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Sample records for bombesin

  1. Radiolabeled bombesin derivatives for preclinical oncological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Ferreira, Carolina; Fuscaldi, Leonardo Lima; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Rubello, Domenico; de Barros, André Luís Branco

    2017-01-01

    Despite efforts, cancer is still one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with approximately 14 million new cases and 8.2 million cancer-related deaths each year, according to the World Health Organization. Among the strategies to reduce cancer progression and improving its management, implementing early detection technologies is crucial. Based on the fact that several types of cancer cells overexpress surface receptors, small molecule ligands, such as peptides, have been developed to allow tumor identification at earlier stages. Allied with imaging techniques such as PET and SPECT, radiolabeled peptides play a pivotal role in nuclear medicine. Bombesin, a peptide of 14 amino acids, is an amphibian homolog to the mammalian gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), that has been extensively studied as a targeting ligand for diagnosis and therapy of GRP positive tumors, such as breast, pancreas, lungs and prostate cancers. In this context, herein we provide a review of reported bombesin derivatives radiolabeled with a multitude of radioactive isotopes for diagnostic purposes in the preclinical setting. Moreover, since animal models are highly relevant for assessing the potential of clinical translation of this radiopeptides, a brief report of the currently used GRP-positive tumor-bearing animal models is described. PMID:28040598

  2. Bombesin-like immunoreactivity in the nervous system of hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Dockray, G J; Yanaihara, N

    1981-01-01

    With immunocytochemical methods, nerve cells have been detected in Hydra attenuata containing bombesin-like immunoreactivity. These nerve cells are located in ectoderm of all body regions of the animal and are especially abundant in basal disk and tentacles. Radioimmunoassay of extracts of hydra ...

  3. Brain histamine mediates the bombesin-induced central activation of sympatho-adrenomedullary outflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuma, Y; Yokotani, K; Murakami, Y; Osumi, Y

    1997-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of bombesin (0.3 nmol) increased plasma levels of both adrenaline and noradrenaline in urethane anesthetized rats. These bombesin-induced increases were inhibited by i.c.v. pretreatment with pyrilamine, an H1-receptor antagonist. Ranitidine, an H2-receptor antagonist also inhibited the increase of adrenaline, however, its effective dose was much larger than that of pyrilamine. Furthermore, the bombesin-induced increase of noradrenaline was not effectively inhibited by ranitidine. In the next series, turnover of histamine was assessed by measuring accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain histamine. I.c.v. administration of bombesin (0.3-3 nmol) increased turnover of hypothalamic histamine, while its intravenous administration was without effect. The present results suggest that the bombesin-induced central activation of sympatho-adrenomedullary outflow is probably, at least in part, mediated through brain histaminergic neurons.

  4. Signal transduction of bombesin-induced circular smooth muscle cell contraction in cat esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung-Uk Park; Chang-Yell Shin; Jung-Su Ryu; Hyen-O La; Sun-Young Park; Hyun-Ju Song; Young-Sil Min; Dong-Seok Kim; Uy-Dong Sohn

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of bombesin-induced circular smooth muscle cell contraction in cat esophagus.METHODS: Specific G protein or phospholipase C involved in cat esophagus contraction was identified,muscle cells were permeabilized with saponin. After permeabilization of muscle cells, the Gi3 antibody inhibited bombesin-induced smooth muscle cell contraction.RESULTS: Incubation of permeabilized circular muscle cells with PLC-β3 antibody could inhibit bombesin-induced contraction. H-7, chelerythrine (PKC inhibitor)and genistein (protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited bombesin-induced contraction, but DAG kinase inhibitor,R59949, could not inhibit it. To examine which mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) was involved in bombesin-induced contraction, the specific MAPK inhibitors (MEK inhibitor, PD98059 and p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB202190)were used. Preincubation of PD98059 blocked the contraction induced by bombesin in a concentration-dependent manner. However, SB202190 had no effects on contraction.CONCLUSION: Bombesin-induced circular muscle cell contraction in cat esophagus is madiated via a PKC or a PTK-dependent pathway or p44/p42 MAPK pathway.

  5. Peripheral injection of bombesin induces c-Fos in NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engster, Kim-Marie; Kroczek, Arthur L; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas; Kobelt, Peter

    2016-10-01

    As anorexigenic hormones bombesin and nucleobindin2 (NUCB2)/nesfatin-1 decrease food intake in rodents. Both hormones have been described in brain nuclei that play a role in the modulation of hunger and satiety, like the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). However, the direct interaction of the two hormones is unknown so far. The aim of study was to elucidate whether bombesin directly interacts with NUCB2/nesfatin-1 neurons in the PVN and NTS. Therefore, we injected bombesin intraperitoneally (ip) at two doses (26 and 32nmol/kg body weight) and assessed c-Fos activation in the PVN, arcuate nucleus (ARC) and NTS compared to vehicle treated rats (0.15M NaCl). We also performed co-localization studies with oxytocin or tyrosine hydroxylase. Bombesin at both doses increased the number of c-Fos positive neurons in the PVN (pNTS (p0.05). In the PVN and NTS the number of c-Fos positive neurons colocalized with NUCB2/nesfatin-1 increased after bombesin injection compared to vehicle treatment (pNTS (pNTS giving rise to a possible interaction between bombesin and NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the modulation of food intake.

  6. Sulphonamide-based bombesin prodrug analogues for glutathione transferase, useful in targeted cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, I; Labrou, N E; Petrou, C; Rassias, N; Cordopatis, P; Clonis, Y D

    2009-05-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are enzymes involved in cellular detoxification by catalysing the nucleophilic attack of glutathione (GSH) on the electrophilic centre of a number of toxic compounds and xenobiotics, including certain chemotherapeutic drugs. The encountered chemotherapeutic resistant of tumour cells, thus, has been associated with the increase of total GST expression. GSTs, in addition to GSH-conjugating activity, exhibit sulphonamidase activity, catalyzing the GSH-mediated hydrolysis of sulphonamide bonds. Such reactions are of interest as potential tumour-directed prodrug activation strategies. In the present work we report the design and synthesis of novel chimaeric sulphonamide derivatives of bombesin, able to be activated by the model human isoenzyme GSTA1-1 (hGSTA1-1). These derivatives bear a peptidyl-moiety (analogues of bombesin peptide: R-[Lue(13)]-bombesin, R-[Phe(13)]-bombesin and R-[Ser(3),Arg(10),Phe(13)]-bombesin, where R=C(6)H(5)SO(2)NH-) as molecular recognition element for targeting the drug selectively to tumour cells. The released S-alkyl-glutathione, after hGSTA1-1-mediated cleavage of the sulphonamide bond, provides an inhibitor of varied strength against GSTs from different sources. These prodrugs are envisaged as a plausible means to sensitize drug-resistant tumours that overexpress GSTs.

  7. Click chemistry for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro-Flores, G., E-mail: ferro_flores@yahoo.com.m [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Rivero, I.A. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Baja California (Mexico); Santos-Cuevas, C.L. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Sarmiento, J.I. [Instituto Tecnologico de Tijuana, Baja California (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, C. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico); Ocampo-Garcia, B.E. [Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca S/N, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Garcia-Becerra, R.; Ordaz-Rosado, D. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran (Mexico)

    2010-12-15

    {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC labeled Lys{sup 3}-bombesin has shown specific binding to gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) over-expressed in cancer cells. Click chemistry offers an innovative functionalization strategy for biomolecules such as bombesin. The aim of this research was to apply a click chemistry approach for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin and to compare the in vitro MCF7 breast cancer cell uptake and biodistribution profile in mice with that of {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin. The results suggest a higher lipophilicity for {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-triazole-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin which explains its higher in vivo hepatobiliary elimination. Pancreas-to-blood ratio for {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-triazole-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin was 4.46 at 3 h and both bombesin radiopharmaceuticals showed specific recognition for GRP receptors in MCF7 cancer cells. Click chemistry is a reliable approach for [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}] labeling of Lys{sup 3}-bombesin.

  8. Enhancement of cytotoxicity of antimicrobial peptide magainin Ⅱ in tumor cells by bombesin-targeted delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan LIU; Hao YANG; Lin WAN; Hua-wei CAI; Sheng-fu LI; You-ping LI; Jing-qiu CHENG; Xiao-feng LU

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the conjugation of magainin II(MG2),an antimicrobial peptides(AMPs),to the tumor-homing peptide bombesin could enhance its cytotoxicity in tumor cells.Methods: A magainin Ⅱ-bombesin conjugate(MG2B)was constructed by attaching magainin Ⅱ(MG2)to bombesin at its N-terminus.The peptides were synthesized using Fmoc-chemistry.The in vitro cytotoxicity of the peptide in cancer cells was quantitatively determined using the CCK-8 celt counting kit.Moreover,the in vivo antitumor effect of the peptide was determined in tumor xenograft models.Results: The IC50 of MG2B for cancer cells(10-15 μmol/L)was at least 10 times lower than the IC50 of unconjugated MG2(125μmol/L).Moreover,the binding affinity of MG2B for cancer cells was higher than that of unconjugated MG2.In contrast,conjugation to a bombesin analog lacking the receptor-binding domain failed to increase the cytotoxicity of MG2,suggesting that bombesin conjugation enhances the cytotoxicity of MG2 in cancer cells through improved binding.Indeed,MG2B selectively induced cell death in cancer cells in vitro with the IC50 ranging from 10 to 15 μmol/L,which was about 6-10 times lower than the IC50 for normal cells.MG2B(20mg/kg per day,intratumorally injected for 5 d)also exhibited antitumor effects in mice bearing MCF-7 tumor grafts.The mean weights of tumor grafts in MG2B-and PBS-treated mice were 0.21±0.05 g and 0.59±0.12 g,respectively.Conclusion: The results suggest that conjugation of AMPs to bombesin might be an alternative approach for targeted cancer therapy.

  9. Rhodium-105 Bombesin Analogs for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvia S. Jurisson, PhD

    2005-12-31

    Over the period of this grant (11/01/2001 to 12/31/2005), the consistent and reproducible production of Rh-105, synthesis and evaluation of three new chelate systems based on hydroxymethyl phosphines, development of a new non-hydroxymethyl phosphine N{sub 2}P{sub 2} chelate system, conjugation of two of the chelates to the bombesin peptide analog BBN[7-14]NH{sub 2}, evaluation of the bombesin conjugates and their Rh-105 complexes for stability, cell binding affinity, and in vivo biodistribution in normal mice has been developed. The BBN analogs bind to GRP receptors that are overexpressed on PC-3 prostate tumor cells. A dedicated glove box is used for the separation and isolation of {sup 105}Rh from the target ({sup 104}Ru). All tubing/connections/valves from the point of the Cl{sub 2} tank are made of Teflon to minimize/eliminate the introduction of any metal into the process (e.g., iron from stainless steel corrosion). The separation of {sup 105}Rh produced from the enriched {sup 104}Ru target involves oxidation of the enriched {sup 104}Ru metal target to ruthenium tetroxide with chlorine gas and sodium hydroxide solution to generate hypochlorite in situ. The RuO4 is removed by distillation and the {sup 105}Rh remaining in the reaction vial is converted into {sup 105}Rh-chloride by acidification with hydrochloric acid and heating. The {sup 105}Rh production process has become reproducible over the past year to consistently make 10-30 mCi of {sup 105}Rh from 1-3 mg of an enriched (99.21%) {sup 104}Ru target. The process itself involves irradiation of the enriched {sup 104}Ru target in the core of the reactor (University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR)) for one week to yield 16-40 mCi of {sup 105}Rh. The irradiated target is processed to separate the Rh-105 in high specific activity from the {sup 104}Ru target. The irradiated target is dissolved in NaOH (2M, 3 mL) by bubbling Cl{sub 2} gas through the solution (generating NaOCl in situ) to generate RuO{sub 4

  10. Synthesis and evaluation of a technetium-99m labeled cytotoxic bombesin peptide conjugate for targeting bombesin receptor-expressing tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okarvi, Subhani M. [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, MBC-03, PO Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: sokarvi@kfshrc.edu.sa; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim [Cyclotron and Radiopharmaceuticals Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, MBC-03, PO Box 3354, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-04-15

    Conjugation of the cytotoxic drugs to receptor-binding peptides is an attractive approach for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic peptide conjugates to tumor cells. In an attempt to develop an efficient peptide-based radiopharmaceutical for targeting bombesin (BN) receptor-expressing tumors (i.e., breast and prostate), we have prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis, a novel BN analog derived from the universal sequence of BN and conjugated to a widely characterized antineoplastic agent, methotrexate (MTX). MTX-BN, after radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc via stannous-tartrate exchange, showed a good stability against cysteine and histidine transchelation as well as a high in vitro metabolic stability in human plasma. In vitro cell-binding and internalization on MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, T47-D breast cancer and PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines demonstrated high affinity and specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-MTX-BN towards both human breast and prostate cancer cells (binding affinities in nanomolar range). In addition, the radioconjugate displayed a significant internalization (values ranged between 19-35%) into the tumor cells. In vivo biodistribution and clearance kinetics in Balb/c mice are characterized by an efficient clearance from the blood and excretion mainly through the renal-urinary pathway with some elimination via the hepatobiliary system. In vivo tumor uptake in nude mice bearing MDA-MB-231 cells was 2.70{+-}0.44% ID/g at 1 h, whereas in nude mice with human epidermoid KB cells the accumulation in the tumor was found to be 1.48{+-}0.31% ID/g at 1 h post injection. The tumor uptake was always higher than in the blood and muscle, with good tumor retention and good tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-muscle ratios. The accumulation/retention in the major organs (i.e., lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, etc.) was low to moderate (<6% ID/g) in both healthy and tumor-bearing mice. However, the uptake/retention in the kidneys was rather high (up to 11.05{+-}1.80% ID/g), which is of a

  11. Synergistic bombesin and insulin stimulation of DNA synthesis in human fetal kidney in serum-free culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brière, N; Chailler, P

    1993-05-01

    The respective influences of growth factors during kidney development can be directly evaluated using the chemically-defined serum-free culture system perfected in our laboratory. Since, in this culture model, conditions are minimal for growth and differentiation, DNA synthesis sharply decreases during the first 48 h. The addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF, 100 ng/ml), insulin (5 micrograms/ml) and transferrin (5 micrograms/ml) significantly restores this important cellular function. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of bombesin, a potent mitogen, supplemented alone or in combination with insulin, transferrin and/or EGF. Cortical explants of human fetal kidneys (17-20 weeks) were maintained during 5 days in culture. When compared with 5 day controls (L-15 medium only), bombesin generated a maximal though weak effect on DNA synthesis at a concentration of 0.3 nM, corresponding to a stimulation index (SI) of 22%. When combined with either transferrin or EGF, or with transferrin plus EGF, bombesin did not alter the SI of individual factors. Insulin, in turn, greatly increased DNA synthesis (SI = 169%), while bombesin strongly potentiated this effect (SI = 275%). Transferrin also enhanced insulin SI from 169 to 240%. When added as a third factor, bombesin further potentiated the effectiveness (SI = 338%) of the combination insulin plus transferrin. These results indicate that bombesin controls cell proliferation in synergism with other regulators and hence may act as a competence growth factor during nephrogenesis.

  12. Regulation of bombesin-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 expression in prostate cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ives Kirk; Chao Celia; Wen Xiaodong; Hellmich Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the bombesin (BBS)-like peptide, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), have been implicated in the progression of hormone-refractory prostate cancer; however, a mechanistic link between the bioactive peptide and COX-2 expression in prostate cells has not been made. Results We report that BBS stimulates COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, and the release of prostaglandin E2 from the GRP receptor (GRPR)-positive, androgen-insensitive prostate cancer ce...

  13. Influence of bombesin, CCK, secretin and CRF on corticosterone concentration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, L D; Porter, J R

    1988-01-01

    The ingestion of food increases adrenoglucocorticoid secretion in humans and rats and influences the circadian periodicity of ACTH and corticosterone in rats fed on restricted schedules. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the brain-gut polypeptides CCK33 (10 U/kg), bombesin (10 micrograms/kg) and secretin (10 U/kg) on corticosterone concentrations in fed rats. The responses were compared to that of CRF (1 micrograms/kg). All experiments were begun at 10 a.m., 3 hours after the lights came on. The rats were given single, IP injections of peptide or vehicle (1 ml/kg) then sacrificed 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 or 60 minutes later. Corticosterone was measured fluorometrically. The control injection (vehicle) alone caused a mild stress response with corticosterone levels peaking between 10 and 15 minutes after the injection then returning to baseline. Both CCK33 and bombesin significantly increased corticosterone to approximately 2.5-fold above the control level in a fashion similar to that of CRF. In all three instances corticosterone levels peaked at 30 minutes post-injection. Secretin had no effect on corticosterone secretion. None of the peptides tested stimulated in vitro corticosterone output from isolated adrenal cells. These findings indicate that both CCK and bombesin cause pituitary-adrenal activation which may be related to the response of this system to food ingestion.

  14. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: Not just trefoil peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos; Chrisoula D Scopa; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Constantine E Vagianos

    2008-01-01

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14 (8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials.

  15. Intradermal endothelin-1 excites bombesin-responsive superficial dorsal horn neurons in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, T; Nagamine, M; Davoodi, A; Iodi Carstens, M; Cevikbas, F; Steinhoff, M; Carstens, E

    2015-10-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in nonhistaminergic itch. Here we used electrophysiological methods to investigate whether mouse superficial dorsal horn neurons respond to intradermal (id) injection of ET-1 and whether ET-1-sensitive neurons additionally respond to other pruritic and algesic stimuli or spinal superfusion of bombesin, a homolog of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) that excites spinal itch-signaling neurons. Single-unit recordings were made from lumbar dorsal horn neurons in pentobarbital-anesthetized C57BL/6 mice. We searched for units that exhibited elevated firing after id injection of ET-1 (1 μg/μl). Responsive units were further tested with mechanical stimuli, bombesin (spinal superfusion, 200 μg·ml(-1)·min(-1)), heating, cooling, and additional chemicals [histamine, chloroquine, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), capsaicin]. Of 40 ET-1-responsive units, 48% responded to brush and pinch [wide dynamic range (WDR)] and 52% to pinch only [high threshold (HT)]. Ninety-three percent responded to noxious heat, 50% to cooling, and >70% to histamine, chloroquine, AITC, and capsaicin. Fifty-seven percent responded to bombesin, suggesting that they participate in spinal itch transmission. That most ET-1-sensitive spinal neurons also responded to pruritic and algesic stimuli is consistent with previous studies of pruritogen-responsive dorsal horn neurons. We previously hypothesized that pruritogen-sensitive neurons signal itch. The observation that ET-1 activates nociceptive neurons suggests that both itch and pain signals may be generated by ET-1 to result in simultaneous sensations of itch and pain, consistent with observations that ET-1 elicits both itch- and pain-related behaviors in animals and burning itch sensations in humans.

  16. Therapeutic Efficacy with Treatment-related Toxicities of {sup 177}Lu-labeled Bombesin Derivative for the Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Cho, Eun Ha; Lee, So Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) has been shown to be overexpressed in many human tumours, including breast cancer, prostate cancer, small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancers, endometrial cancers, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In particular, GRPR expression is high in 83 % of invasive primary prostatic carcinomas. These results suggest that {sup 177}Lu-labeled bombesin derivative has promising characteristics as a novel nuclear medicine, especially for the treatment of GRPR over-expressing prostate tumors.

  17. A Bombesin-Shepherdin Radioconjugate Designed for Combined Extra- and Intracellular Targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane A. Fischer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Radiolabeled peptides which target tumor-specific membrane structures of cancer cells represent a promising class of targeted radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer. A potential drawback of a number of reported radiopeptides is the rapid washout of a substantial fraction of the initially delivered radioactivity from cancer cells and tumors. This renders the initial targeting effort in part futile and results in a lower imaging quality and efficacy of the radiotracer than achievable. We are investigating the combination of internalizing radiopeptides with molecular entities specific for an intracellular target. By enabling intracellular interactions of the radioconjugate, we aim at reducing/decelerating the externalization of radioactivity from cancer cells. Using the “click-to-chelate” approach, the 99mTc-tricarbonyl core as a reporter probe for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT was combined with the binding sequence of bombesin for extracellular targeting of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-r and peptidic inhibitors of the cytosolic heat shock 90 protein (Hsp90 for intracellular targeting. Receptor-specific uptake of the multifunctional radioconjugate could be confirmed, however, the cellular washout of radioactivity was not improved. We assume that either endosomal trapping or lysosomal degradation of the radioconjugate is accountable for these observations.

  18. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  19. Does bombesin-like peptide mediate radiation-induced anorexia and satiety?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalto, Y.; Franzen, L.; Henriksson, R. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Forsgren, S.; Kjoerell, U. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Anatomy; Funegaard, U. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cardiology

    1999-07-01

    Bombesin (BN) and its mammalian counterpart gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) act as neuroregulatory hormones and peripheral and central satiety-inducing agents. Previously, we demonstrated that irradiation induces an increase in the expression of BN/GRP in the innervation of the salivary glands in rats. We therefore carried out a study using radioimmunoassay (RIA) analysis and immunohistochemistry to examine whether saliva contains BN and whether irradiation affects the BN release to saliva in rats. Immunoreactivity for BN was detected not only in the innervation of the parenchyma but also in the duct cells and in the lumina of the ducts, suggesting entrance of BN into saliva. The RIA analysis confirmed that rat saliva contains a BN-like peptide. The observation shows that saliva contains this peptide but that there is no significant increase following the radiation schedule used. Nevertheless, the occurrence of an enhanced expression of BN in different peripheral tissues such as the salivary and laryngeal glands should be taken into consideration when discussing the clinically important problem of reduced food intake and anorexia in cancer patients. (orig.)

  20. Mechanisms underlying anorexia after microinjection of bombesin into the lateral cerebroventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, Hiromi; Mori, Mayumi

    2005-02-01

    Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of bombesin (BN) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) dose-dependently decreased food intake in male Wistar rats fasted for 17 h. Neuromedin B (NMB) did not show any effect on food intake. After BN administration, locomotor activity did not significantly change, compared with a vehicle-injected group. The anorexia induced by BN (0.3 microg) was perfectly inhibited by pretreatment with a GRP-receptor antagonist, [D-Tyr(6)]BN(6-13) methyl ester (10 microg), an NO synthase inhibitor, L-nitro-arginine (30 microg), and a PKG inhibitor, H-9 (2 microg). The cGMP concentration in the hypothalamus increased 1 h after administration when compared with the vehicle-injected group. On the other hand, an NMB-receptor antagonist, BIM23127 (10 microg), and the protein kinase (PK) C inhibitors, chelerythrine (2 microg) and Go6983 (2 microg), inhibited only the late phase of the anorexia. A PKC activator, phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (3 microg), injected into the ventricle decreased food intake. These findings suggest that BN suppresses food intake mainly mediated through the GRP receptor and NO-cGMP-PKG pathway, and NMB receptor and PKC is partly involved in the late phase of the anorexia.

