eight weeks. The rats were sacrificed and blood samples were collected for hematology and serum bone turnover markers analyses. The four limbs of the rats were harvested and micro-computer tomography (micro-CT) scanning and bone ash analyses were performed. No clinical toxicity was observed in the treated rats. Compared to the OVX rats, levels of bone resorption markers (fragments of C-telopeptides of type I collagen) and bone formation markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) decreased significantly in the treated rats. Osteopontin, which mediates the anchoring of osteoclasts to the mineral matrix of bones, also decreased significantly. Micro-CT scanning and histologic examinations of the distal femoral metaphyses showed that the cancellous bone architectures were restored, with a concomitant decrease in bone porosity. The bone mineral content in the bone ashes also increased significantly. This study indicates that ZLN-impregnated CPC reduces bone turnover rate and restores bone architecture in OVX rats. CPC may be an appropriate carrier to deliver drugs to treat osteoporosis, and this approach may also reduce rates of post-dosing symptoms for intravenous ZLN delivery.

  13. PURIFIED WASTE FCC CATALYST AS A CEMENT REPLACEMENT MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danute Vaiciukyniene

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zeolites are commonly used in the fluid catalytic cracking process. Zeolite polluted with oil products and became waste after some time used. The quantity of this waste inevitably rises by expanding rapidly oil industry. The composition of these catalysts depends on the manufacturer and on the process that is going to be used. The main factors retarding hydration process of cement systems and modifying them strength are organic compounds impurities in the waste FCC catalyst. The present paper shows the results of using purified waste FCC catalyst (pFCC from Lithuania oil refinery, as Portland cement replacement material. For this purpose, the purification of waste FCC catalyst (FCC samples was treated with hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is one of the most powerful oxidizers known. By acting of waste with H2O2 it can eliminate the aforementioned waste deficiency, and the obtained product becomes one of the most promising ingredients, in new advanced building materials. Hardened cement paste samples with FCC or pFCC were formed. It was observed that the pFCC blended cements developed higher strength, after 28 days, compared to the samples with FCC or reference samples. Typical content of Portland cement substituting does not exceed 30 % of mass of Portland cement in samples. Reducing the consumption of Portland cement with utilizing waste materials is preferred for reasons of environmental protection.

  14. In vitro study of adhesive polymethylmethacrylate bone cement bonding to cortical bone in maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Marx, Rudolf; Kolk, Andreas; Said-Yekta, Sareh; Grosjean, Maurice B; Stoll, Christian; Tinschert, Joachim; Wirtz, Dieter C; Riediger, Dieter; Endres, Kira

    2010-12-01

    In the treatment of midface fractures, the fragments are immobilized using screws and plates for osteosynthesis until reunion has occurred. This method involves drilling holes for the insertion of the screws, which can be associated with additional fracturing of the corresponding bone owing to the complex architecture and thin layers of facial bone. To alleviate this problem, new adhesive techniques for fixing the plates for osteosynthesis have been investigated, mitigating the detrimental effects of screw hole drilling. In the present experimental study, the strength of this adhesive bond and its resistance to hydrolysis were investigated. To determine the adhesive bonding strength, a tension test was implemented. Osteosynthesis plates with screw holes 1.3 mm in diameter were fixed to cortical bone samples of bovine femur using ultraviolet (UV) light-curing polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. To facilitate bonding, the surface of the bone was conditioned with an amphiphilic bonding agent before cementing. UV light curing was implemented using either a conventional UV unit, such as is used in dentistry, or with a specialized UV unit with a limited emission spectrum but high luminosity. Reference control samples were prepared without application of the bone bonding agent. After this procedure, the samples were stored for 1 to 7 days at 37°C submerged in 0.9% saline solution before being subjected to the tension test. Without the bone bonding agent, the bonding strength was 0.2 MPa. The primary average bonding strength at day 0 was 8.5 MPa when cured with the conventional UV unit and 14 MPa for the samples cured with the specialized UV unit. An almost constant average bond strength of 8 and 16 MPa was noted for all samples stored up to 7 days after curing with the conventional and specialized UV unit, respectively. With the development of a new bone bonding agent, a method is now available to promote the bonding between the hydrophilic bone surface and the

  15. Radioactive bone cement for the treatment of spinal metastases: a dosimetric analysis of simulated clinical scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramsinghani, N. S.; Marquez Miranda, M.; Keyak, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    Vertebral metastases are a common manifestation of many cancers, potentially leading to vertebral collapse and neurological complications. Conventional treatment often involves percutaneous vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy. As a more convenient alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporating a radionuclide. In this study, we used a previously developed Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to evaluate dose distributions from phosphorus-32 radioactive cement in simulated clinical scenarios. Isodose curves were generally concentric about the surface of bone cement injected into cadaveric vertebrae, indicating that dose distributions are relatively predictable, thus facilitating treatment planning (cement formulation and dosimetry method are patent pending). Model results indicated that a therapeutic dose could be delivered to tumor/bone within ∼4 mm of the cement surface while maintaining a safe dose to radiosensitive tissue beyond this distance. This therapeutic range should be sufficient to treat target volumes within the vertebral body when tumor ablation or other techniques are used to create a cavity into which the radioactive cement can be injected. With further development, treating spinal metastases with radioactive bone cement may become a clinically useful and convenient alternative to the conventional two-step approach of percutaneous strength restoration followed by radiotherapy.

  16. Improved workability of injectable calcium sulfate bone cement by regulation of self-setting properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zonggang, E-mail: chenzg@sdu.edu.cn [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Huanye [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Xi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lian, Xiaojie [College of Mechanics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Zhongwu [National Glycoengineering Research Center, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jiang, Hong-Jiang [Wendeng Hospital of Traditional Chinese Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shandong 264400 (China); Cui, Fu-Zhai, E-mail: cuifz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-01

    Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) powder as an injectable bone cement was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). The prepared materials showed X-ray diffraction peaks corresponding to the CSH structure without any secondary phases, implying complete conversion from CSD phase to CSH phase. Thermogravimetric (TG) analyses showed the crystal water content of CSH was about 6.0% (wt.), which is near to the theoretic crystal water value of CSH. From scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs, sheet crystal structure of CSD was observed to transform into rod-like crystal structure of CSH. Most interesting and important of all, CSD as setting accelerator was also introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of injectable CSH paste, and thus the self-setting time of CSH paste can be regulated from near 30 min to less than 5 min by adding various amounts of setting accelerator. Because CSD is not only the reactant of preparing CSH but also the final solidified product of CSH, the setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials, such as mechanical properties. In vitro biocompatibility and in vivo histology studies have demonstrated that the materials have good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration. All these will further improve the workability of CSH in clinic applications. Highlights: ► Calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) can be an injectable bone cement. ► CSH was produced by hydrothermal synthesis of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD). ► CSD was introduced into CSH powder to regulate self-setting properties of CSH. ► Setting accelerator has no significant effect on the other properties of materials. ► Injectable CSH has good biocompatibility and good efficacy in bone regeneration.

  17. Secondary raw materials for synthesising new kind of cements

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, S.; Macías, Mª A., Peña, E.; Fernández-Escalante, E.

    2001-01-01

    [EN]The present paper is a comparative study of some characteristics of new belite cements obtained from two kind of wastes, which were used as secondary raw materials: fly ash (FA), of low CaO content, from coal combustion, and ash from incineration of municipal solid waste (MSWIA). Cements were synthesised in a range of temperature between 700 °C and 900 ""C from MSWIA and FA, which were previously activated by hydrothermal treatment at 200 °C The evolution of cement...

  18. Brushite-Forming Mg-, Zn- and Sr-Substituted Bone Cements for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M.F. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate cements have been in clinical use for the last 10 years. Their most salient features include good biocompatibility, excellent bioactivity, self-setting characteristics, low setting temperature, adequate stiffness, and easy shaping to accomodate any complicated geometry. They are commonly used in filling bone defects and trauma surgeries as mouldable paste-like bone substitute materials. Substitution of trace elements, such as Mg, Sr and Zn ions, into the structure of calcium phosphates is the subject of widespread investigation nowadays, because of their impending role in the biological process. Subtle differences in composition and structure of these materials may have a profound effect on their in vivo behaviour. Therefore, the main goal of this paper is to provide a simple, but comprehensive overview of the present achievements relating to brushite-forming cements doped with Mg, Zn and Sr, and to identify new developments and trends. In particular, the influence of ionic substitution on the chemical, physical and biological properties of these materials is discussed.

  19. Characterization of a new composite PMMA-HA/Brushite bone cement for spinal augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghyarian, Shant; Rodriguez, Lucas C; Chari, Jonathan; Bentley, Elizabeth; Kosmopoulos, Victor; Lieberman, Isador H; Rodrigues, Danieli C

    2014-11-01

    Calcium phosphate fillers have been shown to increase cement osteoconductivity, but have caused drawbacks in cement properties. Hydroxyapatite and Brushite were introduced in an acrylic two-solution cement at varying concentrations. Novel composite bone cements were developed and characterized using rheology, injectability, and mechanical tests. It was hypothesized that the ample swelling time allowed by the premixed two-solution cement would enable thorough dispersion of the additives in the solutions, resulting in no detrimental effects after polymerization. The addition of Hydroxyapatite and Brushite both caused an increase in cement viscosity; however, these cements exhibited high shear-thinning, which facilitated injection. In gel point studies, the composite cements showed no detectable change in gel point time compared to an all-acrylic control cement. Hydroxyapatite and Brushite composite cements were observed to have high mechanical strengths even at high loads of calcium phosphate fillers. These cements showed an average compressive strength of 85 MPa and flexural strength of 65 MPa. A calcium phosphate-containing cement exhibiting a combination of high viscosity, pseudoplasticity and high mechanical strength can provide the essential bioactivity factor for osseointegration without sacrificing load-bearing capability.

  20. Composite bone cements loaded with a bioactive and ferrimagnetic glass-ceramic: Leaching, bioactivity and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verné, Enrica, E-mail: enrica.verne@polito.it [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bruno, Matteo [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Miola, Marta [Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, C. so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Maina, Giovanni; Bianco, Carlotta [Traumatology Orthopedics and Occupational Medicine Dept., Università di Torino, Via G. Zuretti 29, 10126 Torino (Italy); Cochis, Andrea [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Rimondini, Lia [Department of Health Sciences, Università del Piemonte Orientale “Amedeo Avogadro”, Via Solaroli 17, 28100 Novara (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    In this work, composite bone cements, based on a commercial polymethylmethacrylate matrix (Palamed®) loaded with ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic particles (SC45), were produced and characterized in vitro. The ferrimagnetic bioactive glass-ceramic belongs to the system SiO{sub 2}–Na{sub 2}O–CaO–P{sub 2}O{sub 5}–FeO–Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and contains magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) crystals into a residual amorphous bioactive phase. Three different formulations (containing 10, 15 and 20 wt.% of glass-ceramic particles respectively) have been investigated. These materials are intended to be applied as bone fillers for the hyperthermic treatment of bone tumors. The morphological, compositional, calorimetric and mechanical properties of each formulation have been already discussed in a previous paper. The in vitro properties of the composite bone cements described in the present paper are related to iron ion leaching test (by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer), bioactivity (i.e. the ability to stimulate the formation of a hydroxyapatite – HAp – layer on their surface after soaking in simulated body fluid SBF) and cytocompatibility toward human osteosarcoma cells (ATCC CRL-1427, Mg63). Morphological and chemical characterizations by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry have been performed on the composite samples after each test. The iron release was negligible and all the tested samples showed the growth of HAp on their surface after 28 days of immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF). Cells showed good viability, morphology, adhesion, density and the ability to develop bridge-like structures on all investigated samples. A synergistic effect between bioactivity and cell mineralization was also evidenced. - Highlights: • An in vitro biological characterization was carried out on ferromagnetic and bioactive composite cements. • No release of iron was revealed in the physiological solution. • Bioactivity tests

  1. Utilization of Palm Oil Clinker as Cement Replacement Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegathish Kanadasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of waste materials from the palm oil industry provides immense benefit to various sectors of the construction industry. Palm oil clinker is a by-product from the processing stages of palm oil goods. Channelling this waste material into the building industry helps to promote sustainability besides overcoming waste disposal problems. Environmental pollution due to inappropriate waste management system can also be drastically reduced. In this study, cement was substituted with palm oil clinker powder as a binder material in self-compacting mortar. The fresh, hardened and microstructure properties were evaluated throughout this study. In addition, sustainability component analysis was also carried out to assess the environmental impact of introducing palm oil clinker powder as a replacement material for cement. It can be inferred that approximately 3.3% of cement production can be saved by substituting palm oil clinker powder with cement. Reducing the utilization of cement through a high substitution level of this waste material will also help to reduce carbon emissions by 52%. A cleaner environment free from pollutants can be created to ensure healthier living. Certain industries may benefit through the inclusion of this waste material as the cost and energy consumption of the product can be minimized.

  2. A theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage of bone cement: A potential major source of porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, J L; Hasenwinkel, J M; Wixson, R L; Lautenschlager, E P

    2000-10-01

    A theoretical basis for understanding polymerization shrinkage of bone cement is presented based on density changes in converting monomer to polymer. Also, an experimental method, based on dilatometry and the Archimedes' principle is presented for highly precise and accurate measurement of unconstrained volumetric shrinkage of bone cement. Furthermore, a theoretical and experimental analysis of polymerization shrinkage in a constrained deformational state is presented to demonstrate that porosity can develop due to shrinkage. Six bone-cement conditions (Simplex-Ptrade mark vacuum and hand mixed, Endurancetrade mark vacuum mixed, and three two-solution experimental bone cements with higher initial monomer levels) were tested for volumetric shrinkage. It was found that shrinkage varied statistically (ptheory that they are the result of shrinkage. The results of this study show that shrinkage of bone cement under certain constrained conditions may result in the development of porosity at the implant-bone cement interface and elsewhere in the polymerizing cement mantle.

  3. [Water jet cutting for bones and bone cement--parameter study of possibilities and limits of a new method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honl, M; Rentzsch, R; Lampe, F; Müller, V; Dierk, O; Hille, E; Louis, H; Morlock, M

    2000-09-01

    Water jet techniques have been used in industrial cutting, drilling and cleaning applications for more than 30 years. Plain water is typically used for the cutting of non-metallic materials. The addition of abrasive substances to the stream allows almost any material to be cut. The first medical applications were reported in the early 1980s, when the water jet was used to cut organs. The present study investigates the use of water jet cutting technology for endoprosthesis revision surgery. Bone and PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) samples were cut at different pressures using an industrial water jet cutting device. Using plain water at 400 bar, PMMA was cut selectively without damaging the bone; above 400 bar, bone was also cut, but the cutting depths in PMMA were significantly greater (p water-soluble abrasive disaccharide to the water results in a significantly higher removal rate for both materials (p cutting depth between the two materials was significant (p abrasive, the quality of the cut was better for both materials. The water jet technology--in particular the abrasive technique--can be used to cut biomaterials such as bone and bone cement. The diameter of the jet is a great advantage when working in the confined area at the prosthesis interface. The cutting process is essentially cold, thus eliminating a thermal effect, and the jet reaction forces are relatively low. Accurate manipulation of the hydro jet nozzle is possible both manually and by robot. The results obtained show that it is possible to remove prostheses with this cutting technique, rapidly and with little damage to the surrounding tissue. Problem areas are the development of sterile pumps and the "depth control" of the jet.

  4. The contradictory effects of pores on fatigue cracking of bone cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Aquarius, R.J.M.; Stolk, J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial effect of porosity reduction on the fatigue life of bone cement has been demonstrated in numerous experimental studies. Clinically, however, it seems that the beneficial effect of porosity reduction of cement around total hip replacement components can only be found in large follow-up

  5. The biocompatibility of porous vs non-porous bone cements: a new methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dall'Oca

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Composite cements have been shown to be biocompatible, bioactive, with good mechanical properties and capability to bind to the bone. Despite these interesting characteristic, in vivo studies on animal models are still incomplete and ultrastructural data are lacking. The acquisition of new ultrastructural data is hampered by uncertainties in the methods of preparation of histological samples due to the use of resins that melt methacrylate present in bone cement composition. A new porous acrylic cement composed of polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA and β-tricalciumphosphate (β-TCP was developed and tested on an animal model. The cement was implanted in femurs of 8 New Zealand White rabbits, which were observed for 8 weeks before their sacrifice. Histological samples were prepared with an infiltration process of LR white resin and then the specimens were studied by X-rays, histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. As a control, an acrylic standard cement, commonly used in clinical procedures, was chosen. Radiographic ultrastructural and histological exams have allowed finding an excellent biocompatibility of the new porous cement. The high degree of osteointegration was demonstrated by growth of neo-created bone tissue inside the cement sample. Local or systemic toxicity signs were not detected. The present work shows that the proposed procedure for the evaluation of biocompatibility, based on the use of LR white resin allows to make a thorough and objective assessment of the biocompatibility of porous and non-porous bone cements.

  6. The contradictory effects of pores on fatigue cracking of bone cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.; Aquarius, R.J.M.; Stolk, J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The beneficial effect of porosity reduction on the fatigue life of bone cement has been demonstrated in numerous experimental studies. Clinically, however, it seems that the beneficial effect of porosity reduction of cement around total hip replacement components can only be found in large follow-up

  7. Effect of rapidly resorbable calcium phosphates and a calcium phosphate bone cement on the expression of bone-related genes and proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, C; Berger, G; Gildenhaar, R; Meyer, J; Howlett, C R; Markovic, B; Zreiqat, H

    2004-04-01

    The use of biodegradable bone substitutes is advantageous for alveolar ridge augmentation because it avoids second-site surgery for autograft harvesting. This study examines the effect of novel, rapidly resorbable calcium phosphates and a calcium phosphate bone cement on the expression of bone-related genes and proteins by human bone-derived cells (HBDCs) and compares this behavior to that of tricalciumphosphate (TCP). Test materials were alpha-TCP, two materials with a crystalline phase Ca(2)KNa(PO(4))(2) and with a small amorphous portion containing either magnesium potassium phosphate (material denominated GB14) or silica phosphate (material denominated GB9), and a calcium phosphate bone cement (material denominated Biocement D). HBDCs were grown on the substrata for 3, 7, 14, and 21 days, counted, and probed for various mRNAs and proteins (type I collagen, osteocalcin, osteopontin, osteonectin, alkaline phosphatase, and bone sialoprotein). All substrates supported continuous cellular growth for 21 days. In the presence of GB14 and Biocement D specimens cell proliferation was reduced and cell differentiation increased. At day 21, the greatest number of cells was found on GB9 expressing significantly higher levels of bone-related proteins than cells grown on all other surfaces. Because all novel materials facilitated the expression of the osteoblastic phenotype at least as much as TCP and the polystyrene control, these biomaterials can be regarded as excellent candidate bone substitute materials. GB9 induced the highest proliferation and cellular differentiation after 21 days of incubation, suggesting that this material may possess a higher potency for enhancing osteogenesis than TCP.

  8. Influence of Alveolar Bone Loss and Cement Layer Thickness on the Biomechanical Behavior of Endodontically Treated Maxillary Incisors: A 3-dimensional Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Piva, Amanda Maria de Oliveira; Tribst, João Paulo Mendes; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio de Assunção E; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto

    2017-05-01

    In order to understand the mechanical behavior of a weakened incisor, this study aimed to evaluate the stress distribution caused by different alveolar bone heights and cement layer thickness. A finite element analysis was conducted for this investigation. An intact maxillary central incisor was initially modeled, and the bone of the models was modified in order to simulate 4 levels of bone height: BL0 (no bone loss), BL1 (1/3 bone loss), BL2 (1/2 bone loss), and BL3 (2/3 bone loss). These teeth models were remodeled with a fiber post at 2 different cement thicknesses and restored with a ceramic crown; "A" refers to the well-adapted fiber post (0.3 mm) and "B" to the nonadapted fiber post (1 mm), resulting in 12 models. RelyX ARC (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) cement was simulated for the cementation of the crowns and fiber posts for all groups. Numeric models received a load of 100 N on the lingual surface. All materials and structures were considered linear elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic. Numeric models were plotted and meshed with isoparametric elements, and results were expressed in maximum principal stress. For fiberglass posts, cement, and dentin, the highest stress concentration occurred in the groups with increased bone loss. For cortical bone, the highest values were for the groups with 1/3 bone loss. A greater thickness of cement layer concentrates more stress. More bone loss and greater CLT were the influential factors in concentrating the stress. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel injectable calcium phosphate cement-bioactive glass composite for bone regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calcium phosphate cement (CPC can be molded or injected to form a scaffold in situ, which intimately conforms to complex bone defects. Bioactive glass (BG is known for its unique ability to bond to living bone and promote bone growth. However, it was not until recently that literature was available regarding CPC-BG applied as an injectable graft. In this paper, we reported a novel injectable CPC-BG composite with improved properties caused by the incorporation of BG into CPC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The novel injectable bioactive cement was evaluated to determine its composition, microstructure, setting time, injectability, compressive strength and behavior in a simulated body fluid (SBF. The in vitro cellular responses of osteoblasts and in vivo tissue responses after the implantation of CPC-BG in femoral condyle defects of rabbits were also investigated. RESULTS: CPC-BG possessed a retarded setting time and markedly better injectability and mechanical properties than CPC. Moreover, a new Ca-deficient apatite layer was deposited on the composite surface after immersing immersion in SBF for 7 days. CPC-BG samples showed significantly improved degradability and bioactivity compared to CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF. In addition, the degrees of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation on CPC-BG were higher than those on CPC. Macroscopic evaluation, histological evaluation, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT analysis showed that CPC-BG enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation in comparison with CPC. CONCLUSIONS: A novel CPC-BG composite has been synthesized with improved properties exhibiting promising prospects for bone regeneration.

  10. The use of water-jetting technology in prostheses revision surgery-first results of parameter studies on bone and bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honl, M; Rentzsch, R; Müller, G; Brandt, C; Bluhm, A; Hille, E; Louis, H; Morlock, M

    2000-01-01

    Water-jet cutting techniques have been used in industrial applications for many different materials. Recently these techniques have been developed into a revolutionary cutting tool for soft tissues in visceral surgery. The present study investigates the usage of this cutting technology for the revision surgery of endoprostheses. In the first part of the study, samples of bovine bone and acrylic bone cement (PMMA) were cut using an industrial jet cutting device with pure water. Below 400 bar, only PMMA was cut; above 400 bar, bone was also cut, but only pressures above 800 bar resulted in clinically useful rates of material removal (cut depth 2. 4 mm at 10 mm/min traverse speed). In the second part of the study, the effect of adding biocompatible abrasives to the water in order to reduce the required pressure was investigated, resulting in a significantly higher removal of material. At 600 bar, PMMA was cut 5. 2 mm deep with plain water and 15.2 mm deep with added abrasives. The quality of the cuts was increased by the abrasive. Though there was no clear selectivity between bone and PMMA any more, the rate of material removal at similar pressures was significantly higher for PMMA than for bone (600 bar: 1.6 mm cut depth for bone samples, 15.2 mm for PMMA). The measured cut depths with either method were not influenced by a change of the cutting direction with respect to the main direction of the osteons in the bone. However, a reduction of the jet surface angle (90 degrees to 23 degrees ) resulted for bone in a significantly lower cut depth at 600 bar (plain water: 0.62 mm vs. 0.06 mm; abrasive: 1.61 mm vs. 0.60 mm). The laboratory experiments indicate that abrasive water jets may be suitable for cutting biomaterials like bone and bone cement.

  11. Antibiotic-eluting hydrophilized PMMA bone cement with prolonged bactericidal effect for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun Jo; Oh, Se Heang; Lee, In Soo; Kwon, Oh Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2016-05-01

    Osteomyelitis is still considered to be one of the major challenges for orthopedic surgeons despite advanced antiseptic surgical procedures and pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this study, hydrophilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cements containing Pluronic F68 (EG79PG28EG79) as a hydrophilic additive and vancomycin (F68-VAcements) were prepared to allow the sustained release of the antibiotic for adequate periods of time without any significant loss of mechanical properties. The compressive strengths of the bone cements with Pluronic F68 compositions less than 7 wt% were not significantly different compared with the control vancomycin-loaded bone cement (VAcement). TheF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement showed sustained release of the antibiotic for up to 11 weeks and almost 100% release from the bone cement. It also prohibited the growth ofS. aureus(zone of inhibition) over six weeks (the required period to treat osteomyelitis), and it did not show any notable cytotoxicity. From an animal study using a femoral osteomyelitis rat model, it was observed that theF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement was effective for the treatment of osteomyelitis, probably as a result of the prolonged release of antibiotic from the PMMA bone cement. On the basis of these findings, it can be suggested that the use of Pluronic F68 as a hydrophilic additive for antibiotic-eluting PMMA bone cement can be a promising strategy for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

  12. Clean Development Mechanism: Laterite as Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zaighum Abbass

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 a major Green House Gas (GHG in the atmosphere, is believed to be largely responsible for global climate change through industrial emissions. The level of CO2 concentration has exponentially increased from about 280 ppm at the start of the industrial revolution to about 380 ppm to date. Although Kyoto protocol has bound industrialized nations to reduce green house gas emissions by 5.2% below 1990 levels around year 2008-2012, but violation continues. The cement industry is one of the major emitter of green house gases, particularly CO2 due to its energy intensive production process. It is estimated that approximately 1 tone of CO2 is released during the manufacturing of each tone of Portland cement. Most of CO2 emissions originate from burning fossil fuels and de-carbonization of limestone in a cement plant. During past several decades, the use of by-product materials in concrete, either as components of blended cements or as admixtures, has increased significantly. In this study, another alternate Supplementary Cementing Material (SCM, Laterite has been used with the objectives: to evaluate the performance of cement containing different percentages of laterite (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 %; to identify the optimum replacement percentage; and to investigate the effects of different concentrations of laterite on various properties of cement. For that purpose, laterite was tested: before blending (for elemental and mineralogical composition by using XRF, SEM and XRD: after blending (Elemental analysis using XRF, fineness test by using Blaine’s air permeability test and for particle size % on 45, 90 and 200 µ sieve, respectively; and after hydration (for mineralogical analysis using SEM. Furthermore, physical tests of manufactured cement, i.e., water consistency, setting time, Le-Chatlier-expansion and compressive strength were also evaluated and compared with limestone and fly-ash cement blends. The results show that with the

  13. Cement stabilization of road pavement materials: laboratory testing programme phase 1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paige-Green, P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available of seven of the available cements on two typical South African construction materials. Chemical analyses of the two materials showed no incidences of unusual components that would lead to specific problems during cement stabilization of the materials...

  14. MR predictors of bone cement leakage in patients receiving percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Choi, Young Ho; Cha, Joo Hee [Boramae Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Deuk Soo; Jin, Wook; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon Medicine School, Gachon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To identify MR predictors of bone cement leakage in patients receiving percutaneous vertebroplasty. Percutaneous vertebroplasties were performed in 45 vertebras (T7; one, T8; two, T10; two, T11; two, T12; eight, L1; fifteen, L2; eight, L3; five, L4; two) in 35 patients (age 52-83). The procedure was performed using an 11 G Jamshidi needle, which was inserted into the target by the bipedicular approach. Kyphoplasty, unilateral pedicular approach and extrapedicular approach cases were excluded. Shortly after the procedure, all patients underwent a noncontrast CT covering the vertebroplasty sites. A retrospective study was performed to determine whether cement leakage is related to any of following MR findings: presence of cortical disruption of the vertebral body, severity of body compression (proportion of abnormal to normal vertebral body volumes), bone cement amount, bone cement amount/severity of body compression ratio, proportion of low-signal area in a vertebral body on T1 weighted image, presence of either vacuum or cystic portion below a linear dark signal in a fractured vertebra, and the location of dark signal intensity line in a vertebral body. Logisgic discrimination model stepwise method was used in the statistical analysis. On post-vertebroplasty CT scan, bone cement leakage was detected in or around 29 vertebrae (64%), including 11 vertebrae (24%) where leakage was found in the epidural space or radial vein. No patient displayed any neurological symptoms or signs. The most frequent site of bone cement leakage was the anterior external vertebral venous plexus (49%). Endplate cortical bone disruption was related to an increased risk of intervertebral bone cement leakage ({rho} < 0.05). Bone cement leakage tended to occur less frequently when there is a vacuum or cystic change below the dark linear signal intensity in a fractured vertebra ({rho} < 0.05). No other MR findings showed a statistically significant correlation with bone cement leakage. On pre

  15. Natural Radioactivity in Tanzania Cements and their Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloyce Isaya Amasi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the study of natural radioactivity in Tanzania Portland cements and their raw materials. Samples collected as raw materials were pozzolan, sandstone, limestone, clay, gypsum and cement as finished products. The natural radioactivity due to the presence of radium 226Ra, thorium 232Th and potassium 40K were measured by means of gamma spectrometer coupled with HPGe detector. The mean measured activity concentrations of 226Ra, thorium 232Th and potassium 40K in the raw materials range from 2.6 to 93.2, 1.3 to 172.8 and 6.3 to 997 Bq/kg, respectively with higher activity concentrations in pozzolan and lower in gypsum. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in raw materials (excluding some materials from Songwe deposits in Mbeya region are comparative with the worldwide average concentrations of these radionuclides in soil. The average activity concentration of 226Ra, thorium 232Th and potassium 40K in the cements are 46, 28 and 228 Bq/kg, respectively. The calculated values of radiological indices are below 60% of the upper recommended values for building materials. The average annual effective dose to an occupant from use of these materials equals to 0.45 mSv. Average activity concentrations of the mentioned radionuclides in Tanzania cements are in the middle of the variability interval of the national averages.

  16. Influence of Nano-HA Coated Bone Collagen to Acrylic (Polymethylmethacrylate Bone Cement on Mechanical Properties and Bioactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    Full Text Available This research investigated the mechanical properties and bioactivity of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement after addition of the nano-hydroxyapatite(HA coated bone collagen (mineralized collagen, MC.The MC in different proportions were added to the PMMA bone cement to detect the compressive strength, compression modulus, coagulation properties and biosafety. The MC-PMMA was embedded into rabbits and co-cultured with MG 63 cells to exam bone tissue compatibility and gene expression of osteogenesis.15.0%(wt impregnated MC-PMMA significantly lowered compressive modulus while little affected compressive strength and solidification. MC-PMMA bone cement was biologically safe and indicated excellent bone tissue compatibility. The bone-cement interface crosslinking was significantly higher in MC-PMMA than control after 6 months implantation in the femur of rabbits. The genes of osteogenesis exhibited significantly higher expression level in MC-PMMA.MC-PMMA presented perfect mechanical properties, good biosafety and excellent biocompatibility with bone tissues, which has profoundly clinical values.

  17. Cemented total hip arthroplasty with impacted morcellized bone-grafts to restore acetabular bone defects in congenital hip dysplasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolder, S.B.T.; Melenhorst, J.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Veth, R.P.H.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated the results of 27 acetabular reconstructions in 21 patients with secondary osteoarthritis resulting from congenital dysplasia of the hip in which the acetabular bone defects were restored with impacted morcellized bone-grafts in combination with a cemented cup. At an average follow-up

  18. By-product materials in cement clinker manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadayev, A. [ICS and E, Aurora, CO (United States); Kodess, B. [VNIIMS Gosstandart of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    The use of Cl- and SO{sub 3}-containing by-products from chemical industries for manufacturing Portland cement clinker using a wet process was examined. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the by-products and raw materials were determined. Homogeneous raw mixes containing different concentrations of by-products (5--30%) were prepared and the influence of the by-products on all steps of burning the mixes in a kiln to form a cement clinker was investigated. It was shown that introducing Cl- and SO{sub 3}-containing by-products to the raw mixes significantly changes all the cement clinker producing stages and changes the chemical and mineralogical compositions at all intermediate stages and in the finished products, forming new minerals containing Cl and SO{sub 3} [CaO{sub x} (SiO{sub 2}){sub y} CaCl{sub 2}] or [CaO{sub x} (SiO{sub 2}){sub y} CaSO{sub 4}] and increasing the amount of well-known intermediate minerals. The presence of the chlorides and sulfates in the cement clinker burning processes removes alkali from the raw mixes, turning them to volatile forms, accelerating the raw mineral decomposition processes and accelerating the formation processes of cement minerals (C{sub 2}S, C{sub 12}A{sub 7}, C{sub 4}AF) and formation of chloride and sulfate cycles in the kiln, forming clinker liquids and decreasing the formation and growth of the main cement minerals (C{sub 3}A, C{sub 3}S). The cement clinker contains some quantity of minerals with Cl or SO{sub 3}. Their presence in the final product decreases cement quality by reducing the amount of active CaO (C) and reducing the active CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio.

  19. Elastoplastic cup model for cement-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan ZHANG

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on experimental data obtained from triaxial tests and a hydrostatic test, a cup model was formulated. Two plastic mechanisms, respectively a deviatoric shearing and a pore collapse, are taken into account. This model also considers the influence of confining pressure. In this paper, the calibration of the model is detailed and numerical simulations of the main mechanical behavior of cement paste over a large range of stress are described, showing good agreement with experimental results. The case study shows that this cup model has extensive applicability for cement-based materials and other quasi-brittle and high-porosity materials in a complex stress state.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a degradable magnesium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Xu, Chao; Dai, Honglian

    2016-12-01

    A kind of degradable magnesium phosphate bone cement (MPBC) was fabricated by using the mixed powders of magnesium oxide (MgO), potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4) and calcium dihydrogen phosphate (Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O). As MgKPO4, the main product of MgO and KH2PO4 was alkaline, the Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O was added to neutralize the alkali of the system. And the effects of Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O on the performance of MPBC were discussed. The results showed that the adding of Ca(H2PO4)2.H2O extended the setting time, which was about 6 min to 18 min. The compressive strength increased first and then decreased, and maximum value reached 31.2 MPa after setting for 24 h without any additional pressure. The MPBC was degradable in Tris-HCl solution, and the extracts of the cytotoxicity assay showed that the MPBC had good biocompatibility, indicating that the MPBC had good biodegradable and biocompatible properties.

  1. Creep behavior of bone cement: a method for time extrapolation using time-temperature equivalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R L; Farrar, D F; Rose, J; Forster, H; Morgan, I

    2003-04-01

    The clinical lifetime of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cement is considerably longer than the time over which it is convenient to perform creep testing. Consequently, it is desirable to be able to predict the long term creep behavior of bone cement from the results of short term testing. A simple method is described for prediction of long term creep using the principle of time-temperature equivalence in polymers. The use of the method is illustrated using a commercial acrylic bone cement. A creep strain of approximately 0.6% is predicted after 400 days under a constant flexural stress of 2 MPa. The temperature range and stress levels over which it is appropriate to perform testing are described. Finally, the effects of physical aging on the accuracy of the method are discussed and creep data from aged cement are reported.

  2. Synthesis of Chitosan-Hydroxyapatite Composites and Its Effect on the Properties of Bioglass Bone Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingxiao Liu; Fei Shi; Ling Yu; Liting Niu; Shanshan Gao

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan-hydroxyapatite (CS-HA) composite powders were synthesized via in situ co-precipitation method, through the reaction of Ca(NO3)2 and H3PO4 in the simulated body fluid (SBF) containing appropriate amount of chitosan. The thermal evolution, microstructure and morphology were studied by TG-DTA (thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis), XRD (X-ray diffraction), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The in vitro bioactivity test showed that the obtained CS-HA composites had higher capability of inducing calcium ions deposition. Effects of CS-HA composites on the bioactivity and compressive strength of bioglass bone cement were investigated. The results indicated that the bioactivity of bioglass bone cement could be improved further when CS-HA composite powders were added into the cement, and appropriate amount of CS-HA additive was favorable for compressive strength improvement of bioglass bone cement.

  3. Mixed-mode loading of the cement-bone interface: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waanders, Daan; Janssen, Dennis; Bertoldi, Katia; Mann, Kenneth A; Verdonschot, Nico

    2011-02-01

    While including the cement-bone interface of complete cemented hip reconstructions is crucial to correctly capture their response, its modelling is often overly simplified. In this study, the mechanical mixed-mode response of the cement-bone interface is investigated, taking into account the effects of the well-defined microstructure that characterises the interface. Computed tomography-based plain strain finite element analyses models of the cement-bone interface are built and loaded in multiple directions. Periodic boundaries are considered and the failure of the cement and bone fractions by cracking of the bulk components are included. The results compare favourably with experimental observations. Surprisingly, the analyses reveal that under shear loading no failure occurs and considerable normal compression is generated to prevent interface dilation. Reaction forces, crack patterns and stress fields provide more insight into the mixed-mode failure process. Moreover, the cement-bone interface analyses provide details which can serve as a basis for the development of a cohesive law.

  4. Diffusion model for acid corrosion of cemented materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, J.C.; De Moel, P.J.; Nooyen, W.F.; Nuiten, P.C.

    1986-09-25

    The acid corrosion of cemented materials is an important aspect in engineering practice. Corrosion affects the strength of materials and may cause a deterioration of water quality. This article deals with corrosion due to non-erosive acid attacks. A diffusion model is presented in which the depth of attack increases in proportion to the square root of both time, the hydronium ion concentration in the water, and the inverse of the total concentration of lime in the solid phase. Experiments verifying the model are presented. The experiments also reveal that the corrosion of asbestos cement proceeds faster as compared to concrete because of desintegration of the structure of asbestos cement. The diffusion model also worked out to be applicable for corrosion by agressive CO/sub 2/. The lower corrosion rate due to the formation of CaCO/sub 3/ can for this case be described by a lower diffusion coefficient. 4 tabs., 6 figs., 9 refs.

  5. Interactions between chloride and cement-paste materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberon, Fabien; Baroghel-Bouny, Véronique; Zanni, Hélène; Bresson, Bruno; d'Espinose de la Caillerie, Jean-Baptiste; Malosse, Lucie; Gan, Zehong

    2005-02-01

    The durability of cement-based materials with respect to exterior aggressions is one of the current priorities in civil engineering. Depending on their use, the cement-based materials can be exposed to different types of aggressive environments. For instance, damages to concrete structures in contact with a saline environment (sea water on bridges, deicing salts on roads, etc.) are of utmost importance. Upon exposure to saline water, Cl- ions penetrate into the structures and subsequently lead to reinforcement corrosion. Chloride attack is often combined with other aggressive influences such as temperature (e.g., freezing) or the ingress of other ions (e.g., sulfates in sea water). We therefore aim to explore the effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on the structural chemistry of cement paste. Existing studies about reinforcement corrosion by chloride have focused on the penetration of Cl- ions and the comparison between "free" ions (water-soluble ions) and bound ones. However, little is known about the fixation mechanisms, the localization of Cl in the cement matrix and the structural interaction between Cl and the silicate and aluminate hydrate phases present in cement paste. We present here results of a multinuclear nuclear magnetic resonance study on the fixation of chloride in the hydration products and the characterization of new phases potentially appearing due to chloride ingress.

  6. Injectable bioactive calcium-magnesium phosphate cement for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Su, Jiacan; Wei, Jie; Guo, Han; Liu, Changsheng

    2008-12-01

    Novel injectable and degradable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) with rapid-setting characteristic was developed by the introduction of magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) into calcium phosphate cement (CPC). The calcium-magnesium phosphate cement prepared under the optimum P/L ratio exhibited good injectability and desired workability. It could set within 10 min at 37 degrees C in 100% relative humidity and the compressive strength could reach 47 MPa after setting for 48 h, indicating that the prepared cement has relatively high initial mechanical strength. The results of in vitro degradation experiments demonstrated the good degradability of the injectable CMPC, and its degradation rate occurred significantly faster than that of pure CPC in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. It can be concluded that the novel injectable calcium-magnesium phosphate cement is highly promising for a wide variety of clinical applications, especially for the development of minimally invasive techniques.

  7. Multiscale Lattice Boltzmann-Finite Element Modelling of Transport Properties in Cement-based Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cement-based materials are the most widely used man-made materials in the world. The durability of cement-based materials has been a major concern due to the premature failure and serviceability issues of many reinforced concrete structures. Durability of cement-based materials is to a large content

  8. Multiscale Lattice Boltzmann-Finite Element Modelling of Transport Properties in Cement-based Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cement-based materials are the most widely used man-made materials in the world. The durability of cement-based materials has been a major concern due to the premature failure and serviceability issues of many reinforced concrete structures. Durability of cement-based materials is to a large content

  9. The mechanical effects of different levels of cement penetration at the cement–bone interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, D.; Janssen, D.W.; Mann, K.A.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical effects of varying the depth of cement penetration in the cement–bone interface were investigated using finite element analysis (FEA) and validated using companion experimental data. Two FEA models of the cement–bone interface were created from micro-computed tomography data and the p

  10. Systematic review of the use of bone cement in ossicular chain reconstruction and revision stapes surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; van den Berg, Jelle W G; Smit, Adriana L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate the effectiveness of bone cement on mean postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and the proportion of ABG closure to within 20 dB in patients undergoing ossicular chain reconstruction or revision stapes surgery. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, and Central. METHODS: A syste

  11. Calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate mixed cement compositions for bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, C; Bareille, R; Rey, C

    2006-11-01

    The feasibility of making calcium carbonate-calcium phosphate (CaCO(3)-CaP) mixed cements, comprising at least 40% (w/w) CaCO(3) in the dry powder ingredients, has been demonstrated. Several original cement compositions were obtained by mixing metastable crystalline CaCO(3) phases with metastable amorphous or crystalline CaP powders in aqueous medium. The cements set within at most 1 h at 37 degrees C in atmosphere saturated with water. The hardened cement is microporous and exhibits weak compressive strength. The setting reaction appeared to be essentially related to the formation of a highly carbonated nanocrystalline apatite phase by reaction of the metastable CaP phase with part or almost all of the metastable CaCO(3) phase. The recrystallization of metastable CaP varieties led to a final cement consisting of a highly carbonated poorly crystalline apatite analogous to bone mineral associated with various amounts of vaterite and/or aragonite. The presence of controlled amounts of CaCO(3) with a higher solubility than that of the apatite formed in the well-developed CaP cements might be of interest to increase resorption rates in biomedical cement and favors its replacement by bone tissue. Cytotoxicity testing revealed excellent cytocompatibility of CaCO(3)-CaP mixed cement compositions.

