WorldWideScience

Sample records for bonded composite doubler

  1. Nondestructive inspection of bonded composite doublers for aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Moore, David; Walkington, Phillip D.

    1996-11-01

    One of the major thrusts established under the FAA's National Aging Aircraft Research Program is to foster new technologies associated with civil aircraft maintenance. Recent DOD and other government developments in the use of bonded composite doublers on metal structures has supported the need for research and validation of such doubler applications on US certificated airplanes. Composite doubler technology is rapidly maturing and shows promise of cost savings on aging aircraft. While there have been numerous studies and military aircraft installations of composite doublers, the technology has not been certified for use on commercial aircraft. Before the use of composite doublers can be accepted by the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. This paper reports on a series of NDI tests which have been conducted on laboratory test structures and on a fuselage section cut from a retired L-1011 aircraft. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, will be highlighted. In order to quickly integrate this technology into existing aircraft maintenance depots, the use of conventional NDI, ultrasonics, x-ray, and eddy current, is stressed. The application of these NDI technique to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are

  2. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  3. Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.

    1998-08-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting

  4. Development and validation of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2007-07-01

    A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack, impact, and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safely extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC), Boeing, and Federal Express completed a pilot program to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the U.S. commercial aircraft industry. This project focused on repair of DC-10 fuselage structure and its primary goal was to demonstrate routine use of this repair technology using niche applications that streamline the design-to-installation process. As composite doubler repairs gradually appear in the commercial aircraft arena, successful flight operation data is being accumulated. These commercial aircraft repairs are not only demonstrating the engineering and economic advantages of composite doubler technology but they are also establishing the ability of commercial maintenance depots to safely adopt this repair technique. This report presents the array of engineering activities that were completed in order to make this technology available for widespread commercial aircraft use. Focused laboratory testing was conducted to compliment the field data and to address specific issues regarding damage tolerance and flaw growth in composite doubler repairs. Fatigue and strength tests were performed on a simulated wing

  5. Development of bonded composite doublers for the repair of oil recovery equipment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, David W.; Rackow, Kirk A.

    2005-06-01

    An unavoidable by-product of a metallic structure's use is the appearance of crack and corrosion flaws. Economic barriers to the replacement of these structures have created an aging infrastructure and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. In the past decade, an advanced composite repair technology has made great strides in commercial aviation use. Extensive testing and analysis, through joint programs between the Sandia Labs FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center and the aviation industry, have proven that composite materials can be used to repair damaged aluminum structure. Successful pilot programs have produced flight performance history to establish the durability of bonded composite patches as a permanent repair on commercial aircraft structures. With this foundation in place, this effort is adapting bonded composite repair technology to civil structures. The use of bonded composite doublers has the potential to correct the difficulties associated with current repair techniques and the ability to be applied where there are no rehabilitation options. It promises to be cost-effective with minimal disruption to the users of the structure. This report concludes a study into the application of composite patches on thick steel structures typically used in mining operations. Extreme fatigue, temperature, erosive, and corrosive environments induce an array of equipment damage. The current weld repair techniques for these structures provide a fatigue life that is inferior to that of the original plate. Subsequent cracking must be revisited on a regular basis. The use of composite doublers, which do not have brittle fracture problems such as those inherent in welds, can help extend the structure's fatigue life and reduce the equipment downtime. Two of the main issues for adapting aircraft composite repairs to civil applications are developing an installation technique for carbon steel and accommodating large repairs on extremely thick

  6. Development and validation of nondestructive inspection techniques for composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1998-05-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single boron-epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. In order for the use of composite doublers to achieve widespread use in the civil aviation industry, it is imperative that methods be developed which can quickly and reliably assess the integrity of the doubler. In this study, a specific composite application was chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Primary among inspection requirements for these doublers is the identification of disbonds, between the composite laminate and aluminum parent material, and delaminations in the composite laminate. Surveillance of cracks or corrosion in the parent aluminum material beneath the doubler is also a concern. No single nondestructive inspection (NDI) method can inspect for every flaw type, therefore it is important to be aware of available NDI techniques and to properly address their capabilities and limitations. A series of NDI tests were conducted on laboratory test structures and on full-scale aircraft fuselage sections. Specific challenges, unique to bonded composite doubler applications, were highlighted. An array of conventional and advanced NDI techniques were evaluated. Flaw detection sensitivity studies were conducted on applicable eddy current, ultrasonic, X-ray and thermography based devices. The application of these NDI techniques to composite doublers and the results from test specimens, which were loaded to provide a changing flaw profile, are presented in this report. It was found that a team of these techniques can identify flaws in composite doubler installations well before they reach critical size.

  7. Further Evolution of Composite Doubler Aircraft Repairs Through a Focus on Niche Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROACH,DENNIS P.

    2000-07-15

    The number of commercial airframes exceeding twenty years of service continues to grow. A typical aircraft can experience over 2,000 fatigue cycles (cabin pressurizations) and even greater flight hours in a single year. An unavoidable by-product of aircraft use is that crack and corrosion flaws develop throughout the aircraft's skin and substructure elements. Economic barriers to the purchase of new aircraft have created an aging aircraft fleet and placed even greater demands on efficient and safe repair methods. The use of bonded composite doublers offers the airframe manufacturers and aircraft maintenance facilities a cost effective method to safety extend the lives of their aircraft. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is now possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. The FAA's Airworthiness Assurance Center at Sandia National Labs (AANC) is conducting a program with Boeing and Federal Express to validate and introduce composite doubler repair technology to the US commercial aircraft industry. This project focuses on repair of DC-10 structure and builds on the foundation of the successful L-1011 door corner repair that was completed by the AANC, Lockheed-Martin, and Delta Air Lines. The L-1011 composite doubler repair was installed in 1997 and has not developed any flaws in over three years of service, As a follow-on effort, this DC-1O repair program investigated design, analysis, performance (durability, flaw containment, reliability), installation, and nondestructive inspection issues. Current activities are demonstrating regular use of composite doubler repairs on commercial aircraft. The primary goal of this program is to move the technology into niche applications and to streamline the design-to-installation process. Using the data accumulated to date, the team has designed, analyzed, and developed inspection techniques for an array of composite doubler

  8. Composite interlayer for diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A ductile interlayer is described, which is useful for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of metallic articles; the interlayer consisting of a melting point depressant and a plurality of ductile lamellae which are free from carbides, aluminides and borides. The composition and fabrication of the lamellae, and the process for bonding the metallic articles, depend on the composition of the metals to be bonded, and are exemplified in the specification. (U.K.)

  9. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  10. The tevatron energy doubler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Tevatron project is a massive upgrade of the original Fermilab accelerator complex, which became operational in 1972 and operated from 1973 until mid-1982 at typically 400 GeV and 2 x 10/sup 13/ protons per pulse (ppp). The three parts of the Tevatron project when complete will allow for both fixed-target and collider hadron physics using primary beam energies in the 800-1000 GeV range. The Fermilab facility should thus be able to maintain its position at the forefront of high-energy physics research facilities. This paper describes the superconducting accelerator phase of the program Because the new synchrotron provides protons with twice the energy of the old Main Ring, it is frequently called the Energy Doubler. It first accelerated a beam in July 1983 and is presently operating at 800 GeV with intensities above 1 x 10/sup 13/ ppp

  11. Composite Laser Ceramics by Advanced Bonding Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikesue, Akio; Aung, Yan Lin; Kamimura, Tomosumi; Honda, Sawao; Iwamoto, Yuji

    2018-02-09

    Composites obtained by bonding materials with the same crystal structure and different chemical compositions can create new functions that do not exist in conventional concepts. We have succeeded in bonding polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG ceramics without any interstices at the bonding interface, and the bonding state of this composite was at the atomic level, similar to the grain boundary structure in ceramics. The mechanical strength of the bonded composite reached 278 MPa, which was not less than the strength of each host material (269 and 255 MPa). Thermal conductivity of the composite was 12.3 W/mK (theoretical value) which is intermediate between the thermal conductivities of YAG and Nd:YAG (14.1 and 10.2 W/mK, respectively). Light scattering cannot be detected at the bonding interface of the ceramic composite by laser tomography. Since the scattering coefficients of the monolithic material and the composite material formed by bonding up to 15 layers of the same materials were both 0.10%/cm, there was no occurrence of light scattering due to the bonding. In addition, it was not detected that the optical distortion and non-uniformity of the refractive index variation were caused by the bonding. An excitation light source (LD = 808 nm) was collimated to 200 μm and irradiated into a commercial 1% Nd:YAG single crystal, but fracture damage occurred at a low damage threshold of 80 kW/cm². On the other hand, the same test was conducted on the bonded interface of 1% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics fabricated in this study, but it was not damaged until the excitation density reached 127 kW/cm². 0.6% Nd:YAG-YAG composite ceramics showed high damage resistance (up to 223 kW/cm²). It was concluded that composites formed by bonding polycrystalline ceramics are ideal in terms of thermo-mechanical and optical properties.

  12. Interlaminar toughness of fusion bonded thermoplastic composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacchetti, Francisco R.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoplastic composites are of increasing interest to the aerospace industry. The melt-processability of the thermoplastic matrix allows for fast manufacturing and assembling techniques, such as thermoforming and fusion bonding, which are also highly suitable for process automation. Fusion bonding

  13. Energy Doubler cryoloop temperature monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pucci, G.; Howard, D.

    1981-10-01

    The Cryoloop Temperature Monitor System is a fully electronic system designed to monitor temperature at key points in the Energy Doubler cryoloop system. It is used for cryoloop diagnostics, temperature studies, and cooldown valve control

  14. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  15. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy ...

  16. Alkali-bonded composites for thermal and acoustic insulation

    OpenAIRE

    Medri, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Geopolymers are alkali bonded ceramics that thank to their fully inolrganic nature have high temperature resistance depending on their compositions. An overview of the research of ISTEC on Alkali-bonded composites for thermal and acoustic insulation have been presented

  17. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface

  18. Effect of Biofilm on the Repair Bond Strengths of Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, M.; Ozcan, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Composite restorations degrade during wear, but it is unknown how wear affects the composite surface and influences composite-to-composite bonding in minimally invasive repair. Here, it is hypothesized that in vitro exposure of composites to oral biofilm yields clinically relevant degradation of

  19. Effect of simulated pulpal pressure on composite bond strength to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Simulated pulpal pressure had a negative effect on microtensile bond strength of laser ablated dentin when Single Bond adhesive system was used. Key words: Bond strength, laser treatment, pulpal pressure, resin composite. INTRODUCTION. Adhesive techniques have expanded the range of possi-.

  20. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the adhesive and composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced composite material joints and...

  1. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi-Ansari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA, Root MTA (RMTA and calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 subgroups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  2. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC) and Metallic Retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Lassila, Lippo; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot-) resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis. PMID:28976936

  3. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC and Metallic Retainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot- resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis.

  4. Spot-Bonding and Full-Bonding Techniques for Fiber Reinforced Composite (FRC) and Metallic Retainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca

    2017-10-04

    Fiber reinforced Composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced as an aesthetic alternative to conventional metallic splints, but present high rigidity. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate bending and fracture loads of FRC splints bonded with conventional full-coverage of the FRC with a composite compared with an experimental bonding technique with a partial (spot-) resin composite cover. Stainless steel rectangular flat, stainless steel round, and FRC retainers were tested at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections and at a maximum load. Both at 0.2 and 0.3 mm deflections, the lowest load required to bend the retainer was recorded for spot-bonded stainless steel flat and round wires and for spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were identified among them. Higher force levels were reported for full-bonded metallic flat and round splints and the highest loads were recorded for full-bonded FRCs. At the maximum load, no significant differences were reported among spot- and full-bonded metallic splints and spot-bonded FRCs. The highest loads were reported for full bonded FRCs. The significant decrease in the rigidity of spot-bonded FRC splints if compared with full-bonded retainers suggests further tests in order to propose this technique for clinical use, as they allow physiologic tooth movement, thus presumably reducing the risk of ankylosis.

  5. Enhancing wire-composite bond strength of bonded retainers with wire surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterle, L J; Shellhart, W C; Henderson, S

    2001-06-01

    Bonded orthodontic retainers with wires embedded in composite resin are commonly used for orthodontic retention. The purpose of this study was to test, in vitro, various wire surface treatments to determine the optimal method of enhancing the wire-composite bond strength. Coaxial wires and stainless steel wires with different surface treatments were bonded to bovine enamel and then pulled along their long axes with an Instron universal testing machine. Wire surface treatments included placing a right-angle bend in the wire, microetching the wire, and treating the wire with adhesion promoters; combinations of treatments were also examined. The results demonstrated a 24-fold increase in the wire-composite bond strength of wire that was microetched (sandblasted), compared with that of untreated straight wire. The difference between the amount of force required to break the bond produced by microetching alone (246.1 +/- 46.0 MPa) and that required for the bonds produced by the retentive bend (87.8 +/- 16.3 MPa), the adhesion promoters (silane, 11.0 +/- 3.1 MPa; Metal Primer, 28.5 +/- 15.8 MPa), or for any combination of surface treatments, was statistically significant. Microetching a stainless steel wire produced a higher wire-composite bond strength than that obtained from a coaxial wire (113.5 +/- 27.5 MPa). The results of this study indicate that microetching or sandblasting a stainless steel wire significantly increases the strength of the wire-composite bond.

  6. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (figure 7). We have also been able to bond Al2O3 to graphene by using AlCl3 as the reactant. The oxide film was amor- phous after calcination at 600. ◦. C. We have prepared chemically bonded magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles to graphene by functionalizing Fe3O4 by amine, then reacting it with graphene functionalized with.

  7. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  8. Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin-Modified Glass Ionomers as Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    Vandewalle, Kraig Civ 59 DTS/ 59 DG/ SGDTG WHASC f. 9 h. I I 1 CERTIFY ANY HUMAN OR ANIMAL RESEARCH RELATED STUDIES WERE APPROVED AND PERFORMED IN STRICT...strength of composite to dentin using resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGI) as bonding agents. Methods: Sixty extracted human third molars were...59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 2 MAR 20 16 l. Your paper, entitl ed Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin using Resin

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Porcelain Using Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Yassini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Ceramics as in ceramo-metallic and all ceramic tooth restorations have grown popular owing to their high tissue compatibility and esthetic advantages. Such restorations have the capability to deliver valuable services over a long period of time; however, failures under intraoral conditions are not unanticipated.Purpose: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain using different bonding system materials.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four equal groups. The porcelain surfaces were then etched with HF for 2 minutes, washed with water for 2 minutes and treated with a silane layer. The silane treated porcelain surfaces were left for one minute and then the specimens were bonded to composite resin as follow:Group 1 (control group, hybrid composite Z100 was applied and light cured from four directions for 20 seconds. Group 2, flowable composite was applied and light cured for 20 seconds. Group 3, unfilled resin was used and photo cured for 20 seconds. Group 4,(Dentin bonding agent adhesive resin was used followed by 20 seconds photo curing.Hybrid composite resin Z100 was subsequently applied on all porcelain surfaces of groups 2, 3 and 4, and light cured for 20 seconds from four directions. Specimens were then subjected to thermocycling 1000 times. Shear bond strength was determined by a Universal testing machine. The data obtained was subjected to a one-way ANOVA test.Results: The results indicate that there is a statistically significant difference between adhesive group and the other three groups of hybrid, flowable and unfilled resin (P<0.05.Conclusion: The results from this study showed that the shear bond strength of composite resin to porcelain was significantly higher for porcelain bonded surfaces using a dentin bonding agent than that of other materials tested.

  10. Shear bond strength of the amalgam-resin composite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Camilo; Sanchez, Eliana; Alapati, Satish; Seghi, Robert; Johnston, William

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the initial and one year shear bond strengths (SBS) of resin composite bonded to amalgam using Amalgambond-Plus. Resin composite cylinders (Point 4, Kerr Corporation) were bonded to either etched-enamel (A), 50% etched enamel-50% polished amalgam (B), airborne-particle abraded amalgam (C), carbide bur prepared amalgam (D) and airborne-particle abraded 50% amalgam-50% etched-enamel (E). Shear bond strengths were determined using a standardized testing device (Ultradent Products) in a universal testing machine (Instron model 4204). The failed interfaces were evaluated with SEM to obtain visual evidence of the failure mode. ANOVA indicated significant differences among the groups (p composite masking has the strongest, most durable SBS on airborne-particle abraded amalgam and airborne-particle abraded enamel-amalgam surfaces and could be used as a method to improve the esthetics of amalgam restorations.

  11. Effect of composite warming on shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Sigrist, Thomas W; Johnson, Gary M

    2018-01-01

    Several manufacturers produce devices designed to warm composite resins used in restorative dentistry. Previous investigators have examined the effects of heating composite restorative resins prior to placement and polymerization. Heating has been reported to reduce viscosity, improve ease of placement, enhance monomer conversion, and reduce microleakage. The aim of the present study was to compare shear bond strengths of room temperature (22°C) and prewarmed (54°C) restorative composite resin. Extracted bovine mandibular incisors were sectioned sagittally and embedded in acrylic cylinders. Enamel was selectively etched with 37% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Self-etching primer was applied to both enamel and dentin. Self-etching adhesive was then applied and photopolymerized. Composite resin capsules were then divided into prewarmed and room temperature groups. Fourteen composite specimens prewarmed in an incubator were applied to the prepared enamel and dentin and photopolymerized. Fourteen room temperature composite specimens were likewise placed. After storage in water for 24 hours, all composite specimens were subjected to shear stress testing. The resulting data were analyzed with a t test (P = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strengths of the prewarmed and room temperature composite resin specimens. Warming does not appear to affect bond strength of composite resin bonded to both dentin and enamel.

  12. Peeling stress analysis of piezo-bonded laminated composite plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2012-04-01

    A stress function based method is proposed to analyze the interlaminar stresses at the free edge of a piezo-bonded composite laminated structure. Two piezoelectric actuators are symmetrically surface bonded on composite laminate. Same electric fields are applied to the two symmetric piezoelectric actuators which can generate induced strain, resulting in pure extension on the laminated plate. The stresses that satisfy the traction-free boundary conditions at the free edge and at the top and bottom surfaces of the laminate were obtained by using the complementary virtual work principle. Cross-ply and angle-ply laminates were analyzed. To verify the proposed method, the stress concentrations predicted by the present method were compared with those analyzed by the finite element method. The results provided that the stress function based analysis of piezo-bonded laminated composite structure is an efficient and accurate method for initial design stage of piezo-composite structure.

  13. Microshear bond strength between restorative composites and resin cements

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens Nazareno GARCIA; Mário Fernando de GÓES; Marcelo GIANNINI

    2008-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The techniques of adhesive cementationhave been widely used in dental restoration. The purpose of this studywas to evaluate the microshear bond strength between restorativecomposites and resin cements. Material and methods: Twenty composites blocks were prepared in order to obtain a flat surface, using 600-grid sandpaper. The samples were randomly divided in four groups(n=15) according to the experimental groups: [1] Z250 block + Single Bond + cylinder of RelyX ARC...

  14. ADHESIVE SYSTEM AFFECTS REPAIR BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür IRMAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed statistically. Results: Adhesive type and aging significantly affected the repair bond strengths (p<0.0001. No statistical difference was found in aged composite groups repaired with two-step self- etch or two-step total-etch adhesive. One-step self-etch adhesive showed lower bond strength values in aged composite repair (p<0.0001. Conclusion: In the repair of aged resin composite, two-step self-etch and two-step total-etch adhesives exhibited higher shear bond strength values than that of one-step self-etch adhesive.

  15. The Adhesive Bonding of Thermoplastic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-19

    greater than a smooth surface. I T._ ." ’-.5. The mean and standa,d deviation results of the surface rouchness coiection factcrs f. good-:ca cd UC-PEEK...Reinforced Plastics and Composites, 2, p. 2, (1983). [72] J. G. Williams, Int. J. of Fracture, 36, p. 101, (1988). I [73] S. M. Lee , J. of Composite...Technology", 12A, "Adhesion and Adsorption of Polymers", Edited by L. H. Lee , Plenum, New-York, p. 43, (1980). 1 [168] R, S. Drago, G. C. Vogel and T. E

  16. Prediction of fracture toughness and durability of adhesively bonded composite joints with undesirable bonding conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaramthota, Vishal

    Advanced composite materials have enabled the conventional aircraft structures to reduce weight, improve fuel efficiency and offer superior mechanical properties. In the past, materials such as aluminum, steel or titanium have been used to manufacture aircraft structures for support of heavy loads. Within the last decade or so, demand for advanced composite materials have been emerging that offer significant advantages over the traditional metallic materials. Of particular interest in the recent years, there has been an upsurge in scientific significance in the usage of adhesively bonded composite joints (ABCJ's). ABCJ's negate the introduction of stress risers that are associated with riveting or other classical techniques. In today's aircraft transportation market, there is a push to increase structural efficiency by promoting adhesive bonding to primary joining of aircraft structures. This research is focused on the issues associated with the durability and related failures in bonded composite joints that continue to be a critical hindrance to the universal acceptance of ABCJ's. Of particular interest are the short term strength, contamination and long term durability of ABCJ's. One of the factors that influence bond performance is contamination and in this study the influence of contamination on composite-adhesive bond quality was investigated through the development of a repeatable and scalable surface contamination procedure. Results showed an increase in the contaminant coverage area decreases the overall bond strength significantly. A direct correlation between the contaminant coverage area and the fracture toughness of the bonded joint was established. Another factor that influences bond performance during an aircraft's service life is its long term strength upon exposure to harsh environmental conditions or when subjected to severe mechanical loading. A test procedure was successfully developed in order to evaluate durability of ABCJ's comprising severe

  17. Bond strength of composite resin to enamel: assessment of two ethanol wet-bonding techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol wet-bonding (EWB technique has been stated to decrease degradation of resin-dentin bond. This study evaluated the effect of two EWB techniques on composite resin-to-enamel bond strength.Silicon carbide papers were used to produce flat enamel surfaces on the buccal faces of forty-five molars. OptiBond FL (OFL adhesive was applied on enamel surfaces in three groups of 15 namely: Enamel surface and OFL (control;Protocol 1 of the EWB technique: absolute ethanol was applied to water-saturated acid-etched enamel surfaces for 1 minute before the application of ethanol-solvated hydrophobic adhesive resin of OFL 3 times;Protocol 2: progressive ethanol replacement; water was gradually removed from the enamel matrix using ascending ethanol concentrations before OFL application. Composite build-ups were made and the specimens were stored for 24 hours at 37°C and 100% relative humidity. Shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Fracture patterns were evaluated microscopically. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Fisher's exact test (α=0.05.There were no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (P=0.73. However, regarding failure patterns, the highest cohesive enamel fractures were recorded in groups 2 and 3.In this study, although both methods of EWB did not influence immediate bond strength of composite resin to enamel, the majority of failure patterns occurred cohesively in enamel.

  18. Debonding characteristics of adhesively bonded woven Kevlar composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, S.; Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    The fatigue damage mechanism of an adhesively bonded joint between fabric reinforced composite adherends was investigated with cracked-lap-shear specimens. Two bonded systems were studied: fabric Kevlar 49/5208 epoxy adherends bonded together with either EC 3445 or FM-300 adhesive. For each bonded system, two specimen geometries were tested. In all specimens tested, fatigue damage occurred in the form of cyclic debonding; however, the woven Kevlar specimens gave significantly slower debond growth rates and higher fracture toughness than previously found in the nonwoven adherend specimens. The surfaces for the woven adherends were not smooth; rather, they had regular crests (high spots) and troughs (low spots) due to the weave pattern. Radiographs of the specimens and examination of their failure surfaces revealed that fiber bridging occurred between the crests of the two adherends in the debonded region. The observed improvements in debond growth resistance and static fracture toughness are attributed to this bridging.

  19. Laser Surface Preparation for Adhesive Bonding of Aerospace Structural Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, M. A.; Wohl, C. J.; Hopkins, J. W.; Connell, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Adhesive bonds are critical to the integrity of built-up structures. Disbonds can often be detected but the strength of adhesion between surfaces in contact is not obtainable without destructive testing. Typically the number one problem in a bonded structure is surface contamination, and by extension, surface preparation. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, are not ideal because of variations in their application. Etching of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) panels using a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser appears to be a highly precise and promising way to both clean a composite surface prior to bonding and provide a bond-promoting patterned surface akin to peel ply without the inherent drawbacks from the same (i.e., debris and curvature). CFRP surfaces prepared using laser patterns conducive to adhesive bonding were compared to typical pre-bonding surface treatments through optical microscopy, contact angle goniometry, and post-bonding mechanical testing.

  20. Influence of the temperature on the composites' fusion bonding quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkous, Ali; Jurkowski, Tomasz; Bailleul, Jean-Luc; Le Corre, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Thermoplastic composite parts are increasingly used to replace metal pieces in automotive field due to their mechanical properties, chemical properties and recycling potential [1]. To assemble and give them new mechanical functions, fusion bonding is often used. It is a type of welding carried out at a higher temperature than the fusion one [2]. The mechanical quality of the final adhesion depends on the process parameters like pressure, temperature and cycle time [3]. These parameters depend on two phenomena at the origin of the bonding formation: intimate contact [4] and reptation and healing [5]. In this study, we analyze the influence of the temperature on the bonding quality, disregarding in this first steps the pressure influence. For that, two polyamide composite parts are welded using a specific setup. Then, they undergo a mechanical test of peeling in order to quantify the adhesion quality.

  1. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, PK; Huysmans, MC; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N

  2. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  3. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  4. Adhesive system affects repair bond strength of resin composite

    OpenAIRE

    Irmak, Ozgur; Celiksoz, Ozge; Yilmaz, Begum; Yaman, Batu Can

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive systems on repair bond strength of aged resin composites. Materials and Methods: Ninety composite discs were built and half of them were subjected to thermal aging. Aged and non-aged specimens were repaired with resin composite using three different adhesive systems; a two-step self-etch adhesive, a two-step total-etch adhesive and a one-step self-etch adhesive; then they were subjected to shear forces. Data were analyzed stat...

  5. Effect of mode of polymerization of bonding agent on shear bond strength of autocured resin composite luting cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Cecilia C S; McComb, Dorothy; Anderson, James D; Tam, Laura E

    2003-04-01

    There have been anecdotal reports of low bond strength with autocured resin composite materials, particularly when light-cured bonding agents that combine primer and adhesive in a 1-bottle preparation are used. The objective of this study was to determine if the mode of polymerization of the bonding agent influences the strength of the attachment of autocured resin composite luting cements to dentin. The shear bond strength of 2 resin luting cements, Calibra and RelyX ARC, polymerized by autocuring, in combination with 4 different bonding agents, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus, Prime & Bond NT, IntegraBond and Single Bond, polymerized to bovine dentin by light-curing, autocuring or dual-curing, was determined. The pH of each bonding agent and its components was measured. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test the effect of cement and adhesive on shear bond strength. For each bonding agent, the adhesive variable combined the factors product brand and mode of polymerization. With significant interaction among the above variables, the least square means of the 16 combinations of resin cement and adhesive were compared. There was no consistent relationship between shear bond strength and mode of polymerization of the bonding agent. Significant differences in bond strength were specific to the proprietary brand of bonding agent. The pH of the bonding agent depends on the manufacturer's formulation, and low pH may contribute to low bond strength. The low in vitro bond strength occurring with some combinations of bonding agent and resin cement could be clinically significant.

  6. FERMILAB: protons through doubler sector (energy doubler for proton beam); test of superconducting magnets; bubble chamber ups and downs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A recent test of the first stage of the proton beam energy doubler at Fermilab is described. The new beam transport system, particularly the performance of the superconducting magnets, is also described. Initial performance and subsequent difficulties in the operation of the 15 foot bubble chamber are summarised. (W.D.L.).

  7. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to glass-ionomer cement using self-etching bonding agents with different pH: In vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Rajan, Karunamoorthy Jeyavel; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu; Porkodi, Ilango

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the bonding ability of composite to unset glass-ionomer cement (GIC) using different self-etching bonding systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred samples of composite bonded to unset GIC were prepared and were divided into four groups. In Group A, composite was bonded to unset GIC employing a strong (pH 1) self-etch primer was used. In Group B, intermediary strong (pH 1.4) self-etch primer was employed. In Group C and D, mild (pH 2) and (pH 2.2) self-etch primer was employed. Shear bond strength analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: Statistical analysis performed with one way analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed that the bond strength of composite to unset GIC was significantly higher for the mild self-etch primer group. In addition, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis was used to determine the composition of various structural phases identified by FE-SEM along the GIC-bonding agent interfaces. Conclusion: Hence this present study concludes that clinically the use of mild self-etching bonding agent over unset GIC has improved bond strength compared to the use of strong and intermediate self-etching bonding agent. PMID:22368331

  8. Immediate repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled composites after different surface treatments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    Objectives: To evaluate immediate repair bond strengths and failure types of resin composites with and without surface conditioning and characterize the interacting composite surfaces by their surface composition and roughness. Methods: Microhybrid, nanohybrid and nanofilled resin composites were

  9. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Lassila, Lippo

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers. PMID:29130047

  11. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Gandini, Paola; Tessera, Paola; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo; Scribante, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot) composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products) and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics) stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech) were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round) and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  12. Bending Properties of Fiber-Reinforced Composites Retainers Bonded with Spot-Composite Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic and periodontal splints are prepared with round or flat metallic wires. As these devices cannot be used in patients with allergy to metals or with aesthetic demands, fiber-reinforced composite (FRC retainers have been introduced. Stiffness of FRC materials could reduce physiologic tooth movement. In order to lower rigidity of conventional FRC retainers, a modified construction technique that provided a partial (spot composite coverage of the fiber has been tested and compared with metallic splints and full-bonded FRCs. Flat (Bond-a-Braid, Reliance Orthodontic Products and round (Penta-one 0155, Masel Orthodontics stainless steel splints, conventional FRC splints, and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers (Everstick Ortho, StickTech were investigated. The strength to bend the retainers at 0.1 mm deflection and at maximum load was measured with a modified Frasaco model. No significant differences were reported among load values of stainless steel wires and experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers at 0.1 mm deflection. Higher strength values were recoded for conventional full-bonded FRCs. At maximum load no significant differences were reported between metallic splints (flat and round and experimental spot-bonded FRCs, and no significant differences were reported between spot- and full-bonded FRC splints. These results encourage further tests in order to evaluate clinical applications of experimental spot-bonded FRC retainers.

  13. Bonding agensi za kompozitna raketna goriva / Bonding agents for composite rocket propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Petrić

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available U radu je analiziran uticaj bonding agensd na mehaničke karakteristike i viskozitet kompozitnih raketnih goriva na bazi hidroksiterminiranog polibutadiena i toluendiizocijanata, odnosno izoforondiizocijanata. Komparirana je efikasnost bonding agensd (BA različite strukture trietilentetramina (TET, tris-(2-metil aziridinil fosfin oksida (MAPO i N,N-di (2-hidroksietil-4,4-dimetilhidantoina (DHE. Efikasnost delovanja bonding agensa utvrdenaje na osnovu parametara dobijenih iz testa jednoosnog zatezanja uzoraka (σm - zatezna čvrstoća pri maksimalnoj sili, εm relativno izduženje pri maksimalnoj sili i εp - relativno izduženje pri prekidu. Mehaničke karakteristike merene su u temperaturskom području od -50°C do 50°C. Analiziran je uticaj BA na brzinu promene viskoziteta goriva. / The paper analyzes the effects of bonding agents on mechanical properties and viscosity of composite rocket propellants based on hydroxiterminated polybutadiene and toluendiizocyanate, i.e. izophorondiizocyanate. The efficiency of bonding agents (BA of different structure has been compared including triethylentetramine (TET, tris-(2-methyl azyrinidile phosphine oxide (MAPO and N, N-di (2-hydroxiethyl-4,4-dimethylhydantoine (DHE. The BA efficiency has been determined on the basis of parameters obtained by uniaxial tensile tests (σm - tensile strength at maximum force, εm - relative allongation at maximum force and εp - relative allongation at fracture. The mechanical properties have been measured at the temperature range from -50°C to 50°C. The BA effects on propellant viscosity change rates have been analyzed.

  14. Nondestructive Evaluation and Health Monitoring of Adhesively Bonded Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, William Walker

    As the growth of fiber reinforced composite materials continues in many industries, structural designers will have to look to new methods of joining components. In order to take full advantage of composite materials, such as increased stiffness, decreased weight, tailored material properties and increased fatigue life, mechanical fasteners will need to be replaced by adhesive bonding or welding, when possible. Mechanical fasteners require the drilling of holes, which damages the laminate and becomes the source of further fatigue damage. Also, an increase in laminate thickness or inclusion of other features is required for the material to withstand the bearing stress needed to preload fasteners. Adhesives transfer the load over a large area, do not require additional machining operations, provide increased stiffness through the joint, provide corrosion protection when joining dissimilar materials, and provide vibrational damping. Additionally, the repair of composite structures, which will become a major concern in the near future, will require the use of adhesive bonding for thermoset composites. In order for adhesives to be used to join primary aerospace structures they must meet certification requirements, which includes proof that the joint can withstand the required ultimate load without structural failure. For most components, nondestructive inspection is used to find critical flaws, which is combined with fracture mechanics to ensure that the structure can meet the requirements. This process works for some of the adhesive flaws, but other critical defects are not easily detected. Weak interface bonding is particularly challenging. This type of defect results in an interphase zone that may be only a dozen microns in thickness. Traditional bulk wave ultrasonic techniques cannot easily distinguish this zone from the interface between adherend and adhesive. This work considers two approaches to help solve this problem. Guided elastic wave propagation along

  15. Influence of repair procedure on composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Eugenia; Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria Victoria; Ceballos, Laura

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of different repair procedures and storage time on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a resin composite to an older one from a simulated previous restoration. Composite disks were made by layering 2 mm-thick increments of a nanohybrid composite (Grandio) shade A1 in a Teflon mold (4 x 8 mm). Afterwards, they were light-cured and stored (37 degrees C/7 days) in a saline solution. Specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the surface treatment applied: (1) Composite surface was roughened with a bur (Cimara) and Solobond Plus adhesive was applied; (2) Sandblasting with 27 μm aluminum oxide particles (KaVo Rondoflex), and adhesive application; (3) Air-abrasion with 30 μm alumina particles coated with silica (CoJet Sand), silane (Monobond-S) and adhesive application; (4) Negative control group with only adhesive application. Afterwards, Grandio composite (shade A3.5) was packed incrementally on the treated surface obtaining another disk (4 x 8 mm). Repaired blocks were stored (24 hours or 6 months) and afterwards μTBS test was performed and failure mode was evaluated. Also, beams obtained from 8 mm-high composite blocks without any surface treatment were immediately submitted to μTBS test to determine Grandio composite cohesive bond strength (positive control group). Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (P 0.05). All repair procedures achieved bond strength values higher than the negative control group but they did not reach the composite's cohesive bond strength. The overall conclusion was that an increased superficial roughness by means of a bur, silica coating or alumina sandblasting improved μTBS of the repaired composite and bond strength remained stable after 6 months.

  16. Crossing geometry for Main Ring on Doubler collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebold, R.

    1977-01-01

    There are two basic methods for bringing about Main Ring on Doubler collisions: the transposed, and kissing geometries. Examples of both are discussed assuming maximum momenta of 250 on 1000 GeV/c. The magnets required to bring the beams into small-angle collision are substantial in both cases. Detailed engineering work will be required to distinguish a substantial cost advantage of one geometry over the other

  17. Effect of different adhesion strategies on bond strength of resin composite to composite-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, M; Pekkan, G

    2013-01-01

    Service life of discolored and abraded resin composite restorations could be prolonged by repair or relayering actions. Composite-composite adhesion can be achieved successfully using some surface conditioning methods, but the most effective adhesion protocol for relayering is not known when the composite restorations are surrounded with dentin. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesion strategies on the bond strength of resin composite to the composite-dentin complex. Intact maxillary central incisors (N=72, n=8 per subgroup) were collected and the coronal parts of the teeth were embedded in autopolymerized poly(methyl tfr54methacrylate) surrounded by a polyvinyl chloride cylinder. Cylindrical cavities (diameter: 2.6 mm; depth: 2 mm) were opened in the middle of the labial surfaces of the teeth using a standard diamond bur, and the specimens were randomly divided into three groups. Two types of resin composite, namely microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine; AS) and nanohybrid (Grandio; G), were photo-polymerized incrementally in the cavities according to each manufacturer's recommendations. The composite-enamel surfaces were ground finished to 1200-grit silicone carbide paper until the dentin was exposed. The surfaces of the substrate composites and the surrounding dentin were conditioned according to one of the following adhesion protocols: protocol 1: acid-etching (dentin) + silica coating (composite) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); protocol 2: silica coating (composite) + acid-etching (dentin) + silanization (composite) + primer (dentin) + bonding agent (dentin + composite); and protocol 3: acid-etching (dentin) + primer (dentin) + silanization (composite) + bonding agent (dentin + composite). Applied primer and bonding agents were the corresponding materials of the composite manufacturer. Silica coating (CoJet sand, 30 μm) was achieved using a chairside air-abrasion device (distance: 10 mm; duration

  18. Effect of Sandblasting on Shear Bond Strength Composite Resin Veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octarina Octarina

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Attachment between restoration and enamel surface in indirect resin composite veneer restoration (IRCV is obtained using multi-step (MS resin cement. Recently, a one step self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement (SADRC was introduced. Objective: To determine the effect of sandblasting on shear bond strength (SBS of IRCV to enamel using MS resin cement and SADRC. Methods: Forty specimens of buccal surface of enamel human were light-cured in Solidilite chamber and were divided into two groups: IRCV without sandblasting (n=20 and with sandblasting for 10 seconds (n=20 and then bonded to enamel using MS (n=10 and SADRC (n=10, respectively. After 24h SBS of specimens were tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA. Results: The average SBS value of IRCV without SB and bonded with MS was 18.95+7.80MPa and MS with SB was 19.30+ SB (4.85+2.12MPa and SADRC with SB (9.57+3.45MPa(p<0.05. Conclusion: increased SBS VIRK to enamel using MS resin cement than SADRC.  

  19. Bonding of glass ceramic and indirect composite to non-aged and aged resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Özcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-02-01

    Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged resin composite to an indirect resin composite and pressed glass ceramic using two resin cements. Disk-shaped specimens (diameter: 3.5, thickness: 3 mm) (N = 160) produced from a microhybrid resin composite (Quadrant Anterior Shine) were randomly divided into eight groups. While half of the specimens were kept dry at 37°C for 24 h, the other half was aged by means of thermocycling (6000 times, 5°C to 55°C). The non-aged and aged resin composites were bonded to a highly filled indirect composite (Estenia) and a pressed glass ceramic (IPS Empress II) using either a photopolymerizing (Variolink Veneer) or a dual-polymerizing (Panavia F2.0) resin cement. While cementation surfaces of both the direct and indirect composite materials were silica coated (30 µm SiO2, CoJet-Sand) and silanized (ESPE-Sil), ceramic surfaces were conditioned with hydrofluoric acid (20 s), neutralized, and silanized prior to cementation. All specimens were cemented under a load of 750 g. Shear force was applied to the adhesive interface in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure types of the specimens were identified after debonding. Significant effects of aging (p ceramic in combination with both cements showed no significant difference (p > 0.05). Both indirect composite (24.3 ± 5.1 MPa) and glass ceramic in combination with Variolink (22 ± 9 MPa) showed the highest results on non-aged composites, but were not significantly different from one another (p > 0.05). On the aged composites, indirect composite and glass ceramic showed no significant difference in bond strength within each material group (p > 0.05), with both Panavia (17.2 ± 6 and 15 ± 5.5 MPa, respectively) and Variolink (19 ± 8

  20. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  1. Bond strength durability of direct and indirect composite systems following surface conditioning for repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Ozcan, Mutlu; Vanderlei, Aleska Dias; Leite, Fabiola Pessoa Pereira; Kimpara, Estevao Tomomitsu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effect of surface conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between a resin composite and an indirect composite system in order to test the repair bond strength. Materials and Methods: Eighteen blocks (5 x 5 x 4 mm) of indirect resin composite

  2. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, G.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author) [fr

  3. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed

  4. Adhesive Characterization and Progressive Damage Analysis of Bonded Composite Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2014-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  5. Low conversion loss 94 GHz and 188 GHz doublers in InP DHBT technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Squartecchia, Michele

    2017-01-01

    An Indium Phosphide (InP) Double Heterojunction Bipolar Transistor (DHBT) process has been utilized to design two doublers to cover the 94 GHz and 188 GHz bands. The 94 GHz doubler employs 4-finger DHBTs and provides conversion loss of 2 dB. A maximum output power of nearly 3 dBm is measured while...

  6. Balanced G-band Gm-boosted frequency doublers in transferred substrate InP HBT technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Thualfiqar, Al-Sawaf; Weimann, Nils

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, balanced G-band Gm-boosted frequency doublers in transferred substrate (TS) InP HBT technology are reported for the first time. The Gm-boosted frequency doublers consist of a phase compensated Marchand balun, Gm-boosted doubler stage, and an optional cascode gain stage at the outpu...

  7. Shear Bond Strength between Fiber-Reinforced Composite and Veneering Resin Composites with Various Adhesive Resin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlJehani, Yousef A; Baskaradoss, Jagan K; Geevarghese, Amrita; AlShehry, Marey A; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the shear bond strength of different laboratory resin composites bonded to a fiber-reinforced composite substrate with some intermediate adhesive resins. Mounted test specimens of a bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate (StickNet) were randomly assigned to three equal groups. Three types of commercially available veneering resin composites - BelleGlass®, Sinfony®, and GC Gradia® were bonded to these specimens using four different adhesive resins. Half the specimens per group were stored for 24 hours; the remaining were stored for 30 days. There were 10 specimens in the test group (n). The shear bond strengths were calculated and expressed in MPa. Data were analyzed statistically, and variations in bond strength within each group were additionally evaluated by calculating the Weibull modulus. Shear bond values of those composites are influenced by the different bonding resins and different indirect composites. There was a significant difference in the shear bond strengths using different types of adhesive resins (p = 0.02) and using different veneering composites (p veneering composite to bidirectional continuous fiber-reinforced substrate is influenced by the brand of the adhesive resin and veneering composite. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. Resin composites: strength of the bond to dentin versus mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Kasper Boel; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2007-03-01

    This study (1) investigated whether the combination of an adhesive system from one manufacturer with a resin composite from the same manufacturer provides superior bonding of the resin composite to dentin compared with the combination of an adhesive system from one manufacturer with a resin composite from another manufacturer, and (2) tested for a possible influence on bond strength of mechanical properties of the resin composite. After application of an adhesive system, a resin composite was bonded to flattened human dentin and tested in shear after 1 week. Five adhesive systems (AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond, Optibond Solo Plus, and Xeno III) were tested with each of five resin composites (Tetric Ceram, Filtek Supreme, Clearfil AP-X, Premise, and EsthetX). The mechanical properties flexural strength and flexural modulus were determined by three-point loading. Bond strengths were influenced by the brand of adhesive system (P resin composite (P resin composite from the same manufacturer did not provide bond strengths that were superior to those obtained when an adhesive system from one manufacturer was combined with a resin composite from another manufacturer. Independent of the brand of resin composite, the adhesive system Clearfil SE Bond mediated the highest bond strength to dentin. For each adhesive system, the resin composite Clearfil AP-X resulted in the highest bond strength to dentin. Significant positive correlations were found between bond strength and flexural strength (P < 0.0026, r = 0.21) and between bond strength and flexural modulus (P < 0.0017, r = 0.22).

  9. Drastic Improvements in Bonding of Fiber Reinforced Multifunctional Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Achievement of a dramatic increase in the bond strength in the composite/adhesive interfaces of existing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material joints and...

  10. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  11. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3(rd) year, overall "Bravo" rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3(rd) year evaluation (P composite and bonded amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities.

  12. Effect of simulated pulpal pressure on composite bond strength to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical significance was determined by T-test (p < 0.05). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean microtensile bond strengths between the groups (p < 0.0005). Simulated pulpal pressure had a negative effect on microtensile bond strength of laser ablated dentin when Single Bond adhesive system was ...

  13. Bonded carbon or ceramic fiber composite filter vent for radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Brugger, Ronald P.

    1985-02-19

    Carbon bonded carbon fiber composites as well as ceramic or carbon bonded ceramic fiber composites are very useful as filters which can separate particulate matter from gas streams entraining the same. These filters have particular application to the filtering of radioactive particles, e.g., they can act as vents for containers of radioactive waste material.

  14. Effect of Porcelain Surface Pretreatments on Composite Resin-Porcelain Shear Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    compared shear bond strengths between mechanically retained, silicoated, and sputter coated orthodontic brackets cemented with three different cements...between composite resin and porcelain, it is thought that thermocycling accelerates the hydrolysis induced degradation of the composite resin-porcelain bond...Bonding Orthodontic Attachments to Porcelain Teeth Using a Silane Coupling Agent, Am J Orthod 77: 233. Jones, D. W. (1985): Low Fusing Porcelains. In

  15. Microleakage of Class II Combined Amalgam-Composite Restorations Using Different Composites and Bonding Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sharafeddin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the microleakage of composite restorations with and without a cervical amalgam base and to compare the results of dif-ferent composites and bonding agents.Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty mesio-occlusal (MO and disto-occlusal (DO Class II cavities were prepared on sixty extracted permanent premolar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 30 and restored as follows:In group A, the mesio-occlusal cavity (MO, Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 and in the disto-occlusal (DO cavity, Prompt-L-Pop + Z250 were applied. As for group B, in the MO and DO cavities, Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX, and varnish + amalgam (In box + Clearfil SE Bond + Clearfil APX were used respectivelywhile in group C; the teeth were restored with amalgam and varnish mesio-occlusally and with amalgam only disto-occlusally. As for group D, varnish + amalgam (in box + Scotchbond multi purpose plus + Z250 were applied mesio-occlusally and Varnish + Amalgam (in box + Prompt–L–Pop + Z250 disto-occlusally.Marginal leakage was assessed by the degree of dye penetration into various sections of the restored teeth. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used for data analysis.Results: Microleakage in gingival margin was more than that in occlusal margin (P<0.05 and microleakage of combined amalgam-composite restorations was significantly lower than that of conventional composite and amalgam restorations.Conclusion: Marginal microleakage decreased by using amalgam at the base of the box in Class II composite restorations.

  16. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bonding of experimental composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Reza, Fazal

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate how ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation using an ordinary UV sterilizer would affect the bonding of experimental composite resins to an autopolymerizing acrylic resin. To this end, three composite resins and one unfilled resin--of which the compositions were similar to commercial composite resin artificial teeth--were prepared as repair composites. Their shear bond strengths after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes were significantly greater than those before UV irradiation regardless of composite resin type. Failure mode after UV irradiation for one to 60 minutes was mainly cohesive failure of the composite resins, but that before UV irradiation and after 24 hours' irradiation was mainly adhesive failure. These results thus suggested that a short period of UV irradiation on composite resin teeth would improve the bonding efficacy of composite resin artificial teeth to autopolymerizing resin.

  17. Prototype test of Energy Doubler/Saver bending magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, R.; Ishimoto, H.; Price, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    An improved full scale bending magnet for the Energy Doubler was cooled down with a prototype satellite refrigerator and its characteristics were measured. Quenches were intentionally induced on this magnet below 40 kG using a heater, and the quench behavior was investigated from the viewpoint of system safety. The first self-induced quench of this horizontal magnet system occurred at about 41.7 kG. Due to high single phase pressure, the magnet was not trained to any higher field. The measurement of ac loss was done, and the data showed some wire movement at about 20 kG. Transfer function was measured to be 9.81 (G/A). The magnetic field was measured using a harmonic coil. The field quality was found to be improved over the first full scale magnet

  18. Status of the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of building a ring of superconducting magnets was considered very early in the design of the Fermilab main accelerator. It was concluded that the technology of superconducting magnets was not at that time, sufficiently advanced. Therefore, the main ring was designed and built with conventional magnets. However, space was left in the main-ring tunnel for a future ring of superconducting magnets. The Energy Doubler/Saver (ED/S) was initiated in 1972 as a project to build a ring of superconducting magnets with the objective of dramatically increasing the research potential of the Fermilab accelerators. This was to be accomplished at a moderate cost and in such a manner as to make possible a significant saving of electrical energy. A description is given of the evolution of this program as well as give a status report of the Ed/S research and development program

  19. Status of the Fermilab Energy Doubler/Saver project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of building a ring of superconducting magnets was considered very early in the design of the Fermilab main accelerator. It was concluded that the technology of superconducting magnets was not at that time, sufficiently advanced. Therefore, the main ring was designed and built with conventional magnets. However, space was left in the main-ring tunnel for a future ring of superconducting magnets. The Energy Doubler/Saver (ED/S) was initiated in 1972 as a project to build a ring of superconducting magnets with the objective of dramatically increasing the research potential of the Fermilab accelerators. This was to be accomplished at a moderate cost and in such a manner as to make possible a significant saving of electrical energy. A description is given of the evolution of this program as well as give a status report of the Ed/S research and development program.

  20. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  1. Thermal shock resistances of a bonding material of C/C composite and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurumada, Akira; Oku, Tatsuo; Kawamata, Kiyohiro; Motojima, Osamu; Noda, Nobuaki; McEnaney, B.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute to the development and the safety design of plasma facing components for fusion reactor devices. We evaluated the thermal shock resistance and the thermal shock fracture toughness of a bonding material which was jointed a carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon composite (C/C composite) to oxygen-free copper. We also examined the microstructures of the bonding layers using a scanning electron microscope before and after thermal shock tests. The bonding material did not fracture during thermal shock tests. However, thermal cracks and delamination cracks were observed in the bonding layers. (author)

  2. A 3-year randomized clinical trial evaluating two different bonded posterior restorations: Amalgam versus resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemaloglu, Hande; Pamir, Tijen; Tezel, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the performance and postoperative sensitivity of a posterior resin composite with that of bonded amalgam in 40 (n = 20) large sized cavities and to evaluate whether resin composite could be an alternative for bonded amalgam. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial. Twenty patients in need of at least two posterior restorations were recruited. Authors randomly assigned one half of the restorations to receive bonded amalgam and the other half to composite restorations. Forty bonded amalgams (n = 20) and composites (n = 20) were evaluated for their performance on modified-US Public Health Service criteria and postoperative sensitivity using visual analogue scale (VAS) for 36-months. Results: Success rate of this study was 100%. First clinical alterations were rated as Bravo after 1 year in marginal discoloration, marginal adaptation, anatomical form, and surface roughness for both amalgam and composite. At the 3rd year, overall “Bravo” rated restorations were 12 for bonded amalgam and 13 for resin composites. There were no significant differences among the VAS scores of composites and bonded amalgams for all periods (P > 0.05) except for the comparisons at the 3rd year evaluation (P amalgam were clinically acceptable. Postoperative sensitivity results tend to decrease more in composite restorations rather than amalgams. Therefore, it was concluded that posterior resin composite can be used even in large sized cavities. PMID:27011734

  3. Permeability testing of composite material and adhesive bonds for the DC-XA composite feedline program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules IM7/8552 carbon/epoxy and Hysol EA 9394 epoxy adhesive bonded between composite/titanium were tested for permeability after various numbers of thermal cycles between 100 C and liquid nitrogen (-196 C). The specimens were quenched from the 100 C temperature into liquid nitrogen to induce thermal shock into the material. Results showed that the carbon/epoxy system was practically impermeable even after 12 thermal cycles. The EA 9394 adhesive bondline was more permeable than the carbon/epoxy, but vacuum mixing minimized the permeability and kept it within allowable limits. Thermal cycling had little effect on the permeability values of the bondline specimens.

  4. Micro-tensile bond strength of solely self-cured composite cement onto dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Thais Yumi Umeda; Santos, PH; De Munck, Jan; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate bonding effectiveness of a new experimental composite cement to dentin in terms of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) after 1week (‘immediate’) and 6month (‘aged’) artificial aging. Flat ground dentin of 32 human molars was prepared using 600-grit SiC paper. Selfmade composite blocks (Clearfil AP-X,Kuraray Noritake) were bonded to flat dentin surfaces using 4 composite cements: Exp. HPC100 (Kuraray Noritake), Multilink (Ivoclar Vivadent), RelyX Unicem 2 and RelyX Ultimate ...