  1. Experimental obstructive jaundice alters claudin-4 expression in intestinal mucosa: Effect of bombesin and neurotensin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stelios F Assimakopoulos; Constantine E Vagianos; Aristides S Charonis; Ilias H Alexandris; Iris Spiliopoulou; Konstantinos C Thomopoulos; Vassiliki N Nikolopoulou; Chrisoula D Scopa

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of experimental obstructive jaundice and exogenous bombesin (BBS) and neurotensin (NT) administration on the expression of the tight junction (TJ)-protein claudin-4 in intestinal epithelium of rats.METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: Ⅰ = controls, Ⅱ = sham operated, Ⅲ = bile duct ligation (BDL), Ⅳ = BDL+BBS (30 μg/kg per d), V = BDL+NT (300 μg/kg per d). At the end of the experiment on d 10, endotoxin was measured in portal and aortic blood. Tissue sections of the terminal ileum were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for evaluation of claudin-4 expression in intestinal epithelium.RESULTS: Obstructive jaundice led to intestinal barrier failure demonstrated by significant portal and aortic endotoxemia. Claudin-4 expression was significantly increased in the upper third of the villi in jaundiced rats and an upregulation of its lateral distribution was noted.Administration of BBS or NT restored claudin-4 expression to the control state and significantly reduced portal and aortic endotoxemia.CONCLUSION: Experimental obstructive jaundice increases claudin-4 expression in intestinal epithelium,which may be a key factor contributing to the disruption of the mucosal barrier. Gut regulatory peptides BBS and NT can prevent this alteration and reduce portal and sysremic endotoxemia.

  2. Interaction of bombesin and its fragments with gold nanoparticles analyzed using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tąta, Agnieszka; Szkudlarek, Aleksandra; Kim, Younkyoo; Proniewicz, Edyta

    2017-02-01

    This work demonstrates the application of commercially available stable surface composed of gold nanograins with diameters ranging from 70 to 226 nm deposited onto silicon wafer for surface-enhanced Raman scattering investigations of biologically active compounds, such as bombesin (BN) and its fragments. BN is an important neurotransmitter involved in a complex signaling pathways and biological responses; for instance, hypertensive action, contractive on uterus, colon or ileum, locomotor activity, stimulation of gastric and insulin secretion as well as growth promotion of various tumor cell lines, including: lung, prostate, stomach, colon, and breast. It has also been shown that 8-14 BN C-terminal fragment partially retains the biological activity of BN. The SERS results for BN and its fragment demonstrated that (1) three amino acids from these peptides sequence; i.e., L-histidine, L-methionine, and L-tryptophan, are involved in the interaction with gold coated silicon wafer and (2) the strength of these interactions depends upon the aforementioned amino acids position in the peptide sequence.

  3. 177Lu-Dendrimer Conjugated to Folate and Bombesin with Gold Nanoparticles in the Dendritic Cavity: A Potential Theranostic Radiopharmaceutical

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    Héctor Mendoza-Nava

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 177Lu-labeled nanoparticles conjugated to biomolecules have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of this research was to synthesize 177Lu-dendrimer(PAMAM-G4-folate-bombesin with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs in the dendritic cavity and to evaluate the radiopharmaceutical potential for targeted radiotherapy and the simultaneous detection of folate receptors (FRs and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPRs overexpressed in breast cancer cells. p-SCN-Benzyl-DOTA was conjugated in aqueous-basic medium to the dendrimer. The carboxylate groups of Lys1Lys3(DOTA-bombesin and folic acid were activated with HATU and also conjugated to the dendrimer. The conjugate was mixed with 1% HAuCl4 followed by the addition of NaBH4 and purified by ultrafiltration. Elemental analysis (EDS, particle size distribution (DLS, TEM analysis, UV-Vis, and infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies were performed. The conjugate was radiolabeled using 177LuCl3 or 68GaCl3 and analyzed by radio-HPLC. Studies confirmed the dendrimer functionalization with high radiochemical purity (>95%. Fluorescence results demonstrated that the presence of AuNPs in the dendritic cavity confers useful photophysical properties to the radiopharmaceutical for optical imaging. Preliminary binding studies in T47D breast cancer cells showed a specific cell uptake (41.15±2.72%. 177Lu-dendrimer(AuNP-folate-bombesin may be useful as an optical and nuclear imaging agent for breast tumors overexpressing GRPR and FRs, as well as for targeted radiotherapy.

  4. Stress and eating: A dual role for bombesin-like peptides

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    Zul eMerali

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The current obesity ‘epidemic’ in the developed world is a major health concern; over half of adult Canadians are now classified as overweight or obese. Although the reasons for high obesity rates remain unknown, an important factor appears to be the role stressors play in overconsumption of food and weight gain. In this context, increased stressor exposure and/or perceived stress may influence eating behavior and food choices. Stress-induced anorexia is often noted in rats exposed to chronic stress (e.g. repeated restraint and access to standard Chow diet; associated reduced consumption and weight loss. However, if a similar stressor exposure takes place in the presence of palatable, calorie dense food, rats often consume an increase proportion of palatable food relative to Chow, leading to weight gain and obesity. In humans, a similar desire to eat palatable or ‘comfort’ foods has been noted under stressful situations; it is thought that this response may potentially be attributable to stress-buffering properties and/or through activation of reward pathways. The complex interplay between stress-induced anorexia and stress-induced obesity is discussed in terms of the overlapping circuitry and neurochemicals that mediate feeding, stress and reward pathways. In particular, this paper draws attention to the bombesin family of peptides (BBs initially shown to regulate food intake and subsequently shown to mediate stress response as well. Evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that BBs may be involved in stress-induced anorexia under certain conditions, but that the same peptides could also be involved in stress-induced obesity. This hypothesis is based on the unique distribution of BBs in key cortico-limbic brain regions involved in food regulation, reward, incentive salience and motivationally driven behavior.

  5. Does the histaminergic system mediate bombesin/GRP-induced suppression of food intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Z; Banks, K

    1994-12-01

    Bombesin (BN) and its mammalian homologue, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), are potent satiety agents and have been implicated in the physiological regulation of food intake. The mechanism(s) of action of this effect remains unclear. There is a functional and anatomic overlap between histamine and BN in relationship to feeding, which led us to hypothesize that BN may mediate its satiety effects through activation of the histaminergic system. To assess this contention, we examined the effects of R-alpha-methylhistamine (alpha-MH) and Imetit, selective H3-receptor agonists that inhibit the release and synthesis of histamine, on BN- or cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced satiety. In this report we present the first evidence for the role of histamine H3 receptors in the mediation of BN-elicited satiety. During the first hour of the 4-h daily feeding session, BN reduced food intake by > 50% relative to the control condition; this suppression was blocked by prior treatment with the H3-receptor agonist, alpha-MH. This blockade of BN-induced satiety was dose related and selective to BN as alpha-MH failed to attenuate sulfated CCK-8-induced satiety. When alpha-MH was administered alone, it failed to significantly affect food intake. The specificity of this effect was further supported by the demonstration that another H3 agonist, Imetit, was also able to block the feeding-suppressant effects of BN. Furthermore, thioperamide, an H3-receptor antagonist, blocked these effects of Imetit.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Regulation of bombesin-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 expression in prostate cancer cells

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    Ives Kirk

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and the bombesin (BBS-like peptide, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP, have been implicated in the progression of hormone-refractory prostate cancer; however, a mechanistic link between the bioactive peptide and COX-2 expression in prostate cells has not been made. Results We report that BBS stimulates COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, and the release of prostaglandin E2 from the GRP receptor (GRPR-positive, androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. BBS-stimulated COX-2 expression is mediated, in part, by p38MAPK and PI3 kinase (PI3K/Akt pathways, and blocked by a GRPR antagonist. The PI3K/Akt pathway couples GRPR to the transcription factor, activator protein-1 (AP-1, and enhanced COX-2 promoter activity. Although BBS stimulates nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB in PC-3, NF-κB does not regulate GRPR-mediated COX-2 expression. The p38MAPK pathway increases BBS-stimulated COX-2 expression by slowing the degradation of COX-2 mRNA. Expression of recombinant GRPR in the androgen-sensitive cell line LNCaP is sufficient to confer BBS-stimulated COX-2 expression via the p38MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. Conclusions Our study establishes a mechanistic link between GRPR activation and enhanced COX-2 expression in prostate cancer cell lines, and suggests that inhibiting GRPR may, in the future, provide an effective therapeutic alternative to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for inhibiting COX-2 in patients with recurrent prostate cancer.

  7. Validation of the production process of core-equipment HYNIC-Bombesin-Sn; Validacion del proceso de produccion del nucleo-equipo HYNIC-Bombesina-Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio C, N. I. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The validation process is establishing documented evidence that provides a high degree of assurance that a specific process consistently will produce a product that will meet specifications and quality attributes preset and, therefore, ensures the efficiency and effectiveness of a product. The radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-Bombesin is part of the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) analogues of bombesin that are radiolabelled with technetium 99 metastable for molecular images obtention. Is obtained from freeze-dry formulations kits (core- equipment)) and has reported a very high stability in human serum, specific binding to receptors and rapid internalization. Biodistribution data in mice showed rapid blood clearance with predominant renal excretion and specific binding to tissues with positive response to GRP receptors. According to biokinetics studies performed on patients with breast cancer, breast show a marked asymmetry with increased uptake in neoplastic breast in healthy women and the uptake of radiopharmaceuticals is symmetrical in both breasts. No reported adverse reactions. In this paper, the prospective validation core-equipment HYNlC-Bombesin-Sn, which was shown consistently that the product meets the specifications and quality, attributes to preset from the obtained from the diagnostic radiopharmaceutical third generation: {sup 99m}Tc-HYNlC-Bombesin. The process was successfully validated and thereby ensuring the efficiency and effectiveness of this agent as a preliminary diagnostic for approval to be marketed. (Author)

  8. Development of a potent DOTA-conjugated bombesin antagonist for targeting GRPr-positive tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansi, Rosalba; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Wang, Xuejuan [University Hospital Basel, Division of Radiological Chemistry, Basel (Switzerland); Forrer, Flavio [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Erasmus Medical Centre, Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Waser, Beatrice; Cescato, Renzo; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, Berne (Switzerland); Graham, Keith; Borkowski, Sandra [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Radiolabelled somatostatin-based antagonists show a higher uptake in tumour-bearing mouse models than agonists of similar or even distinctly higher receptor affinity. Very similar results were obtained with another family of G protein-coupled receptor ligands, the bombesin family. We describe a new conjugate, RM2, with the chelator DOTA coupled to D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH{sub 2} via the cationic spacer 4-amino-1-carboxymethyl-piperidine for labelling with radiometals such as {sup 111}In and {sup 68}Ga. RM2 was synthesized on a solid support and evaluated in vitro in PC-3 cells. IC{sub 50} and K{sub d} values were determined. The antagonist potency was evaluated by immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca{sup 2+} mobilization assays. Biodistribution studies were performed in PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing mice with {sup 111}In-RM2 and {sup 68}Ga-RM2, respectively. PET/CT studies were performed on PC-3 and LNCaP tumour-bearing nude mice with {sup 68}Ga-RM2. RM2 and {sup 111}In-RM2 are high-affinity and selective ligands for the GRP receptor (7.7{+-}3.3 nmol/l for RM2; 9.3{+-}3.3 nmol/l for {sup nat}In-RM2). The potent antagonistic properties were confirmed by an immunofluorescence-based internalization and Ca{sup 2+} mobilization assays. {sup 68}Ga- and {sup 111}In-RM2 showed high and specific uptake in both the tumour and the pancreas. Uptake in the tumour remained high (15.2{+-}4.8%IA/g at 1 h; 11.7{+-}2.4%IA/g at 4 h), whereas a relatively fast washout from the pancreas and the other abdominal organs was observed. Uptake in the pancreas decreased rapidly from 22.6{+-}4.7%IA/g at 1 h to 1.5{+-}0.5%IA/g at 4 h. RM2 was shown to be a potent GRPr antagonist. Pharmacokinetics and imaging studies indicate that {sup 111}In-RM2 and {sup 68}Ga-RM2 are ideal candidates for clinical SPECT and PET studies. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of 64Cu-labeled bifunctional chelate-bombesin conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Mohand, Samia; Fournier, Patrick; Dumulon-Perreault, Véronique; Kiefer, Garry E; Jurek, Paul; Ferreira, Cara L; Bénard, François; Guérin, Brigitte

    2011-08-17

    Several bifunctional chelates (BFCs) were investigated as carriers of (64)Cu for PET imaging. The most widely used chelator for (64)Cu labeling of BFCs is DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N'''-tretraacetic acid), even though this complex exhibits only moderate in vivo stability. In this study, we prepared a series of alternative chelator-peptide conjugates labeled with (64)Cu, measured in vitro receptor binding affinities in human breast cancer T47D cells expressing the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and compared their in vivo stability in mice. DOTA-, NOTA-(1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid), PCTA-(3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-3,6,9-triacetic acid), and Oxo-DO3A-(1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-4,7,10-triacetic acid) peptide conjugates were prepared using H(2)N-Aoc-[d-Tyr(6),βAla(11),Thi(13),Nle(14)]bombesin(6-14) (BBN) as a peptide template. The BBN moiety was selected since it binds with high affinity to the GRPR, which is overexpressed on human breast cancer cells. A convenient synthetic approach for the attachment of aniline-BFC to peptides on solid support is also presented. To facilitate the attachment of the aniline-PCTA and aniline-Oxo-DO3A to the peptide via an amide bond, a succinyl spacer was introduced at the N-terminus of BBN. The partially protected aniline-BFC (p-H(2)N-Bn-PCTA(Ot-Bu)(3) or p-H(2)N-Bn-DO3A(Ot-Bu)(3)) was then coupled to the resulting N-terminal carboxylic acid preactivated with DEPBT/ClHOBt on resin. After cleavage and purification, the peptide-conjugates were labeled with (64)Cu using [(64)Cu]Cu(OAc)(2) in 0.1 M ammonium acetate buffer at 100 °C for 15 min. Labeling efficacy was >90% for all peptides; Oxo-DO3A-BBN was incubated an additional 150 min at 100 °C to achieve this high yield. Specific activities varied from 76 to 101 TBq/mmol. Competition assays on T47D cells showed that all BFC-BBN complexes retained high affinity for the GRPR. All BFC-BBN (64)Cu

  10. PEGylation of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled bombesin analogues improves their pharmacokinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daepp, Simone; Garayoa, Elisa Garcia [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Maes, Veronique; Brans, Luc; Tourwe, Dirk A. [Department of Organic Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mueller, Cristina [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Schibli, Roger, E-mail: roger.schibli@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences ETH-PSI-USZ, CH-5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Radiolabeled bombesin (BN) conjugates are promising radiotracers for imaging and therapy of breast and prostate tumors in which BN{sub 2}/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors are overexpressed. However, the low in vivo stability of BN conjugates may limit their clinical application. In an attempt to improve their pharmacokinetics and counteract their rapid enzymatic degradation, we prepared a series of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-ylated BN(7-14) analogues for radiolabeling with {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3} and evaluated them in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Derivatization of a stabilized (N{sup {alpha}H}is)Ac-BN(7-14)[Cha{sup 13},Nle{sup 14}] analogue with linear PEG molecules of various sizes [5 kDa (PEG{sub 5}), 10 kDa (PEG{sub 10}) and 20 kDa (PEG{sub 20})] was performed by PEGylation of the {epsilon}-amino group of a {beta}{sup 3}hLys-{beta}Ala-{beta}Ala spacer between the stabilized BN sequence and the (N{sup {alpha}H}is)Ac chelator. The analogues were then radiolabeled by employing the {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl technique. Binding affinity and internalization/externalization studies were performed in vitro in human prostate carcinoma PC-3 cells. Stability was investigated in vitro in human plasma and in vivo in Balb/c mice. Finally, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/X-ray computed tomography studies were performed in nude mice bearing PC-3 tumor xenografts. Results: PEGylation did not affect the binding affinity of BN analogues, as the binding affinity for BN{sub 2}/GRP receptors remained high (K{sub d}<0.9 nM). However, in vitro binding kinetics of the PEGylated analogues were slower. Steady-state condition was reached after 4 h, and the total cell binding was 10 times lower than that for the non-PEGylated counterpart. Besides, PEGylation improved the stability of BN conjugates in vitro and in vivo. The BN derivative conjugated with a PEG{sub 5} molecule showed the best pharmacokinetics in vivo, i.e., faster blood clearance and

  11. Evaluation of 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 as an agent for pancreas tumor detection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N. Carlesso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is important in oncology because of its high mortality rate. Deaths may be avoided if an early diagnosis could be achieved. Several types of tumors overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr, including pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, a radiolabeled peptide derivative of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP may be useful as a specific imaging probe. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 as an imaging probe for Capan-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Xenographic pancreatic tumor was developed in nude mice and characterized by histopathological analysis. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic images were carried out in tumor-bearing nude mice. The two methods showed higher uptake by pancreatic tumor when compared to muscle (used as control, and the tumor-to-muscle ratio indicated that 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 uptake was four-fold higher in tumor cells than in other tissues. Scintigraphic images also showed a clear signal at the tumor site. The present data indicate that 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 may be useful for the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  12. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} as an agent for pancreas tumor detection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlesso, F.N.; Fuscaldi, L.L.; Araujo, R.S.; Teixeira, C.S.; Oliveira, M.C.; Fernandes, S.O.A.; Cassali, G.D.; Reis, D.C.; Barros, A.L.B.; Cardoso, V.N., E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is important in oncology because of its high mortality rate. Deaths may be avoided if an early diagnosis could be achieved. Several types of tumors overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr), including pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, a radiolabeled peptide derivative of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) may be useful as a specific imaging probe. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} as an imaging probe for Capan-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Xenographic pancreatic tumor was developed in nude mice and characterized by histopathological analysis. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic images were carried out in tumor-bearing nude mice. The two methods showed higher uptake by pancreatic tumor when compared to muscle (used as control), and the tumor-to-muscle ratio indicated that {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} uptake was four-fold higher in tumor cells than in other tissues. Scintigraphic images also showed a clear signal at the tumor site. The present data indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} may be useful for the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (author)

  13. [Bombesin-mediated non-cholinergic late slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials in guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, De-Hu; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hong-Mei; Ke, Dao-Ping; Hu, Jin-Lan; Zhu, Yan; Huang, Zhen-Xin

    2003-08-25

    The effect of bombesin (BOM) on non-cholinergic excitatory synaptic transmission of the guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) was investigated by intracellular recording. Repetitive stimulation of the colon nerves (1 ms, 25 Hz, 4 s) elicited a burst of action potentials, which was followed by a long-lasting depolarization in 74.3% (52/70) of the IMG neurons. The depolarization was not blocked by nicotinic (d-tubocurarine, 100 micromol/L) and muscarinic (atropine, 1 micromol/L) antagonists, but was eliminated in a low Ca(2+)/high Mg(2+) Krebs solution, indicating that the depolarization was due to the release of non-cholinergic transmitters. Superfusing the ganglia with BOM (10 micromol/L, 1 min) induced a slow depolarization in 66.5% (109/164) neurons tested. The BOM response was not appreciably changed in low Ca(2+)/high Mg(2+) Krebs solution (n=6, P>0.05), suggesting that BOM depolarized the neurons by acting directly on the postsynaptic membrane rather than via a release of other endogenous depolarizing substances. In a total of 102 cells that exhibited late slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (ls-EPSP), superfusion of the ganglia with BOM produced a membrane depolarization in 82 neurons (80%), while the remaining 20 cells (20%) exhibited no response to BOM. In 18 neurons with ls-EPSP, 4 (22%) neurons were sensitive to both BOM and SP; 6 (33%) and 5 (28%) neurons were only sensitive to BOM and SP, respectively. The remaining 3 (17%) neurons were insensitive to both BOM and SP. Membrane resistance (Rm) had no apparent change in 47.3%, 59.5 % of the neurons tested during the ls-EPSP (n=55) and BOM depolarization (n=84), respectively, but had a marked decrease in 38.2%, 27.4%, and a marked increase in the remaining 14.5%, 13.1% of the neurons. However, when the Rm change accompanying ls-EPSP was compared with that accompanying BOM depolarization (n=20) in the same neuron, the changes in Rm were always parallel. Moreover, ls-EPSP (n=6) and BOM

  14. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor; Desenvolvimento de derivados da bombesina radiomarcados com lutecio-177: relacao estrutura e potencial diagnostico-terapeutico para tumor de prostata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-07-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly){sub n}-BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly){sub n} spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of

  15. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Joseph F; Neuman, Joshua C; Brill, Allison L; Brar, Harpreet K; Thompson, Mary F; Cadena, Mark T; Connors, Kelsey M; Busch, Rebecca A; Heneghan, Aaron F; Cham, Candace M; Jones, Elaina K; Kibbe, Carly R; Davis, Dawn B; Groblewski, Guy E; Kudsk, Kenneth A; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-09-15

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis.

  16. (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9: a novel radiofluorinated bombesin derivative for prostate cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghiasian, Maral; Liu, Zhibo; Pan, Jinhe; Zhang, Zhengxing; Colpo, Nadine; Lin, Kuo-Shyan; Perrin, David M; Bénard, François

    2015-04-01

    A novel radiofluorinated derivative of bombesin, (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9, was synthesized and evaluated for its potential to image prostate cancer by targeting the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR). AmBF3-MJ9 was prepared from an ammoniomethyl-trifluoroborate (AmBF3) conjugated alkyne 2 and azidoacetyl-MJ9 via a copper-catalyzed click reaction, and had good binding affinity for GRPR (Ki=0.5±0.1nM). The (18)F-labeling was performed via a facile one-step (18)F-(19)F isotope exchange reaction, and (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 was obtained in 23±5% (n=3) radiochemical yield in 25min with >99% radiochemical purity and 100±32GBq/μmol specific activity. (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 was stable in mouse plasma, and was partially (22-30%) internalized after binding to GRPR. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies in mice showed fast renal excretion and good uptake of (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 by GRPR-expressing pancreas and PC-3 prostate cancer xenografts. Tumor uptake was 1.37±0.25%ID/g at 1h, and 2.20±0.13%ID/g at 2h post-injection (p.i.) with low background uptake and excellent tumor visualization (tumor-to-muscle ratios of 75.4±5.5). These data suggest that (18)F-AmBF3-MJ9 is a promising PET tracer for imaging GRPR-expressing prostate cancers.