  12. Acrylic bone cements: influence of time and environment on physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottrott, Markus

    2010-06-01

    Acrylic bone cements are in extensive use in joint replacement surgery. They are weight bearing and load transferring in the bone-cement-prosthesis complex and therefore, inter alia, their mechanical properties are deemed to be crucial for the overall outcome. In spite of adequate preclinical test results according to the current specifications (ISO, ASTM), cements with inferior clinical results have appeared on the market. The aim of this study was to investigate whether it is possible to predict the long term clinical performance of acrylic bone cement on the basis of mechanical in vitro testing. We performed in vitro quasistatic testing of cement after aging in different media and at different temperatures for up to 5 years. Dynamic creep testing and testing of retrieved cement were also performed. Testing under dry conditions, as required in current standards, always gave higher values for mechanical properties than did storage and testing under more physiological conditions. We could demonstrate a continuous increase in mechanical properties when testing in air, while testing in water resulted in a slight decrease in mechanical properties after 1 week and then levelled out. Palacos bone cement showed a higher creep than CMW3G and the retrieved Boneloc specimens showed a higher creep than retrieved Palacos. The strength of a bone cement develops more slowly than the apparent high initial setting rate indicates and there are changes in mechanical properties over a period of five years. The effect of water absorption is important for the physical properties but the mechanical changes caused by physical aging are still present after immersion in water. The established standards are in need of more clinically relevant test methods and their associated requirements need better definition. We recommend that testing of bone cements should be performed after extended aging under simulated physiological conditions. Simple quasistatic and dynamic creep tests seem unable

  13. Assessing cement injection behaviour in cancellous bone: an in vitro study using flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Francis, Antony; López, Alejandro; Persson, Cecilia; Hall, Richard M; Kapur, Nikil

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the cement injection behaviour during vertebroplasty and accurately predicting the cement placement within the vertebral body is extremely challenging. As there is no standardized methodology, we propose a novel method using reproducible and pathologically representative flow models to study the influence of cement properties on injection behaviour. The models, confined between an upper glass window and a lower aluminium plate, were filled with bone marrow substitute and then injected (4, 6 and 8 min after cement mixing) with commercially available bone cements (SimplexP, Opacity+, OsteopalV and Parallax) at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min). A load cell was used to measure the force applied on the syringe plunger and calculate the peak pressure. A camera was used to monitor the cement flow during injection and calculate the following parameters when the cement had reached the boundary of the models: the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The peak pressure was comparable to that reported during clinical vertebroplasty and showed a similar increase with injection time. The study highlighted the influence of cement formulations and model structure on the injection behaviour and showed that cements with similar composition/particle size had similar flow behaviour, while the introduction of defects reduced the time to reach the boundary, the filled area and the roundness. The proposed method provides a novel tool for quick, robust differentiation between various cement formulations through the visualization and quantitative analysis of the cement spreading at various time intervals. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. External bone remodeling after injectable calcium-phosphate cement in benign bone tumor: two cases in the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, S; Vaiss, L; Acciaro, A L; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2015-12-01

    Bone remodeling commonly occurred after fracture and curettage benign bone tumor. A lot of previous articles reported "internal" trabecular bone remodeling. There were no previous clinical reports about "external" cortical bone remodeling. We present here 2 clinical cases of "external" bone remodeling after injectable calcium-phosphate in benign bone tumor in the hand. In two cases of benign bone tumor, we performed complete removal of the tumor and immediate filling of the metacarpal bone with injectable calcium-phosphate cement Arexbone(®) from the mechanical viewpoint. With respect to the shape of the calcium-phosphate, by using an injection-type, calcium-phosphate is adhered uniformly to the bone cortex by injecting, remodeling has been promoted. After 5 and 8years, both cases were no recurrences, and the shape of the metacarpal looked close to the contralateral side. These findings supposed to be concerned with potential self-healing and self-protection mechanism in human body.

  15. Surface Hardness of Resin Cement Polymerized under Different Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimmada Kesrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the surface hardness of two light-cured resin cements polymerized under different ceramic discs. Methods. 40 experimental groups of 2 light-cured resin cement specimens (Variolink Veneer and NX3 were prepared and polymerized under 5 different ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press HT, LT, MO, HO, and Cercon of 4 thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 mm, Those directly activated of both resin cements were used as control. After light activation and 37∘C storage in an incubator, Knoop hardness measurements were obtained at the bottom. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA, t-test, and one-way ANOVA. Results. The KHN of NX3 was of significantly higher than that of Variolink Veneer (<0.05. The KHN of resin cement polymerized under different ceramic types and thicknesses was significant difference (<0.05. Conclusion. Resin cements polymerized under different ceramic materials and thicknesses showed statistically significant differences in KHN.

  16. The effect of fly ash and coconut fibre ash as cement replacement materials on cement paste strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuaji, R.; Kurniawan, R. W.; Yasin, A. K.; Fatoni, H. AT; Lutfi, F. M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Concrete is the backbone material in the construction field. The main concept of the concrete material is composed of a binder and filler. Cement, concrete main binder highlighted by environmentalists as one of the industry are not environmentally friendly because of the burning of cement raw materials in the kiln requires energy up to a temperature of 1450° C and the output air waste CO2. On the other hand, the compound content of cement that can be utilized in innovation is Calcium Hydroxide (CaOH), this compound will react with pozzolan material and produces additional strength and durability of concrete, Calcium Silicate Hydrates (CSH). The objective of this research is to explore coconut fibers ash and fly ash. This material was used as cement replacement materials on cement paste. Experimental method was used in this study. SNI-03-1974-1990 is standard used to clarify the compressive strength of cement paste at the age of 7 days. The result of this study that the optimum composition of coconut fiber ash and fly ash to substitute 30% of cement with 25% and 5% for coconut fibers ash and fly ash with similar strength if to be compared normal cement paste.

  17. Bone scans after total knee arthroplasty in asymptomatic patients. Cemented versus cementless

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, A.A.; Wyatt, R.W.; Daniels, A.U.; Armstrong, L.; Alazraki, N.; Taylor, A. Jr. (Univ. of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The natural history of bone scans after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was studied in 26 patients with 28 cemented TKAs and 29 patients with 31 cementless TKAs. The bone scans were examined at specified postoperative intervals. Radionuclide activity of the femoral, tibial, and patellar regions was measured. Six patients who developed pain postoperatively were excluded. Bone scans immediately postoperative and at three months demonstrated increased uptake, which gradually decreased to baseline levels at ten to 12 months. Radioisotope uptake was comparable in the cemented and cementless groups, but was highly variable in individual patients and in each of the follow-up periods. A single postoperative bone scan cannot differentiate component loosening from early bone remodeling. Sequential bone scans, as a supplement to the clinical examination and conventional radiography, may prove useful in the diagnosis of TKA failure.

  18. The Mechanical Behavior of Bone Cement in THR in the Presense of Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Benouis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we analyze three-dimensionally using the finite element method, the level and the Von Mises stress equivalent distribution induced around a cavity and between two cavities located in the proximal and distal bone cement polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA. The effects of the position around two main axes (vertical and horizontal of the cavity with respect to these axes, of the cavity - cavity interdistance and of the type of loading (static on the mechanical behavior of cement orthopedic are highlighted. We show that the breaking strain of the cement is largely taken when the cement in its proximal-lateral part contains cavities very close adjacent to each other. This work highlights not only the effect of the density of cavities, in our case simulated by cavity-cavity interdistance, but also the nature of the activity of the patient (patient standing corresponding to static efforts on the mechanical behavior of cement.

  19. Antibiotic elution from acrylic bone cement loaded with high doses of tobramycin and vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slane, Joshua; Gietman, Bradley; Squire, Matthew

    2017-09-06

    Two-stage revision treatment of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) frequently employs the use of a temporary bone cement spacer loaded with multiple antibiotic types. Tobramycin and vancomycin are commonly used antibiotics in cement spacers, however, there is no consensus on the relative concentrations and combinations that should be used. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dual antibiotic loading on the total antibiotic elution and compressive mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement. Varying concentrations of tobramycin (0-3 g) and vancomycin (0-3 g) were added either alone or in combination to acrylic cement (Palacos R), resulting in 12 experimental groups. Samples were submerged in 37°C saline for 28 d and sampled at specific time points. The collected eluent was analyzed to determine the cumulative antibiotic release. In addition, the cement's compressive mechanical properties and porosity were characterized. Interestingly, the cement with the highest concentration of antibiotics did not possess the best elution properties. Cement samples containing both 3 g of tobramycin and 2 g vancomycin demonstrated the highest cumulative antibiotic release after 28 d, which was coupled with a significant decrease in the mechanical properties and an increased porosity. The collected data also suggests that tobramycin elutes more effectively than vancomycin from cement. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that high antibiotic loading in cement does not necessarily lead to enhanced antibiotic elution. Clinically this information may be used to optimize cement spacer antibiotic loading so that both duration and amount of antibiotics eluted are optimized. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of heat generation from bone cement on bone tissue in total knee arthroplasty; Jinko kansetsu okikaeji no one cement no hatsunetsu ga seitai soshiki ni oyobosu eikyo ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, M.; Uchida, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Iwatsubo, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kurosawa, M.; Hashimoto, Y. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Fukushima, H.

    1998-01-25

    Bone cement is often applied to fix the components in a surgical operation, such as TKA (total knee arthroplasty). In this paper, we consider the effect of heat generation from bone cement on bone tissue in TKA by using numerical simulation. First, we applied an axisymmetric model of tibia to finite element method and analyzed heat generation of bone cement. To confirm the results of analysis by experiment, we measured the temperature determined by 6 points i.e., 2 points each in component-cement interface, cement and bone-cement interface. As a result, the temperature determined by analysis agrees with that determined by experiment. Next, we proposed the evaluation formula of the bone necrosis. We constructed a bone necrosis map from the simulation. From the map, we found that the bone necrosis region was about 2 mm from the bone-cement interface. In addition, the bone necrosis is severe at the base of the tibial component. 7 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part One—Porosity, Setting Times and Compressive Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliette Fitremann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides, to calcium phosphate cement designed for bone reconstruction is described. Thanks to their surface activity and through their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, they both induced a strong increase in the porosity (quantified by Image Analysis and brought a very good workability. Other properties typically studied for these cements are reported, including setting times, compressive strength, cohesion in water, and effect of sterilization on these properties. The whole study brought good insight in the interest of adding these mild surfactants to improve several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing their function.

  2. Long-term compressive creep deformation and damage in acrylic bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwirut, D J

    1984-01-01

    Compressive creep tests were performed on five commercially available acrylic bone cements under conditions simulating in vivo usage. Measured creep strains are quite large, generally exceeding elastic strains. Large variations in creep response were noted among the various cements, with a carbon-reinforced cement by far the most resistant to creep. The empirical model epsilon = a exp(b sigma)tn was found to predict creep strains within about 10% of the measured values. Microscopic examination of some specimens after testing revealed significant cracking, resulting from long-term loading, that could be a contributing cause of time-dependent failure.

  3. Preparation of in situ hardening composite microcarriers: calcium phosphate cement combined with alginate for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hui; Lee, Eun-Jung; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2014-03-01

    Novel microcarriers consisting of calcium phosphate cement and alginate were prepared for use as three-dimensional scaffolds for the culture and expansion of cells that are effective for bone tissue engineering. The calcium phosphate cement-alginate composite microcarriers were produced by an emulsification of the composite aqueous solutions mixed at varying ratios (calcium phosphate cement powder/alginate solution = 0.8-1.2) in an oil bath and the subsequent in situ hardening of the compositions during spherodization. Moreover, a porous structure could be easily created in the solid microcarriers by soaking the produced microcarriers in water and a subsequent freeze-drying process. Bone mineral-like apatite nanocrystallites were shown to rapidly develop on the calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers under moist conditions due to the conversion of the α-tricalcium phosphate phase in the calcium phosphate cement into a carbonate-hydroxyapatite. Osteoblastic cells cultured on the microspherical scaffolds were proven to be viable, with an active proliferative potential during 14 days of culture, and their osteogenic differentiation was confirmed by the determination of alkaline phosphatase activity. The in situ hardening calcium phosphate cement-alginate microcarriers developed herein may be used as potential three-dimensional scaffolds for cell delivery and tissue engineering of bone.

  4. Influence of artificially-induced porosity on the compressive strength of calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzakis, Dionysios; Zaoutsos, Stefanos Polymeros; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Rokidi, Stamatia; Papanicolaou, George

    2016-07-01

    The biological and mechanical nature of calcium phosphate cements (CPC's) matches well with that of bone tissues, thus they can be considered as an appropriate environment for bone repair as bone defect fillers. The current study focuses on the experimental characterization of the mechanical properties of CPCs that are favorably used in clinical applications. Aiming on evaluation of their mechanical performance, tests in compression loading were conducted in order to determine the mechanical properties of the material under study. In this context, experimental results occurring from the above mechanical tests on porous specimens that were fabricated from three different porous additives, namely albumin, gelatin and sodium alginate, are provided, while assessment of their mechanical properties in respect to the used porous media is performed. Additionally, samples reinforced with hydroxyapatite crystals were also tested in compression and the results are compared with those of the above tested porous CPCs. The knowledge obtained allows the improvement of their biomechanical properties by controlling their structure in a micro level, and finds a way to compromise between mechanical and biological response.

  5. Monitoring of hardening and hygroscopic induced strains in a calcium phosphate bone cement using FBG sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimis, A; Karalekas, D; Bouropoulos, N; Mouzakis, D; Zaoutsos, S

    2016-07-01

    This study initially deals with the investigation of the induced strains during hardening stage of a self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement using fiber-Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors. A complementary Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) investigation was also conducted at different time intervals of the hardening period and its findings were related to the FBG recordings. From the obtained results, it is demonstrated that the FBG response is affected by the microstructural changes taking place when the bone cement is immersed into the hardening liquid media. Subsequently, the FBG sensor was used to monitor the absorption process and hygroscopic response of the hardened and dried biocement when exposed to a liquid/humid environment. From the FBG-based calculated hygric strains as a function of moisture concentration, the coefficient of moisture expansion (CME) of the examined bone cement was obtained, exhibiting two distinct linear regions.

  6. Experimental and numerical study of cemented bone-implant interface behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Zlamal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the total hip replacement (THR is a long-proven method of surgical treatment of diseases and disorders of the human hip, the surgery brings some risk of long-term instability of the joint. The aim of the research was to investigate the cemented bone-implant interface behavior. The main problems (cement layer degradation and bone-cement interface debonding during physiological loading conditions have been investigated using a custom hip simulator. The experimental setup was designed to allow cyclic loading of the sample of pelvic bone with implanted cemented acetabular component. The hip contact force of required direction and magnitude was applied to the implant using a spherical femoral component head. The most unfavorable activity (downstairs walking was simulated. The process of damage accumulation in the fixation was monitored by repeated scanning using high resolution micro Computed Tomography (µCT. Use of micro-focus source and large high-resolution flat panel detector allows investigation of structural changes and crack propagation both in the cement layer and the trabecular bone.

  7. Wollastonite nanofiber–doped self-setting calcium phosphate bioactive cement for bone tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Han Guo,1,2 Jie Wei,2 Wenhua Song,2 Shan Zhang,2 Yonggang Yan,3 Changsheng Liu,2 Tiqiao Xiao11Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 3School of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The purpose of this study was to synthesize a self-setting bioactive cement by incorporation of wollastonite nanofibers (WNFs into calcium phosphate cement (CPC. The composition, morphology, setting time, compressive strength, hydrophilicity, and degradation of WNF-doped CPC (wnf-CPC were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy were utilized. Additionally, methyl-thiazolyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, scanning electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, and histological evaluation were used to study the cell and tissue responses to wnf-CPC, both in vitro and in vivo. The results confirmed that the addition of WNFs into CPC had no obvious effect on the setting time or the compressive strength of wnf-CPC, provided the WNF amount was not more than 10 wt%. However, the hydrophilicity and degradability of wnf-CPC were significantly improved by the addition of WNFs – this was because of the change of microstructure caused by the WNFs. The preferred dissolution of WNFs caused the formation of microporosity in wnf-CPC when soaked in tris hydrochloride solution. The microporosity enlarged the surface area of the wnf-CPC and so promoted degradation of the wnf-CPC when in contact with liquid. In addition, MG-63 cell attachment and proliferation on the wnf-CPC were superior to that on the CPC, indicating that

  8. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying

  9. Using bio-based polymers for curing cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zlopasa, J.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Picken, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Curing is the process of controlling the rate and extent of moisture loss from the surface of cement based materials. It is the final stage in the production of cement-based materials and it is the essential part for achieving continuous hydration of cement, while avoiding cracking due to drying shr

  10. Modeling and Optimization of Cement Raw Materials Blending Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianhong Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on modelling and solving the ingredient ratio optimization problem in cement raw material blending process. A general nonlinear time-varying (G-NLTV model is established for cement raw material blending process via considering chemical composition, feed flow fluctuation, and various craft and production constraints. Different objective functions are presented to acquire optimal ingredient ratios under various production requirements. The ingredient ratio optimization problem is transformed into discrete-time single objective or multiple objectives rolling nonlinear constraint optimization problem. A framework of grid interior point method is presented to solve the rolling nonlinear constraint optimization problem. Based on MATLAB-GUI platform, the corresponding ingredient ratio software is devised to obtain optimal ingredient ratio. Finally, several numerical examples are presented to study and solve ingredient ratio optimization problems.

  11. The effect of bone cement particles on the friction of polyethylene and polyurethane knee bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, H. E.; Scholes, S. C.; Unsworth, A.; Jones, E.

    2004-08-01

    Compliant layer knee joints have been considered for use in an attempt to increase the serviceable life of artificial joints. If designed correctly, these joints should operate within the full-fluid film lubrication regime. However, adverse tribological conditions, such as the presence of bone and bone cement particles, may breach the fluid film and cause surface wear. The frictional behaviour of both polyurethane (PU) and conventional polyethylene (PE) tibial components against a metallic femoral component was therefore assessed when bone cement particles were introduced into the lubricant. The bone cement particles caused a large increase in the frictional torque of both the PE and PU bearings; however, the friction produced by the PU bearings was still considerably lower than that produced by the PE bearings. The volume of bone cement particles between each of the bearings and the resultant frictional torque both decreased over time. This occurred more quickly with the PE bearings but greater damage was caused to the surface of the PE bearings than the PU components.

  12. High belite cement from alternative raw materials

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorab, H. Y.; Rizk, M.; Ibrahim, B.; Allam, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Three high belite laboratory clinkers were prepared from traditional and alternative raw materials. Reference clinker was obtained from 77% limestone, 11% sandy clays, 11% fatty clays and 1% iron scales. The fatty clays were replaced by red brick powder in the raw meal of the second clinker and were lowered to 2% with the replacement of 10% of the limestone by egg shells in the third clinker. The SEM examination revealed clear presence of crossed striae and twinning in the rounded belite grai...

  13. Microstructural evaluation of oil well cementing slurries using alternative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Maria D.M.; Melo, Dulce M.A.; Martinelli, Antonio E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    n this work, cementing slurries were prepared with densities between 12.2 and 13.8 lb/gal with addition of clay materials (vermiculite and paligorskite) and pozzolans (metakaolin), comparing with neat reference slurries, from 15.6 to 15.8 lb/gal. The cements employed were the Portland G and ordinary Portland. These mixes were evaluated microstructurally through microhardness testing and acquisition of electronic images by ESEM and X-ray maps by EDS. A semi-quantitative analysis software was developed to identify phase distributions from the X-ray maps. It was found that the addition of metakaolin generated slurries with microhardness comparable to or superior to neat slurries, although a new phase was introduced in the hardened material. On the other hand, clay materials generated slurries with lower microhardness. It was observed in these cases a lower hydration degree, possibly due to water absorption by the clays' grains. One exception was the light slurry with paligorskite, which has an excess of water compared to the others. However, the higher water-cement ratio produced a lower microhardness due to the presence of voids, visible by ESEM. Clay inclusions also decreased the microhardness of the slurries. Based on these results, we can recommend metakaolin as the best performing addition to be further evaluated in the field. (author)

  14. Towards optimization of the silanization process of hydroxyapatite for its use in bone cement formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G; Herrera Kao, Wilberth; Loría-Bastarrachea, María I; Veranes-Pantoja, Yaymarilis; Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V; Cervantes-Uc, José M

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to provide some fundamental information for optimization of silanization of hydroxyapatite intended for bone cement formulations. The effect of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS) concentration and solvent system (acetone/water or methanol/water mixtures) during HA silanization was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis. The effect of silanized HA on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements is also reported. It was found that the silanization process rendered hydroxyapatite with lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. Through EDX, it was observed that the silicon concentration in the HA particles was higher for acetone-water than that obtained for methanol-water system, although the mechanical performance of cements prepared with these particles exhibited the opposite behavior. Taking all these results together, it is concluded that methanol-water system containing MPS at 3wt.% provides the better results during silanization process of HA.

  15. 磷硅酸钙类骨水泥的现状与研究进展%Status and research progress of calcium phosphate bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑江江; 包崇云

    2012-01-01

    背景:磷硅酸钙类骨水泥是一种新型的自固化、可注射性骨替代材料.大量实验证实:该材料具有良好的生物活性、生物相容性以及物理化学性质稳定等优点在临床多个领域均有很大进展.目的:综述磷硅酸钙骨水泥材料的研究现状及进展.方法:应用计算机检索CNKI、Pubmed数据库中1999-01/2011-10 关于新型骨替代材料骨水泥的文章,在标题和摘要中以"磷酸盐类、硅酸盐类、骨水泥、骨替代材料"或"phosphates;silicates;bone cement;bone substitute"为检索词进行检索.选择文章内容与磷硅酸钙类骨水泥有关者,同一领域文献则选择近期发表或发表在权威杂志的文章.初检得到85 篇文章,根据纳入标准选择关于磷硅酸钙类骨水泥的13 篇文献进行综述.结果与结论:磷硅酸盐骨水泥作为一种新型的自固化生物材料,较传统骨水泥材料理化性能、生物学性能更为优良,但仍需运用多种方法来研究并改善材料的相关性能.改性后的材料有望发展为各式新型的钙磷硅系骨水泥材料,为骨缺损的修复提供一种新的思路.%BACKGROUND: Calcium phosphate bone cement is a new kind of self-setting and injectable bone substitute material. Plenty of experiments have proved that there is a great progress in clinical areas of this material due to its good bioactivity, biocompatible and stable physical and chemical properties.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the status and research progress of calcium phosphate bone cement.METHODS: A computer-based online search of papers published from January 1999 to October 2011 related to new bone cement was performed in CNKI database, Science direct database and Pubmed database using the key words of "phosphates, silicates, bone cement, bone substitute" by screening titles and abstracts. The documents associated with calcium phosphate bone cement were selected, and those published recently or in authoritative journals were

  16. In vivo bone response to porous calcium phosphate cement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Real, R.P. del; Ooms, E.M.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Vallet-Regi, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    We conducted an in vivo experiment to evaluate the resorption rate of a calcium phosphate cement (CPC) with macropores larger than 100 microm, using the CPC called Biocement D (Merck Biomaterial, Darmstadt, Germany), which after setting only shows pores smaller than 1 microm. The gas bubble method u

  17. A novel bone cement impregnated with silver–tiopronin nanoparticles: its antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopovich, Polina; Leech, Ralph; Carmalt, Claire J; Parkin, Ivan P; Perni, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Post-operatory infections in orthopedic surgeries pose a significant risk. The common approach of using antibiotics, both parenterally or embedded in bone cement (when this is employed during surgery) faces the challenge of the rising population of pathogens exhibiting resistance properties against one or more of these compounds; therefore, novel approaches need to be developed. Silver nanoparticles appear to be an exciting prospect because of their antimicrobial activity and safety at the levels used in medical applications. In this paper, a novel type of silver nanoparticles capped with tiopronin is presented. Two ratios of reagents during synthesis were tested and the effect on the nanoparticles investigated through TEM, TGA, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Once encapsulated in bone cement, only the nanoparticles with the highest amount of inorganic fraction conferred antimicrobial activity against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at concentrations as low as 0.1% w/w. No other characteristics of the bone cement, such as cytotoxicity or mechanical properties, were affected by the presence of the nanoparticles. Our work presents a new type of silver nanoparticles and demonstrates that they can be embedded in bone cement to prevent infections once the synthetic conditions are tailored for such applications. PMID:23818779

  18. Effects of self-blood on the molding process of polymethyl methacrylate bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yingjun; Nie Lin; Zhang Wen; Mu Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate whether the self-blood has influence on the molding process of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement,and to make sure whether it is valuable for the clinical practice.Methods:An in vitro study was performed to evaluate the prolonging-effect of self-blood on PMMA bone cement.The effect of prolonging was evaluated by the dough time (TD) and operable time (To).Moreover,hardness test,squeezing value test and peak temperature test were also conducted to complete the evaluation of this program.Results:The self-blood,especially the plasma,could greatly prolong the handling time of PMMA bone cement without affecting its basic characteristics including hardness,leakage level and peak temperature.On the other hand,we found that in some abnormal conditions,for example with hyperlipemia,self-blood though can also prolong the handling time,would cause some sideeffects.Conclusion:We report a new effective way to prolong the handling time of PMMA bone cement by adding moderate amount of self-blood.But “individualized medicine” should be noticed because some abnormal conditions like hyperlipemia would cause undesired side-effects.

  19. Effect of gentamicin loaded PMMA bone cement on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, KA; Busscher, HJ; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC

    1999-01-01

    PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) bone cement is widely used in prosthetic implant surgery and is currently prepared with vacuum-mixing for improved mechanical properties. Revision of implants due to infection occurs in about 1% of cases, mostly involving staphylococcal strains. Antibiotic loaded ceme

  20. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on different gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate bone cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Belt, H; Neut, D; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    In this in vitro study, the formation of a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm on six gentamicin-loaded bone cements (CMW1, CMW3, CMW Endurance, CMW2000, Palacos. and Palamed) was determined in a modified Robbins device over a 3 days time span and related with previously (Van de Belt et al., Biomaterials

  1. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on different gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate bone cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Belt, H; Neut, D; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    In this in vitro study, the formation of a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm on six gentamicin-loaded bone cements (CMW1, CMW3, CMW Endurance, CMW2000, Palacos. and Palamed) was determined in a modified Robbins device over a 3 days time span and related with previously (Van de Belt et al., Biomaterials

  2. Bone regeneration in experimental animals using calcium phosphate cement combined with platelet growth factors and human growth hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilov-Velev, K; Clemente-de-Arriba, C; Alobera-García, M Á; Moreno-Sansalvador, E M; Campo-Loarte, J

    2015-01-01

    Many substances (growth factors and hormones) have osteoinduction properties and when added to some osteoconduction biomaterial they accelerate bone neoformation properties. The materials included 15 New Zealand rabbits, calcium phosphate cement (Calcibon(®)), human growth hormone (GH), and plasma rich in platelets (PRP). Each animal was operated on in both proximal tibias and a critical size bone defect of 6mm of diameter was made. The animals were separated into the following study groups: Control (regeneration only by Calcibon®), PRP (regeneration by Calcibon® and PRP), GH (regeneration by Calcibon® and GH). All the animals were sacrificed at 28 days. An evaluation was made of the appearance of the proximal extreme of rabbit tibiae in all the animals, and to check the filling of the critical size defect. A histological assessment was made of the tissue response, the presence of new bone formation, and the appearance of the biomaterial. Morphometry was performed using the MIP 45 image analyser. ANOVA statistical analysis was performed using the Statgraphics software application. The macroscopic appearance of the critical defect was better in the PRP and the GH group than in the control group. Histologically greater new bone formation was found in the PRP and GH groups. No statistically significant differences were detected in the morphometric study between bone formation observed in the PRP group and the control group. Significant differences in increased bone formation were found in the GH group (p=0.03) compared to the other two groups. GH facilitates bone regeneration in critical defects filled with calcium phosphate cement in the time period studied in New Zealand rabbits. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantification of uncertainty of experimental measurement in leaching test on cement-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutand, M; Cyr, M; Clastres, P

    2011-10-01

    When mineral wastes are reused in construction materials, a current practice is to evaluate their environmental impact using standard leaching test. However, due to the uncertainty of the measurement, it is usually quite difficult to estimate the pollutant potential compared to other materials or threshold limits. The aim of this paper is to give a quantitative evaluation of the uncertainty of leachate concentrations of cement-based materials, as a function of the number of test performed. The relative standard deviations and relative confidence intervals are determined using experimental data in order to give a global evaluation of the uncertainty of leachate concentrations (determination of total relative standard deviation). Various combinations were realized in order to point out the origin of large dispersion of the results (determination of relative standard deviation linked to analytical measured and to leaching procedure), generalisation was suggested and the results were compared to literature. An actual example was given about the introduction of residue (meat and bone meal bottom ash--MBM-BA) in mortar, leaching tests were carried out on various samples with and without residue MBM-BA. In conclusion large dispersion were observed and mainly due to heterogeneity of materials. So heightened attention needed to analyse leaching result on cement-based materials and further more other tests (e.g. ecotoxicology) should be performed to evaluate the environmental effect of these materials.

  4. Micro and nano MgO particles for the improvement of fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Morshed; Li, Yanling; Morris, Tracy

    2013-03-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether inclusion of magnesium oxide (MgO) in micro and nanoparticulate forms in poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement has any influence on the fracture toughness of bone-cement interfaces. An interfacial fracture mechanics technique was used to compare the values of fracture toughness (KIC) among bone-PMMA, bone-PMMA with micro MgO particles and bone-PMMA with nano MgO particles interfaces. This study found that the values of KIC of bone-PMMA with micro MgO particles and bone-PMMA with nano MgO particles interfaces were significantly higher when compared to the values of KIC of the bone-PMMA interface (pMgO particles to PMMA improved the quality of bone-cement union.

  5. The influence of surface topography on wear debris generation at the cement/bone interface under cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Kirk A; Yang, Dongliang T; Arola, Dwayne

    2008-05-01

    The long-term success of a total joint replacement can be undermined by loosening of the implant, generation of wear debris or a combination of both factors. In the present study the influence of the surface morphologies of the bone and cement mantle on loosening of cemented total joint replacements (THJRs) and development of wear debris were studied. Model cemented THJR specimens were prepared in which the femoral canal was textured using specific cutting tools. The specimens were subjected to cyclic loads inducing pure shear fatigue of the cement/bone interface. Changes in both the femoral canal and cement mantle resulting from fatigue were quantified in terms of the surface topography and the volume of wear debris. Loosening occurred with cyclic loading due to degradation of the cement and bone and resulted in the development of cement and bone particles. There was no correlation between the fatigue strength of the interfaces and the volume of wear debris. In general, the change in surface topography of the cement mantle with fatigue decreased with increasing volume of cement interdigitation. Femoral canal surfaces with symmetric profile height distribution (i.e., Gaussian surfaces) resulted in the lowest volume of generated debris.

  6. Effect of carbon fiber on calcium phosphate bone cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴红莲; 王欣宇; 黄健; 闫玉华; 李世普

    2004-01-01

    The calcium phosphate cement (α-TCP/TTCP) was reinforced with oxidation-treated carbon fibers. The effect of aspect ratio and content of carbon fiber on the compression strength and bending strength of the hardened body was discussed. The results show that the reinforcing effect is optimal as the aspect ratio is 375 and the additive amount is 0.3% (mass fraction). Under this condition, the compressive strength is increased by 55% (maximum 63.46 MPa), and the bending strength is nearly increased by 100% (maximum 11.95 MPa), respectively. However, if the additive quantity and aspect ratio are too high, the effect of the carbon fibers is limited because it can not be dispersed uniformly in the hardened body. The biological evaluation indicates that the calcium phosphate cement reinforced by carbon fibers has good biocompatibility.

  7. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on the concrete corrosion control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mejía de Gutiérrez, R.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Failure of concrete after a period of years, less than the life expected for which it was designed, may be caused by the environment to which it has been exposed or by a variety of internal causes. The incorporation of supplementary materials has at the Portland cement the purpose of improving the concrete microstructure and also of influence the resistance of concrete to environmental attacks. Different mineral by-products as ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS, silica fume (SF, metakaolin (MK, fly ash (FA and other products have been used as supplementary cementing materials. This paper is about the behavior of concrete in the presence of mineral additions. Compared to Portland cements, blended cements show lower heat of hydration, lower permeability, greater resistance to sulphates and sea water. These blended cements find the best application when requirements of durability are regarded as a priority specially on high performance concrete.

    La falla del concreto en un tiempo inferior a la vida útil para la cual se diseñó puede ser consecuencia del medio ambiente al cual ha estado expuesto o de algunas otras causas de tipo interno. La incorporación de materiales suplementarios al cemento Portland tiene el propósito de mejorar la microestructura del concreto y también de contribuir a la resistencia del concreto a los ataques del medio ambiente. Diferentes minerales y subproductos tales como escorias granuladas de alto horno, humo de sílice, metacaolín, ceniza volante y otros productos han sido usados como materiales suplementarios cementantes. Este documento presenta el comportamiento del hormigón en presencia de diferentes adiciones. Los cementos adicionados, comparados con los cementos Portland muestran bajos calores de hidratación, baja permeabilidad, mayor resistencia a sulfatos y a agua de mar. Estos cementos adicionados encuentran un campo de aplicación importante cuando los requerimientos de durabilidad son

  8. Flexural performance of foam concrete containing pulverized bone as partial replacement of cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Ikponmwosa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study conducted to investigate the flexural behaviour of foam concrete containing pulverised bone as partial replacement of cement. A total of sixty reinforced beams (150×150×750 mm were used to investigate the flexural behaviour of the specimens. For reinforcement of the beams, hot-rolled, deformed 10-mm-diameter bars with yield and ultimate stresses of 478.10 N/mm2 and 710.81 N/mm2 respectively were used. The cement constituent of the mix was partly replaced with up to 20% of pulverised bone. The flexural parameters investigated are crack formation and its pattern, failure mode, ul timate load, theoretical and experimental ultimate moments, deflection and stiffness. From the results of this investigation, it is concluded that the provision of the design standard in relation to shear and flexural design of beams can be considered as adequate for the design of reinforced foam concrete. It is further concluded that the stiffness is not affected by the inclusion of pulverised bone in the mix at up to 15% cement replacement level , and neither is the deflection pattern of the uncracked sections of the specimens affected by the inclusion of pulverised bone. The bending moments of the specimens,however, decreased with increase in pulverised bone.

  9. Bone Cement Implantation Syndrome in the Perioperative Period of Large Joint Endoprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tomashevsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of and intensive therapy for bone cement implantation syndrome in the perioperative period of endoprosthesis of large joints of the lower extremity.Subjects and methods: A study group comprised 18 patients who received standard perioperative intensive therapy for the bone cement implantation syndrome. A control group included 22 patients in whom perioperative correction of hemostatic disorders was made, by including 6% solution into the infusion program of second-generation hydroxyethyl starches (200/0.5 and by postoperatively administering low molecular-weight heparins. To evaluate the state of the basic hemostatic links, the classical laboratory parameters were determined, as described by Z. S. Barkagan, et al. Concurrent with the determination of the classical parameters, an integral estimate was made by rapid blood viscosimetry.Results. Impairments of basic hemostatic links in the bone cement implantation syndrome are characterized by the development of prethrombosis. Rapid blood viscometric parameters, such as the rate of spontaneous platelet aggregation, the onset of clotting, the constants of thrombin, blood clotting, total blood clotting, a fibrin-platelet constant, and the cumulative rate of clot retraction and lysis, correlate with classical biochemical parameters.Conclusion. The pathogenetically warranted use of a combination of low molecular-weight heparin and second-generation hydrox-yethyl starch enhances the efficiency of correction of perioperative impairments of the basic hemostatic links in the cement endoprosthetic replacement of large joints of the lower extremity. 

  10. Ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da LIU

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the ergotropic effect of bone cement on pedicle screw fixation in treatment of osteopo¬rotic thoracolumbar fracture. Methods Fifty-three patients with osteoporotic thoracolumbar fracture, admitted from Jun. 2013 to Dec. 2014, were included for treatment by augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement. All patients underwent pre-operative examination of bone mineral density with T-score ≤-2.5 and augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with injection of 1.5 ml bone cement in adjacent to fractured vertebra. All patients were treated with anti-osteoporosis therapy pre- and post-operation, ob¬served and recorded with basic conditions and complications. At pre-operation, one-week post-operation and last follow-up, pain vi¬sual analogue scale (VAS and neurological function score (ASIA of all patients were recorded, and the compression rats of anterior and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, and compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel of all patients were measured. Results All the 53 patients were successfully undergone operation in about 90-140 min with blood loss of about 150-350 ml. No spinal cord or nerve injury, dural tear and obvious leakage of bone cement and screw loosening occurred during operation. All patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months and the neurological function obviously recovered contrasted with pre-operation. X-ray and CT examination at last follow-up showed good fractures healing, good position and non-loosening of internal fixation device and non-leakage of bone cement. At one week post-operation and last follow-up, VAS, compression rats of anterior edge and posterior edge of fractured vertebra, compression rats of spinal canal and Cobb angel were significantly lower than those at pre-operation (P0.05. Conclusions Augmentation of pedicle screw fixation with bone cement can effectively strengthen the initial stability of pedicle screw in osteo¬porosis, restore the

  11. Fixation of a human rib by an intramedullary telescoping splint anchored by bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liovic, Petar; Šutalo, Ilija D; Marasco, Silvana F

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for rib fixation is presented that involves the use of a bioresorbable polymer intramedullary telescoping splint. Bone cement is used to anchor each end of the splint inside the medullary canal on each side of the fracture site. In this manner, rib fixation is achieved without fixation device protrusion from the rib, making the splint completely intramedullary. Finite element analysis is used to demonstrate that such a splint/cement composite can preserve rib fixation subjected to cough-intensity force loadings. Computational fluid dynamics and porcine rib experiments were used to study the anchor formation process required to complete the fixation.

  12. Comparison of one-dimensional and two-dimensional functionally graded materials for the backing shell of the cemented acetabular cup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedia, H S

    2005-08-01

    Among the factors that have been suggested as contributing to the failure of a total joint replacement are stress shielding and the subsequent bone resorption. Recent studies have shown that when a backing shell made from a Ti alloy is used, high stresses are generated in the cement at the edges of the cup, and low stresses are generated at the dome of the bone in the acetabulum; thus, the bone at the dome suffers stress shielding and the cement edge suffers high stresses. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of using a functionally graded material (FGM), instead of Ti alloy, for the backing shell (BS) on the stress distribution in the BS-cement-bone system. Finite-element and optimization techniques were used to obtain the optimal distribution of materials in the tangential direction only of the backing (1D FGM) as well as in the tangential and radial directions of the backing (2D FGM). It was found that the stress distribution in the BS-cement-bone system was about the same, regardless of whether the BS was fabricated from a 1D or 2D FGM. The stress-shielding factor in the bone at the dome of the acetabulum and the maximum von Mises stress in cement at the cement interfaces for 1D and 2D FGM were reduced by about 51%, 69%, and 50%, respectively, compared to the case when the shell was fabricated from a Ti alloy. The optimal elastic modulus of the 1D FGM was obtained with the materials graded from HA at the dome of the acetabulum to a Ti alloy at the rim of the shell. The optimal elastic modulus of the 2D FGM was obtained with the materials graded from Ti alloy at the right edge of the rim, to Bioglass 45S5 at the left edge of the rim, and to HA at the dome of the shell.