  5. Effect of thermocycling and surface treatment on repair bond strength of composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Saburian, Pardis; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad-Javd

    2017-01-01

    Background Repair of composite restorations is a conservative method that can increase the longevity and durability of restorations while preserving the tooth structure. Achieving a suitable bond between the old and new composite is difficult. To overcome this problem, some methods have been recommended to increase the repair bond strength of composite.This study aimed to assess the effect of aging by thermocycling (5,000 and 10,000 cycles) and mechanical surface treatments (Er,Cr:YSGG laser and bur) on repair shear bond strength of composite resin. Material and Methods Totally, 120 composite blocks measuring 6x4x4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite and were randomly divided into three groups (n=40) based on initial aging protocol: (a) no aging: storage in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, (b) 5,000 thermal cycles, (c) 10,000 thermal cycles. Each group was then randomly divided into two subgroups (n=20) based on mechanical surface treatment (laser and bur). The laser and bur-prepared surfaces were silanized and Adper Single Bond 2 was then applied. The repair composite was bonded to surfaces. Half of the samples in each subgroup (n=10) were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles to assess durability of bond. The remaining half were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and all samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data (in megapascals) were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (P=0.05). Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope. Results Bur preparation significantly improved the bond strength compared to laser (Pcomposite (Pcomposite and surface preparation by bur provides a higher bond strength compared to laser. Key words:Thermocycling, Composite, Repair, Laser. PMID:28936282

  6. Ultrastructural Analysis and Long-term Evaluation of Composite-Zirconia Bond Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboushelib, Moustafa N; Ragab, Hala; Arnaot, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of different aging techniques on zirconia-composite microtensile bond strength using different surface treatments over a 5-year follow-up period. Zirconia disks received three surface treatments: airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles, selective infiltration etching (SIE), or fusion sputtering (FS). The specimens were bonded to pre-aged composite disks using a composite cement containing phosphate monomers (Panavia F2.0). Bonded specimens were sectioned into microbars (1 x 1 x 6 mm) using a precision cutting machine, and all microbars received thermocycling (15,000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C). Initial microtensile bond strength was evaluated, and the test was repeated after storage in the following media for five years (artificial saliva, 20% ethanol, 5% NaOH, 4% acetic acid, and 5% phosphoric acid). The test was repeated every 12 months for 5 years. Scanning electron microscopic images were used to analyze the zirconia-composite interface. A repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni post-hoc tests were used to analyze the data (n = 20, α = 0.05). Significantly higher microtensile bond strength was observed for SIE compared to fusion sputtering and airborne particle abrasion. Five years of artificial aging resulted in significant reduction of zirconia-composite bond strength for all tested specimens. Zirconia-composite bond strength was more sensitive to storage in sodium hydroxide and phosphoric acid, while it was least affected when stored under saliva. These changes were related to the mechanism of ultra-structural interaction between surface treatment and adhesive, as deterioration of the hybrid layer (composite-infiltrated ceramic) was responsible for bond degeneration. Zirconia-composite bond strength was influenced by 5 years of artificial aging.

  7. Penggunaan Fiber Reinforced Composite Sebagai Resin Bonded Prosthesis Pada Gigi Anterior

    OpenAIRE

    Pintadi, Hastoro

    2007-01-01

    Resin bonded prosthesis is a fixed bridge which replace a space where one or two teeth have been lost or extracted, by using acid etched technique and resin bonding. The main goals in selecting a Resin bonded prosthesis were to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics and lower patient fees while providing restorations that had the potential for long-term service. This case report discuss about fiber reinforced composite used as a main material for resin bondedprosthesis to replace incivu...

  8. Effect of universal adhesive etching modes on bond strength to dual-polymerizing composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-Luc; Brown, Matthew

    2018-04-01

    Information is lacking as to the effect on bond strength of the etching modes of universal adhesives when they are used to bond dual-polymerizing composite resins to dentin. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the bonding of dual-polymerizing foundation composite resins to dentin when universal bonding agents are used in self-etch or etch-and-rinse modes. Sixty caries-free, extracted third molar teeth were sectioned transversely in the apical third of the crown and allocated to 12 groups (n=5). Three different bonding agents (Scotchbond Universal, OptiBond XTR, All-Bond Universal) were used to bond 2 different dual-polymerizing composite resins (CompCore AF or CoreFlo DC) to dentin, using 2 different etching approaches (etch-and-rinse or self-etch). The specimens were sectioned into sticks (1×1×8 mm) with a precision saw. The bond strength of the specimens was tested under microtensile force at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data were analyzed using a 3-way ANOVA, a Games-Howell post hoc comparisons model, and Student t tests with Bonferroni corrections (α=.05). In the overall model, the composite resin used had no effect on bond strength (P=.830). The etching protocol by itself also did not have a significant effect (P=.059), although a trend was present. The bonding agent, however, did have an effect (Pcomposite resins to dentin, no single etching protocol is better than another. Depending on which bonding agent is being used, one etching mode may perform better. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of bulk-fill restorative composites to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Jyothi; Vegesna, Divya-Prasanna; Ravi, Ravichandra; Boddeda, Mohan-Rao; Uppalapati, Lakshman-Varma; Ghazanfaruddin, M D

    2017-08-01

    To facilitate the easier placement of direct resin composite in deeper cavities, bulk fill composites have been introduced. The Mechanical stability of fillings in stress bearing areas restored with bulk-fill resin composites is still open to question, since long term clinical studies are not available so far. Thus, the objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the microtensile bond strength of three bulk-fill restorative composites with a nanohybrid composite. Class I cavities were prepared on sixty extracted mandibular molars. Teeth were divided into 4 groups (n= 15 each) and in group I, the prepared cavities were restored with nanohybrid (Filtek Z250 XT) restorative composite in an incremental manner. In group II, III and IV, the bulk-fill composites (Filtek, Tetric EvoCeram, X-tra fil bulk-fill restoratives) were placed as a 4 mm single increment and light cured. The restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling and bond strength testing was done using instron testing machine. The mode of failure was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bond strength values obtained in megapascals (MPa) were subjected to statistical analysis, using SPSS/PC version 20 software.One-way ANOVA was used for groupwise comparison of the bond strength. Tukey's Post Hoc test was used for pairwise comparisons among the groups. The highest mean bond strength was achieved with Filtek bulk-fill restorative showing statistically significant difference with Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill ( p composites. Adhesive failures are mostly observed with X-tra fil bulk fill composites, whereas mixed failures are more common with other bulk fill composites. Bulk-fill composites exhibited adequate bond strength to dentin and can be considered as restorative material of choice in posterior stress bearing areas. Key words: Bond strength, Bulk-fill restoratives, Configuration factor, Polymerization shrinkage.

  10. A Self-Biased Active Voltage Doubler for Energy Harvesting Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Tayyab, Umais

    2017-12-03

    An active voltage doubler utilizing a single supply op-amp for energy harvesting system is presented. The proposed doubler is used for rectification process to achieve both acceptably high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and large rectified DC voltage. The incorporated op-amp is self-biased, meaning no external supply is needed but rather it uses part of the harvested energy for its biasing. The proposed active doubler achieves maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 61.7% for a 200 Hz sinusoidal input of 0.8 V for a 20 K load resistor. This efficiency is 2 times more when compared with the passive voltage doubler. The rectified DC voltage is almost 2 times more than conventional passive doubler. The relation between PCE and the load resistor is also presented. The proposed active voltage doubler is designed and simulated in LF 0.15 μm CMOS process technology using Cadence virtuoso tool.

  11. A Self-Biased Active Voltage Doubler for Energy Harvesting Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umais Tayyab

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An active voltage doubler utilizing a single supply op-amp for energy harvesting system is presented. The proposed doubler is used for rectification process to achieve both acceptably high power conversion efficiency (PCE and large rectified DC voltage. The incorporated op-amp is self-biased, meaning no external supply is needed but rather it uses part of the harvested energy for its biasing. The proposed active doubler achieves maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE of 61.7% for a 200 Hz sinusoidal input of 0.8 V for a 20 KΩ load resistor. This efficiency is 2 times more when compared with the passive voltage doubler. The rectified DC voltage is almost 2 times more than conventional passive doubler. The relation between PCE and the load resistor is also presented. The proposed active voltage doubler is designed and simulated in LF 0.15 μm CMOS process technology using Cadence virtuoso tool.

  12. Bond Characteristics of Macro Polypropylene Fiber in Cementitious Composites Containing Nanosilica and Styrene Butadiene Latex Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Woong Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the bond properties of polypropylene (PP fiber in plain cementitious composites (PCCs and styrene butadiene latex polymer cementitious composites (LCCs at different nanosilica contents. The bond tests were evaluated according to JCI SF-8, in which the contents of nanosilica in the cement were 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt%, based on cement weight. The addition of nanosilica significantly affected the bond properties between macro PP fiber and cementitious composites. For PCCs, the addition of 0–2 wt% nanosilica enhanced bond strength and interface toughness, whereas the addition of 4 wt% or more reduced bond strength and interface toughness. The bond strength and interfacial toughness of LCCs also increased with the addition of up to 6% nanosilica. The analysis of the relative bond strength showed that the addition of nanosilica affects the bond properties of both PCC and LCC. This result was confirmed via microstructural analysis of the macro PP fiber surface after the bond tests, which revealed an increase in scratches due to frictional forces and fiber tearing.

  13. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia copings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumita, M; Kokubo, Y; Kano, T

    2012-09-01

    The present study evaluated and compared the bond strength between zirconia and facing composite resin using different surface conditioning methods before and after thermocycling. Four primers, three opaque resins, and two facing composite resins were used, and 10 surface treatment procedures were conducted. The bond strength was measured before and after 4,000 cycles of thermocycling. The mean values of each group were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The bond strengths of facing composite resins to zirconia after various treatments varied depending on the primers, opaque resins, body resins, and thermocycling. The application of primers and opaque resins to the zirconia surface after sandblasting is expected to yield strong bond strength of the facing composite resin (Estenia CG&B) even after thermocycling.

  14. On Obtaining Design Allowables for Adhesives Used in the Bonded-Composite Repair of Aircraft

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chalkley, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A technique is documented, along with its experimental validation, for obtaining engineering-standard design allowables for structural adhesives used in the bonded/composite repair of aircraft structure...

  15. Bond strength of a composite resin to glass ionomer cements using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Oliveira BECCI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Glass ionomer cements are often used as a base or cavity lining prior to restorative material. Objective To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to different glass ionomer cements, when using a two-step conventional and self-etching adhesive systems. Material and method Three glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, Vitremer and Vitrebond, the composite resin Filtek Z350 XT and the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2, Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Easy One were used. As negative control, resin was bonded to cement without using an adhesive system. Holes (4 mm diameter, 2 mm deep prepared in acrilic bloks were filled with the glass ionomer cements (n=12/group. On the surface, an area of 1mm in diameter was delimited, the adhesive system was applied, and a specimen of composite resin with 1 mm height was made. After 24 hours storage (37 °C and 100% humidity, the microshear test was performed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison between groups (α=0.05. Result The adhesive systems significantly improved the bond strenght of composite resin to glass ionomer cements (p≤0.001. There was no significant difference in bond strength when self-etching adhesive systems were compared with the simplified etch-and-rinse adhesive, except for Vitrebond where Clearfil SE Bond determined higher bond strength when compared to Adper Single Bond 2 (p=0.003. Conclusion Self-etching adhesive systems are a good option for establishing the bond between the composite resin and the glass ionomer cement.

  16. Bonding performance of self-adhesive flowable composites to enamel, dentin and a nano-hybrid composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jana; Rizk, Marta; Hoch, Monika; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-12-14

    This study aimed to analyze bond strengths of self-adhesive flowable composites on enamel, dentin and nano-hybrid composite. Enamel, dentin and nano-hybrid composite (Venus Diamond, Heraeus Kulzer, Germany) specimens were prepared. Three self-adhesive composites (Constic, DMG, Germany; Fusio Liquid Dentin, Pentron Clinical, USA; Vertise Flow, Kerr Dental, Italy) or a conventional flowable composite (Venus Diamond Flow, Heraeus Kulzer, Germany, etch&rinse technique) were applied to enamel and dentin. Nano-hybrid composite specimens were initially aged by thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55 °C). Surfaces were left untreated or pretreated by mechanical roughening, Al 2 O 3 air abrasion or silica coating/silanization. In half of the composite specimens, an adhesive (Optibond FL, Kerr Dental, Italy) was used prior to the application of the flowable composites. Following thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55 °C) of all specimens, shear bond strengths (SBS) and failure modes were analyzed (each subgroup n = 16). Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVAs/Bonferroni post hoc tests, Weibull statistics and χ 2 -tests (p composites on enamel and dentin were significantly lower (enamel: composite (enamel: 13.0 ± 5.1, dentin: 11.2 ± 6.3), and merely adhesive failures could be observed. On the nano-hybrid composite, SBS were significantly related to the pretreatment. Adhesive application improved SBS of the conventional, but not of the self-adhesive composites. The self-adhesive composite groups showed less cohesive failures than the reference group; the occurence of cohesive failures increased after surface pretreatment. Bonding of self-adhesive flowable composites to enamel and dentin is lower than bonding to a nano-hybrid composite.

  17. Resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Frank A; Horvath, Sebastian D; Guess, Petra C; Blatz, Markus B

    2014-01-01

    Resin bonding is essential for clinical longevity of indirect restorations. Especially in light of the increasing popularity of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-fabricated indirect restorations, there is a need to assess optimal bonding protocols for new ceramic/polymer materials and indirect composites. The aim of this article was to review and assess the current scientific evidence on the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. An electronic PubMed database search was conducted from 1966 to September 2013 for in vitro studies pertaining the resin bond to indirect composite and new ceramic/polymer materials. The search revealed 198 titles. Full-text screening was carried out for 43 studies, yielding 18 relevant articles that complied with inclusion criteria. No relevant studies could be identified regarding new ceramic/polymer materials. Most common surface treatments are aluminum-oxide air-abrasion, silane treatment, and hydrofluoric acid-etching for indirect composite restoration. Self-adhesive cements achieve lower bond strengths in comparison with etch-and-rinse systems. Thermocycling has a greater impact on bonding behavior than water storage. Air-particle abrasion and additional silane treatment should be applied to enhance the resin bond to laboratory-processed composites. However, there is an urgent need for in vitro studies that evaluate the bond strength to new ceramic/polymer materials. This article reviews the available dental literature on resin bond of laboratory composites and gives scientifically based guidance for their successful placement. Furthermore, this review demonstrated that future research for new ceramic/polymer materials is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Jennifer; Morscher, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon-carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.

  19. Microtensile bond strengths to cavity floor dentin in indirect composite restorations using resin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Makoto; Nikaido, Toru; Maruoka, Rena; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the effect of a resin coating on the microtensile bond strengths (mu-TBSs) of indirect composite restorations bonded to dentin with resin cement and (2) to compare the mu-TBSs with that of a directly placed composite. Class I cavities were prepared in extracted human molars. The specimens were divided into five groups: For the indirect restorations, the cavity surfaces of the control group were left uncoated (group 1), while the surfaces of the experimental groups were resin coated with a dentin bonding system, Clearfil Protect Bond (PB; groups 2 and 3), or with a combination of PB and a flowable resin composite, Protect Liner F (PLF; group 4). The cavities were temporized for 1 day. Indirect composite restorations (Estenia) were cemented with a resin cement (Panavia F). Pretreatment with ED Primer II was performed in the groups 1, 3, and 4. For the direct restorations, the cavities were restored with PB and a direct composite (Clearfil AP-X; group 5). After 24 hours of water storage, mu-TBSs were measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Sheffe's test (p resin coating consisting of a self-etching primer dentin bonding system and a flowable resin composite significantly improved the mu-TBS of indirect restorations bonded to dentin using resin cement. A resin coating should be required to improve dentin bonding performance of Panavia F in indirect restorations. However, direct composite restorations still provide higher bond strength compared to indirect restorations.

  20. The bond of different post materials to a resin composite cement and a resin composite core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewardson, D; Shortall, A; Marquis, P

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the bond of endodontic post materials, with and without grit blasting, to a resin composite cement and a core material using push-out bond strength tests. Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts containing carbon (C) or glass (A) fiber and a steel (S) post were cemented into cylinders of polymerized restorative composite without surface treatment (as controls) and after grit blasting for 8, 16, and 32 seconds. Additional steel post samples were sputter-coated with gold before cementation to prevent chemical interaction with the cement. Cylindrical composite cores were bonded to other samples. After sectioning into discs, bond strengths were determined using push-out testing. Profilometry and electron microscopy were used to assess the effect of grit blasting on surface topography. Mean (standard deviation) bond strength values (MPa) for untreated posts to resin cement were 8.41 (2.80) for C, 9.61(1.88) for A, and 19.90 (3.61) for S. Prolonged grit blasting increased bond strength for FRC posts but produced only a minimal increase for S. After 32 seconds, mean values were 20.65 (4.91) for C, 20.41 (2.93) for A, and 22.97 (2.87) for S. Gold-coated steel samples produced the lowest bond strength value, 7.84 (1.40). Mean bond strengths for untreated posts bonded to composite cores were 6.19 (0.95) for C, 13.22 (1.61) for A, and 8.82 (1.18) for S, and after 32 seconds of grit blasting the values were 17.30 (2.02) for C, 26.47 (3.09) for A, and 20.61 (2.67) for S. FRC materials recorded higher roughness values before and after grit blasting than S. With prolonged grit blasting, roughness increased for A and C, but not for S. There was no evidence of significant bonding to untreated FRC posts, but significant bonding occurred between untreated steel posts and the resin cement. Increases in the roughness of FRC samples were material dependent and roughening significantly increased bond strength values (ptested FRC posts is required for effective bonding.

  1. Influence of resin composite mechanical properties on adhesive microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goracci, Cecilia; Margvelashvili, Mariam; Apicella, Davide; Sedda, Maurizio; Magni, Elisa; Ferrari, Marco

    2011-08-01

    To determine the influence of mechanical properties of resin-based composites on the microtensile bond strength to dentin of all-in-one adhesives. Microtensile bond strengths were measured with the non-trimming technique for the experimental groups: 1) Bond Force/Estelite Σ (Tokuyama); 2) G-Bond Plus (GC)/Estelite Σ; 3) Bond Force/Gradia Direct Anterior (GC);4) G-Bond Plus/Gradia Direct Anterior; 5) Bond Force/Gradia Direct LoFlo (GC); 6) G-Bond Plus/Gradia Direct LoFlo. The following mechanical properties of the resin-based composites were assessed: tensile strength, flexural strength, tensile elastic modulus, shear elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, Vicker's hardness, contraction stress. Three-dimensional models of microtensile beams were created for finite element analysis of the first principal stress values and distribution in the adhesive layer during microtensile testing. Statistical tests were applied to microtensile bond strength values (two-way ANOVA) and to data from mechanical tests (one-way ANOVA). In all the analyses, the level of significance was set at p building up the coronal portion.

  2. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n=20 according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%. Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one. Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram. Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface.

  3. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Methods. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6

  4. Microshear bond strength of preheated silorane- and methacrylate-based composite resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbuga, Sezer; Ucar, Faruk Izzet; Cayabatmaz, Muhammed; Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Cantekin, Kenan; Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Kilinc, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preheating on microshear bond strength (MSBS) of silorane and methacrylate-based composite resins to human dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into three main groups: (1) composite resins were heated upto 68 °C; (2) cooled to 4 °C; and (3) control [room temperature (RT)]. Each group was then randomly subdivided into four subgroups according to adhesive system used [Solobond M (Voco), All Bond SE (Bisco), Clearfil SE Bond (CSE) (Kuraray), Silorane adhesive system (SAS) (3M ESPE)]. Resin composite cylinders were formed (0.9 mm diameter × 0.7 mm length) and MSBS of each specimen was tested. The preheated groups exhibited the highest MSBS (p composite resins may be an alternative way to increase the MSBS of composites on dentin. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Bond strength of resin composite to light activated bleached enamel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-02

    Sep 2, 2015 ... Conclusion: The various irradiation treatments following the application of the whiteness HP bleaching agent to enamel did not significantly reduce the µTBS within a 14‑day period. Key words: Bleaching agents, lasers, lasers neodymium: yttrium aluminum garnet, resin bonding, tooth bleaching. Date of ...

  6. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate surface treatments on morphology and bond strength to composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joo-Hee; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Park, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Euiseong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micromorphologic changes that accompany different surface treatments on mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and their effect on the bond strength to the composite resin with 4 adhesive systems. Three types of MTA cement, ProRoot MTA (WMTA) (Dentsply, Tulsa, OK), MTA Angelus (AMTA) (Angelus, Londrina, PR, Brazil), and Endocem MTA (EMTA) (Maruchi, Wonju, Korea), were prepared and stored for a week to encourage setting. Surface treatment was performed using phosphoric acid or self-etch primer, and an untreated MTA surface was prepared as a control. The surface changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy. MTA surfaces were bonded with 4 adhesive systems, including Scotchbond Multipurpose (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN), Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE), Clearfil SE BOND (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan), and AdheSE One F (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), to evaluate the adhesive effectiveness of MTA followed by composite resin restoration. The shear bond strength of the polymerized specimens was tested. For WMTA and AMTA, untreated surfaces showed an irregular crystalline plate with clusters of globular aggregate particles. For EMTA, the untreated surface presented a reticular matrix with acicular crystals. After surface treatment, superficial crystalline structures were eroded regardless of the MTA cement and adhesive system used. WMTA bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA and EMTA, regardless of the adhesive system used. In the WMTA and AMTA groups, AdheSE One F showed the highest bond strength to the composite. For EMTA, no significant differences were found across adhesive systems. Acidic treatment of the MTA surface affected the micromorphology and the bond strength to the composite. Within the limitations of this study, using a 1-step self-etch adhesive system might result in a strong bond to WMTA when the composite resin restoration is required over MTA cement. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists

  7. Effect Aging Conditions on the Repair Bond Strength of a Microhybrid and a Nanohybrid Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Cura, Cenk; Brendeke, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the effect of different aging methods on the repair bond strength and failure types of a microhybrid and a nanohybrid composite Materials and Methods Disk shaped microhybrid (Quadrant Anterior Shine-QA) and nanohybrid (Tetric EvoCeram TE) resin composite specimens (N =

  8. The influence of rotating fatigue on the bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirmohammadi, H.; Aboushelib, M.N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; de Jager, N.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of resin composite to zirconia framework material. Methods Bar shaped zirconia/composite specimens (2 mm × 2 mm × 25 mm) were prepared using three different resin cements and placed in a four-point bending test setup. The

  9. Effect of newer antioxidants on the bond strength of composite on bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate the effect of the application of two antioxidants on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Eighty enamel surfaces were obtained from forty human extracted premolars. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20. Group 1: No bleaching (control; Group 2a: Bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide gel; Group 2b: Bleaching, followed by application of 10% sodium ascorbate gel; Group 2c: Bleaching, followed by application of 5% proanthocyanidin agent. Surfaces were etched followed by application of total etch bonding system, and composite resin cylinders were bonded. Specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparison and post hoc Tukey′s test for individual group-wise comparison. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in Group 2c and 2b as compared with Group 1 and 2a (P < 0.05. Among the antioxidants, Group 2c showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than Group 2b (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the use of antioxidant before bonding procedures on bleached enamel completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the bond strength significantly.

  10. Adhesive bond strength evaluation in composite materials by laser-generated high amplitude ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perton, M; Blouin, A; Monchalin, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive bonding of composites laminates is highly efficient but is not used for joining primary aircraft structures, since there is presently no nondestructive inspection technique to ensure the quality of the bond. We are developing a technique based on the propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves to evaluate the adhesive bond strength. Large amplitude compression waves are generated by a short pulse powerful laser under water confinement and are converted after reflection by the assembly back surface into tensile waves. The resulting tensile stresses can cause a delamination inside the laminates or at the bond interfaces. The adhesion strength is evaluated by increasing the laser pulse energy until disbond. A good bond is unaffected by a certain level of stress whereas a weaker one is damaged. The method is shown completely non invasive throughout the whole composite assembly. The sample back surface velocity is measured by an optical interferometer and used to estimate stress history inside the sample. The depth and size of the disbonds are revealed by a post-test inspection by the well established laser-ultrasonic technique. Experimental results show that the proposed method is able to differentiate weak bond from strong bonds and to estimate quantitatively their bond strength.

  11. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of the Orthobond composite under different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos de Oliveira Ruellas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil under different enamel surface conditions. Methods: Ninety bovine mandibular permanent incisors were divided into six groups (n = 15. In Group 1 (control and Group 2 the bonding procedures were performed by using Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA and Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil composites,respectively, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. In the other groups brackets were bonded with Orthobond composite (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil as follows: Group 3 – dental surface conditioned with Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer (3M Unitek, Monrovia, USA; Group 4 – bonding procedure without application of Orthoprimer (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil; Group 5 - Eagle Bond applied on saliva/blood-contaminated dental surface; and Group 6 – use of homogenized Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil. After bonding the brackets, all the samples were submitted to shear bond strength tests by means of an Emic Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results obtained in mega Pascal (MPa were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA and then to the Tukey test. Results: The results in mega Pascal showed statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 (p= 0.041, 1 and 5 (p=0.000 and between 4 and 5 (p=0.016. The ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index scores showed evidence of a higher number of fractures at the bracket/composite interface. Conclusion: In all tested situations the Orthobond (Dental Morelli Ltda, Sorocaba, Brazil was shown to be apt for bracket bonding.

  12. Standard Guide for Acousto-Ultrasonic Assessment of Composites, Laminates, and Bonded Joints

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide explains the rationale and basic technology for the acousto-ultrasonic (AU) method. Guidelines are given for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of flaws and physical characteristics that influence the mechanical properties and relative strength of composite structures (for example, filament-wound pressure vessels), adhesive bonds (for example, joints between metal plates), and interlaminar and fiber/matrix bonds in man-made composites and natural composites (for example, wood products). 1.2 This guide covers technical details and rules that must be observed to ensure reliable and reproducible quantitative AU assessments of laminates, composites, and bonded structures. The underlying principles, prototype apparatus, instrumentation, standardization, examination methods, and data analysis for such assessments are covered. Limitations of the AU method and guidelines for taking advantage of its capabilities are cited. 1.3 The objective of AU is to assess subtle flaws and associated strength variations...

  13. Adjusting the Chemical Bonding of SnO2@CNT Composite for Enhanced Conversion Reaction Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yayi; Huang, Jianfeng; Qi, Hui; Cao, Liyun; Yang, Jun; Xi, Qiao; Luo, Xiaomin; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Jiayin

    2017-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with excellent electron conductivity are widely used to improve the electrochemical performance of the SnO 2 anode. However, the chemical bonding between SnO 2 and CNTs is not clearly elucidated despite it may affect the lithiation/delithiation behavior greatly. In this work, an SnO 2 @CNT composite with SnC and SnOC bonds as a linkage bridge is reported and the influence of the SnC and SnOC bonds on the lithium storage properties is revealed. It is found that the SnC bond can act as an ultrafast electron transfer path, facilitating the reversible conversion reaction between Sn and Li 2 O to form SnO 2 . Therefore, the SnO 2 @CNT composite with more SnC bond shows high reversible capacity and nearly half capacity contributes from conversion reaction. It is opposite for the SnO 2 @CNT composite with more SnOC bond that the electrons cannot be transferred directly to CNTs, resulting in depressed conversion reaction kinetics. Consequently, this work can provide new insight for exploration and design of metal oxide/carbon composite anode materials in lithium-ion battery. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Microleakage of three self-etch bonding agents in class 5 composite cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Nemati Anaraki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Microleakage is one of the most common problems in bonding systems, which cause different clinical shortcomings such as post operative sensitivity, marginal discoloration and pulp necrosis that can decrease those using bonding systems. The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of three self etch bonding agents (generation 6 and 7 in class 5 composite cavities. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 30 facial class 5 cavities were prepared in 30 human premolar teeth which were freshly extracted for orthodontic purposes. Cl V cavities were prepared in 2*3*2 mm dimensions. Occlusal margins were in enamel and gingival ones in cementum and randomly divided into 3 groups of 10 each. Then the cavities were treated by clearhil SE Bond (Kuraray, Japan, G Bond (GC, Japan, and Opti Bond Solo Plus (Kerr, USA, according to the manufacturers’ insductions. Then the cavities were filled using Z100 resin composite. The specimens were then immersed in a 50% AgNo solution for 24 hrs. Then, the teeth were cut buccolingually to be evaluated for dye penetration with stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: This study revealed that Opti bond solo plus had type1 microleakage (dye penetration up to 1/3 of cavity in 80% of specimen, and type 4 microleakage (along axial wall in 10%. Clearfil SE bond had no leakage in 50%, type1 in 40% and type 2 (up to 2/3 of cavity in 10%. But there was no significant difference in the microleakage at the gingival margins between 3 groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: Clearfil SE Bond and G bond could prevent microleakage more effectively than that of Opti Bond Solo Plus on the occlusal margins. However, no difference in the microleakage on the gingival surfaces was found.

  15. Shear bond strength of dual-cured and self-cured resin composites to dentin using different bonding agents and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leevailoj, C; Ua-wutthikrerk, P; Poolthong, S

    2007-01-01

    This study determined the effects of bonding agents on the shear bond strength of dual- and self-cured resin composites to dentin. Two light-cured dentin bonding agents (Excite and One-Step) and a dual-cured bonding agent (Excite DSC) were compared. Light activation of the bonding agents prior to placement of the resin composites was also evaluated. This in vitro study was performed on 120 extracted non-carious human third molars. The occlusal part of the crowns was removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The teeth were then randomly divided into three major groups for Excite, One-Step and Excite DSC as bonding agents. The specimens in each adhesive group were divided into four subgroups: with and without light activation of the bonding agent and with dual-cured (Luxacore Dualcure, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) or light-cured resin (Luxacore, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) composites. After placing the restorations, the specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before being tested for shear bond strength on an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results showed that the shear bond strength of dual-cured resin composite to dentin was significantly higher than that of self-cured resin composite (p = 0.017). Light activation of the bonding agents prior to applying the resin composites led to a significantly higher shear bond strength of the resin composites to dentin, compared to no light activation (p < 0.05).

  16. In vitro evaluation of the bond strength of composite resin foundation materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Harbi, Fahad; Baba, Nadim Z

    2015-10-01

    Achieving adequate bonding of composite resin foundation materials to dentin can be a challenge. Bonding can be affected by the type of bonding material and method used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to test the bond strengths of selected dual-polymerizing composite resin foundation materials to dentin using light, chemical, or dual-polymerized adhesive systems. Eighty freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned vertically into mesial and distal halves and embedded in acrylic resin using a copper cylinder. Specimens were divided into 16 groups. Each group received a resin foundation that was bonded to dentin according to each manufacturer's instructions. All tested foundations were dual polymerized except Tetric Ceram, which was light polymerized. BisCore, Build-it, CompCore, CoreRestore, and FluoroCore resin foundation materials were bonded to dentin with the use of the corresponding adhesives in 3 different bonding methods: adhesive was light polymerized; adhesive was chemically polymerized; and adhesive was dual polymerized. Each specimen was seated in a custom shear test device, and a load was applied with the descending rod of the jig from a mechanical testing machine with a perpendicular force to the dentin-adhesive interface. Statistical analysis was performed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc pairwise comparison with Tukey test when statistically significant differences were found (α=.05). Resin foundation materials bonded to dentin with light-polymerized adhesives produced significantly higher bond strengths than when bonded with chemically or dual-polymerized adhesives. No significant difference was found between the single-component and multiple-components adhesives used with Tetric Ceram and BisCore foundations (P=.083). However, BisCore used with All-Bond 2 adhesive (multiple components) produced significantly lower bond strengths than when used with One-Step (P=.024). Adhesive failure was the most common failure location. Cohesive

  17. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H S Vanishree

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Bonded amalgam appears to be comparable to amalgam when microleakage is considered and to composite resin when fracture resistance is considered; hence, bonded amalgam can also be an alternative material to amalgam in primary molars.

  18. Investigation of the interfacial bonding in composite propellants. 1,3,5-Trisubstituted isocyanurates as universal bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. USCUMLIC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1,3,5-trisubstituted isocyanurates (substituents: CH2CH2OH, CH2CH=CH2 and CH2CH2COOH was synthesized according to a modified literature procedure. Experimental investigations included modification of the synthetic procedure in terms of the starting materials, solvents, temperature, isolation techniques, as well as purification and identification of the products. All the synthesized isocyanurates were identified by their melting point and FTIR, 1H NMR and UV spectroscopic data. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry was also used to study the interaction between ammonium perchlorate, hydroxyl terminated poly(butadiene, carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene, poly(butadiene-co-acrylonitrile, poly(propylene ether, cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine and the compounds synthesized in this work, which can serve as bonding agents. The results show that tris(2-hydroxyethylisocyanurate is a universal bonding agent for the ammonium perchlorate/carboxyl terminated poly(butadiene/cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine composite propellant system.

  19. Dentin-composite bond strength measurement using the Brazilian disk test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Carola A; Chen, Yung-Chung; Li, Yuping; Rudney, Joel; Aparicio, Conrado; Fok, Alex

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a variant of the Brazilian disk test (BDT) for assessing the bond strength between composite resins and dentin. Dentin-composite disks (ϕ 5mm×2mm) were prepared using either Z100 or Z250 (3M ESPE) in combination with one of three adhesives, Adper Easy Bond (EB), Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Adper Single Bond (SB), and tested under diametral compression. Acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to monitor debonding of the composite from the dentin ring. A finite element (FE) model was created to calculate the bond strengths using the failure loads. Fracture modes were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Most specimens fractured along the dentin-resin composite interface. DIC and AE confirmed interfacial debonding immediately before fracture of the dentin ring. Results showed that the mean bond strength with EB (14.9±1.9MPa) was significantly higher than with MP (13.2±2.4MPa) or SB (12.9±3.0MPa) (p0.05). Z100 (14.5±2.3MPa) showed higher bond strength than Z250 (12.7±2.5MPa) (pstrength between dentin and composite, with zero premature failure, reduced variability in the measurements, and consistent failure at the dentin-composite interface. The new test could help to predict the clinical performance of adhesive systems more effectively and consistently by reducing the coefficient of variation in the measured bond strength. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Davari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures.Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22 according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C. Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm(2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05.Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group.Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength.

  1. A comparative effect of various surface chemical treatments on the resin composite-composite repair bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaloo Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was an attempt to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength between pre-existing composite and repair composite resin. Materials and Methods: Forty acrylic blocks were prepared in a cuboidal mould. In each block, a well of 5 mm diameter and 5 mm depth was prepared to retain the composite resin (Filtek™ Z350, 3M/ESPE. Aging of the composite discs was achieved by storing them in water at 37°C for 1 week, and after that were divided into 5 groups (n = 8 according to surface treatment: Group I- 37% phosphoric acid, Group II-10% hydrofluoric acid, Group III-30% citric acid, Group IV-7% maleic acid and Group V- Adhesive (no etchant. The etched surfaces were rinsed and dried followed by application of bonding agent (Adper™ Single Bond 2. 3M/ESPE. The repair composite was placed on aged composite, light-cured for 40 seconds and stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. Shear bond strength between the aged and the new composite resin was determined with a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Statistical Analysis: The compressive shear strengths were compared for differences using ANOVA test followed by Tamhane′s T2 post hoc analysis. Results: The surface treatment with 10% hydrofluoric acid showed the maximum bond strength followed by 30% citric acid, 7% maleic acid and 37% phosphoric acid in decreasing order. Conclusion: The use of 10% hydrofluoric acid can be a good alternative for surface treatment in repair of composite resin restoration as compared to commonly used 37% orthophosphoric acid.

  2. Effect of intermediate agents and pre-heating of repairing resin on composite-repair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacchini, Federica; Magni, Elisa; Radovic, Ivana; Mazzitelli, Claudia; Monticellia, Francesca; Goracci, Cecilia; Polimeni, Antonella; Ferrari, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the composite-to-composite microtensile bond strength and interfacial quality after using different combinations of intermediate agents and pre-curing temperatures of repairing resin. Forty-five composite discs (8x4 mm) of Gradia Direct Anterior (GC Corp), stored in a saline solution at 37 degrees C for one month, were sandblasted (50 microm aluminum oxide), cleaned (35% phosphoric acid) and randomly divided into three groups (n=15) according to the intermediate agent applied: (1) no treatment; (2) unfilled resin (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive, 3M ESPE); (3) flowable composite (Gradia LoFlo, GC Corp). Each disc was incrementally repaired (8x8 mm) with the same resin as the substrate. For each group, three subgroups (n=5) were created, depending on the pre-curing temperature of the repairing resin-4 degrees C, 23 degrees C or 37 degrees C. Two bonded specimens per group were prepared to evaluate the composite-to-composite interfacial quality via scanning electron microscope. Microtensile bond strength measurements were performed with the remaining three specimens and failure mode was examined by stereomicroscopy. Two-way ANOVA revealed that temperature (p resin in groups where intermediate agents were used. The highest bond strengths were recorded when flowable composite was used as an intermediate agent under each of the three temperature conditions. Interfacial quality improved by raising the resin temperature from 4 degrees C to 37 degrees C.

  3. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  4. Recent Trends in Surface Treatment Methods for Bonding Composite Cement to Zirconia: A Reveiw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Al Kheraif, Abdul Aziz A; Jamaluddin, Syed; Elsharawy, Mohamad; Divakar, Darshan Devang

    To evaluate the in vitro studies conducted in the last six years on new zirconia materials to discover and explore current trends in bonding composite cement to zirconia substrate. An in-depth review of the in vitro studies performed between 2010 and 2016 was conducted, focusing on the current trends in surface conditioning methods for zirconia ceramic. PubMed was used for searching the literature. Resin composite bonding to zirconia, zirconia surface coating, and zirconia surface treatment method were the keywords used. Complete scientific articles were reviewed and evaluated for appropriateness. The literature survey showed a variety of surface treatment techniques comprising grit blasting (laboratory or chairside) with or without silica-coated alumina particles, the use of materials containing phosphate monomers, different silanes and primers, laser irradiation, Si vapor-phase deposition, and selective infiltration etching. The problem of composite cement bonding to zirconia has yet to be definitively solved. Nevertheless, the application of phosphate monomer on tribochemically silica-coated zirconia surfaces is currently the least complicated and most efficaceous means of bonding composite cement to zirconia. Selective infiltration etching seems to be a promising technique for establishing a durable bond between composite cement and zirconia, and should be studied further.

  5. Resistance of Bonded Composite Restorations on Fractures of Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Daneshkazemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dentine bonding agents and Glass Ionomer cement beneath composite restorations and its resistance on fractures of endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods: Forty sound maxillary teeth were selected; ten of them for positive control, and on the rest, RCT and MOD cavity preparations were done with standard methods. Then, the teeth were divided to four groups: 1-Sound teeth for positive control. 2-Prepared without any restoration for negative control. 3-Prepared and restored with Vitrabond(3M, USA, Single bond(3M, USA and Z100(3M, USA resin composite. 4-Prepared and restored by Single bond and Z100 resin composite. Specimens were subjected to compressive load by Instron 8502 until fracture occurred. Results: Group 1 showed the highest resistance to compressive forces followed by group 4,3&2 respectively. ANOVA, t test and Chi-square tests indicated significant difference between all the groups. Conclusion: Use of dentine bonding agents and resin composite increases resistance of endodontically treated teeth to fractures more than teeth restored with sandwich of glass ionomer cements, dentine bonding agents and resin composite.

  6. Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced composite root canal posts to composite core material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conclusion: Er:YAG laser treatments on the FRC post surface decreased the bond strength. Airborne-particle abrasion and HF acid etching are alternative methods for increasing bond strength of FRC posts to composite core material.

  7. Strengthening of Concrete Structures with cement based bonded composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Täljsten, Björn; Blanksvärd, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Due to demands on higher loads, degradation, re-construction etc. there is a constant need for repair or strengthening of existing concrete structures. Many varying methods exist to strengthen concrete structures, one such commonly used technique utilizes surface epoxy bonded FRPs (Fibre Reinforced...... with improved working environment and better compatibility to the base concrete structure. This study gives an overview of different cement based systems, all with very promising results for structural upgrading. Studied parameters are structural retrofit for bending, shear and confinement. It is concluded...

  8. Tensile bond strength of an aged resin composite repaired with different protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Esra Uzer; Ergücü, Zeynep; Türkün, L Sebnem; Ercan, Utku Kürșat

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments and bonding procedures on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin composites repaired 6 months after polymerization. Resin composite sticks were aged in distilled water at 37°C for 6 months. They were divided into 12 groups (n = 10) according to the combination of surface treatment/bonding procedures [none, only bur treatment, XP Bond (XPB/Dentsply/DeTrey) with/without bur, AdheSE (A-SE/Ivoclar/Vivadent) with/without bur, Composite Primer (CP/GC) with/without bur, CP after bur and acid-etching, XPB after acid etching and CP with bur, A-SE after bur and CP]. The ultimate tensile bond strength (UTS) of the resin composites was tested in intact but aged specimens. Tensile bond strengths were tested with a universal testing machine (Shimadzu). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan Multiple Comparisons tests (p < 0.05). All repaired groups showed significantly higher TBS than the group without any sureface treatment (p < 0.05). Four groups resulted in TBS similar to those of intact resin composite UTS: A-SE, A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching+CP with bur. Bur treatment, silane primer or etch-and-rinse adhesive application alone were not successful in the repair process of aged resin composite, whereas self-etching adhesive alone showed similar performance to the intact specimens. Combined procedures generally showed better performance: A-SE with bur, A-SE after CP with bur, and XPB after acid etching +CP with bur showed TBS similar to those of the intact specimens. It was concluded that bur roughening of the surfaces and rebonding procedures were essential for repairing aged resin composites.

  9. Composite bonded magnets with controlled anisotropy directions prepared by viscous deformation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Fumitoshi; Kawamura, Kiyomi; Okada, Yukihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Ogushi, Masaki; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi

    2007-01-01

    When a radially anisotropic rare earth bonded magnet for a rotor with a high (BH) max value is magnetized multi-polarly, its flux distributes rectangularly and increases a cogging torque. In order to overcome this difficulty, we newly developed highly dense Sm 2 Fe 17 N 3 and Nd 2 Fe 14 B-based composite bonded magnets with continuously controlled anisotropy directions by using a viscous deformation technique

  10. Comparison of shear bond strengths of conventional orthodontic composite and nano-ceramic restorative composite: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit Nagar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-ceramic restorative composite Ceram-X MonoTM♦, a restorative resin with the traditional orthodontic composite Transbond XTTM† and to evaluate the site of bond failure using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human premolars were divided into two groups of 30 each. Stainless steel brackets were bonded using Transbond XTTM† (Group I and Ceram-X MonoTM♦ (Group II according to manufacturer′s protocol. Shear bond strength was measured on Universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Adhesive Remnant Index scores were assigned to debonded brackets of each group. Data was analyzed using unpaired ′t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The mean shear bond strength of Group I (Transbond XTTM† was 12.89 MPa ± 2.19 and that of Group II (Ceram-X MonoTM was 7.29 MPa ± 1.76. Unpaired ′t′ test revealed statistically significant differences amongst the shear bond strength of the samples measured. Chi-square test revealed statistically insignificant differences amongst the ARI scores of the samples measured. Conclusions: Ceram-X MonoTM♦ had a lesser mean shear bond strength when compared to Transbond XTTM† which was statistically significant difference. However, the mean shear bond of Ceram X Mono was within the clinically acceptable range for bonding. Ceram-X MonoTM† and Transbond XTTM† showed cohesive fracture of adhesive in 72.6% and 66.6% of the specimens, respectively.

  11. In vitro marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restorations bonded to dentin cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiotis, Christos; Tzoutzas, John; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of high-viscosity resin composite restoratives bonded to dentin in a cylindrical cavity model. The buccal enamel of 64 human premolars was removed and cylindrical cavities 3 mm in diameter and 1.3 mm in depth were prepared on each dentin surface. The cavities were divided into 8 groups of 8 cavities each and restored according to the manufacturers' instructions with the following adhesive/composite systems: Bond 1/Alert, Stae/Glacier, OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable, One-Step/Pyramid, Solidbond/Solitaire, Prime&Bond NT/Surefil, One Coat Bond/Synergy, and Scotchbond 1/Z250. The composite surfaces were pressed against mylar strips, covered with cover slips, and photopolymerized in a single increment for 40 s. The restorations were polished with wet SiC papers of 320 to 1000 grit size to expose dentin margins. The marginal adaptation was evaluated immediately after photopolymerization and again after 1 week of storage in water at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Evaluation was performed under a metallographic microscope at 200X magnification by recording the frequency of gap-free restorations (GF), the percentage length of the debonded margins relative to the cavity periphery (DM), the width of the maximum marginal gap (MG), and the marginal index (MI = MG x DM / 100). The results were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Mann-Whitney U-test at alpha = 0.05. No incidence of gaps was found in 62.5% of One Coat Bond/Synergy and 37.5% of OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable restorations. All the other restorative systems exhibited restorations with gaps. One Coat Bond/Synergy, Scotchbond 1/Z250, and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable were the groups with the lowest DM values, while Stae/Glacier showed the highest DM values. One Coat Bond/Synergy and OptiBond Solo/Prodigy Condensable revealed the lowest MI values and Stae/Glacier the highest. No statistically significant differences were recorded between

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Composite-Resin to Porcelain: Effect of Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khoroushi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Different ceramic repair systems have been reported for fractured ceramics.However, limited information is available concerning the bond strength of these systems especially after thermocycling. The aim of this in-vitro study was to determinethe effect of thermocycling on the shear bond strength of composite-resin to feldspathic porcelain with and without silane pretreatment.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, forty porcelain blocks were prepared and randomly divided into four groups (n=10. All porcelain surfaces were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid, rinsed and air dried. In groups 1 and 3, silane pretreatment was applied using Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (ASMP.Smallparticlecomposite-resin was subsequently added on the ceramic surfaces, and lightcured.Specimens of groups 3 and 4 then subjected to 1000 thermal cycles. Shear bond strength was determined on a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Two-way ANOVA test (α=0.05 was used to analyze the bond strength.Results: There were statistically significant differences between study groups (P<0.05.Thermocycling caused a decrease in the shear bond strength for both silanized and nonsilanized groups.Conclusion: According to the results of this study, shear bond strength after thermocycling reduced considerably in ASMP system. In addition, silane treatment of porcelain was critical for achieving durable bond strength between composite-resin and porcelain.

  13. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandak, Manoj G.; Pattanaik, Navdheeraj; Das, Ayan

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC). Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE) was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE). In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE) was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch) showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05) whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0–001). Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A) in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A) as well as without application of the adhesive agent. PMID:23293476

  14. Comparative study to evaluate shear bond strength of RMGIC to composite resin using different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj G Chandak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study is to compare and evaluate the role of new dental adhesives to bond composite to the resinmodified glass inomer cement (RMGIC. Materials and Methods: Thirty specimens were prepared on acrylic blocks, with wells prepared in it by drilling holes, to retain the RMGIC. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups of ten specimens each. In Group a thin layer of selfetch adhesive (3M ESPE was applied between the RMGIC and the composite resin FILTEK P60 (3M SPE. In Group II, total etch adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2, 3M ESPE was applied, and in Group III, there was no application of any adhesive between RMGIC and the composite resin. After curing all the specimens, the shear bond strength was measured using an Instron universal testing machine. Results: The results were drawn and tabulated using ANOVA-fishers and Dunnet D statistical tests.The maximum shear bond strength values were recorded in Group I specimens with self-etch adhesive showing a mean value of 2.74 when compared to the Group II adhesive (Total etch showing a mean shear strength of value 1.89, where no adhesive was used, showed a minimum mean shear bond strength of 1.42. There was a great and significant difference between Group I and Group II (P value 0.05 whereas, both Group I and Group II showed a vast and significant difference from Group III (P value = 0-001. Conclusion: Hence, this present study concludes that application of self-etch adhesive (3M ESPE, U.S.A in between RMGIC and composite resin increases the shear bond strength between RMGIC and the resin composites, as compared to the total-etch type adhesive (Adeper Scotch bond 2,3M ESPE, U.S.A as well as without application of the adhesive agent.

  15. Strength and Mechanics of Bonded Scarf Joints for Repair of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, R. B.; Adkins, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigations of scarf joints indicate that slight bluntness of adherend tips induces adhesive stress concentrations which significantly reduce joint strength, and the stress distribution through the adhesive thickness is non-uniform and has significant stress concentrations at the ends of the joint. The laminate stacking sequence can have important effects on the adhesive stress distribution. A significant improvement in joint strength is possible by increasing overlap at the expense of raising the repair slightly above the original surface. Although a surface grinder was used to make most experimental specimens, a hand held rotary bur can make a surprisingly good scarf. Scarf joints wit doublers on one side, such as might be used for repair, bend under tensile loads and may actually be weaker than joints without doublers.

  16. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds...... @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode...... of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent...

  17. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  18. Influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of composite base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Tarek A; Garoushi, Sufyan; Abdulmajeed, Aous A; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2017-06-01

    Bulk-fill resin composites (BFCs) are gaining popularity in restorative dentistry due to the reduced chair time and ease of application. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of increment thickness on dentin bond strength and light transmission of different BFCs and a new discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite. One hundred eighty extracted sound human molars were prepared for a shear bond strength (SBS) test. The teeth were divided into four groups (n = 45) according to the resin composite used: regular particulate filler resin composite: (1) G-ænial Anterior [GA] (control); bulk-fill resin composites: (2) Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TEBF] and (3) SDR; and discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite: (4) everX Posterior [EXP]. Each group was subdivided according to increment thickness (2, 4, and 6 mm). The irradiance power through the material of all groups/subgroups was quantified (MARC® Resin Calibrator; BlueLight Analytics Inc.). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. SBS and light irradiance decreased as the increment's height increased (p composite used. EXP presented the highest SBS in 2- and 4-mm-thick increments when compared to other composites, although the differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Light irradiance mean values arranged in descending order were (p composites. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite showed the highest value of curing light transmission, which was also seen in improved bonding strength to the underlying dentin surface. Discontinuous fiber-reinforced composite can be applied safely in bulks of 4-mm increments same as other bulk-fill composites, although, in 2-mm thickness, the investigated composites showed better performance.

  19. Strength and sorption properties of cement-bonded composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boards produced with less than 30% wood content exhibited superior strength and dimensional stability properties that can be exploited in ceiling applications where sound absorption is important. Keywords: Eucalyptus, Veneer waste, Cement composite, Strength, dimensional stability. Journal of Applied Science, ...

  20. Processing and properties of FeAl-bonded composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J.H.; Subramanian, R.; Alexander, K.B.; Becher, P.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1996-12-31

    Iron aluminides are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as carbides, borides, oxides, and nitrides, which makes them suitable as the matrix in composites or cermets containing fine ceramic particulates. For ceramic contents varying from 30 to 60 vol.%, composites of Fe-40 at. % Al with WC, TiC, TiB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2} were fabricated by conventional liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures. For ceramic contents from 70 to 85 vol.%, pressureless melt infiltration was found to be a more suitable processing technique. In FeAl-60 vol.% WC, flexure strengths of up to 1.8 GPa were obtained, even though processing defects consisting of small oxide clusters were present. Room temperature fracture toughnesses were determined by flexure testing of chevron-notched specimens. FeAl/WC and FeAl/TiC composites containing 60 vol.% carbide particles exhibited K{sub Q} values around 20 MPa m{sup 1/2}. Slow crack growth measurements carried out in water and in dry oxygen suggest a relatively small influence of water-vapor embrittlement. It appears therefore that the mechanical properties of iron aluminides in the form of fine ligaments are quite different from their bulk properties. Measurements of the oxidation resistance, dry wear resistance, and thermal expansion of iron aluminide composites suggest many potential applications for these new materials.