  17. Structures and bonding on a colloidal silver surface of the various length carboxyl terminal fragments of bombesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawka, Edyta; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Proniewicz, Leonard M

    2008-10-07

    Raman (RS) and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra (SERS) were measured for various length carboxyl terminal fragments (X-14 of amino acid sequence) of bombesin ( BN): BN13-14, BN12-14, BN11-14, BN10-14, BN9-14, and BN8-14 in silver colloidal solutions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of Raman wavenumbers and intensities with extended basis sets (B3LYP/6-31++G**) were performed with the aim of providing the definitive band allocations to the normal coordinates. The proposed band assignment is consistent with the assignment for similar compounds reported in the literature. The nonadsorbed and adsorbed molecular structures were deducted by detailed spectral analysis of the RS and SERS spectra, respectively. This analysis also allowed us to propose the particular surface geometry and orientation of these peptides on silver surface, and their specific interaction with the surface. For example, a SERS spectrum of BN8-14 indicates that the interaction of a thioether atom and Trp8 with the silver surface is favorable and may dictate the orientation and conformation of adsorbed peptide. One of the most prominent and common features in all of the fragments' SERS spectra is a approximately 692 cm (-1) band due to nu(C-S) accompanied by two or three bands of different C-S conformers for all, except BN8-14, which suggests that all of the above-mentioned compounds adsorb on the silver surface through the thioether atom and that the attachment of Trp8 produces limitation in a number of possible C-S conformers adopted on this surface. Our results also show clearly that His12 and CO do not interact with the colloid surface, which supports our earlier results.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman difference between bombesin and its modified analogues on the colloidal and electrochemically roughen silver surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podstawka, Edyta; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-10-01

    In this article, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of bombesin (BN) and its six modified analogues ([D-Phe(12)]BN, [Tyr(4)]BN, [Tyr(4),D-Phe(12)]BN, [D-Phe(12),Leu(14)]BN, [Leu(13)-(R)-Leu(14)]BN, and [Lys(3)]BN) on a colloidal silver surface are reported and compared with SERS spectra of these species immobilized onto an ellectrochemically roughen silver electrode. Changes in enhancement and wavenumber of proper bands upon adsorption on different silver surfaces are consistent with BN and its analogues adsorption primarily through Trp(8). Slightly different adsorption states of these molecules are observed depending upon natural amino acids substitution. For example, the indole ring in all the peptides interacts with silver nanoparticles in a edge-on orientation. It is additionally coordinated to the silver through the N(1)--H bond for all the peptides, except [Phe(12)]BN. This is in contrary to the results obtained for the silver roughen electrode that show direct but not strong N(1)--H/Ag interaction for all peptides except [D-Phe(12),Leu(14)]BN and [Leu(13)-(R)-Leu(14)]BN. For BN only C==O is not involved in the chemical coordination with the colloidal surface. [Lys(3)]BN and BN also adsorb with the C--N bond of NH(2) group normal and horizontal, respectively, to the colloidal surface, whereas C--NH(2) in other peptides is tilted to this surface. Also, the Trp(8) --CH(2)-- moiety of only [Tyr(4)]BN, [Lys(3)]BN, and [Tyr(4),D-Phe(12)]BN coordinates to Ag, whereas the Phe(12) ring of [Phe(12)]BN, [Tyr(4),D-Phe(12)]BN, and [D-Phe(12),Leu(14)]BN assists in the peptides binding only on the colloidal silver.

  19. A coupling of homology modeling with multiple molecular dynamics simulation for identifying representative conformation of GPCR structures: a case study on human bombesin receptor subtype-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowroozi, Amin; Shahlaei, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a computational pipeline was therefore devised to overcome homology modeling (HM) bottlenecks. The coupling of HM with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is useful in that it tackles the sampling deficiency of dynamics simulations by providing good-quality initial guesses for the native structure. Indeed, HM also relaxes the severe requirement of force fields to explore the huge conformational space of protein structures. In this study, the interaction between the human bombesin receptor subtype-3 and MK-5046 was investigated integrating HM, molecular docking, and MD simulations. To improve conformational sampling in typical MD simulations of GPCRs, as in other biomolecules, multiple trajectories with different initial conditions can be employed rather than a single long trajectory. Multiple MD simulations of human bombesin receptor subtype-3 with different initial atomic velocities are applied to sample conformations in the vicinity of the structure generated by HM. The backbone atom conformational space distribution of replicates is analyzed employing principal components analysis. As a result, the averages of structural and dynamic properties over the twenty-one trajectories differ significantly from those obtained from individual trajectories.

  20. Molecular markers derived from bombesin for tumor diagnosis by SPECT and PET; Marcadores moleculares derivados da bombesina para diagnostico de tumores por SPECT e PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2012-07-01

    A high number of molecules have already been identified to have high affinity to some receptors overexpressed on tumour cells and the radiolabelling of those molecules offers the possibility of new compounds for tumour diagnosis and therapy by nuclear medicine. Among of those molecules, bombesin (BBN) has become focus of interest, as its BB{sub 2} receptors are known to be overexpressed in prostate, breast, colon, pancreatic and lung tumour, as long as glioblastomas and neuroblastomas. BBN agonists and antagonists have already been described for this purpose and promising results were obtained in preclinical studies. However, most of them exhibited high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas and intestines, which can compromise diagnosis accuracy and cause serious adverse effects in therapy. In this context, the goal of the present work to radiolabel new BBN derivatives with {sup 11}1In and {sup 68}Ga and to evaluate their potential for BB{sub 2} positive tumors diagnosis by single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The structure of studied peptides was Q-YG{sub n}-BBN(6-14), where Q is the chelator, n is the number of glycine aminoacids in the spacer YG{sub n} and BBN(6-14) is the original bombesin sequence from the aminoacid 6 to 14. The derivative in which the last aminoacid (methionine, Met) was replaced by norleucine (Nle) was also evaluated. The experimental evaluation of the bombesin derivatives was divided into four steps: computational studies, molecular markers for SPECT, molecular markers for PET and toxicological studies. The theoretical partition (log P) and distribution (log D) coefficients were calculated for all bombesin derivatives conjugated to DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) chelators applying computational programmes. Bombesin derivatives for SPECT were developed by radiolabelling DTPA-conjugated bombesin derivatives with

  1. Molecular markers derived from bombesin for tumor diagnosis by SPECT and PET; Marcadores moleculares derivados da bombesina para diagnostico de tumores por SPECT e PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2012-07-01

    A high number of molecules have already been identified to have high affinity to some receptors overexpressed on tumour cells and the radiolabelling of those molecules offers the possibility of new compounds for tumour diagnosis and therapy by nuclear medicine. Among of those molecules, bombesin (BBN) has become focus of interest, as its BB{sub 2} receptors are known to be overexpressed in prostate, breast, colon, pancreatic and lung tumour, as long as glioblastomas and neuroblastomas. BBN agonists and antagonists have already been described for this purpose and promising results were obtained in preclinical studies. However, most of them exhibited high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas and intestines, which can compromise diagnosis accuracy and cause serious adverse effects in therapy. In this context, the goal of the present work to radiolabel new BBN derivatives with {sup 11}1In and {sup 68}Ga and to evaluate their potential for BB{sub 2} positive tumors diagnosis by single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The structure of studied peptides was Q-YG{sub n}-BBN(6-14), where Q is the chelator, n is the number of glycine aminoacids in the spacer YG{sub n} and BBN(6-14) is the original bombesin sequence from the aminoacid 6 to 14. The derivative in which the last aminoacid (methionine, Met) was replaced by norleucine (Nle) was also evaluated. The experimental evaluation of the bombesin derivatives was divided into four steps: computational studies, molecular markers for SPECT, molecular markers for PET and toxicological studies. The theoretical partition (log P) and distribution (log D) coefficients were calculated for all bombesin derivatives conjugated to DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) and DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid) chelators applying computational programmes. Bombesin derivatives for SPECT were developed by radiolabelling DTPA-conjugated bombesin derivatives with

  2. BLOCKADE OF ROSTRAL VENTROLATERAL MEDULLA (RVLM BOMBESIN RECEPTOR TYPE 1 DECREASES BLOOD PRESSURE AND SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY IN ANESTHETIZED SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabella Silva De Jesus Pinto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available IIntrathecal injection of bombesin (BBS promoted hypertensive and sympathoexcitatory effects in normotensive (NT rats. However, the involvement of rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM in these responses is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated: (1 the effects of BBS injected bilaterally into RVLM on cardiorespiratory and sympathetic activity in NT and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; (2 the contribution of RVLM bombesin type 1 receptors (BB1 to the maintenance of hypertension in SHR. Urethane-anesthetized rats (1.2 g · kg−1, i.v. were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure (MAP, diaphragm (DIA motor and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA. In NT rats and SHR, BBS (0.3 mM nanoinjected into RVLM increased MAP (33.9 ± 6.6 mmHg and 37.1 ± 4.5 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.05 and RSNA (97.8 ± 12.9 % and 84.5 ± 18.1 %, respectively; p < 0.05. In SHR, BBS also increased DIA burst amplitude (115.3 ± 22.7 %; p < 0.05. BB1 receptors antagonist (BIM-23127; 3 mM reduced MAP (-19.9 ± 4.4 mmHg; p < 0.05 and RSNA (-17.7 ± 3.8 %; p < 0.05 in SHR, but not in NT rats (-2.5 ± 2.8 mmHg; -2.7 ± 5.6 %, respectively. These results show that BBS can evoke sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses by activating RVLM BB1 receptors. This pathway might be involved in the maintenance of high levels of arterial blood pressure in SHR.

  3. Ameliorative effects of bombesin and neurotensin on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid-induced colitis, oxidative damage and apoptosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of bombesin (BBS) and neurotensin (NTS) on apoptosis and colitis in an ulcerative colitis model. METHODS: In this study, a total of 50 rats were divided equally into 5 groups. In the control group, no colitis induction or drug administration was performed. Colitis was induced in all other groups. Following the induction of colitis, BBS, NTS or both were applied to three groups of rats. The remaining group (colitis group) received no treatment. On the 11th d after induction of colitis and drug treatment, blood samples were collected for TNF-α and IL-6 level studies. Malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and caspase-3 activities, as well as histopathological findings, evaluated in colonic tissues. RESULTS: According to the macroscopic and microscopic findings, the study groups treated with BBS,NTS and BBS+NTS showed significantly lower damage and inflammation compared with the colitis group (macroscopic score,2.1±0.87,3.7±0.94 and 2.1±0.87 vs 7.3 ± 0.94; microscopic score,2.0 ±0.66,3.3±0.82 and 1.8±0.63 vs 5.2±0.78,P<0.01=.TNF-αand IL-6 levels were increased significantly in all groups compared with the control group. These increases were significantly smaller in the BBS,NTS and BBS+NTS groups compared with the colitis group (TNF-α levels,169.69±53.56,245.86±64.85 and 175.54 4±42.19vs 556.44±49.82; IL-6 levels,443.30±53.99,612.80±70.39 and 396.80±78.43 vs 1505.90±222.23,P<0.05=.The colonic MPO and MDA levels were significantly lower in control, BBS, NTS and BBS+NTS groups than in the colitis group (MPO levels,24.36±8.10,40.51±8.67 and 25.83±6.43 vs 161.47±38.24; MDA levels,4.70±1.41,6.55±1.12 and 4.51±0.54 vs15.60±1.88,P<0.05=.Carbonyl content and caspase-3 levels were higher in the colitis and NTS groups than in control, BBS and BBS+NTS groups (carbonyl levels,553.99±59.58and 336.26±35.72 vs 209.76±30.92,219.76±25.77and 220.34 36.95; caspase-3 levels,451.70±68.27and 216.20

  4. Progress of radiolabelled bombesin in diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer%放射性核素标记铃蟾肽在前列腺癌诊治中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢岩; 赵晋华

    2010-01-01

    前列腺癌等多种肿瘤细胞表面能过度表达铃蟾肽受体,因此,铃蟾肽及其受体可以作为靶点进行放射性核素受体显像及靶向治疗肿瘤,并成为近年来诊治前列腺癌的研究热点.该文综述了放射性核素标记铃蟾肽在前列腺癌显像及治疗方面的研究进展.%Studies show that high expression of bombesin exist in the face of many kind of tumors such as prostate cancer, so bombesin and its receptor can be used as target in radionuclide receptor imaging and targeted therapy of tumor, and become the focus of prostate cancer research. This article reviews the progress of radiolabelled bombesin in prostate cancer imaging and therapy.

  5. Biokinetics and dosimetry of {sup 99m} Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-bombesin in humans: imaging of GRP receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C.L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy, C.A de [INCMNSZ, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Cardena, E.; Pichardo R, P. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Oncologia Centro Medico Siglo XXI, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is over-expressed on various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently we reported the {sup 99-}mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-Bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN) complex as a new radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-receptor binding and rapid internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN biokinetics and dosimetry in 5-healthy and 3-breast cancer women. Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source' organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 8 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN time activity curves in each organ, to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with predominantly renal excretion and minimal hepatobiliary elimination. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in breast cancer lesions and well differentiated from GRP-r expression in lungs and airways with normal GRP-r density (ratio 3:1). The equivalent doses for a study using 370 MBq were 7.38{+-}1.68, 0.59{+-}0.08, 2.07{+-}0.60, 0.58{+-}0.1, 0.75{+-}0.09 and 0.43{+-}0.07 mSv for kidneys, liver, lungs, ovaries, pancreas and red marrow respectively. The effective dose was 1.64{+-}0.25 mSv which is comparable with the doses known for most of the {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical studies in nuclear medicine. (Author)

  6. Pyrazolyl conjugates of bombesin: a new tridentate ligand framework for the stabilization of fac-[M(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Susana; Correia, Joao D.G.; Santos, Isabel [Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Veerendra, Bhadrasetty [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Sieckman, Gary L. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Hoffman, Timothy J. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Rold, Tammy L. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Figueroa, Said Daibes [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Retzloff, Lauren [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); McCrate, Joseph [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Prasanphanich, Adam [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Smith, Charles J. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[University of Missouri Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]|[Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States)]|[Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)]. E-mail: smithcj@health.missouri.edu

    2006-07-15

    We have described the synthesis of tridentate pyrazolyl ligand frameworks for coordination to the fac-[*M(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} metal fragment (*M={sup 186/188}Re or {sup 99m}Tc). These ligands impart a degree of kinetic inertness on the metal center, warranting their study in biological systems. We herein report in vitro/in vivo radiolabeling investigations of a new series of pyrazolyl bombesin (BBN) conjugates radiolabeled via the Isolink kit. These new conjugates are based on the general structure [{sup 99m}Tc-pyrazolyl-X-BBN[7-14]NH{sub 2}], where X={beta}-alanine, serylserylserine or glycylglycylglycine. The pyrazolyl ligand is a tridentate ligand framework that coordinates the metal center through nitrogen donor atoms. The results of these investigations demonstrate the ability of these new conjugates to specifically target the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor subtype 2, which is overexpressed on human prostate PC-3 cancerous tissues. Therefore, these studies suggest the tridentate pyrazolyl ligand framework to be an ideal candidate for the design and development of low-valent {sup 99m}Tc-based diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals based on BBN or other targeting vectors.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of Bombesin-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as a targeted contrast agent for imaging of breast cancer using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Atefeh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Farjami Shayesteh, Saber; Heidari, Zahra; Bitarafan Rajabi, Ahmad; Boustani, Komail; Nahardani, Ali

    2015-02-01

    The targeted delivery of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent may facilitate their accumulation in cancer cells and enhance the sensitivity of MR imaging. In this study, SPIONs coated with dextran (DSPIONs) were conjugated with bombesin (BBN) to produce a targeting contrast agent for detection of breast cancer using MRI. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer analyses indicated the formation of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with an average size of 6.0 ± 0.5 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the conjugation of the BBN with the DSPIONs. A stability study proved the high optical stability of DSPION-BBN in human blood serum. DSPION-BBN biocompatibility was confirmed by cytotoxicity evaluation. A binding study showed the targeting ability of DSPION-BBN to bind to T47D breast cancer cells overexpressing gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors. T2-weighted and T2*-weighted color map MR images were acquired. The MRI study indicated that the DSPION-BBN possessed good diagnostic ability as a GRP-specific contrast agent, with appropriate signal reduction in T2*-weighted color map MR images in mice with breast tumors.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of Lys{sup 1}(α, γ-Folate)Lys{sup 3}({sup 177}Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin(1-14) as a potential theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda L, L.; Ferro F, G.; Azorin V, E.; Ramirez, F. M.; Ocampo G, B.; Santos C, C.; Jimenez M, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Issac O, K. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Lutetium-177 labeled hetero bivalent molecules that interact with different targets on tumor cells have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of this work was to synthesize Lys{sup 1} (α,γ-Folate)-Lys{sup 3}({sup 177}Lu-DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) ({sup 177}LuFolate-Bn), as well as to assess its in vitro and in vivo potential for molecular imaging and targeted radiotherapy of breast tumors expressing folate receptors (Fr) and gastrin releasing peptide receptors (GRPR). Lys{sup 1} Lys{sup 3} (DOTA)-Bombesin (1-14) was conjugated to the terminal carboxylic group of the folic acid and the product purified by size-exclusion HPLC. Chemical characterization was carried out by UV-vis, Ft-IR spectroscopies and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. {sup 177}Lu labeling was performed by reaction of {sup 177}LuCl{sub 3} with the Lys{sup 1} (α,γ-Folate)-Lys{sup 3} (DOTA)-Bombesin (Folate-Bn) conjugate. In vitro binding studies were carried out in T47D breast cancer cells (positive to Fr and GRPR). Biokinetic studies and micro-SPECT/CT images were obtained using athymic mice with T47D induced tumors. Spectroscopic studies and HPLC analyses indicated that the conjugate was obtained with high chemical and radiochemical purity (98 ± 1.3%). T47D-tumors were clearly visible with high contrast at 2 h after radiopharmaceutical administration. The {sup 177}Lu-absorbed dose delivered to tumors was 23.9 ± 2.1 Gy (74 MBq, intravenously administered) {sup 177}Lu-Folate-Bn demonstrated properties suitable as a theranostic radiopharmaceutical for breast tumors expressing Fr s and GRPR s. (Author)

  9. Bombesin receptors and transplanted stem cells in rat brain: High-resolution scan with 99mTc BN1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopinaro, F.; Paschali, E.; Di Santo, G.; Antonellis, T.; Massari, R.; Trotta, C.; Gourni, H.; Bouziotis, P.; David, V.; Soluri, A.; Varvarigou, A. D.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this work is to detect the presence of transplanted stem cells (TSC) in rat brain with high-resolution (HR) scintigraphy and labelled bombesin (BN). BN is a morphogen for Central Nervous System (CNS) as well as for other organs: CNS-oriented TSC over-express BN Receptors (BNR). BN is also a neurotransmitter and modulates several functions of CNS. 99mTc labelled BN-like peptide scan of CNS is the ideal method to detect growing TSC once knowing normal distribution of BNRs in CNS. HR Planar and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) images of rat brain were performed with new HR detectors (Li-tech, Italy). Pertechnetate, 99mTc HMPAO and the new 99mTc BN1.1 (patented) were i.v. administered in five rats. HR SPECT of 99mTc BN1.1 detected olfactory tract, fronto-lateral cortex, cerebellum, basal ganglia and amygdale. Results of SPECT were confirmed by bio-distribution study performed after autopsy of three of the five rats. The remaining two rats underwent cerebral lesions followed by transplant of TSC. Three months later, HR scintigraphy was repeated and showed images completely different from previous basal study, with hot spot of 99mTc BN1.1 corresponding to the site of TSC transplant. Immuno-histochemistry confirmed the presence of viable TSC. Not only 99mTc BN1.1 HR scan showed viability of transplanted TSC but also the "background brain" was the still now unknown map of BNR in mammalian brain.

  10. Study of the optical and dosimetric properties of the nano conjugate {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-GGC-Au Np-Bombesin by effect of nano particle size; Estudio de las propiedades opticas y dosimetricas del nanoconjugado {sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-GGC-AUNP-Bombesina por efecto del tamano de nanoparticula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza S, A. N.

    2011-07-01

    The receptors over-expressed on the surface of cancer cells represent promising targets for breast cancer diagnosis or therapy. The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-r) is a seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor that is over-expressed on primary prostate and breast cancer and lymph node metastases. Bombesin (Bn) is a tetradeca peptide that binds with high affinity to GRP-r. The strong, specific Bn-GRP-r binding is the basis for labelling Bn with radionuclides (i.e. {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 18}F) to obtain molecular images. The aim of this work was to develop 3 multifunctional systems of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled gold nanoparticles (Au Np) (5, 10 and 20 nm) conjugated to Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin for GRP-receptor targeting in breast cancer. The systems were characterized by Tem and UV-Vis, IR, Raman, Fluorescence and XP spectroscopy. The {sup 99m}Tc-Au Np-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin multifunctional system (20 nm) shows in vitro and in vivo specific recognition for GRP-r and suitable properties to be used as a nuclear molecular imaging agent. Results also showed a specific Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin binding to the gold surface and higher fluorescence intensity for the 20 nm system. The Nir bands observed in the 20 nm radio conjugate indicate potential for bio imaging as dual systems. (Author)

  11. The Effect of Mini-PEG-Based Spacer Length on Binding and Pharmacokinetic Properties of a 68Ga-Labeled NOTA-Conjugated Antagonistic Analog of Bombesin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Varasteh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The overexpression of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in cancer can be used for peptide-receptor mediated radionuclide imaging and therapy. We have previously shown that an antagonist analog of bombesin RM26 conjugated to 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N',N''-triacetic acid (NOTA via a diethyleneglycol (PEG2 spacer (NOTA-PEG2-RM26 and labeled with 68Ga can be used for imaging of GRPR-expressing tumors. In this study, we evaluated if a variation of mini-PEG spacer length can be used for optimization of targeting properties of the NOTA-conjugated RM26. A series of analogs with different PEG-length (n = 2, 3, 4, 6 was synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The IC50 values of natGa-NOTA-PEGn-RM26 (n = 2, 3, 4, 6 were 3.1 ± 0.2, 3.9 ± 0.3, 5.4 ± 0.4 and 5.8 ± 0.3 nM, respectively. In normal mice all conjugates demonstrated similar biodistribution pattern, however 68Ga-NOTA-PEG3-RM26 showed lower liver uptake. Biodistribution of 68Ga-NOTA-PEG3-RM26 was evaluated in nude mice bearing PC-3 (prostate cancer and BT-474 (breast cancer xenografts. High uptake in tumors (4.6 ± 0.6%ID/g and 2.8 ± 0.4%ID/g for PC-3 and BT-474 xenografts, respectively and high tumor-to-background ratios (tumor/blood of 44 ± 12 and 42 ± 5 for PC-3 and BT-474 xenografts, respectively were found already at 2 h p.i. of 68Ga-NOTA-PEG3-RM26. Results of this study suggest that variation in the length of the PEG spacer can be used for optimization of targeting properties of peptide-chelator conjugates. However, the influence of the mini-PEG length on biodistribution is minor when di-, tri-, tetra- and hexaethylene glycol are compared.