  13. Effect of curing characteristics on residual stress generation in polymethyl methacrylate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingston, J A; Dunne, N J; Looney, L; McGuinness, G B

    2008-08-01

    Residual stresses resulting from the shrinkage of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement have been implicated in the formation of cracks in cement mantles following total hip arthroplasty. This study investigates whether two such cements, with differentiated solidification characteristics (i.e. working and setting times), display significant differences in their residual stress characteristics in an experiment designed to replicate the physical conditions of total hip arthroplasty. Experiments were performed using a representative femoral construct to measure and compare the temperatures and residual strains developed for standard PMMA cement mantles (CMW 1 Gentamicin) and slow curing cement mantles (SmartSet HV Gentamicin) during and following polymerization. These experimental results revealed no statistically significant difference (t-test, p > 0.05) for peak exotherm temperature and residual strain levels between the cements (measured after 3 h). The tailored polymerization characteristics of the slow-curing cement do not significantly affect residual stress generation, compared with the standard cement. It is often considered that residual stresses significantly relax following polymerization and before biomechanical loads are first applied during rehabilitation (up to 3 days later). This was examined for durations of 18 h to 3 days. Axial strains in the model femur and stem reduced by averages of 5.5 and 7.9 per cent respectively, while hoop strains in the stem exhibited larger reductions. An axisymmetric transient thermoelastic finite element model of the experiment was developed, allowing residual stresses to be predicted based on differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the heat released throughout the exothermic curing reaction. The model predictions closely replicated the experimental measurements of both temperature and residual strain at 3 h, suggesting that residual strains can be fully accounted for by the thermal contraction

  14. Prediction of the long-term creep behaviour of hydroxyapatite-filled polyethylmethacrylate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, J C; Venditti, Nicholas P

    2007-09-01

    The creep behaviour of bone cements based on polyethylmethacrylate, with and without addition of hydroxyapatite filler has been investigated, in order to determine the effect of hydroxyapatite filling and to investigate methods of predicting the long-term creep behaviour from short-term tests. The materials were produced under laboratory conditions and tested in tension in Ringer's solution, as the study was intended to investigate the inherent materials behaviour rather than to simulate realistic conditions. The effects of adding hydroxyapatite were to increase the short-term stiffness and more significantly to decrease the creep rate. Short-term creep tests of up to 10(6) s were conducted at various temperatures, stresses and ageing states. These were then used to investigate various methods of extrapolation to long-term behaviour. The use of time-temperature superposition was found to be useful, though it takes no account of ongoing physical ageing and so gives a significant overestimate of long-term creep strains. Stress-time superposition was less useful and also excludes ageing effects. The use of 'effective time' theory was more successful, but requires a large number of short-term tests. The most effective method was that of the 'integrated time' approach, which required fewer tests yet still gave good correlations with longer-term data.

  15. A modified cementing technique using BoneSource to augment fixation of the acetabulum in a sheep model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timperley, A.J.; Nusem, I.; Wilson, K.; Whitehouse, S.L.; Buma, P.; Crawford, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Our aim was to assess in an animal model whether the use of HA paste at the cement-bone interface in the acetabulum improves fixation. We examined, in sheep, the effect of interposing a layer of hydroxyapatite cement around the periphery of a polyethylene socket prior to fixi

  16. Calcium phosphate cements for bone substitution: chemistry, handling and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingtao; Liu, Weizhen; Schnitzler, Verena; Tancret, Franck; Bouler, Jean-Michel

    2014-03-01

    Since their initial formulation in the 1980s, calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) have been increasingly used as bone substitutes. This article provides an overview on the chemistry, kinetics of setting and handling properties (setting time, cohesion and injectability) of CPCs for bone substitution, with a focus on their mechanical properties. Many processing parameters, such as particle size, composition of cement reactants and additives, can be adjusted to control the setting process of CPCs, concomitantly influencing their handling and mechanical performance. Moreover, this review shows that, although the mechanical strength of CPCs is generally low, it is not a critical issue for their application for bone repair--an observation not often realized by researchers and clinicians. CPCs with compressive strengths comparable to those of cortical bones can be produced through densification and/or homogenization of the cement matrix. The real limitation for CPCs appears to be their low fracture toughness and poor mechanical reliability (Weibull modulus), which have so far been only rarely studied.

  17. Calcium Phosphate Bone Cements Including Sugar Surfactants: Part Two—Injectability, Adhesive Properties and Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Briand-Mesange

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Addition of sugar surfactants, sucrose fatty acid esters and alkylpolyglucosides to a calcium phosphate cement, designed for bone reconstruction, is described. Thanks to their adsorption at the surface of the calcium phosphate particles, the sugar surfactants allowed a full injectability and brought a very good workability. Injectability was measured by monitoring force-distance curves. With some of the selected sugar surfactants adhesive properties of the cement pastes were also observed, which were measured by tack tests. Finally, some properties related to biological applications are described, including gentamicine release and osteoblast viability experiments. The whole study demonstrates that addition of these mild surfactants improved several properties of the calcium phosphate cement, without impairing function.

  18. Effect of test frequency on the in vitro fatigue life of acrylic bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gladius; Janna, Si; Carroll, Michael

    2003-03-01

    The goal of the present work was to test the hypothesis that test frequency, f, does not have a statistically significant effect on the in vitro fatigue life of an acrylic bone cement. Uniaxial constant-amplitude tension-compression fatigue tests were conducted on 12 sets of cements, covering three formulations with three very different viscosities, two different methods of mixing the cement constituents, and two values of f (1 and 10 Hz). The test results (number of fatigue stress cycles, N(f)) were analyzed using the linearized form of the three-parameter Weibull equation, allowing the values of the Weibull mean (N(WM)) to be determined for each set. Statistical analysis of the lnN(f) data, together with an examination of the N(WM) estimates, showed support for the hypothesis over the range of f used. The principal use and explanation of the present finding are presented.

  19. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the co...

  20. Maxillary sinus floor elevation using a tissue-engineered bone with calcium-magnesium phosphate cement and bone marrow stromal cells in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Deliang; Xia, Lunguo; Zhang, Wenjie; Huang, Hui; Wei, Bin; Huang, Qingfeng; Wei, Jie; Liu, Changsheng; Jiang, Xinquan

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of maxillary sinus floor elevation with a tissue-engineered bone constructed with bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs) and calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC) material. The calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and phosphorus (P) ions released from calcium phosphate cement (CPC), magnesium phosphate cement (MPC), and CMPC were detected by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs seeded on CPC, MPC, and CMPC or cultured in CPC, MPC, and CMPC extracts were measured by MTT analysis, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, alizarin red mineralization assay, and real-time PCR analysis of the osteogenic genes ALP and osteocalcin (OCN). Finally, bMSCs were combined with CPC, MPC, and CMPC and used for maxillary sinus floor elevation in rabbits, while CPC, MPC, or CMPC without cells served as control groups. The new bone formation in each group was detected by histological finding and fluorochrome labeling at weeks 2 and 8 after surgical operation. It was observed that the Ca ion concentrations of the CMPC and CPC scaffolds was significantly higher than that of the MPC scaffold, while the Mg ions concentration of CMPC and MPC was significantly higher than that of CPC. The bMSCs seeded on CMPC and MPC or cultured in their extracts proliferated more quickly than the cells seeded on CPC or cultured in its extract, respectively. The osteogenic differentiation of bMSCs seeded on CMPC and CPC or cultured in the corresponding extracts was significantly enhanced compared to that of bMSCs seeded on MPC or cultured in its extract; however, there was no significant difference between CMPC and CPC. As for maxillary sinus floor elevation in vivo, CMPC could promote more new bone formation and mineralization compared to CPC and MPC, while the addition of bMSCs could further enhance its new bone formation ability significantly. Our data suggest that

  1. A novel controlled-release system for antibacterial enzyme lysostaphin delivery using hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite bone cement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xue, Bai; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Yihan; Wang, Jincheng; Zhang, Jien; Lu, Min; Li, Guodong; Cao, Zhizhong; Huang, Qingshan

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a lysostaphin-loaded, control-released, self-setting and injectable porous bone cement with efficient protein delivery was prepared by a novel setting method using hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composite scaffold...

  2. A Novel Controlled-Release System for Antibacterial Enzyme Lysostaphin Delivery Using Hydroxyapatite/Chitosan Composite Bone Cement: e113797

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bai Xue; Cheng Zhang; Yihan Wang; Jincheng Wang; Jien Zhang; Min Lu; Guodong Li; Zhizhong Cao; Qingshan Huang

    2014-01-01

      In this work, a lysostaphin-loaded, control-released, self-setting and injectable porous bone cement with efficient protein delivery was prepared by a novel setting method using hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS) composite scaffold...

  3. Effects of Incorporating Carboxymethyl Chitosan into PMMA Bone Cement Containing Methotrexate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ming Liu

    Full Text Available Treatment of bone metastases usually includes surgical resection with local filling of methotrexate (MTX in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA cement. We investigated whether incorporating carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS in MTX-PMMA cement might overcome disadvantages associated with MTX. To determine the optimal CMCS+MTX concentration to suppress the viability of cancer cells, an integrated microfluidic chip culturing highly metastatic lung cancer cells (H460 was employed. The mechanical properties, microstructure, and MTX release of (CMCS+MTX-PMMA cement were evaluated respectively by universal mechanical testing machine, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and incubation in simulated body fluid with subsequent HPLC-MS. Implants of MTX-PMMA and (CMCS+MTX-PMMA cement were evaluated in vivo in guinea pig femurs over time using spiral computed tomography with three-dimensional image reconstruction, and SEM at 6 months. Viability of H460 cells was significantly lowest after treatment with 57 μg/mL CMCS + 21 μg/mL MTX, which was thus used in subsequent experiments. Incorporation of 1.6% (w/w CMCS to MTX-PMMA significantly increased the bending modulus, bending strength, and compressive strength by 5, 2.8, and 5.2%, respectively, confirmed by improved microstructural homogeneity. Incorporation of CMCS delayed the time-to-plateau of MTX release by 2 days, but increased the fraction released at the plateau from 3.24% (MTX-PMMA to 5.34%. Relative to the controls, the (CMCS+MTX-PMMA implants integrated better with the host bone. SEM revealed pores in the cement of the (CMCS+MTX-PMMA implants that were not obvious in the controls. In conclusion, incorporation of CMCS in MTX-PMMA appears a feasible and effective modification for improving the anti-tumor properties of MTX-PMMA cement.

  4. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl2 accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores. PMID:22783062

  5. Properties of Cement Mortar Produced from Mixed Waste Materials with Pozzolanic Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Liang; Tseng, Dyi-Hwa; Wu, Yue-Ze

    2012-07-01

    Waste materials with pozzolanic characteristics, such as sewage sludge ash (SSA), coal combustion fly ash (FA), and granulated blast furnace slag (GBS), were reused as partial cement replacements for making cement mortar in this study. Experimental results revealed that with dual replacement of cement by SSA and GBS and triple replacement by SSA, FA, and GBS at 50% of total cement replacement, the compressive strength (Sc) of the blended cement mortars at 56 days was 93.7% and 92.9% of the control cement mortar, respectively. GBS had the highest strength activity index value and could produce large amounts of CaO to enhance the pozzolanic activity of SSA/FA and form calcium silicate hydrate gels to fill the capillary pores of the cement mortar. Consequently, the Sc development of cement mortar with GBS replacement was better than that without GBS, and the total pore volume of blended cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement was less than that with FA/SSA replacement. In the cement mortar with modified SSA and GBS at 70% of total cement replacement, the Sc at 56 days was 92.4% of the control mortar. Modifying the content of calcium in SSA also increased its pozzolanic reaction. CaCl(2) accelerated the pozzolanic activity of SSA better than lime did. Moreover, blending cement mortars with GBS/SSA replacement could generate more monosulfoaluminate to fill capillary pores.

  6. Bone formation induced by strontium modified calcium phosphate cement in critical-size metaphyseal fracture defects in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Ulrich; Ray, Seemun; Sommer, Ursula; Elkhassawna, Thaqif; Rehling, Tanja; Hundgeburth, Marvin; Henß, Anja; Rohnke, Marcus; Janek, Jürgen; Lips, Katrin S; Heiss, Christian; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Szalay, Gabor; Schumacher, Matthias; Gelinsky, Michael; Schnettler, Reinhard; Alt, Volker

    2013-11-01

    The first objective was to investigate new bone formation in a critical-size metaphyseal defect in the femur of ovariectomized rats filled with a strontium modified calcium phosphate cement (SrCPC) compared to calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and empty defects. Second, detection of strontium release from the materials as well as calcium and collagen mass distribution in the fracture defect should be targeted by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). 45 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three different treatment groups: (1) SrCPC (n = 15), (2) CPC (n = 15), and (3) empty defect (n = 15). Bilateral ovariectomy was performed and three months after multi-deficient diet, the left femur of all animals underwent a 4 mm wedge-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy that was internally fixed with a T-shaped plate. The defect was then either filled with SrCPC or CPC or was left empty. After 6 weeks, histomorphometric analysis showed a statistically significant increase in bone formation of SrCPC compared to CPC (p = 0.005) and the empty defect (p = 0.002) in the former fracture defect zone. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher bone formation at the tissue-implant interface in the SrCPC group compared to the CPC group (p < 0.0001). These data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry revealing an increase in bone-morphogenic protein 2, osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin expression and a statistically significant higher gene expression of alkaline phosphatase, collagen10a1 and osteocalcin in the SrCPC group compared to CPC. TOF-SIMS analysis showed a high release of Sr from the SrCPC into the interface region in this area compared to CPC suggesting that improved bone formation is attributable to the released Sr from the SrCPC.

  7. Damage accumulation, fatigue and creep behaviour of vacuum mixed bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Jonathan R T; Browne, Martin; Taylor, Mark

    2005-09-01

    The behaviour of bone cement under fatigue loading is of interest to assess the long-term in vivo performance. In this study, uniaxial tensile fatigue tests were performed on CMW-1 bone cement. Acoustic emission sensors and an extensometer were attached to monitor damage accumulation and creep deformation respectively. The S-N data exhibited the scatter synonymous with bone cement fatigue, with large pores generally responsible for premature failure; at 20 MPa specimens failed between 2 x 10(3) and 2 x 10(4) load cycles, while at 7 MPa specimens failed from 3 x 10(5) load cycles but others were still intact after 3 x 10(6) load cycles. Acoustic emission data revealed a non-linear accumulation of damage with respect to time, with increasing non-linearity at higher stress levels. The damage accumulation process was not continuous, but occurred in bursts separated by periods of inactivity. Damage in the specimen was located by acoustic emissions, and allowed the failure site to be predicted. Acoustic emission data were also used to predict when failure was not imminent. When this was the case at 3 million load cycles, the tests were terminated. Creep strain was plotted against the number of load cycles and a linear relationship was found when a double logarithmic scale was employed. This is the first time a brand of cement has been characterised in such detail, i.e. fatigue life, creep and damage accumulation. Results are presented in a manner that allows direct comparison with published data for other cements. The data can also be used to characterise CMW-1 in computational simulations of the damage accumulation process. Further evidence is provided for the condition-monitoring capabilities of the acoustic emission technique in orthopaedic applications.

  8. Performance of the Cement Matrix Composite Material With Rubber Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Shao-min; LIU Juan-hong; ZHANG Xi-qing

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the deferent rubber content substituted for fine aggregate on the mortar performancewas studied. The effects of the rubber coated with the coating materials on the mortar compressive strength, bendingstrength and impact work were discussed. The optimum rubber powder content and the suitable coating materialwere found. Through the electrical probe test- BEI, SEI and calcium ion distribution, and the slight crack and theinterface between the rubber and cement matrix are analyzed. The results show that the rubber powder coated withthe surface treatment materials A, B and C bas the capability of absorbing a large amount of energy under thecompressive and flexural load and the slight cracks of R- C were controlled and restrained.

  9. Evaluation of a radiation transport modeling method for radioactive bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, T S [Department of Radiological Sciences, B170 Med Sci I, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Sehgal, V; Al-Ghazi, M S A L; Ramisinghani, N S [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA 92868 (United States); Skinner, H B [St Jude Heritage Medical Group, Fullerton, CA 92835 (United States); Keyak, J H [Departments of Radiological Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)], E-mail: tkaneko@uci.edu

    2010-05-07

    Spinal metastases are a common and serious manifestation of cancer, and are often treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). As an alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporated with a radionuclide. In this study, we present a Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to calculate dose distributions within vertebrae containing radioactive cement. Model accuracy was evaluated by comparing model-predicted depth-dose curves to those measured experimentally in eight cadaveric vertebrae using radiochromic film. The high-gradient regions of the depth-dose curves differed by radial distances of 0.3-0.9 mm, an improvement over EBRT dosimetry accuracy. The low-gradient regions differed by 0.033-0.055 Gy/h/mCi, which may be important in situations involving prior spinal cord irradiation. Using a more rigorous evaluation of model accuracy, four models predicted the measured dose distribution within the experimental uncertainty, as represented by the 95% confidence interval of the measured log-linear depth-dose curve. The remaining four models required modification to account for marrow lost from the vertebrae during specimen preparation. However, the accuracy of the modified model results indicated that, when this source of uncertainty is accounted for, this modeling method can be used to predict dose distributions in vertebrae containing radioactive cement.

  10. Evaluation of a radiation transport modeling method for radioactive bone cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramisinghani, N. S.; Keyak, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Spinal metastases are a common and serious manifestation of cancer, and are often treated with vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). As an alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporated with a radionuclide. In this study, we present a Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to calculate dose distributions within vertebrae containing radioactive cement. Model accuracy was evaluated by comparing model-predicted depth-dose curves to those measured experimentally in eight cadaveric vertebrae using radiochromic film. The high-gradient regions of the depth-dose curves differed by radial distances of 0.3-0.9 mm, an improvement over EBRT dosimetry accuracy. The low-gradient regions differed by 0.033-0.055 Gy/h/mCi, which may be important in situations involving prior spinal cord irradiation. Using a more rigorous evaluation of model accuracy, four models predicted the measured dose distribution within the experimental uncertainty, as represented by the 95% confidence interval of the measured log-linear depth-dose curve. The remaining four models required modification to account for marrow lost from the vertebrae during specimen preparation. However, the accuracy of the modified model results indicated that, when this source of uncertainty is accounted for, this modeling method can be used to predict dose distributions in vertebrae containing radioactive cement.

  11. Antibacterial and bioactive composite bone cements containing surface silver-doped glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miola, Marta; Fucale, Giacomo; Maina, Giovanni; Verné, Enrica

    2015-10-20

    A bioactive silica-based glass powder (SBA2) was doped with silver (Ag(+)) ions by means of an ion-exchange process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) evidenced that the glass powder was enriched with Ag(+) ions. However, a small amount of Ag2CO3 precipitated with increased Ag concentrations in the exchange solution. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Ag-SBA2 towards Staphylococcus aureus were also evaluated and were respectively 0.05 mg ml(-1) and 0.2 mg ml(-1). Subsequently, Ag-SBA2 glass was used as filler (30%wt) in a commercial formulation of bone cement (Simplex(™) P) in order to impart both antibacterial and bioactive properties. The composite bone cement was investigated in terms of morphology (using SEM) and composition (using EDS); the glass powder was well dispersed and exposed on the cement surface. Bioactivity tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) evidenced the precipitation of hydroxyapatite on sample surfaces. Composite cement demonstrated antibacterial properties and a compressive strength comparable to the commercial formulation.

  12. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Filipa O; Pires, Ricardo A; Reis, Rui L

    2013-04-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO2:0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na2O:0.060P2O5 (a, b=0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25±5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492±17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a=0.125 and b=0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment.

  13. The economics of using prophylactic antibiotic-loaded bone cement in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, C J; Zmistowski, B M; Clyde, C T; Parvizi, J

    2014-01-01

    The rate of peri-prosthetic infection following total joint replacement continues to rise, and attempts to curb this trend have included the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cement at the time of primary surgery. We have investigated the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of the use of antibiotic-loaded cement for primary total knee replacement (TKR) by comparing the rate of infection in 3048 TKRs performed without loaded cement over a three-year period versus the incidence of infection after 4830 TKRs performed with tobramycin-loaded cement over a later period of time of a similar duration. In order to adjust for confounding factors, the rate of infection in 3347 and 4702 uncemented total hip replacements (THR) performed during the same time periods, respectively, was also examined. There were no significant differences in the characteristics of the patients in the different cohorts. The absolute rate of infection increased when antibiotic-loaded cement was used in TKR. However, this rate of increase was less than the rate of increase in infection following uncemented THR during the same period. If the rise in the rate of infection observed in THR were extrapolated to the TKR cohort, 18 additional cases of infection would have been expected to occur in the cohort receiving antibiotic-loaded cement, compared with the number observed. Depending on the type of antibiotic-loaded cement that is used, its cost in all primary TKRs ranges between USD $2112.72 and USD $112 606.67 per case of infection that is prevented.

  14. Results of cement augmentation and curettage in aneurysmal bone cyst of spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumyajit Basu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC is a vascular tumor of the spine. Management of spinal ABC still remains controversial because of its location, vascular nature and incidence of recurrence. In this manuscript, we hereby describe two cases of ABC spine treated by curettage, vertebral cement augmentation for control of bleeding and internal stabilization with two years followup. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature describing the role of cement augmentation in spinal ABC in controlling vascular bleeding in curettage of ABC of spine. Case 1: A 22 year old male patient presented with chronic back pain. On radiological investigation, there were multiple, osteolytic septite lesions at L3 vertebral body without neural compression or instability. Percutaneous transpedicular biopsy of L3 from involved pedicle was done. This was followed by cement augmentation through the uninvolved pedicle. Next, transpedicular complete curettage was done through involved pedicle. Case 2: A 15-year-old female presented with nonradiating back pain and progressive myelopathy. On radiological investigation, there was an osteolytic lesion at D9. At surgery, decompression, pedicle screw-rod fixation and posterolateral fusion from D7 to D11 was done. At D9 level, through normal pedicle cement augmentation was added to provide anterior column support and to control the expected bleeding following curettage. Transpedicular complete curettage was done through the involved pedicle with controlled bleeding at the surgical field. Cement augmentation was providing controlled bleeding at surgical field during curettage, internal stabilization and control of pain. On 2 years followup, pain was relieved and there was a stable spinal segment with well filled cement without any sign of recurrence in computed tomography scan. In selected cases of spinal ABC with single vertebral, single pedicle involvement; cement augmentation of vertebra through normal

  15. Effect of Cement Type on Autogenous Deformation of Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2004-01-01

    (BFS) cement pastes. Self-desiccation shrinkage of the BFS cement paste was modeled based on the RH measurements, following the capillary-tension approach. The main findings of this study are: 1) self-desiccation shrinkage can be related to self-desiccation both for Portland and for BFS cement pastes......, taking into account the influence of the dissolved salts in the pore solution, 2) the BFS cement paste studied shows pronounced self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage, mainly caused by its very fine pore structure....

  16. Bond strength analysis of the bone cement- stem interface of hip arthroplasties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Feng Zhang; Shi-Rong Ge; Hong-Tao Liu; Kai-Jin Guo; Shu-Yang Han; Juan-Yan Qi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study and establish the preliminary linear and modified models for the interface shear mechanics performance between implant and bone cement and to explore its damage significance.Method:The loosening research between artificial hip joint prosthesis stem and bone cement interface performance can be evaluated by the push-in test.Based on the debonding performance test, the analytical expressions of the average load and displacement from the debonding failure and splitting failure process were deduced and determined.The correlations of the expressions of the average load-displacement and statistical experimental data were analyzed.Results:It demonstrated that the interface debonding failure mechanical model could be characterized as interface bond strength mechanical performance.Based on analysis of models and experimental data by the three statistical analysis methods, the results indicated the modified model could be better represented by the interfacial debonding strength properties. The bond stressτand relative slidings distribution along the embedment regional were coupling affected by both pressure arch effect and shear lag effect in bone cement.Two stress peaks of implant have been found at the distance from0.175La loading tip to0.325Lafree tip, which also verified the early loosening clinical reports for the proximal and latter region.As the bone cement arch effect, the bond stress peak tend to move to the free tip when the debonding failure would be changed into the splitting failure, which presents a preliminary study on the mechanism of early debonding failurefor the stem-cement interface.Conclusions:Functional models of the stem-bone cement interfacial debonding failure are developed to analyze the relevant mechanism.The different locational titanium alloy stress, and the interfacial bond stress and the relative slides are evaluated to acquire a guide of the different positions of interfacial damage.The coupling effect which is original from

  17. Low-friction arthroplasty with Boneloc bone-cement: outcome at 2 to 4 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, J P; D'Arcy, J C; Ross, K R; James, S E; Bonnici, A V; Koka, S R; Morris, R W

    2000-02-01

    We report the clinical and radiologic outcome of 109 Chamley low-friction arthroplasties implanted with Boneloc bone-cement (Biomet, Bridgend, South Wales, UK) into 104 patients. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range, 2-48 months). There were 72 women (mean age, 71 years) and 32 men (mean age, 72). Cartridge-packed cement was used in 37 cases and vacuum-packed cement in 72 cases. Survivorship analysis based on revision for aseptic loosening showed 79% survival at 4 years. Seventeen (15.5%) hips have been revised for aseptic loosening to date, in which all stems and 4 cups were loose. Extensive femoral osteolysis was always present and resulted in 4 cases of femoral cortical perforation at revision. Survivorship analysis based on revision and radiologic failure showed only 55% survival over the same period. When radiologic loosenings were included as failures, the vacuum-packed cement performed significantly worse than the cartridge-packed cement it replaced. These poor results were consistent with the withdrawal of Boneloc from clinical use in 1995, and we recommend indefinite follow-up for surviving prostheses.

  18. Secondary raw materials for synthesising new kind of cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goñi, S.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a comparative study of some characteristics of new belite cements obtained from two kind of wastes, which were used as secondary raw materials: fly ash (FA, of low CaO content, from coal combustion, and ash from incineration of municipal solid waste (MSWIA. Cements were synthesised in a range of temperature between 700°C and 900°C from MSWIA and FA, which were previously activated by hydrothermal treatment at 200°C The evolution of cemented phases with the heating temperature was followed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results were compared with those obtained from heating the starting FA and MSWIA without the previous hydrothermal treatment. The degree of hydration was quantitatively evaluated by the combined water content, determined from thermogravimetric analyses, during a period of 28 days or 200 days from mixing depending of hydration kinetics of each cement.

    Este trabajo es un estudio comparativo de algunas de las características de nuevos cementos belíticos, obtenidos a partir de dos tipos de residuos, como materia prima secundaria: cenizas volantes (CV de bajo contenido en cal, procedentes de la combustión del carbón y cenizas procedentes de la incineración de residuos sólidos urbanos (CIRSU. Los cementos fueron sintetizados en un rango de temperaturas comprendido entre 700°C y 900°C después de un tratamiento hidrotermal de la CV y CIRSU a 200°C La evolución de las fases cementicias, con la temperatura de calentamiento, fue estudiada por difracción de rayos X (DRX. Los resultados fueron comparados con aquellos obtenidos, directamente, por calentamiento de los residuos, sin un tratamiento hidrotermal previo de los mismos. El grado de hidratación fue cuantitativamente evaluado, por medio del análisis termogravimétrico, a partir del agua combinada de los cementos hidratados durante un período de 28 días o 200 días, dependiendo de la cinética de hidratación de cada cemento.

  19. Estudio experimental de la osteosustitución con biomateriales cerámicos formulados como cementos óseos Experimental study of the bone substitution with ceramic biomaterials formulated as bone cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Sanzana

    2007-01-01

    reabsorption of the materials. Finally, this work concluded that the calcium phosphate bone cements are osteoconductive, osteotransductive and biocompatible materials which behave as bone substitutes.

  20. Elucidation of real-time hardening mechanisms of two novel high-strength calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Valery V; Rau, Julietta V; Generosi, Amanda; Albertini, Valerio Rossi; Ferro, Daniela; Barinov, Sergey M

    2010-04-01

    Despite the numerous literature data available in the field of calcium phosphate bone cements, the mechanism and kinetics of their hardening, both of which are of great importance for cements application, in most cases, is unknown. In this work, the mechanism and kinetics of hardening of two novel high-strength calcium phosphate bone cements were studied using the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, which allows rapid collection of the patterns. The phase transformations occurring on the setting and hardening processes were monitored in situ. Containing minimal quantity of components, whose mixing leads to the formation of cements with pH close to neutral, the cements under study are simple in handling. The main component of both formulations is tetracalcium phosphate. In both cements, the effect of the addition of high- and low-molecular weight chitosan on phase development and kinetics was investigated in detail. One of the cements has the compressive strength of about 70 MPa, whereas the strength of the other, containing Ca(3)Al(2)O(6), is much higher, about 100 MPa. This latter cement could be regarded as an alternative to the common low-strength bioresorbable brushite cements.

  1. Activity of Fosfomycin- and Daptomycin-Containing Bone Cement on Selected Bacterial Species Being Associated with Orthopedic Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun Eick

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine activity of fosfomycin/gentamicin and daptomycin/gentamicin-containing PMMA bone-cement against Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecium (VRE, and E. coli (ESBL; only fosfomycin. Test specimens of the bone cement were formed and bacteria in two concentrations were added one time or repeatedly up to 96 h. All fosfomycin-containing cement killed ultimately all MSSA, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and E. coli within 24 h; growth of MRSA was suppressed up to 48 h. Activity of daptomycin-containing cement depended on the concentration; the highest concentrated bone cement used (1.5 g daptomycin/40 g of powder was active against all one-time added bacteria. When bacteria were added repeatedly to fosfomycin-containing cement, growth was suppressed up to 96 h and that of MRSA and VRE only up to 24 h. The highest concentration of daptomycin suppressed the growth of repeated added bacteria up to 48 h (VRE until 96 h (MSSA, MRSA. In conclusion, PMMA bone cement with 1.5 g of daptomycin and 0.5 g of gentamicin may be an alternative in treatment of periprosthetic infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria.

  2. Antibiotic bone cement and renovation after artificial joint replacement%抗生素骨水泥与人工关节置换后的翻修

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文成

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Antibiotic bone cement is the important method for the prevention and treatment of infection after artificial hip replacement and renovation. OBJECTIVE:To review the research progress of antibiotic bone cement. METHODS:A computer-based online search was performed in PubMed database, CNKI database, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, VIP database and Wanfang database for the literatures from 1978 to 2012. The key words were“bone cement, antibiotic bone cement, infection, joint replacement”in English and Chinese. RESUTLS AND CONCLUSION:A total of 335 literatures were screened out. Final y, 29 literatures were included for in-depth analysis after the primary screen through reading the title, abstract and ful-text. Antibiotic bone cement has been widely used in the treatment of infection after artificial joint replacement and renovation as it can reduce the risk of infection after initial joint replacement and renovation. The material properties and mechanical properties wil not change after bone cement mixed with appropriate amount of antibiotic. Different antibiotics in the bone cement have different release rates, which were closely related with the porosity of bone cement. Adding the additive that used for increasing the porosity of bone cement can increase the antibiotic release.%  背景:抗生素骨水泥是预防和治疗人工关节置换以及翻修后感染的重要方法。目的:综述抗生素骨水泥的研究进展以及人工关节置换后翻修。方法:通过计算机检索Pubmed数据库、中国知网数据库、中国生物医学文献数据库、维普期刊全文数据库、万方数据库,时间范围在1978年至2012年,中文检索词“骨水泥”、“抗生素骨水泥”、“感染”、“关节置换”;英文检索词“bone cement”、“antibiotic bone cement”、“infection”、“joint replacement”。结果与结论:共检索到相关文献335篇。通过阅读标题、摘要以及全

  3. Novel bone wax based on poly(ethylene glycol)-calcium phosphate cement mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Theresa; Schamel, Martha; Kübler, Alexander C; Groll, Jürgen; Gbureck, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Classic bone wax is associated with drawbacks such as the risk of infection, inflammation and hindered osteogenesis. Here, we developed a novel self-setting bone wax on the basis of hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and hydroxyapatite (HA) forming calcium phosphate cement (CPC), to overcome the problems that are linked to the use of conventional beeswax systems. Amounts of up to 10 wt.% of pregelatinized starch were additionally supplemented as hemostatic agent. After exposure to a humid environment, the PEG phase dissolved and was exchanged by penetrating water that interacted with the HA precursor (tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP)/monetite) to form highly porous, nanocrystalline HA via a dissolution/precipitation reaction. Simultaneously, pregelatinized starch could gel and supply the bone wax with liquid sealing features. The novel bone wax formulation was found to be cohesive, malleable and after hardening under aqueous conditions, it had a mechanical performance (∼2.5 MPa compressive strength) that is comparable to that of cancellous bone. It withstood systolic blood pressure conditions for several days and showed antibacterial properties for almost one week, even though 60% of the incorporated drug vancomycin hydrochloride was already released after 8h of deposition by diffusion controlled processes. The study investigated the development of alternative bone waxes on the basis of a hydroxyapatite (HA) forming calcium phosphate cement (CPC) system. Conventional bone waxes are composed of non-biodegradable beeswax/vaseline mixtures that are often linked to infection, inflammation and hindered osteogenesis. We combined the usage of bioresorbable polymers, the supplementation with hemostatic agents and the incorporation of a mineral component to overcome those drawbacks. Self-setting CPC precursors (tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP), monetite) were embedded in a resorbable matrix of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and supplemented with pregelatinized starch. This

  4. Augmentation of screw fixation with injectable calcium sulfate bone cement in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xie, Xin-Hui; Yu, Zhi-Feng; Tang, Ting-Ting

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of augmenting screw fixation with an injectable calcium sulfate cement (CSC) in the osteoporotic bone of ovariectomized rats. The influence of the calcium sulfate (CS) on bone remodeling and screw anchorage in osteoporotic cancellous bone was systematically investigated using histomorphometric and biomechanical analyses. The femoral condyles of 55 Sprague-Dawley ovariectomized rats were implanted with screw augmented with CS, while the contralateral limb received a nonaugmented screw. At time intervals of 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks, 11 rats were euthanized. Six pair-matched samples were used for histological analysis, while five pair-matched samples were preserved for biomechanical testing. Histomorphometric data showed that CS augmented screws activated cancellous bone formation, evidenced by a statistically higher (p < 0.05) percentage of osteoid surface at 2, 4, and 8 weeks and a higher rate of bone mineral apposition at 12 weeks compared with nonaugmented screws. The amount of the bone-screw contact at 2, 8, and 12 weeks and of bone ingrowth on the threads at 4 and 8 weeks was greater in the CS group than in the nonaugmented group (p < 0.05), although these parameters increased concomitantly with time for both groups. The CS was resorbed completely at 8 weeks without stimulating fibrous encapsulation on the screw surface. Also, the cement significantly increased the screw pull-out force and the energy to failure at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after implantation, when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). These results imply that augmentation of screw fixation with CS may have the potential to decrease the risk of implant failure in osteoporotic bone.

  5. [Allergy of calcium phosphate cement material following skull reconstruction: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Miyake, Shigeru; Yoshimoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Sou

    2013-04-01

    The paste form of calcium phosphate cement is often used in skull reconstruction because of the biocompatibility and early handling of these cements. Although it had rarely been shown to produce a foreign body reaction, we encountered a patient who experienced an allergic reaction to calcium phosphate cements(Biopex®. A patch test was performed and a positive reaction to magnesium phosphate was obtained. Biopex® contains magnesium phosphate, so we diagnosed this case as allergic reaction. Pathological analysis revealed infiltration of plasmacytes in the bone flap around the calcium phosphate cement. The postoperative course was uneventful 3 years after surgery. Allergy to calcium phosphate cements is rare, but must be considered in differential diagnosis of its side effects.

  6. Reinforcing effect of calcium sulfate cement bovine bone morphogenetic protein on vertebral in the rabbit model of osteoporosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhang; Yu-Ming Chen; Chen Sheng-Guo; Kaken Habaerxi; Shawuti Alimujiang; Yu Chen; Ming-Zhen Peng; Rong Yue; Yu-Lian Wu; De-Quan Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To observe reinforcing effect of calcium sulfate cement(CSC) bovine bone morphogenetic protein(bBMP) on vertebral in the rabbit model of osteoporosis.Methods:A total of48NewZealand white rabbits were randomly divided into groupⅠ(blank control group), group Ⅱ(CSC injection group), group Ⅲ(CSC/bBMP injection group) and control group.White rabbit osteoporosis model was established rapidly by using castration method+methylprednisolone candidate.After modeling, groups Ⅱ, Ⅲ were given corresponding vertebral body injection material, and4 animals were sacrificed respectively at24 h,6 weeks,12 weeks after vertebral plasty.Tissue pathological status, vertebral mineral density and vertebral body bone mechanical strength were observed.Results:Vertebral body structure form was normal in the groups Ⅱand Ⅲ.Trabecular bone coarsens, connection and repair were observed in micro fracture and bone defects, bone trabecular connectivity was superior to group Ⅰ significantly; vertebral body compression strength in the groupⅠ was on the decline, vertebral compression strength in the groups Ⅱand Ⅲ was on the rise, the largest vertebra.PostoperativeBMC andBMD in groups Ⅱand Ⅲ were incresed, andsignificantly higher than group Ⅰ after6 weeks(P<0.05),BMC and BMD in group Ⅲ after12 weeks were higher than the other three groups.Conclusion:Compound bBMPCSC has good bone induction.It can improve the three-dimensional construction effect for osteoporosis vertebral trabecula, and can significantly improve the vertebral strength, as a vertebral packing material with good application prospect.

  7. Bioactive glass incorporation in calcium phosphate cement-based injectable bone substitute for improved in vitro biocompatibility and in vivo bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiasa, Alexander; Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Franco, Rose Ann; Min, Young Ki; Lee, Byong Taek

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we fabricated injectable bone substitutes modified with the addition of bioactive glass powders synthesized via ultrasonic energy-assisted hydrothermal method to the calcium phosphate-based bone cement to improve its biocompatibility. The injectable bone substitutes was initially composed of a powder component (tetracalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium sulfate dehydrate) and a liquid component (citric acid, chitosan and hydroxyl-propyl-methyl-cellulose) upon which various concentrations of bioactive glass were added: 0%, 10%, 20% and 30%. Setting time and compressive strength of the injectable bone substitutes were evaluated and observed to improve with the increase of bioactive glass content. Surface morphologies were observed via scanning electron microscope before and after submersion of the samples to simulated body fluid and increase in apatite formation was detected using x-ray diffraction machine. In vitro biocompatibility of the injectable bone substitutes was observed to improve with the addition of bioactive glass as the proliferation/adhesion behavior of cells on the material increased. Human gene markers were successfully expressed using real time-polymerase chain reaction and the samples were found to promote cell viability and be more biocompatible as the concentration of bioactive glass increases. In vivo biocompatibility of the samples containing 0% and 30% bioactive glass were evaluated using Micro-CT and histological staining after 3 months of implantation in male rabbits' femurs. No inflammatory reaction was observed and significant bone formation was promoted by the addition of bioactive glass to the injectable bone substitute system.

  8. Porous poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium phosphate cement composite for reconstruction of bone defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cements are injectable, self-setting ceramic pastes generally known for their favorable bone response. Ingrowth of bone and subsequent degradation rates can be enhanced by the inclusion of macropores. Initial porosity can be induced by CO(2) foaming during setting of the

  9. Porous poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid)/calcium phosphate cement composite for reconstruction of bone defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhe, P.Q.; Hedberg, E.L.; Padron, N.T.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Jansen, J.A.; Mikos, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (Ca-P) cements are injectable, self-setting ceramic pastes generally known for their favorable bone response. Ingrowth of bone and subsequent degradation rates can be enhanced by the inclusion of macropores. Initial porosity can be induced by CO(2) foaming during setting of the cem

  10. High-temperature cementing materials for completion of geothermal wells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyoncu, R.S.; Snyder, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    Several portland cement types, oil well cements, and various additives and admixtures were evaluated during the course of development of a number of promising compositions suitable for geothermal applications. Among the cements and various materials considered were portland cement Types I, III, and V; oil well cement Classes G, H, and J; and additives such as silica flour, blast furnace slags, pozzolan, hydrated lime, perlite, and aluminum phosphate. Properties of interest in the study were thickening time, compressive strength, cement-to-metal bond strength, and effects of the cements on the corrosion of steel well casings. Testing procedures and property data obtained on a number of compositions are presented and discussed. Several cementing compositions comprised of Class J oil well cement, pozzolan, blast furnace slags, and silica flour were found to possess properties which appear to make them suitable for use in geothermal well completions. Five of the promising cementing compositions have been submitted to the National Bureau of Standards for additional testing.

  11. Mechanical Behaviour of Composite Bioactive Bone Cements Consisting of Two Different Types of Surface Treated Hydroxyapatite as Filler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Bioactive bone cements based on a paste-paste system for orthopaedic applications were developed consisting of hydroxyapatite ( HA ) filler particles in a methacrylate matrix comprising urethane dimethacrylate(UDMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate ( TEGDMA ). To improve the interface between inorganic filler and orgaric matrix the HA particles were subjected to two different surface treatment methods, using polyacrylic acid ( PAA ) and γ- methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (γMPS). The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of surface treatment and the inclusion of multifunctional methacrylates on the mechanical properties,namely 3-point flexural strength (FS) and fracture toughness of the cements and the effect of ageing in simulated body fluid. Comparing the mechanical properties of the two cements, the γMPS-HA cement showed that the fracture toughness of the experimental bone cements were significantly greater (p< 0.001) compared to that of the PMMA cement, whereas PAA-HA containing cement had strength values around 20% lower. Interestingly, PAA was found to be more effective in improving the interface as the PAA treated HA cement ( UTHAPPA ) maintained its strength on immersion in SBF , suggesting that PAA provided a coupling, which was less sensitive to moisture,a similar trend was also observed with the inclusion of the carboxyl containing multifunctional methacrylates.

  12. Incorporation of biodegradable electrospun fibers into calcium phosphate cement for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yi; Yang, Fang; Wolke, Joop G C; Li, Yubao; Jansen, John A

    2010-04-01

    Inherent brittleness and slow degradation are the major drawbacks for the use of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). To address these issues, biodegradable ultrafine fibers were incorporated into the CPC in this study. Four types of fibers made of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) (PCL12: 1.1 microm, PCL15: 1.4 microm, PCL18: 1.9 microm) and poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA4: 1.4 microm) were prepared by electrospinning using a special water pool technique, then mixed with the CPC at fiber weight fractions of 1%, 3%, 5% and 7%. After incubation of the composites in simulated body fluid for 7 days, they were characterized by a gravimetric measurement for porosity evaluation, a three-point bending test for mechanical properties, microcomputer topography and scanning electron microscopy for morphological observation. The results indicated that the incorporation of ultrafine fibers increases the fracture resistance and porosity of CPCs. The toughness of the composites increased with the fiber fraction but was not affected by the fiber diameter. It was found that the incorporated fibers formed a channel-like porous structure in the CPCs. After degradation of the fibers, the created space and high porosity of the composite cement provides inter-connective channels for bone tissue in growth and facilitates cement resorption. Therefore, we concluded that this electrospun fiber-CPC composite may be beneficial to be used as bone fillers.