  1. Reliability Analysis for Adhesive Bonded Composite Stepped Lap Joints Loaded in Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a probabilistic approach to calculate the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue using three- dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A method for progressive damage modelling is used to assess fatigue damage accumulation and residual...... by the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. Finally, an approach for the assessment of the reliability of adhesive bonded composite stepped lap joints loaded in fatigue is presented. The introduced methodology can be applied in the same way to calculate the reliability level of wind turbine blade components...

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of composite resin to nonprecious metal alloys with different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassini E.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Replacing fractured ceramometal restorations may be the best treatment option, but it is costly. Many different bonding systems are currently available to repair the fractured ceramometal restorations. This study compared the shear bond strength of composite to a base metal alloy using 4 bonding systems.Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, fifty discs, casted in a Ni-Cr-Be base metal alloy (Silvercast, Fulldent,were ground with 120, 400 and 600 grit sandpaper and divided equally into 5 groups receiving 5 treatments for veneering. Conventional feldspathic porcelain (Ceramco2, Dentsply Ceramco was applied on control group (PFM or group1 and the remaining metal discs were air- abraded for 15 seconds with 50 mm aluminum oxide at 45 psi and washed for 5 seconds under tap water.Then the specimens were dried by compressed air and the  groups were treated with one of the bonding systems as follows: All-Bond 2 (AB, Ceramic Primer (CP, Metal Primer II (MP and Panavia F2 (PF. An opaque composite (Foundation opaque followed by a hybrid composite (Gradia Direct was placed on the treated metal surface and light cured separately. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 370C and thermocycled prior to shear strength testing. Fractured specimens were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis was performed with one way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance.Results: Mean shear bond strengths of the groups in MPa were as follows: PFM group 38.6±2, All-Bond 2 17.06±2.85, Ceramic Primer 14.72±1.2, Metal Primer II 19.04±2.2 and Panavia F2 21.37±2.1. PFM group exhibited the highest mean shear bond strength and Ceramic Primer showed the lowest. Tukey's HSD test revealed the mean bond strength of the PFM group to be significantly higher than the other groups (P<0.001. The data for the PF group was significantly higher than AB and CP groups (P<0.05 and the shear

  3. Microleakage and Shear Bond Strength of Composite Restorations Under Cycling Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, R F; Lungova, M; Borges, A B; Torres, Crg; Sydow, H-G; Wiegand, A

    The aim of this study was to evaluate microleakage and shear bond strength of composite restorations under different cycling conditions. Class V cavities were prepared in the buccal and lingual surfaces of 30 human molars (n=60). A further 60 molars were used to prepare flat enamel and dentin specimens (n=60 each). Cavities and specimens were divided into six groups and pretreated with an adhesive (self-etch/Clearfil SE Bond or etch-and-rinse/Optibond FL). Composite was inserted in the cavities or adhered to the specimens' surfaces, respectively, and submitted to cycling (control: no cycling; thermal cycling: 10,000 cycles, 5°C to 55°C; thermal/erosive cycling: thermal cycling plus storage in hydrochloric acid pH 2.1, 5 minutes, 6×/day, 8 days). Microleakage was quantified by stereomicroscopy in enamel and dentin margins after immersion in silver nitrate. Specimens were submitted to shear bond strength testing. Statistical analysis was done by two-way analysis of variance and Kruskal-Wallis tests (pcycling or thermal/erosive cycling. Erosive conditions increased microleakage compared with thermal cycling (significant only for Clearfil SE Bond). No significant differences were observed in dentin margins. Bond strength of enamel specimens was reduced by thermal cycling and thermal/erosive cycling when Clearfil SE Bond was used and only by thermal/erosive cycling when Optibond FL was used. No differences were observed among dentin specimens. Thermal/erosive cycling can adversely affect microleakage and shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to enamel.

  4. Bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin core: influence of temperature on silane coupling agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Simamotos Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Rontani, Regina Maria Puppin; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air drying temperature and different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and composite resin core. The post surface was cleaned with alcohol and treated with different silane coupling agents, being three prehydrolyzed silanes [Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE)] and one two-component silane [Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply)]. Two post-silanization air drying temperatures, 23ºC and 60ºC, were applied. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the silanized post and filled with composite resin. Each bonded post provided 7 slices for push-out testing. Each slice was loaded to failure under compression at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott tests (α=0.05). Dunnett's test was used to compare the mean of the control group with that of each experimental group. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured slices. For the 23ºC air drying temperature, the use of RelyX Ceramic Primer resulted in significantly lower bond strength than the other silane coupling agents, while the bond strength with Silane Coupling Agent was the highest of all groups. Only with Silane Coupling Agent, the bond strength for the 23ºC air drying temperature was significantly higher than that for 60ºC air drying. In conclusion, the use of warm air drying after silane application produced no increase in the bond strength between the fiber-reinforced composite post and the composite core. The two-component silane produced higher bond strength than all prehydrolyzed silanes when it was used with air drying at room temperature.

  5. The effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength to dentin with different adhesion protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOOHPEIMA Fatemeh

    Full Text Available Abstract In Dentistry, restorative materials and oral bacteria are believed to be responsible for restoration failure. To make long-lasting restorations, antibacterial agents should be made. Inorganic nanoparticles and their nano composites are applied as good antibacterial agents. Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength using one etch and rinse and one self-etch adhesive systems. Material and Methods Silver nanoparticles were prepared. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the structure of the particles. Nanoparticles were applied on exposed dentin and then different adhesives and composites were applied. All samples were tested by universal testing machine and shear bond strength was assesed. Results Particles with average diameter of about 20 nm and spherical shape were found. Moreover, it was shown that pretreatment by silver nanoparticles enhanced shear bond strength in both etch and rinse, and in self-etch adhesive systems (p≤0.05. Conclusions Considering the positive antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles, using them is recommended in restorative dentistry. It seems that silver nanoparticles could have positive effects on bond strength of both etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. The best results of silver nanoparticles have been achieved with Adper Single Bond and before acid etching.

  6. Supersonic Retropulsion Surface Preparation of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Epoxy Composites for Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Frank L.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Blohowiak, Kay Y.; Connell, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Surface preparation is widely recognized as a key step to producing robust and predictable bonds in a precise and reproducible manner. Standard surface preparation techniques, including grit blasting, manual abrasion, and peel ply, can lack precision and reproducibility, which can lead to variation in surface properties and subsequent bonding performance. The use of a laser to ablate composite surface resin can provide an efficient, precise, and reproducible means of preparing composite surfaces for adhesive bonding. Advantages include elimination of physical waste (i.e., grit media and sacrificial peel ply layers that ultimately require disposal), reduction in process variability due to increased precision (e.g. increased reproducibility), and automation of surface preparation, all of which improve reliability and process control. This paper describes a Nd:YAG laser surface preparation technique for composite substrates and the mechanical performance and failure modes of bonded laminates thus prepared. Additionally, bonded specimens were aged in a hot, wet environment for approximately one year and subsequently mechanically tested. The results of a one year hygrothermal aging study will be presented.

  7. Use of diffusion bonded SS-Al composite material in the development of neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alex, Mary; Prasad, K.R.; Pappachan, A.L.; Grover, A.K.; Krishnan, J.; Derose, D.J.; Bhanumurthy, K.; Kale, G.B.

    2005-01-01

    The present paper describes the development of a SS-Al composite plate in-house at BARC by diffusion bonding technique. Details of the several tests carried out on the composite material and the use of the plate in the development of a boron lined neutron chamber for Dhruva reactor control instrumentation has been described. The bonded sample has withstood tensile strength test, leak test and thermal cycling test and the leak rate was observed to be less than 3 x 10 -10 stdcc/sec. The chamber with the composite material has been installed in Dhruva Basket C location and connected to the log rate safety channel. It has been working successfully for the past two years. The use of SS-Al composite material has improved the reliability and long-term performance of the detector. (author)

  8. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  9. Effect of three porcelain etchants type (HF-APF-PHA on porcelain- composite shear bond strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermanshah H.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Porcelain restorations are susceptible to fracture and a common method for repairing is the use of silane and composite on etched porcelain. Although HF is very effective in porcelain etching but has detrimental effects on tissues. Purpose: In this study, the effect of APF and PHA was compared with HF in porcelain etching. Also the role of silane, unfilled resin and dentin bonding in bond strength of composite- porcelain was evaluated. Methods and Materials: In this experimental in-vitro study, one-hundred twenty porcelain square blocks (552 mm were prepared and bonding surfaces of each sandblasted. Samples were divided into three groups. The first group (n=40 were etched with buffered HF 9.5% (Ultradent for 1 min., the second group (n=40 were etched with Iranian APF 1.23% (Kimia for 10 minutes and the third group (n=40 were etched with Iranian PHA 37% (Kimia for 1 min. Ultradent silane was applied on the surfaces of half of cases in each group. On the surfaces of half of silane-treated samples unfilled resin was applied and dentin bonding was used on the surfaces of the remaining. Samples without silane were treated in a similar manner. Composite cylinder with 4mm diameter and 2 mm height was bonded to porcelain. Specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to 500 cycles. Shear bond strength was measured with an Instron machine and type of fracture was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results were analyzed using 3 way ANOVA, Kaplan- Maier and Tukey HSD tests. Results: Findings showed that PHA and APF roughened the porcelain surface without creating retentive micro undercuts but HF etches porcelain and creates retentive microundercuts. Ultradent silane had no significant effect on bond strength of porcelain- composite. Unfilled resin with Ultradent silane compared with dentin bonding with the same silane is more effective in bond strength of composite- porcelain. Conclusion: Based on

  10. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, R.L.; Shell, T.E.

    1985-05-20

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500/sup 0/C in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850/sup 0/ to 950/sup 0/C in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  11. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Liu, Jinsong; Zhu, Jianguo; Ye, Yongmei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Zhiqing

    2008-11-01

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed.

  12. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qi [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Liu Jinsong [School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Zhu Jianguo [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Ye Yongmei [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Li Xiang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Chen Zhiqing [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, West China Stomatology Hospital, West China College of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)], E-mail: liuy365@163.com

    2008-11-15

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed.

  13. Piezoelectric and bonding properties of a cement-based composite for dental application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi; Liu Jinsong; Zhu Jianguo; Ye Yongmei; Li Xiang; Chen Zhiqing

    2008-01-01

    A cement-based piezoelectric composite was introduced as real-time health monitoring systems to dentin. Lithium sodium potassium niobate and zinc polycarboxylate cement were mixed and made piezoelectric under different poling conditions. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope confirmed the component and microstructure of the cement. The bonding force of the composites was compared to that of pure cement by analysis of variance. The optimum poling method was determined and the influencing factors of piezoelectric coefficient were discussed

  14. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants - SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05. On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred.

  15. An Experimental Investigation of Silicone-to-Metal Bond Strength in Composite Space Docking System Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing a new universal docking mechanism for future space exploration missions called the Low Impact Docking System (LIDS). A candidate LIDS main interface seal design is a composite assembly of silicone elastomer seals vacuum molded into grooves in an electroless nickel plated aluminum retainer. The strength of the silicone-tometal bond is a critical consideration for the new system, especially due to the presence of small areas of disbond created during the molding process. In the work presented herein, seal-to-retainer bonds of subscale seal specimens with different sizes of intentional disbond were destructively tensile tested. Nominal specimens without intentional disbonds were also tested. Tension was applied either uniformly on the entire seal circumference or locally in one short circumferential length. Bond failure due to uniform tension produced a wide scatter of observable failure modes and measured load-displacement behaviors. Although the preferable failure mode for the seal-to-retainer bond is cohesive failure of the elastomer material, the dominant observed failure mode under the uniform loading condition was found to be the less desirable adhesive failure of the bond in question. The uniform tension case results did not show a correlation between disbond size and bond strength. Localized tension was found to produce failure either as immediate tearing of the elastomer material outside the bond region or as complete peel-out of the seal in one piece. The obtained results represent a valuable benchmark for comparison in the future between adhesion loads under various separation conditions and composite seal bond strength.

  16. The internal bond and shear strength of hardwood veneered particleboard composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    P. Chow; J.J. Janowiak; E.W. Price

    1986-01-01

    The effects of several accelerated aging tests and weather exposures on hardwood reconstituted structural composite panels were evaluated. The results indicated that the internal bond and shear by tension loading strength reductions of the panels were affected by the exposure test method. The ranking of the effects of various exposure tests on strength values in an...

  17. Phosphate-bonded ceramic–wood composites : R&D project overview and invitation to participate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore L. Laufenberg; Matt Aro

    2004-01-01

    We are developing chemically bonded ceramic phosphate binders for the production of biofiber-based composite materials. These binders promise to have better processing and properties than some current cement and polymer resin binder systems. The ceramic phosphate binders (termed Ceramicrete), if used in place of cement and polymers, will significantly reduce the...

  18. Adhesive Properties of Bonded Orthodontic Retainers to Enamel : Stainless Steel Wire vs Fiber-reinforced Composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foek, Dave Lie Sam; Krebs, Eliza; Sandham, John; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to compare the bond strength of a stainless steel orthodontic wire vs various fiber-reinforced composites (FRC) used as orthodontic retainers on enamel, analyze the failure types after debonding, and investigate the influence of different application

  19. Influence of proximal box elevation on bond strength of composite inlays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva Gonçalves, Dayana; Cura, María; Ceballos, Laura; Fuentes, Mª Victoria

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of proximal box elevation on microtensile bond strength (mTBS) of composite inlays to the proximal box floor, using either a total-etch or a self-adhesive resin cement. Twenty-five human molars were selected, and a class II OM (inlay) cavity preparation was performed in each tooth. Cavities were randomly assigned into four experimental groups, according to the location of the proximal cervical margin (located 1 mm below cementoenamel junction (CEJ), or with proximal box elevation with composite resin) and the resin cement used for luting (a total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC or a self-adhesive resin cement G-Cem). After 1-week water storage, samples were subjected to mTBS test. Results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p inlays for both resin cements. However, only for G-Cem was this improvement statistically significant. The proximal box elevation improved the bond strength attained by G-Cem resin cement. For RelyX ARC, the position of the cervical margin did not affect composite inlays bond strength. Proximal box elevation does not decline bond strength of composite inlays to the proximal floor when a total-etch or a self-adhesive resin cement is used.

  20. Temperature effect on the static behaviour of adhesively-bonded metal skin to composite stiffener

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira De Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of temperature on the static behavior of an hybrid structure consisting of adhesively bonded Fiber Metal Laminate skin to a composite stiffener. This hybrid structure was tested using stiffener pull-off tests, which is a typical set-up used to

  1. Bond strength durability of a resin composite on a reinforced ceramic using various repair systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Amaral, Regina; Leite, Fabiola; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the durability of repair bond strength of a resin composite to a reinforced ceramic after three repair systems. Methods. Alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitadur-alpha(R)) (N=30) were randomly divided into three groups according to the repair method:

  2. Monomer priming of denture teeth and its effects on the bond strength of composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Leila; Matinlinna, Jukka P; Tolvanen, Mimmi; Lassila, Lippo V; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-08-01

    The bond strength of acrylic resin denture teeth used as pontics in fiber-reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses needs to be improved. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various chemical surface-conditioning monomers on the ridge-lap surface of acrylic resin denture teeth by determining the strength of their bonding to a composite resin and changes in surface hardness. Acrylic resin denture teeth of 2 different brands (Artic 8 and Vitapan Cuspiform) (n=120) were tested. Four monomer systems were used as surface primers (conditioning): a flowable composite resin, methylmethacrylate 99%, composite primer, and a photopolymerizable dimethacrylate resin. Five surface-conditioning exposure times were used: no conditioning, 1, 5, 15, and 60 minutes. Surface microhardness measurements were made after the application of the monomer systems. Shear bond strength tests were subsequently performed, followed by a new surface microhardness indentation after the application of the load. The evaluation of the changes on specimen surfaces was performed with a scanning electron microscope. The differences between the shear bond strength and the surface hardness were evaluated for statistical significance by using a 3-way ANOVA. Tooth brand, monomer used, exposure time, and their 2- and 3-way interactions had a significant effect on the shear bond strength and hardness before and after testing, except for the 3-way interaction effect on hardness before testing. The chemical pretreatment of the ridge-lap surface of acrylic resin denture teeth increased the shear bond strength and influenced the surface hardness. The monomer systems caused dissolution on the denture surfaces. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: a microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popoff, Daniela Araújo Veloso; Gonçalves, Fabiana Santos; Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira; Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Mjör, Ivar A

    2011-01-01

    Total replacement is the most common technique for defective amalgam restorations, and it represents a major part of restorative dental treatment. Repair is an alternative option for amalgam restorations with localized defects. This study compared microleakage of amalgam restorations repaired by bonded amalgam or composite resin. Thirty extracted human pre-molars were prepared and restored with class I amalgam. A simulated defect was prepared that included the cavosurface margin on restorations, and the pre-molars were assigned to two treatment groups (n=15): In group 1, premolars were treated by composite resin (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Adper Single Bond 2 + Z100) and in group 2, premolars were repaired by bonded amalgam (34% Tooth Conditioner Gel + Prime and Bond 2.1 + Permite C). The teeth were immersed in a 50% silver nitrate solution, thermocycled, sectioned longitudinally and then observed by three examiners using a stereomicroscope. Microleakage was evaluated using a 0-4 scale for dye penetration, and data was analyzed by Kruskal Wallis and Dunn tests. Neither of the two methods eliminated microleakage completely. Composite resin was significantly the most effective for repair/tooth interface sealing (score 0 = 80.0%; P=0.0317). For the repair/restoration interface, composite resin was also statistically more effective as a sealant (score 0=66%; P=0.0005) when compared to the bonded amalgam technique (score 0=13%; P=0.0005). The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  4. Bonding of composites in different industries; Collage des composites dans diverses industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognard, Ph. [societe Bostik Findley, La Defense 2, 92 (France)

    2005-03-01

    The walls of vanes of wind-mills are generally carried out in bonded sandwich materials. The interior tighteners can be bonded too to the exterior panels. For these bonding, epoxides or polyurethanes with two components hardening at ambient temperature, at high mechanical resistance and great durability are used. For the bonds of vanes on the turbine, the vanes are bonded on metallic rings with special epoxide adhesives, with two components, able to support high stresses, having a shear resistance of 30 MPa, a very good fatigue resistance for supporting a lot of turns under alternated bending stresses. These wind-mills have to support service temperature of -40 C to +80 C. (O.M.)

  5. Effect of surface conditioning methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to composite after aging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Barbosa, Silvia Helena; Melo, Renata Marques; Galhano, Graziela Avila Prado; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of two different surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a bis-GMA-adduct/bis-EMA/TEGDMA based resin composite after three aging conditions. Thirty-six composite resin blocks (Esthet X, Dentsply) were prepared (5 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm) and randomly assigned into three groups for aging process: (a) immersion in citric acid (pH 3.0 at 37 degrees C, 1 week) (CA); (b) boiling in water for 8h (BW) and (c) thermocycling (x5000, 5-55 degrees C, dwell time: 30s) (TC). After aging, the blocks were assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) silica coating (30 microm SiO(x)) (CoJet, 3M ESPE)+silane (ESPE-Sil) (CJ), (2) phosphoric acid+adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M ESPE) (PA). Resin composite (Esthet.X) was bonded to the conditioned substrates incrementally and light polymerized. The experimental groups formed were as follows: Gr1:CA+PA; Gr2:CA+CJ; Gr3:BW+PA; Gr4: BW+CJ; Gr5:TC+PA; Gr6: TC+CJ. The specimens were sectioned in two axes (x and y) with a diamond disc under coolant irrigation in order to obtain non-trimmed bar specimens (sticks, 10 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm) with 1 mm(2) of bonding area. The microtensile test was accomplished in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm min(-1)). The means and standard deviations of bond strength (MPa+/-S.D.) per group were as follows: Gr1: 25.5+/-10.3; Gr2: 46.3+/-10.1; Gr3: 21.7+/-7.1; Gr4: 52.3+/-15.1; Gr5: 16.1+/-5.1; Gr6, 49.6+/-13.5. The silica coated groups showed significantly higher mean bond values after all three aging conditions (presin-resin bond strength values compared to acid etching with phosphoric acid followed by adhesive resin applications. Thermocycling the composite substrates resulted in the lowest repair bond strength compared to citric acid challenge or boiling in water.

  6. Photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels with a double-ring sensor featuring a narrow angular aperture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, R.G.M.; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton; de Mul, F.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    A photoacoustic double-ring sensor, featuring a narrow angular aperture, is developed for laser-induced photoacoustic imaging of blood vessels. An integrated optical fiber enables reflection-mode detection of ultrasonic waves. By using the cross-correlation between the signals detected by the two

  7. Revisiting the Fully Automated Double-Ring Infiltrometer Using Open-Source Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The double-ring infiltrometer (DRI) is commonly used for measuring soil hydraulic conductivity. However, constant-head DRI tests typically involve the use of Mariotte tubes, which can be problematic to set-up, and time-consuming to maintain and monitor during infiltration tests....

  8. Enhanced resin-composite bonding to zirconia framework after pretreatment with selected silane monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P; Lassila, Lippo V

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of five experimental silane monomer primers in vitro on the shear bond strength of a phosphate ester resin-composite cement bonded to a silicatized zirconia framework. A total of 144 planar zirconia (Procera AllZircon) specimens were subjected to tribochemical silica treatment, randomly divided into 12 sub-groups (n=12), and silanized with 1.0%(v/v) activated solutions of 3-acryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, 3 glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, styrylethyltrimethoxysilane, and 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane, which had been prepared in 95% ethanol (pH 4.5). A ready-to-use 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (RelyX™ Ceramic Primer) was used as the control. One resincomposite cement (RelyX™ Unicem) stub was bonded to each silicatized and silanized zirconia specimen. Half of the specimen groups were dry-tested and half were thermo-cycled at 6000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C, with a constant dwelling time of 30s. The shear bond strengths of the cement stubs bonded to zirconia were measured using a universal testing machine using a constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min. The silane primer activation was evaluated using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The highest shear bond strength was obtained for 3-acryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane in dry storage, 11.7 MPa (SD, 2.3 MPa) and after thermo-cycling 17.6 (4.1) MPa for glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The lowest shear bond strength values were obtained with control silane: in dry storage, 4.5 (1.3) MPa, after thermo-cycling 6.5 (2.6) MPa. Thermo-cycling increased the bond strengths significantly (ANOVA, psilane (ANOVA, pSilanization with five experimental silane primers in vitro produced significantly greater shear bond strengths than the ready-to-use control silane. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stickiness of dental resin composite materials to steel, dentin and bonded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Kathrin; Graf, Alexandra; Watts, David; Schedle, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Stickiness is a vital rheological parameter for the clinical handling behavior of unset resin composite restoratives. The aim of this study was to investigate the stickiness of three different resin composites at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C tested on steel, dentin and dentin covered with different bonding agents. The stickiness instrument, used in this study consists of a vertical cylindrical stainless steel rod, with a flat circular end, and a platform with a cylindrical mold (diameter: 6.1mm, depth: 2.2mm). The test-material surface temperature and the speed of the rod can be modified. It moves slowly into the prepared mold which is filled with unset composite materials. The degree of stickiness is deducted from the height of the "elevation" the material forms when the plunger is withdrawn from the mold until the steelhead detaches itself from the composite. In this study, stickiness was tested directly to the steel plunger and to dentin slices (uncovered or covered with two different bonding agents) fixed to the plunger rod with a clamp. The coefficients of variation (CVs) were generally less than 0.10, indicating that the stickiness instrument offers an adequately reproducible way of testing stickiness. The tested composite materials varied significantly in stickiness. For all investigated materials a decrease of peak heights with increasing speed was found (for all three materials: psteel and least on bonded dentin. The order of stickiness of composites was not affected by testing the stickiness on the different materials. This method allows the characterization of composite resin materials stickiness to steel, as equivalent to dental steel instruments, and to bonded dentin as equivalent to the tooth cavity after preparation. An ideal material should have a sufficient difference between stickiness on steel and dentin so that it remains in the cavity and is not pulled back by the steel instrument.

  10. Mechanical properties and bond strength of dual-cure resin composites to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksornmuang, Juthatip; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2007-02-01

    To evaluate the regional mechanical properties of dual-cure resin composites and their regional bond strengths to root canal dentin. One of the following dual-cure resin composites was placed in artificial post spaces: Unifil Core (UC), Clearfil DC Core (DC), Build-It FR (BI), Clearfil DC Core-automix (DCA), and photo-cured for 60s. After 24h storage, each specimen was serially sliced to harvest eight hour-glass shaped specimens for measurement of regional ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and the remaining eight semi-circular slabs were polished for the measurement of Knoop Hardness Number (KHN). For the microtensile bond strength (muTBS) test, post cavities were prepared in human premolar roots, and the cavity surfaces treated with Clearfil SE Bond and photo-cured for 10s. The post spaces were then filled with one of the above resin composites and photo-cured for 60s. After 24h storage, each specimen was serially sliced into 8, 0.6x0.6 mm-thick beams for the muTBS test. The data were divided into coronal and apical regions and analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc test (alpha=0.05). UTS and KHN were affected by the type of dual-cure resin composite and region (presin composite possessed superior UTS to that of the hand-mix type. muTBS among the four composite materials were not significantly different at both apical and coronal regions (p>0.05). Regional differences in bond strengths were found for all materials (presin composites varied among each material, however, differences in the mechanical properties of the resin core materials did not affect their adhesion to root canal dentin.

  11. The effect of surface conditioning on the bond strength of resin composite to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Igor R; Hafiana, Khaula; Curtis, Andrew; Barbour, Michele E; Attin, Thomas; Lynch, Christopher D; Jagger, Daryll C

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface, using commercially available restoration repair systems. One hundred and sixty Gamma 2 amalgam specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 2 weeks and then randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning groups (n=20/group): Group 1: air abrasion, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 2: air abrasion and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 3: air abrasion and 'All-Bond 3', Group 4: diamond bur, alloy primer and 'Panavia 21', Group 5: diamond bur and 'Amalgambond Plus', Group 6: diamond bur and 'All-Bond 3', Group 7: silica coating technique, and Group 8: non-conditioned amalgam surfaces (control group). Subsequently, resin composite material was added to the substrate surfaces and the amalgam-resin composite specimens were subjected to TBS testing. Representative samples from the test groups were subjected to scanning electron microscopy and surface profilometry. The data was analysed statistically with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's tests (α=0.05). The mean TBS of amalgam-resin composite ranged between 1.34 and 5.13MPa and varied with the degree of amalgam surface roughness and the type of conditioning technique employed. Significantly highest TBS values (5.13±0.96MPa) were obtained in Group 1 (p=0.013). Under the tested conditions, significantly greater tensile bond strength of resin composite to amalgam was achieved when the substrate surface was conditioned by air abrasion followed by the application of the Panavia 21 adhesive system. Effecting a repair of an amalgam restoration with resin composite via the use of air abrasion and application of Panavia 21 would seem to enhance the integrity of the amalgam-resin composite interface. Clinical trials involving the implementation of this technique are indicated to determine the usefulness of this technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All

  12. Repair bond strength of nanohybrid composite resins with a universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinci, Pinar; Mutluay, Murat; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the repair bond strength of fresh and aged nanohybrid and hybrid composite resins using a universal adhesive (UA). Materials and methods: Fresh and aged substrates were prepared using two nanohybrid (Venus Pearl, Heraus Kulzer; Filtek Supreme XTE, 3 M ESPE) and one hybrid (Z100, 3 M ESPE) composite resin, and randomly assigned to different surface treatments: (1) no treatment (control), (2) surface roughening with 320-grit (SR), (3) SR + UA (iBOND, Heraus Kulzer), (4) SR + Silane (Signum, Ceramic Bond I, Heraeus Kulzer) + UA, (5) SR + Sandblasting (CoJet, 3 M ESPE) + Silane + UA. After surface treatment, fresh composite resin was added to the substrates at 2 mm layer increments to a height of 5 mm, and light cured. Restored specimens were water-stored for 24 h and sectioned to obtain 1.0 × 1.0 mm beams ( n  = 12), and were either water-stored for 24 h at 37 °C, or water-stored for 24 h, and then thermocycled for 6000 cycles before microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests ( p  = .05). Results: Combined treatment of SR, sandblasting, silane and UA provided repair bond strength values comparable to the cohesive strength of each tested resin material ( p  composite resins upto 65% ( p  composite repair. Sandblasting and silane application slightly increases the repair strength for all substrate types.

  13. Are flowable resin-based composites a reliable material for metal orthodontic bracket bonding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Bárbara; Rosa, Vinícius; Azeredo, Tatiana Rocha; Cruz Filho, Eduardo Augusto Mascarenhas; Miranda, Walter Gomes

    2010-07-01

    To compare the tensile bond strength (TBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of three flowable resin-based composites and three orthodontic adhesive systems for metal bracket bonding. Sixty bovine incisors were randomly divided into six groups. Enamel surfaces were etched with 37 percent phosphoric acid for 30 seconds and stainless steel orthodontic brackets were bonded using either flowable resin-based composites (3M Flow, FL; Tetric Flow, TF; and Wave, WA) or orthodontic bonding systems (Transbond XT, TX; Concise Orthodontic, CO; Fill Magic Ortodôntico, FM). All specimens were thermal cycled and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were subsequently tested for TBS using a universal testing machine. ARI scores were determined after the failure of brackets. TBS and ARI data were submitted to ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskal-Wallis tests (p=0.05), respectively. Rankings of the resin-based composites based on TBS means (MPa) were TX (6.4 ± 2.1), followed by CO (4.5 ± 2.7), FM (3.7 ± 1.2), FL (3.6 ± 1.2), TF (3.3 ± 1.2), and WA (2.4 ± 0.6). CO exhibited the lowest ARI mean score (0.9 ± 1.2) which was significantly different from the other five materials: TX (2.8 ± 0.42), FM (2.8 ± 0.42), FL (2.9 ± 0.32), TF (2.9 ± 0.32), and WA (3.0 ± 0.01). However, there were no statistically significant differences among the other groups with mean scores of 2.8-3.0. A score of 3.0 indicated that all the resin remained bonded to the tooth surface. The flowable resin-based composites tested (Fl, TF, and WA) used to bond metal orthodontic brackets to bovine enamel had low mean TBS values but acceptable ARI mean scores. Flowable composites may not be appropriate for bracket bonding, unless the teeth to be bonded are not subjected to higher orthodontic stresses, such as those without an antagonist.

  14. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, A R; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode. In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent; Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) were stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. The specimens were then either immediately subjected to shear bond strength testing or subjected to artificial aging (6,000 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C baths) prior to testing. Failure modes were also assessed. The shear bond strengths were submitted to factorial analysis of variance, and the failure modes were submitted to a Chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). All but power density (curing mode, resin composite material and mode of aging) significantly affected shear bond strength. The curing mode and resin composite material also influenced the failure mode. At the selected constant energy density, pulse-delay curing reduced bonding of the resin composite to dentin.

  15. The effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength to dentin with different adhesion protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemeh, Koohpeima; Mohammad Javad, Mokhtari; Samaneh, Khalafi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silver nanoparticles on composite shear bond strength using one etch and rinse and one self-etch adhesive systems. Silver nanoparticles were prepared. Transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the structure of the particles. Nanoparticles were applied on exposed dentin and then different adhesives and composites were applied. All samples were tested by universal testing machine and shear bond strength was assesed. Particles with average diameter of about 20 nm and spherical shape were found. Moreover, it was shown that pretreatment by silver nanoparticles enhanced shear bond strength in both etch and rinse, and in self-etch adhesive systems (p≤0.05). Considering the positive antibacterial effects of silver nanoparticles, using them is recommended in restorative dentistry. It seems that silver nanoparticles could have positive effects on bond strength of both etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. The best results of silver nanoparticles have been achieved with Adper Single Bond and before acid etching.

  16. Adhesive Bonding Techniques in Hybrid Structures Made from Fibre Reinforced Polymeric Composites and Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Oltean

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical joining techniques are used in construction industry all over the world on a daily basis. A further method of joining has proven to be highly successful – adhesive bonding. Known for thousands of years, adhesive bonding has become as important as other joining techniques as a result of the pace of developments in recent years. In many areas, this bonding technology has become a key technology. Virtually, all solid materials can be connected with one another using adhesives. Although bonding fibre reinforced polymeric composites to the concrete substrate is a relatively simple technique, the proper installation of the fibre reinforced polymeric composites is essential to ensure the adequate performance of the hybrid system. Since the installation procedures differ from one system to another, appropriate specifications will be clearly presented. The paper will include requirements to provide a quality joint assembly, meaning the special pre-treatments of the concrete surface. The material to be bonded is cleaned and prepared so that adhesives can adhere better to them.

  17. A study on the compatibility between one-bottle dentin adhesives and composite resins using micro-shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Shin, Yooseok; Park, Jeong-Won; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed to determine whether the combined use of one-bottle self-etch adhesives and composite resins from same manufacturers have better bond strengths than combinations of adhesive and resins from different manufacturers. 25 experimental micro-shear bond test groups were made from combinations of five dentin adhesives and five composite resins with extracted human molars stored in saline for 24 hr. Testing was performed using the wire-loop method and a universal testing machine. Bond strength data was statistically analyzed using two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test. Two way ANOVA revealed significant differences for the factors of dentin adhesives and composite resins, and significant interaction effect (p composite resin (p composite resin than other manufacturer's composite resin. Not all combinations of adhesive and composite resin by same manufacturers failed to show significantly higher bond strengths than mixed manufacturer combinations.

  18. The cryogenic bonding evaluation at the metallic-composite interface of a composite overwrapped pressure vessel with additional impact investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Eric A.

    A bonding evaluation that investigated the cryogenic tensile strength of several different adhesives/resins was performed. The test materials consisted of 606 aluminum test pieces adhered to a wet-wound graphite laminate in order to simulate the bond created at the liner-composite interface of an aluminum-lined composite overwrapped pressure vessel. It was found that for cryogenic applications, a flexible, low modulus resin system must be used. Additionally, the samples prepared with a thin layer of cured resin -- or prebond -- performed significantly better than those without. It was found that it is critical that the prebond surface must have sufficient surface roughness prior to the bonding application. Also, the aluminum test pieces that were prepared using a surface etchant slightly outperformed those that were prepared with a grit blast surface finish and performed significantly better than those that had been scored using sand paper to achieve the desired surface finish. An additional impact investigation studied the post impact tensile strength of composite rings in a cryogenic environment. The composite rings were filament wound with several combinations of graphite and aramid fibers and were prepared with different resin systems. The rings were subjected to varying levels of Charpy impact damage and then pulled to failure in tension. It was found that the addition of elastic aramid fibers with the carbon fibers mitigates the overall impact damage and drastically improves the post-impact strength of the structure in a cryogenic environment.

  19. Environmental Aging of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M Structural Adhesive in Composite to Composite Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tan-Hung; Miner, Gilda A.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Connell, John W.; Baughman, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites have found increased usage in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance is not well established. In this study, adhesive bonds were prepared by the secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminate. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of single-lap-shear (SLS) specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The aging results of strength retention and failure modes to date are reported.

  20. [Is amalgam stained dentin a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtanus, J D

    2016-06-01

    After the removal of amalgam restorations, black staining of dentin is often observed, which is attributed to the penetration of corrosion products from amalgam. A study was carried out to determine whether this amalgam stained dentin is a proper substrate for bonding resin composites. A literature study and an in vitro study showed that Sn and Zn in particular are found in amalgam stained dentin, and this was the case only in demineralised dentin. In vitro, demineralised dentin acted as porte d'entrÈe for amalgam corrosion products. Bond strength tests with 5 adhesive strategies showed no differences between bond strengths to amalgam stained and to sound dentin, but did show different failure types. A clinical study showed good survival of extensive cusp replacing resin composite restorations. No failures were attributed to inadequate adhesion. It is concluded that staining of dentin by amalgam corrosion products has no negative effect upon bond strength of resin composite. It is suggested that Sn and Zn may have a beneficial effect upon dentin, thus compensating the effects of previous carious attacks, preparation trauma and physico-chemical challenges during clinical lifetime.

  1. Pulse Current Assisted TLP Bonding of SiCP/Al Composites Sheet Using Powders Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Bo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The powders interlayer was applied for transient liquid phase (TLP bonding of SiCp/Al composites using pulse current heating. Pulse current got though the joint with powder interlayer and generated the effect of Joule heat and spark plasma sintering to achieve the TLP bonding of SiCp/Al composites sheet. The results show that there is the good TLP bonded joint without defects under the conditions of vacuum:1.39×103 Pa; Pulse current density: 115 A/mm2; holding time: 15-60 min; original pressure: 0.5 MPa. The results reveal the dense joint without pores composed of the Al-based solid solution, pure Ti zone, Al2Cu, and Al3Ti intermetallic phase. Furthermore, the thermal and isothermal effects of pulse current on in situ synthesis of TLP bonded joints of SiCp/Al composites using mixed Al-Cu-Ti powder interlayer are analyzed and discussed. According to microstructure of joint, pulse current promote to in situ form the intermetallic compound, which can provide higher mechanical properties of joint.

  2. Evaluation of flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of composite repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, T A; Gray, T; DeLatour, F; Boxx, C; Best, A M; Moon, P C

    2014-01-01

    Repairing composite restorations may be a more conservative treatment than replacing the entire restoration. The objective of this in vitro study was to determine the best repair method by measuring flexural, diametral tensile, and shear bond strength of repaired composites in which the surfaces were treated with chemical primers (Add & Bond or Silane Bond Enhancer), a bonding agent (Optibond Solo Plus [OBSP]), or mechanical retention with a bonding agent. Filtek Supreme Ultra shade B1B was placed in special molds to fabricate specimens that served to test the flexural, diametral tensile, or shear strength of the inherent resin substrate. The same molds were modified to make specimens for testing repair strength of the resin. Repairs were made immediately or after aging in deionized water at 37°C for seven days. All repair sites were finished with coarse Sof-Lex discs to simulate finishing new restorations or partially removing aged restorations. Repair surfaces were treated with one of the following: 1) phosphoric-acid etching and OBSP; 2) Add & Bond; 3) phosphoric-acid etching, Silane Bond Enhancer, and OBSP; or 4) quarter round bur, phosphoric-acid etching, and OBSP. Specimens were placed back in the original molds to fabricate specimens for diametral tensile or flexural testing or in an Ultradent jig to make specimens for shear bond testing. Composite resin in shade B5B was polymerized against the treated surfaces to make repairs. Two negative control groups for the three testing methods consisted of specimens in which repairs were made immediately or after aging without any surface treatments. Controls and experimental repairs were aged (water 37°C, 24 hours) before flexural, diametral tensile, or shear testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Experimental flexural repair strengths ranged from 26.4% to 88.6% of the inherent substrate strength. Diametral tensile repair strengths ranged from 40% to 80% of the inherent

  3. Identification of parameters of cohesive elements for modeling of adhesively bonded joints of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottner R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adhesively bonded joints can be numerically simulated using the cohesive crack model. The critical strain energy release rate and the critical opening displacement are the parameters which must be known when cohesive elements in MSC.Marc software are used. In this work, the parameters of two industrial adhesives Hunstman Araldite 2021 and Gurit Spabond 345 for bonding of epoxy composites are identified. Double Cantilever Beam (DCB and End Notched Flexure (ENF test data were used for the identification. The critical opening displacements were identified using an optimization algorithm where the tests and their numerical simulations were compared.

  4. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Litong, E-mail: guolitong810104@163.com [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); ustralian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Baoe [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai [China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO{sub 2} content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO{sub 2} content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity. - Highlights: • Surface roughness of Ti was increased by surface modification of Ti. • Corrosion resistance was enhanced by surface modification of Ti. • Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti by sol–gel process. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were added into the coating to avoid formation of cracks. • The nano-composite coatings increased the bonding strength of about 24%.

  5. The effect of different surface treatments of stainless steel crown and different bonding agents on shear bond strength of direct composite resin veneer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajami B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stainless steel crown (SSC is the most durable and reliable restoration for primary teeth with extensive caries but its metalic appearance has always been a matter of concern. With advances in restorative materials and metal bonding processes, composite veneer has enhanced esthetics of these crowns in clinic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of SSC to composite resin using different surface treatments and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 90 stainless steel crowns were selected. They were mounted in molds and divided into 3 groups of 30 each (S, E and F. In group S (sandblast, buccal surfaces were sandblasted for 5 seconds. In group E (etch acidic gel was applied for 5 minutes and in group F (fissure bur surface roughness was created by fissure diamond bur. Each group was divided into 3 subgroups (SB, AB, P based on different adhesives: Single Bond, All Bond2 and Panavia F. Composite was then bonded to specimens. Cases were incubated in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was measured by Zwick machine with crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA test with p0.05 so the two variables were studied separately. No significant difference was observed in mean shear bond strength of composite among the three kinds of adhesives (P>0.05. Similar results were obtained regarding surface treatments (P>0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, treating the SSC surface with bur and using single bond adhesive and composite can be used successfully to obtain esthetic results in pediatric restorative treatments.

  6. Application of continual annealing and roll bonding (CAR) process for manufacturing Al–Zn multilayered composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehsorkhi, Reza Nasiri; Qods, Fathallah; Tajally, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CAR process was performed on Al–Zn composite. ► Good bonding between layers was achieved by increasing the number of CAR cycles. ► With increasing number of cycles, a good distribution of Zn fragmentations was achieved. ► The composites which were produced by CAR process, possess a higher tensile strength and elongation than ARB process. ► By EDX analysis it is proved that Al and Zn atoms would diffuse with each other. - Abstract: In this study, an aluminium–zinc composite was produced for the first time by using a continual annealing and roll-bonding (CAR) process. A composite with homogeneous distribution of fragmented zinc layers in aluminium matrix was produced after ten CAR cycles. The results demonstrate that tensile strength of the final composites increases up to 410 MPa, which is about 4 times higher than those of initial aluminium and zinc sheets. However, elongation of the composite reduced down to 4% after ten CAR cycles. The fracture surfaces of the tensile samples were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate the failure mode. Observations reveal that the failure mode in CAR-processed composites is a typical ductile fracture which shows deep dimples in samples with few CAR cycles, while the failure mode was shear ductile fracture with shallow and elongated dimples in samples with ten CAR cycles.

  7. Effects of different cavity disinfectants on shear bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Soley; Yazici, A Ruya; Gorucu, Jale; Ertan, Atilla; Pala, Kansad; Ustun, Yakup; Antonson, Sibel A; Antonson, Donald E

    2011-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of different cavity disinfection agents on bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite. Thirty-six caries-free human third mandibular molars sectioned in mesio-distal direction were mounted in acrylic resin with their flat dentin surfaces exposed. After the dentin surfaces were wet ground with # 600 silicon carbide paper, the teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups of 12 each according to the cavity disinfection agents; chlorhexidine (CHX); sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), propolis, ozone, Er,Cr:YSGG laser and no treatment (control). After treatment of dentin surfaces with one of these cavity disinfection agents, Filtek Silorane adhesive system was applied. The silorane-based resin composite, Filtek Silorane was condensed into a mold and polymerized. After storage at 37°C for 24 hours, the specimens were tested in shear mode at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups (p>0.05). The use of the tested cavity disinfection agents, chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, propolis, ozone and Er,Cr:YSGG laser did not significantly affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite, filtek supreme. Cavity disinfectant applications did not affect the dentin bond strength of a silorane-based resin composite.

  8. The Role of Hydrogen Bonds Of The Azeotropic Hydrous Ethanol Fuel Composition To The Exhaust Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Suarta, I.; Nyoman Gede Baliarta, I.; Sopan Rahtika, I. P. G.; Wijaya Sunu, Putu

    2018-01-01

    In this study observed the role of hydrogen bonding to the composition of exhaust emissions which is produced hydrous ethanol fuel (95.5% v). Testing is done by using single cylinder four stroke motor engine. The composition of exhaust gas emissions is tested using exhaust gas analyzer on lean and stoichiometry mixer. The exhaust emissions produced by anhydrous ethanol were also tested. The composition of emissions produced by that two fuels is compared. The results showed CO emissions levels produced by hydrous ethanol are slightly higher than anhydrous ethanol in stoichiometric mixtures. But the composition of CO hydrous ethanol emissions is lower in the lean mix. If lean the mixer the different in the composition of emissions is increasing. On hydrous ethanol emission CO2 content little bit lower on the stoichiometric mixer and higher on the lean mixture. Exhaust emissions of ethanol fuel also produce O2. O2 hydrous ethanol emissions is higher than anhydrous ethanol fuel.

  9. Influence of bonding layer on effective electromechanical properties of macro-fiber composites (MFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasa Prasath, S.; Arockiarajan, A.

    2014-09-01

    An analytical model based on an equivalent layered approach using iso-field assumptions is proposed to find the effect of bonding layers on the effective properties of macro-fiber composites (MFCs). To account for the interdigitated electrode pattern and geometric (shape and position) properties, a finite element analysis is carried out using the representative volume element (RVE) method. The simulated results based on the proposed analytical and numerical models are compared and validated with the data available from the manufacturer and a mixing rules model available in the literature. Experiments are performed on MFCs under pure electrical loading to measure a few coupling constants and the results are compared with simulated results. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the variations of the overall material behavior of MFCs with respect to bonding layer thickness. The present study examines the influence of bonding the layer on the effective properties of MFCs.

  10. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  11. [Influence of primers ' chemical composition on shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagodzińska, Paulina; Bociong, Kinga; Dejak, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Resin cements establish a strong durable bond between zirconia ceramic and hard tissues of teeth. It is essential to use primers with proper chemical composition before cementation. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of primer's chemical composition on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to resin cements. 132 zirconia specimens were randomly assigned to four groups. There were four resin systems used. They included resin cement and respective primer, dedicated to zirconia: Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F2.0, Monobond Plus/Multilink Automix, AZ - Primer/ResiCem, Z - Prime Plus/Duo-Link. In each group the protocol of cementation was as follows: application of primer to the zirconia surface and application of the respective resin cement in cylindric mold (dimensions: 3.0 mm height and 3.0 mm diameter). Then, the shear bond strength was evaluated and the failure type was assessed in lupes (×2.5 magnification), also random specimens under SEM. The Wilcoxon test was used to analyze the data, the level of significance was α = 0.05. Finally, the known chemical composition of each primer was analysed in reference to probable chemical bonds, which may occure between primers and zirconia. The mean shear bond strength between resin cements and zirconia was the highest for Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link (8.24 ± 3,21 MPa) and lowest for Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 (4.60 ± 2.21 MPa). The analysis revealed significant difference between all groups, except pair Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem. The failure type in groups of Clearfil Ceramic Primer/Panavia F 2.0 and AZ-Primer/ResiCem was mainly adhesive, in groups Monobond Plus/ /Multilink Automix and Z-Prime Plus/Duo-Link mainly mixed. The chemical composition of primers affects different bond mechanisms between resin cements and zirconia. The highest shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia can be obtained for the primer composed of 10-Methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen

  12. Differences in interfacial bond strengths of graphite fiber-epoxy resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needles, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of epoxy-size and degree of cure on the interfacial bonding of an epoxy-amine-graphite fiber composite system is examined. The role of the fiber-resin interface in determining the overall mechanical properties of composites is poorly understood. A good interfacial adhesive bond is required to achieve maximum stress transfer to the fibers in composites, but at the same time some form of energy absorbing interfacial interaction is needed to achieve high fracture toughening. The incompatibility of these two processes makes it important to understand the nature and basic factors involved at the fiber-resin interface as stress is applied. The mechanical properties including interlaminar shear values for graphite fiber-resin composites are low compared to glass and boron-resin composites. These differences have been attributed to poor fiber-matrix adhesion. Graphite fibers are commonly subjected to post-treatments including application of organic sizing in order to improve their compatibility with the resin matrix and to protect the fiber tow from damage during processing and lay-up. In such processes, sized graphite fiber tow is impregnated with epoxy resin and then layed-up i nto the appropriate configuration. Following an extended ambient temperature cure, the graphite-resin composite structure is cured at elevated temperature using a programmed temperature sequence to cure and then cool the product.

  13. Efficacy of ceramic repair material on the bond strength of composite resin to zirconia ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmali, Omer; Kapdan, Alper; Harorli, Osman Tolga; Barutcugil, Cagatay; Ozarslan, Mehmet Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin in five different repair systems. Sixty specimens (7 mm in diameter and 3 mm in height) of zirconia ceramic were fabricated. All specimen surfaces were prepared with a 30 µm fine diamond rotary cutting instrument with water irrigation for 10 s and dried with oil-free air. Specimens were then randomly divided into six groups for the following different intra-oral repair systems (n = 10): Group 1, control group; Group 2, Cojet system (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany); Group 3, Cimara® System (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany); Group 4, Z-Prime Plus System (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, IL); Group 5, Clearfil™ System (Kuraray, Osaka, Japan); and Group 6, Z-Bond System (Danville, CA). After surface conditioning, a composite resin Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) was applied to the zirconia surface using a cylindrical mold (5 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length) and incrementally filled up, according to the manufacturer's instructions of each intra-oral system. Each specimen was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until fracture. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the bond strength values. There were significant differences between Groups 2-6 and Group 1. The highest bond strength values were obtained with Group 2 (17.26 ± 3.22) and Group 3 (17.31 ± 3.62), while the lowest values were observed with Group 1 (8.96 ± 1.62) and Group 6 (12.85 ± 3.95). All repair systems tested increased the bond strength values between zirconia and composite resin that used surface grinding with a diamond bur.

  14. Surface modifications and Nano-composite coatings to improve the bonding strength of titanium-porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Litong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Xuemei; Feng, Wei; Li, Baoe; Lin, Cheng; Tao, Xueyu; Qiang, Yinghuai

    2016-04-01

    Surface modifications of Ti and nano-composite coatings were employed to simultaneously improve the surface roughness, corrosion resistance and chemical bonding between porclain-Ti. The specimens were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, surface roughness, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, corrosion resistance and bonding strength tests. The SEM results showed that hybrid structures with micro-stripes, nano-pores and nano-protuberances were prepared by surface modification of Ti, which significantly enhanced the surface roughness and corrosion resistance of Ti. Porous nano-composite coatings were synthesized on Ti anodized with pre-treatment in 40% HF acid. TiO2 nanoparticles were added into the hybrid coating to increase the solid phase content of the sols and avoid the formation of microcracks. With the TiO2 content increasing from 45 wt% to 60 wt%, the quantities of the microcracks on the coating surface gradually decreased. The optimal TiO2 content for the nanocomposite coatings is 60 wt% in this research. Compared to the uncoated group, the bonding strength of the coated groups showed a bonding strength improvement of 23.96%. The cytotoxicity of the 4# coating group was ranked as zero, which corresponds to non-cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, María; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Rubén A.; Solá-Ruiz, Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (α=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-Wceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-Wceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

  16. Resistance of composite and amalgam core foundations retained with and without pins and bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Swigert, Ryan; Richman, Brian; Sawicki, Vincent; Pace, Lauren; Moon, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    To compare the resistance of different amalgam and composite core foundations retained by pins, bonding agents, or both, 100 molars were mounted in acrylic resin and their occlusal surfaces were reduced to expose dentin. Pins were inserted at the four line angles of the teeth and matrices were placed. Bonding agents were applied according to the manufacturers' instructions. Amalgam was handcondensed and composite was incrementally added and photocured. Restorations were adjusted to produce specimens (n = 10) 5 mm in height with a 1 mm bevel at the axial-occlusal surface. After immersion in deionized water for 24 hours, specimens were loaded at a 45 degree angle on their beveled surfaces in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 0.02 in./minute. ANOVA and Tukey's tests indicated that FluoroCore 2 (with or without pins) was statistically stronger than all other combinations (p < 0.05).

  17. Effects of different sulfuric acid etching concentrations on PEEK surface bonding to resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaijareenont, Pisaisit; Prakhamsai, Sasiprapha; Silthampitag, Patcharawan; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2018-01-26

    This study evaluated the effects of surface pretreatment with different concentrations of sulfuric acid etching on surface properties and bonding between Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and a resin composite. Six groups of surface pretreatment (no pretreatment, etched with 70, 80, 85, 90, and 98% sulfuric acid for 60 s) were treated on PEEK. Surface roughness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses were examined. Shear bond strength (SBS) and cross-sectional observations of the interfaces were performed. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed differences in surface roughness and SBS between groups. The 90 and 98% sulfuric acid etching significantly achieved the highest SBS (psulfuric acid etching were suggested to be the optimal concentration to improve adhesion between PEEK and the resin composite.