  12. Optimization of the production process of hybrid and multivalent formulation Bombesin/RGD for the opportune detection of breast cancer; Optimizacion del proceso de fabricacion de la formulacion hibrida y multivalente Bombesina/RGD para la deteccion oportuna de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robles M, M.

    2013-07-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals of third generation are used in nuclear medicine to obtain images of specific molecular targets, and they are unique in their capacity to detect in vivo specific biochemical sites as receptors that are over-expressed in diverse illness. In cancer cells several types of receptors are over-expressed, as the integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) that specifically recognize the sequence RGD (Arginine-Glycin-Ac. Aspartic) and gastrin-releasing peptide that recognizes specifically to the peptide Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin. The integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) are involved in the tumor angio genesis processes and the gastrin-releasing peptide is over-expressed in breast and prostate cancer. The molecular recognition of the specific receptors is the basis to be utilized as targets of the radiopharmaceuticals {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Bombesin and {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-RGD. In this work was developed a lyophilized pharmaceutical formulation effective, stable and safe for the simultaneous obtaining of the radiopharmaceuticals {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin) and {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-RGD ({sup 99m}Tc EDDA/HYNIC-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}). Later on the production process of the product HYNIC-Bombesin/RGD-Sn was optimized using a factorial design and the formulation was transferred to the production plant of radiopharmaceuticals of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The optimized formulation is described in the following chart: HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-Bombesin - 12.5 μg; HYNIC-E-c[RGDfK]{sub 2} - 12.5 μg; Stannous chloride (SnCl{sub 2}) - 20 μg; Ethylenediamine diacetic acid (EDDA) - 10 mg; N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl glycin (Tricine) - 20 mg; Mannitol - 50 mg. The production process was validated and were carried out the stability studies under refrigeration conditions. (Author)

  13. P物质与蛙皮素对豚鼠交感神经节慢突触传递的影响%Effect of substance P and bombesin on slow synaptic transmission in sympathetic ganglia of guinea-pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳; 柯道平; 孔德虎; 潘昱

    2005-01-01

    目的探讨p物质(substance P,SP)、蛙皮素(bombesin,BOM)对豚鼠离体肠系膜下神经节(inferiormesenteric ganglion,IMG)非胆碱能迟慢兴奋性突触后电位(late slow-excitatory postsynaptic potential,ls-EPSP)的影响.方法玻璃微电极细胞内记录技术,观察细胞的膜电位变化、ls-EPSP的幅度和时程.结果刺激突触前神经在IMG细胞上引起ls-EPSP,灌流SP和BOM后分别引起的去极化与ls-EPSP具有相关性;SP受体脱敏使Sp敏感细胞的ls-EPSP减弱或消失,但不影响BOM引起的去极化;BOM受体脱敏使BOM敏感细胞的ls-EPSP减弱或消失,但不影响SP引起的去极化.结论P物质、蛙皮素通过IMG细胞膜上相应受体参与了ls-EPSP的形成,受体间无交互脱敏现象.

  14. Biokinetics and dosimetry in patients of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesin: images of GRP receptors; Biocinetica y dosimetria en humanos de {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-Bombesina: imagenes de receptores GRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos C, C. L. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The bombesin (BN) receptor subtype 2 (GRP-r) is expressed in several normal human tissues and is over-expressed in various human tumors including breast, prostate, small cell lung and pancreatic cancer. Recently [{sup 99m}Tc]EDDA/HYNIC-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin ({sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN) was reported as a radiopharmaceutical with high stability in human serum, specific cell GRP-r binding and rapid cell internalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN to image GRP-r and to assess the radiopharmaceutical biokinetics and dosimetry in 4 breast cancer patients and in 7 healthy women. Methods: Whole-body images were acquired at 20, 90, 180 min and 24 h after {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN administration. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn around source organs on each time frame. The same set of ROIs was used for all 11 scans and the cpm of each ROI was converted to activity using the conjugate view counting method. The image sequence was used to extrapolate {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN time-activity curves in each organ in order to calculate the total number of disintegrations (N) that occurred in the source regions, according with MIRD methodology. N data were the input for the OLINDA/EXM code to calculate internal radiation dose estimates. Results: Images showed a rapid radiopharmaceutical blood clearance with renal excretion as predominant route. {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-BN exhibited high in vivo affinity for GRP-r over-expression successfully visualized in cancer mammary glands and well differentiated from the ubiquitous GRP-r expression in normal breast, lungs and airways. There was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) in the radiation absorbed doses between cancer patients and healthy women. The average equivalent doses (n=11) for a study using 740 MBq were 24.8 +- 8.8 mSv (kidneys), 7.3 +- 1.8 mSv (lungs), 6.5 +- 4.0 mSv (breast) 2.0 +- 0.3 mSv (pancreas), 1.6 +- 0.3 mSv (liver), 1.2 +- 0.2 mSv (ovaries) and 1.0 +- 0.2 mSv (red

  15. Research Progress of Bombesin Receptor Subtype-3 in Lung Diseases%蛙皮素受体亚型-3在肺疾病中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王悦; 石晓灏; 邱国华

    2013-01-01

    Bombesin Receptor Subtype-3 (BRS-3) is a G Protein-coupled receptor and the natural lig-and for BRS-3 remains unknown to date. BRS-3 has been shown to elicit extensive biological effects, including regulations of neuroendocrine, energy metabolism and cell proliferation. BRS-3 is found in rodents and mammals. Very low levels of expression are detected in majority of normal tissues including lung tissue, but high levels in some pulmonary diseases and fetal lung. Here we review the literature pertaining to the characteristics of BRS-3, signal transduction mechanisms when activated, and connections with lung cancer, lung development and chronic inflammatory lung diseases.%蛙皮素受体亚型-3(BRS-3)属G蛋白偶联受体,至今未发现天然配体.BRS-3具有广泛的生物学作用,可调控神经内分泌功能、能量代谢及细胞生长增殖.在啮齿类动物及哺乳动物体内都有分布,大多数组织表达水平很低(包括正常肺组织),但在某些肺部疾病及胎肺中表达增加.就BRS-3受体特点、激活后信号转导机制及其与肺肿瘤、肺发育、慢性炎症性肺病的联系作一综述.

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of Alexa Fluor 680-bombesin[7-14]NH2 peptide conjugate, a high-affinity fluorescent probe with high selectivity for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping; Veerendra, Bhadrasetty; Rold, Tammy L; Retzloff, Lauren; Prasanphanich, Adam; Sieckman, Gary; Hoffman, Timothy J; Volkert, Wynn A; Smith, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors are overexpressed on several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. Bombesin (BBN), a 14-amino acid peptide that is an analogue of human GRP, binds to GRP receptors with very high affinity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a new fluorescent probe based on BBN having high tumor uptake and optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of human breast cancer tissue. In this study, solid-phase peptide synthesis was used to produce H(2)N-glycylglycylglycine-BBN[7-14]NH(2) peptide with the following general sequence: H(2)N-G-G-G-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH(2)). This conjugate was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectra. The fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) conjugate was prepared by reaction of Alexa Fluor 680 succinimidyl ester to H(2)N-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in dimethylformamide (DMF). In vitro competitive binding assays, using (125)I-Tyr(4)-BBN as the radiolabeling gold standard, demonstrated an inhibitory concentration 50% value of 7.7 +/- 1.4 nM in human T-47D breast cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in human T-47D breast cancer cells indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of the fluorescent bioprobe in vitro. In vivo investigations in SCID mice bearing xenografted T-47D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new conjugate to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectivity and affinity.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Alexa Fluor 680-Bombesin[7–14]NH2 Peptide Conjugate, a High-Affinity Fluorescent Probe with High Selectivity for the Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Ma

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP receptors are overexpressed on several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. Bombesin (BBN, a 14–amino acid peptide that is an analogue of human GRP, binds to GRP receptors with very high affinity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a new fluorescent probe based on BBN having high tumor uptake and optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of human breast cancer tissue. In this study, solid-phase peptide synthesis was used to produce H2N-glycylglycylglycine-BBN[7–14]NH2 peptide with the following general sequence: H2N-G-G-G-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2. This conjugate was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectra. The fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7–14]NH2 conjugate was prepared by reaction of Alexa Fluor 680 succinimidyl ester to H2N-G-G-G-BBN[7–14]NH2 in dimethylformamide (DMF. In vitro competitive binding assays, using 125I-Tyr4-BBN as the radiolabeling gold standard, demonstrated an inhibitory concentration 50% value of 7.7 ± 1.4 nM in human T-47D breast cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7–14]NH2 in human T-47D breast cancer cells indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of the fluorescent bioprobe in vitro. In vivo investigations in SCID mice bearing xenografted T-47D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new conjugate to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectivity and affinity.

  18. Optimization, biological evaluation and microPET imaging of copper-64-labeled bombesin agonists, [{sup 64}Cu-NO2A-(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}], in a prostate tumor xenografted mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Stephanie R., E-mail: srlf36@mail.missouri.ed [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nanda, Prasanta [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Rold, Tammy L. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Sieckman, Gary L. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Figueroa, Said D. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Hoffman, Timothy J. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); The Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Jurisson, Silvia S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Smith, Charles J., E-mail: smithcj@health.missouri.ed [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); University of Missouri Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); The Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr) are a member of the bombesin (BBN) receptor family. GRPr are expressed in high numbers on specific human cancers, including human prostate cancer. Therefore, copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) radiolabeled BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2} conjugates could have potential for diagnosis of human prostate cancer via positron-emission tomography (PET). The aim of this study was to produce [{sup 64}Cu-NO2A-(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}] conjugates for prostate cancer imaging, where X=pharmacokinetic modifier (beta-alanine, 5-aminovaleric acid, 6-aminohexanoic acid, 8-aminooctanoic acid, 9-aminonanoic acid or para-aminobenzoic acid) and NO2A=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetic acid [a derivative of NOTA (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid)]. Methods: [(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}] Conjugates were synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS), after which NOTA was added via manual conjugation. The new peptide conjugates were radiolabeled with {sup 64}Cu radionuclide. The receptor-binding affinity was determined in human prostate PC-3 cells, and tumor-targeting efficacy was determined in PC-3 tumor-bearing severely combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Whole-body maximum intensity microPET/CT images of PC-3 tumor-bearing SCID mice were obtained 18 h postinjection (pi). Results: Competitive binding assays in PC-3 cells indicated high receptor-binding affinity for the [NO2A-(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}] and [{sup nat}Cu-NO2A-(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}] conjugates. In vivo biodistribution studies of the [{sup 64}Cu-NO2A-(X)-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}] conjugates at 1, 4 and 24 h pi showed very high uptake of the tracer in GRPr-positive tissue with little accumulation and retention in nontarget tissues. High-quality, high-contrast microPET images were obtained, with xenografted tumors being clearly visible at 18 h pi. Conclusions: NO2A chelator sufficiently stabilizes copper(II) radiometal under in vivo conditions, producing conjugates with very high uptake and retention in

  19. 铃蟾肽、P物质受体脱敏对迟慢兴奋性突触后电位的影响%The effect of seperate desensitization of substance P and bombesin receptor on ls-EPSP in neurons of guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯道平; 孔德虎; 王刚; 祝延; 黄振信

    2003-01-01

    目的:探讨豚鼠肠系膜下神经节(IMG)细胞铃蟾肽(bombesin,Bom)、P物质(substance P,SP)受体间相互作用及对迟慢兴奋性突触后电位(ls-EPSP)的影响.方法:离体细胞内记录,并观察细胞的去极化、ls-EPSP的时程、幅度.结果:SP受体脱敏可使SP敏感细胞的ls-EPSP阻抑,但对Bom去极化无影响;Bom受体脱敏可使Bom敏感细胞的ls-EPSP阻抑,但对SP受体去极化无影响.结论:Bom、SP可通过各自的突触后膜受体形成ls-EPSP,无交互脱敏现象.

  20. 铃蟾肽介导的豚鼠肠系膜下神经节非胆碱能迟慢兴奋性突触后电位%Bombesin-mediated non-cholinergic late slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials in guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔德虎; 王刚; 王宏梅; 柯道平; 胡金兰; 祝延; 黄振信

    2003-01-01

    应用细胞内记录技术, 对铃蟾肽(bombesin, BOM)在豚鼠离体肠系膜下神经节(inferior mesenteric ganglion, IMG)非胆碱能兴奋性突触传递中的作用进行了研究.重复电刺激突触前结肠神经, 有74.3% (52/70) IMG细胞可诱发迟慢兴奋性突触后电位(ls-EPSP).在可引出ls-EPSP 的细胞中, 22% (4/18)细胞同时对BOM和SP敏感.用BOM持续灌流IMG, 可明显抑制对BOM敏感细胞的ls-EPSP, 对BOM不敏感细胞的ls-EPSP则无影响, 且BOM受体与SP受体间无交叉脱敏.BOM受体阻断剂tyr4[D-phe12]bombesin能明显可逆性地抑制BOM敏感细胞的ls-EPSP和去极化, 但对BOM不敏感细胞则无影响.研究结果提示, BOM可能是介导豚鼠IMG 细胞ls-EPSP的一种递质.

  1. Bombesin-like peptide mediates lung injury in a baboon model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunday, ME; Yoder, BA; Cuttitta, F; Haley, KJ; Emanuel, RL

    1998-01-01

    The etiology of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease of infants surviving respiratory distress syndrome, remains fundamentally enigmatic. BPD is decreasing in severity but continues to be a major problem in pediatric medicine, being especially prevalent among very premature infan

  2. Gene : CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 X A Bombesin receptors BRS3_MOUSE 0.0 100% ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus... musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| ...bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI0696...3.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus...] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 ref|NP_001009215.1| bombesin receptor subtype 3 [Ovis aries] sp|O...97967|BRS3_SHEEP RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAD19639.1| bombesin receptor sub...type 3 [Ovis aries] gb|AAD19642.1| bombesin receptor subtype 3 [Ovis aries] NP_001009215.1 1e-110 84% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 0.0 96% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1457 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1457 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 1e-107 55% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 1e-70 95% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 0.0 89% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3530 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3530 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 1e-142 64% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-04-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-04-0014 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 1e-156 68% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0505 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0505 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 1e-96 69% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 0.0 86% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-39-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-39-0035 ref|NP_001028074.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Macaca mulatta] sp|Q6H2Y3|BRS3_MACMU Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAR07972.1| bombesin-like receptor subtype 3 [Macaca mulatta] NP_001028074.1 0.0 88% ...

  13. InterProScan Result: NM_001134240 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134240 NM_001134240_1_ORF2 8F7EFB5ECDE1E93B PANTHER PTHR19264:SF239 BOMBESIN ...RECEPTOR 6e-157 T IPR001556 Bombesin receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|Bi

  14. InterProScan Result: NM_001134239 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134239 NM_001134239_3_ORF2 9C6209F61E5A8E68 PANTHER PTHR19264:SF239 BOMBESIN ...RECEPTOR 2.2e-147 T IPR001556 Bombesin receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 85% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-04-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-04-0014 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 1e-156 69% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2213 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-2213 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 1e-149 66% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-24-0058 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-24-0058 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 99% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-21-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-21-0045 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 96% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2691 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2691 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 2e-66 88% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0612 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0612 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1435 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1435 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0977 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0977 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 100% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1008 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0451 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0451 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 89% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0505 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0505 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 5e-99 70% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0489 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0489 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0931 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0931 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 91% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 86% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 2e-71 95% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0305 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0305 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 1e-138 62% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0733 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0733 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1772 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1772 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 86% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1571 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1571 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 86% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-1671 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-1671 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-07-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-07-0000 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 1e-149 67% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-39-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-39-0035 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 89% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0161 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0161 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2764 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-2764 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OGAR-01-1270 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OGAR-01-1270 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 1e-174 91% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-01-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-01-0050 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 9.2 23% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-24-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-24-0043 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P32247|BRS3_HUMAN Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombes...in receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombesin-like receptor... 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic construct] NP_001718.1 0.0 99% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1508 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1508 ref|NP_001718.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] sp|P3224...7|BRS3_HUMAN RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 gb|AAA35604.1| bombesin receptor subtype...-3 [Homo sapiens] emb|CAA54031.1| uterine bombesin receptor [Homo sapiens] emb|CAB10731.1| bombesin-like rec...eptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAT79496.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW88470.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Homo sapiens] gb|AAI52939.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [synthetic const

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-20-0026 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 100% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0612 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0612 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 82% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0302 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 1e-104 81% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2691 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2691 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 5e-65 86% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-21-0045 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-21-0045 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 85% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0451 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0451 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 84% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-23-0062 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 85% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-24-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-24-0043 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 85% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-1277 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 5e-70 93% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1435 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1435 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 87% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-21-0248 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 96% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0977 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0977 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 85% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0733 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0733 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 2e-89 79% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OGAR-01-1270 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OGAR-01-1270 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 1e-169 89% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1031 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 86% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1457 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1457 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 1e-107 56% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1772 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1772 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 83% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0161 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0161 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 85% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2764 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-2764 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 87% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1008 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1008 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O5479...8|BRS3_MOUSE RecName: Full=Bombesin receptor subtype-3; Short=BRS-3 dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtyp...e-3 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like recep...tor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 1e-172 78% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1571 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1571 ref|NP_033896.2| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] sp|O54798|BRS3_MOUSE Bombes...in receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) dbj|BAA24404.1| bombesin receptor subtype-3 [Mus musculus] ...dbj|BAC30064.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06963.1| Bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAI06962.1| Bombes...in-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25500.1| bombesin...-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL42160.1| bombesin-like receptor 3 [Mus musculus] NP_033896.2 0.0 84% ...

  8. Imaging Primary Prostate Cancer and Bone Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    AAPM 48th Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, July 2006 Zhang X, Cao F, Cai W, Schreibmann E, Wu Y, Wu JC, Xing L, Chen X. 18F-Labeled Bombesin...147– 155 . 3. Chung DH, Evers BM, Beauchamp RD, et al. Bombesin stimulates growth of human gastrinoma. Surgery. 1992;112:1059–1065. 4. Glover SC

  9. InterProScan Result: NM_001134239 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134239 NM_001134239_3_ORF2 9C6209F61E5A8E68 PRINTS PR00358 BOMBESINR 4.4e-05 T IPR001556 Bombes...in receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|Biological Process

  10. InterProScan Result: NM_001134240 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134240 NM_001134240_1_ORF2 8F7EFB5ECDE1E93B PRINTS PR00358 BOMBESINR 1.2e-06 T IPR001556 Bombes...in receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|Biological Process

  11. InterProScan Result: NM_001134239 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134239 NM_001134239_3_ORF2 9C6209F61E5A8E68 PRINTS PR00358 BOMBESINR 4.4e-05 T IPR001556 Bombe...sin receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|Biological Process

  12. InterProScan Result: NM_001134240 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NM_001134240 NM_001134240_1_ORF2 8F7EFB5ECDE1E93B PRINTS PR00358 BOMBESINR 1.2e-06 T IPR001556 Bombe...sin receptor Molecular Function: bombesin receptor activity (GO:0004946)|Biological Process

  13. Cholecystokinin receptor antagonism by peptidergic and non-peptidergic agents in rat pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, A; Jaworek, J; Konturek, P K; Konturek, S J; Warzecha, Z

    1989-01-01

    1. Graded doses of bombesin infused I.V. into conscious rats with chronic pancreatic fistulae induced a dose-dependent stimulation of protein secretion, similar to that obtained with caerulein. This stimulation does not appear to be mediated by cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors because peptidergic (CR-1409) and non-peptidergic (L-364718) CCK antagonists failed to affect protein secretion at a dose range which caused almost complete suppression of caerulein-induced pancreatic secretion. 2. Studies in vitro on isolated rat pancreatic acini revealed that caerulein, pentagastrin and bombesin all showed the same efficacy in their ability to stimulate amylase release. In contrast, CCK antagonists competitively inhibited amylase release induced by caerulein and pentagastrin but not by bombesin or urecholine, indicating that the latter two agents act directly on acinar cells via receptors which are separate from those involved in stimulation induced by caerulein and pentagastrin. 3. DNA synthesis, measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA, was significantly stimulated by caerulein, soybean trypsin inhibitor (FOY 305), pentagastrin and by bombesin in a dose-dependent manner. CCK receptor antagonists prevented stimulation of DNA synthesis induced by caerulein, FOY 305 and pentagastrin but not by bombesin. 4. This study indicates that bombesin strongly stimulates pancreatic enzyme secretion, with an efficacy similar to that of caerulein, and also exerts a potent growth-promoting action on the pancreas, both effects appearing to be mediated by mechanisms independent of the CCK receptors. PMID:2614728

  14. 豚鼠交感神经节非胆碱能迟慢兴奋性突触后电位与蛙皮素、P物质的关系%The Relationship between Non-cholinergic, Late Slow-excitatory Postsynaptic Potential and Bombesin or Substance P in Sympathetic Ganglia of Guinea-pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳; 柯道平; 孔德虎

    2005-01-01

    运用玻璃微电极细胞内记录技术,观察豚鼠(Cavia porcellus)离体肠系膜下神经节(IMG)细胞非胆碱能迟慢兴奋性突触后电位(ls-EPSP)与蛙皮素(BOM)、P物质(SP)的关系,以探讨肽类神经递质在外周神经系统中的作用.结果显示,SP去极化、BOM去极化与ls-EPSP具有相关性;SP受体脱敏使SP敏感细胞的ls-EPSP减弱或消失,但不影响BOM引起的去极化;BOM受体脱敏使BOM敏感细胞的ls-EPSP减弱或消失,但不影响SP引起的去极化.大部分ls-EPSP阳性细胞对SP、BOM敏感,而对SP、BOM均不敏感的细胞多数不出现ls-EPSP.结果提示,BOM、SP通过IMG细胞膜上相应受体参与了ls-EPSP的形成,受体间无交互脱敏现象.