  13. Towards optimization of the silanization process of hydroxyapatite for its use in bone cement formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisneros-Pineda, Olga G.; Herrera Kao, Wilberth; Loría-Bastarrachea, María I. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Veranes-Pantoja, Yaymarilis [Centro de Biomateriales, Universidad de la Habana, Avenida Universidad, s/n, e/G y Ronda, C.P. 10600 C. de La Habana (Cuba); Cauich-Rodríguez, Juan V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Cervantes-Uc, José M., E-mail: manceruc@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán, A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No. 130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, C.P. 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to provide some fundamental information for optimization of silanization of hydroxyapatite intended for bone cement formulations. The effect of 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS) concentration and solvent system (acetone/water or methanol/water mixtures) during HA silanization was monitored by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis. The effect of silanized HA on the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cements is also reported. It was found that the silanization process rendered hydroxyapatite with lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. Through EDX, it was observed that the silicon concentration in the HA particles was higher for acetone–water than that obtained for methanol–water system, although the mechanical performance of cements prepared with these particles exhibited the opposite behavior. Taking all these results together, it is concluded that methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results during silanization process of HA. - Highlights: • Effect of MPS concentration and solvents during HA silanization was studied. • Silanization rendered HA has lower crystallinity compared to untreated HA. • Silicon concentration was higher for acetone than that obtained using methanol. • Methanol–water system containing MPS at 3 wt.% provides the better results.

  14. Aluminum-free glass-ionomer bone cements with enhanced bioactivity and biodegradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Filipa O.; Pires, Ricardo A., E-mail: rpires@dep.uminho.pt; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-04-01

    Al-free glasses of general composition 0.340SiO{sub 2}:0.300ZnO:(0.250-a-b)CaO:aSrO:bMgO:0.050Na{sub 2}O:0.060P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (a, b = 0.000 or 0.125) were synthesized by melt quenching and their ability to form glass-ionomer cements was evaluated using poly(acrylic acid) and water. We evaluated the influence of the poly(acrylic acid) molecular weight and glass particle size in the cement mechanical performance. Higher compressive strength (25 ± 5 MPa) and higher compressive elastic modulus (492 ± 17 MPa) were achieved with a poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa and glass particle sizes between 63 and 125 μm. Cements prepared with glass formulation a = 0.125 and b = 0.000 were analyzed after immersion in simulated body fluid; they presented a surface morphology consistent with a calcium phosphate coating and a Ca/P ratio of 1.55 (similar to calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite). Addition of starch to the cement formulation induced partial degradability after 8 weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer saline containing α-amylase. Micro-computed tomography analysis revealed that the inclusion of starch increased the cement porosity from 35% to 42%. We were able to produce partially degradable Al-free glass-ionomer bone cements with mechanical performance, bioactivity and biodegradability suitable to be applied on non-load bearing sites and with the appropriate physical characteristics for osteointegration upon partial degradation. Zn release studies (concentrations between 413 μM and 887 μM) evidenced the necessity to tune the cement formulations to reduce the Zn concentration in the surrounding environment. Highlights: ► We developed partially degradable, bioactive, Al-free glass-ionomer cements (GICs). ► Enhanced mechanical behavior was achieved using 63–125 μm glass particle size range. ► The highest mechanical resistance was obtained using poly(acrylic acid) of 50 kDa. ► Biodegradation was successfully tuned to start 8 weeks after GIC preparation. ► Zn

  15. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harabech, Mariem; Kiselovs, Normunds Rungevics; Maenhoudt, Wim; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Roost, Dirk; Dupré, Luc

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  16. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen.

  17. A novel injectable, cohesive and toughened Si-HPMC (silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) composite calcium phosphate cement for bone substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weizhen; Zhang, Jingtao; Rethore, Gildas; Khairoun, Khalid; Pilet, Paul; Tancret, Franck; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Weiss, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    This study reports on the incorporation of the self-setting polysaccharide derivative hydrogel (silanized-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, Si-HPMC) into the formulation of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) to develop a novel injectable material for bone substitution. The effects of Si-HPMC on the handling properties (injectability, cohesion and setting time) and mechanical properties (Young's modulus, fracture toughness, flexural and compressive strength) of CPCs were systematically studied. It was found that Si-HPMC could endow composite CPC pastes with an appealing rheological behavior at the early stage of setting, promoting its application in open bone cavities. Moreover, Si-HPMC gave the composite CPC good injectability and cohesion, and reduced the setting time. Si-HPMC increased the porosity of CPCs after hardening, especially the macroporosity as a result of entrapped air bubbles; however, it improved, rather than compromised, the mechanical properties of composite CPCs, which demonstrates a strong toughening and strengthening effect. In view of the above, the Si-HPMC composite CPC may be particularly promising as bone substitute material for clinic application.

  18. Simulation of the mechanical behavior of a HIP implant. Implant fixed to bone by cementation under arbitrary load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldani, C R [Materials Department - FCEFyN - Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Av.Velez Sarsfield 1611 (5016) Cordoba (Argentina); Dominguez, A A [INTI Cordoba, Av. Velez Sarsfield 1561 (5016) Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    In a previous work a finite elements model was constructed to simulate a fatigue assay according to the norm IRAM 9422-3. Three materials were studied, two of them are the most used in this type of implant (Stainless steel 3161 and alloy T16A14V) and the third was a new developed titanium alloy (Ti35Nb7Zr5Ta). Static loads were applied to the model according to the highest requirements of the norm and the stress - strain distribution were determined. In this study a simplified analysis of the material's fatigue was done according to the previous work. The best behavior of the titanium alloys vs. the stainless steel was evident. With the objective of studying the behavior of both: the implant and the femur bone, new finite elements models were realized, in which the presence of the bone was considered. Inside the bone, the femoral component of the implant was placed in a similar way of a cemented prosthesis in a total hip arthroplasty. The advantage of the titanium implant related to the stainless steel one, was very clear.

  19. EFFICIENCY OF USING ULTRASONIC FOR REMOVING BONE CEMENT IN REVISION ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Reznik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the experiment on 5 dogs weighing from 6 to 10 kg the results of applying ultrasonic technology of polymer removal and treatment of bone mantle in revision total hip and knee arthroplasty were examined. As a source of high-amplitude low-frequency ultrasound an ultrasonic surgical apparatus «Tier», operating at 42 kHz, and provides the intensity of exposure at the end of the waveguide to 1200 W / cm2 was applied. The physical parameters of the influence of ultrasound on the bone were studied. The analysis of the rate of removal of the old plastic mantle was performed. The results of experimental and clinical studies proved that the use of ultrasound frequency of 42.5 kHz facilitates the removal of old bone cement in revision arthroplasty of large joints, reduces the duration and severity of the operation.

  20. Numerical modelling of porous cement-based materials by superabsorbent polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viejo, Ismael; Esteves, Luis Pedro; Laspalas, Manuel;

    2016-01-01

    The development of new cementitious materials raises new challenges with regard to structural design. One of the potential applications of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) is to deliver well-defined porosity to cement systems. This is particularly interesting for the development of porous cement...

  1. Secondary fuels and raw materials in the Spanish cement industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordobil, J.C.U.; Guede, Elena [Cementos Lemona s.a. (Spain)

    1997-03-01

    The growing environmental and energy concern are having an impact on the Spanish cement industry. This article describes the impact on waste management, the operation of cement kilns and the possibility for recycling. Current projects and future prospects are described. (UK)

  2. The mechanical and biological studies of calcium phosphate cement-fibrin glue for bone reconstruction of rabbit femoral defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong J

    2013-03-01

    . This present study indicated that the CPC–FG composite at the P/L ratio of 1:1 (g/mL stimulated bone regeneration better than any other designed group, which suggested that CPC–FG at the P/L ratio of 1:1 has significant potential as the bioactive material for the treatment of bone defects.Keywords: calcium phosphate cements, fibrin glue, bone reconstruction, micro-CT, biomechanical testing, histological examination

  3. Sorption of radionuclides by cement-based barrier materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kefei, E-mail: likefei@tsinghua.edu.cn; Pang, Xiaoyun

    2014-11-15

    This paper investigates the sorption of radionuclide ions, {sup 137}Cs{sup +} and {sup 90}Sr{sup 2+}, by cement-based barrier materials for radioactive waste disposal. A mortar with ternary binder is prepared and powder samples are ground from the hardened material following a predetermined granulometry. After pre-equilibrium with an artificial pore solution, the sorption behaviors of powder samples are investigated through single sorption and blended sorption. The results show that: (1) no systematic difference is observed for single and blended sorptions thus the interaction between {sup 137}Cs{sup +} and {sup 90}Sr{sup 2+} sorptions must be weak; (2) the sorption kinetics is rapid and all characteristic times are less than 1d; (3) the sorption capacity is enhanced by C–A–S–H hydrates and the measured K{sub d} values can be predicted from C–S–H sorption data with Ca/Si ratio equal to Ca/(Si + Al) ratio.

  4. Properties and interfacial microstructure of cement-based materials with composite micro-grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi; BA Heng-jing; LIU Jun-zhe

    2005-01-01

    Silica fume, fly ash and nano-fiber mineral materials (NR powder) are employed to incorporate into cement-based materials. According to the grain grading mathematical model of cement-based materials, two packing systems, namely, spherical grading system and nano-fiber reinforced system were designed. Properties and interfacial microstructure of the two systems were studied according to secondary interface theory. It was shown that nano-fiber mineral materials can improve the grain grading of the admixture, increase the density of the system, improve the microstructure of the interface and the hardened paste, and enhance the uniformity of cement-based materials mixed with composite micro-grains and greatly increase their wearable rigidity and flexure strength. In this paper, two kinds of interface models, including spherical grain model and nano-fiber reinforced interface model of the cement-based materials mixed with composite micro-grains, were brought forward.

  5. An ongoing investigation on modeling the strength properties of water-entrained cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Water-entrained cement based materials by superabsorbent polymers is a concept that was introduced in the research agenda about a decade ago. However, a recent application in the production of high performance concrete revealed potential weaknesses when the proportioning of this intelligent...... material is not well performed, raising doubts among both academic and industrial society about the usability of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials. This work constitutes the baseline tentatively to be used on modeling the compressive strength of SF-modified water-entrained cement...

  6. A-mode ultrasound-based intra-femoral bone cement detection and 3D reconstruction in RTHR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Stefan; Mumme, Thorsten; Sellei, Richard; De La Fuente, Matias; Wirtz, Dieter-C; Radermacher, Klaus

    2007-05-01

    Due to the difficulty of determining the 3D boundary of the cement-bone interface in Revision Total Hip Replacement (RTHR), the removal of the distal intra-femoral bone cement can be a time-consuming and risky operation. Within the framework of computer- and robot-assisted cement removal, the principles and first results of an automatic detection and 3D surface reconstruction of the cement-bone boundary using A-mode ultrasound are described. Sound propagation time and attenuation of cement were determined considering different techniques for the preparation of bone cement, such as the use of a vacuum system (Optivac, Biomet). A laboratory setup using a rotating, standard 5-MHz transducer was developed. The prototype enables scanning of bisected cement-prepared femur samples in a 90 degrees rotation range along their rotation axis. For system evaluation ex vivo, the distal femur of a human cadaver was prepared with bone cement and drilled (Ø 10 mm) to simulate the prosthesis cavity in a first approximation. The sample was cut in half and CT scanned (0.24 mm resolution; 0.5 mm distance; 0.5 mm thickness), and 3D voxel models of the manually segmented bone cement were reconstructed, providing the ground truth. Afterwards, 90 degrees segments of each ex-vivo sample were scanned by the A-mode ultrasound system. To obtain better ultrasound penetration, we used coded signal excitation and pulse compression filtering. A-mode ultrasound signal detection, filtering and segmentation were accomplished fully automatically. Subsequently, 3D voxel models of each sample were calculated. Accuracy evaluation of the measured ultrasound data was performed by ICP matching of each ultrasound dataset ( approximately 8000 points) to the corresponding CT dataset and calculation of the residual median distance error between the corresponding datasets. Prior to each ICP matching, an initial pre-registration was calculated using prominent landmarks in the corresponding datasets. This method

  7. [Use of pedicle percutaneous cemented screws in the management of patients with poor bone stock].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti, S; Graillon, T; Mansouri, N; Adetchessi, T; Tropiano, P; Blondel, B; Fuentes, S

    2016-12-01

    Management of patients with poor bone stock remains difficult due to the risks of mechanical complications such as screws pullouts. At the same time, development of minimal invasive spinal techniques using a percutaneous approach is greatly adapted to these fragile patients with a reduction in operative time and complications. The aim of this study was to report our experience with cemented percutaneous screws in the management of patients with a poor bone stock. Thirty-five patients were included in this retrospective study. In each case, a percutaneous osteosynthesis using cemented screws was performed. Indications were osteoporotic fractures, metastasis or fractures on ankylosing spine. Depending on radiologic findings, short or long constructs (2 levels above and below) were performed and an anterior column support (kyphoplasty or anterior approach) was added. Evaluation of patients was based on pre and postoperative CT-scans associated with clinical follow-up with a minimum of 6 months. Eleven men and 24 women with a mean age of 73 years [60-87] were included in the study. Surgical indication was related to an osteoporotic fracture in 20 cases, a metastasis in 13 cases and a fracture on ankylosing spine in the last 2 cases. Most of the fractures were located between T10 and L2 and a long construct was performed in 22 cases. Percutaneous kyphoplasty was added in 24 cases and a complementary anterior approach in 3 cases. Average operative time was 86minutes [61-110] and blood loss was estimated as minor in all the cases. In the entire series, average volume of cement injected was 1.8 cc/screw. One patient underwent a major complication with a vascular leakage responsible for a cement pulmonary embolism. With a 9 months average follow-up [6-20], no cases of infection or mechanical complication was reported. Minimal invasive spinal techniques are greatly adapted to the management of fragile patients. The use of percutaneous cemented screws is, in our experience

  8. In vitro performance assessment of new brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr-substituted beta-TCP bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, S; Vieira, S I; Torres, P M C; Goetz-Neunhoeffer, F; Neubauer, J; da Cruz E Silva, O A B; da Cruz E Silva, E F; Ferreira, J M F

    2010-08-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro performance of brushite-forming Zn- and ZnSr-substituted beta-TCP bone cements in terms of wet mechanical strength and biological response. Quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement of the powdered samples were performed by X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld refinement technique. Initial and final setting times of the cement pastes, measured using Gilmore needles technique, showed that ZnSrCPC sets faster than ZnCPC. The measured values of the wet strength after 48 h of immersion in PBS solution at 37 degrees C showed that ZnSrCPC cements are stronger than ZnCPC cements. Human osteosarcoma-derived MG63 cell line proved the nontoxicity of the cement powders, using the resazurin metabolic assay.

  9. Brushite-based calcium phosphate cement with multichannel hydroxyapatite granule loading for improved bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Swapan Kumar; Lee, Byung Yeol; Padalhin, Andrew Reyas; Sarker, Avik; Carpena, Nathaniel; Kim, Boram; Paul, Kallyanshish; Choi, Hwan Jun; Bae, Sang-Ho; Lee, Byong Taek

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report brushite-based calcium phosphate cement (CPC) system to enhance the in vivo biodegradation and tissue in-growth by incorporation of micro-channeled hydroxyapatite (HAp) granule and silicon and sodium addition in calcium phosphate precursor powder. Sodium- and silicon-rich calcium phosphate powder with predominantly tri calcium phosphate (TCP) phase was synthesized by an inexpensive wet chemical route to react with mono calcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) for making the CPC. TCP nanopowder also served as a packing filler and moderator of the reaction kinetics of the setting mechanism. Strong sintered cylindrical HAp granules were prepared by fibrous monolithic (FM) process, which is 800 µm in diameter and have seven micro-channels. Acid sodium pyrophosphate and sodium citrate solution was used as the liquid component which acted as a homogenizer and setting time retarder. The granules accelerated the degradation of the brushite cement matrix as well as improved the bone tissue in-growth by permitting an easy access to the interior of the CPC through the micro-channels. The addition of micro-channeled granule in the CPC introduced porosity without sacrificing much of its compressive strength. In vivo investigation by creating a critical size defect in the femur head of a rabbit model for 1 and 2 months showed excellent bone in-growth through the micro-channels. The granules enhanced the implant degradation behavior and bone regeneration in the implanted area was significantly improved after two months of implantation.

  10. Bioactive calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement for bone substitute applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangyong [Department of Orthopaedics, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Linhai Zhejiang, 317000 (China); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Liu, Jianli [Trauma Center, Affiliated Hospital of Hainan Medical University, Haikou, Hainan, 570206 (China); Division of Functional Materials and Nanodevices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China); Li, Fan; Pan, Zongyou; Ni, Xiao; Shen, Yue [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Xu, Huazi, E-mail: spinexu@163.com [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, 325000 (China); Huang, Qing, E-mail: huangqing@nimte.ac.cn [Division of Functional Materials and Nanodevices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Ningbo, Zhejiang, 315201 (China)

    2014-02-01

    A novel calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement (CSMPC) composite was prepared and studied in the present work. The physical properties including the phases, the microstructures, the setting properties and the compressive strengths of the CSMPCs were studied. The bio-performances of the CSMPCs were comprehensively evaluated using in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) method and in vitro cell culture. The dependence of the physical and chemical properties of the CSMPC on its composition and microstructure was studied in detail. It is found that the CSMPC composites exhibited mediate setting times (6–12 min) compared to the calcium sulfate (CS) and the magnesium phosphate cement (MPC). They showed an encapsulation structure in which the unconverted hexagonal prism CSH particles were embedded in the xerogel-like MPC matrix. The phase compositions and the mechanical properties of the CSMPCs were closely related to the content of MPC and the hardening process. The CSMPCs exhibited excellent bioactivity and good biocompatibility to support the cells to attach and proliferate on the surface. The CSMPC composite has the potential to serve as bone grafts for the bone regeneration. - Highlights: • The mechanical strength and degradation rate of CSMPC composites are discussed. • The CSMPC composites exhibited good bioactivity to form bone-like apatite. • The CSMPC composites also show good biocompatibility.

  11. Bone Material Properties in Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta entrains changes at every level in bone tissue, from the disorganization of the collagen molecules and mineral platelets within and between collagen fibrils to the macroarchitecture of the whole skeleton. Investigations using an array of sophisticated instruments at multiple scale levels have now determined many aspects of the effect of the disease on the material properties of bone tissue. The brittle nature of bone in osteogenesis imperfecta reflects both increased bone mineralization density-the quantity of mineral in relation to the quantity of matrix within a specific bone volume-and altered matrix-matrix and matrix mineral interactions. Contributions to fracture resistance at multiple scale lengths are discussed, comparing normal and brittle bone. Integrating the available information provides both a better understanding of the effect of current approaches to treatment-largely improved architecture and possibly some macroscale toughening-and indicates potential opportunities for alternative strategies that can influence fracture resistance at longer-length scales.

  12. Bone cement enhanced pedicle screw fixation combined with vertebroplasty for elderly patients with malignant spinal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Jiang-wei; SHEN Bing-hua; DU Wei; LIU Jiang-qing; LU Shi-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Background Older patients with malignant spinal tumors are difficult to treat because they have many co-morbidities including osteoporosis.The purpose of this research is to discuss the technique and clinical outcome of bone cement enhanced pedicle screw fixation combined with vertebroplasty (the Sandwich Procedure) for elderly patients with severe osteoporosis and malignant spinal tumors.Methods This study includes 28 consecutive elderly patients with malignant thoracic or lumbar spinal tumors.There were nine patients with myelomas,and 19 patients with metastatic bone tumors.The Sandwich Procedure began with curettage of the tumor and a vertebroplasty with bone cement (polymethyl methacrylate,PMMA),followed by PMMA enhanced pedicle screw fixation.Patients were evaluated with the visual analogue scale (VAS),oswestry disability index (ODI),American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) neurological function classification,and the radiographic degree of kyphosis (Cobb angle).Data were analyzed using paired t-test to compare the pre-and post-operative values.The complications,local recurrences,and the survival status were also recorded.Results There was no operative mortality,and the mean operative time was 210 minutes (range 150-250 minutes).The average blood loss was 1550 ml (range 650-3300 ml).The average amount of cement for vertebroplasty was 3.6 ml (range 3-5 ml).The VAS,ODI,and ASIA scores were significantly improved after surgery (P <0.05).However,we found no differences between the pre and post-operative Cobb angles.The shortest survival time was 3 months,and we found no evidence of local recurrence in this group of patients.Conclusion The Sandwich Procedure is a safe operation and provides symptomatic relief in these difficult patients,permitting further treatment with chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  13. Radiographic and pathological stages of the changes at the bone-cement interface: an in-vivo experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Neslihan; Seyahi, Aksel; Aksu, Taner; Oztürk, Cağatay; Dervişoğlu, Sergülen; Murat Hiz, Veli Muzaffer

    2008-10-01

    Chemical and physical effects of cementation cause radiographic and histological changes at bone-cement interface. These changes can be of interest in the assessment of the residual lesions and subsequent recurrences after local resection and cementation of local aggressive tumours. The aim of the study was to evaluate the evolution and determine the stages of the changes that occur at the bone-cement interface after cementation of cavitary lesions. We operated on 16 hind legs of 8 sheep (Ovies Aries) under general anaesthesia (Xylasin HCl, Ketamin HCl and Forane). A bone cavity of 12 cm(3) was produced by curettage of the distal femoral condyle and was filled with cement. Control radiographs were taken at 2 days; 3, 6 and 12 weeks, and again at 6 months. One sheep each time was killed after second day and sixth month and two sheep each time after the third, sixth and 12th week and the specimens underwent pathological examination. After the first 3 weeks, a reactive fibrous membrane was detected on pathological examinations. This membrane consisted of granulation tissue, necrotic bone and bone marrow, which were replaced gradually by fibrous tissue. The radiographic revelation of this fibrous membrane was a radiolucent zone of 0.5-1.5 mm at 3 weeks. A Sclerotic rim appeared around this radiolucent zone at 6 weeks. With new bone formation the fibrous membrane disappeared at 3 months. This was seen on radiographs as the replacement of the radiolucent zone by a sclerotic ring of 0.5-2 mm. This sclerotic ring disappeared at 6 months, when a diffuse sclerosis and cortical bone thickening was detected on radiographs. According to our findings we suggest to consider the pathological processes at the bone-cement interface in 3 phases: (1) Reactive phase (first 3 weeks); (2) Resorption phase (3-6 weeks), and (3) Formation phase (6 weeks to 6 months). We have distinguished five different radiographic stages: Stage 1-Early stage with no apparent zone (first 3 weeks); Stage 2

  14. Prospection of Portland cement raw material: A case study in the Marmara region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgüner, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    Representative sampling of the raw materials used to make Portland cement, correct calculations for the possible clinker mixtures, sufficient reserves of the raw materials and selection of the correct infrastructure for the location of a cement factory are essential to the protection of the great investment in the factory. The results of chemical analyses of pipe samples taken in the field at right angles to the strikes of favourable limestone, clay, shale, and marl outcrops were used in Kind's lime saturation formula for clinker calculations of the possible mixtures. The cement modulus values were calculated using the corresponding clinker oxide ratios and were confirmed to be within the standard intervals for positive cement raw material mixtures. The most promising raw material source, a double lithologic mixture of limestone and mudstone was found during the prospection in north of Bilecik Province, where rhyolitic tuff outcrops with pozzolanic properties also exist. Some marble quarries nearby have been inclined to dispose of their marble wastes for use in cement production to prevent polluting the environment with them. The nearby Gemlik fertiliser factory provides inexpensive waste gypsum that can be used as a cool cement mixing material. The limestone, mudstone and trass raw material reserves in this area were calculated to be sufficient for the factory's requirements for more than 100 years of operation as results of the detailed geological mapping. The regional infrastructure is most suitable for distribution and marketing of cement products. The cement factory described in this study has been producing cement for the last 3 years, after coring and testing of the raw material reserves.

  15. [Effects of collagen on the properties of TTCP/MCPM bone cement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fuqiang; Li, Bogang

    2010-04-01

    Bone cement samples were made of tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate(MCPM) powder (Ca/P = 1.67) by using water and 5.24 mg/ml of self-made type I collagen sol as hardening liquid with the solid-liquid ratio of 3:1, their setting time and compressive strength were tested. The results showed that: the compressive strength of TTCP/MCPM bone cement containing collagen could increase from 17.8 +/- 1.9 MPa to 22.7 +/- 1.6 MPa, but its setting time hasn't been significantly affected; the compressive strength of both samples immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) could increase, and the growth rate of the sample containing collagen increased especially; both samples immersed in SBF for 4d and 14d, whose compressive strength could increase to 31.8 +/- 3.9 MPa (collagen)/19.5 +/- 1.3 MPa and 38.1 +/- 3.1 MPa (collagen)/21.9 +/- 2.2 MPa. According to the IR analysis before and after the collagen was mineralized, it showed that: after the collagen was mineralized, the characteristic peaks of the collagen's amide I band showed red-shift, while the amide II band and the amide III band nearly disappeared, suggesting that chemical action occurred between the collagen and hydroxyapatite (HA), which should be the basis of the enhancement on the TTCP/MCPM bone cement caused by collagen; while according to the SEM and XRD patterns of the sample surface before and after the samples were immersed in SBF, it showed that: the immersion in SBF changed brushite (DCPD) into HA, at the same time, large number of new HA deposited, making the samples' surface more dense and smooth. It was not only the enhancement mechanism of immersion in SBF, but also showed the coagulating and hardening process of TTCP/MCPM bone cement was that: the DCPD was generated firstly, then it changed into HA.

  16. Mesh-bone cement sandwich for sternal and sternoclavicular joint reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaud, Stéphane; Pfofe, Denis; Decurtins, Marco; Gelpke, Hans

    2013-03-01

    Resection of the manubrium including both sternoclavicular joints is occasionally performed in the case of sternal tumours. Sternoclavicular joints are the only true joints connecting the axial skeleton to the upper extremity. Therefore, they play an important role in shoulder function. However, data on their reconstruction are lacking. Here, we described the case of a sternal reconstruction including both sternoclavicular joints using a mesh-bone cement sandwich. The mechanical properties of the construct mimicked those of the original sternoclavicular joints and could therefore restore shoulder strength allowing the patient to perform overhead work.

  17. Biphasic calcium sulfate dihydrate/iron-modified alpha-tricalcium phosphate bone cement for spinal applications: in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlad, M D; Lopez, J; Torres, R; Barraco, M; Fernandez, E [Interdepartment Research Group for the Applied Scientific Collaboration (IRGASC), Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Avda Diagonal 647, E-08028-Barcelona (Spain); Valle, L J [Centre of Molecular Biotechnology (CEBIM), Department of Agri-Food Engineering and Biotechnology, ESAB, UPC, Avda Canal Olimpico 15, E-08860-Castelldefels (Spain); Poeata, I, E-mail: enrique.fernandez@upc.ed [Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, ' Gr T Popa' University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Str. Kogalniceanu 9-13, 700454 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-04-15

    In this study, the cytocompatibility of new 'iron-modified/alpha-tricalcium phosphate (IM/alpha-TCP) and calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD)' bone cement (IM/alpha-TCP/CSD-BC) intended for spinal applications has been approached. The objective was to investigate by direct-contact osteoblast-like cell cultures (from 1 to 14 days) the in vitro cell adhesion, proliferation, morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MG-63 cells seeded onto the new cements. The results were as follows: (a) quantitative MTT-assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that cell adhesion, proliferation and viability were not affected with time by the presence of iron in the cements; (b) double immunofluorescent labeling of F-actin and alpha-tubulin showed a dynamic interaction between the cell and its porous substrates sustaining the locomotion phenomenon on the cements' surface, which favored the colonization, and confirming the biocompatibility of the experimental cements; (c) SEM-cell morphology and cytoskeleton observations also evidenced that MG-63 cells were able to adhere, to spread and to attain normal morphology on the new IM/alpha-TCP/CSD-BC which offered favorable substratum properties for osteoblast-like cells proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The results showed that these new iron-modified cement-like biomaterials have cytocompatible features of interest not only as possible spinal cancellous bone replacement biomaterial but also as bone tissue engineering scaffolds.

  18. Physical Properties of Acidic Calcium Phosphate Cements

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The gold standard for bone replacement today, autologous bone, suffers from several disadvantages, such as the increased risk of infection due to the need for two surgeries. Degradable synthetic materials with properties similar to bone, such as calcium phosphate cements, are a promising alternative. Calcium phosphate cements are suited for a limited amount of applications and improving their physical properties could extend their use into areas previously not considered possible. For example...

  19. Self-setting bioactive calcium-magnesium phosphate cement with high strength and degradability for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Wei, Jie; Guo, Han; Chen, Fangping; Hong, Hua; Liu, Changsheng

    2008-11-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been successfully used in clinics as bone repair biomaterial for many years. However, poor mechanical properties and a low biodegradation rate limit any further applications. Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) is characterized by fast setting, high initial strength and relatively rapid degradation in vivo. In this study, MPC was combined with CPC to develop novel calcium-magnesium phosphate cement (CMPC). The setting time, compressive strength, phase composition of hardened cement, degradation in vitro, cells responses in vitro by MG-63 cell culture and tissue responses in vivo by implantation of CMPC in bone defect of rabbits were investigated. The results show that CMPC has a shorter setting time and markedly better mechanical properties than either CPC or MPC. Moreover, CMPC showed significantly improved degradability compared to CPC in simulated body fluid. Cell culture results indicate that CMPC is biocompatible and could support cell attachment and proliferation. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility and osteogenesis, the CMPC samples were implanted into bone defects in rabbits. Histological evaluation showed that the introduction of MPC into CPC enhanced the efficiency of new bone formation. CMPC also exhibited good biocompatibility, biodegradability and osteoconductivity with host bone in vivo. The results obtained suggest that CMPC, having met the basic requirements of bone tissue engineering, might have a significant clinical advantage over CPC, and may have the potential to be applied in orthopedic, reconstructive and maxillofacial surgery.

  20. comparative response of four pedogenic soil materials to cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NIJOTECH

    recommended by [I2] to be adequate for cement stabilized soils, while soils from Yola met the conventional .... alluvium. The two-study areas, Maiduguri and Yola, experiences semi- arid condition and are .... Soil Mechanics and Foundation.

  1. Spatial resolution and measurement uncertainty of strains in bone and bone-cement interface using digital volume correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Qing-Hang; Lupton, Colin; Tong, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The measurement uncertainty of strains has been assessed in a bone analogue (sawbone), bovine trabecular bone and bone-cement interface specimens under zero load using the Digital Volume Correlation (DVC) method. The effects of sub-volume size, sample constraint and preload on the measured strain uncertainty have been examined. There is generally a trade-off between the measurement uncertainty and the spatial resolution. Suitable sub-volume sizes have been be selected based on a compromise between the measurement uncertainty and the spatial resolution of the cases considered. A ratio of sub-volume size to a microstructure characteristic (Tb.Sp) was introduced to reflect a suitable spatial resolution, and the measurement uncertainty associated was assessed. Specifically, ratios between 1.6 and 4 appear to give rise to standard deviations in the measured strains between 166 and 620 με in all the cases considered, which would seem to suffice for strain analysis in pre as well as post yield loading regimes. A microscale finite element (μFE) model was built from the CT images of the sawbone, and the results from the μFE model and a continuum FE model were compared with those from the DVC. The strain results were found to differ significantly between the two methods at tissue level, consistent in trend with the results found in human bones, indicating mainly a limitation of the current DVC method in mapping strains at this level.

  2. Percutaneous bone cement refixation of aseptically loose hip prostheses: the effect of interface tissue removal on injected cement volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malan, Daniel F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Intelligent Systems, Delft (Netherlands); Valstar, Edward R. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Delft (Netherlands); Nelissen, Rob G.H.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    To quantify whether injected cement volumes differed between two groups of patients who underwent experimental minimally invasive percutaneous cement injection procedures to stabilize aseptically loose hip prostheses. One patient group was preoperatively treated using gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy to remove fibrous interface tissue, while the other group received no preoperative treatment. It was hypothesized that cement penetration may have been inhibited by the presence of fibrous interface tissue in periprosthetic lesions. We analyzed 17 patients (14 female, 3 male, ages 72-91, ASA categories 2-4) who were treated at our institution. Osteolytic lesions and injected cement were manually delineated using 3D CT image segmentation, and the deposition of injected cement was quantified. Patients who underwent preoperative gene-directed enzyme therapy to remove fibrous tissue exhibited larger injected cement volumes than those who did not. The observed median increase in injected cement volume was 6.8 ml. Higher cement leakage volumes were also observed for this group. We conclude that prior removal of periprosthetic fibrous interface tissue may enable better cement flow and penetration. This might lead to better refixation of aseptically loosened prostheses. (orig.)

  3. Cemented materials: accounting for compaction delays and minimising strength loss with time

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bredenhann, SJ

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In South Africa extensive use is made of cement stabilized materials in the structural layers of both new road and construction works and pavement rehabilitation. The construction process plays a role in the ultimate strength obtained...

  4. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  5. High-Temperature Release of SO2 from Calcined Cement Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of alternative fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions may occur and cause reductive decomposition of sulfates from calcined cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2...... concentration, which may cause deposit formation in the kiln system. In this study, the release of sulfur from calcined cement raw materials under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is investigated. The investigations include thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the temperature interval of 800–1500 °C...... and experiments in a tube furnace reactor in the temperature interval of 900–1100 °C. The investigated conditions resemble actual conditions in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns. It was found that the sulfates CaSO4, K2SO4, and Na2SO4 were all stable under oxidizing conditions but began to decompose...

  6. ETV Program Report: Coatings for Wastewater Collection Systems - Standard Cement Materials, Epoxy Coating 4553

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Standard Cement Materials, Inc. Standard Epoxy Coating 4553™ (SEC 4553) epoxy coating used for wastewater collection system rehabilitation was evaluated by EPA’s Environmental Technology Verification Program under laboratory conditions at the Center for Innovative Grouting Ma...

  7. Porous calcium phosphate-poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid composite bone cement: A viable tunable drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Abhijit; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Bayer, Emily; Fedorchak, Morgan; Little, Steve R; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-02-01

    Calcium phosphate based cements (CPCs) are frequently used as bone void fillers for non-load bearing segmental bone defects due to their clinically relevant handling characteristics and ability to promote natural bone growth. Macroporous CPC scaffolds with interconnected pores are preferred for their ability to degrade faster and enable accelerated bone regeneration. Herein, a composite CPC scaffold is developed using newly developed resorbable calcium phosphate cement (ReCaPP) formulation containing degradable microspheres of bio-compatible poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) serving as porogen. The present study is aimed at characterizing the effect of in-vitro degradation of PLGA microspheres on the physical, chemical and structural characteristics of the composite cements. The porosity measurements results reveal the formation of highly interconnected macroporous scaffolds after degradation of PLGA microspheres. The in-vitro characterizations also suggest that the degradation by products of PLGA reduces the pH of the local environment thereby increasing the dissolution rate of the cement. In addition, the in-vitro vancomycin release from the composite CPC scaffold suggests that the drug association with the composite scaffolds can be tuned to achieve control release kinetics. Further, the study demonstrates control release lasting for longer than 10weeks from the composite cements in which vancomycin is encapsulated in PLGA microspheres.

  8. Osteoregenerative capacities of dicalcium phosphate-rich calcium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-Ling; Chen, Jian-Chih; Tien, Yin-Chun; Hung, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Chen, Wen-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) is a widely used bone substitute. However, CPC application is limited by poor bioresorption, which is attributed to apatite, the stable product. This study aims to systematically survey the biological performance of dicalcium phosphate (DCP)-rich CPC. DCP-rich CPC exhibited a twofold, surface-modified DCP anhydrous (DCPA)-to-tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) molar ratio, whereas conventional CPC (c-CPC) showed a onefold, surface unmodified DCPA-to-TTCP molar ratio. Cell adhesion, morphology, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the two CPCs were examined with bone cell progenitor D1 cultured in vitro. Microcomputed tomography and histological observation were conducted after CPC implantation in vivo to analyze the residual implant ratio and new bone formation rate. D1 cells cultured on DCP-rich CPC surfaces exhibited higher cell viability, ALP activity, and ALP quantity than c-CPC. Histological evaluation indicated that DCP-rich CPC showed lesser residual implant and higher new bone formation rate than c-CPC. Therefore, DCP-rich CPC can improve bioresorption. The newly developed DCP-rich CPC exhibited potential therapeutic applications for bone reconstruction.

  9. Microwave processing of cement and concrete materials – towards an industrial reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttress, Adam, E-mail: adam.buttress@nottingham.ac.uk; Jones, Aled; Kingman, Sam

    2015-02-15

    Each year a substantial body of literature is published on the use of microwave to process cement and concrete materials. Yet to date, very few if any have lead the realisation of a commercial scale industrial system and is the context under which this review has been undertaken. The state-of the–art is evaluated for opportunities, and the key barriers to the development of new microwave-based processing techniques to enhance production, processing and recycling of cement and concrete materials. Applications reviewed include pyro-processing of cement clinker; accelerated curing, non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E), and end-of-life processing including radionuclide decontamination.

  10. Glycerol Salicylate-based Pulp-Capping Material Containing Portland Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, Fernando Freitas; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Santos, Paula Dapper; Sartori, Cláudia; Wegner, Everton; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the water sorption, solubility, pH and ability to diffuse into dentin of a glycerol salicylate-based, pulp-capping cement in comparison to a conventional calcium hydroxide-based pulp capping material (Hydcal). An experimental cement was developed containing 60% glycerol salicylate resin, 10% methyl salicylate, 25% calcium hydroxide and 5% Portland cement. Water sorption and solubility were determined based on mass changes in the samples before and after the immersion in distilled water for 7 days. Material discs were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 days and 28 days, and a digital pHmeter was used to measure the pH of water. The cement's ability to diffuse into bovine dentin was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. The glycerol salicylate-based cement presented higher water sorption and lower solubility than Hydcal. The pH of water used to store the samples increased for both cements, reaching 12.59 ± 0.06 and 12.54 ± 0.05 after 7 days, for Hydcal and glycerol salicylate-based cements, respectively. Both cements were able to turn alkaline the medium at 24 h and sustain its alkalinity after 28 days. Hydcal exhibited an intense diffusion into dentin up to 40 µm deep, and the glycerol salicylate-based cement penetrated 20 µm. The experimental glycerol salicylate-based cement presents good sorption, solubility, ability to alkalize the surrounding tissues and diffusion into dentin to be used as pulp capping material.

  11. Optimization of fly ash as sand replacement materials (SRM) in cement composites containing coconut fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadzri, N. I. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    The need of utilizing industrial and agricultural wastes is very important to maintain sustainability. These wastes are often incorporated with cement composites to improve performances in term of physical and mechanical properties. This study presents the results of the investigation of the response of cement composites containing coconut fiber as reinforcement and fly ash use as substitution of sand at different hardening days. Hardening periods of time (7, 14 and 28 days) were selected to study the properties of cement composites. Optimization result showed that 20 wt. % of fly ash (FA) is a suitable material for sand replacement (SRM). Meanwhile 14 days of hardening period gave highest compressive strength (70.12 MPa) from the cement composite containing 9 wt. % of coconut fiber and fly ash. This strength was comparable with the cement without coconut fiber (74.19 MPa) after 28 days of curing.

  12. Using calcium silicate to regulate the physicochemical and biological properties when using β-tricalcium phosphate as bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Chia-Tze; Huang, Tsui-Hsien [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chi-Chang, E-mail: chichang31@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Tunghai University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Regarding the formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength as well as the ion release and weight loss of composites were compared both before and after immersions in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured on β-TCP/CS composites. The results show that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites improves as the CS content is increased. For composites with more than a 60% CS content, the samples become completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion period, weight losses of 24%, 32%, 34%, 38%, 41%, and 45% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 20%, 40%, 80%, 80% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In addition, the antibacterial activity of CS/β-TCP composite improves as the CS-content is increased. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 60%, the quantity of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs is stimulated by Si released from the β-TCP/CS composites. The degradation of β-TCP and the osteogenesis of CS give strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements will prove to be effective bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved the physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • Higher CS in the composite, the shorter setting time and the higher DTS was found. • With a CS more than 40%, the osteogenesis and angiogenesis proteins were promoted by

  13. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  14. Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of Hardened Cement Paste with Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Cui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, structural-functional integrated cement-based materials were prepared by employing cement paste and a microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resin as the shell and paraffin as the core material. The encapsulation ratio of the MPCM could reach up to 91.21 wt%. Thermal energy storage cement pastes (TESCPs incorporated with different MPCM contents (5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% by weight of cement were developed, and their thermal and mechanical properties were studied. The results showed that the total energy storage capacity of the hardened cement specimens with MPCM increased by up to 3.9-times compared with that of the control cement paste. The thermal conductivity at different temperature levels (35–36 °C, 55–56 °C and 72–74 °C decreased with the increase of MPCM content, and the decrease was the highest when the temperature level was 55–56 °C. Moreover, the compressive strength, flexural strength and density of hardened cement paste decreased with the increase in MPCM content linearly. Among the evaluated properties, the compressive strength of TESCPs had a larger and faster degradation with the increase of MPCM content.