  18. Effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite repairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadizenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Repairing aged composite resin is a challenging process. Many surface treatment options have been proposed to this end. This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS of nano-filled composite resin repairs. Methods. Seventy-five cylindrical specimens of a Filtek Z350XT composite resin were fabricated and stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours. After thermocycling, the specimens were divided into 5 groups according to the following surface treatments: no treatment (group 1; air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles (group 2; irradiation with Er:YAG laser beams (group 3; roughening with coarse-grit diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid (group 4; and etching with 9% hydrofluoric acid for 120 s (group 5. Another group of Filtek Z350XT composite resin samples (4×6 mm was fabricated for the measurement of cohesive strength (group 6. A silane coupling agent and an adhesive system were applied after each surface treatment. The specimens were restored with the same composite resin and thermocycled again. A shearing force was applied to the interface in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P < 0.05. Results. One-way ANOVA indicated significant differences between the groups (P < 0.05. SBS of controls was significantly lower than the other groups; differences between groups 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were not significant. Surface treatment with diamond bur + 35% phosphoric acid resulted in the highest bond strength. Conclusion. All the surface treatments used in this study improved the shear bond strength of nanofilled composite resin used.

  19. Effect of a New Surface Treatment Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    a lubricated highspeed handpiece. In addition to handpiece lubricant, contaminants such as saliva, blood, dental cements , and imaging powder could...HEALTH SCIENCES AIR FORCE POSTGRADUATE DENTAL SCHOOL 2450 Pepperrell Street Lackland AFB Texas, 78236-5345 http://www.usuhs.ml1 "The author hereby...Solution on the Bond Strength of Composite to Enamel ABSTRACT Clean & Boost (Apex Dental Materials) is a novel surface treatment solution

  20. Mechanical Properties of Low-Density SiC-Coated Carbon-Bonded Carbon Fiber Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ahmed, A. S.; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Rawlings, R. D.; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2012), s. 401-412 ISSN 1546-542X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : SiC coating * Carbon bonded * Carbon Fiber Composites * Fracture Toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.153, year: 2012

  1. Lasing and thermal characteristics of Yb:YAG/YAG composite with atomic diffusion bonding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagisetty, Siva S.; Severová, Patricie; Miura, Taisuke; Smrž, Martin; Kon, H.; Uomoto, M.; Shimatsu, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Higashiguchi, T.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 1 (2017), 1-6, č. článku 015001. ISSN 1612-2011 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015086; GA MŠk LO1602 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composite Yb:YAG ceramic * atomic diffusion bonding * thermal effects Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 2.537, year: 2016

  2. Shear bond strength of a denture base acrylic resin and gingiva-colored indirect composite material to zirconia ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubochi, Kei; Komine, Futoshi; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Yagawa, Shogo; Mori, Serina; Matsumura, Hideo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the shear bond strengths of two gingiva-colored materials (an indirect composite material and a denture base acrylic resin) to zirconia ceramics and determine the effects of surface treatment with various priming agents. A gingiva-colored indirect composite material (CER) or denture base acrylic resin (PAL) was bonded to zirconia disks with unpriming (UP) or one of seven priming agents (n=11 each), namely, Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Act), Metal Link (MEL), Meta Fast Bonding Liner (MFB), MR. bond (MRB), and V-Primer (VPR). Shear bond strength was determined before and after 5000 thermocycles. The data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and Steel-Dwass test. The mean pre-/post-thermalcycling bond strengths were 1.0-14.1MPa/0.1-12.1MPa for the CER specimen and 0.9-30.2MPa/0.1-11.1MPa for the PAL specimen. For the CER specimen, the ALP, CPB, and CPB+Act groups had significantly higher bond strengths among the eight groups, at both 0 and 5000 thermocycles. For the PAL specimen, shear bond strength was significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. After 5000 thermocycles, bond strengths were significantly higher in the CPB and CPB+Act groups than in the other groups. For the PAL specimens, bond strengths were significantly lower after thermalcycling in all groups tested. The MDP functional monomer improved bonding of a gingiva-colored indirect composite material and denture base acrylic resin to zirconia ceramics. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-destructive Evaluation of Bonds Between Fiberglass Composite and Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Selina; Sonta, Kestutis; Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. E.; Berger, Libby

    2015-01-01

    To assess the integrity and reliability of an adhesive joint in an automotive composite component, several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) methodologies are correlated to lap shear bond strengths. A glass-fabric-reinforced composite structure was bonded to a metallic structure with a two-part epoxy adhesive. Samples were subsequently cut and tested in shear, and flaws were found in some areas. This study aims to develop a reliable and portable NDE system for service-level adhesive inspection in the automotive industry. The results of the experimental investigation using several NDE methods are presented and discussed. Fiberglass-to-metal bonding is the ideal configuration for NDE via thermography using excitation with induction heating, due to the conductive metal and non-conductive glass-fiber-reinforced composites. Excitation can be either by a research-grade induction heater of highly defined frequency and intensity, or by a service-level heater, such as would be used for sealing windshields in a body shop. The thermographs thus produced can be captured via a high-resolution infrared camera, with principal component analysis and 2D spatial Laplacian processing. Alternatively, the thermographs can be captured by low resolution thermochromic microencapsulated liquid crystal film imaging, which needs no post-processing and can be very inexpensive. These samples were also examined with phased-array ultrasound. The NDE methods are compared to the lap shear values and to each other for approximate cost, accuracy, and time and level of expertise needed.

  4. Influence of 10-MDP Adhesive System on Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia-Composite Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Cornelius Pott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigated the initial 24h bond strength between different composites and zirconia after application of four different adhesive systems. Methods: A total of 120 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground with a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were each additionally treated with Cimara Zircon “CZ” (VOCO GmbH, Germany, Cuxhaven, Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of three different types of composites – BifixSE (“BS”, BifixQM (“BQ” or GrandioSO (“G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to ten specimens each in every group. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD gave higher SBS than CZ and FBU in combination with all tested composites. In comparison to FBU, FBM gave statistically significant increases in SBS with BifixSE (19.4±5.7 MPa (P

  5. Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Nd-YAG Lased Dentin with and without Dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kermanshah

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: The achievement of a good and durable dentin/composite resin bond is an important task in restorative dentistry. The application of acid conditioners and dentin bonding agents is an accepted method to enhance this bond strength. Pretreating of dentin surface by laser irradiation seems to be a supplemental way to obtain better results,since lased dentin is more roughened and has a widest surface area to interact with acidconditioner.Purpose: In this study, the effect of dentin surface pretreating by Nd-YAG laser on dentin/composite shear bond strength was examined. Moreover, the effect of Chinese ink as a surface energy absorber on this value was investigated.Methods and Materials: Thirty-nine freshly extracted human teeth without dentinal caries were collected and their occlusal dentins were exposed using a diamond disk. The collected samples were divided into three identical groups. The dentin surface of the first group was lased by an Nd-YAG pulsed laser (100 mJ, 20 Hz through a 320 mm fiber optic in a swiping movement. In the second group, 10% solution of Chinese ink was applied on the dentinal surface before lasing. The samples of the third group were not lased at all. Thedentinal surface prepared by 35% phosphoric acid and Scotchbond MP primer and adhesive. Then, composite resin was cured on dentinal surface. After incubation, in water at 37°C for 24 hours, the samples were tested by Digital Tritest ELE machine.Results: The values of bond strength were 20.83±3.96 MPa, 17.83±3.63 MPa and 19.38±4.88 MPa for the lased, unlased and dye-enhanced groups, respectively. The results were not significant by ANOVA test (a=0.05. Although in the Weiboul modulus, the lased group offered better bond strength.Conclusion: Further studies are required to determine whether chemical as well as physical alterations to the dentin surface are induced by laser etching, and whether these influence the performance of the range of dentin

  6. Interface Bond Improvement of Sisal Fibre Reinforced Polylactide Composites with Added Epoxy Oligomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Mingyang; Wu, Hongwu; Qiu, Feng; Wang, Xiwen

    2018-03-07

    To improve the interfacial bonding of sisal fiber-reinforced polylactide biocomposites, polylactide (PLA) and sisal fibers (SF) were melt-blended to fabricate bio-based composites via in situ reactive interfacial compatibilization with addition of a commercial grade epoxy-functionalized oligomer Joncryl ADR @ -4368 (ADR). The FTIR (Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy) analysis and SEM (scanning electron microscope) characterization demonstrated that the PLA molecular chain was bonded to the fiber surface and the epoxy-functionalized oligomer played a hinge-like role between the sisal fibers and the PLA matrix, which resulted in improved interfacial adhesion between the fibers and the PLA matrix. The interfacial reaction and microstructures of composites were further investigated by thermal and rheological analyses, which indicated that the mobility of the PLA molecular chain in composites was restricted because of the introduction of the ADR oligomer, which in turn reflected the improved interfacial interaction between SF and the PLA matrix. These results were further justified with the calculation of activation energies of glass transition relaxation (∆ E a ) by dynamic mechanical analysis. The mechanical properties of PLA/SF composites were simultaneously reinforced and toughened with the addition of ADR oligomer. The interfacial interaction and structure-properties relationship of the composites are the key points of this study.

  7. Interface Bond Improvement of Sisal Fibre Reinforced Polylactide Composites with Added Epoxy Oligomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyang Hao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To improve the interfacial bonding of sisal fiber-reinforced polylactide biocomposites, polylactide (PLA and sisal fibers (SF were melt-blended to fabricate bio-based composites via in situ reactive interfacial compatibilization with addition of a commercial grade epoxy-functionalized oligomer Joncryl ADR@-4368 (ADR. The FTIR (Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy analysis and SEM (scanning electron microscope characterization demonstrated that the PLA molecular chain was bonded to the fiber surface and the epoxy-functionalized oligomer played a hinge-like role between the sisal fibers and the PLA matrix, which resulted in improved interfacial adhesion between the fibers and the PLA matrix. The interfacial reaction and microstructures of composites were further investigated by thermal and rheological analyses, which indicated that the mobility of the PLA molecular chain in composites was restricted because of the introduction of the ADR oligomer, which in turn reflected the improved interfacial interaction between SF and the PLA matrix. These results were further justified with the calculation of activation energies of glass transition relaxation (∆Ea by dynamic mechanical analysis. The mechanical properties of PLA/SF composites were simultaneously reinforced and toughened with the addition of ADR oligomer. The interfacial interaction and structure–properties relationship of the composites are the key points of this study.

  8. Self-bonded composite films based on cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals as antifungal materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Eduardo; Salaberria, Asier M; Herrera, Rene; Fernandes, Susana C M; Labidi, Jalel

    2016-06-25

    Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals, two main components of agricultural and aquacultural by-products, were obtained from blue agave and yellow squat lobster industrial residues. Cellulose nanofibers were obtained using high pressure homogenization, while chitin nanocrystals were obtained by hydrolysis in acid medium. Cellulose nanofibers and chitin nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Infrared spectroscopy. Self-bonded composite films with different composition were fabricated by hot pressing and their properties were evaluated. Antifungal activity of chitin nanocrystals was studied using a Cellometer(®) cell count device, mechanical properties at tension were measured with a universal testing machine, water vapor permeability was evaluated with a thermohygrometer and surface tension with sessile drop contact angle method. The addition of chitin nanocrystals reduced slightly the mechanical properties of the composite. Presence of chitin nanocrystals influenced the growth of Aspergillus sp fungus in the surface of the composites as expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V.; Yavorsky, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  10. Energy transfer, orbital angular momentum, and discrete current in a double-ring fiber array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeyev, C. N.; Volyar, A. V. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Yavorsky, M. A. [Taurida National V.I. Vernadsky University, Vernadsky Prospekt, 4, Simferopol, 95007, Crimea (Ukraine); Universite Bordeaux and CNRS, LOMA, UMR 5798, FR-33400 Talence (France)

    2011-12-15

    We study energy transfer and orbital angular momentum of supermodes in a double-ring array of evanescently coupled monomode optical fibers. The structure of supermodes and the spectra of their propagation constants are obtained. The geometrical parameters of the array, at which the energy is mostly confined within the layers, are determined. The developed method for finding the supermodes of concentric arrays is generalized for the case of multiring arrays. The orbital angular momentum carried by a supermode of a double-ring array is calculated. The discrete lattice current is introduced. It is shown that the sum of discrete currents over the array is a conserved quantity. The connection of the total discrete current with orbital angular momentum of discrete optical vortices is made.

  11. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  12. The effect of different adhesives and setting times on bond strength between Biodentine and composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çolak, Hakan; Tokay, Uğur; Uzgur, Recep; Uzgur, Zeynep; Ercan, Ertuğrul; Hamidi, Mehmet M

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 different adhesives with different functional monomers, on the shear bond strength (SBS) of Biodentine®. Acrylic blocks (n = 90) were prepared and a 2-mm height x 4-mm diameter hole was opened in each block. Every hole was completely restored with Biodentine®. Before preparation of composite restorations over the Biodentine® (2-mm height x 2-mm diameter), 3 different adhesives (Etch-37 (37%) w/BAC by Bisco & Prime Bond N&T, Clearfil S3 Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop) were applied. SBS was evaluated using a universal testing machine, and failure mode for each sample was recorded. The results were statistically analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test. When the megapascal values of all groups were compared, although there was no statistically significant difference in the different setting times (p>0.05), statistically significant differences were observed among all adhesive groups (p<0.05). Moreover, the highest SBS values were observed in the Clearfil S3 Bond group. Clinical performance of Biodentine® may be affected by adhesive procedures and its setting time.

  13. Effect of deproteinization on composite bond strength in hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroğlu, I; Aras, S; Oztaş, D

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the treatment of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) after acid conditioning of the enamel and dentin of the primary teeth affected with hypocalcified amelogenesis imperfecta (HCAI) on the shear bond strength of the composite material. Primary teeth from a 12-year-old girl affected with HCAI and primary teeth collected from apparently healthy children were used. A total of four groups, experimental and control with and without NaOCl treatment were specified. In the control group conventional composite procedure was performed and in the treatment group 5% NaOCl was applied after acid conditioning and then the procedure continued as in the control group. In teeth affected with HCAI, enamel shear bond strengths were significantly enhanced in the treatment group compared with the conventional procedure. Deproteinization could be attributed as effective in enhancing the enamel bonding in HCAI teeth and could be used to overcome the high failure rates of adhesive restorations in HCAI cases.

  14. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Renata M. [Department of Dental Materials and Pronsthodontics at Sao Jose dos Campos Dental Shool, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12245-820 (Brazil); Rahbar, Nima, E-mail: nrahbar@umassd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02720 (United States); Soboyejo, Wole [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2011-05-10

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from {approx} 1.5 to 3.2 J/m{sup 2} when the loading angle increases from {approx} 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  15. Effect of chemisorption structure on the interfacial bonding characteristics of graphene-polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Cheng; Xue Qingzhong; Xia Dan; Ma Ming

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the chemical functionalization of graphene on the interfacial bonding characteristics between graphene and polymer was investigated using molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. In this study, three chemical functionalization, (a) phenyl groups, (b) -C 6 H 13 and(c) -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 , which have the same number of carbon atoms, were chosen to investigate the influence of the structure of functionalized groups on the bonding energy and shear stress in the graphene-polyethylene (PE) composites. Our simulations indicated that, the interfacial bonding energy between the graphene modified by -C 6 H 13 groups and PE matrix has the strongest enhancement, but the shear force between the graphene modified by -C 2 H 4 (C 2 H 5 ) 2 groups and PE matrix is the strongest in the graphene-polymer composites. Therefore, the suitable structure of chemical groups to the graphene surface may be an effective way to significantly improve the load transfer between the graphene and polymer when graphene is used to produce nanocomposites.

  16. Interfacial fracture of dentin adhesively bonded to quartz-fiber reinforced composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melo, Renata M.; Rahbar, Nima; Soboyejo, Wole

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of interfacial failure in a multilayered structure consisting of a dentin/resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced composite (FRC). Slices of dentin close to the pulp chamber were sandwiched by two half-circle discs made of a quartz-fiber reinforced composite, bonded with bonding agent (All-bond 2, BISCO, Schaumburg) and resin cement (Duo-link, BISCO, Schaumburg) to make Brazil-nut sandwich specimens for interfacial toughness testing. Interfacial fracture toughness (strain energy release rate, G) was measured as a function of mode mixity by changing loading angles from 0 deg. to 15 deg. The interfacial fracture surfaces were then examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to determine the failure modes when loading angles changed. A computational model was also developed to calculate the driving forces, stress intensity factors and mode mixities. Interfacial toughness increased from ∼ 1.5 to 3.2 J/m 2 when the loading angle increases from ∼ 0 to 15 deg. The hybridized dentin/cement interface appeared to be tougher than the resin cement/quartz-fiber reinforced epoxy. The Brazil-nut sandwich specimen was a suitable method to investigate the mechanical integrity of dentin/cement/FRC interfaces.

  17. Shear bond strength between veneering composite and PEEK after different surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentritt, Martin; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Sereno, Nuno; Kolbeck, Carola

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to test the influence of different surface treatments and conditioning on the shear bond strength between polyetherketone (PEEK) and composite. Surfaces (570 plates) were used untreated, etched, air-particle abraded or activated with silica-modified alumina oxide. Surface roughness was determined after different treatments. Cylinders of composite were polymerized onto the surfaces. Eighteen different pre-treatment combinations were applied, partly combined with opaque application. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined following ISO TR 11405. Baseline tests were performed 24 h after composite polymerization. For investigating the influence of storage and aging, the specimens were either stored in distilled water (37 °C, 90 days) or thermally cycled (12,000 cycles 5 °C/55 °C, distilled water). Means and standard deviations were calculated (statistics: one-way ANOVA/Bonferroni (α = 0.05)). Surface roughness varied between 0.04 ± 0.01 and 6.76 ± 1.11 μm. Only etching caused a significant (p < 0.001) increase. SBS strongly varied between 0.0 ± 0.0 and 23.2 ± 2.1 MPa. After thermal cycling (TC), nine of the investigated systems showed SBS higher than 5 MPa, varying from 8.8 ± 2.7 MPa (#7) to 19.4 ± 2.5 MPa (#4). After water storage, nine systems provided SBS higher than 5 MPa, seven even values higher than 10 MPa. Maximum SBS was 27.1 ± 3.1 MPa (#2) and lowest value was 5.4 ± 2.6 MPa (#4). Significant (p < 0.001) differences were found between the individual systems after 24 h, TC and after 90 days storage. For good bonding between PEEK and composite, cleaning and roughening is recommended. Surface conditioning prior to bonding seems essential. Combination with opaque revealed an increase in SBS. Successful bonding on PEEK surfaces can be achieved by surface roughening and subsequent surface activation with acetone- or phosphate-based methacrylate primers or tribochemical treatment.

  18. Retention of CAD/CAM resin composite crowns following different bonding protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Amir H; Lee, Jinwhan; Shah, Shreya; Lin, Chee Paul; Kulkarni, Prajakta; Chavali, Ramakiran; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments and primers with a CAD/CAM resin composite block on its crown retention. 120 human molars were prepared with a 24° total convergence angle, 1.5 mm height, and axial walls in dentin. Surface area was measured by digital microscopy. Crowns were machined from CAD/CAM resin composite blocks. Teeth were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n= 10) based on possible combinations of three surface treatments: [Control, Alumina air abrasion (50-µm Al₂O₃ at 0.28 MPa) ]; 5% hydrofluoric acid etch (20-second scrub); silane application (with or without Kerr Silane primer); and adhesive application (with or without Optibond XTR Adhesive). Optibond XTR Adhesive was applied to the tooth preparations and crowns were bonded with MaxCem Elite cement. Crowns were fatigued for 100,000 cycles at 100 N in water and debonded in tension (1 mm/minute). Crown retention strength (maximum load/surface area) values were analyzed using a three-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc tests (α= 0.05). Surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications independently affect retention force (P 0.05). Alumina airborne abrasion surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications all improve retention strength. Therefore, CAD/CAM resin composite crowns can withstand debonding while undergoing mechanical fatigue. Although all forms of surface treatment and primer application improve bond strength, the highest mean retention strength values were recorded when the crowns were alumina particle abraded and coated with adhesive (with or without silane). In order to improve the bonding of resin composite crowns, application of alumina airborne particle abrasion and a coat of adhesive (proceeded by an optional coat of silane) is recommended. If hydrofluoric acid is utilized, the crowns should be treated with a coat of silane followed by adhesive application. Copyright©American Journal of Dentistry.

  19. Post-thermocycling shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite layering material to three implant framework materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Koizuka, Mai; Fushiki, Ryosuke; Taguchi, Kohei; Kamio, Shingo; Matsumura, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite to three implant framework materials, before and after thermocycling, and verify the effect of surface pre-treatment for each framework. Commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti), American Dental Association (ADA) type 4 casting gold alloy (Type IV) and zirconia ceramics (Zirconia) were assessed. For each substrate, 96 disks were divided into six groups and primed with one of the following primers: Alloy Primer (ALP), Clearfil Photo Bond (CPB), Clearfil Photo Bond with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator (CPB+Activator), Estenia Opaque Primer (EOP), Metal Link (MLP) and V-Primer (VPR). The specimens were then bonded to a gingiva-colored indirect composite (Ceramage Concentrate GUM-D). Shear bond strengths were measured at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles and data were analyzed with the Steel-Dwass test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Shear bond strengths were significantly lower after thermocycling, with the exception of Type IV specimens primed with CPB (p = 0.092) or MLP (p = 0.112). For CP-Ti and Zirconia specimens, priming with CPB or CPB+Activator produced significantly higher bond strengths at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles, as compared with the other groups. For Type IV specimens, priming with ALP or MLP produced higher bond strengths at 0 and 20 000 thermocycles. Shear bond strength of a gingiva-colored indirect composite to CP-Ti, gold alloy and zirconia ceramics was generally lower after thermocycling. Application of a hydrophobic phosphate monomer and polymerization initiator was effective in maintaining bond strength of CP-Ti and zirconia ceramics. Combined use of a thione monomer and phosphoric monomer enhanced the durable bond strength of gold alloy.

  20. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser, air abrasion, and silane application on repaired shear bond strength of composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S D; Rajitrangson, P; Matis, B A; Platt, J A

    2013-01-01

    Aged resin composites have a limited number of carbon-carbon double bonds to adhere to a new layer of resin. Study objectives were to 1) evaluate various surface treatments on repaired shear bond strength between aged and new resin composites and 2) to assess the influence of a silane coupling agent after surface treatments. Eighty disk-shape resin composite specimens were fabricated and thermocycled 5000 times prior to surface treatment. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the three surface treatment groups (n=20): 1) air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide, 2) tribochemical silica coating (CoJet), or 3) Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet) laser or to a no-treatment control group (n=20). Specimens were etched with 35% phosphoric acid, rinsed, and dried. Each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10): A) no silanization and B) with silanization. The adhesive agent was applied and new resin composite was bonded to each conditioned surface. Shear bond strength was evaluated and data analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide showed significantly higher repair bond strength than the Er,Cr:YSGG laser and control groups. Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide was not significantly different from tribochemical silica coating. Tribochemical silica coating had significantly higher repair bond strength than Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the control. Er,Cr:YSGG laser and the control did not have significantly different repair bond strengths. Silanization had no influence on repair bond strength for any of the surface treatment methods. Air abrasion with 50-μm aluminum oxide and tribochemical silica followed by the application of bonding agent provided the highest repair shear bond strength values, suggesting that they might be adequate methods to improve the quality of repairs of resin composites.

  1. A hydrogen-bonded electron-tunneling circuit reads the base composition of unmodified DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jin; Lin Lisha; Liu Hao; Zhang Peiming; Lindsay, S M; Lee, Myeong; Sankey, O F

    2009-01-01

    Using a tunnel junction in which one electrode is guanidinium-functionalized (to trap DNA via hydrogen bonding to the backbone phosphates) and a second electrode which is functionalized with a base (to capture its complementary target on the DNA), current versus distance curves are obtained which yield an accurate measure of the base composition of DNA oligomers. With this long tunneling path, resolution is limited to sequence blocks of about twenty bases or larger, because of the need to form a large-area tunnel junction. A shorter hydrogen-bonded path across bases will be required for DNA sequencing. Nonetheless, these measurements point the way to a new type of nanoscale sensor.

  2. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  3. A New Material Model for 2D FE Analysis of Adhesively Bonded Composite Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libin ZHAO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective and convenient stress analysis techniques play important roles in the analysis and design of adhesively bonded composite joints. A new material model is presented at the level of composite ply according to the orthotropic elastic mechanics theory and plane strain assumption. The model proposed has the potential to reserve nature properties of laminates with ply-to-ply modeling. The equivalent engineering constants in the model are obtained only by the material properties of unidirectional composites. Based on commercial FE software ABAQUS, a 2D FE model of a single-lap adhesively bonded joint was established conveniently by using the new model without complex modeling process and much professional knowledge. Stress distributions in adhesive were compared with the numerical results by Tsai and Morton and interlaminar stresses between adhesive and adherents were compared with the results from a detailed 3D FE analysis. Good agreements in both cases verify the validity of the proposed model. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.5960

  4. Nonlinear finite element modeling of concrete deep beams with openings strengthened with externally-bonded composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawileh, Rami A.; El-Maaddawy, Tamer A.; Naser, Mohannad Z.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A 3D nonlinear FE model is developed of RC deep beams with web openings. ► We used cohesion elements to simulate bond. ► The developed FE model is suitable for analysis of such complex structures. -- Abstract: This paper aims to develop 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) models for reinforced concrete (RC) deep beams containing web openings and strengthened in shear with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite sheets. The web openings interrupted the natural load path either fully or partially. The FE models adopted realistic materials constitutive laws that account for the nonlinear behavior of materials. In the FE models, solid elements for concrete, multi-layer shell elements for CFRP and link elements for steel reinforcement were used to simulate the physical models. Special interface elements were implemented in the FE models to simulate the interfacial bond behavior between the concrete and CFRP composites. A comparison between the FE results and experimental data published in the literature demonstrated the validity of the computational models in capturing the structural response for both unstrengthened and CFRP-strengthened deep beams with openings. The developed FE models can serve as a numerical platform for performance prediction of RC deep beams with openings strengthened in shear with CFRP composites.

  5. Effect of Curing Mode on Shear Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to Composite Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Young Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the disadvantages of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM processed indirect restorations using glass-ceramics and other ceramics, resin nano ceramic, which has high strength and wear resistance with improved polish retention and optical properties, was introduced. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength and fracture pattern of indirect CAD/CAM composite blocks cemented with two self-etch adhesive cements with different curing modes. Sand-blasted CAD/CAM composite blocks were cemented using conventional resin cement, Rely X Ultimate Clicker (RXC, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA with Single Bond Universal (SB, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA for the control group or two self-adhesive resin cements: Rely X U200 (RXU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA and G-CEM Cerasmart (GC, GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan. RXU and GC groups included different curing modes (light-curing (L and auto-curing (A. Shear bond strength (SBS analyses were performed on all the specimens. The RXC group revealed the highest SBS and the GC A group revealed the lowest SBS. According to Tukey’s post hoc test, the RXC group showed a significant difference compared to the GC A group (p < 0.05. For the curing mode, RXU A and RXU L did not show any significant difference between groups and GC A and GC L did not show any significant difference either. Most of the groups except RXC and RXU L revealed adhesive failure patterns predominantly. The RXC group showed a predominant cohesive failure pattern in their CAD/CAM composite, LavaTM Ultimate (LU, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA. Within the limitations of this study, no significant difference was found regarding curing modes but more mixed fracture patterns were showed when using the light-curing mode than when using the self-curing mode.

  6. Effect of Surface Treatment, Silane, and Universal Adhesive on Microshear Bond Strength of Nanofilled Composite Repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornazari, I A; Wille, I; Meda, E M; Brum, R T; Souza, E M

     The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment and universal adhesive on the microshear bond strength of nanoparticle composite repairs.  One hundred and forty-four specimens were built with a nanofilled composite (Filtek Supreme Ultra, 3M ESPE). The surfaces of all the specimens were polished with SiC paper and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 14 days. Half of the specimens were then air abraded with Al 2 O 3 particles and cleaned with phosphoric acid. Polished specimens (P) and polished and air-abraded specimens (A), respectively, were randomly divided into two sets of six groups (n=12) according to the following treatments: hydrophobic adhesive only (PH and AH, respectively), silane and hydrophobic adhesive (PCH, ACH), methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP)-containing silane and hydrophobic adhesive (PMH, AMH), universal adhesive only (PU, AU), silane and universal adhesive (PCU, ACU), and MDP-containing silane and universal adhesive (PMU, AMU). A cylinder with the same composite resin (1.1-mm diameter) was bonded to the treated surfaces to simulate the repair. After 48 hours, the specimens were subjected to microshear testing in a universal testing machine. The failure area was analyzed under an optical microscope at 50× magnification to identify the failure type, and the data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell test (α=0.05).  The variables "surface treatment" and "adhesive" showed statistically significant differences for psilane did not lead to a statistically significant increase in bond strength. Silane-containing universal adhesive on its own was as effective as any combination of silane and adhesive, particularly when applied on air-abraded surfaces.

  7. Chemical composition, crystal structure, and their relationships with the intrinsic properties of spinel-type crystals based on bond valences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Lavina, Barbara; Tu, Bingtian; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2014-06-16

    Spinel-type crystals may possess complex and versatile chemical composition and crystal structure, which leads to difficulty in constructing relationships among the chemical composition, crystal structure, and intrinsic properties. In this work, we develop new empirical methods based on bond valences to estimate the intrinsic properties, namely, compressibility and thermal expansion of complex spinel-type crystals. The composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra is derived as a function of the composition-weighted average of bond valences, which can be calculated according to the experimental chemical composition and crystal structural parameters. We discuss the coupled effects of tetrahedral and octahedral frameworks on the aforementioned intrinsic properties. The bulk modulus could be quantitatively calculated from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra. In contrast, a quantitative estimation of the thermal expansion coefficient could be obtained from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in octahedral coordination polyhedra. These empirical methods have been validated by the results obtained for a new complex quaternary spinel-type oxynitride Mg0.268Al2.577O3.733N0.267 as well as MgAl2O4 and Al2.85O3.45N0.55 from the literature. Further, these empirical methods have the potential to be extensively applied in other types of complex crystals.

  8. Influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokokawa, Miho; Rikuta, Akitomo; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-02-01

    The influence of methyl mercaptan on the repair bond strength of composites fabricated using self-etch adhesives was investigated. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of test liquids placed on composites that had been immersed in different concentrations of methyl mercaptan (0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 M). To determine the repair bond strength, self-etch adhesives were applied to the aged composite, and then newly added composites were condensed. Ten samples of each specimen were subjected to shear testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm min(-1). Samples were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference (HSD) test. Although the dispersion force of the composites remained relatively constant, their polar force increased slightly as the concentration of methyl mercaptan increased. The hydrogen-bonding forces were significantly higher after immersion in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan, leading to higher surface-free energies. However, the repair bond strengths for the repair restorations prepared from composites immersed in 1.0 M methyl mercaptan were significantly lower than for those immersed in 0.01 and 0.10 M methyl mercaptan. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that the repair bond strengths of both the aged and newly added composites were affected by immersion in methyl mercaptan solutions. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  9. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  10. Effect of acid etching duration on tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser-prepared dentine. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousterman, M; Heysselaer, D; Dridi, S M; Bayet, F; Misset, B; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of composite resin bonded to erbium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Er:YAG) laser-prepared dentine after different durations of acid etching. The occlusal third of 68 human third molars was removed in order to expose the dentine surface. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups: group B (control group), prepared with bur and total etch system with 15 s acid etching [37% orthophosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4))]; group L15, laser photo-ablated dentine (200 mJ) (laser irradiation conditions: pulse duration 100 micros, air-water spray, fluence 31.45 J/ cm(2), 10 Hz, non-contact hand pieces, beam spot size 0.9 mm, irradiation speed 3 mm/s, and total irradiation time 2 x 40 s); group L30, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 30 s acid etching; group L60, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 60 s acid etching; group L90, laser prepared, laser conditioned and 90 s acid etching. A plot of composite resin was bonded onto each exposed dentine and then tested for tensile bond strength. The values obtained were statistically analysed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with the Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. A 90 s acid etching before bonding showed the best bonding value (P < 0.05) when compared with all the other groups including the control group. There is no significance difference between other groups, nor within each group and the control group. There was a significant increase in tensile bond strength of the samples acid etched for 90 s.

  11. Polyacrylonitrile based composite materials with extracting agents containing chemically bonded CMPO groups for separation of actinoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan Kamenik; Ferdinand Sebesta; Jan John

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials made from polyacrylonitrile binding polymer and solid extracting agents with functional groups of diphenyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide bonded to a platform of calix[4]arenes and cobalt bis(dicarbollide) cluster anion were tested for application in column chromatography. They exhibited high affinity for americium, plutonium, uranium, and europium ions in nitric acid solutions. However, europium distribution isotherm in 3 M HNO 3 indicated low capacity and unsatisfactory employment of the functional groups. Similar material with octyl(phenyl)-N,N'-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide extracting agent had both high affinity and uptake capacity. (author)

  12. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  13. The Effect of Nylon and Polyester Peel Ply Surface Preparation on the Bond Quality of Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moench, Molly K.

    The preparation of the surfaces to be bonded is critical to the success of composite bonds. Peel ply surface preparation is attractive from a manufacturing and quality assurance standpoint, but is a well known example of the extremely system-specific nature of composite bonds. This study examined the role of the surface energy, morphology, and chemistry left by peel ply removal in resulting bond quality. It also evaluated the use of contact angle surface energy measurement techniques for predicting the resulting bond quality of a prepared surface. The surfaces created by preparing three aerospace fiber-reinforced composite prepregs were compared when prepared with a nylon vs a polyester peel ply. The prepared surfaces were characterized with contact angle measurements with multiple fluids, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray electron spectroscopy. The laminates were bonded with aerospace grade film adhesives. Bond quality was assessed via double cantilever beam testing followed by optical and scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces.The division was clear between strong bonds (GIC of 600- 1000J/m2 and failure in cohesion) and weak bonds (GIC of 80-400J/m2 and failure in adhesion). All prepared laminates showed the imprint of the peel ply texture and evidence of peel ply remnants after fabric removal, either through SEM or XPS. Within an adhesive system, large amounts of SEM-visible peel ply material transfer correlated with poor bond quality and cleaner surfaces with higher bond quality. The both sides of failed weak bonds showed evidence of peel ply remnants under XPS, showing that at least some failure is occurring through the remnants. The choice of adhesive was found to be significant. AF 555 adhesive was more tolerant of peel ply contamination than MB 1515-3. Although the bond quality results varied substantially between tested combinations, the total surface energies of all prepared surfaces were very similar. Single fluid contact angle

  14. Comparison of Micro-Shear Bond Strength between Silorane-Based Composite and Conventional Methacrylate-Based Composite to the Dentin of Primary Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharifi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bond strength between the restorative material and tooth structure is one of the major factors in the selection of restorative materials, which plays a key role in durable restoration and reducing microleakage. Considering the recent attention of researchers to low-shrinkage composites, the present study aimed to compare the micro-shear bond strength of silorane-based composite (P90 with the conventional methacrylate-based composite (Z250 to the dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 24 intact primary canines were selected. Two disks (thickness: 2 mm were prepared from each tooth, and the samples were randomly divided into four groups (n=12. Composite resin cylinders (r=0.7 were adapted on each dentin surface, as follows: g1: (silorane bond system + P90, g2: (etch + silorane bond system + P90, g3: (single bond + Z250, g4: (etch + single bond + Z250. Afterwards, the samples were subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test until failure. Data analysis was performed using Tamhane’s T2 (P

  15. Effects of composite adherend properties on stresses in double lap bonded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari, M.; Madani, K.; Belhouari, M.; Touzain, S.; Feaugas, X.; Ratwani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analysis the maximal stresses distribution in the adhesive and the adherend for double lap joint. ► We modified the mechanical properties of adherend layer to decreases the stresses in adhesive layer. ► Then, we analysis the influence of modifying the types of fibers on maximal stresses distributions. ► We analysis the thickness modifications of some layers on maximal stresses distribution. ► In last, we analysis the combination of different modifications on maximal stresses distribution. -- Abstract: The effects of composite layer stiffness, thickness and ply orientations on stresses in the adhesive layer of a double lap bonded joint are investigated using three-dimensional finite element analysis code ABAQUS. A special 3-layer modelling technique is used in the finite element analysis. The non-linear behaviour of adhesive is also considered. Six composite laminates with different ply orientations are used in the lap-joint analysis. The composite materials considered in the analysis are – carbon epoxy, boron epoxy, T300/934 graphite-epoxy, and aramid epoxy. The analysis results indicate that the maximum stress in the adhesive can be significantly reduced by changing the stiffness and fibre orientations in the composite layer. Also, the use of hybrid composite (changing the nature of the fibres in two layers which are near the adhesive layer) results in reducing adhesive shear stresses.

  16. A study of laser surface treatment in bonded repair of composite aircraft structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaolong; Sun, Ting; Liu, Chang; Yang, Wenfeng; Tang, Qingru

    2018-03-01

    Surface pre-treatment is one of the key processes in bonded repair of aircraft carbon fibre reinforced polymer composites. This paper investigates the surface modification of physical and chemical properties by laser ablation and conventional polish treatment techniques. Surface morphology analysed by laser scanning confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that a laser-treated surface displayed higher roughness than that of a polish-treated specimen. The laser-treated laminate exhibited more functional groups in the form of O 1 s/C 1 s atomic ratio of 30.89% for laser-treated and 20.14% for polish-treated as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observation. Contact angle goniometry demonstrated that laser treatment can provide increased surface free energy and wettability. In the light of mechanical interlocking, molecular bonding and thermodynamics theories on adhesion, laser etching process displayed enhanced bonding performance relative to the polishing surface treatment. These properties resulted in an increased single lap shear strength and a cohesive failure mode for laser etching while an adhesive failure mode occurred in polish-treated specimen.

  17. PHYSICAL-MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CEMENT-BONDED KENAF BAST FIBRES COMPOSITE BOARDS WITH DIFFERENT DENSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. AHMED AMEL

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to explore the potential of kenaf bast fibres (KBFs for production of cement-bonded kenaf composite boards (CBKCBs. More than 70% of the KBFs were of size >3.35 mm and length of 31±0.4 mm, therefore, they were used for CBKCBs production. The CBKCBs with the dimensions of 450 × 450 × 12 mm were produced using cement (C: KBF with proportion of (2:1 and different board densities (BD namely 1100, 1300 and 1500 kg/m3. The CBKCBs were first cured in a tank saturated with moisture for 7days, and then kept at room temperature for 21 days. Mechanical and physical properties of the CBKCBs were characterized with regards to their modulus of rupture (MOR, modulus of elasticity (MOE, internal bond (IB, water absorption (WA, and thickness swelling (TS. Results of the tested CBKCBs revealed that the MOR increased while the MOE decreased due to uniform distribution of KBFs. It was found that loading of KBFs has a negative influence on the internal bond (IB of the CBKCBs; the IB was reduced as KBFs tend to balling and making unmixed aggregates with the cement. These results showed that the CBKCB is a promising construction material that could potentially be used in different structural applications due to their good mechanical characteristics.

  18. Comparison between Phase-Shift Full-Bridge Converters with Noncoupled and Coupled Current-Doubler Rectifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Tao Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents comparison between phase-shift full-bridge converters with noncoupled and coupled current-doubler rectifier. In high current capability and high step-down voltage conversion, a phase-shift full-bridge converter with a conventional current-doubler rectifier has the common limitations of extremely low duty ratio and high component stresses. To overcome these limitations, a phase-shift full-bridge converter with a noncoupled current-doubler rectifier (NCDR or a coupled current-doubler rectifier (CCDR is, respectively, proposed and implemented. In this study, performance analysis and efficiency obtained from a 500 W phase-shift full-bridge converter with two improved current-doubler rectifiers are presented and compared. From their prototypes, experimental results have verified that the phase-shift full-bridge converter with NCDR has optimal duty ratio, lower component stresses, and output current ripple. In component count and efficiency comparison, CCDR has fewer components and higher efficiency at full load condition. For small size and high efficiency requirements, CCDR is relatively suitable for high step-down voltage and high efficiency applications.

  19. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre-reinforced polyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The surfaces of the graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide composites presently pretreated prior to bonding with polyimide adhesive contained variable amounts of a fluoropolymer, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Lap shear strengths were determined for unaged samples and for those aged over 500- and 1000-hour periods at 177 and 232 C. Unaged sample lap strengths, which were the highest obtained, exhibited no variation with surface pretreatment, but a significant decrease is noted with increasing aging temperature. These thermally aged samples, however, had increased surface fluorine concentration, while a minimal concentration was found in unaged samples. SEM demonstrated a progressive shift from cohesive to adhesive failure for elevated temperature-aged composites.

  20. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional......The present paper accesses the significance of shrinkage inducedclamping pressure in fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms incementitious composite materials. The paper contains a description of an experimental setup whichallows mbox{measurement} of the clamping pressure which develops on anelastic...... inhomogeneity embedded in a matrix consisting of acementitious material undergoing shrinkage during hydration(autogenous shrinkage). Furthermore, the paperpresents the analysis necessary to perform an interpretation of the experimental results and which allows for thedetermination of the clamping pressure...

  1. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self-adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sachdeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The latest advancement in adhesive dentistry is the development of self adhering flowable composite resin which incorporates the self-etch adhesion technology to eliminate the steps of etching, rinsing, priming and bonding. Few studies have addressed resin bonding to primary teeth. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength and nanoleakage of conventional and self adhering flowable composites to primary teeth dentin. Settings and Design: This study was conducted in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, I.T.S Dental College, Hospital and Research Centre, Greater Noida; in association with the Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.T.S Engineering College, Greater Noida; and the Advanced Instrumentation Research Facility (AIRF, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Materials and Methods: Sixty of the ninety primary teeth were evaluated for shear bond strength and thirty for nanoleakage. The samples were divided into three groups; Group I - Dyad Flow (Kerr, Group II - Fusio Liquid Dentin (Pentron Clinical Technologies and Group III - G-aenial Universal Flo (GC. Shear bond strength was determined using a universal testing machine. Nanoleakage pattern was observed under scanning electron microscope. Results: The shear bond strength of conventional flowable composite was significantly greater than self adhering flowable composite (p<0.05. Nanoleakage scores of both conventional and self adhering flowable composites were comparable. Conclusions: Self adhering flowable composites combine properties of composites and self etch adhesives, eliminating the need for separate bond application that simplifies direct restorative procedure. The evolution of self adhering materials could open new horizons for pediatric dentistry.

  2. Effect of saliva contamination on bond strength witha hydrophilic composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauren Bitencourt Deprá

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on the bond strength of metallic brackets bonded to enamel with hydrophilic resin composite. METHODS: Eighty premolars were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20 according to bonding material and contamination: G1 bonded with Transbond XT with no saliva contamination, G2 bonded with Transbond XT with saliva contamination, G3 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with no saliva contamination and G4 bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change with saliva contamination. The results were statistically analyzed (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTS: The means and standard deviations (MPa were: G110.15 ± 3.75; G2 6.8 ± 2.54; G3 9.3 ± 3.36; G4 8.3 ± 2.95. The adhesive remnant index (ARI ranged between 0 and 1 in G1 and G4. In G2 there was a prevalence of score 0 and similar ARI distribution in G3. CONCLUSION: Saliva contamination reduced bond strength when Transbond XT hydrophobic resin composite was used. However, the hydrophilic resin Transbond Plus Color Change was not affected by the contamination.OBJETIVO: avaliar a influência da contaminação por saliva na resistência de união de braquetes metálicos colados ao esmalte com um compósito resinoso hidrofílico. MÉTODOS: oitenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos (n=20, de acordo com o material de colagem e a presença de contaminação - G1 colagem com Transbond XT na ausência de contaminação; G2 colagem com Transbond XT na presença de contaminação; G3 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na ausência de contaminação; G4 colagem com Transbond Plus Color Change na presença de contaminação. Os resultados foram tratados estatisticamente (ANOVA/Tukey. RESULTADOS: as médias e desvios-padrão (MPa foram G1 = 10,15 ± 3,75; G2 = 6,8 ± 2,54; G3 = 9,3 ± 3,36; G4 = 8,3 ± 2,95. O índice de adesivo remanescente (IAR variou entre 0 e 1 no G1 e no G4; no G2, houve predomínio do escore 0 e distribuição similar no

  3. Effects of surface conditioning on repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinastiti, Margareta; Siswomihardjo, Widowati; Busscher, Henk J.; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluates effects of aging on repair bond strengths of microhybrid, nanohybrid, and nanofilled composite resins and characterizes the interacting surfaces after aging. Disk-shaped composite specimens were assigned to one of three aging conditions: (1) thermocycling (5,000x, 5-55 degrees

  4. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adhesive systems, the RMGI samples were cured. Composite layers were applied and shear bond strength was measured. Two samples of each group were evaluated by SEM. Failure mode was determined by streomicroscope. Both curing methods and adhesive systems had significant effect on bond strength (P-value adhesives had significantly higher shear bond strength than the total-etch adhesive (P-value technique improved the bond strength in self-etch adhesives, but decreased the bond strength in total-etch adhesive (P-valueadhesive systems and co-curing technique can improve the bond strength between the RMGI and composite.

  5. Shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns for primary molars using a universal adhesive and two different surface treatments: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S S; Kontham, U R; Kamath, A; Kontham, R

    2016-10-01

    This was to determine the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to preformed metal crowns with a new adhesive. Buccal surfaces of the crowns were roughened by two different methods to increase retention. Typodont mandibular second primary molars (38) were divided into two groups (19 per group). Preformed metal crowns were cemented to the teeth with glass-ionomer cement. To enhance retention, buccal surfaces of the crowns in group I were roughened with cross-cut carbide burs (SS White #56); crowns in group II were sandblasted (aluminium oxide, 50 µm). Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (3 M-ESPE) was used to bond composite resin to the crowns. A universal testing machine tested the maximum shearing force withstood by the veneered composite surfaces. Sandblasted crowns demonstrated significantly higher resistance (p = 0.001) to shearing force (324.4 N) than did the crowns that were roughened with a bur (234.2 N). Chairside veneering of composite resin to pretreated crowns could be a feasible, aesthetically pleasing, and an economical option in paediatric dentistry.

  6. Comparison of two test designs for evaluating the shear bond strength of resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, M; Weiger, R; Fischer, J

    2016-02-01

    To compare a shear bond strength test for resin composite cements developed in order to better consider the shrinkage stress (here termed "Swiss shear test") with the shear test design according to ISO 29022. Four restorative materials (VITA Enamic (VE), VITA Suprinity (VS), Vitablocs Mark II (VM) and VITA YZ T (YZ)) served as substrate. VE, VS and VM were polished or etched. YZ was polished, sandblasted or etched. Specimens were either bonded according to the Swiss or the ISO shear test. RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, Maxcem Elite and PermaFlo DC were used as cements. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated by means of SEM. Mean SBS values obtained with the Swiss shear test were significantly lower than those obtained with the ISO shear test. VE and VM exhibited similar SBS, values of VS were significantly higher. On etched surfaces VM and VE exhibited primarily cohesive failures, VS primarily adhesive failures. On polished substrates significantly lower bond strength values and exclusively adhesive failures were observed. YZ exhibited solely adhesive failures. Compared to polished YZ, SBS significantly increased after sandblasting and even more after etching. Only for adhesively failed specimens mean SBS values of Swiss and ISO shear test were strongly correlated. Both test designs showed the same ranking of test results. When adhesive failure occurred test results were strongly correlated. When cohesive failure was involved, both test designs did not provide reliable results. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasonic, microwave, and millimeter wave inspection techniques for adhesively bonded stacked open honeycomb core composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Clint D.; Cox, Ian; Ghasr, Mohammad Tayeb Ahmed; Ying, Kuang P.; Zoughi, Reza

    2015-03-01

    Honeycomb sandwich composites are used extensively in the aerospace industry to provide stiffness and thickness to lightweight structures. A common fabrication method for thick, curved sandwich structures is to stack and bond multiple honeycomb layers prior to machining core curvatures. Once bonded, each adhesive layer must be inspected for delaminations and the presence of unwanted foreign materials. From a manufacturing and cost standpoint, it can be advantageous to inspect the open core prior to face sheet closeout in order to reduce end-article scrap rates. However, by nature, these honeycomb sandwich composite structures are primarily manufactured from low permittivity and low loss materials making detection of delamination and some of the foreign materials (which also are low permittivity and low loss) quite challenging in the microwave and millimeter wave regime. Likewise, foreign materials such as release film in adhesive layers can be sufficiently thin as to not cause significant attenuation in through-transmission ultrasonic signals, making them difficult to detect. This paper presents a collaborative effort intended to explore the efficacy of different non-contact NDI techniques for detecting flaws in a stacked open fiberglass honeycomb core panel. These techniques primarily included air-coupled through-transmission ultrasonics, single-sided wideband synthetic aperture microwave and millimeter-wave imaging, and lens-focused technique. The goal of this investigation has been to not only evaluate the efficacy of these techniques, but also to determine their unique advantages and limitations for evaluating parameters such as flaw type, flaw size, and flaw depth.

  8. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on Repair Micro-shear Bond Strength of Silica- and Zirconia-filled Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulaei, Mohammad; Bahari, Mahmoud; Ahmadi, Anahid; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Effect of surface treatments on repair bond strength of aged composite resins might be different due to their dissimilar fillers. The aim was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on repair micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of silica- (Spectrum TPH) and zirconia-filled (Filtek Z250) composite resins. Materials and methods Twenty-seven composite resin blocks were made from each type of composite resin: Z250 and Spectrum TPH. After aging, blocks of each type were randomly divided into three groups according to surface treatments: alloy primer, silane, and only surface roughening. Subsequently, each group was further subdivided into 3 subgroups based on the adhesive system used: Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond, and Margin Bond. Four composite resin columns were added on each block. After thermocycling, µSBStest were done at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analysed using multifactor ANOVA, one-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Bonferroni tests (α = 0.05). Results Analysis of data showed that the effect of composite resin type was not significant (p > 0.05), but the effects of the type of surface treatment (p = 0.01) and the type of adhesive system (p = 0.01) were significant on repair µSBS. In addition, the cumulative effect of the composite type-surface treatment and the composite type with the type of adhesive system were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). However, the cumulative effects of the adhesive system-surface treatment (p = 0.03) and the composite type-the adhesive system-surface treatments (p = 0.002) were significant. Conclusion Although repair µSBS values of both silica- and zirconia-filled composite resins were similar, use of different combinations of surface treatments and adhesive systems affected their repair µSBS differently. PMID:23277859

  9. Interfacial bonding and friction in silicon carbide (filament)-reinforced ceramic- and glass-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, J.D.; Shetty, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports interfacial shear strength and interfacial sliding friction stress assessed in unidirectional SiC-filament-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and borosilicate glass composites and 0/90 cross-ply reinforced borosilicate glass composite using a fiber pushout test technique. The interface debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load were measured for varying lengths of the embedded fibers by continuously monitoring the load during debonding and pushout of single fibers in finite-thickness specimens. The dependences of the debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load on the initial embedded lengths of the fibers were in agreement with nonlinear shear-lag models. An iterative regression procedure was used to evaluate the interfacial properties, shear debond strength (τ d ), and sliding friction stress (τ f ), from the embedded fiber length dependences of the debonding load and the maximum frictional sliding load, respectively. The shear-lag model and the analysis of sliding friction permit explicit evaluation of a coefficient of sliding friction (μ) and a residual compressive stress on the interface (σ 0 ). The cross-ply composite showed a significantly higher coefficient of interfacial friction as compared to the unidirectional composites

  10. Accelerated fatigue testing of dentin-composite bond with continuously increasing load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Guo, Jiawen; Li, Yuping; Heo, Young Cheul; Chen, Jihua; Xin, Haitao; Fok, Alex

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an accelerated fatigue test method that used a continuously increasing load for testing the dentin-composite bond strength. Dentin-composite disks (ϕ5mm×2mm) made from bovine incisor roots were subjected to cyclic diametral compression with a continuously increasingly load amplitude. Two different load profiles, linear and nonlinear with respect to the number of cycles, were considered. The data were then analyzed by using a probabilistic failure model based on the Weakest-Link Theory and the classical stress-life function, before being transformed to simulate clinical data of direct restorations. All the experimental data could be well fitted with a 2-parameter Weibull function. However, a calibration was required for the effective stress amplitude to account for the difference between static and cyclic loading. Good agreement was then obtained between theory and experiments for both load profiles. The in vitro model also successfully simulated the clinical data. The method presented will allow tooth-composite interfacial fatigue parameters to be determined more efficiently. With suitable calibration, the in vitro model can also be used to assess composite systems in a more clinically relevant manner. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on the bond strength of a composite resin adhered to stainless steel crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza-Robleto, Selene J; Villa-Negrete, Dulce M; García-Contreras, René; Scougall-Vílchis, Rogelio J; Guadarrama-Quiroz, Luis J; Robles-Bermeo, Norma L

    2013-01-01

    A technique whereby the practitioner could improve the esthetic appearance of anterior stainless steel crowns (SSC) could provide a cost-effective alternative to more expensive commercially available preveneered SSCs, which may not be uniformly available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the metal crown surface on the shear bond strength of composite resin adhered to stainless steel crowns. Seventy extracted anterior bovine teeth randomly divided into 2 groups (n=35/group), were restored with primary maxillary left central incisor SSCs. Surface roughening with a green stone was performed on the labial surfaces, and the crowns of the experimental group were exposed to UV irradiation for 80 minutes. All samples were treated with metal-composite adhesive, followed by composite opaquer. Standardized composite blocks were bonded on the treated surfaces, and the shear bond strength was tested at 1 mm/minute. The values were recorded in MPa and statistically analyzed. The mean value of shear bond strength was significantly higher for the experimental group (19.7 ± 4.3 MPa) than the control group (16.3 ± 4.5 MPa). Ultraviolet irradiation of primary tooth stainless steel crowns significantly increased the shear bond strength of composite resin adhered to the facial surface.