  15. Comparison of two peptide radiotracers for prostate carcinoma targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bluma Linkowski Faintuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Scintigraphy is generally not the first choice treatment for prostate cancer, although successful studies using bombesin analog radiopeptides have been performed. Recently, a novel peptide obtained using a phage display library demonstrated an affinity for prostate tumor cells. The aim of this study was to compare the use of a bombesin analog to that of a phage display library peptide (DUP-1 radiolabeled with technetium-99m for the treatment of prostate carcinoma. The peptides were first conjugated to S-acetyl-MAG3 with a 6-carbon spacer, namely aminohexanoic acid. METHODS: The technetium-99m labeling required a sodium tartrate buffer. Radiochemical evaluation was performed using ITLC and was confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The coefficient partition was determined, and in vitro studies were performed using human prostate tumor cells. Biodistribution was evaluated in healthy animals at various time points and also in mice bearing tumors. RESULTS: The radiochemical purity of both radiotracers was greater than 95%. The DUP-1 tracer was more hydrophilic (log P = -2.41 than the bombesin tracer (log P = -0.39. The biodistribution evaluation confirmed this hydrophilicity by revealing the greater kidney uptake of DUP-1. The bombesin concentration in the pancreas was greater than that of DUP-1 due to specific gastrin-releasing peptide receptors. Bombesin internalization occurred for 78.32% of the total binding in tumor cells. The DUP-1 tracer showed very low binding to tumor cells during the in vitro evaluation, although tumor uptake for both tracers was similar. The tumors were primarily blocked by DUP1 and the bombesin radiotracer primarily targeted the pancreas. CONCLUSION: Further studies with the radiolabeled DUP-1 peptide are recommended. With further structural changes, this molecule could become an efficient alternative tracer for prostate tumor diagnosis.

  16. Coexistence of neuropeptides in hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1983-01-01

    Using a technique for simultaneous visualisation of two antigens in one section, oxytocin-like immunoreactivity has been found to coexist with bombesin-like immunoreactivity in neurons of the basal disk, gastric region and tentacles of hydra. Neurons with oxytocin-like immunoreactivity in peduncle...... and hypostome, on the other hand, have little or no bombesin-like material. Oxytocin-like immunoreactivity never coexists with FMRFamide-immunoreactivity. The neurons with oxytocin- and FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity, however, are often found to be closely intermingled. The results show that coexistence...

  17. Mechanisms of Radiosensitization by the Neurotensin Receptor Antagonist SR48692 in Prostate Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    normal prostate gland , regulating prostatic growth, differentiation and secretion. However, clusters of NE-like cells are also found in most prostate...factors, including parathyroid hormone-related peptides, serotonin, calcitonin, bombesin- related peptide, and neurotensin, that enhance DNA synthesis...adrenal gland or within the tumor itself (autocrine stimulation). The relationship between NT, androgen, and their respective receptors is complex

  18. Physiological function of gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin B receptors in regulating itch scratching behavior in the spinal cord of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devki D Sukhtankar

    Full Text Available Pruritus (itch is a severe side effect associated with the use of drugs as well as hepatic and hematological disorders. Previous studies in rodents suggest that bombesin receptor subtypes i.e. receptors for gastrin-releasing peptide (GRPr and neuromedin B (NMBr differentially regulate itch scratching. However, to what degree spinal GRPr and NMBr regulate scratching evoked by intrathecally administered bombesin-related peptides is not known. The first aim of this study was to pharmacologically compare the dose-response curves for scratching induced by intrathecally administered bombesin-related peptides versus morphine, which is known to elicit itch in humans. The second aim was to determine if spinal GRPr and NMBr selectively or generally mediate scratching behavior. Mice received intrathecal injection of bombesin (0.01-0.3 nmol, GRP (0.01-0.3 nmol, NMB (0.1-1 nmol or morphine (0.3-3 nmol and were observed for one hour for scratching activity. Bombesin elicited most profound scratching over one hour followed by GRP and NMB, whereas morphine failed to evoke scratching response indicating the insensitivity of mouse models to intrathecal opioid-induced itch. Intrathecal pretreatment with GRPr antagonist RC-3095 (0.03-0.1 nmol produced a parallel rightward shift in the dose response curve of GRP-induced scratching but not NMB-induced scratching. Similarly, PD168368 (1-3 nmol only attenuated NMB but not GRP-induced scratching. Individual or co-administration of RC-3095 and PD168368 failed to alter bombesin-evoked scratching. A higher dose of RC-3095 (0.3 nmol generally suppressed scratching induced by all three peptides but also compromised motor function in the rotarod test. Together, these data indicate that spinal GRPr and NMBr independently drive itch neurotransmission in mice and may not mediate bombesin-induced scratching. GRPr antagonists at functionally receptor-selective doses only block spinal GRP-elicited scratching but the suppression of

  19. Neuropeptide-induced androgen independence in prostate cancer cells: roles of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases Etk/Bmx, Src, and focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L F; Guan, J; Qiu, Y; Kung, H J

    2001-12-01

    The bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) family of neuropeptides has been implicated in various in vitro and in vivo models of human malignancies including prostate cancers. It was previously shown that bombesin and/or neurotensin (NT) acts as a survival and migratory factor(s) for androgen-independent prostate cancers. However, a role in the transition from an androgen-dependent to -refractory state has not been addressed. In this study, we investigate the biological effects and signal pathways of bombesin and NT on LNCaP, a prostate cancer cell line which requires androgen for growth. We show that both neurotrophic factors can induce LNCaP growth in the absence of androgen. Concurrent transactivation of reporter genes driven by the prostate-specific antigen promoter or a promoter carrying an androgen-responsive element (ARE) indicate that growth stimulation is accompanied by androgen receptor (AR) activation. Furthermore, neurotrophic factor-induced gene activation was also present in PC3 cells transfected with the AR but not in the parental line which lacks the AR. Given that bombesin does not directly bind to the AR and is known to engage a G-protein-coupled receptor, we investigated downstream signaling events that could possibly interact with the AR pathway. We found that three nonreceptor tyrosine kinases, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Src, and Etk/BMX play important parts in this process. Etk/Bmx activation requires FAK and Src and is critical for neurotrophic factor-induced growth, as LNCaP cells transfected with a dominant-negative Etk/BMX fail to respond to bombesin. Etk's activation requires FAK, Src, but not phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Likewise, bombesin-induced AR activation is inhibited by the dominant-negative mutant of either Src or FAK. Thus, in addition to defining a new G-protein pathway, this report makes the following points regarding prostate cancer. (i) Neurotrophic factors can activate the AR, thus circumventing the normal growth

  20. Towards cancer cell-specific phototoxic organometallic rhenium(I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidova, Anna; Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Heier, Jakob; Ferrari, Stefano; Gasser, Gilles

    2014-03-21

    Over the recent years, several Re(I) organometallic compounds have been shown to be toxic to various cancer cell lines. However, these compounds lacked sufficient selectivity towards cancer tissues to be used as novel chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we probe the potential of two known N,N-bis(quinolinoyl) Re(I) tricarbonyl complex derivatives, namely Re(I) tricarbonyl [N,N-bis(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-4-butane-1-amine (Re-NH₂) and Re(I) tricarbonyl [N,N-bis(quinolin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-5-valeric acid (Re-COOH), as photodynamic therapy (PDT) photosensitizers. Re-NH₂ and Re-COOH proved to be excellent singlet oxygen generators in a lipophilic environment with quantum yields of about 75%. Furthermore, we envisaged to improve the selectivity of Re-COOH via conjugation to two types of peptides, namely a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and a derivative of the neuropeptide bombesin, to form Re-NLS and Re-Bombesin, respectively. Fluorescent microscopy on cervical cancer cells (HeLa) showed that the conjugation of Re-COOH to NLS significantly enhanced the compound's accumulation into the cell nucleus and more specifically into its nucleoli. Importantly, in view of PDT applications, the cytotoxicity of the Re complexes and their bioconjugates increased significantly upon light irradiation. In particular, Re-Bombesin was found to be at least 20-fold more toxic after light irradiation. DNA photo-cleavage studies demonstrated that all compounds damaged DNA via singlet oxygen and, to a minor extent, superoxide production.

  1. Pancreatic acinar cells: effects of micro-ionophoretic polypeptide application on membrane potential and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, O H; Philpott, H G

    1979-05-01

    1. Acinar cell membrane potential and resistance were measured from superfused segments of mouse pancreas, in vitro, using intracellular glass micro-electrodes. One or two extracellular micropipettes containing caerulein, bombesin nonapeptide (Bn) or acetylcholine (ACh) were placed near to the surface of the impaled acinus. The secretagogues were ejected rapidly from the micropipettes by ionophoresis.2. Each secretagogue evoked a similar electrical response from the impaled acinar cell: membrane depolarization and a simultaneous reduction in input resistance. The duration of cell activation from caerulein ionophoresis was longer than that observed for ACh and Bn. The cell response to the peptide hormone applications could be repeated in the presence of atropine.3. The minimum interval before the onset of cell depolarization after caerulein ionophoresis was determined. Values ranged between 500 and 1000 msec. The minimum latencies after Bn ionophoresis were 500-1400 msec.4. With two electrodes inserted into electrically coupled acinar cells, direct measurements of the caerulein and Bn null potentials were made. At high negative membrane potentials an enhanced depolarization was evoked by caerulein ionophoresis. At low negative membrane potentials the caerulein stimulation produced a diminished depolarization, and at membrane potentials less than - 10 mV acinar cell hyperpolarizations were observed. A similar series of responses was obtained in experiments where Bn ionophoresis was used. The caerulein and the Bn null potentials were always contained within - 10 to - 15 mV.5. The results describe the almost identical electrical response of acinar cells to stimulation by ACh, caerulein and bombesin. All three secretagogues have similar null potentials and latencies of activation on acinar cells. The bombesin latency responses appear as short as those measured for caerulein and provide electro-physiological evidence that Bn acts directly on acinar cells. The findings

  2. Epidermal growth factor inhibits hormone- and fibroblast growth factor-induced activation of phospholipase C in rat pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjek-Kaminska, D; Piiper, A; Caspary, W F; Zeuzem, S

    1995-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits cholecystokinin-octapeptide-stimulated amylase release and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (1,4,5-IP3) production in isolated rat pancreatic acini. In the present study, pancreatic acini were used to investigate the effect of EGF on amylase release and 1,4,5-IP3 production induced by secretagogues that activate either phospholipase C-beta (carbachol, bombesin) or phospholipase C-gamma [basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)]. The results show that EGF (100 ng/ml) inhibited bombesin (0.1 nM-1 microM)-induced amylase release almost completely. Similarly, the effect of EGF on carbachol-stimulated amylase release was substantial at submaximal (0.1 microM: 44% inhibition), maximal (1 microM: 75% inhibition), and supramaximal (100 microM: 33% inhibition) carbachol concentrations. EGF reduced amylase release at submaximal bFGF concentrations (0.1 nM: 40% inhibition), but not at supramaximal bFGF concentrations (1 and 10 nM). EGF decreased the peak increase of 1,4,5-IP3 in response to bombesin and carbachol (5 s after beginning of the incubation) and bFGF (15 s after beginning of the incubation) by 81 +/- 19%, 65 +/- 15%, and 56 +/- 18%, respectively. Receptor binding characteristics for secretagogues that activate phospholipase C were not influenced by coincubation with EGF excluding heterologous transmembrane receptor modulation. These results suggest that EGF inhibits the action of phospholipase C-beta- and gamma-isoenzyme-activating secretagogues in the exocrine pancreas by a postreceptor mechanism.

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-21-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-21-0006 ref|NP_005305.1| gastrin-releasing peptide receptor [Homo sapiens...] sp|P30550|GRPR_HUMAN Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) (GRP-preferring bombesin receptor) gb|AAA88050.1| gastrin releasing... peptide receptor gb|AAB27329.1| gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, GRP receptor=b...ng peptide receptor [Homo sapiens] gb|AAH74733.1| Gastrin-releasing peptide recepto...r [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW98909.1| gastrin-releasing peptide receptor [Homo sapiens] NP_005305.1 0.0 98% ...

  4. Central nervous system action of peptides to influence gastrointestinal motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taché, Y; Garrick, T; Raybould, H

    1990-02-01

    The central action of peptides to influence GI motility in experimental animals is summarized in Table 1. TRH stimulates gastric, intestinal, and colonic contractility in rats and in several experimental species. A number of peptides including calcitonin, CGRP, neurotensin, NPY, and mu opioid peptides act centrally to induce a fasted MMC pattern of intestinal motility in fed animals while GRF and substance P shorten its duration. The dorsal vagal complex is site of action for TRH-, bombesin-, and somatostatin-induced stimulation of gastric contractility, and for CCK-, oxytocin- and substance P-induced decrease in gastric contractions or intraluminal pressure. The mechanisms through which TRH, bombesin, calcitonin, neurotensin, CCK, and oxytocin alter GI motility are vagally mediated. An involvement of central peptidergic neurons in the regulation of gut motility has recently been demonstrated in Aplysia, indicating that such regulatory mechanisms are important in the phylogenesis. Alterations of the pattern of GI motor activity are associated with functional changes in transit. TRH is so far the only centrally acting peptide stimulating simultaneously gastric, intestinal, and colonic transit in various animals species. Opioid peptides acting on mu receptor subtypes in the brain exert the opposite effect and inhibit concomitantly gastric, intestinal, and colonic transit. Bombesin and CRF were found to act centrally to inhibit gastric and intestinal transit and to stimulate colonic transit in the rat. The antitransit effect of calcitonin and CGRP is limited to the stomach and small intestine. The delay in GI transit is associated with reduced GI contractility for most of the peptides except central bombesin that increases GI motility. Nothing is known about brain sites through which these peptides act to alter gastric emptying and colonic transit. Regarding brain sites influencing intestinal transit, TRH-induced stimulation of intestinal transit in the rat is

  5. An immunocytochemical and ultrastructural study of the larval anterior intestine of the frog Rana temporaria, with especial reference to endocrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegas, M E; Villaro, A C; Burrell, M A; Rovira, J; Valverde, E; Ortiz De Zárate, A; Sesma, P

    1997-10-01

    Endocrine cells of the larval intestine of Rana temporaria tadpoles have been identified by argyrophilic, immunocytochemical and electron-microscopical techniques. Scarce endocrine cells have been found in both the short non-absorptive zone immediately following the stomach, and in the rest of the anterior intestine. Endocrine cells are frequently seen to extend a cytoplasmic process towards the lumen. Immunoreactivity for serotonin, somatostatin, bombesin and cholecystokinin-8 has been detected. According to the ultrastructural traits of the endocrine granules, three larval intestinal endocrine populations have been differentiated.

  6. FMRFamide immunoreactivity in the nervous system of the medusa Polyorchis penicillatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Spencer, A N

    1984-01-01

    Three different antisera to the molluscan neuropeptide Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-amide (FMRFamide) and two different antisera to the fragment RFamide were used to stain sections or whole mounts of the hydrozoan medusa Polyorchis penicillatus. All antisera stained the same neuronal structures. Strong immuno...... with several antisera to oxytocin/vasopressin and bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide. The morphology and location of most FMRFamide-immunoreactive neurons in Polyorchis coincides with two identified neuronal systems, which have been recently discovered from neurophysiological studies....

  7. Mechanisms of peptide YY release induced by an intraduodenal meal in rats: neural regulation by proximal gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Cheng, X; Anini, Y; Chariot, J; Castex, N; Galmiche, J P; Rozé, C

    1997-03-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) release in anaesthetized rats was studied during the 2 h following the intraduodenal administration of a semi-liquid meal of 21 kJ. Surgical and pharmacological manipulations were performed in order to analyse the mechanisms of PYY release. Postprandial PYY release was suppressed or strongly decreased by caecocolonectomy, truncal vagotomy, tetrodotoxin, hexamethonium, sensory denervation by perivagal capsaicin, and by the NO-synthase inhibitor L-N-arginine methyl ester, while atropine, adrenergic blockers, antagonists of type-A or type-B cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors or bombesin receptors had no effect. Comparing the digestive transit of the semi-liquid meal with the amount of PYY contained in the small bowel wall showed that nutrients had not reached the area rich in cells containing PYY by 30 min, the time at which there was a large PYY release in plasma. By 120 min, the meal front had travelled 72% of the small intestine length, just beginning to reach the PYY-rich part of the ileum. We conclude that the main postprandial PYY release studied in this model comes from ileal and colonic L-cells indirectly stimulated through a neural mechanism originating in the proximal gut and involving sensory vagal fibres, nicotinic synapses and NO release, while CCK and bombesin do not seem to be physiologically involved.

  8. Improving the stability of peptidic radiotracers by the introduction of artificial scaffolds: which structure element is most useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Lisa; Fischer, Gabriel; Litau, Shanna; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Wängler, Björn; Baller, Marko; Wängler, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Peptidic radiotracers are highly potent substances for the specific in vivo imaging of various biological targets with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Positron Emission Tomography. However, some radiolabeled peptides such as bombesin analogs were shown to exhibit only a limited stability, hampering a successful target visualization. One option to positively influence the stability of radiolabeled peptides is the introduction of certain artificial molecular scaffolds. In order to comparatively assess the influence of different structure elements on the stability of radiolabeled peptides and to identify those structure elements being most useful for peptide radiotracer stabilization, several monomeric and dimeric bombesin derivatives were synthesized, exhibiting differing molecular designs and the chelator NODAGA for (68) Ga-labeling. The radiolabeled peptides were evaluated regarding their in vitro stability in human serum to determine the influence of the introduced molecular scaffolds on the peptides' serum stabilities. The results of the evaluations showed that the introduction of scaffold structures and the overall molecular design have a substantial impact on the stabilities of the resulting peptidic radiotracers. But besides some general trends found using certain scaffold structures, the obtained results point to the necessity to empirically assess their influence on stability for each susceptible peptidic radiotracer individually.

  9. Bronchial carcinoid tumors metastatic to the sella turcica and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkin, Olga; Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Soares, Mark; Coire, Claire; Smyth, Harley S; Goth, Miklos; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-06-01

    We review here the literature on neuroendocrine neoplasms metastatic to the pituitary and present an example of the disease. Metastasis of bronchial carcinoid tumors to the sellar region are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with constant cough and headaches. She had previously been operated for carcinoid tumor of the lung. During the preoperative investigation, a CT scan of the head revealed a sellar mass. Six months after a left lower lobectomy, the sellar lesion was removed by transsphenoidal surgery. The two tumors were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Both showed identical morphologic features, those of carcinoid tumor. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactivity for the endocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin, as well as CD-56, serotonin, bombesin and vascular endothelial growth factor. The sellar neoplasm showed nuclear immunopositivity for thyroid transcription factor-1, supporting the diagnosis of a metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumor. In conclusion, this is the first report of a serotonin- and bombesin-immunopositive atypical bronchial carcinoid tumor metastatic to the sella.

  10. Influence of breast feeding on blood level of gastrointestinal hormone in preterm infants%母乳喂养对早产新生儿血胃肠激素水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓莹; 孙建华; 李菁; 步军; 谢恩萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the influence of breast feeding on the blood level of gastrointestinal hormone in preterm infants. Methods Radio-immunoassay was used to detect the blood levels of gastrin and bombesin of 27 cases ( experimental group ) with breast feeding at 3rd, 7th and 14th day of enteral feeding. Another 33 preterm infants fed with formula milk were taken as control group. Meanwhile the blood levels of gastrin and bombesin at 3rd and 7th day after delivery were detected. Results The levels of gastrin and bombesin of infants with breast feeding were higher on the 3rd day than those on the 7th day after delivery ( t = 6. 526, P = 0. 000; t = 2. 222,P =0. 042 ). Within 2 weeks of enteral feeding, the blood level of gastrin in experimental group had no significant change( F =0. 335,P =0. 722 ), but that of bombesin was descending( F = 5.060,P =0. 021 )and it descended significantly on the 14th day ( F =7. 932,P =0. 009 ). However, in the control group the blood level of gastrin was increasing( F = 5. 147,P =0. 015 ), and that on the 7th day was obviously higher than that on the 3rd day ( F = 5. 126, P < 0. 05 ). The blood level of bombesin had no significant change( F = 1. 147,P =0. 334 ). Conclusion The blood levels of gastrin and bombesin in preterm infants with breast feeding are relatively high, and they are descending within 1 week after delivery. The change tendency of the blood levels of gastrin and bombesin is different between the experimental group and the control group, and it needs further study.%目的 探讨母乳喂养对早产新生儿血胃肠激素水平的影响.方法 采用放射免疫法测定27例母乳喂养早产儿(实验组)肠内喂养第3天、7天及14天时餐前血清胃泌素、血浆蛙皮素浓度,并以33例早产配方奶粉喂养早产儿作为对照组;同时测定分娩后第3天、7天早产母乳胃泌素、蛙皮素浓度.结果 分娩后第3天早产母乳胃泌素、蛙皮素浓度均高于分娩后第7天(t=6

  11. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  12. Involvement of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase signalling pathway in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert-Gangneux F.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about signalling in Toxoplasma gondii, but it is likely that protein kinases might play a key role in the parasite proliferation, differentiation and probably invasion. We previously characterized Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinases in T. gondii lysates. In this study, cultured cells were tested for their susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii infection after tachyzoite pretreatment with drugs interfering with AMP kinase activation pathways. Protein kinases inhibitors, i.e. genistein, R031-8220 and PD098059, reduced tachyzoite infectivity by 38 ± 4.5 %, 85.5 ± 9 % and 56 ± 10 %, respectively. Conversely, protein kinases activators, i.e. bombesin and PMA, markedly increased infectivity (by 202 ± 37 % and 258 ± 14 %, respectively. These results suggest that signalling pathways involving PKC and AAAP kinases play a role in host cell invasion by Toxoplasma.