  15. An active contour method for bone cement reconstruction from C-arm x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Blake C; Otake, Yoshito; Armand, Mehran; Taylor, Russell H

    2012-04-01

    A novel algorithm is presented to segment and reconstruct injected bone cement from a sparse set of X-ray images acquired at arbitrary poses. The sparse X-ray multi-view active contour (SxMAC-pronounced "smack") can 1) reconstruct objects for which the background partially occludes the object in X-ray images, 2) use X-ray images acquired on a noncircular trajectory, and 3) incorporate prior computed tomography (CT) information. The algorithm's inputs are preprocessed X-ray images, their associated pose information, and prior CT, if available. The algorithm initiates automated reconstruction using visual hull computation from a sparse number of X-ray images. It then improves the accuracy of the reconstruction by optimizing a geodesic active contour. Experiments with mathematical phantoms demonstrate improvements over a conventional silhouette based approach, and a cadaver experiment demonstrates SxMAC's ability to reconstruct high contrast bone cement that has been injected into a femur and achieve sub-millimeter accuracy with four images.

  16. Bioactive calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement for bone substitute applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangyong; Liu, Jianli; Li, Fan; Pan, Zongyou; Ni, Xiao; Shen, Yue; Xu, Huazi; Huang, Qing

    2014-02-01

    A novel calcium sulfate/magnesium phosphate cement (CSMPC) composite was prepared and studied in the present work. The physical properties including the phases, the microstructures, the setting properties and the compressive strengths of the CSMPCs were studied. The bio-performances of the CSMPCs were comprehensively evaluated using in vitro simulated body fluid (SBF) method and in vitro cell culture. The dependence of the physical and chemical properties of the CSMPC on its composition and microstructure was studied in detail. It is found that the CSMPC composites exhibited mediate setting times (6-12 min) compared to the calcium sulfate (CS) and the magnesium phosphate cement (MPC). They showed an encapsulation structure in which the unconverted hexagonal prism CSH particles were embedded in the xerogel-like MPC matrix. The phase compositions and the mechanical properties of the CSMPCs were closely related to the content of MPC and the hardening process. The CSMPCs exhibited excellent bioactivity and good biocompatibility to support the cells to attach and proliferate on the surface. The CSMPC composite has the potential to serve as bone grafts for the bone regeneration.

  17. Plasma nitriding of titanium alloy: Effect of roughness, hardness, biocompatibility, and bonding with bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Morshed; Riahinezhad, Shahram; Li, Yanling; Vaughan, Melville B; Sultana, Fariha; Morris, Tracy L; Phinney, Lucas; Hossain, Khalid

    2016-11-25

    Titanium (Ti) alloys have been widely used in orthopedics and orthodontic surgeries as implants because of their beneficial chemical, mechanical, and biological properties. Improvement of these properties of a Ti alloy, Ti-6Al-4V Eli, is possible by the use of plasma nitriding treatment on the Ti alloy. The novelty of this study is the evaluation of a DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment method on the surface, mechanical and biological properties of Ti alloy. Specifically, this study measured the chemical states, roughness, hardness, and biocompatibility of plasma nitride treated Ti-6Al-4V Eli as well as determined the effect of plasma treatment on the fracture strength between the Ti alloy and bone clement. This study hypothesized that DC glow discharge nitrogen plasma treatment may alter the surface chemical and mechanical states of the Ti alloy that may influence the fracture strength of implant/cement interfaces under static load. This study found that plasma nitride treatment on Ti alloy does not have effect on the roughness and biocompatibility (P value > 0.5), but significantly effect on the hardness and fracture strength of Ti-bone cement interfaces compared to those values of untreated Ti samples (P value plasma treated Ti alloy can potentially be used for orthopedic applications.

  18. Sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium phosphate and polymethylmethacrylate bone cements on root ends prepared using an Erbium: Yttriumaluminium garnet laser and ultrasonics evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, C Sabari; Ponnappa, Kc; Girish, Tn; Ponappa, Mc

    2013-07-01

    Surgical endodontic therapy comprises of exposure of the involved root apex, resection of the apical end of the root, preparation of a class I cavity, and insertion of a root end filling material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is now the gold standard among all root end filling materials. MTA is however difficult to handle, expensive and has a very slow setting reaction. (1) To compare the sealing ability of MTA, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement and CHITRA Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) when used as root end filling material using Rhodamine B dye evaluated under a confocal laser scanning microscope. (2) To compare the seal of root ends prepared using an ultrasonic retroprep tip and an Er: YAG laser using three different root end filling materials. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA and a two-way ANOVA, independent samples t-test and Scheffe's post hoc test using SPSS Version 16 for Windows. All the three materials, namely MTA, PMMA BONE CEMENT and CHITRA CPC, showed microleakage. Comparison of microleakage showed maximum peak value of 0.86 mm for MTA, 0.24 mm for PMMA bone cement and 1.37 mm for CHITRA CPC. The amount of dye penetration was found to be lesser in root ends prepared using Er: YAG laser when compared with ultrasonics, but the difference was found to be not statistically significant. PMMA bone cement is a better material as root end filling material to prevent apical microleakage. MTA still continues to be a gold standard root end filling material showing minimum microleakage. Er: YAG laser is a better alternative to ultrasonics for root end preparations.

  19. Application of labeled radioimmunoimaging tracing in detecting pulmonary embolism in rabbits after bone cement perfusion and relevant treatment effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiang-bei; ZHANG Ying-ze; PAN Jin-she; MA Li-jie; WANG Jian-zhao; WANG Lin

    2011-01-01

    Background During the process of bone cement joint replacement,some patients show a series of complications,such as a sudden drop in blood pressure or dyspnea.The cause of the complication is considered to be due to emboli caused by the femur prosthesis insertion.The purpose of the present study was to detect the pulmonary embolism in rabbits after bone cement perfusion by radioimmunoimaging,and to explore its protective measures.Methods Forty rabbits,2.5-3.0 kg weight,were randomly assigned to four groups,with ten rabbits in each group.Group Ⅰ (no intervention):Bone cement perfusion was done after medullary cavity reaming and pressurizing.Group Ⅱ (epinephrine hydrochloride intervention):The medullary cavity was rinsed with a 1:10000 normal saline-diluted epinephrine hydrochloride solution followed by bone cement perfusion after medullary cavity reaming and pressurizing.Group Ⅲ (fibrin sealant intervention):The medullary cavity was precoated with fibrin sealant followed by bone cement perfusion after medullary cavity reaming and pressurizing.Group Ⅳ (blank control group):The medullary cavity was not perfused with bone cement after reaming.In each group,the rabbits underwent femoral head resection and medullary cavity reaming.Before bone cement perfusion,2 ml of developing tracer was injected through the ear vein.Radionuclide imaging was performed at 60,120,and 180 minutes after bone cement perfusion,and the pulmonary radioactivity in vivo was measured.The rabbits were immediately sacrificed,and the pulmonary tissue was removed and its radioactivity was measured in vitro.Pulmonary tissue was then fixed and the pulmonary embolism and the associated pathological changes were observed.Results The pulmonary radioactivity in vivo was measured at 60,120,and 180 minutes after bone cement perfusion.The radioactivities of the four groups were 11.67±2.16,14.59±2.92 and 18.43±4.83 in group Ⅰ; 8.37±3.05,10.35±2.24 and 11.48±2.96 in group Ⅱ; 3.91±1.19,5.53±2

  20. Injectability of brushite-forming Mg-substituted and Sr-substituted alpha-TCP bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, S; Torres, P M C; Ferreira, J M F

    2010-02-01

    The influence of magnesium- and strontium-substitutions on injectability and mechanical performance of brushite-forming alpha-TCP cements has been evaluated in the present work. The effects of Mg- and Sr-substitutions on crystalline phase composition and lattice parameters were determined through quantitative X-ray phase analysis and structural Rietveld refinement of the starting calcium phosphate powders and of the hardened cements. A noticeable dependence of injectability on the liquid-to-powder ratio (LPR), smooth plots of extrusion force versus syringe plunger displacement and the absence of filter pressing effects were observed. For LPR values up to 0.36 ml g(-1), the percentage of injectability was always higher and lower for Mg-containing cements and for Sr-containing cements, respectively, while all the pastes could be fully injected for LPR > 0.36 ml g(-1). The hardened cements exhibited relatively high wet compressive strength values (~17-25 MPa) being the Sr- and Mg-containing cements the strongest and the weakest, respectively, holding an interesting promise for uses in trauma surgery such as for filling bone defects and in minimally invasive techniques such as percutaneous vertebroplasty to fill lesions and strengthen the osteoporotic bone.

  1. Multifunctional materials for bone cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques C

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Catarina Marques,1 José MF Ferreira,1 Ecaterina Andronescu,2 Denisa Ficai,2 Maria Sonmez,3 Anton Ficai21Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal; 2Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Material Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Bucharest, Romania; 3National Research and Development Institute for Textiles and Leather, Bucharest, RomaniaAbstract: The purpose of this review is to present the most recent findings in bone tissue engineering. Special attention is given to multifunctional materials based on collagen and collagen–hydroxyapatite composites used for skin and bone cancer treatments. The multifunctionality of these materials was obtained by adding to the base regenerative grafts proper components, such as ferrites (magnetite being the most important representative, cytostatics (cisplatin, carboplatin, vincristine, methotrexate, paclitaxel, doxorubicin, silver nanoparticles, antibiotics (anthracyclines, geldanamycin, and/or analgesics (ibuprofen, fentanyl. The suitability of complex systems for the intended applications was systematically analyzed. The developmental possibilities of multifunctional materials with regenerative and curative roles (antitumoral as well as pain management in the field of skin and bone cancer treatment are discussed. It is worth mentioning that better materials are likely to be developed by combining conventional and unconventional experimental strategies.Keywords: bone graft, cancer, collagen, magnetite, cytostatics, silver

  2. Amino acid-assisted synthesis of strontium hydroxyapatite bone cement by a soft solution freezing method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Gopi; S Nithiya; L Kavitha; J M F Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Among many cations that can substitute for calcium in the structure of hydroxyapatite, strontium provokes an increasing interest because of its beneficial effect on bone formation and prevention of bone resorption. Strontium-incorporated calcium phosphates show potential in biomedical application, particularly the doped strontium may help in new bone formation. We have synthesized strontium hydroxyapatite powders at 2 °C by a soft solution freezing method using glycine as the template. The structural and morphological characterizations were carried out on the as obtained powders using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Strontium was quantitatively incorporated into hydroxyapatite where its substitution for calcium provoked a linear shift of the infrared absorption bands of the hydroxyl and phosphate groups. The strontium substituted bone cement has potential for use in orthopaedic surgeries. The present study shows that the addition of glycine plays an important role in reducing the particle size of strontium hydroxyapatite which could be used for biomedical applications.

  3. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  4. Building materials for a sustainable future – cement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mapiravana, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available /or content were compared against a fixed 1kg OPC/CEM I (91% clinker), at plant, using Eco-invent data version 2.1 unit process. Results of the simulation are shown in Table 2. 8 Table 2. Comparison of carbon footprints of simulated geopolymers against... Geopolymer cement (0.85kg blast furnace slag, 0.15kg sodium silicate, furnace liquor, 37% in H2O, , Eco-invent data version 2.1 unit process 3. 1kg Geopolymer Cement (0.85kg blast furnace slag, 0.075kg sodium silicate, furnace liquor, 37% in H2O, at plant...

  5. Investigation of the physical properties of tricalcium silicate cement-based root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-02-01

    Tricalcium silicate-based cements have been displayed as suitable root-end filling materials. The physical properties of prototype radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material was used as a control. The physical properties of a prototype zirconium oxide replaced tricalcium silicate cement and two proprietary cements composed of tricalcium silicate namely Bioaggregate and Biodentine were investigated. Intermediate restorative material (IRM) was used as a control. Radiopacity assessment was undertaken and expressed in thickness of aluminum. In addition the anti-washout resistance was investigated using a novel basket-drop method and the fluid uptake, sorption and solubility were investigated using a gravimetric method. The setting time was assessed using an indentation technique and compressive strength and micro-hardness of the test materials were investigated. All the testing was performed with the test materials immersed in Hank's balanced salt solution. All the materials tested had a radiopacity value higher than 3mm thickness of aluminum. IRM exhibited the highest radiopacity. Biodentine demonstrated a high washout, low fluid uptake and sorption values, low setting time and superior mechanical properties. The fluid uptake and setting time was the highest for Bioaggregate. The addition of admixtures to tricalcium silicate-based cements affects the physical properties of the materials. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel controlled-release system for antibacterial enzyme lysostaphin delivery using hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite bone cement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Xue

    Full Text Available In this work, a lysostaphin-loaded, control-released, self-setting and injectable porous bone cement with efficient protein delivery was prepared by a novel setting method using hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CS composite scaffold. The cement samples were made through cementitious reactions by mixing solid powder, a mixture of HA/CS composite particles, lysostaphin, Ca(OH2, CaCO3 and NaHCO3, with setting liquid containing citric acid, acetic acid, NaH2PO4, CaCl2 and poloxamer. The setting parameters of the cement samples were determined. The results showed that the final setting time was 96.6±5.2 min and the pH value increased from approximately 6.2 to nearly 10 during the setting process and the porosity was 34% at the end. And the microstructure and composition were detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. For the release behavior of lysostaphin loaded in the cement sample, the in vitro cement extract experiment indicated that about 94.2±10.9% of the loaded protein was released before day 8 and the in vivo Qdot 625 fluorescence tracking experiment showed that the loaded protein released slower than the free one. Then the biocompatibility of the cement samples was evaluated using the methylthiazol tetrazolium assay, SEM and hematoxylin-eosin staining, which suggested good biocompatibility of cement samples with MC 3T3-E1 cells and subcutaneous tissues of mice. Finally the antibacterial activity assay indicated that the loaded lysostaphin had good release ability and strong antibacterial enzymatic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Collectively, all the results suggested that the lysostaphin-loaded self-setting injectable porous bone cement released the protein in a controlled and effective way and the protein activity was well retained during the setting and releasing process. Thus this bone cement can be potentially applied as a combination of

  7. Promotion of in vivo degradability, vascularization and osteogenesis of calcium sulfate-based bone cements containing nanoporous lithium doping magnesium silicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liehu; Weng, Weizong; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jun; Zhou, Qirong; Cui, Jin; Zhao, Yuechao; Shin, Jung-Woog; Su, Jiacan

    2017-01-01

    Nanoporous lithium doping magnesium silicate (nl-MS) was introduced into calcium sulfate hemihydrate to prepare calcium sulfate composite (nl-MSC) bone cements. The introduction of nl-MS improved the in vitro degradability of nl-MSC cements, which could neutralize acidic degradable products of calcium sulfate and prevented the pH from dropping. The cements were implanted into the bone defects of femur bone of rabbits, and the results of histological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed that massive new bone tissue formed in the defects while the cements were degradable, indicating that the osteogenesis and degradability of the nl-MSC cements were much better than the control calcium sulfate dihydrate (CSD) cements. Furthermore, the positive expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and collagen type I for nl-MSC cements was higher than CSD, indicating that addition of nl-MS into the cements enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation. The results suggested that the nl-MSC cements with good biocompatibility and degradability could promote vascularization and osteogenesis, and had great potential to treat bone defects. PMID:28260883

  8. Strong and tough magnesium wire reinforced phosphate cement composites for load-bearing bone replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Reinhard; Seitz, Jan-Marten; Ewald, Andrea; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Groll, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are brittle biomaterials of low bending strength. One promising approach to improve their mechanical properties is reinforcement with fibers. State of the art degradable reinforced composites contain fibers made of polymers, resorbable glass or whiskers of calcium minerals. We introduce a new class of composite that is reinforced with degradable magnesium alloy wires. Bending strength and ductility of the composites increased with aspect ratio and volume content of the reinforcements up to a maximal bending strength of 139±41MPa. Hybrid reinforcement with metal and polymer fibers (PLA) further improved the qualitative fracture behavior and gave indication of enhanced strength and ductility. Immersion tests of composites in SBF for seven weeks showed high corrosion stability of ZEK100 wires and slow degradation of the magnesium calcium phosphate cement by struvite dissolution. Finally, in vitro tests with the osteoblast-like cell line MG63 demonstrate cytocompatibility of the composite materials.

  9. The materials used in bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, V. P., E-mail: tervp@ngs.ru; Kirilova, I. A.; Sadovoy, M. A.; Larionov, P. M. [Novosibirsk Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics n.a. Ya.L. Tsivyan, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Bone tissue engineering looking for an alternative solution to the problem of skeletal injuries. The method is based on the creation of tissue engineered bone tissue equivalent with stem cells, osteogenic factors, and scaffolds - the carriers of these cells. For production of tissue engineered bone equivalent is advisable to create scaffolds similar in composition to natural extracellular matrix of the bone. This will provide optimal conditions for the cells, and produce favorable physico-mechanical properties of the final construction. This review article gives an analysis of the most promising materials for the manufacture of cell scaffolds. Biodegradable synthetic polymers are the basis for the scaffold, but it alone cannot provide adequate physical and mechanical properties of the construction, and favorable conditions for the cells. Addition of natural polymers improves the strength characteristics and bioactivity of constructions. Of the inorganic compounds, to create cell scaffolds the most widely used calcium phosphates, which give the structure adequate stiffness and significantly increase its osteoinductive capacity. Signaling molecules do not affect the physico-mechanical properties of the scaffold, but beneficial effect is on the processes of adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of cells. Biodegradation of the materials will help to fulfill the main task of bone tissue engineering - the ability to replace synthetic construct by natural tissues that will restore the original anatomical integrity of the bone.

  10. Three-dimensional Microstructure Simulation Model of Cement Based Materials,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, G.; Van Breugel, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a computer-based numerical model for the simulation of the development of microstructure during cement hydration. Special emphasis is on the algorithm for characterizing the pores. This includes the porosity and the pore size distribution and the topological properties of the po

  11. The Integration of EIS parameters and bulk matrix characterization in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g. reinf

  12. The integration of eis parameters and bulk matrix characteristics in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g. reinf

  13. The integration of eis parameters and bulk matrix characteristics in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  14. The Integration of EIS parameters and bulk matrix characterization in studying reinforced cement-based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion in reinforced concrete is a major and costly concern, arising from the higher complexity of involved phenomena on different levels of material science (e.g. electrochemistry, concrete material science) and material properties (macro/micro/ nano). Reinforced cement-based systems (e.g.

  15. Utilization of flotation wastes of copper slag as raw material in cement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, I; Deveci, H; Süngün, H

    2008-11-30

    Copper slag wastes, even if treated via processes such as flotation for metal recovery, still contain heavy metals with hazardous properties posing environmental risks for disposal. This study reports the potential use of flotation waste of a copper slag (FWCS) as iron source in the production of Portland cement clinker. The FWCS appears a suitable raw material as iron source containing >59% Fe(2)O(3) mainly in the form of fayalite (Fe(2)SiO(4)) and magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). The clinker products obtained using the FWCS from the industrial scale trial operations over a 4-month period were characterised for the conformity of its chemical composition and the physico-mechanical performance of the resultant cement products was evaluated. The data collected for the clinker products produced using an iron ore, which is currently used as the cement raw material were also included for comparison. The results have shown that the chemical compositions of all the clinker products including those of FWCS are typical of a Portland cement clinker. The mechanical performance of the standard mortars prepared from the FWCS clinkers were found to be similar to those from the iron ore clinkers with the desired specifications for the industrial cements e.g. CEM I type cements. Furthermore, the leachability tests (TCLP and SPLP) have revealed that the mortar samples obtained from the FWCS clinkers present no environmental problems while the FWCS could act as the potential source of heavy metal contamination. These findings suggest that flotation wastes of copper slag (FWCS) can be readily utilised as cement raw material due to its availability in large quantities at low cost with the further significant benefits for waste management/environmental practices of the FWCS and the reduced production and processing costs for cement raw materials.

  16. Utilization of Red Mud as Raw Material in the Production of Field Road Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao; LUO Zhongtao; ZHANG Lei; RONG Hui; YANG Jiujun

    2016-01-01

    The total utilization amount of red mud is limited due to its high content of alkali, heavy metals and naturally occurring radioactive element. In order to rationalize the use of red mud, a typical ifeld road cement using dealkalized red mud (content of alkali lower than 1%) as raw material was ifrstly prepared in this paper. Then, a preliminary research on the radioactivity of the red mud based ifeld road cement has been carried out. For that reason, two samples of raw materials were prepared. One was with ordinary raw materials, as the control group (CG), the other was with 23w % red mud, as the experimental group (EG). The clinkers were acquired by sintering the above two raw materials at 1 400℃. Subsequently, the two types of cement prepared by the above two kinds of clinkers were tested by measuring the normal consistency, setting time, mechanical strength and drying shrinkage. Meanwhile, the hydration products of the two types of cement were examined by XRD analysis at the curing age of 6 hours, 1, 3, 7, and 28 days, respectively. The radioactivity of the two kinds of cement clinkers was then measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The experimental results indicate that the main mineralogical phases components in the EG ifeld road cement clinkers are C3S, C2S, and C4AF, the 28 days lfexural and compressive strength of the EG ifeld road cement mortars could be up to 8.45 and 53.2 MPa, respectively. The radioactive measuring results of the EG field road cement show that the value of radium equivalent activity index (Raeq) is 254.8 Bq/Kg-1, which is lower than the upper limit.

  17. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Harabech

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs in an alternating magnetic field (AMF. Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  18. Antibacterial Efficacy of a New Gentamicin-Coating for Cementless Prostheses Compared to Gentamicin-Loaded Bone Cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neut, Danielle; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; Thompson, Jonathan I.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2011-01-01

    Cementless prostheses are increasingly popular but require alternative prophylactic measures than the use of antibiotic-loaded bone cements. Here, we determine the 24-h growth inhibition of gentamicin-releasing coatings from grit-blasted and porous-coated titanium alloys, and compare their antibacte

  19. The effect of stem surface treatment and material on pistoning of ulnar components in linked cemented elbow prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Yara K; King, Graham J W; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-09-01

    The ulnar component of a total elbow replacement can fail by "pistoning." Stem surface treatments have improved stability at the stem-cement interface but with varied success. This study investigated the role of surface treatment and stem substrate material on implant stability under axial loading. Sixty circular stems (diameter, 8 mm) made of cobalt chrome (n = 30) or titanium (n = 30) had different surfaces: smooth, sintered beads, and plasma spray. The surface treatment length was either 10 mm or 20 mm. Stems were potted in bone cement, allowed to cure for 24 hours, and tested in a materials testing machine under a compressive staircase loading protocol. Failure was defined as 2 mm of push-out or completion of the protocol. Two-way analyses of variance compared the effects of surface treatment and substrate material on interface strength and motion. Significant interactions were found between surface treatment and substrate material for both interface strength and motion (P .05) to the 20-mm plasma-spray stems (P component stability but is dependent on substrate material. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Damping Property of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to explore the damping property of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT. In the study, the cement composites with different contents of CNT (0 wt%, 0.033 wt%, 0.066 wt%, and 0.1 wt% were investigated. Logarithmic Decrement method and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA method were utilized to study the damping property of CNT/cement composite. The influences of CNT on pore size distribution and microstructure of composite were analyzed by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry (MIP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, respectively. The experimental results showed that CNT/cement composite presented higher flexural strength index than that of a pure cement paste. Additional CNT could improve the vibration-reduction capacity of cement paste. Furthermore, the experiments proved that CNT could bridge adjacent hydration products and support load transfer within cement matrix, which contributed to the energy dissipation during the loading process.

  1. Does Metaphyseal Cement Augmentation in Fracture Management Influence the Adjacent Subchondral Bone and Joint Cartilage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzen, Michael; Hofmann-Fliri, Ladina; Arens, Daniel; Zeiter, Stephan; Stadelmann, Vincent; Nehrbass, Dirk; Richards, R. Geoff; Blauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Augmentation of implants with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement in osteoporotic fractures is a promising approach to increase implant purchase. Side effects of PMMA for the metaphyseal bone, particularly for the adjacent subchondral bone plate and joint cartilage, have not yet been studied. The following experimental study investigates whether subchondral PMMA injection compromises the homeostasis of the subchondral bone and/or the joint cartilage. Ten mature sheep were used to simulate subchondral PMMA injection. Follow-ups of 2 (4 animals) and 4 (6 animals) months were chosen to investigate possible cartilage damage and subchondral plate alterations in the knee. Evaluation was completed by means of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) imaging, histopathological osteoarthritis scoring, and determination of glycosaminoglycan content in the joint cartilage. Results were compared with the untreated contralateral knee and statistically analyzed using nonparametric tests. Evaluation of the histological osteoarthritis score revealed no obvious cartilage damage for the treated knee; median histological score after 2 months 0 (range 4), after 4 months 1 (range 5). There was no significant difference when compared with the untreated control site after 2 and 4 months (P = 0.23 and 0.76, respectively). HRpQCT imaging showed no damage to the metaphyseal trabeculae. Glycosaminoglycan measurements of the treated joint cartilage after 4 months revealed no significant difference compared with the untreated cartilage (P = 0.24). The findings of this study support initial clinical observation that PMMA implant augmentation of metaphyseal fractures appears to be a safe procedure for fixation without harming the subchondral bone plate and adjacent joint cartilage. PMID:25621690

  2. Treating osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intraosseous vacuum phenomena using high-viscosity bone cement via bilateral percutaneous vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Shengfei; Zhang, Liang; Feng, Xinmin

    2017-04-01

    Osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intraosseous vacuum phenomena could cause persistent back pains in patients, even after receiving conservative treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using high-viscosity bone cement via bilateral percutaneous vertebroplasty in treating patients who have osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intraosseous vacuum phenomena.Twenty osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture patients with intraosseous vacuum phenomena, who received at least 2 months of conservative treatment, were further treated by injecting high-viscosity bone cement via bilateral percutaneous vertebroplasty due to failure of conservative treatment. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by determining the anterior vertebral compression rates, visual analog scale (VAS) scores, and Oswestry disability index (ODI) scores at 1 day before the operation, on the first day of postoperation, at 1-month postoperation, and at 1-year postoperation.Three of 20 patients had asymptomatic bone cement leakage when treated via percutaneous vertebroplasty; however, no serious complications related to these treatments were observed during the 1-year follow-up period. A statistically significant improvement on the anterior vertebral compression rates, VAS scores, and ODI scores were achieved after percutaneous vertebroplasty. However, differences in the anterior vertebral compression rate, VAS score, and ODI score in the different time points during the 1-year follow-up period was not statistically significant (P > 0.05).Within the limitations of this study, the injection of high-viscosity bone cement via bilateral percutaneous vertebroplasty for patients who have osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures with intraosseous vacuum phenomena significantly relieved their back pains and improved their daily life activities shortly after the operation, thereby improving their life quality. In this study, the use of high-viscosity bone

  3. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  4. Influence of silica-based hybrid material on the gas permeability of hardened cement paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R.; Hou, P.; Xie, N.; Zhou, Z.; Cheng, X.

    2017-03-01

    Surface treatment is one of the most effective ways to elongate the service life of concrete. The surface treatment agents, including organic and inorganic types, have been intensively studied. In this paper, the silica-based hybrid nanocomposite, which take advantages of both organic and inorganic treatment agents, was synthesized and used for surface treatment of hardened cement-based material. The effectiveness of organic and inorganic hybrid nanocomposite was evaluated through investigations on the gas permeability of cement-based materials. The results showed that SiO2/PMHS hybrid nanocomposite can greatly decrease the gas transport properties of hardened cement-based materials and has a great potential for surface treatment of cementitious materials.

  5. Long-term Durability of Cement-based Materials with Very Low w/b

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Youjun; LIU Yunhua; LONG Guangeheng

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the durability, especially the long-term stability of cement-based materials with very low w/b, the air permeability test, carbonation test, capillary absorption rate test and dilation Dotential test were adopted under long-term heat treatment condition. Microstructure of these materials is also analyzed by scannmg electronic microscopy (SEM) and mercury intrusion porosimeter (MIP) in order to further unveil its mechanism and interrelation between microstructure and its properties. The results indicate that in the area investigated, cement-based material with w/b 0.17, like RPC, possesses low porosity and excellent durability. Moreover, its porosity will further decrease under long-term heat treatment compared with normal heat treatment. Its long-term durability is much superior to that of other cement-based materials with w/b 0.25 or 0.35 as high strength concrete (HSC).

  6. CONTRIBUTION TO THE STATISTICAL INTERPRETATION OF RAW MATERIALS FOR THE CEMENT INDUSTRY OF SPLIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Matijaca

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to the last two decades cement was produced from mari called »tupina« (with about 76% CaCOj which is an ideal mixture for cement production. Due to the quantity decrease of this raw material, cement production went on using the mixture of other members of the flysch series: limestones, marls, clay, loess, sandstones a.o. By the analysis of natural materials the CaCO^ content has mostly been proved. Therefore, knowing the correlation of oxides in mineral raw material is of special significance. The article discusses investigation results of the correlation between CaCO-i and other oxides of the raw material (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. An ongoing investigation on modeling the strength properties of water-entrained cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    -based materials. Beyond the discussion of whether or not the introduction of superabsorbent polymers leads to a strength reduction, this paper uses both experimental and theoretical background to separate the effect of SAP in both pore structure and internal relative humidity and the effect from the active......Water-entrained cement based materials by superabsorbent polymers is a concept that was introduced in the research agenda about a decade ago. However, a recent application in the production of high performance concrete revealed potential weaknesses when the proportioning of this intelligent...... material is not well performed, raising doubts among both academic and industrial society about the usability of superabsorbent polymers in cement-based materials. This work constitutes the baseline tentatively to be used on modeling the compressive strength of SF-modified water-entrained cement...

  8. Evaluation of inherent toxicology and biocompatibility of magnesium phosphate bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonglin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Changsheng; Zhang, Bingwen; Chen, Honghong; Guo, Han; Zhong, Gaoren; Qu, Weidong; Jiang, Songhui; Huang, Huangyuan

    2010-04-01

    Magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) is a kind of novel biodegradable bone adhesive for its distinct performance. However, there is few research work concerning on the systemic biocompatibility and genetic toxicological evaluation of MPC. In this study, the investigation on the inherited toxicology of MPC including gene mutation assay (Ames test), chromosome aberration assay (micronucleus test), and DNA damage assay (unscheduled DNA synthesis test) were carried out. Fracture healing and degradation behavior were explored for the evaluation of the biocompatibility of MPC, using macroscopical histological, histomorphometrical, and scanning electron microscopical methods. The results of mutagenicity and potential carcinogenicity of MPC extracts were negative, and the animal implantation illustrated no toxicity and good resorption. The study suggested that bioresorbable MPC was safe for application and might have potential applications for physiological fracture fixation.

  9. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting measureme......Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting...

  10. Early Carbonation Behavior of High-volume Dolomite Powder-cement Based Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Huamei; HE zhen; SHAO Yixin

    2015-01-01

    Combined with DTG analysis, X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD) andfi eld emission scanning electron microscopy analysis (FSEM) affi liated with energy dispersive spectrometer analysis (EDS), the early hydration and carbonation behavior of cement paste compacts incorporated with 30% of dolomite powder at low water to cement ratio (0.15) was investigated. The results showed that early carbonation curing was capable of developing rapid early strength. It is noted that the carbonation duration should be strictly controlled otherwise subsequent hydration might be hindered. Dolomite powder acted as nuclei of crystallization, resulting in acceleration of products formation and refi nement of products crystal size. Therefore, as for cement-based material, it was found that early carbonation could reduce cement dosages to a large extent and promote rapid strength gain resulting from rapid formation of products, supplemental enhancement due to water release in the reaction of carbonation, and formation of nanometer CaCO3 skeleton network at early age.

  11. Effect of supplementary cementing materials on concrete resistance against carbonation and chloride ingress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, V.G.

    2000-02-01

    In this work the durability of Portland cement systems incorporating supplementary cementing materials (SCM; silica fume, low- and high-calcium fly ash) is investigated. Experimental tests simulating the main deterioration mechanisms is reinforced concrete (carbonation and chloride penetration) were carried out. It was found that for all SCM tested, the carbonation depth decreases as aggregate replacement by SCM increases, and increases as cement replacement by SCM increases. The specimens incorporating an SCM, whether it substitutes aggregate or cement, when exposed to chlorides exhibit significantly lower total chloride content for all depths from the surface, apart from a thin layer near the external surface. New parameter values were estimated and existing mathematical models were modified to describe the carbonation propagation and the chloride penetration in concrete incorporating SCM.

  12. Online Monitoring Volume Deformation of Cement-based Materials in Multiple Enviroments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Comparing and analyzing some volume deformation measuring means for cement-based materials at home and abroad, a continuous online monitor of cement-based material volume deformation in multiple environments is developed. The device is designed based on the environmental simulation technology, micro-distance measuring technology of laser and eddy current, and transmission agent online monitoring the deformation of multi-group samples. This device can be used widely, such as glass, ceramics, walling material, and so on, with high precision, low testing cost, and intellectualization.

  13. Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1980-07-01

    A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

  14. Elastoplastic cup model for cement-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yan; Shao, Jian-Fu

    2010-01-01

    Based on experimental data obtained from triaxial tests and a hydrostatic test, a cup model was formulated. Two plastic mechanisms, respectively a deviatoric shearing and a pore collapse, are taken into account. This model also considers the influence of confining pressure. In this paper, the calibration of the model is detailed and numerical simulations of the main mechanical behavior of cement paste over a large range of stress are described, showing good agreement with experimental results...

  15. 磷酸钙骨水泥/骨形态发生蛋白复合人工骨的生物相容性%Biocompatibility of calcium phosphate cement/BMP composite as bone graft material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明林; 胡蕴玉; 贾新斌; 李丹; 刘忠湘; 朱德生

    2001-01-01

    AIM To construct CPC/BMP composite by combining CPC with BMP, and to detect their biocompatibity. METHODS The toxicity, pyrogen, hemolytic activities and immunogen were detected by means of animal test, cell culture, hemolysis test and histochemical technique. RESULTS The composites were found no toxicity and no pyrogen by animal test, no hemolytic activities and couldn't influence the coagulate of blood in vitro. When the materials were grafted into the muscle pounches in the thigh of mice or rabbits, no obvious specific antibodies produced were detected in serum by ELISA, nor were significant immune reaction of foreign body observed by histochemistry technique. The composites were also testified no cytotoxicity in vitor for the proliferation of cultured cells couldn' be inhibited. CONCLUSION The CPC/BMP composite might have good biocompatibility and be safe for clinical use.%目的将自行合成的磷酸钙骨水泥(CPC)作为载体与BMP复合成人工骨,检测其生物相容性. 方法制备CPC/BMP及CPC骨块,通过体外实验、细胞培养、动物实验等方法观察其毒性、免疫原性、对血液系统的影响等生物相容性指标. 结果动物实验表明材料属无毒级,不含致热原,体外试验不引起溶血反应,对凝血功能无明显影响. 植入兔或小鼠肌袋内未检测出特异性抗体. 组织学检查未见免疫排斥反应,对肌肉无刺激作用.对体外培养的细胞增殖没有明显抑制作用.结论材料有较好的生物相容性,临床使用安全.

  16. Characterization of environmentally-friendly alkali activated slag cements and ancient building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakulich, Aaron Richard

    Alternative cement technologies are an area of increasing interest due to growing environmental concerns and the relatively large carbon footprint of the cement industry. Many new cements have been developed, but one of the most promising is that made from granulated, ground blast furnace slag activated by a high-pH solution. Another is related to the discovery that some of the pyramid limestone blocks may have been cast using a combination of diatomaceous earth activated by lime which provides the high pH needed to dissolve the diatomaceous earth and bind the limestone aggregate together. The emphasis of this thesis is not on the latter---which was explored elsewhere---but on the results supplying further evidence that some of the pyramid blocks were indeed reconstituted limestone. The goal of this work is to chemically and mechanically characterize both alkali-activated slag cements as well as a number of historic materials, which may be ancient analogues to cement. Alkali activated slag cements were produced with a number of additives; concretes were made with the addition of a fine limestone aggregate. These materials were characterized mechanically and by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA. Samples from several Egyptian pyramids, an 'ancient floor' in Colorado, and the 'Bosnian Pyramids' were investigated. In the cements, it has been unequivocally shown that C-S-H, the same binding phase that is produced in ordinary portland cement, has been produced, as well as a variety of mineral side products. Significant recarbonation occurs during the first 20 months, but only for the Na2CO3-activated formulae. Radiocarbon dating proves that the 'Bosnian Pyramids' and 'ancient floors' are not made from any type of recarbonated lime; however, Egyptian pyramid limestones were finite, thus suggesting that they are of a synthetic nature. XRD and FTIR results were inconclusive, while TGA results indicate the limestones are identical to naturally occurring limestones, and SEM

  17. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  18. Severe particulate pollution from the deposition practices of the primary materials of a cement plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Rapsomanikis, S; Zerefos, C; Georgoulias, A K; Pavlidou, E

    2014-01-01

    Global cement production has increased twofold during the last decade. This increase has been accompanied by the installation of many new plants, especially in Southeast Asia. Although various aspects of pollution related to cement production have been reported, the impact of primary material deposition practices on ambient air quality has not yet been studied. In this study, we show that deposition practices can have a very serious impact on levels of ambient aerosols, far larger than other cement production-related impacts. Analyses of ambient particulates sampled near a cement plant show 1.3-30.4 mg/m(3) total suspended particulates in the air and concentrations of particles with a diameter of 10 μm or less at 0.04-3 mg/m(3). These concentrations are very high and seriously exceed air quality standards. We unequivocally attribute these levels to outdoor deposition of cement primary materials, especially clinker, using scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We also used satellite-derived aerosol optical depth maps over the area of study to estimate the extent of the spatial impact. The satellite data indicate a 33% decrease in aerosol optical depth during a 10-year period, possibly due to changing primary material deposition practices. Although the in situ sampling was performed in one location, primary materials used in cement production are common in all parts of the world and have not changed significantly over the last decades. Hence, the results reported here demonstrate the dominant impact of deposition practices on aerosol levels near cement plants.

  19. Evolution of cement based materials in a repository for radioactive waste and their chemical barrier function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzler, Bernhard; Metz, Volker; Schlieker, Martina; Bohnert, Elke [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Nukleare Entsorgung (INE)

    2015-07-01

    The use of cementitious materials in nuclear waste management is quite widespread. It covers the solidification of low/intermediate-level liquid as well as solid wastes (e.g. laboratory wastes) and serves as shielding. For both high-level and intermediate-low level activity repositories, cement/concrete likewise plays an important role. It is used as construction material for underground and surface disposals, but more importantly it serves as barrier or sealing material. For the requirements of waste conditioning, special cement mixtures have been developed. These include special mixtures for the solidification of evaporator concentrates, borate binding additives and for spilling solid wastes. In recent years, low-pH cements were strongly discussed especially for repository applications, e.g. (Celine CAU DIT COUMES 2008; Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). Examples for relevant systems are Calcium Silicate Cements (ordinary Portland cement (OPC) based) or Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC). Low-pH pore solutions are achieved by reduction of the portlandite content by partial substitution of OPC by mineral admixtures with high silica content. The blends follow the pozzolanic reaction consuming Ca(OH){sub 2}. Potential admixtures are silica fume (SF) and fly ashes (FA). In these mixtures, super plasticizers are required, consisting of polycarboxilate or naphthalene formaldehyde as well as various accelerating admixtures (Garcia-Sineriz, et al. 2008). The pH regime of concrete/cement materials may stabilize radionuclides in solution. Newly formed alteration products retain or release radionuclides. An important degradation product of celluloses in cement is iso-saccharin acid. According to Glaus 2004 (Glaus and van Loon 2004), it reacts with radionuclides forming dissolved complexes. Apart from potentially impacting radionuclide solubility limitations, concrete additives, radionuclides or other strong complexants compete for surface sites for sorbing onto cement phases. In

  20. Lime kiln dust as a potential raw material in portland cement manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. Michael; Callaghan, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    In the United States, the manufacture of portland cement involves burning in a rotary kiln a finely ground proportional mix of raw materials. The raw material mix provides the required chemical combination of calcium, silicon, aluminum, iron, and small amounts of other ingredients. The majority of calcium is supplied in the form of calcium carbonate usually from limestone. Other sources including waste materials or byproducts from other industries can be used to supply calcium (or lime, CaO), provided they have sufficiently high CaO content, have low magnesia content (less than 5 percent), and are competitive with limestone in terms of cost and adequacy of supply. In the United States, the lime industry produces large amounts of lime kiln dust (LKD), which is collected by dust control systems. This LKD may be a supplemental source of calcium for cement plants, if the lime and cement plants are located near enough to each other to make the arrangement economical.