  12. Effect of filler ratio in adhesive systems on the shear bond strength of resin composite to porcelains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Ahmet Umut; Sarikaya, Isil Biçer; Güler, Eda; Yücel, Ali cagin

    2009-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of six different adhesive systems on the shear bond strength of resin composite to feldspathic and low-fusing porcelains. Sixty porcelain blocks were prepared for each low-fusing (Matchmaker) and feldspathic (MVK95) porcelain specimen. After surface preparation, the porcelain specimens were divided into six groups (n = 10) for different adhesive systems (Adper Prompt L-Pop, QuadrantUnil Bond, Te-Econom, PQ1, One-StepPlus and Prime&Bond NT). After adhesive application, a universal resin composite (FiltekZ250) was condensed on the specimens. The prepared specimens were then stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, then all the samples were thermal cycled 1000 times between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. Shear testing was performed on a universal test machine using a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The statistical analysis of the bond strength data included two-way ANOVA. Then, the means were compared by Tukey HSD test (alpha = 0.05). The lowest bond strength was observed in Adper Prompt L-Pop. No statistically significant difference was observed between One-Step Plus and Prime&Bond NT. The highest bond strength was observed in PQ1. When low-fusing or feldspathic porcelain restorations are repaired with resin composite, self-etching adhesive systems may not be indicated. If maximum bond strength is the goal in porcelain resin bonding, adhesive systems that have a high filler ratio should be used.

  13. Comparison of the resin cement bond strength to an indirect composites treated by Er;YAG laser and sandblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansure Mirzaee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Indirect composites are designed to overcome the shortcomings of direct composites such as polymerization shrinkage and low degree of conversion. But, good adhesion of resin cements to indirect composites is still difficult. This research was designed to assess the effect of different powers of Er;YAG laser compared with sandblasting. On the micro tensil bond strength of resin cement to indirect composites.   Materials and Methods: Specimens were prepred using dental resin composite (Gradia GC and metallic mold (15×5×5 mm and were cured according to the manufacturer’s instructions. 24 blocks were prepared and randomly divided into 12 groups. G1:no treatment (as control, G 2-6: Er; YAG laser irradiation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watt, G7: sandblast. Two composite blocks were bonded to each other with Panavia F.2. resin cement. The cylindrical sections with dimensions of 1 mm were tested in a microtensile bond strength tester device using 0.5 mm/min speed until fracture points. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and T-test.   Results: Interaction between lasers irradiation and sandblast treatments were significant (P0.05 whether samples were sandblasted or not. Samples which received 300 mJ of laser showed lower bond strength compared with no laser treatment. Other groups showed no significant difference (P>0.05.   Conclusion: It seems that application of sandblast with proper variables, is a good way to improve bond strength.Laser application had no influence in improving the bond strength between the indirect composite and resin cement.

  14. An evaluation on shear strength of composite resin bonded to primary teeth dentin after Nd: YAG laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowsari A

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the differences in the composite and morphology of dentin in primary and permanent teeth, it is necessary to make improvements in bonding techniques to promote the strength of composite resins bonded to the dentinal surface, in primary teeth. The use of lower radiation, to make structural and chemical changes in dentinal surfaces has been investigated. This research was conducted to evaluate the shear strength of the composite bonded to primary teeth dentin after Nd: YAG laser radiation and acid etching for conditioning. Peripheral dentin of the buccal and lingua! surfaces of 60 extracted posterior primary teeth were exposed and polished with 600 grit with Sic paper. The teeth were divided randomly in 3 groups of 20 teeth. In group 1 etching gel, primer and adhesive of scotch bond multipurpose system (SMP, in group 2 laser at 1.6 w and 80 mj/pulse, and in group 3 laser at 2 s and 700 mj/pulse were used. Moreover, in groups 2 and 3, after laser radiation, acid etching, primer and adhesive of SMP system were applied. After necessary laboratory tests, the mean shear bond strength in MPa were 20.99±5.3 (group 1, 23.82±6.31 (group 2 and 26.58±5.59 (group 3. ANOVA, scheffe, tukey statistical tests showed that the bond strengths of group 3 were statistically higher than group 1. The frequency of dentin cohesive failures were significantly higher in groups 2 and 3, compared to group 1 that indicates a higher bond strength in these groups. Scanning electron mirographs of laser radiated surfaces, show a porous and rough surface morphology that enhances the mechanical bond of the composite.

  15. Influence of frequency on shear fatigue strength of resin composite to enamel bonds using self-etch adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamizawa, Toshiki; Scheidel, Donal D; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of different frequency rates on of bond durability of self-etch adhesives to enamel using shear fatigue strength (SFS) testing. A two-step self-etch adhesive (OX, OptiBond XTR), and two single step self-etch adhesives (GB, G-ӕnial Bond and SU, Scotchbond Universal) were used in this study. The shear fatigue strength (SFS) to enamel was obtained. A staircase method was used to determine the SFS values with 50,000 cycles or until failure occurred. Fatigue testing was performed at frequencies of 5Hz, 10Hz, and 20Hz. For each test condition, 30 specimens were prepared for the SFS testing. Regardless of the bond strength test method, OX showed significantly higher SFS values than the two single-step self-etch adhesives. For each of the three individual self-etch adhesives, there was no significant difference in SFS depending on the frequency rate, although 20Hz results tended to be higher. Regardless of the self-etch adhesive system, frequencies of 5Hz, 10Hz, and 20Hz produced similar results in fatigue strength of resin composite bonded to enamel using 50,000 cycles or until bond failure. Accelerated fatigue testing provides valuable information regarding the long term durability of resin composite to enamel bonding using self-etch adhesive system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparative efficacy of Er,Cr:YSGG and Er:YAG lasers for etching of composite for orthodontic bracket bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amir Hossein; Chiniforush, Nasim; Sharifi, Nastaran; Hosseini, Amir Mehdi

    2018-01-11

    Several techniques have been proposed to obtain a durable bond, and the efficacy of these techniques is assessed by measuring parameters such as bond strength. Laser has provided a bond strength as high as that of acid etching in vitro and has simpler use with shorter clinical time compared to acid etching. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers for etching and bonding of composite to orthodontic brackets. No previous study has evaluated the effect of these particular types of laser. A total of 70 composite blocks were randomly divided into five groups (n = 14): group 1, etching with phosphoric acid for 20 s; group 2, Er:YAG laser irradiation with 2 W power for 10 s; group 3, Er:YAG laser with 3 W power for 10 s; group 4, Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 2 W power for 10 s; group 5, Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 3 W power for 10 s. Metal brackets were then bonded to composites, and after 5000 thermal cycles, they were subjected to shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine after 24 h of water storage. One sample of each group was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to assess changes in composite surface after etching. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was calculated under a stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed. The mean and standard deviation of shear bond strength were 18.65 ± 3.36, 19.68 ± 5.34, 21.31 ± 4.03, 17.38 ± 6.94, and 16.45 ± 4.26 MPa in groups 1-5, respectively. The ARI scores showed that the bond failure mode in all groups was mainly mixed. The groups were not significantly different in terms of shear bond strength. Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG lasers with the mentioned parameters yield optimal shear bond strength and can be used as an alternative to acid etching for bracket bond to composite.

  17. Thermally Bonded PET–Basalt Sandwich Composites for Heat Pipeline Protection: Preparation, Stab Resisting, and Thermal-Insulating Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the cost and bulky problems of buried thermal pipeline insulating materials, this study adopts basalt fabric and low-melting PET nonwoven to construct low-cost and light-weight pipeline thermal-insulating composites after needle punching and thermal bonding processes. Research result shows that thermal-bonded temperature affected the stab resistance and burst energy more significantly. As thermal-bonded temperature increased, knife resistance and spike resistance presented the upward and then downward trends, but the burst energy gradually decreased. Yarn pull-out result shows that the enhancement of stab resistance of intra-/inter-thermal-bonded structure resulted from the increment in the coefficient of friction between yarns. When PET–basalt sandwich composites were thermal-bonded at 140 °C for 5 min, the maximum knife and spike resistance were 147.00 N (1.99 J and 196.30 N (1.11 J, respectively, and burst energy was 4.79 J, thermal conductivity reduced to 0.0073 W/(m∙K. The resultant thermally bonded sandwich composites can be used as thermal-insulating protection for buried thermal pipeline.

  18. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, A; Nandlal, B

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composite resin and nanocomposite resin to sandblasted primary anterior stainless steel crown. The study samples consisted of 30 primary anterior stainless steel crowns (Unitek TM, size R4), embedded in resin blocks with crown, in test groups of 15 samples each. Mounting of the crown was done using resin block with one crown each. Sandblasting was done and the bonding agent Prime and Bond NT (Dentsply) was applied on the labial surface of the primary anterior sandblasted crown. The composite resin and nanocomposite resin were placed into the well of Teflon jig and bonded to Stainless Steel Crowns. The cured samples were placed in distilled water and stored in incubator at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. Shear bond strength was measured using universal testing machine (Hounsefield U.K. Model, with a capacity of 50 KN). Independent sample 't' test revealed a nonsignificant (P resin and nanocomposite resin had statistically similar mean shear bond strength, with nanocomposite having little more strength compared to conventional composite.

  19. The comparative evaluation of fracture resistance and microleakage in bonded amalgam, amalgam, and composite resins in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanishree, H S; Shanthala, B M; Bobby, W

    2015-01-01

    The intense development of adhesive restorative materials and parents' preferences for esthetic restorations prompt clinicians to use alternative restorative materials for primary molars. Amalgam, however, is the choice of material when it comes to occlusal stress bearing areas, either in primary or permanent molars. To overcome the drawbacks of amalgam and restorative adhesive materials, the bonded amalgam technique is employed. To evaluate microleakage and fracture resistance of bonded amalgam in primary molars, and compare it with the microleakage and fracture resistance of high-copper amalgam and composite resin materials. An in vitro study and 60 caries-free primary molars were used. A total of 60 samples were randomly divided into two equal groups for the evaluation of microleakage and fracture resistance. Class V cavities for microleakage study prepared on 30 samples and Class II mesio-occluso-distal cavities for fracture resistance study on other 30 samples were prepared and randomly divided into three equal groups. Group I received amalgam, Group II received bonded amalgam, and Group III received composite resins. The microleakage was viewed under a stereomicroscope. The fracture resistance was evaluated using a universal testing machine. Bonded amalgam exhibited minimum microleakage, when compared to amalgam and composite resin and was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.203), while amalgam showed better fracture resistance compared to bonded amalgam and composite resin. It was found to be statistically insignificant (P = 0.144). Bonded amalgam appears to be comparable to amalgam when microleakage is considered and to composite resin when fracture resistance is considered; hence, bonded amalgam can also be an alternative material to amalgam in primary molars.

  20. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane.

  1. Repair bond strength of resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic using different repair systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the repair bond strength of a nanohybrid resin composite to a novel CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic based on four intraoral ceramic repair systems. Vita Enamic (VE) CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic was used in this study. Specimens were divided into five test groups according to the repair method performed on the ceramic surface: Gr C (No treatment; control); Gr CZ (Cimara Zircon); Gr PR (Porcelain Repair); Gr CR (Clearfil Repair); and Gr CS (CoJet system). Nanohybrid resin composite (GrandioSO) was packed onto treated ceramic surfaces for adhesion testing using microtensile bond strength test. Debonded specimens were examined with a stereomicroscope and SEM to determine the fracture mode. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. PR and CZ repair systems significantly enhanced the bond strength of nanohybrid resin composite to VE CAD/CAM hybrid ceramic when compared with the other tested repair systems.

  2. Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cafer Türkmen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group: direct composite resin restoration (Alert with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive, Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia luted with a resin cement (Cement-It combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond, Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. RESULTS: The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7 showed better results compared to the other groups (p0.05. The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. CONCLUSION: The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces.

  3. Development of a thin film vitreous bond based composite ceramic coating for corrosion and abrasion services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, B.

    2003-01-01

    IPC has been involved with the Alberta Research Council in developing a vitreous bond (VB) - based composite ceramic fluoropolymer coating technology. Compared to the present state of the art which is based on a hard discontinuous phase (ceramic particles) suspended in a soft continuous matrix (fluoropolymer mix) the novelty of our approach consists of designing a composite system in which both the ceramic and the fluoropolymer phases are continuous. The ceramic matrix will provide the strength and the erosion resistance for the fluoropolymer matrix even at high temperatures. The ceramic formulation employed is not affected by temperatures up to 500 o F while the fluoropolymer matrix provides a corrosion protection seal for the ceramic matrix. The inherent flexibility of the polymer matrix will protect against brittle fractures that may develop by handling or impact. Therefore the composite coating is able to withstand the deformation of the substrate without chipping or disbanding. The fluoropolymer matrix also provides dry lubrication properties further enhancing the erosion resistance of the ceramic phase. The thickness of the coating is very thin, in the 25 to 100 micron range. In summary, the coating technology is able to provide the following features: Corrosion protection levels similar to those of fluoropolymer coatings; Erosion resistance similar to that of ceramic coatings; Price comparable to that of polymer coatings; Exceptional wear resistance properties; and Capability for coating complicated shapes internally or externally or both. This paper will discuss the theory and development of this new technology and the resultant coating and potential properties. (author)

  4. Static Strength of Adhesively-bonded Woven Fabric Kenaf Composite Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Ahmad; Lee, Sim Yee; Supar, Khairi

    2017-06-01

    Natural fibers are potentially used as reinforcing materials and combined with epoxy resin as matrix system to form a superior specific strength (or stiffness) materials known as composite materials. The advantages of implementing natural fibers such as kenaf fibers are renewable, less hazardous during fabrication and handling process; and relatively cheap compared to synthetic fibers. The aim of current work is to conduct a parametric study on static strength of adhesively bonded woven fabric kenaf composite plates. Fabrication of composite panels were conducted using hand lay-up techniques, with variation of stacking sequence, over-lap length, joint types and lay-up types as identified in testing series. Quasi-static testing was carried out using mechanical testing following code of practice. Load-displacement profiles were analyzed to study its structural response prior to ultimate failures. It was found that cross-ply lay-up demonstrates better static strength compared to quasi-isotropic lay-up counterparts due to larger volume of 0° plies exhibited in cross-ply lay-up. Consequently, larger overlap length gives better joining strength, as expected, however this promotes to weight penalty in the joining structure. Most samples showed failures within adhesive region known as cohesive failure modes, however, few sample demonstrated interface failure. Good correlations of parametric study were found and discussed in the respective section.

  5. Hydrogen bonds, interfacial stiffness moduli, and the interlaminar shear strength of carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H. Cantrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemical treatment of carbon fibers used in carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites greatly affects the fraction of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds formed at the fiber-matrix interface. The H-bonds are major contributors to the fiber-matrix interfacial shear strength and play a direct role in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS of the composite. The H-bond contributions τ to the ILSS and magnitudes KN of the fiber-matrix interfacial stiffness moduli of seven carbon fiber-epoxy matrix composites, subjected to different fiber surface treatments, are calculated from the Morse potential for the interactions of hydroxyl and carboxyl acid groups formed on the carbon fiber surfaces with epoxy receptors. The τ calculations range from 7.7 MPa to 18.4 MPa in magnitude, depending on fiber treatment. The KN calculations fall in the range (2.01 – 4.67 ×1017 N m−3. The average ratio KN/|τ| is calculated to be (2.59 ± 0.043 × 1010 m−1 for the seven composites, suggesting a nearly linear connection between ILSS and H-bonding at the fiber-matrix interfaces. The linear connection indicates that τ may be assessable nondestructively from measurements of KN via a technique such as angle beam ultrasonic spectroscopy.

  6. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Sánchez-Ayala

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S 3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06. None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76. When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05 at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3–Q1, 1.25–0.00 compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3–Q1, 0.25–0.00. The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin.

  7. Bond strength and monomer conversion of indirect composite resin restorations, Part 1: Light vs heat polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Daniel Alexandre Menezes Pedrosa; Magne, Pascal; Monteiro-Junior, Sylvio

    2014-12-01

    To assess the resin microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and the monomer conversion (MC) of indirect composite resin restorations made of three different materials. Two light-polymerized direct materials (Filtek Z100 and Premise) and one light- and heat-polymerized indirect material (Premise Indirect) were used. For MTBS testing, 42 cylindrical samples were fabricated (7 pairs per material). Surface conditioning included airborne-particle abrasion, cleaning, and application of a silane. Cylinders were bonded to each other using adhesive resin (Optibond FL). Specimens were stored in water for 24 h. Another 15 cylinders (5 per material) were fabricated for MC measurements (FT-IR) immediately and at 24 h. The MTBS data were submitted to one-way ANOVA and the MC to two-way ANOVA (material and storage time) (α=0.05), followed by post-hoc comparisons with the Tukey test. The MTBS to Z100 was 72.2 MPa, significantly higher than that to Premise (48.4 MPa) and Premise Indirect (52.7 MPa). The immediate MC was similar for all materials (range 51% to 56%) and significantly increased at 24 h (range 57% to 66%), except for Z100. Premise Indirect showed the highest MC (66% at 24 h). Z100 showed better "bondability" than Premise and Premise Indirect. Premise Indirect, with its heat initiator, did not present a higher MC.

  8. Load Rate Effects in Adhesive Single Lap Joints Bonded with Epoxy/Ceramic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heraldo da Costa Mattos

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the analysis of the effect of the loading rate in a particular class of single lap joints used in the oil industry. The adhesive/adherend system consists of ASTM A36 steel plates bonded with an epoxy/ceramic composite. The loading rate sensitivity is analysed considering two different situations: (i strain controlled quasi-static rupture tests and (ii applications in which the joint may oscillate like a spring. This second situation is motivated by a specific application: the transport of an ethanol reservoir by a crane using a special truss lifting system attached to the tank through bonded joints. Quasi-static tensile tests allow observing a rate-dependent behaviour of the joint with higher strengths for higher cross-head velocities. An algebraic equation is proposed to predict the dependence of the rupture force on the elongation rate in tensile tests and the model predictions are in good agreement with experimental results. However, in the case of the transport of a tank with mass M (situation (ii, the lifting system cannot be only designed to resist the static load (the weight. Fast loading may induce vibration. Like in a spring-mass system, even a very small oscillation of the joint induces a dynamic load that is higher than the static load. A simple analysis allows proposing conditions for a safe operation in this case.

  9. Chemical bonding and the equilibrium composition of Grignard reagents in ethereal solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, André M; Barbosa, André G H

    2011-11-10

    A thorough analysis of the electronic structure and thermodynamic aspects of Grignard reagents and its associated equilibrium composition in ethereal solutions is performed. Considering methylmagnesium halides containing fluorine, chlorine, and bromine, we studied the neutral, charged, and radical species associated with their chemical equilibrium in solution. The ethereal solvents considered, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and ethyl ether (Et(2)O), were modeled using the polarizable continuum model (PCM) and also by explicit coordination to the Mg atoms in a cluster. The chemical bonding of the species that constitute the Grignard reagent is analyzed in detail with generalized valence bond (GVB) wave functions. Equilibrium constants were calculated with the DFT/M06 functional and GVB wave functions, yielding similar results. According to our calculations and existing kinetic and electrochemical evidence, the species R(•), R(-), (•)MgX, and RMgX(2)(-) must be present in low concentration in the equilibrium. We conclude that depending on the halogen, a different route must be followed to produce the relevant equilibrium species in each case. Chloride and bromide must preferably follow a "radical-based" pathway, and fluoride must follow a "carbanionic-based" pathway. These different mechanisms are contrasted against the available experimental results and are proven to be consistent with the existing thermodynamic data on the Grignard reagent equilibria.

  10. Laser-based surface patterning of composite plates for improved secondary adhesive bonding

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Ran

    2018-03-01

    The effects of laser irradiation surface pretreatments on the mode I fracture toughness of adhesively bonded composite joints were evaluated. First, pulsed CO2 laser irradiation was uniformly deployed on carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) substrates. Next, double cantilever beam (DCB) tests were performed to assess the effects of surface pretreatments on the mode I fracture toughness of the adhesive joints. Then, a thoughtful combination of the proposed surface pretreatments was deployed to fabricate DCB specimens with patterned interfaces. A wide range of techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), contact profilometry, and optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to ascertain the effects of all investigated surface pretreatments. It is shown that patterning promoted damage mechanisms that were not observed in the uniformly treated interfaces, resulting in an effective fracture toughness well above that predicted by a classical rule of mixture.

  11. Ultrasonic techniques for repair of aircraft structures with bonded composite patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. H.; Senapati, N.; Francini, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    This is a paper on a research and development project to demonstrate a novel ultrasonic process for the field application of boron/epoxy (B/Ep) patches for repair of aircraft structures. The first phase of the project was on process optimization and testing to develop the most practical ultrasonic processing techniques. Accelerated testing and aging behavior of precured B/Ep patches, which were ultrasonically bonded to simulated B-52 wing panel assemblies, were performed by conducting flight-by-flight spectrum loading fatigue tests. The spectrum represented 2340 missions/flights or 30 years of service. The effects of steady-state applied temperature and prior exposure of the B/Ep composite patches were evaluated. Representative experimental results of this phase of the project are presented.

  12. Effect of Different Anti-Oxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resins to Bleached Human Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladi, Hari Krishna; Bollu, Indira Priyadarshini; Burla, Devipriya; Ballullaya, Srinidhi Vishnu; Devalla, Srihari; Maroli, Sohani; Jayaprakash, Thumu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The bond strength of the composite to the bleached enamel plays a very important role in the success and longevity of an aesthetic restoration. Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the effect of Aloe Vera with 10% Sodium Ascorbate on the Shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached human enamel. Materials and Methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into 5 groups. Group I and V are unbleached and bleached controls groups respectively. Group II, III, IV served as experimental groups. The labial surfaces of groups II, III, IV, V were treated with 35% Carbamide Peroxide for 30mins. Group II specimens were subjected to delayed composite bonding. Group III and IV specimens were subjected to application of 10% Sodium Ascorbate and leaf extract of Aloe Vera following the Carbamide Peroxide bleaching respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength using universal testing machine and the results were statistically analysed using ANOVA test. Tukey (HSD) Honest Significant Difference test was used to comparatively analyse statistical differences between the groups. A p-value <0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results The mean shear bond strength values of Group V showed significantly lower bond strengths than Groups I, II, III, IV (p-value <0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength values of groups I, II, III, IV. Conclusion Treatment of the bleached enamel surface with Aloe Vera and 10% Sodium Ascorbate provided consistently better bond strength. Aloe Vera may be used as an alternative to 10% Sodium Ascorbate. PMID:26674656

  13. Parental satisfaction with bonded resin composite strip crowns for primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Waggoner, William F

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the parental satisfaction of bonded resin composite strip crowns for the treatment of maxillary anterior primary incisors and compare their satisfaction with the clinical evaluation and success of the crowns. This was a retrospective, clinical study of patients who had strip crowns (SC) placed on maxillary primary incisors, returned for at least 1 recall examination, and whose parents gave consent for them to participate in the study. Color photographs were used for evaluation by 2 independent pediatric dentists. Parental satisfaction regarding the esthetics of the crowns was evaluated by a questionnaire. One hundred and twelve restorations placed in 40 children were evaluated. The evaluations were performed after the crowns had been in place for an average of 18 months (range=6-25 months). Overall parental satisfaction with the treatment was excellent; however, satisfaction with regard to color received the lowest rating. No significant differences were found between dentist and parent evaluations of color, size, and overall appearance (Fisher exact test; P=.194,.776,.291, respectively). Parents rated their overall satisfaction as being positive regardless of their poor ratings of color, size, or overall appearance. However, a significant relationship was found between durability and overall satisfaction (P=.046). Parents who gave poor ratings to durability also rated their overall satisfaction as being poor. Parental satisfaction with bonded resin composite SCs for the treatment of primary incisors with large or multi-surface caries was excellent. Parents' dissatisfaction was most often related to color of the restorations. However, this did not affect their overall satisfaction with the crowns. The durability of restorations negatively affected the rating of overall satisfaction with the crown. Durability seems to be of more concern than excellent color match to this group of parents.

  14. Effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of composite resin to amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Koolman, C; Aladag, A; Dündar, M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing amalgam restorations with composite resins using surface conditioning methods is a conservative treatment approach. This study investigated the effects of different conditioning methods that could be used for repair of amalgam fractures. Amalgam (N=96) was condensed into cavities within autopolymerizing polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and the exposed surface of each specimen (diameter, 6 mm; thickness, 2 mm) was ground finished. The specimens were randomly divided into nine experimental groups (n=12 per group), depending on the conditioning method used. The control group had natural central incisors with amalgam (n=12). The combination of the following conditioning methods was tested: silicacoating (Sc), sandblasting (Sb), metal primers, coupling agents, fiber (Fb) application, and opaquers (O). Five types of silanes, metal primers, or adhesives (Visiobond [V], Porcelain Photobond [PP], Alloy Primer [AP], Unibond sealer [Us], ESPE-Sil [ES]), and four opaquers, namely, Clearfil St Opaquer (CstO), Sinfony (S), Miris (M), and an experimental Opaquer (EO-Cavex), were used. The groups were as follows: group 1, Sc+ES+S+V; group 2, Sc+ES+CstO+V; group 3, Sc+ES+M+V; group 4, Sc+ES+EO+V; group 5, Sb+AP+S; group 6, Sb+AP+PP+CstO; group 7, Sc+ES+S+Fb+V+Fb; group 8-control, SC+ES+V; and group 9, Etch+Sc+ES+S+Us. One repair composite was used for all groups (Clearfil Photo Bond Posterior, Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan). Shear bond strengths (SBSs) (MPa ± SD) were evaluated after 5 weeks of water storage (analysis of variance [ANOVA], Tukey honestly significant differences [HSD], α=0.05). Group 1 exhibited significantly higher values (35.5 ± 4.1) than were seen in group 4 (19.4 ± 8.9), group 6 (19.1 ± 7.8), and group 8 (20.1 ± 4.1) (pcomposite adhesion to amalgam. Experimental opaquer exhibited lower values. Leaving a small border of enamel around the restoration decreased the bond strength.

  15. Effect of low fluency dentin conditioning on tensile bond strength of composite bonded to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, B; Askari, N; Tielemans, M; Heysselaer, D; Lamard, L; Peremans, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Nammour, S

    2011-03-01

    Several studies in the literature have previously shown that the bond strength of a composite bonded to dentin is almost equivalent as when dentin is prepared by either bur or Er:YAG laser. The aim of this preliminary study is to assess the hypothesis that dentin conditioning at low fluency by means of Er:YAG laser can improve the value of adhesion of composites resin to dentin. Sixty surfaces of caries-free human third molars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided into five groups of 12 teeth. The bur group was the control, prepared using bur, group L was prepared using Er:YAG 200 mJ, SSP (50 µs), 20 Hz, 15 seconds of sweeping, for groups L80, L100, L120, they were prepared first, with the same parameters of the group L 200, and then they received a conditioning, which is, respectively, 15 s of irradiations at: 80 mJ (SSP, 10 Hz), 100 mJ (SSP, 10 Hz), and 120 mJ (SSP, 10 Hz). All samples were restored in a single-component adhesive system: Xenon (DENTSPLY), and ceramX (DENTSPLY) as the resin composite. The specimens were submitted to tensile bond strength test using a universal testing machine. Data were submitted to statistical analysis using ANOVA coupled to a Tukey-Kramer test at the 95% level. The mean values in MPa were 33.3 for group B, 36.73 for group L 200, 41.7 for group L80, 37.9 for group L100, and 39.1 for group L120. Our results showed that dentin conditioning at a low fluency of 12.58 J/cm(2) per pulse, with 80 mJ output energy and 50-µs pulse duration can significantly improve tensile bond strength of a composite bonded to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentine.

  16. Damage prognosis of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of unmanned aerial vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gobbato, Maurizio [UCSD; Conte, Joel [UCSD; Kosmatke, John [UCSD; Oliver, Joseph A [UCSD

    2009-01-01

    The extensive use of lightweight advanced composite materials in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) drastically increases the sensitivity to both fatigue- and impact-induced damage of their critical structural components (e.g., wings and tail stabilizers) during service life. The spar-to-skin adhesive joints are considered one of the most fatigue sensitive subcomponents of a lightweight UAV composite wing with damage progressively evolving from the wing root. This paper presents a comprehensive probabilistic methodology for predicting the remaining service life of adhesively-bonded joints in laminated composite structural components of UAVs. Non-destructive evaluation techniques and Bayesian inference are used to (i) assess the current state of damage of the system and, (ii) update the probability distribution of the damage extent at various locations. A probabilistic model for future loads and a mechanics-based damage model are then used to stochastically propagate damage through the joint. Combined local (e.g., exceedance of a critical damage size) and global (e.g.. flutter instability) failure criteria are finally used to compute the probability of component failure at future times. The applicability and the partial validation of the proposed methodology are then briefly discussed by analyzing the debonding propagation, along a pre-defined adhesive interface, in a simply supported laminated composite beam with solid rectangular cross section, subjected to a concentrated load applied at mid-span. A specially developed Eliler-Bernoulli beam finite element with interlaminar slip along the damageable interface is used in combination with a cohesive zone model to study the fatigue-induced degradation in the adhesive material. The preliminary numerical results presented are promising for the future validation of the methodology.

  17. Effect of organic solvents compared to sandblasting on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid and nanofilled composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Rafael Torres; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; Mazur, Rui Fernando; De Souza, Evelise Machado; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the repair bond strength of nanohybrid (Empress Direct) and nanofilled (Filtek Z350 XT) composite resins. A total of 120 specimens of each material (7.5 x 4.5 x 3 mm) were prepared and polished with SiC paper. Half of the specimens were kept in water for seven days and the other half for six months; they were then divided into six groups according to the type of surface treatment: negative control (no treatment), Al2O3sandblasted, liquid acetone, acetone gel, liquid alcohol and alcohol gel. Following application of the silane coupling agent and the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were fabricated on the specimens and light cured (20 seconds). The same composite resins were used for the repair. Additionally, ten intact specimens of each composite resin (without repair) were prepared (positive control). The specimens were then loaded to failure in the microshear mode. Three additional specimens were fabricated in each group, and the surface treatments were analyzed by atomic force microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nanofilled composite resin showed higher cohesive strength and repair bond strength than the nanohybrid composite resin. The aging process affected the repair bond strength of the nanofilled composite resin. Al2O3sandblasting was more efficient for the nanofilled composite resin and promoted greater surface roughness in both materials. The solvents demonstrated higher efficacy for the nanohybrid composite resin. The strengths resulting from the solvents were material dependent, and Al2O3sandblasting resulted in superior repair bond strength in both materials.

  18. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  19. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Eslami, Samaneh; Ameri, Hamide; Chasteen, Joseph E; Majidinia, Sara; Moghadam, Fatemeh Velayaty

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05). There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Various Surface Treatments of Fiber Posts on the Bond Strength to Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Nadalizadeh

    Full Text Available Introduction: The reliable bond at the root-post-core interface is critical for the clinical success of post-retained restorations. To decrease the risk of fracture, it is important to optimize the adhesion. Therefore, various post surface treatments have been proposed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of various surface treatments of fiber posts on the bond strength to composite core. Materials & Methods: In this study, 40 fiber reinforced posts were used. After preparing and sectioning them, resulting specimens were divided into four groups (N=28. The posts received different surface treatments such as no surface treatment (control group, preparing with hydrogen peroxide 10%, preparing with silane, preparing with HF and silane. Then, posts were tested in micro tensile testing machine. The results were analyzed by One-Way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Results: The greatest bond strength observed was in treatment with hydrogen peroxide 10% (19.84±8.95 MPa, and the lowest strength was related to the control group (12.44±3.40 MPa. The comparison of the groups with Dunnett T3 test showed that the differences between the groups was statistically significant (α=0.05.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, preparing with H2O2 -10 % and silane increases the bond strength of FRC posts to the composite core more than the other methods. Generally, the bond strength of posts to the composite core increases by surface treatment.

  1. Effect of thione primers on adhesive bonding between an indirect composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Hideyuki; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Shimoe, Saiji; Hirata, Isao; Matsumura, Hideo; Nikawa, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of primers on the shear bond strength of an indirect composite material joined to a silverpalladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd-Cu-Au) alloy (Castwell). Disk specimens were cast from the alloy and were air-abraded with alumina. Eight metal primers were applied to the alloy surface. A light-polymerized indirect composite material (Solidex) was bonded to the alloy. Shear bond strength was determined both before and after the application of thermocycling. Two groups primed with Metaltite (thione) and M. L. Primer (sulfide) showed the greatest post-thermocycling bond strength (8.8 and 6.5 MPa). The results of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analysis suggested that the thione monomer (MTU-6) in the Metaltite primer was strongly adsorbed onto the Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy surface even after repeated cleaning with acetone. The application of either the thione (MTU-6) or sulfide primer is effective for enhancing the bonding between a composite material and Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

  2. Comparison between water and ethanol wet bonding of resin composite to root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Di Renzo, Simona; Castagnola, Raffaella; Grande, Nicola M; Plotino, Gianluca; Foschi, Federico; Mannocci, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of resin dentin interfaces created with adhesives applied on root dentin using the water wet or ethanol wet bonding technique. The morphology of resin dentin interfaces was evaluated using confocal microscopy. Four experimental resin adhesives (R#A to R#D) and one commercial three-step/etch and rinse adhesive were applied to the root canal dentin of endodontically treated single canal incisors using the water (control) or ethanol wet bonding technique. The ethanol wet bonding substrate was achieved by keeping the root canal immersed in absolute ethanol (100%) for 3 minutes. The root dentin bonded specimens were sectioned into beams, stored in distilled water (24 hours) and finally tested for microtensile bond strengths (tTBS). Additional dentin surfaces were conditioned and bonded as previously described. They were prepared for the microscopy study and finally observed using confocal microscopy. The ethanol wet bonding technique gave higher bond strength values for all the adhesives tested: in Group 1 (water wet bonding technique) no significant difference was found between the resins tested; the only exception being the most hydrophilic Resin #4 showing the highest bond strength values (P < 0.05). In Group 2 (ethanol wet bonding technique) no statistical differences were present between Resin #A and Resin #D. Resin #C showed the highest bond strength values. Confocal microscopy showed better resin diffusion and hybrid layer formation when the ethanol wet bonding was used.

  3. Fabrication, Microstructure, and Mechanical Property of NiAl-based Composite with Microlaminated Architecture by Roll Bonding and Annealing Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guohua; Wang, Qingwei; Geng, Lin; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Weiping; Du, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Microlaminated TiB2-NiAl composite sheets consisting of alternating TiB2-rich and monolithic NiAl layers have been successfully fabricated by roll bonding and reaction annealing of Ni sheets and TiB2/Al composite sheets. Solid-liquid reaction mechanisms including diffusion reaction and precipitation were determined in the initial multi-laminated Ni-(TiB2/Al) sheets at 1473 K (1200 °C). After fabrication, the microlaminated composite sheets have a strong texture with parallel to normal direction formed by phase transformation inheritance from initial rolling texture of Ni sheets via diffusion reaction. Both the tensile strength and elongation of the microlaminated TiB2-NiAl composite sheets were significantly improved when tested at the temperatures above BDTT, which could be attributed to the unique laminated structure, bimodal grain size distribution in NiAl matrix, and enhanced interface bonding between both layers.

  4. A high conversion-gain Q-band InP DHBT subharmonic mixer using LO frequency doubler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Vidkjær, Jens; Krozer, Viktor

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents analysis and design of a Q-band subharmonic mixer (SHM) with high conversion gain. The SHM consists of a local oscillator (LO) frequency doubler, RF pre-amplifier, and single-ended mixer. The SHM has been fabricated in a high-speed InP double heterojunction bipolar transistor...

  5. A high frequency active voltage doubler in standard CMOS using offset-controlled comparators for inductive power transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung-Min; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we present a fully integrated active voltage doubler in CMOS technology using offset-controlled high speed comparators for extending the range of inductive power transmission to implantable microelectronic devices (IMD) and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags. This active voltage doubler provides considerably higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and lower dropout voltage compared to its passive counterpart and requires lower input voltage than active rectifiers, leading to reliable and efficient operation with weakly coupled inductive links. The offset-controlled functions in the comparators compensate for turn-on and turn-off delays to not only maximize the forward charging current to the load but also minimize the back current, optimizing PCE in the high frequency (HF) band. We fabricated the active voltage doubler in a 0.5-μm 3M2P std . CMOS process, occupying 0.144 mm(2) of chip area. With 1.46 V peak AC input at 13.56 MHz, the active voltage doubler provides 2.4 V DC output across a 1 kΩ load, achieving the highest PCE = 79% ever reported at this frequency. In addition, the built-in start-up circuit ensures a reliable operation at lower voltages.

  6. Sequential fault diagnosis for mechatronics system using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a sequential fault diagnosis method to handle asynchronous distinct faults using diagnostic hybrid bond graph and composite harmony search. The faults under consideration include fault mode, abrupt fault, and intermittent fault. The faults can occur in different time instances, which add to the difficulty of decision making for fault diagnosis. This is because the earlier occurred fault can exhibit fault symptom which masks the fault symptom of latter occurred fault. In order to solve this problem, a sequential identification algorithm is developed in which the identification task is reactivated based on two conditions. The first condition is that the latter occurred fault has at least one inconsistent coherence vector element which is consistent in coherence vector of the earlier occurred fault, and the second condition is that the existing fault coherence vector has the ability to hide other faults and the second-level residual exceeds the threshold. A new composite harmony search which is capable of handling continuous variables and binary variables simultaneously is proposed for identification purpose. Experiments on a mobile robot system are conducted to assess the proposed sequential fault diagnosis algorithm.

  7. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotes, Caroline; Cardoso, Mayra; Melo, Renata Marques de; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  8. Effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two self-etch adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Samimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual-cured composite resins are similar to self-cured composite resins in some of their clinical applications due to inadequate irradiation, lack of irradiation, or delayed irradiation. Therefore, incompatibility with self-etch adhesives (SEAs should be taken into account with their use. On the other, the extent of dentin dehydration has a great role in the quality of adhesion of these resin materials to dentin. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of dentin dehydration and composite resin polymerization mode on bond strength of two SEAs. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dentinal specimens were prepared from extracted intact third molars. Half of the samples were dehydrated in ethanol with increasing concentrations. Then Clearfil SE Bond (CSEB and Prompt L-Pop (PLP adhesives were applied in the two groups. Cylindrical composite resin specimens were cured using three polymerization modes: (1 Immediate light-curing, (2 delayed light-curing after 20 min, and (3 self-curing. Bond strength was measured using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Duncan post hoc tests. Statistical significance was defined at P 0.05. PLP showed significant differences between subgroups with the lowest bond strength in hydrated dentin with delayed light-curing and self-cured mode of polymerization. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, a delay in composite resin light-curing or using chemically cured composite resin had a deleterious effect on dentin bond strength of single-step SEAs used in the study.

  9. Microtensile bond strength and failure modes of flowable composites on primary dentin with application of different adhesive strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simge Durmuslar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resin composite is an option for the restoration of primary teeth, and new materials with simplified procedures are increasingly being suggested. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the microtensile bond strengths and fracture modes of flowable composites on primary dentin with application of different adhesive strategies. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted noncaries primary molars were abraded from buccal surfaces to expose dentin surface. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups as follows: Group 1, Vertise™ Flow (Kerr (self-adhering flowable composite; Group 2, G-aenial Universal Flo® (GC Europe (used with one-step self-etch system; Group 3, Tetric® N-Flow (Ivoclar/Vivadent (used with two-step total etch system. Then, the flowable composites were applied to buccal dentin surfaces with the help of guide mold. Samples were embedded in acrylic blocks and sectioned to form dentin-composite sticks with a surface area of approximately 1 mm2. Finally, a total of 180 sticks were obtained to give each group of 60 sticks. Microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min. Fracture modes were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Statistical Analysis: Microtensile bond strengths data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis nonparametric test. Results: The microtensile bond strengths of G-aenial (15.5 megapascals [Mpa] and Tetric (13.0 MPa were statistically significant higher than Vertise (2.3 MPa. It was recorded that most of fractures in G-aenial was 40% cohesive, Tetric was 53.3% mixed, and Vertise was 83.3% adhesive. Conclusions: The self-adhering flowable composite Vertise™ Flow had the lowest and G-aenial Universal Flo® had the highest microtensile bond values.

  10. SEM/XPS analysis of fractured adhesively bonded graphite fibre surface resin-rich/graphite fibre composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devilbiss, T. A.; Wightman, J. P.; Progar, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    Samples of graphite fiber-reinforced polyimide were fabricated allowing the resin to accumulate at the composite surface. These surface resin-rich composites were then bonded together and tested for lap shear strength both before and after thermal aging. Lap shear strength did not appear to show a significant improvement over that previously recorded for resin-poor samples and was shown to decrease with increasing aging time and temperature.

  11. Active Metal Brazing and Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to C/C Composites for Heat Rejection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, Tarah; Cerny, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Robust assembly and integration technologies are critically needed for the manufacturing of heat rejection system (HRS) components for current and future space exploration missions. Active metal brazing and adhesive bonding technologies are being assessed for the bonding of titanium to high conductivity Carbon-Carbon composite sub components in various shapes and sizes. Currently a number of different silver and copper based active metal brazes and adhesive compositions are being evaluated. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). Several mechanical tests have been employed to ascertain the effectiveness of different brazing and adhesive approaches in tension and in shear that are both simple and representative of the actual system and relatively straightforward in analysis. The results of these mechanical tests along with the fractographic analysis will be discussed. In addition, advantages, technical issues and concerns in using different bonding approaches will also be presented.

  12. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  13. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer's instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly ( p strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength ( p strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength.

  14. Influence of surface pretreatment on the short-term bond strength of resin composite to a zirconia-based material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazi, Giovanni; Vichi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Marco

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of airborne-particle abrasion of zirconia before and after sintering, on the bond strength between a zirconia core and an indirect resin composite material. 9 disks of Y-TZP zirconia core were prepared and divided into three equal groups. In Group 1 pre-sintered Y-TZP zirconia was airborne-particle abraded with 120 microm alumina oxide. In Group 2 sintered Y-TZP zirconia was airborne-particle abraded with 120 microm alumina oxide. In Group 3 sintered Y-TZP zirconia was not treated and thus served as the control group. A 10-methacryloylooxydecyldihydrogenphosphate (MDP) containing bonding agent and silane coupling agent mixture was applied to the disks in all three experimental groups. Resin composite for indirect restorations was incrementally layered in a plastic mold to a final thickness of 3 mm. Specimens were sectioned under water cooling to obtain microsticks 6 x 1 x 1 mm in dimension. 30 microsticks per experimental group were generated. Microtensile bond strength test was conducted with a universal testing machine. Fractured microsticks and sections from each group were also examined under an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope to evaluate respectively the mode of failure and the zirconia-composite interface. T-test for independent samples was selected to analyze the data. The level of significance was set at P resin composite bond. Airborne-particle abrasion performed before sintering zirconia did not produce any significant differences.

  15. Shear Sensing in Bonded Composites with Cantilever Beam Microsensors and Dual-Plane Digital Image Correlation (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-15

    correlation (DIC) technique that spatially measures the relative displacement of the adhesive -adherend interfaces as seen through transparent...Feb 2017. This document contains color. Journal article published in Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 10170, 5 Apr 2017. © 2017 SPIE. The U.S...composites in aerospace structural applications, adhesively bonded joints with assured mechanical properties are of increasing interest. Adhesively

  16. Effect of the cross-linking silane concentration in a novel silane system on bonding resin-composite cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka; Ozcan, Mutlu; Lassila, Lippo; Kalk, Warner; Vallittu, Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Four experimental blends of an organo-functional silane monomer with a non-functional cross-linking silane monomer (a novel silane system) were evaluated as adhesion promoters in an experiment in which a resin-composite cement was bonded to silica-coated titanium. Material and Methods.

  17. Clinical longevity of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations up to 40 months

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M. M.; Kalk, Warner; Ozcan, Mutlu

    This study evaluated the survival rate of ceramic laminate veneers bonded to teeth with and without existing composite restorations (ECR). Twenty patients (mean age: 49.7 years) received 92 feldspathic ceramic laminate veneers (Shofu Vintage AL) on the maxillary teeth (intact teeth: n = 26; teeth

  18. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test were used to analyze the data (pself-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (pself-etch) with D (p= 0.024). The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive.

  19. High conductivity composite flip-chip joints and silver-indium bonding to bismuth telluride for high temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen P.

    Two projects are reported. First, the barrier layer and silver (Ag)-indium (In) transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding for thermoelectric (TE) modules at high temperature were studied, and followed with a survey of Ag microstructure and grain growth kinetics. Second, the high electrical conductivity joint materials bonded by both Ag-AgIn TLP and solid-state bonding processes for small size flip-chip applications were designed. In the first project, barrier and Ag-In TLP bonding layer for TE module at high temperature application were studied. Bismuth telluride (Bi2 Te3) and its alloys are used as materials for a TE module. A barrier/bonding composite was developed to satisfy the TE module for high temperature operation. Titanium (Ti)/ gold (Au) was chosen as the barrier layers and an Ag-rich Ag-In joint was chosen as the bonding layer. An electron-beam evaporated Ti layer was selected as the barrier layer. An Ag-In fluxless TLP bonding process was developed to bond the Bi 2Te3 chips to the alumina substrates for high temperature applications. To prepare for bonding, the Bi2Te3 chips were coated with a Ti/Au barrier layer followed by a Ag layer. The alumina substrates with titanium-tungsten (TiW)/Au were then electroplated with the Ag/In/Ag structure. These Bi2Te3 chips were bonded to alumina substrates at a bonding temperature of 180ºC with a static pressure as low as 100psi. The resulting void-free joint consists of five regions: Ag, (Ag), Ag2In, (Ag), and Ag, where (Ag) is Ag-rich solid solution with In atoms in it and Ag is pure Ag. This joint has a melting temperature higher than 660ºC, and it manages the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the Bi2Te3 and alumina substrate. The whole Ti/Au barrier layer and Ag-In bonding composite between Bi 2Te3 and alumina survived after an aging test at 250°C for 200 hours. The Ag-In joint transformed from Ag/(Ag)/Ag2In/(Ag)/Ag to a more reliable (Ag) rich layer after the aging test. Ag thin films were

  20. [Effect of hydrofluoric acid concentration on the surface morphology and bonding effectiveness of lithium disilicate glass ceramics to resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailan, Qian; Lingyan, Ren; Rongrong, Nie; Xiangfeng, Meng

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed at determining the influence of hydrofluoric acid (HF) in varied concentrations on the surface morphology of lithium disilicate glass ceramics and bond durability between resin composites and post-treated lithium disilicate glass ceramics. After being sintered, ground, and washed, 72 as-prepared specimens of lithium disilicate glass ceramics with dimensions of 11 mm×13 mm×2 mm were randomly divided into three groups. Each group was treated with acid solution [32% phosphoric acid (PA) or 4% or 9.5% HF] for 20 s. Then, four acidified specimens from each group were randomly selected. One of the specimens was used to observe the surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy, and the others were used to observe the surface roughness using a surface roughness meter (including Ra, Rz, and Rmax). After treatment with different acid solutions in each group, 20 samples were further treated with silane coupling agent/resin adhesive/resin cement (Monobond S/Multilink Primer A&B/Multilink N), followed by bonding to a composite resin column (Filtek™ Z350) with a diameter of 3 mm. A total of 20 specimens in each group were randomly divided into two subgroups, which were used for measuring the microshear bond strength, with one of them subjected to cool-thermal cycle for 20 000 times. The surface roughness (Ra, Rz, and Rmax) of lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% or 9.5% HF was significantly higher than that of the ceramic treated with PA (Pglass ceramics treated with 9.5% HF also demonstrated better surface roughness (Rz and Rmax) than that of the ceramics treated with 4% HF. Cool-thermal cycle treatment reduced the bond strength of lithium disilicate glass ceramics in all groups (Pglass ceramics treated with HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with PA. The lithium disilicate glass ceramics treated with 4% HF had higher bond strength than that of the ceramics treated with 9.5% HF (Pglass ceramics treated with 4

  1. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  2. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  3. Body-insensitive Multi-Mode MIMO Terminal Antenna of Double-Ring Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Kun; Zhang, Shuai; Ishimiya, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel multimode multi-input multi-output (MIMO) antenna system composed of a dual-element MIMO cellular antenna and dual-element MIMO Wi-Fi antenna for mobile terminal applications. The antenna system has a double-ring structure and can be integrated with the metal frame...... of mobile terminals. With the multimode excitation, the MIMO cellular antenna can operate at 830-900 MHz, 1700-2200 MHz, and 2400-2700 MHz, for 2G, 3G, and LTE bands, respectively. The MIMO Wi-Fi antenna can cover two Wi-Fi bands from 2.4 to 2.5 GHz and from 5.2 to 5.8 GHz. The effect of a user's body...

  4. Study of double-ring slow-light gyroscope with two input-output waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong; Liu, Xiao-qing

    2017-10-01

    A novel structure of double-ring slow-light gyroscope with two input-output waveguides is studied. We utilize interferometric detection method, and sufficiently combine the advantages of Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyro (I-FOG) and Resonator Optic Gyro (ROG). The responses of the structure are derived and simulated. Here two experimental schemes are also proposed. By applying a square wave to the integrated phase modulator, we can make the structure work at the highest sensitivity. After applied the square wave, the system runs at linear zone, thus the angular velocity can be obtained according to the linear relationship between the phase difference and the angular velocity. The optimal parameters for the largest phase difference of light signal monitored at different output ports are investigated. Some comparisons are done in the condition of various values of transmission loss coefficients.