  13. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Sophia Wisser

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK, bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY, as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP. Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  14. Interactions of Gastrointestinal Peptides: Ghrelin and Its Anorexigenic Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite. PMID:20798884

  15. Neuroendocrine diffuse system of the respiratory tract of Rana temporaria: an immunocytochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodegas, M E; Montuenga, L M; Sesma, P

    1995-11-01

    The neuroendocrine cell population of the respiratory system of Rana temporaria has been studied by means of immunocytochemical methods at the light-microscopic level. Isolated or clustered endocrine cells have been found in the epithelium of the buccal cavity, glottis, larynx, and lung. Nine different types of endocrine isolated cell types can be distinguished according to their immunoreactivity to several regulatory peptides [calcitonin, substance P, bombesin, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), cholecystokinin (CCK), and endothelin 1] and neuroendocrine markers (7B2, chromogranin, and serotonin). Neuroepithelial bodies are innervated clusters of cells simultaneously immunoreactive for serotonin and 7B2. Nerves and/or neurons have been detected in different regions of the respiratory system using antibodies against protein gene product 9.5, serotonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P, PHI, helodermin, and CCK.

  16. An electron microscopic study on VIP-, BOM- and CCK-like immunoreactive terminals in the celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaji, M; Kawai, Y; Kawashima, Y; Tohyama, M

    1989-05-29

    The distribution and fine structure were studied of the following 3 peptide-containing fibers of enteric origin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), bombesin (BOM) and cholecystokinin (CCK)-like immunoreactive peptide in the celiac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex (CMG) of the guinea pig. These peptides, especially VIP, were distributed more densely on the mesenteric side than on the celiac side of the CMG, and their distribution shared a similar mosaic pattern. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that the fibers formed synaptic contacts with the proximal dendrites of the principal ganglion cells, however, the profiles of these synaptic junctions differed between fibers. Those containing VIP or CCK formed symmetrical synapses, while those containing BOM formed assymetrical ones. This suggests that there are some functional differences between these enterofugal fibers in the CMG.

  17. Interactions of gastrointestinal peptides: ghrelin and its anorexigenic antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Habbel, Piet; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F; Mönnikes, Hubert; Kobelt, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Food intake behaviour and energy homeostasis are strongly regulated by a complex system of humoral factors and nerval structures constituting the brain-gut-axis. To date the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting peptide that stimulates food intake is ghrelin, which is mainly synthesized in the stomach. Recent data indicate that the orexigenic effect of ghrelin might be influenced by other gastrointestinal peptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), bombesin, desacyl ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), as well as glucagon-like peptide (GLP). Therefore, we will review on the interactions of ghrelin with several gastrointestinal factors known to be involved in appetite regulation in order to elucidate the interdependency of peripheral orexigenic and anorexigenic peptides in the control of appetite.

  18. Radiolabeled Peptides: Valuable Tools for the Detection and Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fani, H. R. Maecke, S. M. Okarvi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human cancer cells overexpress many peptide receptors as molecular targets. Radiolabeled peptides that bind with high affinity and specificity to the receptors on tumor cells hold great potential for both diagnostic imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy. The advantage of solid-phase peptide synthesis, the availability of different chelating agents and prosthetic groups and bioconjugation techniques permit the facile preparation of a wide variety of peptide-based targeting molecules with diverse biological and tumor targeting properties. Some of these peptides, including somatostatin, bombesin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin, neurotensin, exendin and RGD are currently under investigation. It is anticipated that in the near future many of these peptides may find applications in nuclear oncology. This article presents recent developments in the field of small peptides, and their applications in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  19. Radiolabelled peptides for tumour therapy: current status and future directions. Plenary lecture at the EANM 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Marion de; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Valkema, Roelf; Krenning, Eric P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, L2, Erasmus MC, 3015 GD, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2003-03-01

    On their plasma membranes, cells express receptor proteins with high affinity for regulatory peptides, such as somatostatin. Changes in the density of these receptors during disease, e.g. overexpression in many tumours, provide the basis for new imaging methods. The first peptide analogues successfully applied for visualisation of receptor-positive tumours were radiolabelled somatostatin analogues. The next step was to label these analogues with therapeutic radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Results from preclinical and clinical multicentre studies have already shown an effective therapeutic response when using radiolabelled somatostatin analogues to treat receptor-positive tumours. Infusion of positively charged amino acids reduces kidney uptake, enlarging the therapeutic window. For PRRT of CCK-B receptor-positive tumours, such as medullary thyroid carcinoma, radiolabelled minigastrin analogues are currently being successfully applied. The combination of different therapy modalities holds interest as a means of improving the clinical therapeutic effects of radiolabelled peptides. The combination of different radionuclides, such as {sup 177}Lu- and {sup 90}Y-labelled somatostatin analogues, to reach a wider tumour region of high curability, has been described. A variety of other peptide-based radioligands, such as bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues, receptors for which are expressed on common cancers such as prostate and breast cancer, are currently under development and in different phases of (pre)clinical investigation. Multi-receptor tumour targeting using the combination of bombesin and NPY(Y{sub 1}) analogues is promising for scintigraphy and PRRT of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  20. An analysis of cosecretion and coexpression of gut hormones from male rat proximal and distal small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Berit; Pedersen, Jens; Albrechtsen, Nicolai Jacob Wewer; Hartmann, Bolette; Toräng, Signe; Rehfeld, Jens F; Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-03-01

    Gut endocrine cells are generally thought to have distinct localization and secretory products. Recent studies suggested that the cells are highly related and have potential to express more than one hormone. We studied the coexpression and cosecretion of gut hormones in separate segments of rat small intestine. We measured secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), neurotensin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin (CCK) from proximal and distal half of the small intestine, isolated from male rats and perfused ex vivo. Hormone secretion was stimulated by bombesin, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, and peptones. Furthermore, tissue samples collected along the intestine were analyzed for expression, hormone content, and cell densities including colocalization. Most hormones responded to all three stimuli (but no GIP response to bombesin). GLP-1 secretion was similar from proximal and distal intestine, whereas PYY was secreted only from the distal half. CCK and GIP were mainly secreted proximally, whereas neurotensin was equally secreted from both parts. Cell densities, hormone concentrations, and expression patterns were generally parallel, with increasing values distally for GLP-1 and PYY, an exclusively proximal pattern for CCK, even distribution for neurotensin and GIP except for the most distal segments. PYY nearly always colocalized with GLP-1. Approximately 20% of GLP-1 cells colocalized with CCK and neurotensin, whereas GLP-1/GIP colocalization was rare. Our findings indicate that two L cell types exist, a proximal one secreting GLP-1 (and possibly CCK and neurotensin), and a distal one secreting GLP-1 and PYY. GIP seems to be secreted from cells that are not cosecreting other peptides.

  1. Gene expression accurately distinguishes liver metastases of small bowel and pancreas neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Scott K; Maxwell, Jessica E; Carr, Jennifer C; Wang, Donghong; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Sue O'Dorisio, M; O'Dorisio, Thomas M; Howe, James R

    2014-12-01

    Small bowel (SBNETs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) often present with liver metastases. Although liver biopsy establishes a neuroendocrine diagnosis, the primary tumor site is frequently unknown without exploratory surgery. Gene expression differences in metastases may distinguish primary SBNETs and PNETs. This study sought to determine expression differences of four genes in neuroendocrine metastases and to create a gene expression algorithm to distinguish the primary site. Nodal and liver metastases from SBNETs and PNETs (n = 136) were collected at surgery under an Institutional Review Board-approved protocol. Quantitative PCR measured expression of bombesin-like receptor-3, opioid receptor kappa-1, oxytocin receptor, and secretin receptor in metastases. Logistic regression models defined an algorithm predicting the primary tumor site. Models were developed on a training set of 21 nodal metastases and performance was validated on an independent set of nodal and liver metastases. Expression of all four genes was significantly different in SBNET compared to PNET metastases. The optimal model employed expression of bombesin-like receptor-3 and opioid receptor kappa-1. When these genes did not amplify, the algorithm used oxytocin receptor and secretin receptor expression, which allowed classification of all 136 metastases with 94.1 % accuracy. In the independent liver metastasis validation set, 52/56 (92.9 %) were correctly classified. Positive predictive values were 92.5 % for SBNETs and 93.8 % for PNETs. This validated algorithm accurately distinguishes SBNET and PNET metastases based on their expression of four genes. High accuracy in liver metastases demonstrates applicability to the clinical setting. Studies assessing this algorithm's utility in prospective clinical decision-making are warranted.

  2. The Nutrient-Responsive Hormone CCHamide-2 Controls Growth by Regulating Insulin-like Peptides in the Brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of growth with nutritional status is essential for proper development and physiology. Nutritional information is mostly perceived by peripheral organs before being relayed to the brain, which modulates physiological responses. Hormonal signaling ensures this organ-to-organ communication, and the failure of endocrine regulation in humans can cause diseases including obesity and diabetes. In Drosophila melanogaster, the fat body (adipose tissue has been suggested to play an important role in coupling growth with nutritional status. Here, we show that the peripheral tissue-derived peptide hormone CCHamide-2 (CCHa2 acts as a nutrient-dependent regulator of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (Dilps. A BAC-based transgenic reporter revealed strong expression of CCHa2 receptor (CCHa2-R in insulin-producing cells (IPCs in the brain. Calcium imaging of brain explants and IPC-specific CCHa2-R knockdown demonstrated that peripheral-tissue derived CCHa2 directly activates IPCs. Interestingly, genetic disruption of either CCHa2 or CCHa2-R caused almost identical defects in larval growth and developmental timing. Consistent with these phenotypes, the expression of dilp5, and the release of both Dilp2 and Dilp5, were severely reduced. Furthermore, transcription of CCHa2 is altered in response to nutritional levels, particularly of glucose. These findings demonstrate that CCHa2 and CCHa2-R form a direct link between peripheral tissues and the brain, and that this pathway is essential for the coordination of systemic growth with nutritional availability. A mammalian homologue of CCHa2-R, Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (Brs3, is an orphan receptor that is expressed in the islet β-cells; however, the role of Brs3 in insulin regulation remains elusive. Our genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that bombesin receptor signaling with its endogenous ligand promotes insulin production.

  3. Neurotransmitters and putative neuromodulators in the gut of Anguilla anguilla (L.. Localizations in the enteric nervous and endocrine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Veggetti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gut of silver eels (Anguilla anguilla L. was investigated in order to describe both the cholinergic and adrenergic intramural innervations, and the localization of possible accessory neuromediators. Histochemical reactions for the demonstration of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form-(NADPH-diaphorase and acetylcholinesterese (AChEase were performed, as well as the immunohistochemical testing of tyrosine hydroxylase, met-enkephalin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, bombesin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, neuropeptide Y (NPY, somatostatin, cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK-8, serotonin, cholineacetyltransferase. The results evidenced a different pattern in comparison with other vertebrates, namely mammals, and with other fish. Both NADPH-diaphorase and AChEase activities were histochemically detected all along the gut in the myenteric plexus, the inner musculature and the propria-submucosa. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was observed in the intestinal tract only, both in the myenteric plexus and in the inner musculature. Several neuropeptides (metenkephalin, CGRP, bombesin, substance P, VIP, NPY, somatostatin were, in addition, detected in the intramural innervation; some of them also in epithelial cells of the diffuse endocrine system (met-enkephalin, substance P, NPY, somatostatin. Serotonin was only present in endocrine cells. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in localizations to those of similar NADPHdiaphorase- reactivity, and in the same nerve bundles in which substance P- and CGRP-likeimmunoreactivities were detectable in the intestinal tract. In addition, NADPH-diaphorase-reactive neurons showed an anatomical relationship with AChEase-reactive nerve terminals, and a similar relationship existed between the latter and substance P-like immunoreactivity.

  4. Diagnostic criteria and follow-up in neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivianne Calheiros Chaves Gomes

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI is a form of childhood interstitial lung disease characterized by tachypnea, retractions, crackles, and hypoxia. The aim of this study was to report and discuss the clinical, imaging, and histopathological findings in a series of NEHI cases at a tertiary pediatric hospital, with an emphasis on diagnostic criteria and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Between 2003 and 2011, 12 full-term infants were diagnosed with NEHI, based on clinical and tomographic findings. Those infants were followed for 1-91 months. Four infants were biopsied, and the histopathological specimens were stained with bombesin antibody. RESULTS: In this case series, symptoms appeared at birth in 6 infants and by 3 months of age in the remaining 6. In all of the cases, NEHI was associated with acute respiratory infection. The most common initial chest HRCT findings were ground-glass opacities that were in the middle lobe/lingula in 12 patients and in other medullary areas in 10. Air trapping was the second most common finding, being observed in 7 patients. Follow-up HRCT scans (performed in 10 patients revealed normal results in 1 patient and improvement in 9. The biopsy findings were nonspecific, and the staining was positive for bombesin in all samples. Confirmation of NEHI was primarily based on clinical and tomographic findings. Symptoms improved during the follow-up period (mean, 41 months. A clinical cure was achieved in 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients, the diagnosis of NEHI was made on the basis of the clinical and tomographic findings, independent of the lung biopsy results. Most of the patients showed clinical improvement and persistent tomographic changes during the follow-up period, regardless of the initial severity of the disease or type of treatment.

  5. Changes in the phenotype of human small cell lung cancer cell lines after transfection and expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B E; Battey, J; Linnoila, I; Becker, K L; Makuch, R W; Snider, R H; Carney, D N; Minna, J D

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer growing in cell culture possesses biologic properties that allow classification into two categories: classic and variant. Compared with classic small cell lung cancer cell lines, variant lines have altered large cell morphology, shorter doubling times, higher cloning efficiencies in soft agarose, and very low levels of L dopa decarboxylase production and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. C-myc is amplified and expressed in some small cell lung cancer cell lines and all c-myc amplified lines studied to date display the variant phenotype. To investigate if c-myc amplification and expression is responsible for the variant phenotype, a normal human c-myc gene was transfected into a cloned classic small cell lung cancer cell line not amplified for or expressing detectable c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA). Clones were isolated with one to six copies of c-myc stably integrated into DNA that expressed c-myc mRNA. In addition, one clone with an integrated neo gene but a deleted c-myc gene was isolated and in this case c-myc was not expressed. C-myc expression in transfected clones was associated with altered large cell morphology, a shorter doubling time, and increased cloning efficiency, but no difference in L dopa decarboxylase levels and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. We conclude increased c-myc expression observed here in transfected clones correlates with some of the phenotypic properties distinguishing c-myc amplified variants from unamplified classic small cell lung cancer lines. Images PMID:3016030

  6. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  7. Preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-BN; Preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 99m} Tc-HYNIC-[Lys{sup 3}]-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde S, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In accordance with their design, the radiopharmaceuticals can be divided in three generations. The radiopharmaceuticals of third generation are used in nuclear medicine to obtain images of specific molecular targets, and they are only in their capacity to detect in vivo such specific biochemical places as receivers and enzymes. The receivers of regulator peptides are over expressed in numerous carcinogenic cells. Those receivers have been used as molecular targets of radiolabelled peptides to locate cancerous tumors. The small peptide bombesin (BN, 14 amino acids) it was isolated of the frog skin and it belongs to a wide neuropeptides group with many biological functions. The equivalent human is the liberator peptide of the gastrin (GRP, 27 amino acids) and his receivers (r-GRP) that are on expressed in the membranes of the tumor cells. The receiving subtype 2 of bombesin (receiving GRP) it is on expressed in several human tumors including breast, prostate, lung cells and pancreatic cancer. Some radiopharmaceuticals similar of BN has been developed that were prepared to be used in nuclear medicine for the detection of wicked tumors and to evidence prostate cancers, breast and of lymphatic nodules. A technique was developed to allow the conjugation of HYNIC-[Lys3]-BN that allowed to obtain this product with a high purity. The identity was determined by HPLC chromatography. It was necessary the validation of the method and the HPLC system, to assure that the results were reliable. Linearity, specificity, accuracy and precision parameters were analyzed, that are those required by the Mexican pharmacopoeia for chromatographic methods. With this conjugated a formulation for lyophilized kits were analyzed, with the purpose of obtaining a radiochemical purity, after the labelled one with {sup 99m}Tc, bigger to 95%; the components used in the nucleus-equipment should favor the conjugation of the {sup 99m}Tc by means of a ligands exchange between the tricine and the

  8. Paul Scherrer Institut Scientific Report 2001. Volume II: Life Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaussi, R.; Gschwend, B. (eds.)

    2002-03-01

    The IMR group investigated some new approaches to tumour therapy. Several candidate molecules for targeting the tumour vasculature have been identified and are being produced for in vivo studies in tumour-bearing mice. The liposome technology is well established in this group and the goal is to produce suitably tagged liposomes for delivering a variety of cytotoxic agents to tumours. The Centre for Radiopharmaceutical Science, a joint venture with the ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, pursues a number of projects that should eventually lead to novel radiopharmaceuticals for tumour diagnosis and therapy. Functionally, these radioactive drugs consist of a tumour targeting part, a radionuclide and a linking moiety, which stably connects the two. Optimisation of the components and their combination in terms of in vitro and in vivo properties as well as the efficient large-scale production of promising candidates for eventual first clinical trials is a demanding task. The major emphasis is still on using antibodies, antibody derivatives or peptides as tumour targeting vehicles. In collaboration with the Queens Medical Centre Nottingham, the first patients were treated with a {sup 67}Cu labelled antibody targeting bladder carcinomas. When completed, these studies should give us important information on the usefulness of {sup 67}Cu as a therapeutic radionuclide. Neuropeptides such as neurotensin and bombesin are promising starting points for tumour targeting as their receptors are over expressed on certain tumour cells. Presently, the efforts concentrate on preparing for further clinical studies with neurotensin derivatives (diagnosis of pancreatic tumours using {sup 99m}Tc) and further improving the stability and pharmacological properties of bombesin derivatives. In both these projects the ultimate goal is to label the optimised compounds with {sup 186}Re, a therapeutic radionuclide that can be attached in the stable tricarbonyl form which is easily accessible by

  9. Absorbed dose at subcellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a {sup 99m}Tc-peptide with nuclear internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L., E-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The utility of radiolabeled peptides for the early and specific diagnosis of cancer is being investigated around the world. Recent investigations have demonstrated the specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-bombesin conjugates to target breast and prostate cancer cells. The novel idea of adding the Tat (49-57) peptide to the radiopharmaceutical in order to penetrate the cell nucleus is a new proposal for therapy at cellular level. {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide produces Auger energy of 0.9 keV/decay and internal conversion electron energy of 15.4 keV/decay, which represent 11.4% of the total {sup 99m}Tc energy released per decay. It is expected that the dose delivered at specific microscopic levels in cancer cells induce a therapeutic effect. The aim of this research was to assess in vitro internalization kinetics in breast and prostate cancer cells of {sup 99m}Tc-Tat(49-57)-bombesin and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose at subcellular level simulating the electron transport. The pen main program from the 2006 version of the Penelope code was used to simulate and calculate the absorbed dose by Auger and internal conversion electron contribution in the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus of Pc-3 prostate cancer and MCF7 and MDA human breast cancer cell lines. Nuclear data were obtained from the 2002 BNM-LNHB {sup 99m}Tc decay scheme. The spatial distribution of the absorbed doses to the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus were calculated using a geometric model built from real images of cancer cells. The elemental cell composition was taken from the literature. The biokinetic data were obtained evaluating total disintegrations in each subcellular compartment by integration of the time-activity curves acquired from experimental data. Results showed that 61, 63 and 46% of total disintegrations per cell-bound {sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn activity unit occurred in the nucleus of Pc-3, MCF7 and MDA-MB231 respectively. {sup 99m}Tc--Tat-Bn absorbed doses were 1.78, 5.76 and 2.59 Gy/Bq in the nucleus of

  10. 胃泌素释放肽在炎性疾病中的作用%Roles of gastrin-releasing peptide in inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭龙; 阮林星; 李金宝

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide, belongs to the bombesin (BB) and is expressed in various organs (such as gastrointestinal system, respiratory system, nervous system, endocrine gland and skeletal muscles).Gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPR) is a kind of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs).In recent years, more and more studies have focused on potential roles of GRP in inflammatory diseases.RC-3095, as a specific GRPR antagonist, has been found to have antiinflammatory properties.Objective To investigate the potential roles and research situation of GRP-GRPR in inflammatory diseases.Content Mainly focusing on reviewing sepsis, arthritis, gastroenteritis, and uveitis, we summarized the roles of GRP-GRPR in inflammatory diseases.Trend In conclusion, GRP and its receptor is a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases as well as the possible transformation from preclinical findings to clinical application.%背景 胃泌素释放肽(gastrin-releasing peptide,GRP)是一种神经肽,属于铃蟾肽类(bombesin,BB),表达于多种组织(胃肠系统、呼吸系统、神经系统、内分泌腺以及骨骼肌等).胃泌素释放肽受体(gastrin-releasing peptide receptor,GRPR)属于G蛋白耦联受体(G protein coupled receptors,GPCRs).近年来,GRP在炎症性疾病中的作用备受关注,研究显示RC-3095作为GRPR特异性拮抗剂具有抗炎作用.目的 探讨GRP在炎性疾病中的作用及其研究现状.内容 主要从脓毒症、关节炎、胃肠炎、眼葡萄膜炎等炎性疾病着手,对GRP在炎症疾病中的作用进行归纳总结.趋向 GRP-GRPR将有可能成为炎性疾病的潜在治疗靶点,并有望实现从基础研究到临床应用的转化.