  1. Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Cement As a Root Canal Sealer Filling Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement for root end sealing was obtained by mixing α-tricalcium phosphate and additives with an aqueous solution of citric. Powder and liquid were mixed at a ratio of 1.25g/mL. The biocompatibility of this material was investigated primarily by subcutaneous implantation tests. Then calcium phosphate cement was used to fill three adult dogs' root canal, both calcium hydroxide paste and hydroxyapatite paste as control. The animals were killed at 4,12,20 weeks postoperatively respectively. The effects of different materials on the apical closure, restoration of periapical tissues and adaptability to the dentinal surface were examined by optical and electronic microscope. The observation at 20 weeks shows that the calcium phosphate cement has the potentialities of being a root canal sealer filling material available for pulpless teeth with open-apex and destructive periapical tissue.

  2. Influence of the method of blending an antibiotic powder with an acrylic bone cement powder on physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the cured cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gladius; Janna, Si; Bhattaram, Anuradha

    2005-07-01

    Two variants of antibiotic powder-loaded acrylic bone cements (APLBCs) are widely used in primary total joint replacements. In the United States, the antibiotic is manually blended with the powder of the cement at the start of the procedure, while, in Europe, pre-packaged commercially-available APLBCs (in which the blending is carried out using an industrial mixer) are used. Our objective was to investigate the influence of the method of blending gentamicin sulphate with the powder of the Cemex XL formulation on a wide collection of properties of the cured cement. The blending methods used were manual mixing (the MANUAL Set), use of a small-scale, easy-to-use, commercially-available mechanical powder mixer, OmoMix 1 (the MECHANICAL Set), and use of a large-scale industrial mixer (Cemex Genta) [the INDUSTRIAL Set]. In the MECHANICAL and MANUAL Sets, the blending time was 3 min. In preparing the test specimens for each set, the blended powder used contained 4.22 wt% of the gentamicin powder. The properties determined were the strength, modulus, and work-to-fracture (all obtained under four-point bending), plane-strain fracture toughness, Weibull mean fatigue life (fatigue conditions: +/-15 MPa; 2 Hz), activation energy and frequency factor for the cement polymerization process (both determined using differential scanning calorimetry, at heating rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 Kmin(-1)), the diffusion coefficient for the absorption of phosphate buffered saline, PBS, at 37 degrees C, and the rate of elution of the gentamicin into PBS, at 37 degrees C (E). Also determined were the particle size, particle size distribution, and morphology of the blended powders and of the gentamicin. For each of the cured cement properties (except for E), there is no statistically significant difference between the means for the 3 cements, a finding that parallels the observation that there are no significant differences in either the mean particle size or the morphology of the blended cement

  3. RESULTS OF THE FOSFOMYCIN APPLICATION FOR THE IMPREGNATION OF BONE REPLACEMENT MATERIALS IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC OSTEOMYELITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Konev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to evaluate in the experimental study in vitro the duration of antimicrobial activity of fosfomycin-impregnated bone cement and to study the dynamics of radiological and morphological changes depending on the local antibiotic therapy in two-stage treatment of chronic osteomyelitis in rabbits.Materials and methods. Duration of antimicrobial activity of bone cement (depuy cmw1 gentamicin with fosfomycin in vitro was studied in comparison to cements with vancomycin and controls without additional antibiotics. Presence of the lysis zone of bacterial cultures was evaluated (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC6538 and ATCC33591, Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC33495 and Escherichia coli ATCC25922 after application of 10 μl of the solution, collected from the cement samples after incubation for 24 hours. For the in vivo experiment, Chinchilla rabbits (n = 20 with local osteomyelitis of the tibia underwent two-stage treatment where substitution of the bone defect at stage I was performed with PMMA and stage II – with the bioresorbable material based on hydroxyapatite and triclacium phosphate (ReproBone. In an experience group (n = 10 before setting osteoreplacement materials with fosfomycin (group FOSFO, and by control (n = 10 – vancomycin (group VANCO. X-ray imaging was performed on the 1st and 21st day after installation of the cement spacer, and 45th day after substitution of the spacer with the bioresorbable material. Microbiological analysis of the samples was performed intraoperatively and on the 7th, 14th day after each stage. Histological study was conducted in both groups on the 14th, 21th day after stage I and 45th day after stage II of the treatment.Results. Maximal duration of antimicrobial activity in vitro was observed in samples of PMMA with fosfomycin whereas minimal – in control samples of gentamicin-based bone cement. Relief of the infection was attained in all animals while application of fosfomycin resulted in a more

  4. Attack of Limestone Cement-based Material Exposed to Magnesium Sulfate Solution at Low Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fengchen; WU Shengxing; FANG Yonghao; ZHOU Jikai; LI Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Limestone in cement could be a source of CO32-needed for thaumasite formation which will result in thaumasite form of sulfate attack (TSA) probably. TSA has more deterioration than ettringite or gypsum form of sulfate attack because it targets the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H) which is the main binder phase in all Portland cement-based materials. By means of physical and mechanical property testing as well as erosion phases analysis, magnesium sulfate attack of cement-based material containing 35% limestone powder by mass at 5 ± 2℃is investigated. The compressive strength and flexural strength of mortar specimen immersed in MgSO4 solution increase firstly, then decrease rapidly with the immersing age. Relative dynamic elastic modulus of mortar specimen changes in a phased process. After immersing in MgSO4 solution for 15 weeks, the main erosion phases in paste specimen change from four phases compounds, three phases compounds to two phases compounds from surface to inside. Deterioration course of limestone cement-based material exposed to magnesium sulfate aggressive environment appears progressive damage layer by layer, and every layer probably suffers four stages, which are property strengthening stage, initial degradation stage, thaumasite formation stage and cementation loss stage, respectively.

  5. RECYCLED WASTE-BASED CEMENT COMPOSITE PATCH MATERIALS FOR RAPID/PERMANENT ROAD RESTORATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2001-07-31

    Over the past year, KeySpan Energy sponsored a research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) aimed at recycling boiler ash (BA) and waste water treatment sludge (WWTS) byproducts generated from Keyspan's power stations into potentially useful materials, and at reducing concurrent costs for their disposal. Also, KeySpan has an interest in developing strategies to explicitly integrate industrial ecology and green chemistry. From our collaborative efforts with Keyspan (Diane Blankenhom Project Manager, and Kenneth Yager), we succeeded in recycling them into two viable products; Pb-exchange adsorbents (PEAs), and high-performance cements (HpCs). These products were made from chemically bonded cement and ceramic (CBC) materials that were synthesized through two-step chemical reaction pathways, acid-base and hydration. Using this synthesis technology, both the WWTS and BA served in acting as solid base reactants, and sodium polyphosphate, [-(-NaPO{sub 3}-)-{sub n}], known as an intermediator of fertilizer, was employed as the acid solution reactant. In addition, two commercial cement additives, Secar No. 51 calcium aluminate cement (CAC) and Type I calcium silicate cement (CSC), were used to improve mechanical behavior and to promote the rate of acid-base reaction of the CBC materials.

  6. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear...... affects the particle size distribution of Mg(OH)2 (used as model material) as well as silica, whereas the addition of superplasticizers affects only the smallest particles in cement and thus primarily acts as water reducers and not dispersers....

  7. Stochastic Modelling and Self Tuning Control of a Continuous Cement Raw Material Mixing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu T. Toivonen

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of a continuously operating system for cement raw material mixing is studied. The purpose of the mixing system is to maintain a constant composition of the cement raw meal for the kiln despite variations of the raw material compositions. Experimental knowledge of the process dynamics and the characteristics of the various disturbances is used for deriving a stochastic model of the system. The optimal control strategy is then obtained as a minimum variance strategy. The control problem is finally solved using a self-tuning minimum variance regulator, and results from a successful implementation of the regulator are given.

  8. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking...... bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA...

  9. Changes in microgaps, micromotion, and trabecular strain from interlocked cement-trabecular bone interfaces in total knee replacements with in vivo service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark A; Goodheart, Jacklyn R; Khechen, Benjamin; Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A

    2016-06-01

    The initial fixation of cemented Total Knee Replacements (TKRs) relies on mechanical interlock between cement and bone, but loss of interlock occurs with in vivo service. In this study, cement-trabeculae gap morphology and micromechanics were measured for lab prepared (representing post-operative state) and postmortem retrieval (with in vivo remodeling) TKRs to determine how changes in fixation affect local micromechanics. Small specimens taken from beneath the tibial tray were loaded with 1 MPa axial compression and the local micromechanics of the trabeculae-cement interface was quantified using digital image correlation. Lab prepared trabeculae that initially interlock with cement had small gaps (ave:14 μm) and limited micromotion (ave:1 μm) which were larger near the cement border. Trabecular resorption was prevalent following in vivo service; interface gaps became larger (ave:40 μm) and micromotion increased (ave:6 μm), particularly near the cement border. Interlocked trabeculae from lab prepared specimens exhibited strains that were 20% of the supporting bone strain, indicating the trabeculae were initially strain shielded. The spatial and temporal progression of gaps, micromotion, and bone strain was complex and much more variable for post-mortem retrievals compared to the lab prepared specimens. From a clinical perspective, attaining more initial interlock results in cement-bone interfaces that are better fixed with less micromotion. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1019-1025, 2016.

  10. Cemented materials in the LLW and MLW Spanish disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero, A.

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available BWR and PWR cemented matrices to confine low and medium simulated liquid radioactive wastes have been submitted to the leaching process in de-ionized water at 20ºC and 40ºC, to obtain the medium leachability index (L and the effective diffusion coefficient (De of different ions. Otherwise, it has been studied the associated expansion of the backfilling mortar of the concrete containers of the Spanish repository of these wastes, due to a possible attack of the sulfate ions coming from the cemented matrices.

    Matrices cementicias confinantes tipo BWR y PWR de residuos simulados de baja y media radiactividad se han sometido a procesos de lixiviación en agua desionizada a 20ºC y 40ºC, obteniéndose los índices medios de lixiviación (L y el coeficiente de difusión efectiva (De de algunos iones. Por otra parte, se ha estudiado la expansión asociada a un mortero de relleno constitutivo del depósito de almacenamiento de los residuos, por posible ataque de los iones SO4-2 procedentes de las matrices.

  11. Preparation, bioactivity and mechanism of nano-hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate/chitosan bone repair material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianguo; Li, Yanqun; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Jingxian; Xie, Yufen; Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2017-08-11

    As the major inorganic component of natural bone, nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) on its own is limited in its use in bone repair, due to its brittleness. Chitosan (CS) and sodium alginate (SAL) are used to reduce its brittleness and tendency to degradation. However, the compressive strength of the composite is still low, and its biological performance needs further study. Nano-hydroxyapatite/sodium alginate/chitosan (n-HA/SAL/CS) composite was prepared via an in situ synthesis method. Further, we prepared the n-HA/SAL/CS self-setting bone repair material by mixing n-HA/SAL/CS powder with a curing liquid (20 wt.% citric acid). In addition, the in vitro bioactivity and cell cytotoxicity were also explored. Transmission electron microscopy photos revealed that the n-HA crystals were uniformly distributed throughout the polymer matrix. Infrared IR spectroscopy indicated that the HA interacted with the COO- of SAL and NH2- of CS. The compressive strength of the n-HA/SAL/CS bone cement was 34.3 MPa and matched the demands of weight-bearing bones. Soaking in vitro in simulated body fluid demonstrated that the composite material had reasonably good bioactivity, while cytotoxicity tests indicated that the n-HA/SAL/CS cement could promote cell proliferation and was biocompatible. Compressive strength of n-HA/SAL/CS can satisfy the needs of cancellous bone, and in vitro bioactivity and cytotoxicity tests results indicated that the n-HA/SAL/CS composite could act as an optimal bone repair material.

  12. Characterisation of Cements From Dominantly Volcanic Raw Materials of the Carpathian Bend Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halmagy Timea

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations regarding the production of cements from local raw materials, such as limestone from Varghis, gypsum from Nucsoara, basaltic scoria from Racosul de Jos, volcanic tuff from Racosul de Sus, diatomite from Filia, and red mud from Oradea. The raw mixtures, based on modified Bogue calculations, contain limestone, gypsum, and one or two of the above-mentioned materials. The cements resulted from clinker grinding in a laboratory gas furnace at 1260-1300 °C, with one hour at the peak temperatures, and were characterised for Blaine specific surface area, specific density, and mineral phases. Physico-mechanical properties, such as water content for normal consistency, setting time, soundness, and compressive strength were also determined. Results show that these cements contain belite, ferrite, calcium sulphoaluminate, anhydrite, and some minor compounds.

  13. Properties of Cement-based Composite Materials under Different Storing Environment Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, T. L.; Weng, S. H.; Cho, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    This study reports on the properties of cement-based composite materials (mortars) under different storing environment temperature, as determined using the accelerated chloride migration test (ACMT). Mortars with a water/cement ratio of 0.45 and five fine aggregate volume fractions (0%, 15%, 30%, 50% and 60%) under various environment temperatures (25, 40, 60 and 80°C) were evaluated according to the passage of chloride ions through the specimens using ACMT. Calculate chloride migration coefficients on the steady-state. Cement-based composite materials with 60 % fine aggregate presented a migration coefficient higher than that of other specimens, whereas mortar with 30 % fine aggregate was lower, due to the effects of dilution and tortuosity.

  14. Microcrack Identification in Cement-Based Materials Using Nonlinear Acoustic Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. J.; Kim, J.-Y.; Qu, J.; Kurtis, K. E.; Wu, S. C.; Jacobs, L. J.

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents results from tests that use nonlinear acoustic waves to distinguish microcracks in cement-based materials. Portland cement mortar samples prepared with alkali-reactive aggregate were exposed to an aggressive environment to induce cracking were compared to control samples, of the same composition, but which were not exposed to aggressive conditions. Two nonlinear ultrasonic methods were used to characterize the samples, with the aim of identifying the time and extent of microcracking; these techniques were a nonlinear acoustical modulation (NAM) method and a harmonic amplitude relation (HAR) method. These nonlinear acoustic results show that both methods can distinguish damaged samples from undamaged ones, demonstrating the potential of nonlinear acoustic waves to provide a quantitative evaluation of the deterioration of cement-based materials.

  15. 21 CFR 872.3930 - Bone grafting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3930 Bone grafting material. (a) Identification... “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Bone Grafting Material Devices.” (See § 872.1(e) for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bone grafting material. 872.3930 Section...

  16. Proximal Tibia Chondroblastoma Treated With Curettage and Bone Graft and Cement Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwan Seong; Park, Yeong Kyoon; Oh, Joo Han; Lee, Jung Hyun; Han, Ilkyu; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma has a predilection for the epiphyses or apophyses of long tubular bones. Management of lesions in the proximal tibia is challenging because it is difficult to gain access to intraepiphyseal lesions for completion of curettage. From October 2007 to December 2011, 9 patients with de novo chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia underwent surgery at the authors' institution. All patients initially presented with pain, and 5 patients had limitation of range of motion of the ipsilateral knee. Four lesions abutted the tibial attachment sites of the cruciate ligaments. Surgical procedures included intralesional tumor curettage, additional burring, and packing of the defect with bone graft and/or bone cement. The extra-articular approach was used according to tumor location. The medial or lateral parapatellar approach was used when the tumor was located in the anterior two-thirds of the horizontal plane. When a lesion was located in the posterior third, the posteromedial or posterolateral approach was used as the lesion was cornered. Mean duration of follow-up was 47.2 months (range, 27-80 months). No local recurrence or pulmonary metastasis was noted at latest follow-up. Mean functional score was 29.3 points (range, 28-30 points). All patients fully recovered range of motion in the affected knee. No avulsion fracture or anteroposterior instability of the knee joint was detected. Results of the current study suggest that intralesion curettage followed by additional burring with an extra-articular approach is a successful treatment option for chondroblastoma of the proximal tibia.

  17. Histological and mechanical evaluation of self-setting calcium phosphate cements in a sheep vertebral bone void model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naomi; Ong, Kevin; Villarraga, Marta; Schwardt, Jeffrey; Wenz, Robert; Togawa, Daisuke; Fujishiro, Takaaki; Turner, A Simon; Seim, Howard B; Bauer, Thomas W

    2007-06-15

    We investigated the histological and compressive properties of three different calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) using a sheep vertebral bone void model. One of the CPCs contained barium sulfate to enhance its radiopacity. Bone voids were surgically created in the lumbar region of 23 ovine spines - L3, L4, and L5 (n = 69 total vertebral bodies) - and the voids were filled with one of the three CPCs. A fourth group consisted of whole intact vertebrae. Histologic evaluation was performed for 30 of the 69 vertebrae 2 or 4 months after surgery along with radiographic evaluation. Compressive testing was performed on 39 vertebrae 4 months after surgery along with micro-CT analysis. All three CPCs were biocompatible and extremely osteoconductive. Osteoclasts associated with adjacent bone formation suggest that each cement can undergo slow resorption and replacement by bone and bone marrow. Compressive testing did not reveal a significant difference in the ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and structural modulus, among the three CPCs and intact whole vertebrae. Micro-CT analysis revealed good osseointegration between all three CPCs and adjacent bone. The barium sulfate did not affect the CPCs biocompatibility or mechanical properties. These results suggest that CPC might be a good alternative to polymethylmethacrylate for selected indications.

  18. Characterization of composite materials based on cement-ceramic powder blended binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulovaná, Tereza; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-06-01

    Characterization of newly developed composite mortars with incorporated ceramic powder coming from precise brick cutting as partial Portland cement replacement up to 40 mass% is presented in the paper. Fine ceramic powder belongs to the pozzolanic materials. Utilization of pozzolanic materials is accompanied by lower request on energy needed for Portland clinker production which generally results in lower production costs of blended binder and lower CO2 emission. In this paper, the ceramic powder is used in cement based mortar composition in amount of 8, 16, 24, 32, and 40 mass% of cement. Chemical composition of ceramic powder is analyzed by X-Ray Fluorescence and X-Ray Diffraction. The particle size distribution of ceramics is accessed on laser diffraction principle. For 28 days cured mortar samples, basic physical and mechanical properties are experimentally determined. The obtained results demonstrate that ceramic powder has potential to replace a part of Portland cement in composition of cement based composites and to reduce negative environmental impact of their production.

  19. Bond strength of a resin cement to a cured composite inlay material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latta, M A; Barkmeier, W W

    1994-08-01

    Although resin cements have been effectively bonded to mineralized tooth structures, bonding to a cured composite material has remained a challenge. This study evaluated the shear bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a cured composite inlay material by use of a variety of composite surface treatments: (1) hydrofluoric acid/60 seconds, (2) ammonium bifluoride/60 seconds, (3) resin adhesive, (4) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide, and (5) microabrasion with 50 microns aluminum oxide and application of a resin adhesive. The resin cement was also bonded to human enamel that was etched with phosphoric acid. Scanning electron microscopy examinations were completed to evaluate the effects of the composite surface treatments. The results indicated that microabrasion of a cured composite enhances bonding of a resin cement. The bond strength of a resin cement to a composite surface that was air abraded with aluminum oxide, with or without the application of a resin adhesive, was higher than surface treatments with hydrofluoric acid or ammonium bifluoride. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that an irregular surface on the composite was created with aluminum oxide air abrasion.

  20. Effects of porosity on the fatigue performance of polymethyl methacrylate bone cement: an analytical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, S L

    2006-01-01

    Porosity has been shown to affect the fatigue life of bone cements, but, although vacuum mixing is widely used to reduce porosity in the clinical setting, results have been mixed and the effects of porosity are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of porosity using stress analysis and fracture mechanics techniques. The stress concentrations arising at voids in test specimens were found using analytical solutions and boundary element methods. The fatigue life of specimens containing voids of various sizes was predicted using fracture mechanics techniques. For spherical voids that do not occupy a significant proportion of the cross-section, the resulting stress concentration is independent of void size and too small to account for the observed crack initiation. Cracks must therefore initiate at additional stress raisers such as radiopacifier particles or additional voids. For large voids, the stress increases as the remaining cross-section of the specimen decreases, and this may account for much of the observed reduction in fatigue strength in hand-mixed cement. Although crack initiation may be largely independent of void size, there is an effect on crack growth rate. Cracks are predicted to grow faster around larger voids, since they remain in the stress concentration around the void for longer. This effect may account for the relationship between porosity and fatigue life that has been observed in samples without large voids. Since porosity appears to affect crack growth more than initiation, it may be less damaging in high-cycle clinical fatigue, which may be predominantly initiation controlled, than in short laboratory tests.

  1. Potential of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Cement Composites as Concrete Repair Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are a virtually ideal reinforcing agent due to extremely high aspect ratios and ultra high strengths. It is evident from contemporary research that utilization of CNT in producing new cement-based composite materials has a great potential. Consequently, possible practical application of CNT reinforced cementitious composites has immense prospect in the field of applied nanotechnology within construction industry. Several repair, retrofit, and strengthening techniques are currently available to enhance the integrity and durability of concrete structures with cracks and spalling, but applicability and/or reliability is/are often limited. Therefore, there is always a need for innovative high performing concrete repair materials with good mechanical, rheological, and durability properties. Considering the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs and the test results of CNT reinforced cement composites, it is apparent that such composites could be used conveniently as concrete repair material. With this end in view, the applicability of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT reinforced cement composites as concrete repair material has been evaluated in this study in terms of setting time, bleeding, and bonding strength (slant shear tests. It has been found that MWNT reinforced cement mortar has good prospective as concrete repair material since such composites exhibited desirable behavior in setting time, bleeding, and slant shear.

  2. Thermal properties of a new ecological building material / Granular cork embedded in white cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherki Abou-bakr

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cork, natural and renewable product, has thermal and acoustic properties very interesting because of its microstructure and porosity representing a significant portion of its apparent volume; it’s coming from Moroccan Maamora’s forest. This work is a contribution to understand the thermal behaviour of the composite material based on granular cork embedded in white cement. An experimental investigation of its thermal properties was mainly performed using the asymmetrical device of transient Hot Plate method. The effect of granular cork size on the thermal properties of the mixture was studied. The experimental study of this sustainable material aims to characterize its thermal properties and then compare them with those of white cement without cork for motivate the proposal that this composite material will be used as walls insulator. A comparison of the energy performances of the composite material and white cement was made; it allows deducing a very interesting energy gain. The findings of the experiments indicate that the composite is better than white cement in term of thermal insulation, energy storage capacity and lightness. So, it can be used to realize the internal walls insulation. Its utilization should contribute to the improvement of the energy efficiency in building especially that this is a mixture based on a sustainable and renewable material.

  3. Biomechanical effects of bone cement volume on the endplates of augmented vertebral body: a three-dimensional finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Liang; Chang Zhen; Xu Zhengwei; Liu Tuanjiang; He Baorong; Hao Dingjun

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that percutaneous vertebroplasty might alter vertebral stress transfer,leading to adjacent vertebral failure.However,no three-dimensional finite element study so far accounted for the stress distributions on different cement volumes.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stress distributions on the endplate under different loading conditions after augmentation with various volumes of bone cement.Methods L2-L3 motion segment data were obtained from CT scans of the lumbar spine from a cadaver of a young man who had no abnormal findings on roentgenograms.Three-dimensional model of L2-L3 was established using Mimics software,and finite element model of L2-L3 functional spinal unit (FSU) was established using Ansys10.0 software.For simulating percutaneous vertebral augmentation,polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) was deposited into the bipedicle of the L2 vertebra.The percentage of PMMA volume varied between 15% and 30%.The stress distributions on the endplate of the augmented vertebral body were calculated under three different loading conditions.Results In general,the stress level monotonically increased with bone cement volume.Under each loading condition,the stress change on the L2 superior and inferior endplates in three kinds of finite element models shows monotonic increase.Compared with the stress-increasing region of the endplate,the central part of the L2 endplate was subject to the greatest stress under three kinds of loading conditions,especially on the superior endplate and under flexion.Conclusions The finite element models of FSU are useful to optimize the planning for vertebroplasty.The bone cement volume might have an influence on the endplate of the augmentation,especially the superior endplate.It should be noted that the optimization of bone cement volume is patient specific; the volume of the bone cement should be based on the size,body mineral density,and stiffness of the vertebrae of individual

  4. Rheological properties of acrylic bone cement during curing and the role of the size of the powder particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gladius; Carroll, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A dynamic compressive rheometric technique was used to determine the true or complex viscosity (eta*) of three poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA-based bone cement formulations (one commercially available and two experimental), as a function of the time that elapsed from commencement of hand mixing of the cement constituents (t). For each cement, two rheological parameters [namely, the time of onset of cure (t(ons)) and the critical cure rate (CCR), which is herein defined as the complex viscosity rate computed at t(ons)] were determined from the eta*-t data. For each cement, particle analysis was used to obtain the powder particle size distribution, from which the following parameters were obtained: (a) the overall mean particle diameter D(m), and (b) the relative amounts of small-sized PMMA beads (mean diameter d between 0 and 40 mum) (alpha) and large-sized PMMA beads (d > 75 mum) (beta). It is seen that the key particle parameter is not D(m) per se but alpha and beta. Thus, the highest values of t(ons) and CCR were obtained from a cement with the highest values of alpha and beta. An explanation for these trends is given, and two areas for further research work in this field are outlined.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Calcium Phosphate Cement/Gelatine Composite Scaffold with Oriented Pore Structure for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xiaopeng; HE Fupo; YE Jiandong

    2012-01-01

    The macroporous calcium phosphate(CPC) cement with oriented pore structure was prepared by freeze casting.SEM observation showed that the macropores in the porous calcium phosphate cement were interconnected aligned along the ice growth direction.The porosity of the as-prepared porous CPC was measured to be 87.6% by Archimede's principle.XRD patterns of specimens showed that poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite was the main phase present in the hydrated porous calcium phosphate cement.To improve the mechanical properties of the CPC scaffold,the 15% gelatine solution was infiltrated into the pores under vacuum and then the samples were freeze dried to form the CPC/gelatine composite scaffolds.After reinforced with gelatine,the compressive strength of CPC/gelatine composite increased to 5.12 MPa,around fifty times greater than that of the unreinforced macroporous CPC scaffold,which was only 0.1 MPa.And the toughness of the scaffold has been greatly improved via the gelatine reinforcement with a much greater fracture strain.SEM examination of the specimens indicated good bonding between the cement and gelatine.Participating the external load by the deformable gelatine,patching the defects of the CPC pores wall,and crack deflection were supposed to be the reinforcement mechanisms.In conclusion,the calcium phosphate cement/gelatine composite with oriented pore structure prepared in this work might be a potential scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Effect of retardants on the heat release during setting of bone cement-type composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pijocha

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of retardants on the heat release during setting of the new hydroxyapatite (HA - magnesium phosphate cement (MPC - calcium sulphate hemihydrate (CSH composites.Design/methodology/approach: We used the calorimetric method to measure the temperature effect of setting reaction in these new composites. Microstructure observations by means of scanning electron microscopy was also performed.Findings: The decrease in maximum temperature reached during hardening process with use of different retardants was confirmed.Research limitations/implications: Biological evaluation and in vitro physico-chemical tests of the novel composites need to be done.Practical implications: The highly exothermic setting reaction of cement composites based on MPC can be lowered to avoid harmful necrosis of the tissues surrounding the implant material.Originality/value: Detailed studies on the heat release during setting of HA - MPC - CSH composites were performed for a first time, giving an opportunity to choose the best composition for further studies.

  7. Compound soil-tyre chips modified by cement as a road construction material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panu Promputthangkoon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to overcome the two problems of low-quality soil and a growing number of discarded tyres bymixing low-CBR soil with recycled tyre chips. The compound soil-tyre chips was then stabilised by Portland cement with theaim of using them as a new material in road construction in order to reduce the occurrence of shrinkage cracks. To achievethe purposes of this research three standard geotechnical testing programmes were employed: (1 modified compaction tests,(2 California Bearing Ratio tests (CBR, and (3 unconfined compression tests. The modified compaction test results provedthat for the mixtures having very low tyre chips and cement content, the behaviour is very complex. It was also observed thatthe greater the percentage of rubber added the lower the global density. However, this is predictable as the specific gravityof the rubber is much lower than that of the soil. For the relationship between the optimum moisture content (OMC and thecement content, it was observed that there is no clear pattern.For the specimens having no cement added, the CBR for unsoaked specimens was observed to be greater than that forsoaked specimens. However, when the cement was introduced the CBR test showed that the resistance to penetration for thesoaked specimens was significantly greater, indicating the effects of cement added on the strength. In addition, it was foundthat the CBR values for both soaked and unsoaked specimens gradually increased with the increase of cement content.Lastly, the unconfined compressive strength progressively increased with the increased percentage of cement.

  8. RE-USE OF SPENT CATALYST FROM OIL-CRACKING REFINERIES AS SUPPLEMENTARY CEMENTING MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. K. Antiohos; E. Chouliara; S. Tsimas

    2006-01-01

    Advanced technological achievements and the continuous growth of economy have made the disposal,recycle and reuse of industrial by-products a severe challenge. The cement industry is considered one of the key sectors in this effort in successfully (in terms of not extenuating but improving some of the properties of the final product) absorbing large quantities of solid wastes, either as aggregates or as secondary cementitious materials. This not only contributes to the creation of an energy and CO2-emission depository (as commonly used raw materials are spared), but also simultaneously alleviates the acute environmental burden caused by the irresponsible disposal of such by-products. In this study, the possibility of reusing spent fluid catalytic-cracking catalyst (FCC) as a supplementary cementing material(SCM) was examined. A series of tests were conducted, initially aiming at characterizing the material and thereafter evaluating its pozzolanic activity and its effect on the mechanical properties of blended cements. Major findings in this investigation revealed that the use of FCC as a mineral admixture in cement is feasible, strengthening the belief that siliceous glassy residues should represent a steady supply for the construction sector.

  9. The Cemented Material Dam: A New, Environmentally Friendly Type of Dam

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinsheng Jia Michel Lino Feng Jin Cuiying Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The first author proposed the concept of the cemented material dam (CMD) in 2009. This concept was aimed at building an environmentally friendly dam in a safer and more economical way for both the dam and the area downstream...

  10. Modeling Framework for Fracture in Multiscale Cement-Based Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhiwei; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; van Breugel, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    Multiscale modeling for cement-based materials, such as concrete, is a relatively young subject, but there are already a number of different approaches to study different aspects of these classical materials. In this paper, the parameter-passing multiscale modeling scheme is established and applied to address the multiscale modeling problem for the integrated system of cement paste, mortar, and concrete. The block-by-block technique is employed to solve the length scale overlap challenge between the mortar level (0.1–10 mm) and the concrete level (1–40 mm). The microstructures of cement paste are simulated by the HYMOSTRUC3D model, and the material structures of mortar and concrete are simulated by the Anm material model. Afterwards the 3D lattice fracture model is used to evaluate their mechanical performance by simulating a uniaxial tensile test. The simulated output properties at a lower scale are passed to the next higher scale to serve as input local properties. A three-level multiscale lattice fracture analysis is demonstrated, including cement paste at the micrometer scale, mortar at the millimeter scale, and concrete at centimeter scale. PMID:28772948

  11. Incinerated sewage sludge ash as alternative binder in cement-based materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejcirikova, Barbora; Goltermann, Per; Hodicky, Kamil

    2013-01-01

    it can minimize the need of ash landfill disposal. The objective of this study is to show potential use of incinerated sewage sludge ash (ISSA), an industrial byproduct, as possible binder in cement-based materials. Chemical and mechanical characteristics are presented and compared with results obtained...

  12. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include...... bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA...

  13. Study of peanut husk ashes properties to promote its use as supplementary material in cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kreiker

    Full Text Available The properties of peanut husk ashes as a potential supplementary material in cement mortars were studied in the laboratory. The ashes were prepared in an electric furnace at 500, 650 and 800 ºC during 180 minutes and used without further treatment. The characterization of ashes includes X-Ray fluorescence, X-Ray diffraction, SEM, and determination of pozzolanic activity by conductivity. The ashes were tested in mortars as partial substitute of Portland cement, in a rate of 15 % of substitution. The compression strength of mortars was evaluated between 7 and 120 days, for probes prepared using a proportion of cement:sand of 1:3 on weight with water/cement ratio of 0,5 v/v. It was observed that the calcinations conditions influenced the behavior of the ashes, giving better results the ashes obtained at 500 ºC. The compression tests showed values near to 70% at 7 days but higher than 80% after 28 days for mortars prepared with ashes, respect to the cement mortar reference.

  14. USE OF CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTES AS RAW MATERIALS IN CEMENT CLINKER PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos-Triantafyllos Galbenis; Stamatis Tsimas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present paper was to investigate the possibility of utilizing Construction and Demolition(C&D) wastes as substitutes of Portland cement raw meal. The C&D wastes that were so used, were the Recycled Concrete Aggregates (RCA) and the Recycled Masonry Aggregates (RMA) derived from demolished buildings in Attica region, Greece. RCA and RMA samples were selected because of their calcareous and siliceous origin respectively,which conformed the composition of the ordinary Portland cement raw meal. For that reason, six samples of cement raw meals were prepared: one with ordinary raw materials, as a reference sample, and five by mixing the reference sample with RCA and RMA in appropriate proportions. The effect on the reactivity of the generated mixtures, was evaluated on the basis of the free lime content (fCaO) in the mixtures sintered at 1350℃, 1400℃ and 1450℃. Test showed that the added recycled aggregates improved the burnability of the cement raw meal without affecting negatively the cement clinker properties. Moreover, the formation of the major components (C3S, C2S, C3A and C4AF) of the produced clinkers(sintered at 1450℃) was corroborated by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD).

  15. A Histologic Evaluation on Tissue Reaction to Three Implanted Materials (MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement Type I in the Mandible of Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sasani

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Nowadays Mineral Trioxide aggregate (MTA is widely used for root end fillings, pulp capping, perforation repair and other endodontic treatments.Investigations have shown similar physical and chemical properties for Portland cement and Root MTA with those described for MTA.Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the tissue reaction to implanted MTA, Portland cement and Root MTA in the mandible of cats.Materials and Methods: Under asepsis condition and general anesthesia, a mucoperiosteal flap, following the application of local anesthesia, was elevated to expose mandibular symphysis. Two small holes in both sides of mandible were drilled. MTA, Portland cement and Root MTA were mixed according to the manufacturers, recommendation and placed in bony cavities. In positive control group, the test material was Zinc oxide powder plus tricresoformalin. In negative control group, the bony cavities were left untreated. After 3,6 and 12 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and the mandibular sections were prepared for histologic examination under light microscope. The presence and thickness of inflammation, presence of fibrosis capsule, the severity of fibrosis and bone formation were investigated. The data were submitted to Exact Fisher test, chi square test and Kruskal-Wallis test for statistical analysis.Results: No statistically significant differences were found in the degree of inflammation,presence of fibrotic capsule, severity of fibrosis and inflammation thickness between Root MTA, Portland cement and MTA (P>0.05. There was no statistical difference in boneformation between MTA and Portland cement (P>0.05. However, bone formation was not found in any of the Root MTA specimens and the observed tissue was exclusively of fibrosis type.Conclusion: The physical and histological results observed with MTA are similar to those of Root MTA and Portland cement. Additionally, all of these three materials are biocompatible

  16. Feasibility of Pulverized Oyster Shell as a Cementing Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou-Fu Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research intends to study the cementing potential of pulverized oyster shell, rich in calcium, when mixed with fly ash and soil. Cylindrical compacted soil and cubic lime specimens with different proportions of the shells and fly ash are made to study the strength variance. Soil, which is classified as CL in the USCS system, commercialized pulverized oyster shell, F-type fly ash, and lime are mixed in different weight percentages. Five sample groups are made to study the compressive strength of soil and lime specimens, respectively. The lime cubes are made with 0.45 W/B ratio and the cylindrical soils are compacted under the standard Procter compaction process with 20% moisture content. The results show that increment of shell quantity result to lower strength on both the soil and lime specimens. In a 56-day curing, the compressive strength of the lime cubes containing fly ash increases evidently while those carrying the shell get little progress in strength. The soil specimens containing fly ash gradually gain strength as curing proceeds. It suggests that mixtures of the shell and fly ash do not process any Pozzolanic reaction nor help to raise the unconfined strength of the compacted soil through the curing.

  17. Fatigue crack propagation of acrylic bone cements. Influence of the radio-opaque agents; Propagacion de grietas por fatiga de cementos oseos acrilicos. Influencia de los agentes radiopacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginebra, M. P.; Albuixech, L.; Fernandez-Barragan, E.; Gil, F. J.; Planell, J. A.; San Roman, J.; Vazquez, B.

    2001-07-01

    In this work the 2,5-diiodo-8-quinolyl methacrylate (IHQM), is proposed as a new radiopaque agent. The addition of the iodine containing methacrylate provided a statistically significant increase in the tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility, with respect to the barium sulphate containing cement. This effect was attributed to the fact that the use of a radiopaque monomer eliminated the porosity associated to the barium sulphate particles. However, since fatigue resistance is one of the main properties required to ensure a good long-term performance of permanent pros these, as is the case of acrylic bone cements, it is important to compare the fatigue properties of this new bone cement formulation with the radiolucent and the BaSO{sub 4} containing bone cements. The results show that the absence of inorganic particles with no matrix adhesion plays a negative role when the fatigue crack propagation is considered. (Author) 26 refs.

  18. Micromechanics of the Interface in Fibre-Reinforced Cement Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Shah, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    the strength and ductility of the brittlematrix material rather than changing the overall stiffness,the ability of the fibres to interact with cracking processes in thematrix material is essential. Furthermore, since matrix cracking in afibre reinforced material can only take place with simultaneousinterfacial...

  19. Bone cement distribution in the vertebral body affects chances of recompression after percutaneous vertebroplasty treatment in elderly patients with osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Lin; Shen, Jian; Zhang, Qiwei; Sun, Changtai

    2017-01-01

    Objective Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a surgical procedure that has been widely used to treat patients suffering from osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs). The procedure involves injection of bone cement into a fractured vertebra. In this study, we investigated whether the distribution of the cement in the vertebral body is related to the occurrence of recompression after surgery. Patients and methods A total of 172 patients diagnosed with OVCF, from January 2008 to June 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. Fifty of these patients experienced recompression after surgery during the follow-up period (recompression group), and 122 patients had no recompression observed during the follow-up period (control group). Statistical analysis was performed to compare clinical and operative parameters between these two groups. Results Differences were found in bone cement distribution between the recompression group and control group (P=0.001). Patients with bone cement distributed around both upper and lower endplates had a significantly less incidence of recompression (4/50 patients), when compared to other patterns of cement distribution (eg, below upper endplate, above lower endplate, and in the middle of vertebral body). The logistic multiple regression analysis also indicated that patients with bone cement distributed around both the upper and lower endplates had a lower risk of recompression when compared to patients with bone cement distributed in the middle of vertebral body (odds ratio =0.223, P=0.003). Conclusion We herein suggest that the control of bone cement distribution during surgery provides beneficial effects on reducing the risks of recompression after PVP treatment in patients with OVCF. PMID:28260871

  20. Development of Clinical Cement of Nanoapatite and Polyamide Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new type of inorganicorganic biomimetic bone cement consisting of nanohydroxyapatite and polyamide 66 composite was investigated. This cement can be handled as paste and easily shaped into any contour. Nanoapatite and polyamide composite cement has a reasonable setting time, excellent washout resistance, high mechanical strength and bioactivity, and it is easily handled and shaped, which can be developed as a clinical cement. It can be predicted that nanoapatite/polymer composite cement would be a new trend of biomedical material, showing a promising prospect.

  1. Cytotoxicity of calcium enriched mixture cement compared with mineral trioxide aggregate and intermediate restorative material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozayeni, Mohammad A; Milani, Amin S; Marvasti, Laleh A; Asgary, Saeed

    2012-08-01

    Calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement has been recently invented by the last author. It is composed of calcium oxide, calcium phosphate, calcium silicate and calcium sulphate; however, it has a different chemical composition to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). The purpose of this ex vivo study was to investigate the cytotoxicity of CEM cement, and compare it with intermediate restorative material (IRM) and MTA. The materials were tested in fresh and set states on L929 fibroblasts to assess their cytotoxicity. The cell viability responses were evaluated with methyl-tetrazolium bromide assay and Elisa reader at 1, 24 and 168 h (7 days). The tested materials were eluted with L929 culture medium according to international standard organisation 109935 standard. Distilled water and culture medium served as positive and negative controls, respectively. Differences in cytotoxicity were evaluated by one-way anova and t-tests. The cytotoxicity of the materials was statistically different at the three time intervals (P IRM subgroups were the most cytotoxic root-end/dental material (P IRM because of lower cytotoxicity. CEM cement also has good biocompatibility as well as lower estimated cost to MTA and seems to be a promising dental material.