  5. A strategy to synthesize graphene-incorporated lignin polymer composite materials with uniform graphene dispersion and covalently bonded interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Duong, Le Dai; Ma, Yifei; Sun, Yan; Hong, Sung Yong; Kim, Ye Chan; Suhr, Jonghwan; Nam, Jae-Do

    2017-08-01

    Graphene-incorporated polymer composites have been demonstrated to have excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In the field of graphene-incorporated composite material synthesis, there are two main obstacles: Non-uniform dispersion of graphene filler in the matrix and weak interface bonding between the graphene filler and polymer matrix. To overcome these problems, we develop an in-situ polymerization strategy to synthesize uniformly dispersed and covalently bonded graphene/lignin composites. Graphene oxide (GO) was chemically modified by 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) to introduce isocyanate groups and form the urethane bonds with lignin macromonomers. Subsequential polycondensation reactions of lignin groups with caprolactone and sebacoyl chloride bring about a covalent network of modified GO and lignin-based polymers. The flexible and robust lignin polycaprolactone polycondensate/modified GO (Lig-GOm) composite membranes are achieved after vacuum filtration, which have tunable hydrophilicity and electrical resistance according to the contents of GOm. This research transforms lignin from an abundant biomass into film-state composite materials, paving a new way for the utilization of biomass wastes.

  6. [In vitro study of marginal microleakage of Clearfil S3 BOND adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei; Zhu, Ya-qin

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the microleakage of standard box-type cavity filled with Clearfil S3 BOND self-etch adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin. 40 permanent molars were randomly divided into experimental and control groups, 20 of each . The box-type cavities, 3mm in length and width and 2mm in depth, were prepared at the cemento-enamel junction on buccal surface of forty permanent extracted teeth. According to grouping, the experimental group was filled with Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin, and the control group was filled with 3M Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin. After thermal circulation(2000 times, 5 degrees centigrade-55 degrees centigrade) and soaked for 24 hours in 2% methyl blue solution, the samples were cut through the midline of the restoration and the leakage depth was measured with vernier caliper. The microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package for Mann-Whitney U test and independent-samples t test. Microleakage was observed in both groups. But the microleakage degrees and microleakage depth of 2 groups had no significant difference (P>0.05). The marginal sealibility of Clearfil S(3) BOND self-adhesive systems and Majesty composite resin is as good as Adper Prompt self-adhesive and Filtek Z350 composite resin,it may be an ideal clinical restoration material.

  7. Effects of carbon fiber surface characteristics on interfacial bonding of epoxy resin composite subjected to hygrothermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Liu, Hongxin; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Yanxia; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2014-01-01

    The changes of interfacial bonding of three types of carbon fibers/epoxy resin composite as well as their corresponding desized carbon fiber composites subjecting to hygrothermal conditions were investigated by means of single fiber fragmentation test. The interfacial fracture energy was obtained to evaluate the interfacial bonding before and after boiling water aging. The surface characteristics of the studied carbon fiber were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The effects of activated carbon atoms and silicon element at carbon fiber surface on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance were further discussed. The results show that the three carbon fiber composites with the same resin matrix possess different hygrothermal resistances of interface and the interfacial fracture energy after water aging can not recovery to the level of raw dry sample (irreversible changes) for the carbon fiber composites containing silicon. Furthermore, the activated carbon atoms have little impact on the interfacial hygrothermal resistance. The irreversible variations of interfacial bonding and the differences among different carbon fiber composites are attributed to the silicon element on the carbon fiber bodies, which might result in hydrolyzation in boiling water treatment and degrade interfacial hygrothermal resistance.

  8. Analysis of the diametral compressive bond strength between composite resin and amalgam in different stages of oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez Catirse, A B E; Oliveira Pagnano, V; Da Silva Mello, A S; Do Nascimento, C; Mardegan Issa, J P

    2007-04-01

    Amalcomp is a technique that combines composite resin to amalgam in restorative procedures to improve esthetics and minimize the negative effects of polymerization on dental tissues. The objective of this in vitro study was to measure the diametral compressive bond strength between Fill Magic composite (Vigodent) versus Permite (DFL) or Velvalloy (SS White) amalgams in different oxidation stages. Twenty-four cylinders of each amalgam brand were fabricated using a Teflon matrix and divided into 3 groups according to the immersion period in artificial saliva for oxidation: A (1 day), B (7 days) and C (30 days). After immersion, the amalgam cylinders were bonded to the composite specimens using the Scotch Bond Multi Use Plus (3M) bonding system. Diametral compression assays were then carried out in an EMIC-MEM 2000 universal testing machine set to 0.5 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The mean recorded strength (MPa) for each oxidation group was: A=9.71, B=8.21 and C=6.98 (A>B = C; Pcomposite than Velvalloy (9.36; Pamalgam showed the greatest diametral compressive strength values.

  9. Effect of Silane Solvent on Microtensile Bond Strength of Hy-drogen Peroxide-Treated Fiber Post and Composite Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Kasraei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitrostudy was to evaluate the effect of the type of solvent in silane solution on microtensile bond strength of fiber posts to composite resin cores af-ter application of 24% hydrogen peroxide.Materials and Methods: Eighteen white fiber posts, immersed in 24% hydrogen peroxide were divided into three groups (n=6. In the group A post surfaces were silanized with an ethanol based solution, in group B with an acetone based solution, in the group C with and un-diluted methacryloxytrimethoxysilane (as the control group. The cores were built up using flowable composite. Microtensile bond strength test and evaluations using stereomi-croscope were performed on the samples and the data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests.Results: A significant difference was observed between the amounts of microtensile bond strength of fiber poststo composite cores in the groups A and B, and the ones in group C (P0.05.Conclusion: The type of solvent in silane solution has no effect on microtensile bond strength between fiber post andcomposite resin core after application of 24% Hydrogen Peroxide.

  10. Effects of ethanol concentrations of acrylate-based dental adhesives on microtensile composite-dentin bond strength and hybrid layer structure of a 10 wt% polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-incorporated bonding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mostafa Mousavinasab

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Incorporation of 31% ethanol as solvent into a 10 wt% POSS-incorporated experimental dental adhesive might increase the bond strength of composite to dentin and improve the quality and morphology of the hybrid layer. However, higher concentrations of the solvent might not improve the bond strength or quality of the hybrid layer.

  11. Flexural Behavior of RC Members Using Externally Bonded Aluminum-Glass Fiber Composite Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns improvement of flexural stiffness/strength of concrete members reinforced with externally bonded, aluminum-glass fiber composite (AGC beams. An experimental program, consisting of seven reinforced concrete slabs and seven reinforced concrete beams strengthened in flexure with AGC beams, was initiated under four-point bending in order to evaluate three parameters: the cross-sectional shape of the AGC beam, the glass fiber fabric array, and the installation of fasteners. The load-deflection response, strain distribution along the longitudinal axis of the beam, and associated failure modes of the tested specimens were recorded. It was observed that the AGC beam led to an increase of the initial cracking load, yielding load of the tension steels and peak load. On the other hand, the ductility of some specimens strengthened was reduced by more than 50%. The A-type AGC beam was more efficient in slab specimens than in beam specimens and the B-type was more suitable for beam specimens than for slabs.

  12. Grinding performance evaluation of porous composite-bonded CBN wheels for Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhenzhen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For high-efficiency grinding of difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium and nickel alloys, a high porosity is expected and also a sufficient mechanical strength to satisfy the function. However, the porosity increase is a disadvantage to the mechanical strength. As a promising pore forming agent, alumina bubbles are firstly induced into the abrasive layer to fabricate porous cubic boron nitride (CBN wheels. When the wheel porosity reaches 45%, the bending strength is still high up to 50 MPa with modified orderly pore distribution. A porous CBN wheel was fabricated with a total porosity around 30%. The grinding performance of the porous composite-bonded CBN wheel was evaluated in terms of specific force, specific grinding energy, and grinding temperature, which were better than those of the vitrified one under the same grinding conditions. Compared to the vitrified CBN wheel, clear straight cutting grooves and less chip adhesion are observed on the ground surface and there is also no extensive loading on the wheel surface after grinding.

  13. Flexural Strength of Preheated Resin Composites and Bonding Properties to Glass-Ceramic and Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Richard Kramer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the impact of preheating (25, 37, 54, or 68 °C of TetricEvoCeram (TEC, FiltekSupremeXT (FSXT, and Venus (V on flexural strength (FS, shear bond strength (SBS and interfacial tension (IFT. FS was tested with TEC and FSXT. For SBS, glass-ceramic and human dentin substrate were fabricated and luted with the preheated resin composite (RC. SBSs of 1500 thermal cycled specimens were measured. For IFT, glass slides covered with the non-polymerized RC were prepared and contact angles were measured. Data were analyzed using 2/1-way ANOVA with Scheffé-test, and t-test (p < 0.05. Preheated TEC (37–68 °C showed higher FS compared to the control-group (25 °C (p < 0.001. FSXT presented higher FS than TEC (p < 0.001. For SBS to dentin higher values for FSXT than TEC were found. The preheating temperature showed no impact on SBS to dentin. SBS to glass-ceramic revealed a positive influence of temperature for TEC 25–68 °C (p = 0.015. TEC showed higher values than V and FSXT (p < 0.001. IFT values increased with the preheating temperature. A significant difference could be observed in every RC group between 25 and 68 °C (p < 0.001.

  14. Using x-radiometry to count resin-bonded layers in aramid ballistic cloth composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, R.E.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The army paratroopers and support ground troops (PASGT) helmet is a composite consisting of nominally 19 layers thickness aramid ballistic cloth heat-bonded in a press with rolled-on phenolic resin. Inadvertent omission or poor fitting of layers during hot pressing can significantly weaken the helmet and thereby drastically impair its effectiveness under combat conditions. Currently, helmets are accepted or rejected on a lot basis using ballistic projectile penetration destructive tests on a statistically significant sample from each lot. A Phase I small business innovative research (SBIR) was performed to access the feasibility of nondestructively counting layers by through-transmission x-radiometry, a technique that would allow 100 percent testing of helmets for layer count if proved feasible. Tests were conducted on flat panels, crown panels containing gaps, and actual helmets using 14-18 keV Pu x-rays from a 30-mCi Cm-244 source, a sodium iodide scintillation counter, several collimators, and a multichannel analyzer. The infusing of resin into artificially produced lateral gaps in the crown specimen and into actual lateral gaps in the helmet during press-curing impaired the effectiveness of the radiometric method by introducing high radiometric density material into the beam path. It is concluded that radiometry should be combined with visual inspection to assure helmet integrity. Modified approaches are discussed

  15. Effect of composition polymeric PVB binder on physical, magnetic properties and microstructure of bonded magnet NdFeB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardjono, P.; Muljadi; Suprapedi; Sinuaji, P.; Ramlan; Gulo, F.

    2017-04-01

    The bonded magnet NdFeB has been made by using the hot press method and using Poly Vinyl Butiral (PVB) as a binder. The composition of polymeric binder was varied: 0, 2, 4, 6 and 7 % of weight. Both raw materials are weighed and mixed according to the composition of PVB, then formed by hot press with a pressure 30 MPa, a temperature of 160 ° C and holding time for 30 minutes. The bulk density was measured by using Archimedes method. SEM observation was done to determine the microstructure of bonded magnet NdFeB. The flux magnetic value was measured by using a Gauss meter and the measurement of hysteresis curves was done to know value of remanence Br, coercivity Hc and energy product BHmax by using VSM. According to the characterization results show that the best composition of PVB is 2 of weight. The properties of bonded magnet NdFeB of those compositions are the bulk density around 5.66 g/cm3. Flux Magnetic value: 1862 Gauss, Br value: 5000 kGauss, Hc value: 8.49 kOe and BHmax value : 5.10 MGOe. According of SEM observation results show that the polymer matrix of PVB appears to have covered on all surface grain and filled grain boundary.

  16. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  17. Adhesive Bonding Techniques in Hybrid Structures Made from Fibre Reinforced Polymeric Composites and Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Oltean, Ruxandra; Cozmanciuc, Ciprian; Munteanu, Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical joining techniques are used in construction industry all over the world on a daily basis. A further method of joining has proven to be highly successful – adhesive bonding. Known for thousands of years, adhesive bonding has become as important as other joining techniques as a result of the pace of developments in recent years. In many areas, this bonding technology has become a key technology. Virtually, all solid materials can be connected with one another using adhesives. Althoug...

  18. In vitro evaluation of the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with composite fillings after cyclic loading

    OpenAIRE

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Geramipanah, Farideh; Allahyari, Somayeh; Fallahi Sichani, Babak; Kharazi Fard, Mohamd Javad

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE There is insufficient data regarding the durability of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to existing composite fillings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with existing composite fillings. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups (for each group, n=10): intact teeth (NP), teeth with class III composite fillings (C3) and teeth with class IV cav...

  19. Effect of endodontic irrigation and dressing procedures on the shear bond strength of composite to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar E. Abo-Hamar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of three sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl-endodontic irrigation procedures used alone or in combinations with two intermediate dressing materials on bond strengths of two adhesive composite systems to coronal dentin. Surfaces were treated with NaOCl or NaOCl–Glyde-File-Prep (H2O2 and EDTA with or without chlorhexidine (CHX as a final rinse. Intermediate dressing materials of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 and sodium perborate (SP were combined with surface treatments. Surface treatment groups (n = 10/group included (1 distilled water (control, (2 5.25% NaOCl (30 min, (3 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min, (4 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + CHX (2 min, (5 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + Ca(OH2 (5 days + CHX (2 min, and (6 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + SP (9 days + CHX (2 min. For each surface treatment group, dentin shear bond strengths of two different composite systems (Excite/Tetric Flow Chroma, [EX/TFC], and Clearfil Protect Bond/Protect Liner F [PB/PLF] were evaluated. Median shear bond strengths (EX/TFC, PB/PLF for each surface treatment group in MPa were (1 21, 18; (2 26, 18; (3 21, 17; (4 22, 16; (5 17, 11; and (6 14, 11, respectively. NaOCl significantly increased the bond strength of EX/TFC (p  0.05, whereas it significantly decreased PB/PLF (p < 0.05. Ca(OH2 and SP significantly decreased the bond strengths of both adhesive systems (p < 0.05. Adhesion to coronal dentin is dependent upon the irrigation regimen and the type of adhesive.

  20. The effect of erbium family laser on tensile bond strength of composite to dentin in comparison with conventional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Sima; Chiniforush, Nasim; Bahramian, Hoda; Monzavi, Abbas; Baghalian, Ali; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser on tensile bond strength of composite resin to dentine in comparison with bur-prepared cavities. Fifteen extracted caries-free human third molars were selected. The teeth were cut at a level below the occlusal pit and fissure plan and randomly divided into three groups. Five cavities were prepared by diamond bur, five cavities prepared by Er:YAG laser, and the other group prepared by Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Then, all the cavities were restored by composite resin. The teeth were sectioned longitudinally with Isomet and the specimens prepared in dumbbelled shape (n = 36). The samples were attached to special jigs, and the tensile bond strength of the three groups was measured by universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results of the three groups were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tamhane test. The means and standard deviations of tensile bond strength of bur-cut, Er:YAG laser-ablated, and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-ablated dentine were 5.04 ± 0.93, 13.37 ± 3.87, and 4.85 ± 0.93 MPa, respectively. There is little difference in tensile bond strength of composite resin in Er,Cr:YSGG lased-prepared cavities in comparison with bur-prepared cavities, but the Er:YAG laser group showed higher bond strength than the other groups.

  1. Effect of Silane Heat Treatment by Laser on the Bond Strength of a Repair Composite to Feldspathic Porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimaneh, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Shayegh, Sayed Shojaedin; Ghavami-Lahiji, Mehrsima; Chokr, Ahmad; Moraditalab, Azizollah

    2018-01-29

    Ceramic restoration fracture may occur in the oral cavity. Intraoral repair of fractured porcelain could be advantageous to both patient and dentist. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of heat treatment of the silane coupling agent by Er:YAG and CO 2 lasers on the microshear bond strength of a repair composite to feldspathic porcelain. Sixty ceramic blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10): (i) HF + silane (HS); (ii) silane + CO 2 laser (SC); (iii) CO 2 laser + silane (CS); (iv) silane + Er:YAG laser (SE); (v) Er:YAG laser + silane (ES); (vi) bur + HF + silane (BuHS). An adhesive resin was applied to the prepared ceramic surfaces and light-cured. Two transparent plastic tubes were placed perpendicularly to each ceramic block. The composite resin was then placed on the treated ceramic surface and light-cured for 40 seconds. The bonded blocks were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and subjected to 3000 thermocycles. Microshear bond strength (μSBS) tests were performed using a wire and loop method. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests (p ≤ 0.05). The comparison of the mean μSBS values showed no significant differences between the ES and HS groups (p = 0.914). On the other hand, the specimens in these groups exhibited significantly higher bond strengths than those in the other groups (p 0.05). The μSBS for the SC group was significantly lower than that of the other groups (p silane application can be as effective as HF etching. Heat treatment of silane by CO 2 or Er:YAG lasers does not improve the bond strength between feldspathic porcelain and composite resin. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. Evaluation of bond strength and thickness of adhesive layer according to the techniques of applying adhesives in composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Fernando Carlos Hueb; da Silva, Stella Borges; Valentino, Thiago Assunção; Oliveira, Maria Angélica Hueb de Menezes; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Conçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive restorations have increasingly been used in dentistry, and the adhesive system application technique may determine the success of the restorative procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the application technique of two adhesive systems (Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Scotchbond MultiPurpose) on the bond strength and adhesive layer of composite resin restorations. Eight human third molars were selected and prepared with Class I occlusal cavities. The teeth were restored with composite using various application techniques for both adhesives, according to the following groups (n = 10): group 1 (control), systems were applied and adhesive was immediately light activated for 20 seconds without removing excesses; group 2, excess adhesive was removed with a gentle jet of air for 5 seconds; group 3, excess was removed with a dry microbrushtype device; and group 4, a gentle jet of air was applied after the microbrush and then light activation was performed. After this, the teeth were submitted to microtensile testing. For the two systems tested, no statistical differences were observed between groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 presented higher bond strength values compared with the other studied groups, allowing the conclusion that excess adhesive removal with a dry microbrush could improve bond strength in composite restorations. Predominance of adhesive fracture and thicker adhesive layer were observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in groups 1 and 2. For groups 3 and 4, a mixed failure pattern and thinner adhesive layer were verified. Clinicians should be aware that excess adhesive may negatively affect bond strength, whereas a thin, uniform adhesive layer appears to be favorable.

  3. Bond Strength of Resin Composite to Dentin with Different Adhesive Systems: Influence of Relative Humidity and Application Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Fabienne; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian; Flury, Simon

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the influence of relative humidity and application time on bond strength to dentin of different classes of adhesive systems. A total of 360 extracted human molars were ground to mid-coronal dentin. The dentin specimens were treated with one of six adhesive systems (Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, Clearfil SE Bond, AdheSE, Xeno Select, or Scotchbond Universal), and resin composite (Filtek Z250) was applied to the treated dentin surface under four experimental conditions (45% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 45% relative humidity/reduced application time; 85% relative humidity/application time according to manufacturers' instructions; 85% relative humidity/reduced application time). After storage (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 h), shear bond strength (SBS) was measured and data analyzed with nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests with Bonferroni-Holm correction for multiple testing (level of significance: α = 0.05). Increased relative humidity and reduced application time had no effect on SBS for Clearfil SE Bond and Scotchbond Universal (p = 1.00). For Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, AdheSE, and Xeno Select there was no effect on SBS of reduced application time of the adhesive system (p ≥ 0.403). However, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS for Syntac Classic, OptiBond FL, and Xeno Select irrespective of application time (p ≤ 0.003), whereas for AdheSE, increased relative humidity significantly reduced SBS at recommended application time only (p = 0.002). Generally, increased relative humidity had a detrimental effect on SBS to dentin, but reduced application time had no effect.

  4. The role of oxygen inhibition of a self-etch adhesive on self-cure resin composite bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tatsuo; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strengths on enamel and dentin with a self-etch adhesive (iBond), with or without oxygen-inhibited surface layer, or covered with intermediate self-curing resin, in combination with chemical-cured composite (Core Paste). Bond strengths on human enamel and dentin (n = 8) were determined according to the following procedures: 1. Adhesive cured under ambient air. 2. Inhibited surface wiped with ethanol. 3. Adhesive cured under nitrogen. 4. Adhesive covered with glycerol during activation. 5. Adhesive coated with glycerol for 1 minute after activation. 6. As 5, but covered for 5 minutes. 7. Cured adhesive coated with intermediate self-curing resin. 8. As 7, but intermediate resin's amine component loaded with anion exchange resin in OH- form. Shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured after 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water. SBSs on enamel (7.1 to 25.6 MPa) were, by ranking order (Presin group (mean 19.6 MPa), showed bond strengths resin was low, irrespective of the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer. Deprotonization of the acidic adhesive monomer with an admixed anion exchange compound, added to an intermediate self-cured resin, was effective at overcoming the incompatibility.

  5. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p Biodentine showed a significantly higher shear bond strength than MTA (p Biodentine and GIC was not significant (p > 0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  6. Adhesive-Bonded Composite Joint Analysis with Delaminated Surface Ply Using Strain-Energy Release Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadegani, Alireza; Yang, Chihdar; Smeltzer, Stanley S. III

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model to determine the strain energy release rate due to an interlaminar crack of the surface ply in adhesively bonded composite joints subjected to axial tension. Single-lap shear-joint standard test specimen geometry with thick bondline is followed for model development. The field equations are formulated by using the first-order shear-deformation theory in laminated plates together with kinematics relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. The system of second-order differential equations is solved to using the symbolic computation tool Maple 9.52 to provide displacements fields. The equivalent forces at the tip of the prescribed interlaminar crack are obtained based on interlaminar stress distributions. The strain energy release rate of the crack is then determined by using the crack closure method. Finite element analyses using the J integral as well as the crack closure method are performed to verify the developed analytical model. It has been shown that the results using the analytical method correlate well with the results from the finite element analyses. An attempt is made to predict the failure loads of the joints based on limited test data from the literature. The effectiveness of the inclusion of bondline thickness is justified when compared with the results obtained from the previous model in which a thin bondline and uniform adhesive stresses through the bondline thickness are assumed.

  7. COMPARISON OF SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE TO DECIDUOUS TEETH ENAMEL FOLLOWING PHOSPBORIC ACID AND ND:YAG LASER ETCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MOUSAVINASAB

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Enamel acid etching prior to repair dental caries and fractures with composites has been quite satisfactory and economic, however, etching on deciduous dentition has shown less effective due to its resistance to acids. The purpose of this study was to evaluate composite bond strength on decidious teeth treated with laser instead of being acid etched. Methods. Forty four deciduous molars without any restoration or buccal decay were chased and randomly divided in the four groups of 10. Four other teeth were prepared for SEM observation. Group 1: samples were treated with Nd: YA Glaser (20 pps, 1.6 w. Group 2: samples, treated with Nd: YA Glaser (10 pps, 0.8 w. Group 3: samples acid etched with 37% phosphoric acid. Group 4: samples in this group were taken as control with no treatment on enamel. Shear bond strength of the composite and teeth in all 4 groups were then measured with universal tast machine (Dartec.Data were analysed statistically using ANOVA test. Results. The least mean amount of bond strength was related to group 4 (control, which was significantly different from other groups (P < 0.05. The most mean amount was related to group 3 (acid etched with statistically significant difference from other groups (P < 0.05. Among the samples treated with laser, group 1 has greater amount of mean strength comparing to group 2, however this difference was not significant (P > 0.05. Discussion. In order to obtain optimum bond strength for composite restorations, enamel surface should be prepared. Use of Nd: YAG laser for enamel etching under the condition of our study is not recommended on deciduous dentition.

  8. Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrode activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seung Mi; Lee, Eunsil; Adpakpang, Kanyaporn; Patil, Sharad B.; Park, Mi Jin; Lim, Young Soo; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Jong-Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is easily prepared by high energy mechanical milling process. • The bond covalency of In 4 Se 2.85 is notably changed upon the composite formation with graphene. • In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite shows promising anode performance for lithium ion battery. -- Abstract: Evolution of the chemical bonding nature and electrochemical activity of indium selenide upon the composite formation with carbon species is systematically investigated. Nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black are synthesized via a solid state reaction between In and Se elements, and the following high energy mechanical milling of In 4 Se 2.85 with graphene and carbon-black, respectively. The high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) of In 4 Se 2.85 with carbon species gives rise to a decrease of particle size with a significant depression of the crystallinity of In 4 Se 2.85 phase. In contrast to the composite formation with carbon-black, that with graphene induces a notable decrease of (In−Se) bond covalency, underscoring significant chemical interaction between graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 . Both the nanocomposites of In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene and In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black show much better anode performance for lithium ion batteries with larger discharge capacity and better cyclability than does the pristine In 4 Se 2.85 material, indicating the beneficial effect of composite formation on the electrochemical activity of indium selenide. Between the present nanocomposites, the electrode performance of the In 4 Se 2.85 @graphene nanocomposite is superior to that of the In 4 Se 2.85 @carbon-black nanocomposite, which is attributable to the weakening of (In−Se) bonds upon the composite formation with graphene as well as to the better mixing between In 4 Se 2.85 and graphene. The present study clearly demonstrates that the composite formation with graphene has strong influence

  9. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    COTES, Caroline; CARDOSO, Mayra; de MELO, Renata Marques; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Material and Methods Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm) were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath). A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT) No treatment (control); (SP) Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC) Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC) Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO) Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8) and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS), while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath) and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05). Results The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007) and thermocycling (p=0.000). Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Conclusion Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement. PMID:25760269

  10. Effect of composite surface treatment and aging on the bond strength between a core build-up composite and a luting agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline COTES

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of conditioning methods and thermocycling on the bond strength between composite core and resin cement. Material and Methods Eighty blocks (8×8×4 mm were prepared with core build-up composite. The cementation surface was roughened with 120-grit carbide paper and the blocks were thermocycled (5,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a 30 s dwell time in each bath. A layer of temporary luting agent was applied. After 24 h, the layer was removed, and the blocks were divided into five groups, according to surface treatment: (NT No treatment (control; (SP Grinding with 120-grit carbide paper; (AC Etching with 37% phosphoric acid; (SC Sandblasting with 30 mm SiO2 particles, silane application; (AO Sandblasting with 50 mm Al2O3 particles, silane application. Two composite blocks were cemented to each other (n=8 and sectioned into sticks. Half of the specimens from each block were immediately tested for microtensile bond strength (µTBS, while the other half was subjected to storage for 6 months, thermocycling (12,000 cycles, between 5°C and 55°C, with a dwell time of 30 s in each bath and µTBS test in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (α=0.05. Results The µTBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (p=0.007 and thermocycling (p=0.000. Before aging, the SP group presented higher bond strength when compared to NT and AC groups, whereas all the other groups were statistically similar. After aging, all the groups were statistically similar. SP submitted to thermocycling showed lower bond strength than SP without thermocycling. Conclusion Core composites should be roughened with a diamond bur before the luting process. Thermocycling tends to reduce the bond strength between composite and resin cement.

  11. Bonding promotion of resin composite to silica-coated zirconia implant surface using a novel silane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P; Choi, Andy H; Tsoi, James Kit-Hon

    2013-03-01

    Bonding of restorative materials in dentistry may be enhanced significantly by the use of engineered silane blends. Trialkoxy silane esters have the unique property to unite dissimilar materials. Silanization is required when cementing the crown or the abutment on a silica-coated zirconia subgingival implant surface with an organophosphate-resin-composite. In this laboratory study, we report about our latest findings in laboratory experiments on experimental silane primers. In the adhesion promotion of resin-composites to the zirconia implant surface using four experimental blends, a so-called "Novel Silane System", consisting of a functional silane (3-acryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane, 3-isocyanatopropyltriethoxysilane, 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane and 3-styrylethyltrimethoxysilane) and a cross-linking silane, bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane, were mixed in a water/ethanol solvent system with a pH of 4.5, and applied onto silica-coated planar zirconia specimens. A resin composite stub (with a bonding area diameter of 2.0 mm) was cemented using a polypropylene mold. Initial shear bond strengths (baseline values) were measured of specimens after dry storage and after thermo-cycling between 5.0 ± 0.5°C and 55.0 ± 0.5°C. As the control was a dental prehydrolyzed ready-to-use silane product. All the values for shear bond strength test were significantly increased (P > 0.05) during thermo-cycling. The results showed that the highest shear bond strength was obtained for 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane +bis-1,2-(triethoxysilyl)ethane in both dry and thermo-cycled conditions with stress values of 11.04 and 14.89 MPa, respectively. The lowest values were found for the control silane in both dry and thermo-cycled conditions with stress values of 4.5 and 6.5 MPa, respectively. Silanization with a novel silane system yielded significantly higher shear bond strength than the control silane (a 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane containing). We have introduced a

  12. In vitro evaluation of repair bond strength of composite: Effect of surface treatments with bur and laser and application of universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Espahbodi, Melika; Chiniforush, Nasim; Karazifard, Mohammad Javd; Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat Hashemi

    2017-09-30

    This study aimed to assess the effect of surface treatment by bur and laser and application of universal adhesive on repair bond strength of composite resin. A total of 120 composite blocks measuring 6×4×4 mm were fabricated of Filtek Z250 composite. All samples were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles and divided into two groups for surface preparation by bur and by Er,Cr:YSGG laser (n = 60). The surfaces were then etched with orthophosphoric acid, rinsed with water and divided into three groups (silane, silane plus Single Bond and silane plus Single Bond Universal). Repair composite was then bonded to aged composite. Half of the samples in each group were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and the other half underwent 5000 thermal cycles. All samples were then subjected to shear bond strength testing using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Mode of failure was determined using a stereomicroscope. Bur preparation plus universal adhesive yielded the highest bond strength (30.16 µ 2.26 MPa). Laser plus silane yielded the lowest bond strength (5.63 µ 2.43 MPa). Bur preparation yielded significantly higher bond strength than laser (P composite by bur and application of universal adhesive can improve the repair bond strength of composite. Application of silane (without adhesive) in the process of repair cannot provide adequately high repair bond strength.

  13. Influence of method and period of storage on the microtensile bond strength of indirect composite resin restorations to dentine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro Santana

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the method and period of storage on the adhesive bond strength of indirect composite resin to bovine dentin. Ninety bovine incisors were stored in three different solutions: 0.2% thymol, 10% formalin, and 0.2% sodium azide, during 3 periods of storage: 7 days, 30 days and 6 months, resulting in 9 groups (n = 10. The roots were cut off and the buccal surface was ground with #600-grit silicon carbide paper. The surface was conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and a composite resin restoration (TPH Spectrum was fixed using a one-bottle adhesive system (Adper Single Bond and a dual-cured resinous cement (Rely X ARC under a load of 500 g for 5 minutes. The samples were serially cut perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain slices of 1.2 mm in thickness. Each slab was trimmed with a cylindrical diamond bur resulting in an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm². The microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing was performed in a testing machine (EMIC 2000 DL at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead-speed until failure. After fracture, the specimens were examined under SEM to analyze the mode of fracture. μTBS Means were expressed in MPa and the data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA (3X3 and the Tukey test (α = 0.05. The storage times of 7 and 30 days produced no significant difference irrespective of the solution type. The formalin and thymol solutions, however, did have a negative influence on bond strength when the teeth were stored for 6 months.

  14. Study on the strength of cold-bonded high-phosphorus oolitic hematite-coal composite briquettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Sun, Ti-chang; Liu, Zhen-zhen; Kou, Jue; Xu, Cheng-yan

    2014-05-01

    Composite briquettes containing high-phosphorus oolitic hematite and coal were produced with a twin-roller briquette machine using sodium carboxymethyl cellulose, molasses, starch, sodium silicate, and bentonite as binders. The effect of these binders on the strength of the composite briquettes, including cold strength and high-temperature strength, was investigated by drop testing and compression testing. It was found the addition of Ca(OH)2 and Na2CO3 not only improved the reduction of iron oxides and promoted dephosphorization during the reduction-separation process but also provided strength to the composite briquettes during the briquetting process; a compressive strength of 152.8 N per briquette was obtained when no binders were used. On this basis, the addition of molasses, sodium silicate, starch, and bentonite improved the cold strength of the composite briquettes, and a maximum compressive strength of 404.6 N per briquette was obtained by using starch. When subjected to a thermal treatment at 1200°C, all of the composite briquettes suffered from a sharp decrease in compressive strength during the initial reduction process. This decrease in strength was related to an increase in porosity of the composite briquettes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses showed that the decrease in strength of the composite briquettes could be caused by four factors: decomposition of bonding materials, gasification of coal, transportation of byproduct gases in the composite briquettes, and thermal stress.

  15. Repair of amalgam restorations with composite resin and bonded amalgam: A microleakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Araújo Veloso Popoff

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of adhesive systems significantly affected the ability to seal the repair/ tooth interface. However, at the level of the repair/restoration interface, the bonded amalgam technique may increase microleakage.

  16. Influence of provisional cements on ultimate bond strength of indirect composite restorations to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Martins, Luis Roberto Marcondes; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Soares, Carlos José

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cements on the adhesion of resin bonded indirect restorations and determine the best method for avoiding adverse effects. Forty-five bovine incisors were selected, and the enamel removed with a 600-grit SiC abrasive disk to expose superficial dentin. Provisional restorations of acrylic resin were cemented with three different provisional cements: calcium hydroxide cement, Dycal (HC); cement containing zinc oxide-eugenol, Provy (ZOE); zinc oxide eugenol-free cement, TempBond NE (ZNE). The specimens were stored at 100% humidity, 37 degrees C. Then provisional restorations were removed with: (1) hand scaler for 10 s; (2) pumice-water slurry for 10 s; (3) aluminum oxide sandblasting for 10 s. The indirect restorations were subsequently cemented with Single Bond and Rely-X ARC. The teeth were sectioned, 4 slices per tooth (n = 16), and each slice trimmed with a diamond bur to obtain an adhesion area of 1 mm2. The microtensile bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine (Instron-4411) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (p provisional cement and dentin cleaning method; in general, aluminum oxide sandblasting provided the highest values of bond strength and calcium hydroxide the lowest. The type of provisional cement and its method of removal can affect the adhesion of resin-bonded indirect restorations.

  17. Effect of desensitization using bioactive glass, hydroxyapatite, and diode laser on the shear bond strength of resin composites measured at different time intervals: An In vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timsi Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin desensitizers may change the properties of smear layer and have adverse effects on the bonding performance of adhesive systems. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of bioactive glass (BG, hydroxyapatite, and diode laser desensitization on shear bond strength of resin composites to dentin at different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Seventy-two caries-free maxillary premolars were selected. Buccal surfaces were flattened to expose dentin. Teeth were divided into four groups (Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 according to treatment modality (control with no pretreatment, Sensodyne Repair and Protect, Teethmate Desensitizer, diode laser. Bonding was performed using self-etch adhesive followed by composite buildup. Universal testing machine was used to determine shear bond strengths immediately after bonding, after 3 months, and 5 months storage in artificial saliva. Results: Pretreatment with BG and hydroxyapatite desensitizers increased, whereas diode laser decreased mean shear bond strength of composite to dentin as compared to control group. No statistical significant difference in shear bond strength values was seen in groups after storage. Conclusion: Desensitizing toothpastes incorporating remineralizing agents not only occluded open dentinal tubules but also increased shear bond strength of composite to dentin.

  18. Hydrogen-bonding effects on film structure and photoelectrochemical properties of porphyrin and fullerene composites on nanostructured TiO 2 electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kira, Aiko; Tanaka, Masanobu; Umeyama, Tomokazu; Matano, Yoshihiro; Yoshimoto, Naoki; Zhang, Yi; Ye, Shen; Lehtivuori, Heli; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonding effects on film structures and photophysical, photoelectrochemical, and photovoltaic properties have been examined in mixed films of porphyrin and fullerene composites with and without hydrogen bonding on nanostructured TiO2 electrodes. The nanostructured TiO2 electrodes modified

  19. Thermal Shock Resistance of Si3N4/h -BN Composites Prepared via Catalytic Reaction-Bonding Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Peng, Zhigang; Dai, Lina; Shi, Zhongqi; Jin, Zhihao

    2017-09-01

    Si3N4/h-BN ceramic matrix composites were prepared via a catalytic reaction-bonding route by using ZrO2 as nitridation catalyst, and the water quenching (fast cooling) and molten aluminum quenching tests (fast heating) were carried out to evaluate the thermal shock resistance of the composites. The results showed that the thermal shock resistance was improved obviously with the increase in h-BN content, and the critical thermal shock temperature difference (Δ T c) reaches as high as 780 °C when the h-BN content was 30 wt.%. The improvement of thermal shock resistance of the composites was mainly due to the crack tending to quasi static propagating at weak bonding interface between Si3N4 and h-BN with the increase in h-BN content. For the molten aluminum quenching test, the residual strength showed no obvious decrease compared with water quenching test, which could be caused by the mild stress condition on the surface. In addition, a calculated parameter, volumetric crack density ( N f), was presented to quantitative evaluating the thermal shock resistance of the composites in contrast to the conventional R parameter.

  20. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  1. Cobalt double-ring and double-dot structures: Magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Urías, F.; Torres-Heredia, J.J.; Muñoz-Sandoval, E.

    2016-01-01

    The magnetization reversal mechanism of nanostructures of cobalt double-rings (D-rings) and double-dots (D-dots) is investigated in the framework of micromagnetic simulations. The arrays contain two identical coupled rings (wide and narrow) or dots with outer diameter of 200 nm and thicknesses ranging from 2–20 nm. Hysteresis loops, dipole–dipole and exchange energies are systematically calculated for the cases of the structures touching and the structures with a 50-nm inter-magnet separation; moreover, magnetization states along the hysteresis curve are analyzed. The results of both dot and ring D-magnets are compared with the corresponding individual magnets. Our results reveal that all D-ring (in contact and separated) arrays containing narrow rings exhibit non-null remanent magnetization; furthermore, higher coercive fields are promoted when the magnet thickness is increased. It is observed that the magnetization reversal is driven mainly by a clockwise rotation of onion-states, followed by states of frustrated vortices. Our results could help improve the understanding of the magnetic interactions in nanomagnet arrays.

  2. An Improved Current-Doubler Rectifier for the Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic Transmitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxi Song

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High power marine controlled source electromagnetic transmitters have gained interest with applications in marine geological survey and mineral resources exploration. The direct current to direct current (DC-DC converter that is typically used in marine transmitters has some issues, as the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT tube cannot achieve zero-voltage switching (ZVS. In particular, lagging-leg switching cannot easily achieve ZVS. The conversion efficiency of the heat converter requires improvement. This paper proposes an improved current-doubler rectifier for the marine controlled source electromagnetic transmitter (ICDR-MCSET. Resonant inductance is increased and a blocking capacitor is added to the converter (DC-DC circuit, where the converter can achieve ZVS in a wide load range. This results in the effective decrease of the heating temperature and the improvement of transformation efficiency. Saber software simulation and a 20 KW electromagnetic transmitter are used to verify the results, which show that the method is feasible and effective.

  3. Cobalt double-ring and double-dot structures: Magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Urías, F., E-mail: flo@ipicyt.edu.mx [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a sección, 78216, San Luis Potosí S.L.P., México (Mexico); Torres-Heredia, J.J. [Instituto Tecnológico Superior de Las Choapas, Col. J. M. Rosa do, 96980, Las Choapas, Veracruz (Mexico); Muñoz-Sandoval, E. [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a sección, 78216, San Luis Potosí S.L.P., México (Mexico)

    2016-02-15

    The magnetization reversal mechanism of nanostructures of cobalt double-rings (D-rings) and double-dots (D-dots) is investigated in the framework of micromagnetic simulations. The arrays contain two identical coupled rings (wide and narrow) or dots with outer diameter of 200 nm and thicknesses ranging from 2–20 nm. Hysteresis loops, dipole–dipole and exchange energies are systematically calculated for the cases of the structures touching and the structures with a 50-nm inter-magnet separation; moreover, magnetization states along the hysteresis curve are analyzed. The results of both dot and ring D-magnets are compared with the corresponding individual magnets. Our results reveal that all D-ring (in contact and separated) arrays containing narrow rings exhibit non-null remanent magnetization; furthermore, higher coercive fields are promoted when the magnet thickness is increased. It is observed that the magnetization reversal is driven mainly by a clockwise rotation of onion-states, followed by states of frustrated vortices. Our results could help improve the understanding of the magnetic interactions in nanomagnet arrays.

  4. DESIGN AND SIMULATION OF A HIGH PERFORMANCE CMOS VOLTAGE DOUBLERS USING CHARGE REUSE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAMIL H. HUSSEIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Voltage doubler (VD structure plays an important role in charge pump (CP circuits. It provides a voltages that is higher than the voltage of the power supply or a voltage of reverse polarity. In many applications such as the power IC and switched-capacitor transformers. This paper presents the design and analysis for VD using charge reuse technique CMOS 0.35µm tech. with high performance. Bootstrapped and charge reuse techniques is used to improve performance of integrated VD. Charge reusing method is based on equalizing the voltages of the pumping capacitances in each stage of CP. As a consequence, it reduces the load independent losses, improve the efficiency. Simulation using Orcad is applied for various VD structures shows improvement in charge reuse technique compared with existing counterpart. The results obtained show that the VD can be used in a wide band frequencies (0-100 MHz or greater. The charge reuse VD circuit provided a good efficiency about (87.6% and (83.5% for one stage and two stage respectively at pump capacitance of 57pf, load current of 1mA, frequency of 10 MHz and supply voltage is 3.5 V compared with one stage and two stage of a latched VD are (85.4% and (80% respectively.

  5. Remote monitoring of bond line defects between a composite panel and a stiffener using distributed piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xudong; Fan, Zheng; Puliyakote, Sreedhar; Castaings, Michel

    2018-03-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using ultrasonic guided waves has proven to be attractive for the identification of damage in composite plate-like structures, due to its realization of both significant propagation distances and reasonable sensitivity to defects. However, topographical features such as bends, lap joints, and bonded stiffeners are often encountered in these structures, and they are susceptible to various types of defects as a consequence of stress concentration and cyclic loading during the service life. Therefore, the health condition of such features has to be assessed effectively to ensure the safe operation of the entire structure. This paper proposes a novel feature guided wave (FGW) based SHM strategy, in which proper FGWs are exploited as a screening tool to rapidly interrogate the representative stiffener-adhesive bond-composite skin assembly. An array of sensors permanently attached to the vicinity of the feature is used to capture scattered waves from the localized damage occurring in the bond line. This technique is combined with an imaging approach, and the damage reconstruction is achieved by the synthetic focusing algorithm using these scattered signals. The proposed SHM scheme is implemented in both the 3D finite element simulation and the experiment, and the results are in good agreement, demonstrating the feasibility of such SHM strategy.

  6. Dynamic fracture of adhesively bonded composite structures using cohesive zone models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhecha, Dhaval P.

    material model to be used in an explicit code (LS-DYNA). Dynamic simulations of the standard test configurations for Mode I (Double Cantilever Beam) and Mode II (End Load Split) are carried out using the explicit code. Verification of these coupon tests leads to the crash analysis of realistic structures like the square composite tube. Analyses of bonded and unbonded square tubes are presented. These tubes shows a very uncharacteristic failure mode: the composite material disintegrates on impact, and this has been captured in the analysis. Disadvantages of the interface element approach are well documented in the literature. An alternative method, known as the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM), is implemented here through an eight-noded quadrilateral plane strain element. The method, based on the partition-of-unity, is used to study simple test configuration like the three-point bend problem and a double cantilever beam. Functionally graded materials are also simulated and the results are compared to the experimental results available in the literature.

  7. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fibre reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  8. Effects of ethanol concentrations of acrylate-based dental adhesives on microtensile composite-dentin bond strength and hybrid layer structure of a 10 wt% polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-incorporated bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavinasab, Seyed Mostafa; Atai, Mohammad; Barekatain, Mehrdad; Fattahi, Parisa; Fattahi, Amir; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess for the first time the effects of different amounts of ethanol solvent on the microtensile bond strength of composite bonded to dentin using a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-incorporated adhesive. This experimental study was performed on 120 specimens divided into six groups (in accordance with the ISO TR11405 standard requiring at least 15 specimens per group). Occlusal dentin of thirty human molar teeth was exposed by removing its enamel. Five teeth were assigned to each of six groups and were converted to 20 microtensile rods (with square cross-sections of 1 mm × 1 mm) per group. The "Prime and Bond NT" (as a common commercial adhesive) was used as the control group. Experimental acrylate-based bonding agents containing 10 wt% POSS were produced with five concentrations of ethanol as solvent (0, 20, 31, 39, and 46 wt%). After application of adhesives on dentin surface, composite cylinders (height = 6 mm) were bonded to dentin surface. The microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin was measured. The fractured surfaces of specimens were evaluated under a scanning electron microscope to assess the morphology of hybrid layer. Data were analyzed using one-sample t -test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). the mean bond strength in the groups: "control, ethanol-free, and 20%, 31%, 39%, and 46% ethanol" was, respectively, 46.5 ± 5.6, 29.4 ± 5.7, 33.6 ± 4.1, 59.0 ± 5.5, 41.9 ± 6.2, and 18.7 ± 4.6 MPa. Overall difference was significant (ANOVA, P composite to dentin and improve the quality and morphology of the hybrid layer. However, higher concentrations of the solvent might not improve the bond strength or quality of the hybrid layer.

  9. Effects of Bond Coating on NiCrBSi-Mo Composite Functional Coating Properties in Plasma Spraying NiCrBSi-Mo/Ni Coating

    OpenAIRE

    DU Ji-yu; LI Fang-yi; LU Hai-yang; SHANG Jian-tong; LI Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Nickel-based bond coating and composite functional coating were sprayed on leaf blade steel material FV520B successively by using air plasma spraying system. NiCrBSi-Mo powder deposition rate, coating porosity, bonding strength and surface hardness were tested. The results indicate that, for the NiCrBSi-Mo/Ni coating, bond coating with 180-220μm thickness can improve NiCrBSi-Mo powder deposition rate while the surface coating with lower porosity, higher bonding strength and high hardness is p...

  10. Effect of grape seed extract against biodegradation of composite resin-dentin shear bond strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generosa, D. M.; Suprastiwi, E.; Asrianti, D.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on resin-dentin shear bond strength. A group of 48 dentin samples were divided into 6 groups. The six groups, each with eight specimens, included group 1 (control), group 2 (control + NaOCl 10%), group 3 (2.9% GSE application before etching), group 4 (2.9% GSE application before etching + NaOCl 10%), group 5 (2.9% GSE application after etching), and group 6 (2.9% GSE application after etching + NaOCl 10%). Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was done with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney U test. The highest median value was in group 3, and the lowest value was in group 5. GSE can improve the shear bond strength (p = 0.002 and 0.001), but it has no effect on reducing biodegradation (p = 0.141).

  11. Microtensile bond strength between indirect composite resin inlays and dentin: effect of cementation strategy and mechanical aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, Emília Pithan; Amaral, Marina; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; Silva, Tatiana Bernardon; Saavedra, Guilherme; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite inlays to dentin using two cementation strategies, before and after mechanical aging. Standardized inlay cavities (bucco-lingual width: 3 mm; depth: 4 mm) were prepared in 32 human premolars. The teeth were embedded in self-curing acrylic resin up to 3 mm from the cementoenamel junction, impressions were made using a polyvinyl siloxane material, master dies were obtained using type 4 stone, and inlay composite resin restorations were fabricated (Sinfony, 3M ESPE). The teeth were randomly allocated into 4 groups according to the cementation strategy (conventional [C] and simplified [S]) and aging (mechanical cycling [MC] and not aged): C[G1]: Adper SingleBond + RelyX ARC without aging; CMC[G2]: conventional cementation + mechanical cycling (106 cycles, 88 N, 4 Hz, ± 37°C); S[G3]: self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U-100) without aging; SMC[G4] self-adhesive cementation + mechanical cycling. Intaglio surfaces of composite inlays were treated by tribochemical silica coating in G1 and G2, while G3 and G4 received no surface treatment. Non-aged specimens were stored in a moist environment at ca 37°C for the same period as MC (3 days). Non-trimmed beam specimens (bonding area = 1 mm²) were produced by serial cutting, and microtensile testing was performed (0.5 mm/min). Two-way ANOVA showed that the microtensile bond strength was affected only by cementation strategy (p < 0.0001). Tukey's test showed that groups G1 (35.1 ± 9.1) and G2 (32.7 ± 10.7) presented significantly higher bond strength values than G3 (8.7 ± 6.3) and G4 (5.2 ± 4.6). The use of a conventional adhesive technique and tribochemical silica coating resulted in higher μTBS than the one-step simplified cementation, even after mechanical cycling.

  12. Effect of Addition of Curcumin Nanoparticles on Antimicrobial Property and Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Composite to Bovine Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Baghaeian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of curcumin nanoparticles (curcNPs on antimicrobial property and shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic composite to bovine enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro, experimental study, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs were added to Transbond XT composite. Stainless steel brackets were bonded to 48 sound bovine incisors in four groups (n=12 using composite containing 0% (control, 1%, 5% and 10% curcNPs. The bracket-tooth SBS was measured by a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI score was calculated after debonding using a stereomicroscope. Also, 180 discs were fabricated of the four composites; 108 were subjected to eluted component test, 36 were used for disc diffusion test and 36 were used for biofilm test to assess their antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Lactobacillus acidophilus.Results: The highest and lowest SBS belonged to control and 10% curcNP groups, respectively. The difference in SBS was significant among the four groups (P=0.008. The SBS of control group was significantly higher than that of 10% curcNPs (P=0.006. The four groups were not significantly different in terms of ARI score (P>0.05. Growth inhibition zones were not seen in any group. In biofilm test, the colony counts of all bacteria significantly decreased by an increase in percentage of curcNPs. Colony count significantly decreased only at 30 days.Conclusions: At 1% concentration, curcNPs have significant antimicrobial activity against cariogenic bacteria with no adverse effect on SBS. However, insolubility of curcNPs remains a major drawback.Keywords: Curcumin; Nanoparticles; Shear Strength; Composite Resins; Orthodontic Brackets; Anti-Bacterial Agents

  13. Bond Strength of Methacrylate-Based Composite to Dentin using a Silorane Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    the CEJ in a custom cylindrical block. A diamond saw (Isomet, Buhler, Lake Bluff, IL) was used to section the crowns of the teeth horizontally in a...resin 3M/ESPE St. Paul, MN Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA Zirconia , silica LS System Adhesive 2-step self-etch methacrylate-based bonding

  14. Tensile bond strength of composite luting cements to metal alloys after various surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizoglu Saip

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the effects of two different surface treatments and bonding agents on tensile bond strength between a Co-Cr and a Ni-Cr cast alloy and two resin-luting cements. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and forty alloy samples were cast and subjected to surface treatments such as sandblasting, chemical etching, and sandblasting plus chemical etching. Panavia F and CandB cement were used as cementing mediums. The etching qualities were examined by a stereooptic microscope. Failure surfaces were examined throughout scanning electron microscopy. The data were evaluated using statistical methods, namely analysis of variance and multiple comparison test (Tukey HSD. Results: Significant differences were found in the bonding provided by the various cements (P < 0.001 and also type of surface treatments (P < 0.001. For all groups, sandblasted surfaces showed the highest bond strength values. There was no significant difference between the Cr-Co and the Cr-Ni alloys (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Panavia F showed higher tensile strength and the sandblasted samples possessed higher tensile strength.

  15. Repair bond strength of a resin composite to alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goia, Tamiye Simone; Pereira Leite, Fabiola Pessoa; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Oezcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This study compared the microtensile bond strength of a repair resin to an alumina-reinforced feldspathic ceramic (Vitadur-alpha, Vita) after 3 surface conditioning methods: Group 1, etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 1 minute plus rinsing and drying, followed by application of silane for 5

  16. Bond strength between composite resin and resin modified glass ionomer using different adhesive systems and curing techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Gharaei, Samineh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate bond strength between RMGI and composite using different adhesive systems and curing techniques. Materials and Methods: Sixty prepared samples of RMGI were randomly divided into six groups according to adhesive systems (total-etch, two-step self-etch and all-in-one) and curing techniques (co-curing and pre-curing). In co-curing technique, the adhesive systems were applied on uncured RMGI samples and co-cured together. In the pre-curing technique, before application of adh...