  11. Spacial compartmentalization of Ca2+ signaling complexes in pancreatic acini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Zeng, W; Diaz, J; Muallem, S

    1996-10-04

    Imaging [Ca2+]i at high temporal resolution and measuring the properties of Ca2+ signaling in streptolysin O (SLO)-permeabilized cells were used to study the spacial organization of signaling complexes. Sequential stimulation of single cells within pancreatic acini with several Ca2+-mobilizing agonists revealed an agonist-specific pattern and propagation rate of Ca2+ waves in the same cells, with CCK8 stimulating the fastest and bombesin the slowest waves. More importantly, each agonist initiated the wave in a different region of the same cell. On the other hand, repetitive stimulation with the same agonist induced Ca2+ waves of the same pattern that were initiated from the same region of the cell. The agonist-specific Ca2+ signaling does not appear to be the result of coupling to different G proteins as infusion of an anti-Galphaq antibody into the cells through a patch pipette equally inhibited Ca2+ signaling by all agonists. Further evidence for compartmentalization of signaling complexes was developed in permeabilized cells. The time-dependent loss of Ca2+ signaling due to SLO permeabilization occurred in an agonist-specific manner in the sequence cabachol > bombesin > cholecystokinin. Signaling by all agonists could be completely restored with as low as 2 micro guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS). At this low concentration GTPgammaS recoupled inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production and Ca2+ release, rather than enhancing phospholipase C activity. Priming of Ca2+ signaling by GTPgammaS was agonist-specific. Guanosine 5'-O-(thio)diphosphate (GDPbetaS) uncoupled the ability of signaling complexes to release Ca2+ much better than stimulating inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. The uncoupling of Ca2+ signaling by GDPbetaS was also agonist-specific. The combined findings of agonist-specific initiation sites of the Ca2+ wave and differential access of guanine nucleotides to signaling complexes suggest spacial compartmentalization of Ca2+ signaling

  12. Expression of feeding-related peptide receptors mRNA in GT1-7 cell line and roles of leptin and orexins in control of GnRH secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying YANG; Li-bin ZHOU; Shang-quan LIU; Jing-feng TANG; Feng-yin LI; Rong-ying LI; Huai-dong SONG; Ming-dao CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the expression of feeding-related peptide receptors mRNA in GT1-7 cell line and roles of leptin and orexins in the control of GnRH secretion.Methods: Receptors of bombesin3, cholecystokinin (CCK)-A, CCK-B, glucagonlike peptide (GLP)1, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)1, orexinl, orexin2,neuromedin-B, neuropeptide Y (NPY) 1 and NPY5, neurotensin (NT) 1, NT2, NT3,and leptin receptor long form mRNA in GT1-7 cells were detected by reversed transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. GT1-7 cells were treated with leptin,orexin A and orexin B at a cohort of concentrations for different lengths of time,and GnRH in medium was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results:Receptors of bombesin 3, CCK-B, GLP1, MCH1, orexinl, neuromedin-B, NPY1,NPY5, NT1, NT3, and leptin receptor long form mRNA were expressed in GT1-7cells, of which, receptors of GLP1, neuromedin-B, NPY1, and NT3 were highly expressed. No amplified fragments of orexin2, NT2, and CCK-A receptor cDNA were generated with GT1-7 RNA, indicating that the GT1-7 cells did not express mRNA of them. Leptin induced a significant stimulation of GnRH release, the results being most significant at 0.1 nmol/L for 15 min. In contrast to other studies in hypothalamic explants, neither orexin A nor orexin B affected basal GnRH secretion over a wide range of concentrations ranging from 1 nmol/L to 500 nmol/Lat 15, 30, and 60 min. Conclusion: Feeding and reproductive function are closely linked. Many orexigenic and anorexigenic signals may control feeding behavior as well as alter GnRH secretion through their receptors on GnRH neurons.

  13. Calculus of spatial distribution of absorbed dose to cellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a radio-labelled peptide with {sup 188}Re and with nuclear internalization : preliminary results; Calculo de la distribucion espacial de dosis absorbida a nivel celular por simulacion Monte Carlo para un peptido radiomarcado con {sup 188}Re y con internalizacion nuclear : resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan y Jesus Carranza, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)], e-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.mx

    2009-10-15

    The {sup 188}Re is a radionuclide of radiation gamma emitter, useful in obtaining of gamma-graphic images, but it is also emitter of beta radiations and Auger electrons. A bio-molecule directed to a specific receptor of a cancer cell labeled with a emitter radionuclide of beta particles and Auger electrons, as the {sup 188}Re-Tat-Bombesin, it has the potential to be used in radiotherapy of molecular targets for its capacity to penetrate to cellular nucleus. In this system, the radiation dose is distributed in way located at microscopic levels in sub cellular specific places, where Auger emissions contributes of significant way in absorbed dose. The cellular dosimetry is realized in most of cases, using analytic or semi analytical methods, for example the cellular MIRD methodology. However, it is required to complement these calculations simulating the electrons transport and considering experimental bio kinetics data. Therefore, in this work preliminary results are presented of dosimetric calculation to sub cellular level for {sup 188}Re-Tat-Bombesin by Monte Carlo simulation, using the 2008 version of PENELOPE: PENEASY code. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose in membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, was calculated with geometry of a cell of 10 {mu}m of diameter, a nucleus of 2 {mu}m of ratio and membrane of 0.2 {mu}m of thickness, considering elementary constitution for each cellular compartment proposal in literature. The total number of disintegrations at sub cellular level was evaluated integrating the activity in function of time starting from experimental bio kinetics data in mamma cancer cells MDA-MB231. The preliminary results show that 46.4% of total disintegrations for unit of captured activity by cell occurs in nucleus, 38.4% in membrane and 15.2% in cytoplasm. The due absorbed dose to Auger electrons for 1 Bq of {sup 188}Re located in cellular membrane were respectively of 1.32E-1 and 1.43E-1 Gy in cytoplasm and nucleus. (Author)

  14. Obese and lean Zucker rats respond similarly to intraperitoneal administration of gastrin-releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Martha C; Park, Karen H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-08-01

    The Zucker rat is an animal model used to study obesity and the control of food intake by various satiety peptides. The amphibian peptide bombesin (Bn) reduces cumulative food intake similarly in both obese and lean weanling Zucker rats. Here, we hypothesized that intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptides-10, -27 and -29 (GRP-10, GRP-27, GRP-29), which are the mammalian forms of Bn, would reduce first meal size (MS, 10% sucrose) and prolong the intermeal interval (IMI, time between first and second meals) similarly in obese and lean adult Zucker rats. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-10, GRP-27 and GRP-29 (0, 2.1, 4.1 and 10.3 nmol/kg) i.p. to obese and lean male Zucker rats (who were deprived of overnight food but not water) and then measured the first and second MS, IMI and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS). We found that in both obese and lean rats, all forms of GRP reduced the first MS, and in lean rats, they also decreased the second MS. Additionally, GRP-10 and GRP-29 prolonged the IMI in both obese and lean rats, but GRP-27 only prolonged it in lean rats. Finally, we found that all forms of GRP increased the SR in both obese and lean rats. In agreement with our hypothesis, we conclude that all forms of GRP reduce food intake in obese and lean adult Zucker rats similar to Bn in weanling rats.

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis analysis and detection of mid-spectrum biological warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, C.A.; Townsley, C.

    1995-04-01

    DRE Suffield has initiated a research program to develop methods and equipment for field detection and laboratory identification of mid-spectrum agents, molecules of biological origin such as proteins, peptides and toxins. In this study, a highly efficient and reproducible capillary zone electrophoresis method was developed to separate and identify a series of nine peptides of defence interest: bradykinin, bradykinin fragment 1-5, substance P,ARG8-vasopressin, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, bombesin, leucine enkephalin, methionine enkephalin, and oxytocin. Using a 50 micrometer x 47 cm capillary column, 22.5 kV separation voltage and a 100 mM pH 2.5 phosphate buffer, all nine peptide could separated in under 10 minutes. Three strategies, which could be used in a fully automated field detection and identification system, were demonstrated for the identification of unknown peptides: comparison of migration times, comparison of electrophoretic mobilities, and co-injection of multiple reference standards. These experiments demonstrate that a separation based analytical method such as capillary electrophoresis could form the basis of a generic detection system for mid-spectrum protein and peptide toxins.

  16. Endocrine cells producing regulatory peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solcia, E; Usellini, L; Buffa, R; Rindi, G; Villani, L; Zampatti, C; Silini, E

    1987-07-15

    Recent data on the immunolocalization of regulatory peptides and related propeptide sequences in endocrine cells and tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, lung, thyroid, pituitary (ACTH and opioids), adrenals and paraganglia have been revised and discussed. Gastrin, xenopsin, cholecystokinin (CCK), somatostatin, motilin, secretin, GIP (gastric inhibitory polypeptide), neurotensin, glicentin/glucagon-37 and PYY (peptide tyrosine tyrosine) are the main products of gastrointestinal endocrine cells; glucagon, CRF (corticotropin releasing factor), somatostatin, PP (pancreatic polypeptide) and GRF (growth hormone releasing factor), in addition to insulin, are produced in pancreatic islet cells; bombesin-related peptides are the main markers of pulmonary endocrine cells; calcitonin and CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) occur in thyroid and extrathyroid C cells; ACTH and endorphins in anterior and intermediate lobe pituitary cells, alpha-MSH and CLIP (corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide) in intermediate lobe cells; met- and leu-enkephalins and related peptides in adrenal medullary and paraganglionic cells as well as in some gut (enterochromaffin) cells; NPY (neuropeptide Y) in adrenaline-type adrenal medullary cells, etc.. Both tissue-appropriate and tissue-inappropriate regulatory peptides are produced by endocrine tumours, with inappropriate peptides mostly produced by malignant tumours.

  17. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural characterization of endocrine cells in the larval stomach of the frog Rana temporaria tadpoles: a comparison with adult specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaro, A C; Rovira, J; Bodegas, M E; Burrell, M A; García-Ros, D; Sesma, P

    2001-10-01

    According to immunostaining and ultrastructural patterns, Rana temporaria tadpole stomach displays a well-differentiated endocrine population comprising, at least, six cellular types: ECL, EC [serotonin], D [somatostatin] - all three of them abundant -, P [bombesin] - less numerous -, CCK-8 [cholecystokinin/gastrin] and A [glucagon/glicentin] - both very scarce. Larval endocrine cells are mainly located in the surface epithelium and show open or closed morphologies. Cellular diversity is similar in tadpoles and frogs, with the exception of immunoreactivity for gastrin-17, found in adults in numerous cells. Larval cells display mature ultrastructural traits, although with smaller secretory granules. The different distribution of endocrine cells, which in adults are preferentially located in the glands, probably refers to different functional requirements. However, the rich vascular plexus present in larval mucosa may be an efficient transport medium of surface hormones to-gastric targets. The enhancement in adults of endocrine population and correlative increase in hormonal secretion indicates a more active functional role, probably related to the shift from herbivorous to carnivorous habits. In summary, the tadpole gastric endocrine population, although not as numerous as that of adult frogs, displays histological traits that indicate a relevant (immunoreactive and ultrastructural properties, cellular diversity) and specific (surface location, relative abundance of open-type cells) role of local regulatory factors in amphibian larval gastric function.

  18. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  19. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4+ cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals’ endocrine system. PMID:27775083

  20. The next generation of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Roney, Celeste A; Daumar, Pierre; Lewis, Jason S

    2011-07-01

    Although (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) is still the most widely used positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer, there are a few well-known limitations to its use. The last decade has seen the development of new PET probes for in vivo visualization of specific molecular targets, along with important technical advances in the production of positron-emitting radionuclides and their related labeling methods. As such, a broad range of new PET tracers are in preclinical development or have recently entered clinical trials. The topics covered in this review include labeling methods, biological targets, and the most recent preclinical or clinical data of some of the next generation of PET radiopharmaceuticals. This review, which is by no means exhaustive, has been separated into sections related to the PET radionuclide used for radiolabeling: fluorine-18, for the labeling of agents such as FACBC, FDHT, choline, and Galacto-RGD; carbon-11, for the labeling of choline; gallium-68, for the labeling of peptides such as DOTATOC and bombesin analogs; and the long-lived radionuclides iodine-124 and zirconium-89 for the labeling of monoclonal antibodies cG250, and J591 and trastuzumab, respectively.

  1. Gastrin-releasing peptide is a transmitter mediating porcine gallbladder contraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Birgit; Poulsen, S.S.; Schmidt, P.

    1991-01-01

    We studied the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) for porcine gallbladder motility. Immunohistochemistry visualized nerve fibers containing GRP-like immunoreactivity in muscularis. GRP concentration dependently stimulated contractions of muscularis strips (ED50, 2.9 nM). Neuromedin B was less...... potent (ED50, 0.1 microM), suggesting existence of GRP-preferring receptors. GRP-induced contractions were unaffected by muscarinic antagonism (1 microM atropine), axonal blockade (1 microM tetrodotoxin), cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonism (10 microM MK-329), or substance P desensitization (1...... microM), supporting the existence of myogenic GRP receptors. The bombesin (BN) analogue D-Phe6-BN-(6-13)propylamide (PA) stimulated contractions (ED50, 3.3 nM) with low efficacy (29% of that of GRP). D-Phe6-BN-(6-13)PA (1 microM) shifted GRP concentration-response curves one log to the right. D-Phe6-BN...

  2. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin: an immunohistochemical study of tumor markers and neuroendocrine products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, L; Ulich, T; Liao, S; Barr, R; Cheng, L; Lewin, K L

    1986-08-01

    Fifteen neuroendocrine carcinomas of the skin (Merkel cell tumors) were stained within the constraints of tissue availability by the Grimelius method and immunohistochemically for keratin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), S-100, common leukocyte antigen (CLA), met-enkephalin, bombesin, calcitonin, ACTH, gastrin, and somatostatin. Focal argyrophilia was present in 5 of 12 tumors. All tumors tested demonstrated immunoreactivity for NSE and 5 tumors were positive for keratin. One tumors appeared to demonstrate focal ACTH-like immunoreactivity, but otherwise no immunoreactivity for the above mentioned polypeptide hormones was noted in 11 completely studied tumors. One tumor contained histologically obvious areas of squamous differentiation in addition to areas of Merkel cell tumor. In various tumors, keratin immunoreactivity was present either in areas of histologically obvious squamous differentiation, in randomly scattered single cells not histologically identifiable as squamous, or in a paranuclear dot-like distribution. Immunoreactivity for CEA, S-100 and CLA was not present in any tumors. The lack of met-enkephalin and the presence of squamous differentiation in these tumors indicates multidirectional differentiation in a fashion not phenotypically typical of Merkel cells.

  3. A solvent resistant lab-on-chip platform for radiochemistry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensch, Christian; Lindner, Simon; Salvamoser, Ruben; Leidner, Stephanie; Böld, Christoph; Samper, Victor; Taylor, David; Baller, Marko; Riese, Stefan; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Björn

    2014-07-21

    The application of microfluidics to the synthesis of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracers has been explored for more than a decade. Microfluidic benefits such as superior temperature control have been successfully applied to PET tracer synthesis. However, the design of a compact microfluidic platform capable of executing a complete PET tracer synthesis workflow while maintaining prospects for commercialization remains a significant challenge. This study uses an integral system design approach to tackle commercialization challenges such as the material to process compatibility with a path towards cost effective lab-on-chip mass manufacturing from the start. It integrates all functional elements required for a simple PET tracer synthesis into one compact radiochemistry platform. For the lab-on-chip this includes the integration of on-chip valves, on-chip solid phase extraction (SPE), on-chip reactors and a reversible fluid interface while maintaining compatibility with all process chemicals, temperatures and chip mass manufacturing techniques. For the radiochemistry device it includes an automated chip-machine interface enabling one-move connection of all valve actuators and fluid connectors. A vial-based reagent supply as well as methods to transfer reagents efficiently from the vials to the chip has been integrated. After validation of all those functional elements, the microfluidic platform was exemplarily employed for the automated synthesis of a Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) binding the PEGylated Bombesin BN(7-14)-derivative ([(18)F]PESIN) based PET tracer.

  4. Neuromedin B receptors regulate EGF receptor tyrosine phosphorylation in lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Terry W.; Berna, Marc J.; Mantey, Samuel; Sancho, Veronica; Ridnour, Lisa; Wink, David A.; Chan, Daniel; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jensen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Neuromedin B (NMB), a member of the bombesin family of peptides, is an autocrine growth factor for many lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the ability of NMB to cause transactivation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in lung cancer cells. By Western blot, addition of NMB or related peptides to NCI-H1299 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, caused phosphorylation of Tyr1068 of the EGF receptor. The signal was amplified using NCI-H1299 cells stably transected with NMB receptors. The transactivation of the EGF receptor or the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by AG1478 or gefitinib (tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and NMB receptor antagonist PD168368 but not the GRP receptor antagonist, BW2258U89. The transactivation of the EGF receptor caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by GM6001 (matrix metalloprotease inhibitor), PP2 (Src inhibitor), or transforming growth factor (TGF)α antibody. The transactivation of the EGF receptor and the increase in reactive oxygen species caused by NMB-like peptides was inhibited by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or Tiron. Gefitinib inhibited the proliferation of NCI-H1299 cells and its sensitivity was increased by the addition of PD168368. The results indicate that the NMB receptor regulates EGF receptor transactivation by a mechanism dependent on Src as well as metalloprotease activation and generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:20388507

  5. Cloning of neuromedin B and its receptor in the rabbit and generating a polyclonal antibody to the neuromedin B protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting-Ting; Su, Juan; Ma, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Jun-Xiao; Jin, Meng-Meng; Li, Xiang; Lei, Zhi-Hai

    2015-06-10

    Neuromedin B (NMB) is a highly conserved bombesin-related neuropeptide found in mammals. Neuromedin B (NMB) executes its effect by binding to the cell surface receptor, neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). In this study, we cloned the rabbit NMB and NMBR genes. The similarity and phylogenetic analyses of NMB and NMBR gene sequences were performed. The expression of NMB and NMBR mRNA in the rabbit was investigated using real-time RT-PCR. Our bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that the cloned rabbit NMB precursor cDNA encoded Gly-His-Phe-Met-NH2 amino acids at the C-terminus, and that its receptor possessed typical transmembrane features. The NMB mRNA was highly expressed in the CNS, while the NMBR mRNA was widely expressed in many tissues, with the highest expression in the gastrointestinal tract. The studies on the NMB distribution and function are limited by the lack of a specific antibody to this neuropeptide. In this paper, polyclonal NMB antibody was generated in mice. Western blotting analysis revealed that the prepared antibody could specifically recognize the recombinant and the endogenous NMB proteins. Immunohistochemistry analysis indicated that the NMB protein was localized in the cytoplasm of the pituitary cells. The existence of NMB protein in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis suggests that NMB might function in rabbit reproduction.

  6. Short- and long-term effects of irradiation on laryngeal mucosa of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidegran, M. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology; Forsgren, S. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Anatomy; Dahlqvist, Aa. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology; Franzen, L. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Domeij, S. [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Histology and Cell Biology

    1999-07-01

    Although radiotherapy is often used to treat laryngeal carcinoma, there is little information on the effects of this treatment on laryngeal structures. Rats were irradiated to the head and neck region and the larynges were studied by light- and electron-microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Ten days after irradiation, a change in the ultrastructural appearance of the granules of the subglottic glands was observed. Substance P-, bombesin- and enkephalin-like immunoreactivity was increased in local ganglionic cells and glandular nerve fibres. The mast cells were reduced in number. At examination 4-6 months after irradiation, there were no obvious differences compared with controls concerning mast-cell numbers and neuropeptide expression. The ultrastructural changes seen in the subglottic glands remained to some extent. The results show that structural changes in the subglottic glands occur concomitantly with an increased expression of certain neuropeptides in the innervation of these glands, which implies a relationship between these two parameters. The mast cells respond drastically to irradiation, but in the long run, regeneration of these cells occurs. (orig.)

  7. Insights into the Binding Sites of Organometallic Ruthenium Anticancer Compounds on Peptides Using Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Rebecca H.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Lopez-Clavijo, Andrea F.; Barrow, Mark P.; Sadler, Peter J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-04-01

    The binding sites of two ruthenium(II) organometallic complexes of the form [(η6-arene)Ru( N, N)Cl]+, where arene/ N, N = biphenyl (bip)/bipyridine (bipy) for complex AH076, and biphenyl (bip)/ o-phenylenediamine ( o-pda) for complex AH078, on the peptides angiotensin and bombesin have been investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. Fragmentation was performed using collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), with, in some cases, additional data being provided by electron capture dissociation (ECD). The primary binding sites were identified as methionine and histidine, with further coordination to phenylalanine, potentially through a π-stacking interaction, which has been observed here for the first time. This initial peptide study was expanded to investigate protein binding through reaction with insulin, on which the binding sites proposed are histidine, glutamic acid, and tyrosine. Further reaction of the ruthenium complexes with the oxidized B chain of insulin, in which two cysteine residues are oxidized to cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H), and glutathione, which had been oxidized with hydrogen peroxide to convert the cysteine to cysteine sulfonic acid, provided further support for histidine and glutamic acid binding, respectively.