  2. Regulation of physicochemical properties, osteogenesis activity, and fibroblast growth factor-2 release ability of β-tricalcium phosphate for bone cement by calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ching-Chuan [Antai Medical Care Cooperation Antai Tian-Sheng Memorial Hospital, Pingtung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Chia-Tze; Hung, Chi-Jr [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yi-Jyun [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Dental Department, Taichung Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taichung City, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tsui-Hsien, E-mail: thh@csmu.edu.tw [School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shie, Ming-You, E-mail: eviltacasi@gmail.com [Institute of Oral Science, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-01

    β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an osteoconductive material. For this research we have combined it with a low degradation calcium silicate (CS) to enhance its bioactive and osteostimulative properties. To check its effectiveness, a series of β-TCP/CS composites with different ratios were prepared to make new bioactive and biodegradable biocomposites for bone repair. Formation of bone-like apatite, the diametral tensile strength, and weight loss of composites were considered before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). In addition, we also examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) released from β-TCP/CS composites and in vitro human dental pulp cell (hDPC) and studied its behavior. The results showed that the apatite deposition ability of the β-TCP/CS composites was enhanced as the CS content was increased. For composites with more than 50% CS contents, the samples were completely covered by a dense bone-like apatite layer. At the end of the immersion point, weight losses of 19%, 24%, 33%, 42%, and 51% were observed for the composites containing 0%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 100% β-TCP cements, respectively. In vitro cell experiments show that the CS-rich composites promote human dental pulp cell (hDPC) proliferation and differentiation. However, when the CS quantity in the composite is less than 70%, the amount of cells and osteogenesis protein of hDPCs was stimulated by FGF-2 released from β-TCP/CS composites. The combination of FGF-2 in degradation of β-TCP and osteogenesis of CS gives a strong reason to believe that these calcium-based composite cements may prove to be promising bone repair materials. - Highlights: • CS improved physicochemical properties and osteogenic activity of β-TCP. • The higher the CS in the cement, the shorter the setting time and the higher the DTS. • The cell behavior was stimulated by FGF-2 released from composite containing 50% CS. • β-TCP/CS composite with FGF-2 has optimal properties for

  3. The influence of iron on water radiolysis in cement-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouniol, P., E-mail: pascal.bouniol@cea.f [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, F-91991 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-08-15

    For the time being, assessing the H{sub 2} source term generated by {gamma} irradiated cement-based materials consists of simulating the radiolysis of the pore liquid on the only elementary reactions relating to the decomposition of alkaline water. Such incomplete description does not take into account the impurities contained in the cement and leads to underestimate the production of H{sub 2}. Systematically present in cement materials, iron is likely to influence radiolysis by the disturbance induced on radical chemistry throughout the irradiation period. The faster reactivity of e{sub aq}{sup -} and OH{sup {center_dot}} radicals on Fe(III) and Fe(II), respectively, than on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} is responsible for the lower recycling capability of the 'Allen's chain reaction', allowing for H{sub 2} to be preserved in a closed system. A critical review of reaction data about iron complexes (hydroxo-, peroxo-) is presented in order to build up an 'iron' database. Radiolysis simulations in cement porewater in the presence of Fe(OH){sub 3} (considered as a model phase) show, as expected, an increase in the effective production of radiolytic H{sub 2} and the co-existence of exotic valence Fe(IV) with Fe(II) and (III) during the irradiation period ({gamma}).

  4. Sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials examined by x-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Nikhila N.; Kurtis, Kimberly E.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Jupe, Andrew C.; Stock, Stuart R.

    2004-10-01

    Sulfate ions present in soil, groundwater, seawater, decaying organic matter, acid rain, and industrial effluent adversely affect the long-term durability of portland cement concrete, but lack of complete understanding of the nature and consequences of sulfate attack hamper our ability to accurately predict performance of concrete in sulfate-rich environments. One impediment to improved understanding of sulfate deterioration of cement-based materials has been the lack of appropriate non-destructive characterization techniques. Laboratory x-ray microtomography affords an opportunity to study in situ the evolution of physical manifestations of damage due to sulfate exposure. The influence of materials selection and mixture parameters - including water-to-cement ratio, cement type, and presence or absence of aggregate, as well as the influence of sulfate exposure conditions, including sulfate and cation type (i.e., Na2SO4 and MgSO4) and concentration - have been examined by microtomography to determine their influence on the rate and character of the sulfate-induced deterioration.

  5. Biodegradable Materials for Bone Repairs: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lili Tan; Xiaoming Yu; Peng Wan; Ke Yang

    2013-01-01

    With attractive research and development of biomaterials,more and more opportunities have been brought to the treatments of human tissue repairs.The implant is usually no need to exist in the body accompanied with the recovery or regeneration of the tissue lesions,and the long-term effect of exotic substance to human body should be reduced as lower as possible.For this purpose,biodegradable materials,including polymers,magnesium alloys and ceramics,have attracted much attention for medical applications due to their biodegradable characters in body environment.This paper in turn introduces these three different types of widely studied biodegradable materials as well as their advantages as implants in applications for bone repairs.Relevant history and research progresses are summarized.

  6. Comparative histomorphometric analysis between α-Tcp cement and β-Tcp/Ha granules in the bone repair of rat calvaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Grandi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the effect of two bioceramics on the process of bone repair: α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP cement and β-tricalcium phosphate hydroxyapatite particles (β-TCP/HA. Calvarial defects were created in 50 rats, divided into two groups (α and β/HA. Software was used at 7, 21, 60, 90 and 120 days to assess bone formation. Mean new bone formation rates were as follows: α group, 1.6% at 7 days, 5.24% at 21 days, 24% at 60 days, 30.21% at 90 days and 50.59% at 120 days; β/HA group, 1.94% at 7 days, 2.53% at 21 days, 12.47% at 60 days, 26.84% at 90 days and 38.82% at 120 days; control group, 0.15% at 7 days, 10.12% at 21 days, 15.10% at 60 days, 18.94% at 90 days, 48.50% at 120 days. Both materials are osteoconductive and biocompatible. Perhaps the larger rate of new bone formation observed in the α-TCP group, it also occurs in the β-TCP/HA group within a longer time period.

  7. Cellular compatibility of improved scaffold material with deproteinized heterogeneous bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; PEI Fu-xing; ZHOU Zong-ke; LI Qi-hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study cellular compatibility of improved scaffold material with deproteinized heterogeneous bone and provide experimental basis on choosing the scaffold material in bone tissue engineering.Methods: Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) were co-cultured with heterogeneous deproteinized bone in vitro. The contrast phase microscope, scanning electron microscope, MTT assay, flow cytometry were performed and the BGP content and ALP activities were detected in order to observe the cell growth, adhesion in the material, cell cycle and cell viability.Results: The scaffold material of deproteinized heterogeneous bone had no inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation, differentiation and secretion function of BMSCs.Conclusions: The established heterogeneous deproteinized bone has good biocompatibility with BMSCs and is a potentially ideal scaffold material for bone tissue engineering.

  8. The grain grading model and prediction of deleterious porosity of cement-based materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qi; LIU Jun-zhe

    2008-01-01

    The calculating model for the packing degree of spherical particles system was modified. The grain grading model of cement-based materials was established and could be applied in the global grading system as well as in the nano-fiber reinforced system. According to the grain grading model, two kinds of mortar were de-signed by using the global grain materials and nano-fiber materials such as fly ash, silica fume and NR powder.In this paper, the densities of two above systems cured for 90d were tested and the relationship of deleterious porosity and the total porosity of hardened mortar was discussed. Research results show that nano-fiber materialsuch as NR powder can increase the density of cement-based materials. The relationship of deleterious porosity and the total porosity of hardened mortar accords with logarithmic curve. The deleterious porosity and the ration-ality of the grading can be roughly predicted through calculating the packing degree by the grain grading model of cement-based materials.

  9. Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autogenous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water-to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal...... relative humidity development; autogenous deformation; and eigenstress development, using a novel embedded spherical stress sensor. Because the latter three measurements are conducted under sealed conditions, whereas chemical-shrinkage measurements are made under "saturated" conditions, the National...... controls the initial pore-size distribution of the cement paste, which, in turn, regulates the magnitude of the induced autogenous shrinkage stresses produced by the water/air menisci in the air-filled pores formed throughout the hydration process. The experimental results indicate that a small autogenous...

  10. Enhanced healing of rabbit segmental radius defects with surface-coated calcium phosphate cement/bone morphogenetic protein-2 scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yi; Hou, Juan; Yin, ManLi [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: biomatwj@163.com [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, ChangSheng, E-mail: csliu@sh163.net [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Large osseous defects remain a difficult clinical problem in orthopedic surgery owing to the limited effective therapeutic options, and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is useful for its potent osteoinductive properties in bone regeneration. Here we build a strategy to achieve prolonged duration time and help inducting new bone formation by using water-soluble polymers as a protective film. In this study, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds were prepared as the matrix and combined with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) respectively to protect from the digestion of rhBMP-2. After being implanted in the mouse thigh muscles, the surface-modified composite scaffolds evidently induced ectopic bone formation. In addition, we further evaluated the in vivo effects of surface-modified scaffolds in a rabbit radius critical defect by radiography, three dimensional micro-computed tomographic (μCT) imaging, synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomographic (SRμCT) imaging, histological analysis, and biomechanical measurement. The HPMC-modified CPC scaffold was regarded as the best combination for segmental bone regeneration in rabbit radius. - Highlights: • A simple surface-coating method was used to fabricate composite scaffolds. • Growth factor was protected from rapid depletion via superficial coating. • Significant promotion of bone regeneration was achieved. • HPMC-modification displayed optimal effect of bone regeneration.

  11. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  12. Synergistic effects of chemical admixtures in concretes containing supplementary cementing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mailvaganam, N. P. [National Research Council of Canada, Instiute for Research in Construction, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the need to produce more durable structures, chemical additives to concrete such as superplasticizers and supplementary cementing materials such as silica fume and fly ash, attract considerable interest. The combined use of these materials produces a synergistic effect which results in a range of modifications such as improved mobility, cohesiveness, ultimate strength and durability, making it possible to place highly durable concrete under a variety of conditions. This paper examines the role of additives in augmenting desirable features in fly ash or silica fume/portland cement mixes, using specific examples to illustrate the manner in which these admixtures compensate for limitations and increase the effectiveness of both of these supplementary cementing materials. Rheological, structural and durability characteristics are the focus of interest. Results show that admixtures influence both the hydration and packing efficiency in the fly ash or silica fume concrete, producing significant improvements in the concrete that could not be readily attained if the materials were used individually. 30 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  13. High-strength resorbable brushite bone cement with controlled drug-releasing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M P; Mohammed, A R; Perrie, Y; Gbureck, U; Barralet, J E

    2009-01-01

    Brushite cements differ from apatite-forming compositions by consuming a lot of water in their setting reaction whereas apatite-forming cements consume little or no water at all. Only such cement systems that consume water during setting can theoretically produce near-zero porosity ceramics. This study aimed to produce such a brushite ceramic and investigated whether near elimination of porosity would prevent a burst release profile of incorporated antibiotics that is common to prior calcium phosphate cement delivery matrices. Through adjustment of the powder technological properties of the powder reactants, that is particle size and particle size distribution, and by adjusting citric acid concentration of the liquid phase to 800mM, a relative porosity of as low as 11% of the brushite cement matrix could be achieved (a 60% reduction compared to previous studies), resulting in a wet unprecompacted compressive strength of 52MPa (representing a more than 100% increase to previously reported results) with a workable setting time of 4.5min of the cement paste. Up to 2wt.% of vancomycin and ciprofloxacin could be incorporated into the cement system without loss of wet compressive strength. It was found that drug release rates could be controlled by the adjustable relative porosity of the cement system and burst release could be minimized and an almost linear release achieved, but the solubility of the antibiotic (vancomycin>ciprofloxacin) appeared also to be a crucial factor.

  14. Study of the Influence of Bone Cement Type and Mixing Method on the Bioactivity and the Elution Kinetics of Ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Javier; Mura, Carla; Merino, Virginia; Nácher, Amparo; Climente, Mónica; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine ciprofloxacin release from three trademarks of bone cements (Simplex®, Lima® and Palacos®) and its bioactivity using as variables, the mixing method, the chemical form of the antibiotic and the antibiotic combination. The antibiotic amount released in base form represents 35% of antibiotic amount released when hydrochloride form is incorporated. Moreover, the combination (vancomycin and ciprofloxacin) shows a stronger release (132%) than hydrochloride ciprofloxacin alone. Three cements show equal drug release profile (P > 0.05). A bioactivity simulation exercise showed that until 72 hours post-surgery, ciprofloxacin concentrations in the implant would be higher than 0.1 μg/mL in 100% of the patients. After drain removal, it is expected that bioactivity would increase since drug clearance from implant would decrease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Simulation of expansion in cement based materials subjected to external sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Hodhod

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The standard test for length change in hydraulic-cement mortars exposed to sulfate solution, ASTM C1012-95, has been widely used by researchers to study the sulfate resistance of cement based materials. However, there are deficiencies in this test method including lengthy measuring period, insensitivity of the measurement tool to sulfate attack, effect of curing and pH change. So, in this study, a model will be built by artificial neural networks (ANNs to simulate this test and overcome these defects. This model will deal with different types of cement in the presence of blast-furnace slag (GGBFS or fly ash (PFA. From the results of simulations, it is possible to understand the impact of cement chemistry and these two types of additions on resistance of sulfate attack more readily, faster, and accurately. Such an understanding improves the decision making process in every stage of construction and maintenance and will help in better administration of resources.

  16. Effects of TEA·HCl hardening accelerator on the workability of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenhao; Ding, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yanwen

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the test is to research the influence rules of TEA·HCl on the workability of cement paste and concrete. Based on the features of the new hardening accelerator, an experimental analysis system were established through different dosages of hardening accelerator, and the feasibility of such accelerator to satisfy the need of practical engineering was verified. The results show that adding of the hardening accelerator can accelerate the cement hydration, and what’s more, when the dosage was 0.04%, the setting time was the shortest while the initial setting time and final setting time were 130 min and 180 min, respectively. The initial fluidity of cement paste of adding accelerator was roughly equivalent compared with that of blank. After 30 min, fluidity loss would decrease with the dosage increasing, but fluidity may increase. The application of the hardening accelerator can make the early workability of concrete enhance, especially the slump loss of 30 min can improve more significantly. The bleeding rate of concrete significantly decreases after adding TEA·HCl. The conclusion is that the new hardening accelerator can meet the need of the workability of cement-based materials in the optimum dosage range.

  17. Aspects of bonding between resin luting cements and glass ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Burrow, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    The bonding interface of glass ceramics and resin luting cements plays an important role in the long-term durability of ceramic restorations. The purpose of this systematic review is to discuss the various factors involved with the bond between glass ceramics and resin luting cements. An electronic Pubmed, Medline and Embase search was conducted to obtain laboratory studies on resin-ceramic bonding published in English and Chinese between 1972 and 2012. Eighty-three articles were included in this review. Various factors that have a possible impact on the bond between glass ceramics and resin cements were discussed, including ceramic type, ceramic crystal structure, resin luting cements, light curing, surface treatments, and laboratory test methodology. Resin-ceramic bonding has been improved substantially in the past few years. Hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching followed by silanizaiton has become the most widely accepted surface treatment for glass ceramics. However, further studies need to be undertaken to improve surface preparations without HF because of its toxicity. Laboratory test methods are also required to better simulate the actual oral environment for more clinically compatible testing. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of hydroxyapatite bone cement for controlled drug release via tetracycline hydrochloride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sayed Mahmood Rabiee

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the preparation and characterization of drug–hydroxyapatite cement. The hydroxyapatite (HA) cement has been synthesized by using tricalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous with sodium hydrogen phosphate as liquid phase. The effect of added tetracycline hydrochloride (TCH) as drug on final phases, microstructure, setting behaviour and compressive strength has been studied. The drug release rate was first order within the first day and then was zero order. No obvious difference could be detected in XRD patterns of the TCH–HA cement with various amounts of drug. By increasing the drug concentration, mechanical strength of cement was decreased and its setting time was increased. The results of this study demonstrate the potential of using HA cement as a carrier for drug delivery.

  19. Clinical efficacy of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the therapeutic effect of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion for lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis. Methods  The clinical data were analyzed retrospectively of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis who received treatment of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system and intervertebral fusion from Aug. 2013 to Nov. 2015. The 21 patients (9 males and 12 females aged from 60 to 80 years (mean 64 years old; 6 of them presented degenerative spondylolysis, 15 with isthmic spondylolisthesis; 2 cases had I degree slippage, 13 had Ⅱdegree slippage, 6 had Ⅲdegree slippage, and all the cases were unisegmental slippage including 9 cases in L4 and 12 cases in L5. Bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (L2-L5 was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and T values conforming to the diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis were less than or equal to -2.5; All patients were operated with whole lamina resection for decompression, bone cement injectable pedicle screws system implantation, propped open reduction and fixation intervertebral fusion. The clinical outcomes were determined by the radiographic evaluation including intervertebral height, height of intervertebral foramen, slip distance, slip rate and slip angle, and Oswestry disability index (ODI on preoperative, 3 months after operation and the end of the time, and the interbody fusion were followed up. Results  Cerebrospinal fluid leakage of incision was observed in two cases after operation, compression and dressing to incision, Trendelenburg position, dehydration and other treatments were taken, and the stitches of incisions were taken out on schedule. Slips in the 21 patients were reset to different extent, and lumbar physiological curvatures were recovered. The intervertebral height and height of intervertebral foramen were obviously higher 3 months after operation than that before operation (P0

  20. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 1. Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moinzadeh, A T; Jongsma, L; de Groot-Kuin, D; Cristescu, R; Neirynck, N; Camilleri, J

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic Calcium Silicate Cements (HCSCs) constitute a group of materials that have become increasingly popular in endodontics since the introduction of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) in the 1990s. MTA is Portland cement to which bismuth oxide has been added to increase its radiopacity. The most important property of MTA is its capacity to set in water or a humid environment. However, MTA also has important limitations, for example, it's difficult to work with and can discolour teeth. Recently, numerous products based on HCSC chemistry, which can be considered as modifications of MTA intended to reduce its limitations, have become available on the market. Despite their potential advantages, all of these materials have their own specific limitations that are currently insufficiently known and investigated.

  1. CERAMIC WASTES AS RAW MATERIALS IN PORTLAND CEMENT CLINKER FABRICATION.· CHARACTERIZATION AND ALKALINE ACTIVATION

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    [EN] The world-wide cementindustry is seeking experimentalavenues that wi// lead to cementproduction that is less energy-intensive/ less damaging to the surrounding environment and less prolific in GHGemissions. In Spain andEurope in general, this approach is who//y consistent with the concept of sustainability and compliance with the Kyoto Protocol. The use ofdifferent kinds of industrial waste and by-products as alternative materials in cement manufacture has proved to ...

  2. Bone strength and material properties of the glenoid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frich, Lars Henrik; Jensen, N.C.; Odgaard, A.;

    1997-01-01

    The quality of the glenoid bone is important to a successful total shoulder replacement. Finite element models have been used to model the response of the glenoid bone to an implanted prosthesis. Because very little is known about the bone strength and the material properties at the glenoid, thes...

  3. Primary loading causes bone cement-stem interface debonding injury%初次承重引发骨水泥-柄界面脱粘损伤的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚峰; 葛世荣; 刘洪涛; 郭开今

    2016-01-01

    using acoustic emission tester. The non-destructive testing on the metal surface and the inner layer of bone cement cylinder was conducted using three-dimensional surface profiler, ultrasonic microscopy and X-ray detector. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The online monitoring results of debonding experiment and acoustic emission tester demonstrated that the initial damage of bone cement initiated in the primary loading of patients after operation, rather than at fatigue damage stage. Bone cement coffin caused cracks initiation mainly due to the combination effect of radial and axial stress. The bone cement-stem interfacial shear lag effect could not prevent the gradual extension of interface and inner coffin crack from top to bottom. The bone cement defects formed in solidification process was likely to affect the mechanical properties of the material, and eventual y induced the crystal face and macromolecular chain fractures, forming silver striated cracks and leading component failure.

  4. Characterization of sugar cane bagasse ash as supplementary material for Portland cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth Torres Agredo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sugar Cane Bagasse is a by-product of the sugar agroindustry; it is partly used as fuel. However, bagasse ash (SCBA is considered waste, which creates a disposal problem. Furthermore, if sugar cane bagasse is burned under controlled conditions, the SCBA can be potentially reused. This paper considers the technical viability of using SCBA as a partial replacement for cement. Two samples of SCBA from a Colombian sugar industry were characterized. The chemical composition of the samples shows high percentages of silica, 76.3% and 63.2%. The mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the waste were determined by X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD, thermal analysis (TG/DTA and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The pozzolanic activity of SCBA was evaluated using the Frattini test and the strength activity index test (SAI. The ASTM C618 defines an SAI of at least 75% as a requirement for classifying material as a pozzolan. This condition was achieved in the experiments performed. The results indicate that SCBA produced in the manufacture of commercial cements can be recycled for use as pozzolanic material. This supplementary material can partially replace cement and therefore reduce CO2 emissions.

  5. Sequestration of phosphorus from wastewater by cement-based or alternative cementitious materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Chen, Jiding; Kong, Yaping; Shi, Xianming

    2014-10-01

    Cement-based and alternative cementitious materials were tested in the laboratory for their capability of removing phosphate from wastewater. The results demonstrated that both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were suitable for describing the adsorption characteristics of these materials. Among the four types of filter media tested, the cement-based mortar A has the highest value of maximum adsorption (30.96 mg g(-1)). The P-bonding energy (KL) and adsorption capacity (K) exhibited a positive correlation with the total content of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in each mortar. The maximum amount of P adsorbed (Qm) and adsorption intensity (1/n) exhibited a positive correlation with the CaO content in each mortar. For three of them, the P-removal rates were in excess of 94 percent for phosphorus concentrations ranging from 20 to 1000 mg L(-1). The underlying mechanisms were examined using field emission scanning microscopy (FESEM), coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The results reveal that the removal of phosphate predominantly followed a precipitation mechanism in addition to weak physical interactions between the surface of adsorbent filter media and the metallic salts of phosphate. The use of cement-based or alternative cementitious materials in the form of ground powder shows great promise for developing a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable technology for P-sequestration and for wastewater treatment.

  6. Severe particulate pollution from deposition practices of primary materials of cement plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Rapsomanikis, Spyridon; Zerefos, Christos; Georgoulias, Aristeidis; Pavlidou, Eleni

    2014-05-01

    Analysis of ambient particulates sampled at a residential area near a cement manufacturing plant in Greece, showed total aerosol mass in the sampled air 1.3-30.4 mg/m3 and PM10 concentrations 0.04-3 mg/m3. These concentrations are very high and seriously exceed air quality standards. Morphological examination and elemental analysis of air samples and primary materials with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)/Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) showed that ambient particulates shared appearance features and had similar elemental synthesis to clinker and fly ash, showing heavy impacts on the ambient aerosol load from the cement plant practice of open deposition of primary materials. Satellite-derived AOD over the area during the period 2000-2010 shows extended spatial impact, while satellite overpass data indicate a 33% decrease in AOD over this period, possibly due to changing production and primary material deposition practices. Although the sampling was performed more than one decade ago in Greece, environmental legislation and its reinforcement practices at that time in Greece are similar to current ones in many parts of the world. The global increase in cement production, especially in south-east Asia, make these measurements particularly relevant.

  7. Pore Distribution and Water Uptake in a Cenosphere-Cement Paste Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronins, J.; Setina, J.; Sahmenko, G.; Lagzdina, S.; Shishkin, A.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina silicate cenospheres (CS) is a significant waste material from power plants that use a coal. Use CS as Portland cement replacement material gives opportunity to control physical and mechanical properties and makes a product lighter and more cost-effective. In the frame of this study, Portland cement paste samples were produced by adding CS in the concentration range from 0 to 40 volume %. Water uptake of hardened samples was checked and pore size distribution by using the mercury porosimetry was determined. In a cold climate where the temperature often falls below 0 °C, it is important to avoid the amount of micrometer sized pores in the final structure and to decrease water absorption capacity of material. In winter conditions, water fills such pores and causes additional stresses to their walls by expansion while freezing. It was found that generally water uptake capacity for cement paste samples decreased up to 20% by increasing the concentration of CS up to 40 volume %, at the same time, the volume of micrometer sized opened pores increases.

  8. Alternative cementing materials for completion of deep, hot oil wells; Sementeringsmateriale med regulert herdetid, for anvendelse i dype, varme oljebroenner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justnes, H.; Dahl-Joergensen, E.

    1995-03-06

    The invention deals with alternative cementing materials for use in oil well completion. A cementing material with controlled curing time, for use in the primary secondary cementing of deep hot oil wells with a static background temperature in the range of 120 to 200{sup o}C, comprising a resin consisting of ortho-, meta- and/or para-diallyl phthalates and/or prepolymers and/or oligomers thereof; a curing agent in the form of a dissolved organic peroxide generating free radicals, and an inhibitor for stabilizing free radicals so as to obtain the required open time for pumping the resin in place, and optionally the following, one or more heavy weight filler(s) for controlling the density of the cement; extender materials controlling the consistency and materials compensating inherent shrinkage. 6 figs.

  9. Augmentation of Bone Tunnel Healing in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Grafts: Application of Calcium Phosphates and Other Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. R. Baxter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone tunnel healing is an important consideration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL replacement surgery. Recently, a variety of materials have been proposed for improving this healing process, including autologous bone tissue, cells, artificial proteins, and calcium salts. Amongst these materials are calcium phosphates (CaPs, which are known for their biocompatibility and are widely commercially available. As with the majority of the materials investigated, CaPs have been shown to advance the healing of bone tunnel tissue in animal studies. Mechanical testing shows fixation strengths to be improved, particularly by the application of CaP-based cement in the bone tunnel. Significantly, CaP-based cements have been shown to produce improvements comparable to those induced by potentially more complex treatments such as biologics (including fibronectin and chitin and cultured cells. Further investigation of CaP-based treatment in the bone tunnels during ACL replacement is therefore warranted in order to establish what improvements in healing and resulting clinical benefits may be achieved through its application.

  10. Modification of Baksi sloppy hinge elbow to minimize the stresses at the humeral bone cement interface- An early experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baksi D

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Baksi sloppy hinge elbow is an all metal prosthesis having 7 0 - 10 0 varus - valgus inherent laxity at the hinge section with minimal motion bearing contact area. Due to the presence of laxity at it′s hinge section, any strain on the prosthesis dissipates primarily to the surrounding soft tissues thus protecting the cement bone interfaces. However, from our long term clinical experiences on the use of our sloppy hinge design since 1984 and the knowledge of literature review of the results of using other semi-constrained (sloppy or unconstrained designs, it was observed that radiolucency or loosening at the bone-cement interface occurred mainly around the humeral stem in the long run due to the continued effect of rotational torque of forearm and hand. Hence, an attempt in the improvement of the design concept is being made. Methods : In this respect one flange each of one cm height and breadth and three mm thickness has been incorporated on either sides of the shank of humeral stem of the sloppy hinge at medio-lateral (coronal plane which will be seated in the corresponding longitudinal groove cut on either side of humeral shaft extending from its transverse cut end to become single assembly during the rotation of humerus. Results : The preliminary results of clinical application of the modified sloppy hinge elbow in ten cases are found satisfactory. Conclusion : The cyclical compression and distraction forces during flexion and extension of the elbow will be distributed over the larger bony area of lower end of humerus where flanges of the humeral shank being seated. The rotational torque effect of forearm and hand particularly with the arm in abduction will be minimised at the humeral bone cement interface as the humerus and the prosthetic stem act as a single assembly by the snugly fitting of the prosthetic flange in the humural shaft

  11. Fibrin gel-immobilized primary osteoblasts in calcium phosphate bone cement: in vivo evaluation with regard to application as injectable biological bone substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneser, U; Voogd, A; Ohnolz, J; Buettner, O; Stangenberg, L; Zhang, Y H; Stark, G B; Schaefer, D J

    2005-01-01

    Osteogenic injectable bone substitutes may be useful for many applications. We developed a novel injectable bone substitute based on osteoblast-fibrin glue suspension and calcium phosphate bone cement (BC). Human osteoblasts were isolated from trabecular bone samples and cultured under standard conditions. Osteoblasts were suspended in fibrinogen solution (FS). BC was cured with thrombin solution. 8 x 4 mm injectable bone discs were prepared using silicon molds and a custom-made applicator device. Discs containing BC, BC/FS, or BC/FS/osteoblasts were implanted subcutaneously into athymic nude mice. After 3, 9 and 24 weeks, specimens were explanted and subjected to morphologic and biomechanical evaluation. In vitro fibrin gel-embedded osteoblasts displayed a differentiated phenotype as evidenced by alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 and von Kossa stains. A proportion of osteoblasts appeared morphologically intact over a 3-day in vitro period following application into the BC. BC/FS and BC/FS/osteoblast discs were sparsely infiltrated with vascularized connective tissue. There was no bone formation in implants from all groups. However, positive von Kossa staining only in BC/FS/osteoblast groups suggests engraftment of at least some of the transplanted cells. Biomechanical evaluation demonstrated initial stability of the composites. Young's modulus and maximal load did not differ significantly in the BC/FS and BC/FS/osteoblast groups. The practicability of osteoblast-containing injectable bone could be demonstrated. The dense microstructure and the suboptimal initial vascularization of the composites may explain the lack of bone formation. Modifications with regard to enhanced osteoblast survival are mandatory for a possible application as injectable osteogenic bone replacement system.

  12. Engineering of bone using porous calcium phosphate cement and bone marrow stromal cells for maxillary sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Derong; Guo, Lian; Lu, Jiayu; Zhang, Xiuli; Wei, Jie; Liu, Changsheng; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xinquan

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of maxillary sinus floor elevation and simultaneous dental implantation with a tissue-engineered bone complex of calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds combined with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). A large animal goat model is used with the tissue engineering method. Eighteen bilateral maxillary sinus of nine goats were randomly allocated into three groups; the CPC/BMSC complex (n=6) was used to elevate maxillary sinus floor with a simultaneous implant placement; the effects were compared with those treated with CPC alone (n=6) or autogenous bone (n=6). After a healing period of 3 months, sequential triad-color fluorescence labeling, micro-CT, as well as histological and histomorphometric analyses indicated that the tissue-engineered BMSC/CPC complex could promote earlier bone formation and mineralization, and maximally maintain the volume and height of the augmented maxillary sinus. By comparison, CPC-alone or autogenous bone achieved less bone formation and later mineralization. Besides, the average bone-implant contact value reflecting the osseointegration was 35.63%±9.42% in the BMSCs/CPC group, significantly higher than 22.47%±4.28% in the CPC-alone group or 28.26%±8.03% in the autogenous bone group. In conclusion, CPC serves as a potential substrate for BMSCs for the maxillary sinus floor augmentation and simultaneous implantation. The tissue-engineered bone might enhance the stability of implants and thus be of great significance to achieve improved quality to restore the oral function in clinic.

  13. Gas permeability of cement based materials; Etude de la permeabilite au gaz des materiaux cimentaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galle, Ch.; Pin, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets (DCC/DESD/SESD), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Daian, J.F. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Grenoble I, (INPG/CNRS/IRD), 38 (France)

    2000-07-01

    The study of the permeability of cement based materials is an important issue for their transport properties, which are good indicators of their durability. Studies were undertaken to acquire experimental data and to model the gas permeability of cement based materials. Among many parameters like cement type, water-cement ratio (w/c), curing, etc, the degree of water saturation and microstructural properties are the two main parameters controlling the ability of such type of materials to transport gas. It is well known that the higher the water saturation, the lower the gas permeability. Under pressure, gas will be also transported through the biggest pore accesses. It must be emphasized that the w/c ratio is the fundamental parameter for cement based materials. This ratio controls the hydration process and hence the material porosity. Gas permeability was calculated with Darcy law as modified by the Hagen-Poiseuille formula (1). Various materials were investigated: pure cement pastes prepared with different types of cement (CEM I-OPC, CEM V-BFS-PFA) and various w/c ratios, and industrial concretes. After curing, the samples were stored under controlled relative humidity conditions using saline solutions to reach a stable hydric state. N{sup 2} gas permeability tests were then performed with a Hassler apparatus. The microstructural properties of CEM I and CEM V materials are given in Figure 2. Examples of experimental results obtained with pure pastes are shown in Figure 3. A comparative example of paste and concrete data is provided in Figure 4. It was experimentally observed that gas permeability is extremely sensitive to material water saturation: up to five orders of magnitude of variation (between 10{sup -16} and 10{sup -21} m{sup 2} on average) for water saturations from a few % to 100%. The higher the w/c ratio, the higher the gas permeability. CEM I pastes are also less permeable than CEM V pastes. The higher total porosity effect of CEM V materials is not

  14. Cytotoxicity and Osteogenic Potential of Silicate Calcium Cements as Potential Protective Materials for Pulpal Revascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Eduardo A.; Niu, Li-na; Palani, Chithra D.; El-Awady, Ahmed R.; Hammond, Barry D.; Pei, Dan-dan; Tian, Fu-cong; Cutler, Christopher W.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In pulpal revascularization, a protective material is placed coronal to the blood clot to prevent recontamination and to facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchynal stem cells to produce new dental tissues. Although mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been the material of choice for clot protection, it is easily displaced into the clot during condensation. The present study evaluated the effects of recently-introduced calcium silicate cements (Biodentine and TheraCal LC) on the viability and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) by comparing with MTA Angelus. Methods Cell viability was assessed using XTT assay and flow cytometry. The osteogenic potential of hDPSCs exposed to calcium silicate cements was examined using qRT-PCR for osteogeic gene expressions, alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity, Alizarin red S staining and transmission electron microscopy of extracellular calcium deposits. Parametric statistical methods were employed for analyses of significant difference among groups, with α=0.05. Results The cytotoxic effects of Biodentine and TheraCal LC on hDPSCs were time- and concentration-dependent. Osteogenic differentiation of hDPSCs was enhanced after exposure to Biodentine that was depleted of its cytotoxic components. This effect was less readily observed in hDPSCs exposed to TheraCal LC, although both cements supported extracelluar mineralization better than the positive control (zinc oxide-eugenol–based cement). Significance A favorable tissue response is anticipated to occur with the use of Biodentine as a blood clot-protecting material for pulpal revascularizaiton. Further investigations with the use of in vivo animal models are required to validate the potential adverse biological effects of TheraCal LC on hDPSCs. PMID:26494267

  15. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Lin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of dynamic hip screw with bone cement augmentation in normal bone%骨水泥强化正常骨质DHS固定的生物力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎宁; 彭阿钦; 聂喜增; 李锋; 赵永涛; 毕靖博; 韩长伶

    2008-01-01

    the fixation of intertrochanteric fracture specimen that has a normal bone density.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Bilateral contrast observation study of the same sample was performed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics, Hebei Orthopaedic Research Institute (Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, China) between March and April In 2005.MATERIALS: Bilateral upper femora from the embalmed male cadaver were provided by Anatomy Department of Hebei Medical University (China). X-ray scan results proved the absence of tuberculosis, anatomical deformity and tumor.METHODS: Twenty-four matched pairs of the upper femora (48 sides) were used to make the specimens of the intertrochanteric fracture of type A2. The right femur specimens were fixed with DHS augmented by bone cement, as the augmentation group (The screw track of femoral neck was expended by curette, and the femoral head facing upwards were injected with 2mL low viscosity bone cement. Then lag screw was wrested to keep the position unchanged till the bone cement coagulated. Placing barrel, compressing through tighten tail screw, and cortical screw fixing side-plate were. followed). And the left femur specimen was fixed with DHS conventional fixation, as the control group. The bending and torsional tests were performed in the two groups.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The maximum load and the maximum torque in the two groupsRESULTS: The maximum load and the maximum torque were (3852.1602±143.6031) N and (15.5+2.6) Nm in the augmentation group, and (3702.9667±133.8601) N and (14.7±3.4) Nm in the control group. There was no significant difference in the biomechanical effects between the two groups (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The augmenting fixation with bone cement for intertrochanteric fracture specimen has no significant effect on the strength of DHS fixation or on the overall stability of the fractured bone in normal bone density.

  17. Preliminary investigation of cement materials in the Taif area, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Conrad

    1970-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of possible sources of cement rock in the Taft area was made during the latter part of August 1968. Adequate deposits of limestone, clay, quartz conglomerate and sandstone, and pisolitic iron ore, yet no gypsum, were located to support a Cement plant should it prove feasible to establish one in this area. These materials, made up mostly of Tertiary and later sediments, crop out in isolated, inconspicuous low hills in a north- trending belt, 10 to 15 kilometers wide, lying about 90 kilometers to-the east of At Taft. The belt extends for more than 90 kilometers from the vicinity of Jabal 'An in the south to the crushed rock pits at Radwan and beyond in the north. The area is readily accessible either from the Talf-Riyadh highway or from the Taif-Bishah road presently under construction. The limestone, which is quite pure and dense in some localities but dolomitic, argillaceous, and cherty in others, occurs in a variety of colors and would make suitable decorative building stone. The volcanic rocks of the Harrat Hadan, lying directly to the east of the limestone belt, include volcanic ash beds some of which may have been altered to bentonitlc clays. Others may have been lithified and might be suitable for light-weight aggregate. These possibilities remain to be investigated. Precambrian metamorphic rocks lying directly to the south and southeast of Taif were also investigated as possible cement rock sources, but no suitable material was found here.

  18. Non destructive determination of the free chloride content in cement based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsener, B. [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Cagliari, I-09128 Cagliari (Italy); Institute of Materials Chemistry and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Zimmermann, L.; Boehni, H. [Institute of Materials Chemistry and Corrosion, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Hoenggerberg, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2003-06-01

    A non-destructive chloride sensitive sensor element for use in cement based porous materials is presented. The sensor element determines the activity of the free chloride ions in solutions and in porous cement based materials such as cement paste, mortar or concrete. The calibration in synthetic pore solution showed a response according to Nernst law over three decades of chloride concentration. The sensor element has shown excellent reproducibility and long term stability. The sensor element has been used to monitor the chloride uptake into mortar specimens. The results show a good agreement between the free chloride content determined by the sensor and by pore water expression. Applications in monitoring of reinforced concrete structures and their limitations are discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Chloridsensor zur zerstoerungsfreien Erfassung des Chloridgehalts in zementoesen Materialien beschrieben. Der Sensor bestimmt die Aktivitaet der freien Chloridionen in Loesungen und in Zementstein, Moertel oder Beton. Die Kalibrierungskurve in synthetischer Betonporenloesung zeigt das erwartete Nernst'sche Verhalten ueber mehr als drei Konzentrationsdekaden. Der Sensor weist eine sehr hohe Reproduzierbarkeit und Langzeitstabilitaet auf. Der Chloridsensor wurde eingesetzt, um das Eindringen der Chloridionen in Moertelpruefkoerpern zu untersuchen. Ein Vergleich der Chloridkonzentration bestimmt durch Auspressen der Porenloesung am Ende der Versuche mit den von Sensoren bestimmten Chloridkonzentration zeigt eine sehr gute Uebereinstimmung. Praktische Anwendungen und die Einsatzgrenzen des Sensors werden diskutiert. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Evaluation of frost damage in cement-based materials by a nonlinear elastic wave technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiras, J. N.; Kundu, T.; Popovics, J. S.; Monzó, J.; Soriano, L.; Payá, J.

    2014-03-01

    Frost resistance of concrete is a major concern in cold regions. RILEM (International union of laboratories and experts in construction materials, systems and structures) recommendations provide two alternatives for evaluating frost damage by nondestructive evaluation methods for concrete like materials. The first method is based on the ultrasonic pulse velocity measurement, while the second alternative technique is based on the resonant vibration test. In this study, we monitor the frost damage in Portland cement mortar samples with water to cement ratio of 0.5 and aggregate to cement ratio of 3. The samples are completely saturated by water and are frozen for 24 hours at -25°C. The frost damage is monitored after 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 freezing-thawing cycles by nonlinear impact resonance acoustic spectroscopy (NIRAS). The results obtained are compared with those obtained by resonant vibration tests, the second alternative technique recommended by RILEM. The obtained results show that NIRAS is more sensitive to early stages of damage than the standard resonant vibration tests.

  20. Bone-like apatite layer formation on the new resin-modified glass-ionomer cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourmohammadi, Jhamak; Sadrnezhaad, S K; Ghader, A Behnam

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the apatite-forming ability of the new resin-modified glass-ionomer cement was evaluated by soaking the cement in the simulated body fluid. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns of the soaked cement pointed to the creation of poorly crystalline carbonated apatite. It was found that the releasing of calcium ions from the soaked cement will dominate the undesirable effect of polyacrylic acid on apatite formation. Consequently, the ionic activity products (IAPs) of the apatite in the surrounding medium increased which accelerated apatite nucleation induced by the presence of the Si-OH and COOH groups. Accordingly, the apatite nuclei started to form via primary heterogeneous nucleation and continued by secondary nucleation. Therefore, nucleation and growth occurs as in the layer-by-layer mode so that finite numbers of monolayers are produced. Subsequent formation of film occurs by formation of discrete nuclei (layer-plus-island or SK growth).

  1. [Development and evaluation of fertilizers cemented and coated with organic-inorganic materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qiang; Wang, Jia-Chen; Zuo, Qiang; Zhang, Lin; Liu, Bao-Cun; Zhao, Tong-Ke; Zou, Guo-Yuan; Xu, Qiu-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Four kinds of organic-inorganic cementing and coating materials were prepared by a coating method using water as the solvent, and the corresponding cemented and coated fertilizers (B2, PS, F2, and F2F) were produced by disc pelletizer. The tests on the properties of these fertilizers showed that the granulation rate, compression strength, and film-forming rate were B2 > PS > F2 > F2F. Soil column leaching experiment showed that the curve of accumulated nitrogen-dissolving rate was the gentlest for B2. In 48 days, the accumulated nitrogen-dissolving rate was in the order of B2, 54.65% fertilizers had better effects on corn yield, among which, B2 was the best, with the corn yield and fertilizer use efficiency increased by 19.72% and 20.30%, respectively. The yield-increasing effect of other test fertilizers was in the order of PS > F2 > F2F.