  17. The Effect of Titanium Tetrafluoride and Sodium Hypochlorite on the Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate and Silorane Based Composite Resins: an In-Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Razazan, Nader

    2017-06-01

    The bond strength of composites with different adhesive systems with dentin is an important factor in long term durability of composite restorations. The effect of titanium tetrafluoride (TiF 4 ) as anti caries agent and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) as disinfectant on the shear bond of nanofilled and silorane based composite resins have not been investigated in previous studies. This study was conducted to determine bond strength between dentin and two composite systems, by means of shear bond test using TiF 4 and NaOCl. Middle dentin of 60 intact extracted maxillary premolar teeth were exposed by sectioning the crowns at a depth of 2mm from central groove and parallel to the occlusal surface. Standardized smear layer was created using a 600-grit silicon carbide paper and then samples were embedded in acrylic resin blocks. Then the samples were randomly divided into 6 \\groups summarized as Group I: Z350, Group II: Z350+ NaOCl, Group III: Z350+ TiF 4 , Group IV: P90, Group V: P90+ NaOCl, Group VI: P90+ TiF 4 according to manufacturer's instruction. Then samples were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test using universal testing machine and data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests ( p composite resin ( p = 0.004), and also silorane based composite resin ( p = 0.006). Application of 4% TiF 4 caused a significant increase in SBS of silorane based composite resin ( p = 0.001). The effect of TiF 4 on nanofilled composite was not statistically significant. Using TiF 4 has a positive effect on increasing the shear bond while NaOCl has negative effect on bond strength.

  18. Flowable composite an alternative orthodontic bonding adhesive: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Supradeep; Rao, C Hanumantha; Reddy, Kv Baburam; Chidambaram, S; Girish, Hc; Murgod, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    To determine the clinical applicability of Ormocer based fowable adhesive (Admira fow) in comparison with BisGMA based adhesive (Transbond XT) and Ormocer based packable adhesive (Admira). Sixty human premolars, divided into group I (n = 20) Transbond XT, group II (n = 20) Admira and group III (n = 20) Admira fow were bonded with metal brackets using adhesives. Brackets were debonded in shear on an Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm per minute. The mode of bond failure was determined by modifed ARI index. The results obtained from SBS evaluation and modifed ARI showed highest shear bond strength for Transbond XT (SD 11.64) 3.68 followed by Admira fow (SD 11.0) 2.87 and least for Admira (SD 9.42) 2.21. However, the difference was not statistically signifcant, but an intergroup comparison done using Independent student 't' test, showed statically signifcant difference between Transbond XT and Admira. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed least survival median value for Admira, but the survival median value is not statistically signifcant among the three groups. All groups had modifed ARI score of three (60-70%), suggestive of cohesive type of failure. The in vitro study showed that fowable Ormocer can be an good alternative to commonly used BisGMA based adhesive but the its effcacy needs clinical assessment through a survival analysis. CLINICAL SIGNIFCANCE: Admire fow can defnitely be considered as an alternative bonding system due to their comparable bond strength and debonding characters and reported properties of biocompatibility.

  19. Shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to zirconia: Effect of surface treatment by CNC-milling and composite layer deposition on zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R L P; Silva, F S; Nascimento, R M; Souza, J C M; Motta, F V; Carvalho, O; Henriques, B

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of veneering feldspathic porcelain to zirconia substrates modified by CNC-milling process or by coating zirconia with a composite interlayer. Four types of zirconia-porcelain interface configurations were tested: RZ - porcelain bonded to rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZ - porcelain bonded to zirconia substrate with surface holes (n=16); RZI - application of a composite interlayer between the veneering porcelain and the rough zirconia substrate (n=16); PZI - application of a composite interlayer between the porcelain and the zirconia substrate treated by CNC-milling (n=16). The composite interlayer was composed of zirconia particles reinforced porcelain (30%, vol%). The mechanical properties of the ceramic composite have been determined. The shear bond strength test was performed at 0.5mm/min using a universal testing machine. The interfaces of fractured and untested specimens were examined by FEG-SEM/EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD multiple comparison test was used to compare shear bond strength results (α=0.05). The shear bond strength of PZ (100±15MPa) and RZI (96±11MPa) specimens were higher than that recorded for RZ (control group) specimens (89±15MPa), although not significantly (p>0.05). The highest shear bond strength values were recorded for PZI specimens (138±19MPa), yielding a significant improvement of 55% relative to RZ specimens (p<0.05). This study shows that it is possible to highly enhance the zirconia-porcelain bond strength - even by ~55% - by combining surface holes in zirconia frameworks and the application of a proper ceramic composite interlayer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles incorporation on antibacterial properties and shear bond strength of dental composite used in Orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sodagar

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Plaque accumulation and bond failure are drawbacks of orthodontic treatment, which requires composite for bonding of brackets. As the antimicrobial properties of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have been proven, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and mechanical properties of composite resins modified by the addition of TiO2 NPs. Methods: Orthodontics composite containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were prepared. 180 composite disks were prepared for elution test, disk agar diffusion test and biofilm inhibition test to collect the counts of microorganisms on three days, measure the inhibition diameter and quantify the viable counts of colonies consequently. For shear bond strength (SBS test, 48 intact bovine incisors were divided into four groups. Composites containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were used for bonding of bracket. The bracket/tooth SBS was measured by using an universal testing machine. Results: All concentration of TiO2 NPs had a significant effect on creation and extension of inhibition zone. For S. mutans and S. sanguinis, all concentration of TiO2 NPs caused reduction of the colony counts. Composite containing 10% TiO2 NPs had significant effect on reduction of colony counts for S. mutans and S. sanguinis in all three days. The highest mean shear bond strength belonged to the control group, while the lowest value was seen in 10% NPs composite. Conclusions: Incorporating TiO2 nanoparticles into composite resins confer antibacterial properties to adhesives, while the mean shear bond of composite containing 1% and 5% NPs still in an acceptable range.

  1. Effect of TiO2 nanoparticles incorporation on antibacterial properties and shear bond strength of dental composite used in Orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodagar, Ahmad; Akhoundi, Mohamad Sadegh Ahmad; Bahador, Abbas; Jalali, Yasamin Farajzadeh; Behzadi, Zahra; Elhaminejad, Farideh; Mirhashemi, Amir Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Plaque accumulation and bond failure are drawbacks of orthodontic treatment, which requires composite for bonding of brackets. As the antimicrobial properties of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) have been proven, the aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and mechanical properties of composite resins modified by the addition of TiO2 NPs. Orthodontics composite containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were prepared. 180 composite disks were prepared for elution test, disk agar diffusion test and biofilm inhibition test to collect the counts of microorganisms on three days, measure the inhibition diameter and quantify the viable counts of colonies consequently. For shear bond strength (SBS) test, 48 intact bovine incisors were divided into four groups. Composites containing 0%, 1%, 5% and 10% NPs were used for bonding of bracket. The bracket/tooth SBS was measured by using an universal testing machine. All concentration of TiO2 NPs had a significant effect on creation and extension of inhibition zone. For S. mutans and S. sanguinis, all concentration of TiO2 NPs caused reduction of the colony counts. Composite containing 10% TiO2 NPs had significant effect on reduction of colony counts for S. mutans and S. sanguinis in all three days. The highest mean shear bond strength belonged to the control group, while the lowest value was seen in 10% NPs composite. Incorporating TiO2 nanoparticles into composite resins confer antibacterial properties to adhesives, while the mean shear bond of composite containing 1% and 5% NPs still in an acceptable range.

  2. Effect of surface conditioning modalities on the repair bond strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Pereira, Sarina Maciel; Amaral, Regina; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Pekkan, Gurel

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface conditioning protocols on the repair strength of resin composite to the zirconia core / veneering ceramic complex, simulating the clinical chipping phenomenon. Forty disk-shaped zirconia core (Lava Zirconia, 3M ESPE) (diameter: 3 mm) specimens were veneered circumferentially with a feldspathic veneering ceramic (VM7, Vita Zahnfabrik) (thickness: 2 mm) using a split metal mold. They were then embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic with the bonding surfaces exposed. Specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning protocols (n = 10 per group): group 1, veneer: 4% hydrofluoric acid (HF) (Porcelain Etch) + core: aluminum trioxide (50-µm Al2O3) + core + veneer: silane (ESPE-Sil); group 2: core: Al2O3 (50 µm) + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane; group 3: veneer: HF + core: 30 µm aluminum trioxide particles coated with silica (30 µm SiO2) + core + veneer: silane; group 4: core: 30 µm SiO2 + veneer: HF + core + veneer: silane. Core and veneer ceramic were conditioned individually but no attempt was made to avoid cross contamination of conditioning, simulating the clinical intraoral repair situation. Adhesive resin (VisioBond) was applied to both the core and the veneer ceramic, and resin composite (Quadrant Posterior) was bonded onto both substrates using polyethylene molds and photopolymerized. After thermocycling (6000 cycles, 5°C-55°C), the specimens were subjected to shear bond testing using a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Failure modes were identified using an optical microscope, and scanning electron microscope images were obtained. Bond strength data (MPa) were analyzed statistically using the non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and the Bonferroni Holm correction (α = 0.05). Group 3 demonstrated significantly higher values (MPa) (8.6 ± 2.7) than those of the other groups (3.2 ± 3.1, 3.2 ± 3, and 3.1 ± 3.5 for groups 1, 2, and 4

  3. Enhanced capacity of chemically bonded phosphorus/carbon composite as an anode material for potassium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Hong; Qi, Xiujun; Xing, Zheng; Zhuang, Quanchao; Ju, Zhicheng

    2018-02-01

    Potassium-ion batteries are attracting great attention as a promising alternative to lithium-ion batteries due to the abundance and low price of potassium. Herein, the phosphorus/carbon composite, obtained by a simple ball-milling of 20 wt% commercial red phosphorus and 80 wt% graphite, is studied as a novel anode for potassium-ion batteries. Considering the high theoretical specific capacity of phosphorus and formation of stable phosphorus-carbon bond, which can alleviate the volume expansion efficiently, the phosphorus/carbon composite exhibits a high charge capacity of 323.5 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 50 mA g-1 with moderate rate capability and cycling stability. By the X-ray diffraction analysis, the alloying-dealloying mechanism of phosphorus is proposed to form a KP phase. Meanwhile, prepotassiation treatment is conducted to improve the low initial coulomb efficiency.

  4. Local structure and hydrogen bond characteristics of imidazole molecules for proton conduction in acid and base proton-conducting composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yuta; Chikai, Takuma; Ida, Tomonori; Mizuno, Motohiro

    2018-04-18

    Composite materials of acidic polymers and basic molecules have high proton-conductivity. Understanding the proton conduction mechanism of the composite materials, which depends on hydrogen bond characteristics, is an important task for developing materials with high proton-conductivity. This work is focused on poly(vinylphosphonic acid)-imidazole and alginic acid-imidazole as examples of composite materials of acidic polymers and basic molecules and examines the local structure and hydrogen bond characteristics of imidazole (Im) molecules in composite materials using density functional theory. The results show that Im molecules interact strongly with polymeric acids in these composite materials and that the interaction energy increases with the increase in the number of Im molecules. The rotational motion of Im molecules occurs in the segment where only Im molecules without excess protons are hydrogen-bonded to each other. The calculation results for the various segments, which depend on the hydrogen bonding environment, show that the proton conduction process in composite materials consists of the following steps: proton transfer in the segment where Im molecules interact with polymeric acids, proton transfer in the segment where Im molecules are affected by excess protons, and Grotthuss diffusion with reorientation of Im molecules in the segment where only Im molecules without excess protons are bonded to each other.

  5. Influence of provisional cements on ultimate bond strength of indirect composite restorations to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, RB; Martins, LRM; Quagliatto, PS; Soares, CJ

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of provisional cements on the adhesion of resin bonded indirect restorations and determine the best method for avoiding adverse Materials and Methods: Forty-five bovine incisors were selected, and the enamel removed with a 600-grit SiC abrasive disk to expose superficial dentin. Provisional restorations of acrylic, resin were cemented with three different provisional cements: calcium hydroxide cement, Dycal (HC); cement containing zinc...

  6. Tribological Properties of Laser Microtextured Surface Bonded With Composite Solid Lubricant at High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xijun; Sun, Jianguo; Zhang, Peiyun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Rong; Ji, Jinghu; Fu, Yonghong

    2016-07-01

    A combination technology of the solid lubricant and the laser surface texturing (LST) can significantly improve the tribological properties of friction pairs. The plate sample was textured by fiber laser and composite lubricant of polyimide (PI) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) powders were filled in the microdimples. Sliding friction performances of micron-sized composite lubricant and nano-sized composite lubricant were investigated by ring-plate tribometer at temperatures ranging from room temperature (RT) to 400 °C. On the one hand, the results of the micron-sized composite lubricant show that the friction coefficient of the textured surface filled with composite lubricant (TS) exhibits the lowest level and the highest stability compared to a textured surface without solid lubrication, smooth surface without lubrication, smooth surface burnished with a layer of composite solid lubricant. The better dimple density range is 35-46%. The friction coefficients of the sample surface filled with micron-composite solid lubricant with the texture density of 35% are maintained at a low level (about 0.1) at temperatures ranging from RT to 300 °C. On the other hand, the results of the nano-sized composite lubricant show that these friction properties are better than those of MoS 2 -PI micron-sized composite. The friction coefficients of MoS 2 -PI-CNTs nano-sized composite solid lubricant are lower than those of the MoS 2 -PI composite lubricant at temperatures ranging from RT to 400 °C. In addition, the possible mechanisms involving the synergetic effect of the surface texture and the solid lubricant are discussed in the present work.

  7. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive.

  8. Composite panels made with biofiber or office wastepaper bonded with thermoplastic and/or thermosetting resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Muehl; Andrzej M. Krzysik; Poo Chow

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two groups of composite panels made from two types of underutilized natural fiber sources, kenaf bast fiber and office wastepaper, for their suitability in composite panels. All panels were made with 5% thermosetting phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and 1.5% wax. Also, an additional 10% polypropylene (PP) thermoplastic resin was...

  9. Effect of two abrasive systems on resin bonding to laboratory-processed indirect resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouschlicher, M R; Cobb, D S; Vargas, M A

    1999-01-01

    This study compared two methods of surface roughening or preparation, with or without the use of proprietary surface wetting agents, to evaluate their effect on resin cement adhesion to the following laboratory-processed, indirect restorations: Artglass (AG), belleGlass HP (BG), Concept (C), and Targis (T). Methods of surface roughening or preparation included microetching with aluminum oxide (AO): 50 microns at 34 psi and silanized silica coating, CoJet-Sand (CJ): 30 microns at 34 psi. Artglass and Concept were tested with and without the use of their respective surface wetting agents: Artglass Liquid (AGL) and Special Bond II (SB). One hundred twenty specimens, each consisting of a pair of cylinders (7.0 x 3 mm and 4.3 x 3 mm) were fabricated. The larger cylinder or base was embedded in self-curing resin in a phenolic ring, and bonding surfaces were finished with 320-grit silicon carbide paper. Specimen pairs for each restorative material were randomly assigned to treatment groups (n = 10) and received the following surface treatments prior to cementation: group 1 (AG/AO/+AGL), group 2 (AG/AO/-AGL), group 3 (AG/CJ/+AGL), group 4 (AG/CJ/-AGL), group 5 (BG/AO), group 6 (BG/CJ), group 7 (C/AO/+SB), group 8 (C/AO/-SB), group 9 (C/CJ/+SB), group 10 (C/CJ/-SB), group 11 (T/AO), and group 12 (T/CJ). Specimen pairs were cemented with a dual-cure resin cement (Dual) and a standardized force of 1 MPa. Specimens were light-cured 40 seconds per side (80 s total), then thermocycled 300 times at between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C. Shear bond strengths (MPa) were determined using a Zwick Materials Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm per minute. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's multiple range test (alpha = 0.05) by restoration type indicated no significant differences in shear bond strength between BG group 5 (29.8 +/- 5.8), BG group 6 (28.3 +/- 4.3), T group 11 (29.3 +/- 4.9), and T group 12 (29.0 +/- 4.4). Shear bond strength in AG group 3 (35.9 +/- 3

  10. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan CANTEK?N

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB composites, silorane-based (SB composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Material and Methods: Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results: The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2 than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7 (p<0.001, the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6 and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6 showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively. Conclusions: The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  11. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARAO Nobuaki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS and Block HC (BHC] were pretreated as follows: (a no treatment (None, (b application of a ceramic primer (CP, (c alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB, (d AB followed by CP (AB+CP, and (e glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB followed by CP (GBB+CP. The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS and ResiCem (RC]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0 and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05. Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p0.05. The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05, but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05. Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP.

  12. Accelerated Fatigue Resistance of Thick CAD/CAM Composite Resin Overlays Bonded with Light- and Dual-polymerizing Luting Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jack; Güth, Jan-Frederik; Magne, Pascal

    To evaluate the accelerated fatigue resistance of thick CAD/CAM composite resin overlays luted with three different bonding methods. Forty-five sound human second mandibular molars were organized and distributed into three experimental groups. All teeth were restored with a 5-mm-thick CAD/CAM composite resin overlay. Group A: immediate dentin sealing (IDS) with Optibond FL and luted with light-polymerizing composite (Herculite XRV). Group B: IDS with Optibond FL and luted with dual-polymerizing composite (Nexus 3). Group C: direct luting with Optibond FL and dual-polymerizing composite (Nexus 3). Masticatory forces at a frequency of 5 Hz were simulated using closed-loop servo-hydraulics and forces starting with a load of 200 N for 5000 cycles, followed by steps of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200 and 1400 N for a maximum of 30,000 cycles. Each step was applied through a flat steel cylinder at a 45-degree angle under submerged conditions. The fatigue test generated one failure in group A, three failures in group B, and no failures in group C. The survival table analysis for the fatigue test did not demonstrate any significant difference between the groups (p = 0.154). The specimens that survived the fatigue test were set up for the load-to-failure test with a limit of 4600 N. The survival table analysis for the load-to-failure test demonstrates an average failure load of 3495.20 N with survival of four specimens in group A, an average failure load of 4103.60 N with survival of six specimens in group B, and an average failure load of 4075.33 N with survival of nine specimens in group C. Pairwise comparisons revealed no significant differences (p composites in combination with IDS are not contraindicated with thick restorations.

  13. Bonding two surfaces by exposing to actinic radiation an epoxide liquid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing a film adhesive from an epoxide resin is described. A liquid containing an epoxide resin and a photopolymerizable compound is polymerized to form a solid continuous film by exposure to actinide radiation. A catalyst can be used but no thermal crosslinking should be allowed to occur. The film so obtained is used to bond surfaces together by the application of heat and pressure. The period of heating can be very short, as there need be no solvent to evaporate and the films need not be thick, typically 20 to 250 μm. (O.T.)

  14. Effect of Metal Primers on Bond Strength of a Composite Resin to Nickel-Chrome Metal Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nima, Gabriel; Ferreira, Paulo Vitor Campos; Paula, Andreia Bolzan de; Consani, Simonides; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three metal primers and one multi-mode adhesive system on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a flowable composite resin to nickel-chrome metal alloy (Ni-Cr). Ninety plates were cast from Ni-Cr and divided in nine groups (n=10). The surfaces were sandblasted with Al2O3 and primed with three adhesive primers: Alloy Primer (AP), Universal Primer (TP) and RelyX Ceramic Primer (CP), and a multi-mode adhesive (Scotchbond Universal, SU). The Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and SU adhesives were also combined with adhesive primers. Control group did not have any surface treatment. The groups were: AP, AP+SB, AP+SU, TP+SB, TP+SU, CP+SB, CP+SU and SU. Composite cylinders were built on alloy surface. After 24 h, half the specimens were subjected to SBS and the other half to thermal cycling before testing. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05). Failure modes were assessed by SEM observation. Higher SBS were obtained with AP and TP combined with adhesives at 24 h and the lowest one for control group. Thermocycling reduced SBS for AP, CP+SU and SU. Combination between TP and SU resulted in the highest SBS after the thermocycling. TP groups showed all types of failures and high incidence of mixed failures. The use of AP and UP metal primers before application of SU and SB adhesive systems increased the SBS of composite to Ni-Cr. These combinations between metal primers and adhesives had the highest SBS after thermocycling.

  15. INFLUENCE OF SILANE HEAT TREATMENT ON THE TENSILE BOND STRENGTH BETWEEN EX-3 SYNTHETIC VENEERING PORCELAIN AND COMPOSITE RESIN USING FIVE DIFFERENT ACTIVATION TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spartak Yanakiev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to assess the effect of five different silane activation temperatures and eight activation methods on the tensile bond strength between one veneering porcelain and one composite resin material. Material and methods: A total of 81 ceramic rods were made of EX-3 veneering ceramic (Kuraray Noritake Dental, Japan. Sintered ceramic bars were grinded with diamond disks to size 10x2x2mm ± 0,05mm. The front part of each bar was polished. After ultrasonic cleaning in distilled water, the specimens were divided into nine groups. Silane was activated with air at room temperature, 38º С, 50º С, 100º С, 120º С using a custom made blow drier. In a silicone mold, a composite resin Z250 (3М ESPE, St. Paul, USA was condensed toward the bond ceramic surface. A total of 81 specimens approximately 2,0 cm long were prepared for tensile bond testing. One way ANOVA, followed by Bonferroni and Games-Howell tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: The lowest tensile bond strength was observed in the control group (3,51MPa. Group 2 yielded the highest bond strength among all groups (19,54MPa. Silane heat treatment enhanced the bond strength for all treatment methods. Within the polished specimens, the highest bond strength was yielded with warm air at 120ºС (11,31MPa. Conclusion: The most effective method for bonding Z250 composite resin to EX-3 veneering ceramic includes HF etching, silane, and adhesive resin. The most effective heat treatment method for bonding is hot air at 120ºС.

  16. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantekin, Kenan; Avci, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. The highest (17.7 ± 6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8 ± 3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7 ± 6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9 ± 5.7) (p Biodentine® = 8.0 ± 3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA = 5.8 ± 3.2; GIC and Biodentine = 6.7 ± 2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p = 0.73 and p = 0.38, respectively). The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite.

  17. Effect of activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and low-viscosity composite liners on bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rubens Nazareno; Reis, André Figueiredo; Giannini, Marcelo

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the activation mode of dual-cured resin cements and application of low-viscosity composite liners over self-primed dentin on bond strength (BS) of dentin-bonding agents (DBA). Three DBA (Single Bond; Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond), their respective resin cements (RelyX ARC and Panavia F) and two low-viscosity composites (Filtek Flow and Protect Liner F) were tested. After removing the buccal enamel surfaces of 25 bovine incisors, each flat dentin surface was sectioned longitudinally and divided into two similar parts. The dentin surfaces were wet-abraded with 600-grit SiC paper and randomly divided into 10 groups. Experimental groups comprised the use of DBA and their respective dual-cured resin cements, with or without light-activation of resin cements. The low-viscosity resin was used only for the self-etching systems, Prompt L-Pop and Clearfil SE Bond. Three resin cement cylinders (0.5mm high and 0.75mm diameter) were built on each bonded dentin surface, using a tygon tubing mold. After water storage for 24h, specimens were subjected to micro-shear testing. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Light-activation of resin cements resulted in significantly higher BS for all DBA versus groups in which the resin cements were allowed to self-cure. The low-viscosity composite application increased the BS only for Prompt L-Pop. The bond strength of resin cements to dentin is reduced if light-activation is not employed. The use of a low-viscosity composite liner resulted in improved bond strength only for the single-step self-etching adhesive.

  18. The influence of long term water immersion on shear bond strength of amalgam repaired by resin composite and mediated by adhesives or resin modified glass ionomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, R; Nissan, J; Shafir, H; Shapira, G; Alter, E; Brosh, T

    2012-07-01

    To assess the shear bond strength between amalgam and resin composite mediated by either multipurpose adhesive systems or RMGI when subjected to long term immersion in saline. Part I: Cylindrical specimens (6 mm × 6 mm) composed of equal parts of sandblasted set amalgam (Oralloy) and composite (Z-100), with a thin layer of either Scotchbond Multipurpose, All Bond 2, Amalgam Bond Plus, High Q Bond Plus or Vitrebond in between were fabricated (n = 100 × 5). Each group was divided into 3 subgroups, immersed in saline at 37 °C for either 48 h, 3 or 6 months, followed by thermocycling (5000; 5/55 °C) and shear bond strength testing (SBS). Part II: Identical specimens were fabricated with intermediary of either Ketac Cem, Fuji Lining LC, Rely X Luting, Fuji Plus or Meron Plus (n = 100 × 5). Immersion periods, followed by thermocycling and SBS testing as in Part I. Two representative specimens from each subgroup were sectioned and inspected under SEM. The two classes of intermediary agents yielded SBS which differed mainly in the 6 months incubation period. While multipurpose adhesives provided SBS values of ~9-10 MPa RMGI provided higher SBS of ~16 MPa. All Bond 2 and Amalgam Bond Plus exhibited deterioration of SBS during the 6 month period as well as Rely X Luting. Gap sizes between 0.5 and 3 μm exist between all intermediaries and the amalgam; on the other hand all intermediaries exhibit gap-free interfaces between the adhesives/RMGI and the composite. Vitrebond in particular and RMGIs in general can serve as an excellent coupler of resin composite to amalgam, providing a durable bond. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Controlling the Sn-C bonds content in SnO2@CNTs composite to form in situ pulverized structure for enhanced electrochemical kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yayi; Huang, Jianfeng; Qi, Hui; Cao, Liyun; Luo, Xiaomin; Li, Jiayin; Xu, Zhanwei; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-07

    The Sn-C bonding content between the SnO 2 and CNTs interface was controlled by the hydrothermal method and subsequent heat treatment. Electrochemical analysis found that the SnO 2 @CNTs with high Sn-C bonding content exhibited much higher capacity contribution from alloying and conversion reaction compared with the low content of Sn-C bonding even after 200 cycles. The high Sn-C bonding content enabled the SnO 2 nanoparticles to stabilize on the CNTs surface, realizing an in situ pulverization process of SnO 2 . The in situ pulverized structure was beneficial to maintain the close electrochemical contact of the working electrode during the long-term cycling and provide ultrafast transfer paths for lithium ions and electrons, which promoted the alloying and conversion reaction kinetics greatly. Therefore, the SnO 2 @CNTs composite with high Sn-C bonding content displayed highly reversible alloying and conversion reaction. It is believed that the composite could be used as a reference for design chemically bonded metal oxide/carbon composite anode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Predicting performance of polymer-bonded Terfenol-D composites under different magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xinchun; Dong Xufeng; Ou Jinping

    2009-01-01

    Considering demagnetization effect, the model used to calculate the magnetostriction of the single particle under the applied field is first created. Based on Eshelby equivalent inclusion and Mori-Tanaka method, the approach to calculate the average magnetostriction of the composites under any applied field, as well as the saturation, is studied by treating the magnetostriction particulate as an eigenstrain. The results calculated by the approach indicate that saturation magnetostriction of magnetostrictive composites increases with an increase of particle aspect and particle volume fraction, and a decrease of Young's modulus of the matrix. The influence of an applied field on magnetostriction of the composites becomes more significant with larger particle volume fraction or particle aspect. Experiments were done to verify the effectiveness of the model, the results of which indicate that the model only can provide approximate results.

  1. Effect of deproteinization and tubular occlusion on microtensile bond strength and marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Baseggio

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Dentin adhesion procedure presents limitations, especially regarding to lifetime stability of formed hybrid layer. Alternative procedures have been studied in order to improve adhesion to dentin. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of deproteinization or dentin tubular occlusion, as well as the combination of both techniques, on microtensile bond strength (µTBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Extracted erupted human third molars were randomly divided into 4 groups. Dentin surfaces were treated with one of the following procedures: (A 35% phosphoric acid gel (PA + adhesive system (AS; (B PA + 10% NaOCl + AS; (C PA + oxalate + AS and (D PA + oxalate + 10% NaOCl + AS. Bond strength data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. The microleakage scores were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney non-parametric tests. Significance level was set at 0.05 for all analyses. RESULTS: µTBS data presented statistically lower values for groups D and B, ranking data as A>C>B>D. The use of oxalic acid resulted in microleakage reduction along the tooth/restoration interface, being significant when used alone. On the other hand, the use of 10% NaOCl alone or in combination with oxalic acid, resulted in increased microleakage. CONCLUSIONS: Dentin deproteinization with 10% NaOCl or in combination with oxalate significantly compromised both the adhesive bond strength and the microleakage at interface. Tubular occlusion prior to adhesive system application seems to be a useful technique to reduce marginal microleakage.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Accumulative Roll-Bonded AA1050A/AA5005 Laminated Metal Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Kümmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Laminated metal composites (LMCs with alternating layers of commercial pure aluminum AA1050A and aluminum alloy AA5005 were produced by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB. In order to vary the layer thickness and the number of layer interfaces, different numbers of ARB cycles (4, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 were performed. The microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized in detail. Up to 8 ARB cycles, the ultrafine-grained (UFG microstructure of the layers in the LMC evolves almost equally to those in AA1050A and AA5005 mono-material sheets. However, the grain size in the composites tends to have smaller values. Nevertheless, the local mechanical properties of the individual layers in the LMCs are very similar to those of the mono-material sheets, and the macroscopic static mechanical properties of the LMCs can be calculated as the mean value of the mono-material sheets applying a linear rule of mixture. In contrast, for more than 12 ARB cycles, a homogenous microstructure was obtained where the individual layers within the composite cannot be visually separated any longer; thus, the hardness is at one constant and a high level across the whole sheet thickness. This results also in a significant higher strength in tensile testing. It was revealed that, with decreasing layer thickness, the layer interfaces become more and more dominating.

  3. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  4. Liquid-phase diffusion bonding: Temperature effects and solute redistribution in high temperature lead-free composite solders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Choquette, Stephanie [Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-05-17

    Liquid-phase diffusion bonding (LPDB) is being studied as the primary phenomena occurring in the development of a high temperature lead-free composite solder paste composed of gas-atomized Cu-10Ni, wt.% (Cu-11Ni, at.%) powder blended with Sn-0.7Cu-0.05Ni-0.01Ge (Sn-1.3Cu-0.1Ni-0.02Ge, at.%) Nihon-Superior SN100C solder powder. Powder compacts were used as a model system. LPDB promotes enhanced interdiffusion of the low-melting alloy matrix with the solid Cu-10Ni reinforcement powder above the matrix liquidus temperature. The initial study involved the effective intermetallic compound (IMC) compositions and microstructures that occur at varying reflow temperatures and times between 250-300°C and 30-60s, respectively. Certain reflow temperatures encourage adequate interdiffusion to form a continuous highly-conductive network throughout the composite solder joints. The diffusion of nickel, in particular, has a disperse pattern that foreshadows the possibility of a highly-conductive low-melting solder that can be successfully utilized at high temperatures.

  5. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading; Etude des mecanismes d'endommagement d'un assemblage cuivre / composite carbone - carbone sous chargement thermomecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncel, L

    1999-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  6. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength of an indirect composite to bovine dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Sandblasting was a safe surface treatment for the indirect composite, increasing the BS values. Hydrofluoric acid applied after sandblasting damaged the BS values and should not be recommended while ethanol and H2O2, when applied after sandblasting, were effective in increasing BS values.

  7. Significance of Shrinkage Induced Clamping Pressure in Fiber-Matrix Bonding in Cementitious Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    used in high performance cementitious composite materials.Assuming a Coulomb type of friction on the fiber/matrix interface andusing typical values for the frictional coefficient it is shownthat the shrinkage induced clamping pressure could be one of the mostimportant factors determining the frictional...

  8. Polyacrylonitrile based composite materials with extracting agents containing chemically bonded CMPO groups for separation of actinoids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kameník, Jan; Šebesta, F.; John, J.; Böhmer, V.; Rudzevich, V.; Grüner, Bohumír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 304, č. 1 (2015), s. 313-319 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : actinoids * CMPO * Calix[4]arene * cobalt bis(dicarbollide) * polyacrylonitrile * composite material Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2015

  9. Microtensile Bond Strength of New Ceramic/Polymer Materials Repaired with Composite Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    surface texture due to larger filler particles 4 and greater wear of the composite matrix material. The aforementioned study reported that...DVA, Corona , CA). Each bar specimen was loaded to failure, at a cross-head speed of 1mm/min on a universal testing machine (Model 5943, Instron

  10. Efficacy of Esthetic Retainers: Clinical Comparison between Multistranded Wires and Direct-Bond Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Splints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Scribante

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the reliability of two different types of orthodontic retainers in clinical use: a multistrand stainless steel wire and a polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin composite. Moreover the level of satisfaction of the patient about the esthetic result was also analyzed by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. 34 patients (9 boys and 25 girls, mean age 14.3, in the finishing phase of orthodontic treatment, were selected for the study. Since splints were applied the number, cause, and date of splint failures were recorded for each single tooth over 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a paired -test, Kaplan Meier survival estimates, and the log-rank test. Kruskal Wallis test was performed to analyze VAS recordings. Differences between the bond failure rates were not statistically significant. Esthetic result of VAS was significantly higher for polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin retainers than for stainless steel wires.

  11. Influence of light-curing unit systems on shear bond strength and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fernandes Sassi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different photopolymerization (halogen, halogen soft-start and LED systems on shear bond strength (SBS and marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations. Forty Class V cavities (enamel and dentin margins were prepared for microleakage assessment, and 160 enamel and dentin fragments were prepared for the SBS test, and divided into 4 groups. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests showed statistically significant difference in microleakage between the margins (p 0.05 neither between substrates nor among groups. It was concluded that Soft-Start technique with high intensity end-light influenced negatively the cervical marginal sealing, but the light-curing systems did not influence adhesion.

  12. Effect of primers containing N-methylolacrylamide or N-methylolmethacrylamide on dentin bond durability of a resin composite after 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, T; Inoue, Y; Miyazaki, K; Itoh, T

    2001-03-01

    The effect of experimental dentin primers containing N-methylolacrylamide (MEAA) or N-methylolmethacrylamide (MEMA) on bond durability of a resin composite (Photo Clearfil A) with a bonding agent (Clearfil Photo Bond) to bovine dentin was investigated. The etching agents were 10% maleic acid (10% MA), 10% phosphoric acid (10% PA) and 10% citric acid-3% ferric chloride (10-3 solution). Water solutions of 35% hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 50% MEAA or 30% MEMA were used as dentin primers. The etched dentin was pre-treated with the dentin primers for 30s. The resin composite systems were applied in a Teflon tube positioned onto pre-treated dentin surfaces. After water immersion for 1 day and 5 years, the shear bond strengths were measured. The amounts of calcium dissolved with etching agents were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. The thicknesses of hybrid layers at the dentin-resin interfaces treated with 6 mol/l HCl and 1% NaOCl were measured using scanning electron microscopy. The bond strengths of the specimens (Controls) without primers to dentin etched with 10% MA and 10-3 solution significantly decreased after immersion in water for 5 years (pMEAA-primed dentin were significantly higher than that of the control after 1 day, regardless of the types of etching agents (pMEAA-primed dentin were significantly higher than that of the control, regardless of the types of etching agents (pMEAA-primed dentin were significantly higher than those of the composites to HEMA-primed dentin, regardless of the types of etching agents (pMEAA solution was more effective in improving the bond strength of the controls to etched dentin than was HEMA after 1 day and 5 years. Clearfil Photo Bond created good hybrid dentin layers which could resist NaOCl-attack and showed good dentin bond durability when dentin primers were used, regardless of the type of etching agent.

  13. Asymptotic Sampling for Reliability Analysis of Adhesive Bonded Stepped Lap Composite Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimiaeifar, Amin; Lund, Erik; Thomsen, Ole Thybo

    2013-01-01

    Reliability analysis coupled with finite element analysis (FEA) of composite structures is computationally very demanding and requires a large number of simulations to achieve an accurate prediction of the probability of failure with a small standard error. In this paper Asymptotic Sampling, which....... Three dimensional (3D) FEA is used for the structural analysis together with a design equation that is associated with a deterministic code-based design equation where reliability is secured by partial safety factors. The Tsai-Wu and the maximum principal stress failure criteria are used to predict...... failure in the composite and adhesive layers, respectively, and the results are compared with the target reliability level implicitly used in the wind turbine standard IEC 61400-1. The accuracy and efficiency of Asymptotic Sampling is investigated by comparing the results with predictions obtained using...

  14. Reliability-based framework for fatigue damage prognosis of bonded structural elements in aerospace composite structures

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbato, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Fatigue-induced damage is one of the most uncertain and extremely unpredictable failure mechanisms for a large variety of structural systems (e.g., aerospace, automotive, offshore, and civil structures) subjected to stochastic and cyclic loading during service life. Among these systems, composite lightweight aerospace structures -- such as fighter aircrafts and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) -- are particularly sensitive to both fatigue- induced and impact-induced damage. Within this scenari...

  15. Long-Term Provisional Bonded Composite Restorations Make Full-Mouth Rehabilitation Possible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Ronald G

    2016-05-01

    Full-mouth rehabilitation cases frequently require an extended period to complete. In this case involving a patient who presented with a significant amount of lost tooth structure, treatment featured laboratory-fabricated composite provisional restorations aimed at stabilizing the dentition and enabling definitive treatment to be completed in segments. The approach taken allowed occlusal and esthetic issues to be resolved through use of the provisionals while minimizing tooth preparation. The technique provided immediate improvement in esthetics, function, and comfort.

  16. Fabrication of Wood-Rubber Composites Using Rubber Compound as a Bonding Agent Instead of Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongwei Shao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Differing from the hot-pressing method in the manufacturing of traditional wood-rubber composites (WRCs, this study was aimed at fabricating WRCs using rubber processing to improve water resistance and mechanical properties. Three steps were used to make WRCs, namely, fiber-rubber mixing, tabletting, and the vulcanization molding process. Ninety-six WRC panels were made with wood fiber contents of 0%–50% at rotor rotational speeds of 15–45 rpm and filled coefficients of 0.55–0.75. Four regression equations, i.e., the tensile strength (Ts, elongation at break (Eb, hardness (Ha and rebound resilience (Rr as functions of fiber contents, rotational speed and filled coefficient, were derived and a nonlinear programming model were developed to obtain the optimum composite properties. Although the Ts, Eb and Rr of the panels were reduced, Ha was considerably increased by 17%–58% because of the wood fiber addition. Scanning electron microscope images indicated that fibers were well embedded in rubber matrix. The 24 h water absorption was only 1%–3%, which was much lower than commercial wood-based composites.

  17. Fabrication of Wood-Rubber Composites Using Rubber Compound as a Bonding Agent Instead of Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Dongwei; Xu, Min; Cai, Liping; Shi, Sheldon Q

    2016-06-14

    Differing from the hot-pressing method in the manufacturing of traditional wood-rubber composites (WRCs), this study was aimed at fabricating WRCs using rubber processing to improve water resistance and mechanical properties. Three steps were used to make WRCs, namely, fiber-rubber mixing, tabletting, and the vulcanization molding process. Ninety-six WRC panels were made with wood fiber contents of 0%-50% at rotor rotational speeds of 15-45 rpm and filled coefficients of 0.55-0.75. Four regression equations, i.e. , the tensile strength ( T s), elongation at break ( E b), hardness ( H a) and rebound resilience ( R r) as functions of fiber contents, rotational speed and filled coefficient, were derived and a nonlinear programming model were developed to obtain the optimum composite properties. Although the T s, E b and R r of the panels were reduced, H a was considerably increased by 17%-58% because of the wood fiber addition. Scanning electron microscope images indicated that fibers were well embedded in rubber matrix. The 24 h water absorption was only 1%-3%, which was much lower than commercial wood-based composites.

  18. Effect of Green Tea Extract as Antioxidant on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Composite to in-Office and Home-Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharafeddin F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Shear bond strength (SBS of home and office bleached enamel will be compromised by immediate application of composite restoration. Antioxidant agent may overcome this problem. Objectives: This in vitro study assessed the effect of green tea extract on shear bond strength of resin composite to in-office and home-bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5 ×1.5 cm, with the coronal portion above the cemento enamel junction out of the block. Then, after bleaching labial enamel surfaces of 20 teeth with 15% carbamide peroxide 6 hours a day for 5 days, they were randomly divided into two groups: A1 and A2 (n = 10, depending upon whether or not they are treated with antioxidant. Labial enamel surfaces of the remaining 20 teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide before being randomly divided into groups B1 and B2 (n = 10, again depending on whether or not the antioxidant was used in their treatment . The experimental groups (A2,B2 were treated with 5% solution of green tea extract before resin composite restoration was done by a cylindrical Teflon mould (5×2 mm. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under a universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020. The SBS data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between shear bond strength of the control group (A1 and treated group (A2 but there were statistically significant differences between the groups B1 and B2 (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Application of antioxidant did not increase the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel to resin composite but its application increased the shear bond strength of in-office bleached enamel to resin composite.

  19. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, Deepa; Pandey, Swapnil; Kubde, Rajesh; Rathod, Yogesh; Atara, Rahul; Rathi, Shravan

    2013-10-01

    Fiber posts are widely used for restoration of mutilated teeth that lack adequate coronal tooth structure to retain a core for definitive restoration, bond between the fiber post and composite material depends upon the chemical reaction between the post surface and the resin material used for building up the core. In attempt to maximize the resin bonding with fiber post, different post surface conditioning is advocated. Therefore the purpose of the study is to examine the interfacial strength between fiber post and composite, as core build-up material after different surface treatments of fiber posts. Twenty fiber posts were split into four groups off five each according to different surface treatments viz. Group I-(Negative Control), Group II-Silanization (Positive control), Group III-(37% Phosphoric Acid & Silanization) ,Group IV- (10% Hydrogen Peroxide and Silanization). With the preformed plastic mould, a core of dual cure composite resin around the fiber post having the uniform thickness was created. Tensile bond strength of each specimen was measured under Universal Testing Machine (UTM) at the cross head speed of 3mm/min. The results achieved with 10% Hydrogen peroxide had a marked effect on micro tensile bond strength values between the tested materials. Immense enhancement in the silanization efficiency of quartz fiber phase was observed with different surface chemical treatment of the resin phase of fiber posts with the marked increase in the micro-tensile bond strength between fiber post and composite core. Shori D, Pandey S, Kubde R, Rathod Y, Atara R, Rathi S. To evaluate and compare the effect of different Post Surface treatments on the Tensile Bond Strength between Fiber Posts and Composite Resin. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):27-32.

  20. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  1. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, G.; Godowitch, J.; Henderson, B. H.; Fahey, K.; Pouliot, G.; Hutzell, W. T.; Mathur, R.; Kang, D.; Goliff, W. S.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-10-01

    We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2) into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU). Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  2. Effect of Air Abrasion and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er: YAG) laser preparation on Shear Bond Strength of Composite to Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavan, Ayoub; Mehmanchi, Mobin; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess shear bond strength of composite to dentin after air abrasion and laser treatment. 40 human extracted molars divided into 4 groups (n=10) received the following treatments. Group 1: carbide bur, Group 2: air abrasion with aluminum oxide 50 μm, Group 3: irradiated with Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er: YAG) laser (150 mJ/20Hz), Group 4: irradiated with Er:YAG laser (150 mJ/20Hz)+ air. Specimens in all groups were chemically etched with phosphoric acid 37% and treated with bonding agent (single bond 3M). Then, composite build-up was performed by tygon tube. After storage in distilled water at 37°c for one week, all specimens were subjected to a shear bond strength test with universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and T-Test. The mean and standard deviation of shear bond strength of the 4 groups were 20.8±6.76, 14.98±3.98, 11.43±4.36 and 14.95± 3.18 MPa, respectively. Air abrasion after laser treatment improved the shear bond strength.

  3. Shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ugur; Sancakli, Hande Sar; Sancakli, Erkan; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda; Yucel, Taner; Yildiz, Esra

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface pretreatment techniques on the surface roughness and shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for use with lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material. A total of one hundred thirty lithium disilicate CAD/CAM ceramic plates with dimensions of 6 mm × 4 mm and 3 mm thick were prepared. Specimens were then assigned into five groups (n=26) as follows: untreated control, coating with 30 µm silica oxide particles (Cojet™ Sand), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, and grinding with a high-speed fine diamond bur. A self-adhering flowable composite resin (Vertise Flow) was applied onto the pre-treated ceramic plates using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. Surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. Shear bond strength test were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface roughness data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD tests. Shear bond strength test values were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at α=.05. Hydrofluoric acid etching and grinding with high-speed fine diamond bur produced significantly higher surface roughness than the other pretreatment groups (Presin used as repair composite resin exhibited very low bond strength irrespective of the surface pretreatments used.

  4. Effect of dental surface treatment with Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers on bond strength of resin composite to recently bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Del Moral de Lazari, Regina; Ribeiro, Carolina Ferraz; Borges, Alessandra Buhler

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of surface treatment with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers on resin composite bond strength to recently bleached enamel. In this study, 120 bovine incisors were distributed into two groups: group C: without bleaching treatment; group B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Each group was divided into three subgroups: subgroup N: without laser treatment; subgroup Nd: irradiation with Nd:YAG laser; subgroup Er: irradiation with Er:YAG laser. The adhesive system (Adper Single Bond 2) was then applied and composite buildups were constructed with Filtek Supreme composite. The teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel-resin sticks (1 × 1 mm) and submitted to microtensile bond testing. The data were statistically analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey tests. The bond strength values in the bleached control group (5.57 MPa) presented a significant difference in comparison to the group bleached and irradiated with Er:YAG laser (13.18 MPa) or Nd:YAG (25.67 MPa). The non-bleached control group presented mean values of 30.92 MPa, with statistical difference of all the others groups. The use of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers on bleached specimens was able to improve the bond strengths of them.

  5. Shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancakli, Hande Sar; Sancakli, Erkan; Eren, Meltem Mert; Ozel, Sevda; Yucel, Taner; Yildiz, Esra

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of different surface pretreatment techniques on the surface roughness and shear bond strength of a new self-adhering flowable composite resin for use with lithium disilicate-reinforced CAD/CAM ceramic material. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of one hundred thirty lithium disilicate CAD/CAM ceramic plates with dimensions of 6 mm × 4 mm and 3 mm thick were prepared. Specimens were then assigned into five groups (n=26) as follows: untreated control, coating with 30 µm silica oxide particles (Cojet™ Sand), 9.6% hydrofluoric acid etching, Er:YAG laser irradiation, and grinding with a high-speed fine diamond bur. A self-adhering flowable composite resin (Vertise Flow) was applied onto the pre-treated ceramic plates using the Ultradent shear bond Teflon mold system. Surface roughness was measured by atomic force microscopy. Shear bond strength test were performed using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Surface roughness data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD tests. Shear bond strength test values were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at α=.05. RESULTS Hydrofluoric acid etching and grinding with high-speed fine diamond bur produced significantly higher surface roughness than the other pretreatment groups (Presin used as repair composite resin exhibited very low bond strength irrespective of the surface pretreatments used. PMID:25551002

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite to resin-modified glass-ionomer cement using three different resin adhesives vs. glass-ionomer based adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sadeghi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical success of sandwich technique depends on the strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC bonding to both dentin and resin composite. Therefore, the shear bond strength (SBS of resin composite bonded to RMGIC utilizing different resin adhesives versus a GIC-based adhesive was compared. Materials and methods: In this in vitro study, 84 holes (5×2 mm were prepared in acrylic blocks, randomly divided into seven groups (n=12 and filled with RMGIC (Light-Cured Universal Restorative, GC. In the Group I; no adhesive was applied on the RMGIC. In the Group II, non-etched and Group III was etched with phosphoric acid. In groups II and III, after rinsing, etch-and-rinse adhesive (OptiBond Solo Plus; in the Group IV; a two-step self-etch adhesive (OptiBond XTR and in Group V; a one-step self-etch (OptiBond All-in-One were applied on the cement surfaces. Group VI; a GIC-based adhesive (Fuji Bond LC was painted over the cement surface and cured. Group VII; the GIC-based adhesive was brushed over RMGIC followed by the placement of resin composite and co-cured. Afterward; resin composite (Point 4 cylinders were placed on the treated cement surfaces. The specimens were placed in 100% humidity at 37 ± 1°C and thermo cycled. The shear bond test was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min and calculated in MPa; the specimens were examined to determine mode of failure. The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: The maximum (24.62±3.70 MPa and minimum (18.15±3.38 MPa SBS mean values were recorded for OptiBond XTR adhesive and the control group, respectively. The pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences between the groups that bonded with different adhesives. The adhesive failure was the most common failure mode observed. Conclusion: This study suggests that GIC-based adhesive could be applied over RMGIC as co-cure technique for sandwich restorations in lieu of employing the resin

  7. Three Year Aging of Prototype Flight Laser at 10 Khz and 1 Ns Pulses with External Frequency Doubler for the Icesat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of three year life-aging of a specially designed prototype flight source laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and external frequency doubler. The Fibertek-designed, slightly pressurized air, enclosed-container source laser operated at 1064 nm in active Q-switching mode. The external frequency doubler was set in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm discreetly. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, crystal operated at non-critical phase-matching. Due to 1064 nm diagnostic needs, the amount of fundamental frequency power available for doubling was 13.7W. The power generated at 532 nm was between 8.5W and 10W, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The life-aging consisted of double stress-step operation for doubler crystal, at 0.35 J/cm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to normal conditions, and then at 0.93 J/cm2 for the rest of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated testing. We observed no degradation at the first step and linear degradation at the second step. The linear degradation at the second stress-step was related to doubler crystal output surface changes and linked to laser-assisted contamination. We discuss degradation model and estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm. This work was done within the laser testing for NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  8. Three Three-Year Aging of Prototype Flight Laser at 10 kHz and 1 ns Pulses With External Frequency Doubler for ICESat-2 Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, Oleg A.; Chiragh, Furqan L.; Vasilyev, Aleksey A.; Edwards, Ryan; Stephen, Mark A.; Troupaki, Elisavet; Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Sawruk, Nick; Hovis, Floyd; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of three year life-aging of a specially designed prototype flight source laser operating at 1064 nm, 10 kHz, 1ns, 15W average power and external frequency doubler. The Fibertek-designed, slightly pressurized air, enclosed-container source laser operated at 1064 nm in active Q-switching mode. The external frequency doubler was set in a clean room at a normal air pressure. The goal of the experiment was to measure degradation modes at 1064 and 532 nm discreetly. The external frequency doubler consisted of a Lithium triborate, LiB3O5, crystal operated at non-critical phase-matching. Due to 1064 nm diagnostic needs, the amount of fundamental frequency power available for doubling was 13.7W. The power generated at 532 nm was between 8.5W and 10W, depending on the level of stress and degradation. The life-aging consisted of double stress-step operation for doubler crystal, at 0.35 Jcm2 for almost 1 year, corresponding to normal conditions, and then at 0.93 Jcm2 for the rest of the experiment, corresponding to accelerated testing. We observed no degradation at the first step and linear degradation at the second step. The linear degradation at the second stress-step was related to doubler crystal output surface changes and linked to laser-assisted contamination. We discuss degradation model and estimate the expected lifetime for the flight laser at 532 nm. This work was done within the laser testing for NASAs Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite-2 (ICESat-2) LIDAR at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD with the goal of 1 trillion shots lifetime.

  9. A Study On The Metal Carbide Composite Diffusion Bonding For Mechanical Seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D.-K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical Seal use highly efficient alternative water having a great quantity of an aqueous solution and has an advantage no corrosion brine. Metal Carbide composites have been investigated as potential materials for high temperature structural applications and for application in the processing industry. The existing Mechanical seal material is a highly expensive carbide alloy, and it is difficult to take a price advantage. Therefore the study of replacing body area with inexpensive steel material excluding O-ring and contact area which demands high characteristics is needed.