  2. The effect of CNTs reinforcement on thermal and electrical properties of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarchos, D. A.; Dalla, P. T.; Tragazikis, I. K.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of the nano-reinforcement on the thermal properties of cement mortar. Nano-modified cement mortar with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) leading to the development of innovative materials possessing multi-functionality and smartness. Such multifunctional properties include enhanced mechanical behavior, electrical and thermal conductivity, and piezo-electric characteristics. The assessment of the thermal behavior was evaluated using IR Thermography. Two different thermographic techniques are used to monitor the influence of the nano-reinforcement. To eliminate any extrinsic effects (e.g. humidity) the specimens were dried in an oven before testing. The electrical resistivity was measured with a contact test method using a custom made apparatus and applying a known D.C. voltage. This study indicate that the CNTs nano-reinforcement enhance the thermal and electrical properties and demonstrate them useful as sensors in a wide variety of applications.

  3. Interaction between pollutants produced in sewage sludge combustion and cement raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Araceli; Conesa, Juan A; Martín-Gullón, Ignacio; Font, Rafael

    2007-09-01

    Nowadays the use of waste as secondary fuel in clinker kilns is an extensive practice, but the interaction between cement raw material (CRM) and the combustion gases of the fuels has not been extensively studied. Because of that, in this work the effect of the interaction of exhaust from the combustion of sewage sludge and CRM has been studied in a laboratory furnace. The experiments were performed at 300 degrees C, close to the temperature at the cyclones in a cement industry. The behavior of volatile compounds, polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAH) and polychloro dibenzo-p-dioxin and polychloro dibenzofurans (PCCD/F) were analysed in the presence or absence of CRM. The results obtained show that the presence of CRM at the outlet of the combustion gases is beneficial for the decrease of pollutant emissions.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddharam M; Kamble, Vikas B; Desai, Raviraj G; Arabbi, Kashinath C; Prakash, Ved

    2015-08-01

    The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 37(0)c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of pstrength of the luting cements (pcore materials (pstrength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than traditional GIC luting cement for all core buildup materials except, for silver amalgam core buildup material. RMGIC core material showed highest shear bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI Silver Reinforced, GI and

  5. Microstructure of a Planting Material Consisting of Nutrition-Expansive Perlitic-Cement Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-ru; LIU Zu-de

    2003-01-01

    An ecotypic revetment material consisting of nutrition-expansive perlitic-cement composites is introduced. This planting material can combine vegetation recovery with slope protection. The XRD, SEM and image analysis techniques were used to study its composition and microstructure. Its strength was measured by an electro-hydraulic servo-controlled testing machine. The results show the unconfined compressive strength is about 393.6 kPa, and the average elastic modulus is about 47.0 MPa. The quartz, felspar, chlorite and calcite are the main non-clay minerals in the planting material. Its particles are mainly spherical,and the range of the equivalent diameter is 1.83 to 15.96 μm. The results also show the planting material contains a large amount of micro non-capillary and capillary pores, and has a microstructure characteristic of honeycomb and coralline. CSH gel produced by hydration of cement increases the strength and water stability of the particles. The anisotropy and slight orientation of the particles increase the void cross-section area,providing an explanation of the high permeability for the planting material.The better porosity of the planting material is apt tokeep moisture and nutriment, provides oxygen for plant root breathing, and aids to exhaust the carbon dioxide by means of exchanging with atmosphere, hence it can facilitate vegetation.

  6. Characterization of chlorhexidine-releasing, fast-setting, brushite bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anne M; Ng, Poon Yun J; Gbureck, Uwe; Nazhat, Showan N; Barralet, Jake E; Hofmann, Michael P

    2008-07-01

    The effect of antibacterial chlorhexidine diacetate powder (CHX) on the setting kinetics of a brushite-forming beta-tricalcium phosphate/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (beta-TCP/MCPM) cement was monitored using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The final composition of the set cement with up to 12 wt.% CHX content before and after submersion in water for 24h, the kinetics of chlorhexidine release and the total sample mass change in water over four weeks was monitored using Raman mapping, UV spectroscopy and gravimetry, respectively. Below 9 wt.%, CHX content had no significant effect on brushite formation rate at 37 degrees C, but at 12 wt.% the half-life of the reaction decreased by one-third. Raman mapping confirmed that brushite was the main inorganic component of the set cements irrespective of CHX content, both before and after submersion in water. The CHX could be detected largely as discrete solid particles but could also be observed partially dispersed throughout the pores of the set cement. The percentage of CHX release was found to follow Fick's law of diffusion, being independent of its initial concentration, proportional to the square root of time and, with 1mm thick specimens, 60% was released at 24h. Total set cement mass loss rate was not significantly affected by CHX content. On average, cements exhibited a loss of 7 wt.% assigned largely to surface phosphate particle loss within the initial 8h followed by 0.36 wt.% per day.

  7. Dimensional stability of materials based on Portland cement at the early stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa Yandy, Angélica; Zerbino, Raúl L.; Giaccio, Graciela M.; Russo, Nélida A.; Duchowicz, Ricardo

    2014-09-01

    In this work two fiber optic sensing techniques are used to study the dimensional stability in fresh state of different cementitious materials. A conventional Portland cement mortar and two commercial grouts were selected. The measurements were performed by using a Bragg grating embedded in the material and a non-contact Fizeau interferometer. The first technique was applied in a horizontal sample scheme, and the second one, by using a vertical configuration. In addition, a mechanical length comparator was used in the first case in order to compare the results. The evolution with time of the dimensional changes of the samples and the analysis of the observed behavior are included.

  8. Heuristic economic assessment of the Afghanistan construction materials sector: cement and dimension stone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossotti, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the U.S. Government has invested more than $106 billion for physical, societal, and governmental reconstruction assistance to Afghanistan (Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction, 2012a). This funding, along with private investment, has stimulated a growing demand for particular industrial minerals and construction materials. In support of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey released a preliminary mineral assessment in 2007 on selected Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2007). More recently, the 2007 mineral assessment was updated with the inclusion of a more extensive array of Afghan nonfuel minerals (Peters and others, 2011). As a follow-up on the 2011 assessment, this report provides an analysis of the current use and prospects of the following Afghan industrial minerals required to manufacture construction materials: clays of various types, bauxite, gypsum, cement-grade limestone, aggregate (sand and gravel), and dimension stone (sandstone, quartzite, granite, slate, limestone, travertine, marble). The intention of this paper is to assess the: Use of Afghan industrial minerals to manufacture construction materials, Prospects for growth in domestic construction materials production sectors, Factors controlling the competitiveness of domestic production relative to foreign imports of construction materials, and Feasibility of using natural gas as the prime source of thermal energy and for generating electrical energy for cement production. The discussion here is based on classical principles of supply and demand. Imbedded in these principles is an understanding that the attributes of supply and demand are highly variable. For construction materials, demand for a given product may depend on seasons of the year, location of construction sites, product delivery time, political factors, governmental regulations, cultural issues, price, and how essential a given product might be to the buyer. Moreover, failure on the

  9. Distribution of Hg, As and Se in material and flue gas streams from preheater-precalciner cement kilns and vertical shaft cement kilns in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dahai; Peng, Zheng; Ding, Qiong; Karstensen, Kåre Helge; Engelsen, Christian J; Li, Li; Ren, Yong; Jiang, Chen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of Hg, As, and Se in cement production. Two types of cement plants were studied, including the vertical shaft kiln (VSK) and preheater-precalciner kiln (PPK) processes. Determination of Hg, As, and Se in the main material and gas streams were performed. It was found that recycling of particulate matter captured by an air pollution control device caused a significant enrichment of Hg and As inside both processes. The total quantity of Hg entering the process and the quantity emitted to the atmosphere were found to be 10-109 and 6.3-38 mg, respectively, per ton of clinker produced. The average Hg emission was calculated to be around 41% of the total mercury input. The emissions found complied with the European Union (EU) limit and exceeded partly the U.S. limit. Furthermore, it was found that oxidized mercury was the dominant species in the PPK process, whereas the reduced form was dominant in the VSK process, due to the oxidizing and reducing gas conditions, respectively. Regarding the distribution of As and Se, the major amounts were bound to the solid materials, that is, cement clinker and particulate matter. Based on cement production data in China in 2013, the annual emissions of Hg and As were estimated to be in the range of 8.6-52 and 4.1-9.5 tons, respectively.

  10. Multi-scale Modeling of the Effective Chloride lon Diffusion Coefficient in Cement-based Composite Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Guowen; SUN Wei; ZHANG Yunsheng; LIU Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    N-layered spherical inclusions model was used to calculate the effective diffusion coefficient of chloride ion in cement-based materials by using multi-scale method and then to investigate the relationship between the diffusivity and the microstructure of cement-basted materials where the microstructure included the interfacial transition zone (ITZ) between the aggregates and the bulk cement pastes as well as the microstructure of the bulk cement paste itself.For the convenience of applications,the mortar and concrete were considered as a four-phase spherical model,consisting of cement continuous phase,dispersed aggregates phase,interface transition zone and their homogenized effective medium phase.A general effective medium equation was estabhshed to calculate the diffusion coefficient of the hardened cement paste by considering the microstructure.During calculation,the tortuosity (n) and eonstrictivity factors (Ds/D0) of pore in the hardened pastes are n≈3.2,Ds/D0=1.0× 10-4 respectively from the test data.The calculated results using the n-layered spherical inclusions model are in good agreement with the experimental results; The effective diffusion coefficient of ITZ is 12 times that of the bulk cement for mortar and 17 times for concrete due to the difference between particle size distribution and the volume fraction of aggregates in mortar and concrete.

  11. Blooming gelatin: an individual additive for enhancing nanoapatite precipitation, physical properties, and osteoblastic responses of nanostructured macroporous calcium phosphate bone cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orshesh, Ziba; Hesaraki, Saeed; Khanlarkhani, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great interest in using natural polymers in the composition of calcium phosphate bone cements to enhance their physical, mechanical, and biological performance. Gelatin is a partially hydrolyzed form of collagen, a natural component of bone matrix. In this study, the effect of blooming gelatin on the nanohydroxyapatite precipitation, physical and mechanical properties, and cellular responses of a calcium phosphate bone cement (CPC) was investigated. Various concentrations of blooming gelatin (2, 5, and 8 wt.%) were used as the cement liquid and an equimolar mixture of tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate was used as solid phase. The CPC without any gelatin additive was also evaluated as a control group. The results showed that gelatin accelerated hydraulic reactions of the cement paste, in which the reactants were immediately converted into nanostructured apatite precipitates after hardening. Gelatin molecules induced 4%-10% macropores (10-300 μm) into the cement structure, decreased initial setting time by ~190%, and improved mechanical strength of the as-set cement. Variation in the above-mentioned properties was influenced by the gelatin concentration and progressed with increasing the gelatin content. The numbers of the G-292 osteoblastic cells on gelatin-containing CPCs were higher than the control group at entire culture times (1-14 days), meanwhile better alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was determined using blooming gelatin additive. The observation of cell morphologies on the cement surfaces revealed an appropriate cell attachment with extended cell membranes on the cements. Overall, adding gelatin to the composition of CPC improved the handling characteristics such as setting time and mechanical properties, enhanced nanoapatite precipitation, and augmented the early cell proliferation rate and ALP activity.

  12. The effect of temperature rise on microstructural properties of cement-based materials: correlation of experimental data and a simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the influence of stray current flow on temperature rise in hardening cement-based materials and consequently altered cement hydration. To simulate stray current, different levels of electrical current were applied to cement paste and mortar specimens immediately after casting. I

  13. The effect of temperature rise on microstructural properties of cement-based materials: correlation of experimental data and a simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, A.; Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports on the influence of stray current flow on temperature rise in hardening cement-based materials and consequently altered cement hydration. To simulate stray current, different levels of electrical current were applied to cement paste and mortar specimens immediately after casting.

  14. Peen treatment on a titanium implant: effect of roughness, osteoblast cell functions, and bonding with bone cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khandaker M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Morshed Khandaker,1,4 Shahram Riahinezhad,1 Fariha Sultana,1 Melville B Vaughan,2,4 Joshua Knight,2 Tracy L Morris3,4 1Department of Engineering & Physics, 2Department of Biology, 3Department of Mathematics and Statistics, 4Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Education and Research, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK, USA Abstract: Implant failure due to poor integration of the implant with the surrounding biomaterial is a common problem in various orthopedic and orthodontic surgeries. Implant fixation mostly depends upon the implant surface topography. Micron to nanosize circular-shaped groove architecture with adequate surface roughness can enhance the mechanical interlock and osseointegration of an implant with the host tissue and solve its poor fixation problem. Such groove architecture can be created on a titanium (Ti alloy implant by laser peening treatment. Laser peening produces deep, residual compressive stresses in the surfaces of metal parts, delivering increased fatigue life and damage tolerance. The scientific novelty of this study is the controlled deposition of circular-shaped rough spot groove using laser peening technique and understanding the effect of the treatment techniques for improving the implant surface properties. The hypothesis of this study was that implant surface grooves created by controlled laser peen treatment can improve the mechanical and biological responses of the implant with the adjoining biomaterial. The objective of this study was to measure how the controlled laser-peened groove architecture on Ti influences its osteoblast cell functions and bonding strength with bone cement. This study determined the surface roughness and morphology of the peen-treated Ti. In addition, this study compared the osteoblast cell functions (adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation between control and peen-treated Ti samples. Finally, this study measured the fracture strength between each kind of Ti samples

  15. Magnesium modification of a calcium phosphate cement alters bone marrow stromal cell behavior via an integrin-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lin, Dan; Shi, Hengsong; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Wei; Zhou, Huanjun; Guo, Han; Qian, Jiangchao; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-06-01

    The chemical composition, structure and surface characteristics of biomaterials/scaffold can affect the adsorption of proteins, and this in turn influences the subsequent cellular response and tissue regeneration. With magnesium/calcium phosphate cements (MCPC) as model, the effects of magnesium (Mg) on the initial adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the underlying mechanism were investigated. A series of MCPCs with different magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) content (0∼20%) in calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were synthesized. MCPCs with moderate proportion of MPC (5% and 10%, referred to as 5MCPC and 10MCPC) were found to effectively modulate the orientation of the adsorbed fibronectin (Fn) to exhibit enhanced receptor binding affinity, and to up-regulate integrin α5β1 expression of BMSCs, especially for 5MCPC. As a result, the attachment, morphology, focal adhesion formation, actin filaments assembly and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on 5MCPC were strongly enhanced. Further in vivo experiments confirmed that 5MCPC induced promoted osteogenesis in comparison to ot her CPC/MCPCs. Our results also suggested that the Mg on the underlying substrates but not the dissolved Mg ions was the main contributor to the above positive effects. Based on these results, it can be inferred that the specific interaction of Fn and integrin α5β1 had predominant effect on the MCPC-induced enhanced cellular response of BMSCs. These results provide a new strategy to regulate BMSCs adhesion and osteogenic differentiation by adjusting the Mg/Ca content and distribution in CPC, guiding the development of osteoinductive scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

  16. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  17. Potential Use Of Carbide Lime Waste As An Alternative Material To Conventional Hydrated Lime Of Cement-Lime Mortars

    OpenAIRE

    Al Khaja, Waheeb A.

    1992-01-01

    The present study aimed at the possibility of using the carbide lime waste as an alternative material to the conventional lime used for cement-lime mortar. The waste is a by-product obtained in the generation of acetylene from calcium carbide. Physical and chemical properties of the wastes were studied. Two cement-lime-sand mix proportions containing carbide lime waste were compared with the same mix proportions containing conventional lime along with a control mix without lime. Specimens wer...

  18. The site of bone cement leakage and its prevention in vertebroplasty%椎体成形术骨水泥渗漏部位及防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    zz

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss the site of vertebral body bone cement leakage and its preventive action. Methods 46 patients with bone cement leakage were selected after surgery. The bone cement leakage by imaging examination were observed, the site of the bone cement leakage and the leakage of clinical manifestations were recorded. After an-alyzing the causes of leakage, preventive action was applied. Results Spinal canal leakage of bone cement was found in 6 cases, intervertebral discs 9 cases, 10 cases of vertebral soft tissue by bone cement leakage, 10 cases of needle pulling the tail bone cement leakage, anterior of vertebral bone cement leakage in 11 cases. 38 patients with-out dealing with the condition was effectively controlled with ease;3 patients with bone cement leakage of spinal canal appeared low limbs acute pain after the operation, ease pain after emergency operation and decompression therapy;5 patients with disc leakage of bone cement appeared different degrees of lower back pain, through using the method of corresponding treatment, the 1 ~3 days pain was greatly reduced. Conclusions Strengthening standard operation procedures, skilled and precise operation, perfect image monitor can effective prevention of bone cement leakage dur-ing vertebroplasty.%目的 探讨椎体成形术出现骨水泥渗漏的部位及预防措施. 方法 对46例椎体成形术中出现骨水泥渗漏的患者通过影像学检查观察注射骨水泥椎体的渗漏情况,记录骨水泥渗漏的位置及渗漏所产生的临床表现,分析渗漏原因,提出防治措施. 结果 椎管内骨水泥渗漏6例,椎间盘内骨水泥渗漏9例,椎旁软组织骨水泥渗漏10例,穿刺针道拖尾骨水泥渗漏10例,椎体前骨水泥渗漏11例. 38例无需处理病情得到有效控制与缓解;3例椎管内骨水泥渗漏者术后出现肢体剧烈疼痛,经过急诊手术和减压治疗之后疼痛得到缓解;5例椎间盘骨水泥渗漏者术后第1~3天出现不

  19. Near-field microwave inspection and characterization of cement based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois, Karl Joseph

    The objective of this research project has been to investigate the potential of correlating the near-field microwave reflection coefficient properties of hardened cement paste (water and cement powder), mortar (water, cement powder and sand) and concrete (water, cement powder, sand and coarse aggregate) specimens to their various constituent make-up and compressive strengths. The measurements were conducted using open-ended rectangular waveguide probes operating at various microwave frequencies and in-contact with cubic specimens. For each material, various properties of the measured microwave reflection coefficient, such as the mean of the measured magnitude of reflection coefficient, and the standard deviation of the measured magnitude of reflection coefficient at various frequencies were monitored. Subsequently, the measurements were correlated to important parameters such as w/c ratio, s/c ratio, ca/c ratio, cure-state, constituent volume content and compressive strength. Other issues such as the detection of aggregate segregation in concrete as well as the detection chloride in cement paste and mortar were also addressed. Other related issues such as the detection of grout in masonry blocks were also investigated. In achieving these objectives, several theoretical modeling efforts were required, constituting significant contributions to the available literature. A complete analytical full wave expression (i.e. inclusion of higher-order modes) for the fields at the aperture of an open-ended waveguide probe radiating into a dielectric infinite half-space was derived. Also a novel two-port transmission line dielectric property measurement technique for granular and liquid materials was developed. A decision making process, based on the maximum likelihood scheme, was also implemented to determine w/c, s/c and ca/c ratios from the measured mean and standard deviation of reflection coefficient at two frequency bands. Finally, the issue of non-contact measurement was

  20. The Evaluation of Material Properties of Low-pH Cement Grout for the Application of Cementitious Materials to Deep Radioactive Waste Repository Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Seop; Kwon, S. K.; Cho, W. J.; Kim, G. W

    2009-12-15

    Considering the current construction technology and research status of deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal, it is inevitable to use cementitious materials in spite of serious concern about their long-term environmental stability. Thus, it is an emerging task to develop low pH cementitious materials. This study reviews the state of the technology on low pH cements developed in Sweden, Switzerland, France, and Japan as well as in Finland which is constructing a real deep repository site for high-level radioactive waste disposal. Considering the physical and chemical stability of bentonite which acts as a buffer material, a low pH cement limits to pH {<=}11 and pozzolan-type admixtures are used to lower the pH of cement. To attain this pH requirement, silica fume, which is one of the most promising admixtures, should occupy at least 40 wt% of total dry materials in cement and the Ca/Si ratio should be maintained below 0.8 in cement. Additionally, selective super-plasticizer needs to be used because a high amount of water is demanded from the use of a large amount of silica fume. In this report, the state of the technology on application of cementitious materials to deep repository tunnels for radioactive waste disposal was analysed. And the material properties of low-pH and high-pH cement grouts were evaluated base on the grout recipes of ONKALO in Finlan.

  1. Determination of replicate composite bone material properties using modal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuridan, Steven; Goossens, Quentin; Pastrav, Leonard; Roosen, Jorg; Mulier, Michiel; Denis, Kathleen; Desmet, Wim; Sloten, Jos Vander

    2017-02-01

    Replicate composite bones are used extensively for in vitro testing of new orthopedic devices. Contrary to tests with cadaveric bone material, which inherently exhibits large variability, they offer a standardized alternative with limited variability. Accurate knowledge of the composite's material properties is important when interpreting in vitro test results and when using them in FE models of biomechanical constructs. The cortical bone analogue material properties of three different fourth-generation composite bone models were determined by updating FE bone models using experimental and numerical modal analyses results. The influence of the cortical bone analogue material model (isotropic or transversely isotropic) and the inter- and intra-specimen variability were assessed. Isotropic cortical bone analogue material models failed to represent the experimental behavior in a satisfactory way even after updating the elastic material constants. When transversely isotropic material models were used, the updating procedure resulted in a reduction of the longitudinal Young's modulus from 16.00GPa before updating to an average of 13.96 GPa after updating. The shear modulus was increased from 3.30GPa to an average value of 3.92GPa. The transverse Young's modulus was lowered from an initial value of 10.00GPa to 9.89GPa. Low inter- and intra-specimen variability was found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cementing Material From Rice Husk-Broken Bricks-Spent Bleaching Earth-Dried Calcium Carbide Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthengia Jackson Washira

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A cementious material, coded CSBR (Carbide residue Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husks, was made from dried calcium carbide residue (DCCR and an incinerated mix of rice husks (RH, broken bricks (BB and spent bleaching earth (SBE. Another material, coded SBR (Spent bleaching earth Broken bricks and Rice husk ash, was made from mixing separately incinerated RH, SBE and ground BB in the same ash ratio as in CSBR. When CSBR was inter-ground with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC, it showed a continued decrease in Ca(OH2 in the hydrating cement as a function of curing time and replacement levels of the cement. Up to 45 % replacement of the OPC by CSBR produced a Portland pozzolana cement (PPC material that passed the relevant Kenyan Standard. Incorporation of the CSBR in OPC reduces the resultant calcium hydroxide from hydrating Portland cement. The use of the waste materials in production of cementitious material would rid the environment of wastes and lead to production of low cost cementitious material.

  3. Effect of carbonation on the linear and nonlinear dynamic properties of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiras, Jesus N.; Kundu, Tribikram; Popovics, John S.; Monzó, José; Borrachero, María V.; Payá, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Carbonation causes a physicochemical alteration of cement-based materials, leading to a decrease of porosity and an increase of material hardness and strength. However, carbonation will decrease the pH of the internal pore water solution, which may depassivate the internal reinforcing steel, giving rise to structural durability concerns. Therefore, the proper selection of materials informed by parameters sensitive to the carbonation process is crucial to ensure the durability of concrete structures. The authors investigate the feasibility of using linear and nonlinear dynamic vibration response data to monitor the progression of the carbonation process in cement-based materials. Mortar samples with dimensions of 40×40×160 mm were subjected to an accelerated carbonation process through a carbonation chamber with 55% relative humidity and >95% of CO2 atmosphere. The progress of carbonation in the material was monitored using data obtained with the test setup of the standard resonant frequency test (ASTM C215-14), from a pristine state until an almost fully carbonated state. Linear dynamic modulus, quality factor, and a material nonlinear response, evaluated through the upward resonant frequency shift during the signal ring-down, were investigated. The compressive strength and the depth of carbonation were also measured. Carbonation resulted in a modest increase in the dynamic modulus, but a substantive increase in the quality factor (inverse attenuation) and a decrease in the material nonlinearity parameter. The combined measurement of the vibration quality factor and nonlinear parameter shows potential as a sensitive measure of material changes brought about by carbonation.

  4. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laili, Zalina, E-mail: liena@nm.gov.my [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yasir, Muhamad Samudi [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, 43600, Selangor Malaysia (Malaysia); Wahab, Mohd Abdul [Waste and Environmental Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  5. Tissue reaction and material characteristics of four bone substitutes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S S; Aaboe, M; Pinholt, E M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the tissue reactions around four different bone substitutes used in orthopedic and craniofacial surgery. Cylinders of two bovine bone substitutes (Endobon and Bio-Oss) and two coral-derived bone substitutes (Pro Osteon 500......-Oss was osseointegrated to a higher degree than the other biomaterials. Material characteristics obtained by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry analysis and energy-dispersive spectrometry did not explain the differences in biologic behavior....

  6. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking skeletal bones. The osteoconductive properties of the composite might be improved by adding bone marrow aspirate (BMA), which can be harvested during surgery. Other alternatives to bone graft are demineralised bone matrix (DBM) and human cancellous bone (CB). DBM is prepared by acid extraction of human bone and includes bone collagen, morphogenetic proteins and growth factors. The combination of DBM with CB and with allograft might improve the healing potential of these grafts around non-cemented orthopaedic implants and thereby the implant fixation. Study I investigates the effect of HA/Collagen composite alone and in combination with BMA on the early fixation of porous coated titanium implants. In addition, the study compares also the effect of autograft with the gold standard allograft. By using a sheep model, the implants were inserted in the trabecular bone of femoral condyles. The test biomaterials were placed in a well defined peri-implant gap. After the observation period, the bone-implant specimens were harvested and evaluated mechanically by a destructive push

  7. CEMENT SLURRIES FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS CEMENTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available During a well cementing special place belongs to the cement slurry design. To ensure the best quality of cementing, a thorough understanding of well parameters is essential, as well as behaviour of cement slurry (especially at high temperatures and application of proven cementing techniques. Many cement jobs fail because of bad job planning. Well cementing without regarding what should be accomplished, can lead to well problems (channels in the cement, unwanted water, gas or fluid production, pipe corrosion and expensive well repairs. Cementing temperature conditions are important because bot-tomhole circulating temperatures affect slurry thickening time, arheology, set time and compressive strength development. Knowing the actual temperature which cement encounters during placement allows the selection of proper cementing materials for a specific application. Slurry design is affected by well depth, bottom hole circulating temperature and static temperature, type or drilling fluid, slurry density, pumping time, quality of mix water, fluid loss control, flow regime, settling and free water, quality of cement, dry or liquid additives, strength development, and quality of the lab cement testing and equipment. Most Portland cements and Class J cement have shown suitable performances in geot-hermal wells. Cement system designs for geothermal wells differ from those for conventional high temperature oil and gas wells in the exclusive use of silica flour instead of silica sand, and the avoidance of fly ash as an extender. In this paper, Portland cement behaviour at high temperatures is described. Cement slurry and set cement properties are also described. Published in literature, the composition of cement slurries which were tested in geothermal conditions and which obtained required compressive strength and water permeability are listed. As a case of our practice geothermal wells Velika Ciglena-1 and Velika Ciglena-la are described.

  8. Binding Materials of Dehydrated Phases of Waste Hardened Cement Paste and Pozzolanic Admixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Linnu; HE Yongjia; HU Shuguang

    2009-01-01

    Fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS) were added to improve the performances of regenerated binding materials (RBM) which refer to dehydrated phases with rebinding ability of waste hardened cement paste. Flowability tests, compressive strength tests,SEM, TG-DSC, and non-evaporable water content tests were employed to study the performances of the combined binding materials and the interactions between RBM, FA, and GGBFS. Results show that adding FA or GGBFS can improve the workability of RBM paste, and GGBFS has positive effects on strength of RBM. Pozzolanic reactions happen between RBM, FA, and GGBFS. And the activation effect of RBM to FA and GGBFS is superior to that of P.O grade-32.5 cement, especially at earlier ages, because of the high reactive f-CaO existing in RBM. On the advantages of the synergetic effects of RBM and pozzolanic admixtures such as FA and GGBFS, new combined binding materials can be prepared by blending them together.

  9. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selen Küçükkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P>0.05. MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73% after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P<0.05. Despite the significant changes in cell viability over time, materials presented similar cytotoxicity profile. Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  10. Incorporation of biodegradable electrospun fibers into calcium phosphate cement for bone regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuo, Y.; Yang, F.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Li, Yubao; Jansen, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Inherent brittleness and slow degradation are the major drawbacks for the use of calcium phosphate cements (CPCs). To address these issues, biodegradable ultrafine fibers were incorporated into the CPC in this study. Four types of fibers made of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) (PCL12: 1.1 microm, P

  11. [Favourable long-term results from cemented total hip arthroplasty combined with acetabular bone impaction grafting in patients under the age of 50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, V.J.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Veth, R.P.H.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determination of long-term results of hip replacements in patients who, at the time of operation, were under the age of 50. Procedures whereby an existing acetabulum defect was filled with bone chips that were impacted into a strong layer, after which a cemented total hip prosthesis was i

  12. Properties of SiMn slag as apozzolanic material in portland cement manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías, M.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the behaviour of SiMn slag as a pozzolanic material in commercial Portland cement manufacture. This necessitated exploring different scientific and technical aspects to ensure a correct valuation. The results obtained revealed that silica and calcium are the main components of SiMn slag, whose pozzolanic activity occupies an intermediate position between silica fume and fly ash; it reduces heat of hydration and mortars made with cement containing SiMn slag exhibit compressive strength values similar to the figures for standard mortar. Consequently, the use of SiMn slag as an active addition to cement is feasible, inasmuch as the resulting product meets the requirements laid down in the present legislation.

    El objetivo principal de este trabajo es evaluar el comportamiento de la escoria de SiMn como material puzolánico en la fabricación de cementos Portland comerciales. Para ello, resulta necesario investigar diferentes aspectos científicos y técnicos que conlleven a una correcta valorización de las mismas. Los resultados obtenidos en el presente trabajo han puesto de manifiesto que la escoria de SiMn presenta una naturaleza sílico-cálcica, actividad puzolúnica intermedia entre el humo de sílice y ceniza volante, reduce el calor de hidratación y los morteros con escoria de SiMn muestra alcanzan resistencias a compresión similares a las del mortero patrón. Por lo tanto, la utilización de la escoria de SiMn como adición activa al cemento es viable, cumpliendo con las exigencias recogidas en la norma vigente.

  13. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesaraki, S., E-mail: S-hesaraki@merc.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95 MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20 MPa after immersing for 30 days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~ 32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37 °C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. - Highlights: • Light cure cement based on SiO{sub 2}-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass and polymer-like matrix was formed. • The matrix includes poly(acrylic/maleic acid) and poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate). • The cement is as strong as polymethylmethacrylate bone cement. • The cement exhibits apatite formation ability in simulated body fluid. • The cement is biodegradable and supports proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

  14. Surface and subsurface damage detection in cement-based materials using electrical resistance tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, T.; Poursaee, A.

    2016-04-01

    Cement-based materials are widely used in infrastructure facilities. However, often the degradation of structures leads to the failures earlier than designed service life. Thus, non-destructive testing techniques are urgently needed to evaluate the health information of the structures. In this paper, the implementation of Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) was investigated. This low cost, radiation free and easy to perform modality is based on measuring the electrical properties of the material under test and using that to evaluate the existence of defects in that material. It uses a set of boundary potentials and injected current to reconstruct the conductivity distribution. An automatic measurement system was developed and surface damages as well as subsurface damages on mortar specimens were investigated. The reconstructed images were capable to show the presence and the location of the damages.

  15. High Water Content Material Based on Ba-Bearing Sulphoaluminate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Jun; CHENG Xin; LU Lingchao; HUANG Shifeng; YE Zhengmao

    2005-01-01

    A new type of high water content material which is made up of two pastes is prepared, one is made from lime and gypsum, and another is based on Ba-bearing stdphoaluminate cement. It has excellent properties such as slow single paste solidifing,fast double pastes solidifing,fast coagulating and hardening, high early strength, good suspension property at high W/C ratio and low cost. Meanwhile, the properties and hydration mechanism of the material were analyzed by using XRD , DTA- TG and SEM. The hydrated products of new type of high water content material are Ba-bearing ettringite, BaSO4 , aluminum gel and C-S-H gel.

  16. Decomposition of paper wastes in presence of ceramics and cement raw material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conesa, Juan A; Gálvez, Araceli; Fullana, Andrés

    2008-05-01

    Paper recycling is an environmental important activity that is carried out in all the countries, but during the recycling process a paper waste is produced. Generally these wastes are placed in landfill sites but it is possible to profit it as secondary fuel and raw material in manufacture furnaces. In this work the combustion of the waste papers with cement and ceramic raw material has been studied with the objective to analyse the interaction of these substances with the emitted pollutants like PAHs and PCDD/Fs. The results of the study show that the presence of inorganic material produces an increment in the lighter PAH emission but chlorinated compounds are not affected. The PCDD/F emission level found in the combustion of this waste is quite low compared with other wastes subjected to similar conditions.

  17. Influence of raw powder granulometry on the mechanical properties of a calcium phosphate bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittet, C. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab. de Technologie des Poudres; Hopital Orthopedique de la Suisse Romande, Lausanne (Switzerland); Grasso, P.; Lemaitre, J. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Lausanne (Switzerland). Lab. de Technologie des Poudres

    2002-07-01

    Brushite cement is a calcium phosphate cement obtained by mixing three powders with water. Starting powders are monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM), calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP). The main phase obtained after setting is brushite (DCPD). The goal of this work was to mill the starting powders to obtain a finer and more homogeneous microstructure after setting, in order to enhance the mechanical properties of the cement. All three powders were milled and freeze-dried. The median diameters passed from 70.5 to 6.2 {mu}m for MCPM, 27.2 to 1.1 {mu}m for CSH, 2.4 to 1.5 {mu}m for {beta}-TCP. Specific surface areas of the powders increased on milling. Attrition of MCPM and CSH appeared to be beneficial to the maximum stresses the set cement can withstand. Cements prepared with raw powders showed 1.4 MPa indirect tensile strength and 4.4 MPa compressive strength. With milled MCPM and CSH, those values reached 4.1 and 22.1 MPa respectively. After these benefits, we tried to use the milled {beta}-TCP expecting further enhancement. To ensure wetting of all three powders and to keep the same paste rheology, the liquid/solid ratio had to be increased. The indirect tensile strength was seen to decrease by a factor of 3 when three milled powders were used at the same time. SEM of the fracture surfaces showed that milled {beta}-TCP formed clusters that did not react to form brushite. Lowering the maximum indirect tension stress is due to the fact that less brushite was formed, and to a higher porosity in the final product (mainly due to the higher liquid/solid ratio). (orig.)

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Osteogenic Calcium Phosphate Silicate Cement: Material Characterization and In Vitro/In Vivo Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxing; Wang, Zhiqin; Zhang, Yixi; Zhang, Yubiao; Hou, Mingxiao; Liu, Xinwei; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Lejun; Ruse, N Dorin; Troczynski, Tom; Häfeli, Urs O

    2016-02-18

    Vertebral compression fractures can be successfully restored by injectable bone cements. Here the as-yet unexplored in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo biodegradation, and osteoconductivity of a new calcium phosphate silicate cements (CPSC) are studied, where monocalcium phosphate (MCP; 5, 10, and 15 wt%) is added to calcium silicate cement (CSC). Setting rate and compressive strength of CPSC decrease with the addition of MCP. The crystallinity, microstructure, and porosity of hardened CPSC are evaluated by X-ray diffractometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and microcomputed tomography (CT). It is found that MCP reacts with calcium hydroxide, one of CSC hydration products, to precipitate apatite. While the reaction accelerates the hydration of CSC, the formation of calcium silicate hydrate gel is disturbed and highly porous microstructures form, resulting in weaker compressive strength. In vitro studies demonstrate that CPSC is noncytotoxic to osteoblast cells and promotes their proliferation. In the rabbit tibia implantation model, clinical X-ray and CT scans demonstrate that CPSC biodegrades slower and osseointegrates better than clinically used calcium phosphate cement (CPC). Histological studies demonstrate that CPSC is osteoconductive and induces higher bone formation than CPC, a finding that might warrant future clinical studies.

  19. Material model of pelvic bone based on modal analysis: a study on the composite bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henyš, Petr; Čapek, Lukáš

    2017-02-01

    Digital models based on finite element (FE) analysis are widely used in orthopaedics to predict the stress or strain in the bone due to bone-implant interaction. The usability of the model depends strongly on the bone material description. The material model that is most commonly used is based on a constant Young's modulus or on the apparent density of bone obtained from computer tomography (CT) data. The Young's modulus of bone is described in many experimental works with large variations in the results. The concept of measuring and validating the material model of the pelvic bone based on modal analysis is introduced in this pilot study. The modal frequencies, damping, and shapes of the composite bone were measured precisely by an impact hammer at 239 points. An FE model was built using the data pertaining to the geometry and apparent density obtained from the CT of the composite bone. The isotropic homogeneous Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of the cortical and trabecular bone were estimated from the optimisation procedure including Gaussian statistical properties. The performance of the updated model was investigated through the sensitivity analysis of the natural frequencies with respect to the material parameters. The maximal error between the numerical and experimental natural frequencies of the bone reached 1.74 % in the first modal shape. Finally, the optimised parameters were matched with the data sheets of the composite bone. The maximal difference between the calibrated material properties and that obtained from the data sheet was 34 %. The optimisation scheme of the FE model based on the modal analysis data provides extremely useful calibration of the FE models with the uncertainty bounds and without the influence of the boundary conditions.

  20. Effect of Fly Ash on TSA Resistance of Cement-based Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Fengchen; MA Baoguo; WU Shengxing; ZHOU Jikai

    2011-01-01

    Thaumasite form of sulfate attack (TSA) is a major concern in evaluating durability of concrete structures subjected to sulfate and carbonate ions. By means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and energy dispersive spectrum (EDS)as well as Raman spectra of erosion substances, effect of fly ash on TSA resistance of Portland cement-based material were investigated. Immersed in magnesium sulfate solution with 33 800 ppm mass concentration of SO42- at 5±2 ℃ for 15 weeks, ratio of compressive strength loss decreased as binder replacement ratio of fly ash increased. Furthermore, when binder replacement of fly ash was 60%, compressive strength increased. When thaumasite came into being in samples with 0, 15% binder replacement ratio of fly ash, ettringite and gypsum appeared in those with 30%, 45%, 60% binder replacement ratio of fly ash. Results mentioned above showed that fly ash can restrain formation of thaumasite and improve TSA resistance of Portland cement-based material sufficiently.

  1. In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Calcium Silicate-Based Endodontic Cement as Root-End Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küçükkaya, Selen; Görduysus, Mehmet Ömer; Zeybek, Naciye Dilara; Müftüoğlu, Sevda Fatma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of three types of calcium silicate-based endodontic cement after different incubation periods with human periodontal ligament fibroblasts. Human periodontal ligament fibroblasts were cultured from extracted third molars and seeded in 96-well plates. MTA, calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, and Biodentine were prepared and added to culture insert plates which were immediately placed into 96-well plates containing cultured cells. After incubation periods of 24, 48, and 72 hours, cell viability was determined with WST-1 assay. Data were analysed statistically by ANOVA with repeated measures and Bonferroni tests. There was no significant difference in cell viability amongst the test materials after each incubation period (P > 0.05). MTA and CEM presented more than 90% cell viability after 24 and 48 hours of incubation and showed statistically significant decrease in cell viability after 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine showed significantly less cell viability (73%) after 24 hours of incubation, whereas more than 90% cell viability was seen after 48 and 72 hours of incubation (P Biodentine and CEM can be considered as alternative materials for root-end surgery procedures.

  2. Shear bond strength of four resin cements used to lute ceramic core material to human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altintas, Subutayhan; Eldeniz, Ayçe Unverdi; Usumez, Aslihan

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of four resin cements on the shear bond strength of a ceramic core material to dentin. One hundred twenty molar teeth were embedded in a self-curing acrylic resin. The occlusal third of the crowns were sectioned under water cooling. All specimens were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth each according to the resin cement used. One hundred twenty cylindrical-shaped, 2.7-mm wide, 3-mm high ceramic core materials were heat-pressed. The core cylinders were then luted with one of the four resin systems to dentin (Super-Bond C&B, Chemiace II, Variolink II, and Panavia F). Half of the specimens (n = 15) were tested after 24 hours; the other half (n = 15) were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 1 day and then thermocycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C prior to testing. Shear bond strength of each specimen was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa, and the results were statistically analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The shear bond strength varied significantly depending on the resin cement used (p strengths after thermocycling were not remarkable as compared with the corresponding prethermal cycling groups (p > 0.05). Significant interactions were present between resin cement and thermocycling (p strength, whereas the specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.6 +/- 0.4 MPa) showed the lowest. After thermocycling, the bond strength values of specimens luted with Chemiace II (1.1 +/- 0.1 MPa) and Super-Bond C&B (1.7 +/- 0.4 MPa) decreased; however, this was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The increase in the shear bond strength values in the Panavia F (4.5 +/- 0.7 MPa) and Variolink II (5.5 +/- 2.1 MPa) groups after thermocycling was also not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Variolink II and Panavia F systems showed higher shear bond strength values than Chemiace II and

  3. Prosthesis, bone graft and internal fixation and bone cement filling for treatment of giant cell tumor of bone%假体置换、植骨内固定及骨水泥填充治疗骨巨细胞瘤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    广东; 王亚军; 赵凡

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Artificial joint replacement or allogeneic bone fixation and bone substitute materials filling are common ways torepair bone defects in giant cell tumor of bone after curettage, so which one is more ideal?OBJECTIVE: To understand the staging standard of giant cell tumors through access to Chinese and English literature a