  10. Adhesive bond of veneering composites on various metal surfaces using silicoating, titanium-coating or functional monomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin; Gröger, Gerhard; Handel, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength (SBS) between veneering composites and titanium (grade 1), a cobalt-chromium-alloy and a high precious-alloy, which were pretreated using silicoating systems, functional monomers or an experimental titanium-dioxide coating system. The specimens were sized to rectangular plates of 20 x10 x 2mm(3) (l,w,h) and a composite cylinder (height of 4mm, diameter 5mm) was axially polymerized to the middle of the plates. After aging (24h or 150 d storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, or thermal-cycling: 6000 x 5 degrees /55 degrees C) the SBS was determined. Independent of the type of metal and the conditioning/coating techniques the lowest SBSs were found after thermal-cycling. Titanium. The SBS of the silica coating systems and the functional monomers did not differ statistically on titanium. However, the titanium-dioxide coating method had significantly higher values than the other methods. Cobalt-chromium. The highest mean values were observed with the titanium-dioxide coating system and the phosphate acid ester. Precious alloy. No statistical significant different SBS was found for the silicoating and the titanium-dioxide coating methods, while the functional monomers were statistically significant (lower) different to both systems. Generally, the titanium-dioxide coating system achieved the highest SBS under different aging conditions and on all three different metal-surfaces.

  11. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (poptimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  12. Microstructure of bonding zones in laser-clad Ni-alloy-based composite coatings reinforced with various ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Y.T.; Ouyang, J.H.; Lei, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    Microstructure of the bonding zones (BZs) between laser-clad Ni-alloy-based composite coatings and steel substrates was studied by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques. Observations indicate that for pure Ni-alloy coating the laser parameters selected for good interface fusion have no effect on the microstructure of the BZ except for its thickness. However, the addition of ceramic particles (TiN, SiC, or ZrO 2 ) to the Ni alloy varies the compositional or constitutional undercooling of the melt near the solid/liquid interface and consequently leads to the observed changes of microstructure of the BZs. For TiN/Ni-alloy coating the morphology of γ-Ni solid solution in the BZ changes from dendritic to planar form with increasing scanning speed. A colony structure of eutectic is found in the BZ of SiC/Ni-alloy coating in which complete dissolution of SiC particles takes place during laser cladding. The immiscible melting of ZrO 2 and Ni-alloy powders induces the stratification of ZrO 2 /Ni-alloy coating which consists of a pure ZrO 2 layer fin the upper region and a BZ composed mainly of γ-Ni dendrites adjacent to the substrate. All the BZs studied in this investigation have good metallurgical characteristics between the coatings and the substrates

  13. Physicochemical characterisation and investigation of the bonding mechanisms of API-titanate nanotube composites as new drug carrier systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Barbara; Pintye-Hódi, Klára; Kónya, Zoltán; Kelemen, András; Regdon, Géza; Sovány, Tamás

    2017-02-25

    Titanate nanotube (TNT) has recently been explored as a new carrier material for active pharmaceutical ingredients (API). The aim of the present work was to reveal the physicochemical properties of API-TNT composites, focusing on the interactions between the TNTs and the incorporated APIs. Drugs belonging to different Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) classes were loaded into TNTs: diltiazem hydrochloride (BCS I.), diclofenac sodium (BCS II.), atenolol (BCS III.) and hydrochlorothiazide (BCS IV.). Experimental results demonstrated that it is feasible for spiral cross-sectioned titanate nanotubes to carry drugs and maintain their bioactivity. The structural properties of the composites were characterized by a range of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, DSC, TG-MS, etc. The interactions between APIs and TNTs were identified as electrostatic attractions, mainly dominated by hydrogen bonds. Based on the results, it can be stated that the strength of the association depends on the hydrogen donor strength of the API. The drug release of incorporated APIs was evaluated from compressed tablets and compared to that of pure APIs. Differences noticed in the dissolution profiles due to incorporation showed a correlation with the strength of interactions between the APIs and the TNTs observed in the above analytical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Shear Resistance on Flexural Debonding Load-Carrying Capacity of RC Beams Strengthened with Externally Bonded FRP Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guibing Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Debonding failure is the main failure mode in flexurally strengthened reinforced concrete beams by externally bonded or near surface mounted fibre reinforced polymer (FRP composites. It is believed that FRP debonding will be initiated if the shear stress on the concrete-FRP interface reaches the tensile strength of concrete. However, it was found through experimental and analytical studies that the debonding mechanism of FRP composites has the potential of shear failure in combination with debonding failure. Moreover, the shear failure probably influences the debonding failure. Presently, there are very little experimental and analytical studies to investigate the influence of shear resistance of reinforced concrete (RC beam on FRP debonding failure. The current study investigates and analyzes the effect of shear resistance on FRP debonding failure based on test results. The analytical results show that the shear resistance of RC beam has a great effect on flexural debonding load-carrying capacity of FRP-strengthened RC beam. The influence of shear resistance on flexural debonding load-carrying capacity must be fully considered in flexural strengthening design of RC beams.

  15. Effects of tributylborane-activated adhesive and two silane agents on bonding computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of an experimental adhesive agent [methyl methacrylate-tributylborane liquid (MT)] and two adhesive agents containing silane on the bonding between a resin composite block of a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a light-curing resin composite veneering material. The surfaces of CAD/CAM resin composite specimens were ground with silicon-carbide paper, treated with phosphoric acid, and then primed with either one of the two silane agents [Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SC) and GC Ceramic Primer II (GC)], no adhesive control (Cont), or one of three combinations (MT/SC, MT/GC, and MT/Cont). A light-curing resin composite was veneered on the primed CAD/CAM resin composite surface. The veneered specimens were subjected to thermocycling between 4 and 60 °C for 10,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey-Kramer HSD test (α = 0.05, n = 8). MT/SC (38.7 MPa) exhibited the highest mean bond strengths, followed by MT/GC (30.4 MPa), SC (27.9 MPa), and MT/Cont (25.7 MPa), while Cont (12.9 MPa) and GC (12.3 MPa) resulted in the lowest bond strengths. The use of MT in conjunction with a silane agent significantly improved the bond strength. Surface treatment with appropriate adhesive agents was confirmed as a prerequisite for veneering CAD/CAM resin composite restorations.

  16. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  17. Needle-Bonded Electromagnetic Shielding Thermally Insulating Nonwoven Composite Boards: Property Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complicated environmental problems inevitably arise when technology advances. One major environmental problem is the presence of electromagnetic radiation. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation can damage people’s health in many ways. Therefore, this study proposes producing composite boards with electromagnetic shielding effectiveness and thermal insulation by utilizing the structures and properties of materials. Different combinations of flame-retardant polyester fiber (FR fiber, recycled far-infrared polyester fiber (FI fiber, and 4D low-melting-point fibers (LM fiber were made into flame-retardant and thermally insulating matrices. The matrices and carbon fiber (CF woven fabric in a sandwich-structure were needle-punched in order to be tightly compact, and then circularly heat dried in order to have a heat set and reinforced structure. The test results indicate that Polyester (PET/CF composite boards are mechanically strong and have thermal insulation and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness at a frequency between 0.6 MHz and 3 GHz.

  18. Influence of retainer design on two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed dental prostheses: An in vitro and finite element analysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulemans, F.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strenght of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed dental prostheses (FDP). Conclusion: A dual-wing retainer is the optimal design for replacement of a single

  19. In vitro evaluation of the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with composite fillings after cyclic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadighpour, Leyla; Geramipanah, Farideh; Allahyari, Somayeh; Fallahi Sichani, Babak; Kharazi Fard, Mohamd Javad

    2014-08-01

    There is insufficient data regarding the durability of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to existing composite fillings. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the fracture resistance and microleakage of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth with existing composite fillings. Thirty maxillary central incisors were divided into three groups (for each group, n=10): intact teeth (NP), teeth with class III composite fillings (C3) and teeth with class IV cavities (C4). Porcelain laminate veneers were made using IPS-Empress ceramic and bonded with Panavia F2 resin cement. The microleakage of all of the specimens was tested before and after cyclic loading (1 × 10(6) cycles, 1.2 Hz). The fracture resistance values (N) were measured using a universal testing machine, and the mode of failure was also examined. The statistical analyses were performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (α=.05). There was a significant difference in the mean microleakage of group C4 compared with group NT (P=.013). There was no significant difference in the fracture loads among the groups. The microleakage and failure loads of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to intact teeth and teeth with standard class III composite fillings were not significantly different.

  20. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC TM (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine TM (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into th...

  1. The clinical and radiographic success of bonded resin composite strip crowns for primary incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupietzky, Ari; Waggoner, William F; Galea, Jon

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical and radiographic success of the treatment of maxillary anterior primary incisors with composite resin strip crowns placed in a private practice setting. This was a retrospective, clinical study of patients who had strip crowns (SC) placed on maxillary primary incisors, returned for at least 1, 6-month recall examination, and whose parents consented to participate in the study. Radiographic and photographic examinations were used for evaluation. Two evaluators rated the images independently. When ratings were not in agreement, the 2 examiners reviewed the photograph or radiograph together and reached a consensus rating. One hundred twelve restorations placed in 40 children were evaluated. The evaluations were performed after the crowns had been in place for an average of 18 months. None of the restorations were totally lost, and only 12% were rated as having lost some resin material, resulting in an 88% overall retention rate. There was no difference in restoration success if the crowns were placed 4 at a time, or if fewer crowns were placed in a single sitting; the failure rates were comparable. Teeth that had pulpal treatment were judged to have far more significant color match discrepancies than those teeth without pulpal treatment. Ninety-one percent of the teeth demonstrated healthy pulps. Eight percent had some pulpal changes but did not require immediate attention. Only 1 tooth showed radiographic evidence of pulpal necrosis. Only 11 teeth had pulpal treatment, but of these, 10 demonstrated clinical success. Composite resin strip crowns for restoring primary incisors with large or multisurface caries performed well. Color match of these crowns with adjacent teeth may be significantly reduced when placed upon teeth that have undergone pulpectomy treatment and have been obturated with an iodoform paste. However, based upon the results of this study, the strip crown may provide an esthetic and durable restoration

  2. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth with major hard tissue loss - influence of post surface design on pull-out bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Andreas Thomas Alfred; Binus, Stefanie Martina; Holzschuh, Barbara; Petschelt, Anselm; Powers, John M; Berthold, Christine

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the influence of post surface design and luting system on bond strength of quartz-fiber-reinforced composite posts (QFRCPs) luted to root canal dentin. Single-rooted bovine teeth (n = 650) were randomly assigned (13 groups, n = 50), sectioned, endodontically treated, filled, and post space (length 8 mm) prepared. Custom-made plain-surfaced fiber posts (PSXRO) and (both RTD) macroretentive Macro-Lock Post Illusion X-RO (MLXRO) were inserted into the post spaces using six luting systems: Ketac Cem (KC), Fuji Plus (FP), RelyX Unicem, Multilink Primer_Multilink, Sealbond Ultima_CoreCem, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z. As control, a titanium post was cemented with KC. After water storage (24 h, 37°C), pull-out test was performed, followed by failure mode assessment. Bond strength was calculated in MPa and analyzed using anova, Dunnett-T3-test, and Student's t-test with Bonferroni correction. Post design and luting system significantly influenced the bond strength [MPa] (P < 0.05). Compared with the control 4.3 (1.5), all test groups exhibited higher bond strengths (P < 0.05), except for group PSXRO/KC 4.2 (1.0). The remaining bond strengths were PSXRO: FP 8.6 (1.5), RelyX Unicem 10.4 (3.4), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.7 (3.0), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 12.7 (3.0), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 15.7 (2.5), and MLXRO: KC 7.2 (2.2), FP 13.4 (2.5), RelyX Unicem 9.2 (2.9), Multilink Primer_Multilink 12.5 (4.5), SealBond Ultima_CoreCem 13.7 (4.6), LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z 20.6 (2.2). The bond strengths of MLXRO were higher than those of PSXRO when luted with KC, FP, and LuxaBond_LuxaCore Z (P < 0.05). The post surface design and luting system selection influenced the bond strength of conventionally and adhesively luted QFRCPs to bovine root canal dentin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Influence of light-activated and auto- and dual-polymerizing adhesive systems on bond strength of indirect composite resin to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes, Maria Jose Lorena; Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvao; Giannini, Marcelo

    2006-08-01

    Clinicians must be aware of the bonding effectiveness of auto- and dual- polymerizing adhesive systems before choosing the material and technique of cementing inlay/onlays to dentin. An inadequate choice may compromise the success of indirect restorations. This study compared the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of indirect composite resin bonded to dentin by light-activated, autopolymerizing, and dual-polymerizing adhesive systems. Occlusal dentin surfaces of 36 human third molars were exposed and flattened. Teeth were assigned to 1 of the following 6 groups (n=6) of adhesive luting systems: 2 dual-polymerizing systems (Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus/Rely X [SBMP] and Prime & Bond NT Dual Cure/Enforce [PBDC]); 1 autopolymerizing system (ED Primer/Panavia F [EDP]); and 3 light-activated systems (control groups) (Adper Single Bond/Rely X [SB], Prime & Bond NT/Enforce [PB], and Clearfil SE Bond/Panavia F [CF]). The restorative materials were applied according to manufacturer's directions. A 2-mm-thick prepolymerized composite resin (Clearfil APX) disc was cemented with the resin cements on the bonded dentin. Teeth were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Afterwards, teeth were sectioned both mesial-distally and buccal-lingually to obtain multiple bonded beam specimens with 0.8 mm(2) of cross-sectional area. Each specimen was tested in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Data (MPa) were analyzed by 1-way analysis of variance and the Tukey post hoc test (alpha=.05). Failure patterns of tested specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Mean MTBS values (MPa) for experimental groups were as follows: SBMP, 32.89 +/- 3.26(a); SB, 26.74 +/- 7.45(ab); PB, 26.11 +/- 4.48(ab); CF, 25.30 +/- 6.42(ab); EDP, 16.82 +/- 5.53(bc); PBDC, 11.20 +/- 5.89(c) (P<.001). Groups with similar lowercase letters were not significantly different. Failure pattern of fractured specimens varied according to the polymerization mode. The

  4. Effect of different blood contaminated adherent surface treatments on shear bond strength of compomer and composite resin to dentin, using a self etching adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortazavi V.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Blood contamination is a common problem in dentistry that can decrease bond strength dramatically which may be affected by methods of decontamination as well. Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the influence of blood contamination on shear bond strength of composite and compomer to dentin using Prompt L-Pop as an adhesive system. Also, to assess the effectiveness of different surface treatments on the bond strength. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 120 molar teeth were sectioned to provide flat occlusal dentinal surfaces. Specimens were embedded in acrylic resin with the flat surface exposed. The dentinal expose surfaces were polished to 600 grit. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups of twelve specimens (F1–F5 for compomer material and five other groups (Z1- Z5 for composite resin. After application of Promt L-Pop to dentinal surfaces of specimens, the surfaces in all groups, except for F1 and Z1, (as controls were contaminated with human blood and then one of the following surface treatments was applied. Groups F2 and Z2 without any treatment, groups F3 and Z3 rinsing with water, groups F4 and Z4 rinsing with water and reapplication of adhesive, groups F5 and Z5 rinsing with NaOCl and using Prompt L-Pop again. Restorative materials were applied to treated surfaces using plastic molds. After thermocycling, shear bond strengths, mode of failures and morphology of dentin-material interfaces were evaluated. The data were statistically analyzed using Factorial analysis of Variance, One-Way ANOVA, Duncan, T-student and Chi-Square tests with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: Compomer showed statistically significant higher bond strength in comparison to composite (P<0.001. Duncan test showed significant differences between all compomer groups, except between groups F4 and F5, and between all composite groups except for groups Z1 and Z4 and for groups Z2 and Z3

  5. James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Integrated Science Instruments Module (ISIM) Electronics Compartment (IEC) Conformal Shields Composite Bond Structure Qualification Test Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yew, Calinda; Stephens, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The JWST IEC conformal shields are mounted onto a composite frame structure that must undergo qualification testing to satisfy mission assurance requirements. The composite frame segments are bonded together at the joints using epoxy, EA 9394. The development of a test method to verify the integrity of the bonded structure at its operating environment introduces challenges in terms of requirements definition and the attainment of success criteria. Even though protoflight thermal requirements were not achieved, the first attempt in exposing the structure to cryogenic operating conditions in a thermal vacuum environment resulted in approximately 1 bonded joints failure during mechanical pull tests performed at 1.25 times the flight loads. Failure analysis concluded that the failure mode was due to adhesive cracks that formed and propagated along stress concentrated fillets as a result of poor bond squeeze-out control during fabrication. Bond repairs were made and the structures successfully re-tested with an improved LN2 immersion test method to achieve protoflight thermal requirements.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Microleakage in Class V Composite Restorations using a Fifth Generation Adhesive and a Glass Ionomer Bonding Agent - An In Vitro Dye Leakage Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipali Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The dawn of minimally invasive dentistry has led to the development of materials which rely on the use of effective adhesion to remaining tooth tissue. Despite making important advances, dentin bonding has to overcome hurdles with respect to structural heterogencity of dentin and long term stability of the bond. The primary mode of failure for adhesive restorations has been described as the loss of marginal adaptation and loss of retention. Methods: This in vitro study was undertaken to assess marginal adaptation and microleakage of Class V lesions using two cavity designs, a fifth generation dentin adhesive and a glass ionomer bonding agent-liner in extracted human molars, restored with composite resin restorations. Extracted permanent molars were divided into four groups (n=10. Class V cavities on buccal surfaces with retentive or non retentive features were prepared. A comparative dye leakage study was done between Syntac single component and Fujibond LC bonding agent, when cavities were restored with Heliomolar composite resin. 2% methylene blue dye was used to assess microleakage under stereomicroscope. The scores obtained were subjected to the Kruskal Wallis one-way analysis and Mann Whiteney U test. Results: Results of this study showed that the glass ionomer bonding agent-liner groups in both retentive and non-retentive cavities exhibited statistically significant (P<0.05 less microleakage as compared to the non-retentive dentin bonding agent group on the dentinal/cemental cavosurface margins. Conclusion: Within the limits of the study, it was concluded that the glass ionomer bonding agent-liner may be effective in reducing gingival microleakage in Class V situations with gingival margins in cementum and dentin.

  7. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Final Report for Cooperative Research and Development Agreement Number ORNL93-0237 Adhesive Bonding Technologies for Automotive Structural Composites; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeman, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC) to conduct research and development that would overcome technological hurdles to the adhesive bonding of current and future automotive materials. This effort is part of a larger Department of Energy (DOE) program to promote the use of lighter weight materials in automotive structures for the purpose of increasing fuel efficiency and reducing environmental pollutant emissions. In accomplishing this mission, the bonding of similar and dissimilar materials was identified as being of primary importance to the automotive industry since this enabling technology would give designers the freedom to choose from an expanded menu of low mass materials for component weight reduction. The research undertaken under this CRADA addresses the following areas of importance: bulk material characterization, structural fracture mechanics, modeling/characterization, process control and nondestructive evaluation (PC/NDE), manufacturing demonstration, and advanced processing. For the bulk material characterization task, the individual material properties of the adherends and adhesives were characterized. This included generating a database of mechanical and physical properties, after identifying and developing standard test methods to obtain properties. The structural fracture mechanics task concentrated on test development to characterize the fracture toughness of adhesively bonded joints subjected to Mode I, Mode II and mixed-mode conditions. Standard test procedures for quantifying an adhesive/adherend system's resistance to crack growth were developed for use by industry. In the modeling/characterization task, fracture mechanics-based design guidelines and predictive methodologies have been developed which will facilitate iteration on design concepts for bonded joints while alleviating the need for extensive testing

  8. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  9. Efficacy of Esthetic Retainers: Clinical Comparison between Multistranded Wires and Direct-Bond Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Splints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribante, Andrea; Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Broggini, Simona; D'Allocco, Marina; Gandini, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal prospective randomized study was to evaluate the reliability of two different types of orthodontic retainers in clinical use: a multistrand stainless steel wire and a polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin composite. Moreover the level of satisfaction of the patient about the esthetic result was also analyzed by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). 34 patients (9 boys and 25 girls, mean age 14.3), in the finishing phase of orthodontic treatment, were selected for the study. Since splints were applied the number, cause, and date of splint failures were recorded for each single tooth over 12 months. Statistical analysis was performed using a paired t-test, Kaplan Meier survival estimates, and the log-rank test. Kruskal Wallis test was performed to analyze VAS recordings. Differences between the bond failure rates were not statistically significant. Esthetic result of VAS was significantly higher for polyethylene ribbon-reinforced resin retainers than for stainless steel wires. PMID:22114597

  10. Acid hydrolysis and molecular density of phytoglycogen and liver glycogen helps understand the bonding in glycogen α (composite particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence O Powell

    Full Text Available Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.

  11. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  12. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Al-TiB2/TiC In Situ Aluminum-Based Composites during Accumulative Roll Bonding (ARB) Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jinfeng; Wang, Fang; Li, Yusheng; Cao, Yang; Liu, Xiangfa; Zhao, Yonghao; Zhu, Yuntian

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a kind of Al-TiB2/TiC in situ composite was successfully prepared using the melt reaction method and the accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) technique. The microstructure evolution of the composites with different deformation treatments was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The mechanical properties of the Al-TiB2/TiC in situ composite were also studied with tensile and microhardness tests. It was found that the distribution of reinforcement particles becomes more homogenous with an increasing ARB cycle. Meanwhile, the mechanical properties showed great improvement during the ARB process. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and microhardness of the composites were increased to 173.1 MPa and 63.3 Hv after two ARB cycles, respectively. Furthermore, the strengthening mechanism of the composite was analyzed based on its fracture morphologies. PMID:28772467

  13. The Effect of Accelerated Aging on the Colour Stability of Composite Resin Luting Cements using Different Bonding Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Alfaifi, Mohammed; Almuaddi, Abdulmajeed; Al-Yazeedi, Mazen; Al-Ahmari, Abdulmajeed

    2017-04-01

    The main criterion of successful aesthetic restoration is to match the colour of the adjacent teeth. Porcelain laminate veneer is widely practiced indirect restoration in the contemporary aesthetic dentistry. The underlying luting cement colour influences the final outcome of the thin, translucent veneer shade. Hence, colour stability of luting cement is important criteria during their selection. The objective of the study was to assess the colour stability of the different dentin bonding techniques in composite resin luting cements. A total of forty intact, non carious teeth were prepared to receive Porcelain Laminate Veneers (PLV). The lithium disilicate PLV were fabricated, and fitting surface was conditioned with 5% hydrofluoric acid and silane application. According to the bonding technique employed for the cementation of the PLV, the teeth samples were randomly divided into the four groups of ten each. The Group I and Group II samples were conditioned with etch and wash; the polymerization of resin was accomplished with the dual cure for Group I and light cure for Group II. The Group III and Group IV samples were conditioned with self-etch and self-adhesive technique correspondingly. The teeth shade was recorded in similar locations with a spectrophotometer before and after subjecting them to the accelerated ageing process. The ageing process included the thermocycling process in water between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by 100 hours xenon light exposure. The data were analysed with SPSS 19.0 by ANOVA and LSD post-hoc comparison. The higher mean colour change was observed in Group I sample (etch washdual cure) with a ∆E value of 2.491. The ∆E value for Group II (etch wash-light cure) and Group III (selfetch) was 1.110 and 2.357 respectively. The lowest mean colour change was observed in Group IV (self-adhesive) with ∆E at 0.614. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between Group IV and Group I; Group IV and Group III with

  14. Influence of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Aydin, Murat

    2008-05-01

    Reliable bonding between zirconia posts and composite resin core materials is difficult to achieve because of the smooth surface texture and lack of silica content of zirconia posts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the short-term bond strength and durability between a zirconia post and a composite resin core material. Eighty zirconia posts were divided into 4 groups (n=20). Specimens received 1 of 4 different surface treatments: group AIRB, airborne-particle abrasion; group TSC-SIL, tribochemical silica coating (CoJet system) and silanization (ESPE Sil); group AIRB-BSIL, airborne-particle abrasion and MDP-containing primer (Clearfil SE Bond Primer)/silane coupling agent (Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator) mixture application; and group TSC-BSIL, tribochemical silica coating and MDP-containing primer/silane coupling agent mixture application. Average surface roughness (Ra) of zirconia posts produced by airborne-particle abrasion or silica coating was measured using an optical profilometer. Composite resin core foundations (Build-it FR) were formed using transparent acrylic resin tubes (12mm in length and 7mm in diameter). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups of 10 specimens and stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C, either for 24 hours or for 150 days with 37,500 thermal cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, with a dwell time of 30 seconds. Following water storage, the specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface into 2-mm-thick post-and-core specimens under water cooling. Push-out tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min. Debonded post surfaces were examined with SEM. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way ANOVA and Tukey multiple comparison tests (alpha=0.05). No significant differences were detected between the Ra values of airborne-particle-abraded and silica-coated specimens (P=.781). The short-term mean bond strengths for

  15. On the problem of whether mass or chemical bonding is more important to bombardment-induced compositional changes in alloys and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1980-01-01

    The bombardment of alloys, oxides, and halides often leads to marked compositional changes at the surface, and these changes have been attributed to an interplay of mass-dependent effects, chemical bonding, electronic processes, and diffusion. We attempt here to answer the limited question of whether, considering only alloys and oxides, mass or bonding is normally more important. The relevant theory is reviewed and extended, with mass effects being shown to be associated most explicitly with recoil sputtering and bonding effects being shown to be associated with all three of cascade sputtering, thermal sputtering, and surface segregation. As far as experimental examples are concerned, mass correlations are found to be quite unsuccessful, whereas most observations can be understood rather well in terms of bonding. Nevertheless, there is a basic problem in that the cascade component of sputtering, normally judged to be predominant, should give significantly less compositional change than is observed. Thermal sputtering would lead to more significant changes, but there is a new problem that, at least with alloys, the absolute yields are probably rather small. A combination of surface segregation with sputtering would also lead to more significant changes, but it is unclear whether segregation is rapid enough to be important in room-temperature bombardments. (orig.)

  16. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (Psilanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (Psilane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study.

  17. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF COMPOSITE RESIN TO DENTAL ENAMEL CONDITIONED WITH PHOSPHORIC ACID OR Nd: YAG LASER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO Carlos de Paula

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has been focused on a comparison between the shear bond strength of a composite resin attached to dental enamel surface, after a 35% phosphoric acid etching and after a Nd:YAG laser irradiation with 165.8 J/cm2 of energy density per pulse. After etching and attaching resin to these surfaces, the specimens were thermocycled and then underwent the shearing bond strength tests at a speed of 5 mm/min. The results achieved, after statistical analysis with Student's t-test, showed that the adhesion was significantly greater in the 35% phosphoric acid treated group than in the group treated with the Nd:YAG laser, thus demonstrating the need for developing new studies to reach the ideal parameters for an effective enamel surface conditioning as well as specific adhesives and composite resins when Nd:YAG laser is used

  18. Bonding effectiveness of composite-dentin interfaces after mechanical loading with a new device (Rub&Roll)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montagner, A.F.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Ruben, J.L.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mechanical loading with a new device on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of adhesive systems to dentin. Forty molars were divided according to adhesive systems: self-etch (ClearfilTM SE Bond -CSE) and etch-and-rinse (Adper ScotchbondTM 1XT -ASB); and to

  19. Evaluation of two thione primers and composite luting agents used for bonding a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Atsuta, M; Tanoue, N

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bond strength and durability of two metal adhesive systems bonded to a silver-palladium-copper-gold (Ag-Pd) alloy. Disk specimens were cast from an Ag-Pd alloy (Castwell M.C. 12), air-abraded with 50 micro m grain-sized alumina, and they were bonded with two primer-cement bonding systems (Alloy Primer and Panavia Fluoro Cement; Metaltite and Bistite II). For each cement, unprimed specimens were also prepared as experimental controls. Shear bond strengths were determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C, 1 min each, 100 000 cycles). The average post-thermocycling bond strengths in MPa (n=8) were: 39.0 for the Metaltite-Bistite II system, 32.2 for the Alloy Primer-Panavia Fluoro Cement system, 23.1 for the Bistite II material and 21.0 for the Panavia Fluoro Cement material. The use of proprietary primers, both of which contain thione functional monomer, enhanced the post-thermocycling bond strengths of both cements (P 0.05). It is concluded that the combined use of the thione primer and the luting agent is necessary for bonding the Ag-Pd alloy examined.

  20. Effect of carbon-sulphur bond in a sulphur/dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile/reduced graphene oxide composite cathode for lithium-sulphur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarov, Aishuak; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Sun, Yang-Kook; Myung, Seung-Taek

    2017-07-01

    A S/DPAN (dehydrogenated polyacrylonitrile) composite shows promising electrode performances as a cathode material for Li-S batteries though its electric conductivity is insufficient for high rate tests. In an attempt to enhance the electric conductivity, the S/DPAN composite is attached on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets via self-assembling modification. As a result, the conductivity improves to ∼10-4 S cm-1, and the S/DPAN/rGO composite thereby delivers approximately 90% of the theoretical capacity of sulphur at a rate of 0.2C (0.34 A g-1) over 700 mAh (g-S)-1 even at 2C (3.4 A g-1). We first report on the Csbnd S bond between sulphur and DPAN in a composite that maintains the bond even after an extensive cycling test, as confirmed by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). These synergistic effects enable facile electron transport such that the S/DPAN/rGO composite electrode is able to maintain superior electrode performances.

  1. Avaliação da resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes colados com resinas ortodônticas fluoretadas Evaluation of shear bond strength of brackets bonded with orthodontic fluoride-releasing composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Rastelli

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos colados com resinas que contêm flúor, comparando-as a uma resina convencional; e analisar a quantidade de adesivo remanescente na superfície do esmalte. MÉTODOS: sessenta pré-molares foram divididos aleatoriamente em 3 grupos: Grupo I - Concise (3M, Grupo II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil e Grupo III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. Após a colagem dos braquetes, as amostras foram termocicladas (500 ciclos nas temperaturas de 5°C e 55°C. Após 48 horas, foram submetidas aos ensaios mecânicos de cisalhamento na direção oclusocervical, com velocidade de carga de 0,5mm/min, em uma máquina MTS 810. RESULTADOS: foram observadas resistências médias ao cisalhamento de 24,54±6,98MPa para o Grupo I, de 11,53±6,20MPa para o Grupo II e de 16,46±5,72MPa para o Grupo III. A Análise de Variância determinou diferença estatística entre as médias de resistência ao cisalhamento entre os grupos (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of stainless steel brackets bonded with fluoride releasing composite resins, comparing them with a conventional resin and to analyze the amount of resin left on the enamel surface. METHODS: Sixty premolars were randomly divided into three groups: Group I - Concise (3M, Group II - Ultrabond (Aditek do Brasil and Group III - Rely-a-Bond (Reliance. After bonding, the samples were thermocycled (500 cycles at 5ºC and 55ºC temperatures. After 48 hours they were subjected to shear bond strength testing, in the occluso-gingival direction, using an MTS 810 Universal Testing Machine with load speed of 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The results demonstrated a mean shear bond strength of 24.54 ± 6.98 MPa for Group I, 11.53 ± 6.20 MPa for Group II, and 16.46 ± 5.72 MPa for Group III. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA determined a statistical difference in the mean shear bond strengths between groups (p < 0.001. The Tukey test evidenced that the averages of the

  2. Design of a single phase high voltage DC power supply at 15 kV output using voltage doubler circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariun, N.; Anayet, K.; Khan, N.; Amran, M. [Putra Malaysia Univ., Serdang (Malaysia). Dept. of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

    2006-07-01

    High voltage testing equipment is normally used in research laboratories and routine testing laboratories. However, the work carried out in research laboratories varies significantly from one establishment to the other. In addition, the type of equipment needed varies accordingly. A general high voltage laboratory may include equipment for all classes of routine tests, with testing equipment such as transformer, switchgear, bushings as well as cables. In the industry, the main application of the direct current (DC) high voltage is for testing cables with a relatively large capacitance, which takes a very large current if it is tested with alternating current (AC) voltages. This paper presented the results of a study that examined the voltage doubler circuit based on simulation, hardware implementation, and on Cockcroft-Walton (C-W) voltage multiplier circuits to fabricate a DC power supply in the laboratory at the output range of 15 kV. The paper provided a detailed description of the simulation, design, development and implementation of the hardware needed in order to build a high voltage DC power supply in the laboratory. The simulation and experimental results were also presented using EMTDC PSCAD software. 7 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  3. Resistência ao cisalhamento da colagem dos compósitos Concise e Transbond XT com e sem agente de união Shear bond strength of Concise and Transbond XT composites with and without bonding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Maêda Neves

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento da colagem de braquetes e o Índice de Remanescente de Adesivo (IRA dos compósitos Concise e Transbond XT com ou sem agente de união. MÉTODOS: a amostra consistiu de 60 incisivos bovinos divididos em 4 grupos (n=15. Em todos os corpos de prova foram realizados profilaxia com pedra-pomes e condicionamento do esmalte com ácido fosfórico a 37%. Nos Grupos 1 e 2, foram colados braquetes com o compósito Concise, respectivamente, com e sem aplicação da resina fluida. Nos Grupos 3 e 4, utilizou-se o Transbond XT, respectivamente, com e sem aplicação do XT Primer. Nesses dois últimos grupos, as colagens foram fotopolimerizadas por 40 segundos. O ensaio de resistência ao cisalhamento da amostra foi realizado em máquina Instron à velocidade de 0,5mm/min e, em seguida, foi avaliado o IRA. RESULTADOS: com relação à resistência ao cisalhamento, o Grupo 4 foi estatisticamente superior aos Grupos 1 e 2 (p0,05. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas significativas entre os Grupos 1, 2 e 3 (p>0,05. Como resultados do IRA, o Grupo 3 foi estatisticamente superior ao Grupo 2 (p0,05. Não foram encontradas diferenças estatísticas significativas entre os grupos 1, 2 e 4 (p>0,05. CONCLUSÃO: os compósitos Concise e Transbond XT obtiveram valores de resistência adesiva adequados com ou sem a utilização de seus respectivos agentes de união.Transbond XT composites with and without the use of a bonding agent. METHODS: The sample consisted of 60 bovine incisors divided into four groups (n=15. All teeth were subjected to prophylaxis with pumice and enamel etching with phosphoric acid at 37%. In Groups 1 and 2 brackets were bonded with Concise composite with and without application of enamel bond resin, respectively. In Groups 3 and 4, Transbond XT was used with and without XT Primer application, respectively. In these latter groups bonding was light cured for 40 seconds. Specimen shear

  4. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  5. Investigating the Effect of C-Factor and the Method of Bulk-Fill and Nanohybrid Composites Placement on Their Microtensile Bond Strength to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danesh Kazemi AR

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bulk-fill composites have recently been introduced. There are few studies conducted on them. Objectives: Therefore, the aim of this study is to ascertain the effect of C-factor and the method of bulk-fill and nanohybrid composites placement on their microtensile bond strength to dentin. Materials and Method: In this study, 40 extracted third human molars with no caries were collected. The specimens were disinfected and mounted on plaster blocks. Some rectangular cavities (5*3 mm2 were carved on the occlusal level of teeth in the depths of 2 and 4 millimeters. The molars were equally divided into eight study groups at random. After the carving was done, cavities were restored with universal (Tetric N-ceram/Ivoclar vivdent and bulk-fill (Tetric N-ceram BulkFill/Ivoclar vivdent composites with incremental and bulky techniques. Then they were stored in distilled water for one week. After that, they were cut into halves from the middle of the restoration spot at the buccolingual direction to turn them into rectangles. Then the microtensile bond strength test was carried out on them to record the failure resistance. The data were analyzed by conducting an ANOVA, a post hoc test, and a T-test. The failure mode was evaluated with a stereomicroscope. Results: Using bulk-fill and nanohybrid composites in cavities filled mas-sively in a 4-mm depth showed a significantly lower level of microtensile bond strength compared with other groups (p= 0.000. Failure was often adhesive in these groups. Conclusion: Considering the research constraints of this laboratory study, bulk-fill composites can be cured well in a 4-mm depth. However, it is advised to use the incremental method in cavities with high C-factors due to the high stress caused by the polymerization shrinkage.

  6. Evaluation of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Effect on Microshear Bond Strength of a Self-Adhesive Flowable Composite in the Dentin of Permanent Molar: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Moslemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and Background. Recently, new restorative materials such as self-adhesive flowable composites, because of their simple use and no need to bonding and etching, are considered important, particularly in pediatric dentistry. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser on microshear bond strength of self-adhesive flowable composite on permanent teeth dentin in vitro. Material and Methods. In this experimental study, 40 dentin sections were prepared from healthy third molars and divided into two groups according to their surface preparation by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or without laser, only with silicon carbide paper. In each group, two groups of 10 teeth were treated with self-adhesive flowable composite (Dyad and conventional flowable composite (acid etch and bonding. Samples were stored in normal saline and after 48 hours their bond strength was measured. The failure mode of samples was observed on stereomicroscope. In order to analyse the results, the one way ANOVA and Tukey’s test for multiple comparisons were used. Result. The maximum bond strength was related to conventional flowable composite with laser preparation group (24/21 Mpa. The lowest one was seen in Dyad composite without laser emitting (9/89 Mpa. The statistical difference between this two groups was significant (P value = 0/0038. The microshear bond strength differences between Dyad composite groups with laser preparation (mean = 16/427±1/79 and without laser preparation (mean = 12/85±1/90 were statistically significant too (P value = 0/01. Conclusion. Self-adhesive flowable composite has lower microshear bond strength than conventional flowable composite. Moreover, the laser irradiation as a surface treatment can improve this bond strength.

  7. Structural Health Monitoring of a Bonded Composite Patch Repair on a Fatigue-Cracked F-111C Wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    wing ready for bonding and b) the silicone - rubber electrical-resistance heating blanket in place over the patch. Figure 5: RAAF technician...under silicone rubber heat blanket; the thermocouple wires and electrical connection to the blanket can also be seen The rig to provide the bonding...wing skin A15-5 of aircraft A8-145 during a routine visual inspection. The wing skin material is aluminium alloy 2025-T851, ~ 4 mm thick in the

  8. Effect of oxygen inhibition in two-step self-etch systems on surface free energy and dentin bond strength with a chemically cured resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaji, Ayumi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Asaoka, Tetsui; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2014-09-01

    We compared the surface free energies and dentin bond strengths of two-step self-etch systems with and without an oxygen-inhibited layer. The adhesives were applied to self-etching primer-treated dentin surfaces of bovine incisors, after which the teeth were light-irradiated and the oxygen-inhibited layer was left intact or removed with ethanol. We determined surface free energies (γS) and their components by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. We also measured the dentin bond strengths of chemically cured resin composite to the adhesives, with and without the oxygen-inhibited layer. For all surfaces, the estimated surface tension component, γS(LW), was relatively constant. The Lewis base (γS(-)) component decreased significantly when the oxygen-inhibited layer was removed, whereas the Lewis acid (γS(+)) component slightly increased. The dentin bond strengths of the two-step self-etch systems did not significantly differ in relation to the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer. Although the surface free energy of the adhesive was affected by the presence of the oxygen-inhibited layer, no changes in dentin bond strength were detected.

  9. Role of powder preparation route on microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-TiB2 composites fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askarpour, M.; Sadeghian, Z.; Reihanian, M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was conducted up to seven cycles to fabricate Al-TiB 2 particulate metal matrix composites. The reinforcing particles were prepared and used in three different processing conditions: as-received TiB 2 , mixed TiB 2 -Al and in-situ synthesized TiB 2 -Al. The mixed TiB 2 -Al powder was produced by milling of TiB 2 with Al powder and in-situ synthesized TiB 2 -Al powder was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) through inducing TiB 2 particles in the Al with various composition of 10, 20 and 30 wt% Al. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to evaluate the microstructure of the produced composites. The composite obtained from the in-situ TiB 2 -Al powder showed the most uniform distribution of particles and exhibited the highest tensile strength of about 177 MPa in comparison with the composites reinforced with the as-received TiB 2 (156 MPa) and mixed TiB 2 -Al powder (160 MPa). After seven ARB cycles, an ultra-fine grained structure with the average size of about 300 nm was obtained in the composite reinforced with in-situ TiB 2 -Al powder. The appearance of dimples in tensile fracture surfaces revealed a ductile-type fracture in the produced composites.

  10. The Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Aircraft Fluid Exposure on T800H/3900-2 Composites Bonded with AF-555M Adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Lowther, Sharon E.; Thibeault, Sheila A.; Connell, John W.; Blasini, Sheila Roman

    2010-01-01

    Fiber reinforced resin matrix composites and structural adhesives have found increased usage on commercial and military aircraft in recent years. Due to the lack of service history of these relatively new material systems, their long-term aging performance has not been well established. In this study, single lap shear specimens (SLS) were fabricated by secondary bonding of Scotch-Weld(TradeMark) AF-555M between pre-cured adherends comprised of T800H/3900-2 uni-directional laminates. The adherends were co-cured with wet peel-ply for surface preparation. Each bond-line of the SLS specimen was measured to determine thickness and inspected visually using an optical microscope for voids. A three-year environmental aging plan for the SLS specimens at 82 C (180 F) and 85% relative humidity was initiated. SLS strengths were measured for both controls and aged specimens at room temperature and 82 C. The effect of this exposure on lap shear strength and failure modes to date is reported. In addition, the effects of water, saline water, deicing fluid, JP-5 jet fuel and hydraulic fluid on both the composite material and the adhesive bonds were investigated. The up to date results on the effects of these exposures will be discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Effect of Zirconia Surface Treatment, Using Plasma of Argon and Silane, on the Shear Bond Strength of Two Composite Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Aswathy; Ramdev, Poojya; Shruthi, C S

    2017-08-01

    Yttria stabilised tetragonal zirconia opens new vistas for all ceramic restoration by the mechanism of transformation toughening, making it much stronger compared to all other ceramic materials. Currently, it is the most recent core material for all ceramic fixed partial dentures due to its ability to withstand high simulated masticatory loads. Problems which have been reported with zirconia restorations involve the core cement interface leading to loss of retention of the prosthesis. Different reasons which have been reported for the same include the lack of adhesion between zirconia and commonly used cements due to absence of silica phase which makes zirconia not etchable. In addition, the hydrophobic nature of zirconia causes low wettability of zirconia surface by the adhesive cements which are commonly used. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare and evaluate the effect of two pre-treatments of zirconia, using plasma of argon and silane, on the shear bond strength values of two composite resin cements to zirconia and to evaluate the failure pattern of the debonded areas using stereomicroscopic analysis. Sixty zirconia discs (10 mm×2 mm) were randomly divided into three groups (n=20), following surface treatment, with airborne particle abrasion, using 110 µm Al2O3: Group I (control), Group II (plasma of argon cleaning), and Group III (application of silane primer). Each group had two subgroups based on the type of resin cement used for bonding: subgroup A; Rely X Ultimate (3M ESPE) and subgroup B; Panavia F (Kuraray). In subgroup A, Rely X universal silane primer and in subgroup B Clearfil ceramic primer was used. Shear bond strengths were determined after water storage for one day and thermocycling for 5000 cycles. Data (megapascal) were analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni test. Specimens were subjected to stereomicroscopic analysis, for evaluation of failure pattern. Group III produced the highest shear bond strength followed by Group II and Group

  12. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  13. Boron carbides formed by coevaporation of B and C atoms: Vapor reactivity, BxC1-x composition, and bonding structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretti, I.; Gago, R.; Albella, J. M.; Jiménez, I.

    2008-05-01

    Boron carbides (BxC1-x) in thin film form have been synthesized in a high vacuum by coevaporation of B and C atoms from independent sources, allowing a study of the whole composition range from pure B films to pure C films. The relationship between the impinging B/C atomic fluxes and the film composition has been studied, providing information on the chemical reactivity between the B and C vapors. The composition was determined with x-ray emission energy dispersion spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Finally, the bonding structure of the films has been determined by XANES, showing a change from structures based on B12 -icosahedral units for the B-rich samples to hexagonal-like structures for the C-rich samples. The study shows that the structural transition takes place for xtilde 0.5 .

  14. Tensile bond srength between composite resin using different adhesive systems Avaliação da resistência à ruptura por tração entre resina composta e diversos adesivos dentinários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Dias

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the tensile bond strength (TBS among nine adhesive systems and one composite resin. The groups were made as follows: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0 /Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/ Copalite-Cooley & Cooley (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. The control group (G10 was made only with the composite resin (Z100/3M. One hundred specimens were made, 10 for each group. There were significant differences on TBS among groups. G3 showed the hightest TBS in comparison to other tested groups. G10 presented higher TBS than all groups. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi investigar in vitro a resistência de união entre uma resina composta e nove sistemas adesivos dentinários. Os adesivos estudados foram assim agrupados: Single Bond/3M (G1, Etch & Prime 3.0/ Degussa (G2, Bond 1/Jeneric/Pentron (G3, Prime & Bond 2.1/Dentsply (G4, OptiBond FL/Kerr (G5, Stae/SDI (G6, Snap Bond/Copalite (G7, Prime & Bond NT/Dentsply (G 8, Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus/3M (G9. O Grupo controle (G10. foi confeccionado somente com a resina composta (Z100/3M. Foram confeccionados 100 espécimes, 10 para cada grupo. Houve diferenças estatísticas significantes entre os grupos. O grupo 3 foi o que mostrou a mais alta resistência em comparação aos nove testados. O grupo controle (G10 apresentou a mais alta resistência entre todos os Grupos.  

  15. The effect of ceramic primer on shear bond strength of resin composite cement to zirconia: a function of water storage and thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Uhrenbacher, Julia; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Ing, Dipl

    2013-11-01

    The authors investigated the use of ceramic primers combined with self-adhesive resin composite cements on the shear bond strength (SBS) to zirconia and compared them with one conventional resin composite cement. The authors divided zirconia substrates (N = 550) into three groups: RelyX Unicem Aplicap self-adhesive universal resin composite cement (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Minn.) (group A) (n = 220); G-CEM Capsule self-adhesive resin composite cement (GC Europe, Leuven, Belgium) (group B) (n = 220); and Panavia 21 with Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator and Clearfil SE Bond primer (n = 110) (Kuraray Dental, Tokyo) used as a standard comparison (SC). The authors examined the self-adhesive resin composite cements without (0) and with (1) the use of a ceramic primer. They measured SBS initially (37°C for three hours), after water storage (37°C for one, four, nine, 16 or 25 days) and after thermal cycling (5°C and 55°C for 1,500, 6,000, 13,500, 24,000 or 37,500 cycles). The authors analyzed data by using descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and a χ(2) test. Application of a ceramic primer did not result in a negative impact on SBS. Specimens in the A1 group (that is, RelyX Unicem Aplicap with ceramic primer) exhibited significantly higher SBS before and after water storage and thermal cycling compared with specimens that were not treated with a primer. The self-adhesive resin composite cements combined with ceramic primer exhibited similar or higher SBS values compared with those in the SC group at each aging duration (that is, water storage and thermal cycling). With respect to G-CEM Capsule, the authors observed a significantly positive effect of the primer after nine and 16 days' water storage and after one and four days' thermal cycling. They observed predominantly adhesive failures. Ceramic primer in combination with self-adhesive resin composite cement demonstrated a positive effect on SBS to zirconia and should be used for

  16. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at Different Output Powers on the Micromorphology and the Bond Property of Non-Carious Sclerotic Dentin to Resin Composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Sun

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated at different powers on the micromorphology and the bonding property of non-carious sclerotic dentin to resin composites.Two hundred bovine incisors characterized by non-carious sclerotic dentin were selected, and the seventy-two teeth of which for surface morphological analysis were divided into nine groups according to various treatments (A: the control group, B: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, C: diamond bur polishing followed by Adper Easy One, D-I: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, 5W, 6W output power, respectively, followed by Adper Easy One. The surface roughness values were measured by the non-contact three-dimensional morphology scanner, then the surface micromorphologies of surfaces in all groups were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM; meanwhile, Image Pro-Plus 6.0 software was used to measure the relative percentage of open tubules on SEM images. The rest, one hundred twenty-eight teeth for bond strength test, were divided into eight groups according to the different treatments (A: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, B: diamond bur polishing followed by the above adhesive, C-H: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1 W, 2 W, 3 W, 4 W, 5 W, 6 W output power, respectively, followed by the above adhesive, and each group was subsequently divided into two subgroups according to whether aging is performed (immediately tested and after thermocycling. Micro-shear bond strength test was used to evaluate the bond strength.The 4W laser group showed the highest roughness value (30.84±1.93μm, which was statistically higher than the control group and the diamond bur groups (p<0.05. The mean percentages ((27.8±1.8%, (28.0±2.2%, (30.0±1.9% of open tubules area in the 4W, 5W, 6W group were higher than other groups (p<0.05. The 4W laser group showed the highest micro-shear bond strength not only in immediately

  17. Influence of artificial aging on the shear bond strength of zirconia-composite interfaces after pretreatment with new 10-MDP adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    p.c pott

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This in-vitro study investigates the bond strength of different zirconia composites  with three different modern adhesive systems after artificial aging using thermocycling and water storage. Methods: A total of 90 specimens of zirconia (InCoris, Sirona, Germany, Bernsheim were ground using a 165 µm grit rotating diamond disc. Thirty specimens were additionally treated with either Futurabond U “FBU” (VOCO GmbH, or Futurabond M+ “FBM” (VOCO GmbH or Futurabond M+ in combination with the DCA activator “FBMD” (VOCO GmbH. One of the three different types of composites – BifixSE “BS”, BifixQM “BQ” or GrandioSO “G” (VOCO GmbH – was bonded to the ten specimens of each group. All of the specimens underwent artificial aging using thermocycling between 5°C and 55°C for 5000 cycles followed by water storage for 100 days. Shear bond strength (SBS was determined in a universal testing machine. The type of failure was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The data were compared to existing data without artificial aging. Statistical analysis was performed with ANOVA and the Tukey test. Results: FBM and FBMD had higher SBS than FBU in combination with all tested composites, except BifixSE. In nearly all groups, artificial aging had no effect, with the exception of the combination of FBMD with BifixSE, in which there was a significant decrease in SBS after the aging process (p

  18. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, F L A; Carvalho, J G; Andrade, M F; Saad, J R C; Hebling, J; Lizarelli, R F Z

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm 2 ) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p < 0.05). Laser irradiation alone did not lead to differences in µ-TBS (p > 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin. (paper)

  19. Streptococcus mutans counts in plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement or resin-based composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Machado Mota

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU (colony forming units in the saliva and plaque adjacent to orthodontic brackets bonded with a glass ionomer cement - GIC (Fuji Ortho or a resin-based composite - RC (Concise. Twenty male and female patients, aged 12 to 20 years, participated in the study. Saliva was collected before and after placement of appliances. Plaque was collected from areas adjacent to brackets and saliva was again collected on the 15th, 30th, and 45th day after placement. On the 30th day, 0.4% stannous fluoride gel was applied for 4 minutes. No significant modification in the number of Streptococcus mutans CFU in saliva was observed after placement of the fixed orthodontic appliances. On the 15th day, the percentage of Streptococcus mutans CFU in plaque was statistically lower in sites adjacent to GIC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.365 than in those adjacent to RC-bonded brackets (mean = 0.935. No evidence was found of a contribution of GIC to the reduction of CFU in plaque after the 15th day. Topical application of stannous fluoride gel on the 30th day reduced the number of CFU in saliva, but not in plaque. This study suggests that the antimicrobial activity of GIC occurs only in the initial phase and is not responsible for a long-term anticariogenic property.

  20. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Al-B4C Composite Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding: Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Faradonbeh, Alireza; Shamanian, Morteza; Edris, Hossein; Paidar, Moslem; Bozkurt, Yahya

    2018-02-01

    In this investigation, friction stir welding (FSW) of Al-B4C composite fabricated by 10 cycles accumulative roll bonding was conducted. In order to investigate the influences of pin geometry on microstructure and mechanical properties, four different pin geometries (cylindrical, square, triangular and hexagonal) were selected. It was found that FSW parameters had a major effect on the fragmentation and distribution of reinforcement particles in stir zone. When the tool travel speed was increased, the distribution of B4C particles was become gradually uniform in the aluminum matrix. The effect of tool rotational speed on the peak temperature was determined to be greater than the tool travel speed. The attained data of tensile properties and microhardness tests showed that the tool travel speed had bilateral effect on the tensile strength. The maximum tensile joint efficiency was obtained as 238% for FSWed of Al-2%B4C composite to annealed base Al sheet.

  2. Friction Stir Welding of Al-B4C Composite Fabricated by Accumulative Roll Bonding: Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Faradonbeh, Alireza; Shamanian, Morteza; Edris, Hossein; Paidar, Moslem; Bozkurt, Yahya