  8. [The central mechanisms of the stimulating influence of intervalic hypoxic conditioning on the endocrine function of the pancreas in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V

    1997-01-01

    In the investigation of Wistar rats the morpho-functional state of the neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of n. vagus (DVC), locus coeruleus (LC) and peptidergic neurons of medical parvocellular subnuclei of paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVHmp) in the conditions of intermittent hypoxic training (IHT) (6 hours a day on the altitude 6000 m for 21 day) was studied. Immunocytochemical method was used to determine the functional state of peptidergic neurons of PVMmp and of the median eminence of hypothalamus, which are synthesizing neurotensin, cholecystokinin, bombesin, leu- and met-enkephalins, calcitonin-gene-related peptide and vasointestinal peptide. It was established that IHT leads to the activation of peptidergic neurons of PVHmp, neurons of DVC and to the lesser restrain of LC. It is demonstrated that these structures may take part in realisation of IHT's stimulating effect on the state of pancreatic beta-cells. In consists of insulin-stimulating and insulocyteprotective effects, that can be realised by the hypothalamic and neuroconducting ways of regulation of endocrine pancreas, with direct participation of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

  9. Stability analysis of glutamic acid linked peptides coupled to NOTA through different chemical linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-11-03

    Glutamic acid is a commonly used linker to form dimeric peptides with enhanced binding affinity than their corresponding monomeric counterparts. We have previously labeled NOTA-Bn-NCS-PEG3-E[c(RGDyK)]2 (NOTA-PRGD2) [1] with [(18)F]AlF and (68)Ga for imaging tumor angiogenesis. The p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was attached to E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2] through a mini-PEG with a thiourea linkage, and the product [1] was stable at radiolabeling condition of 100 °C and pH 4.0 acetate buffer. However, when the same p-SCN-Bn-NOTA was directly attached to the α-amine of E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], the product NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] became unstable under similar conditions and the release of monomeric c(RGDfK) [5] was observed. The purpose of this work was to use HPLC and LC-MS to monitor the decomposition of glutamic acid linked dimeric peptides and their NOTA derivatives. A c(RGDyK) [6] and bombesin (BBN) [7] heterodimer c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and a dimeric bombesin E(BBN)2 [9], both with a glutamic acid as the linker, along with a model compound PhSCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10] were also studied. All the compounds were dissolved in 0.5 M pH 4.0 acetate buffer at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, and 0.1 mL of each sample was heated at 100 °C for 10 min and the more stable compounds were heated for another 30 min. The samples at both time points were analyzed with analytical HPLC to monitor the decomposition of the heated samples. The samples with decomposition were further analyzed by LC-MS to determine the mass of products from the decomposition for possible structure elucidation. After 10 min heating, the obvious release of c(RGDfK) [5] was observed for NOTA-Bn-NCS-E[c(RGDfK)]2 [4] and Ph-SCN-E[c(RGDfK)] [10]. Little or no release of monomers was observed for the remaining samples at this time point. After further heating, the release of monomers was clearly observed for E[c(RGDyK)]2 [2], E[c(RGDfK)]2 [3], c(RGDyK)-E-BBN [8], and E(BBN)2 [9]. No decomposition or little decomposition was observed for NOTA

  10. The Src kinase Yes is activated in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters, but not pancreatic growth factors, which stimulate its association with numerous other signaling molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Veronica; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Jensen, R T

    2012-08-01

    For growth factors, cytokines, G-protein-coupled receptors and numerous other stimuli, the Src Family of kinases (SFK) play a central signaling role. SFKs also play an important role in pancreatic acinar cell function including metabolism, secretion, endocytosis, growth and cytoskeletal integrity, although the specific SFKs involved are not fully known. In the present study we used specific antibodies for the SFK, Yes, to determine its presence, activation by pancreatic secretagogues or growth factors, and interaction with cellular signaling cascades mediated by CCK in which Yes participates in to cause acinar cell responses. Yes was identified in acini and secretagogues known to activate phospholipase C (PLC) [CCK, carbachol, bombesin] as well as post-receptor stimulants activating PKC [TPA] or mobilizing cellular calcium [thapsigargin/calcium ionophore (A23187)] each activated Yes. Secretin, which activates adenylate cyclase did not stimulate Yes, nor did pancreatic growth factors. CCK activation of Yes required both high- and low-affinity CCK(1)-receptor states. TPA-/CCK-stimulated Yes activation was completely inhibited by thapsigargin and the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X. CCK/TPA stimulated the association of Yes with focal adhesion kinases (Pyk2, FAK) and its autophosphorylated forms (pY397FAK, pY402Pyk2). Moreover, CCK/TPA stimulated Yes interacted with a number of other signaling proteins, including Shc, PKD, p130(Cas), PI3K and PTEN. This study demonstrates that in rat pancreatic acini, the SFK member Yes is expressed and activated by CCK and other gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters. Because its activation results in the direct activation of many cellular signaling cascades that have been shown to mediate CCK's effect in acinar cell function our results suggest that it is one of the important pancreatic SFKs mediating these effects.

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide signaling plays a limited and subtle role in amygdala physiology and aversive memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederique Chaperon

    Full Text Available Links between synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA and Pavlovian fear learning are well established. Neuropeptides including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP can modulate LA function. GRP increases inhibition in the LA and mice lacking the GRP receptor (GRPR KO show more pronounced and persistent fear after single-trial associative learning. Here, we confirmed these initial findings and examined whether they extrapolate to more aspects of amygdala physiology and to other forms of aversive associative learning. GRP application in brain slices from wildtype but not GRPR KO mice increased spontaneous inhibitory activity in LA pyramidal neurons. In amygdala slices from GRPR KO mice, GRP did not increase inhibitory activity. In comparison to wildtype, short- but not long-term plasticity was increased in the cortico-lateral amygdala (LA pathway of GRPR KO amygdala slices, whereas no changes were detected in the thalamo-LA pathway. In addition, GRPR KO mice showed enhanced fear evoked by single-trial conditioning and reduced spontaneous firing of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA. Altogether, these results are consistent with a potentially important modulatory role of GRP/GRPR signaling in the amygdala. However, administration of GRP or the GRPR antagonist (D-Phe(6, Leu-NHEt(13, des-Met(14-Bombesin (6-14 did not affect amygdala LTP in brain slices, nor did they affect the expression of conditioned fear following intra-amygdala administration. GRPR KO mice also failed to show differences in fear expression and extinction after multiple-trial fear conditioning, and there were no differences in conditioned taste aversion or gustatory neophobia. Collectively, our data indicate that GRP/GRPR signaling modulates amygdala physiology in a paradigm-specific fashion that likely is insufficient to generate therapeutic effects across amygdala-dependent disorders.

  12. Expression of early growth response factor-1 in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan-Bo Gong; Li He; Yang Liu; Xue-Qing Chen; Bo Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the expressions of early growth response factor-1 (Egr-L) and tissue factor (TF) in rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and to explore its significance.METHODS: A large dose of cerulein was used to create the experimental acute pancreatitis model in rats. The changes of Egr-1 mRNA and protein in rats were observed during 30 min to 4 h after the treatment and immunohistochemical method was used to observe the localized expression of Egr-1 in tissues. In addition to the mRNA expression of Egr-1 target gene, TF was also observed. A blank control group, and a bombesinadministered group were used for comparison.RESULTS: After the stimulation of a large dose of cerulein,the rats showed typical inflammatory changes of acute pancreatitis. Thirty minutes after the stimulation, the mRNA expression of Egr-1 in the pancreatic tissue reached its peak and then declined, while the expression of Egr-1protein reached its peak 2 h after the stimulation.Histologically, 2 h after the stimulation, almost all pancreatic acinar cells had the expression of Egr-1 protein,which was focused in the nuclei. The mRNA expression of TF occurred 1 h after the stimulation and gradually increased within 4 h. However, a large dose of bombesin only stimulated the pancreatic tissue to produce a little mRNA expression of Egr-1 and no mRNA expression of Egr-1 protein and TF.CONCLUSION: Egr-1 as a pro-inflammatory transcription factor may play an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis by modulating the expression of TF.

  13. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  14. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-03-01

    Foregut neuroendocrine tumors [NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal (GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid,BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor,Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr(1068) EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs.

  15. Regulation of feeding behavior and food intake by appetite-regulating peptides in wild-type and growth hormone-transgenic coho salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Samantha L; Volkoff, Helene; Devlin, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Survival, competition, growth and reproductive success in fishes are highly dependent on food intake, food availability and feeding behavior and are all influenced by a complex set of metabolic and neuroendocrine mechanisms. Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic fish can result in greatly enhanced growth rates, feed conversion, feeding motivation and food intake. The objectives of this study were to compare seasonal feeding behavior of non-transgenic wild-type (NT) and GH-transgenic (T) coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to examine the effects of intraperitoneal injections of the appetite-regulating peptides cholecystokinin (CCK-8), bombesin (BBS), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) on feeding behavior. T salmon fed consistently across all seasons, whereas NT dramatically reduced their food intake in winter, indicating the seasonal regulation of appetite can be altered by overexpression of GH in T fish. Intraperitoneal injections of CCK-8 and BBS caused a significant and rapid decrease in food intake for both genotypes. Treatment with either GLP-1 or α-MSH resulted in a significant suppression of food intake for NT but had no effect in T coho salmon. The differential response of T and NT fish to α-MSH is consistent with the melanocortin-4 receptor system being a significant pathway by which GH acts to stimulate appetite. Taken together, these results suggest that chronically increased levels of GH alter feeding regulatory pathways to different extents for individual peptides, and that altered feeding behavior in transgenic coho salmon may arise, in part, from changes in sensitivity to peripheral appetite-regulating signals.

  16. Gastrin-releasing peptide signaling plays a limited and subtle role in amygdala physiology and aversive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaperon, Frederique; Fendt, Markus; Kelly, Peter H; Lingenhoehl, Kurt; Mosbacher, Johannes; Olpe, Hans-Rudolf; Schmid, Peter; Sturchler, Christine; McAllister, Kevin H; van der Putten, P Herman; Gee, Christine E

    2012-01-01

    Links between synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA) and Pavlovian fear learning are well established. Neuropeptides including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) can modulate LA function. GRP increases inhibition in the LA and mice lacking the GRP receptor (GRPR KO) show more pronounced and persistent fear after single-trial associative learning. Here, we confirmed these initial findings and examined whether they extrapolate to more aspects of amygdala physiology and to other forms of aversive associative learning. GRP application in brain slices from wildtype but not GRPR KO mice increased spontaneous inhibitory activity in LA pyramidal neurons. In amygdala slices from GRPR KO mice, GRP did not increase inhibitory activity. In comparison to wildtype, short- but not long-term plasticity was increased in the cortico-lateral amygdala (LA) pathway of GRPR KO amygdala slices, whereas no changes were detected in the thalamo-LA pathway. In addition, GRPR KO mice showed enhanced fear evoked by single-trial conditioning and reduced spontaneous firing of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Altogether, these results are consistent with a potentially important modulatory role of GRP/GRPR signaling in the amygdala. However, administration of GRP or the GRPR antagonist (D-Phe(6), Leu-NHEt(13), des-Met(14))-Bombesin (6-14) did not affect amygdala LTP in brain slices, nor did they affect the expression of conditioned fear following intra-amygdala administration. GRPR KO mice also failed to show differences in fear expression and extinction after multiple-trial fear conditioning, and there were no differences in conditioned taste aversion or gustatory neophobia. Collectively, our data indicate that GRP/GRPR signaling modulates amygdala physiology in a paradigm-specific fashion that likely is insufficient to generate therapeutic effects across amygdala-dependent disorders.

  17. Gastrointestinal growth factors and hormones have divergent effects on Akt activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Thill, Michelle; Pace, Andrea; Hoffmann, K. Martin; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Lauro; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    Akt is a central regulator of apoptosis, cell growth and survival. Growth factors and some G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) regulate Akt. Whereas growth-factor activation of Akt has been extensively studied, the regulation of Akt by GPCR's, especially gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters, remains unclear. To address this area, in this study the effects of GI growth factors and hormones/neurotransmitters were investigate in rat pancreatic acinar cells which are high responsive to these agents. Pancreatic acini expressed Akt and 5 of 7 known pancreatic growth-factors stimulate Akt phosphorylation (T308, S473) and translocation. These effects are mediated by p85 phosphorylation and activation of PI3K. GI hormones increasing intracellular cAMP had similar effects. However, GI-hormones/neurotransmitters[CCK, bombesin,carbachol] activating phospholipase C (PLC) inhibited basal and growth-factor-stimulated Akt activation. Detailed studies with CCK, which has both physiological and pathophysiological effects on pancreatic acinar cells at different concentrations, demonstrated CCK has a biphasic effect: at low concentrations(pM) stimulating Akt by a Src-dependent mechanism and at higher concentrations(nM) inhibited basal and stimulated Akt translocation, phosphorylation and activation, by de-phosphorylating p85 resulting in decreasing PI3K activity. This effect required activation of both limbs of the PLC-pathway and a protein tyrosine phosphatase, but was not mediated by p44/42 MAPK, Src or activation of a serine phosphatase. Akt inhibition by CCK was also found in vivo and in Panc-1 cancer cells where it inhibited serum-mediated rescue from apoptosis. These results demonstrate that GI growth factors as well as gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters with different cellular basis of action can all regulate Akt phosphorylation in pancreatic acinar cells. This regulation is complex with phospholipase C agents such as CCK, because both stimulatory and inhibitory

  18. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardo A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Accardo,1 Luigi Aloj,2 Michela Aurilio,2 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Diego Tesauro11Centro interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPeB, Department of Pharmacy and Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBB CNR, University of Naples “Federico II”, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs; and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors.Keywords: receptors binding peptides, drug delivery

  19. Role of neuropeptides in appetite regulation and obesity--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sarika; Anubhuti

    2006-12-01

    Obesity represents the most prevalent nutritional problem worldwide which in the long run predisposes to development of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, endometrial carcinoma, osteoarthritis, gall stones and cardiovascular diseases. Despite significant reductions in dietary fat consumption, the prevalence of obesity is on a rise and is taking on pandemic proportions. Obesity develops when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. Recently, a close evolutionary relationship between the peripheral and hypothalamic neuropeptides has become apparent. The hypothalamus being the central feeding organ mediates regulation of short-term and long-term dietary intake via synthesis of various orexigenic and anorectic neuropeptides. The structure and function of many hypothalamic peptides (neuropeptide Y (NPY), melanocortins, agouti-related peptide (AGRP), cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), melanin concentrating hormone (MCH), orexins have been characterized in rodent models The peripheral neuropeptides such as cholecystokinin (CCK), ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY3-36), amylin, bombesin regulate important gastrointestinal functions such as motility, secretion, absorption, provide feedback to the central nervous system on availability of nutrients and may play a part in regulating food intake. The pharmacological potential of several endogenous peripheral peptides released prior to, during and/or after feeding are being explored. Long-term regulation is provided by the main circulating hormones leptin and insulin. These systems implicated in hypothalamic appetite regulation provide potential targets for treatment of obesity which could potentially pass into clinical development in the next 5 years. This review summarizes various effects and interrelationship of these central and peripheral neuropeptides in metabolism, obesity and their potential role as targets for treatment of obesity.

  20. Evaluation of the internalization kinetics of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)Lys{sup 3}-Bn with diagnostic purposes, using comet assay; Evaluacion de la cinetica de internalizacion del radiofarmaco {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-TAT(49-57)Lys{sup 3}-BN con fines diagnosticos, empleando ensayo cometa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna G, M. A.

    2011-07-01

    Gastrin-rea leasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) are over expressed in breast and prostate cancer cells. Bombesin (Bn) binds specifically and strongly to GRP-r and this is the base for to label the Bn with radionuclides by gamma rays. Tat (49-57) is a peptide that across the cell membrane easily so that, when it is conjugated to different proteins, it can works as a Trojan horse, facilitating the drug internalization to the cells. The radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)-Lys{sup 3}-Bn was prepared for diagnosis and therapy at early stage of breast cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the role of Tat in the internalization kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals measured by DNA damage induced by means of comet assay. Human lymphocytes were treated with the following protocols: a) Tat-Bn, b) {sup 99m}Tc-Bn, or c) {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)-Lys{sup 3}-Bn, also an untreated group was conformed. The internalization was evaluated at 0, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min after exposure with three repetitions each one, and for radiopharmaceuticals with 2.9, 6.6, 9.0 and 14.8 MBq activities. DNA damage was scored in 100 cells per time and treatment, as tail length and tail moment. A Kruskal-Wallis variance analysis with p{<=} 0.05 was applied for comparison between treatments. The results showed that the damage caused by {sup 99m}Tc-N{sub 2}S{sub 2}-Tat(49-57)-Lys{sup 3}-Bn is significantly higher than that caused by {sup 99m}Tc-Bn and Tat-Bn, showing that Tat favors the internalization of the radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  1. 糖尿病/星型胶质细胞富集磷蛋白酶-15的表达对急性胰腺炎腺泡细胞凋亡的影响%Effects of diabetes mellitus/astrocyte enriched phosphorus protease 15 expression on the apoptosis of acinar cells in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡明星; 王玉柱; 刘传江; 秦涛

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察糖尿病/星型胶质细胞富集磷蛋白酶-15(PED/PEA-15)的表达对蛙皮素诱导的体外急性胰腺炎(AP)模型腺泡细胞凋亡的影响.方法 建立体外AP模型:用10 nmol/L的蛙皮素处理胰腺腺泡细胞株(AR42J细胞)建立AP模型,4h后检测培养液淀粉酶水平,实时荧光定量反转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)检测PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达,吖啶橙/溴乙锭(AO/EB)法检测AR42J细胞的凋亡.构建PED/PEA-15的真核表达载体pcDNA3和空载体,利用脂质体转染AR42J细胞,72 h后加入10 nmol/L的蛙皮素处理,RT-PCR检测PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达水平,AO/EB法检测AR42J细胞的凋亡.结果 蛙皮素处理的AR42J细胞培养液淀粉酶水平较未处理细胞明显升高[(748.75±42.90) U/L较(249.75±27.16) U/L,P<0.05],PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达降低(5.24±0.66)倍(P<0.05),细胞凋亡率[(78.75±0.03)%]较未处理组[(17.50±0.04)%]升高(P<0.05).PED/PEA-15-pcDNA组AR42J细胞较空载体组PED/PEA-15的mRNA表达升高(4.27±0.78)倍(P<0.05),淀粉酶水平[(528.71±34.92) U/L]较空载体组[(856.29±52.39) U/L]明显下降(P<0.05),细胞凋亡率[(22.19±1.21)%]较空载体组[(68.92±1.83)%]降低(P<0.05),转染空载体组各项指标与未转染组差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 PED/PEA-15蛋白在胰腺腺泡细胞的表达升高,能够抑制蛙皮素诱导的AR42J胰腺腺泡细胞凋亡.%Objective To investigate the effect of diabetes mellitus/astrocyte enriched phosphorus protease 15 (PED/PEA-15) expression on the apoptosis of acinar cells in bombesin-induced acute pancreatitis.Methods A model of acute pancreatitis with bombesin of 10 nmol/L was established.Amylase was determined 4 h later.The real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of PED/PEA-15 mRNA.The pcDNA or empty vehicle was created and transfected into AR42J cells.After the AR42J cells were treated with 10 nmol/L bombesin for 72 h, the

  2. Co-expressed peptide receptors in breast cancer as a molecular basis for in vivo multireceptor tumour targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Gugger, Mathias; Waser, Beatrice [Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, University of Berne (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    Breast cancers can express different types of peptide receptors such as somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate which is the most appropriate peptide receptor or peptide receptor combination for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic targeting of breast cancers. Seventy-seven primary breast cancers and 15 breast cancer lymph node metastases were investigated in vitro for their expression of somatostatin, VPAC{sub 1}, GRP and NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors using in vitro receptor autoradiography on successive tissue sections with {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 3}]-octreotide, {sup 125}I-VIP, {sup 125}I-[Tyr{sup 4}]-bombesin and {sup 125}I-[Leu{sup 31},Pro{sup 34}]-PYY respectively. This study identified two groups of tumours: a group of 68 tumours (88%) with at least one receptor expressed at high density (>2,000 dpm/mg tissue) that may provide a strong predictive value for successful in vivo targeting, and a group of nine tumours (12%) with no receptors or only a low density of them (<2,000 dpm/mg tissue). In the group with high receptor density, 50 of the 68 tumours (74%) expressed GRP receptors, 45 (66%) expressed NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 25 (37%) expressed VPAC{sub 1} receptors and 14 (21%) expressed somatostatin receptors. Mean density was 9,819{+-}530 dpm/mg tissue for GRP receptors, 9,135{+-}579 dpm/mg for NPY(Y{sub 1}) receptors, 4,337{+-}528 dpm/mg for somatostatin receptors and 3,437{+-}306 dpm/mg for VPAC{sub 1} receptors. It is of note that tumours expressing NPY(Y{sub 1}) or GRP receptors, or both, were found in 63/68 (93%) cases. Lymph node metastases showed a similar receptor profile to the corresponding primary tumour. This in vitro study strongly suggests that the combination of radiolabelled GRP and Y{sub 1} analogues should allow targeting of breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases for in vivo peptide receptor scintigraphy and radiotherapy

  3. Mouse bronchiolar cell carcinogenesis. Histologic characterization and expression of Clara cell antigen in lesions induced by N-nitrosobis-(2-chloroethyl) ureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, S.; Lijinsky, W.; Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    Female Swiss mice (Cr:NIH(S)) developed bronchiolar cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, metaplasia, and various morphologic types of bronchiolar cell tumors after topical (skin) application of N-nitroso-methyl-bis-chloroethylurea (NMBCU) or N-nitroso-tris-chloroethylurea (NTCU). These compounds are the first found to induce systemically bronchiolar cell tumors in mice in high incidence. Twice a week, with a 3-day interval, a 25-microliter drop of 0.04 mol/l (molar) NMBCU or NTCU in acetone was applied to the shaved interscapular integument for a maximum of 35 to 40 weeks. The earliest lung neoplasms were seen in mice that died after 23 weeks of treatment and affected 11 of 19 with NMBCU and 14 of 19 with NTCU treatment. Tumor growth pattern was nodular or the neoplastic tissue was frequently disseminated throughout the parenchyma, starting from multicentric peribronchiolar foci. The most common tumor types were squamous cell carcinomas and adenosquamous carcinomas, followed by adenocarcinomas with or without secretory cells, and a single ciliated-cell tumor. Histochemical and immunohistochemical studies were carried out on paraffin-embedded lungs using the avidin-biotin immunoperoxidase complex procedure and antisera against keratin, Clara cell antigen, surfactant apoprotein, neuron-specific enolase, bombesin, and chromogranin A. In several mice from both groups, hyperplasias and tumors were composed of cells expressing Clara cell antigen. No tumor cells were found expressing alveolar type II or neuroendocrine cell markers. It appeared that bronchiolar cells, in particular Clara cells, had migrated from terminal bronchioles or invaded bronchiolar walls to extend into the alveolar parenchyma. Squamous cell metaplasia with keratin expression was seen within airways or associated with glandular tumors, especially at the periphery. A unique cell type, with large eosinophilic globules and associated eosinophilic crystals, was seen lining airways or forming hyperplastic and

  4. In vitro and in vivo analysis of [{sup 64}Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2}]: a site-directed radiopharmaceutical for positron-emission tomography imaging of T-47D human breast cancer tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasanphanich, Adam F. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Retzloff, Lauren [Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lane, Stephanie R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Nanda, Prasant K. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Sieckman, Gary L. [Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Rold, Tammy L. [Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Ma, Lixin [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); The Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Figueroa, Said D. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Research Division, Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital, Columbia, MO 65201 (United States); Sublett, Samantha V. [The Radiopharmaceutical Sciences Institute, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-02-15

    Introduction: Human breast cancer, from which the T-47D cell line was derived, is known to overexpress the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) in some cases. Bombesin (BBN), an agonist for the GRPR, has been appended with a radionuclide capable of positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging and therapy. {sup 64}Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2} (NO2A=1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4-diacetate) has produced high-quality microPET images of GRPR-positive breast cancer xenografted tumors in mice. Methods: The imaging probe was synthesized by solid-phase peptide synthesis followed by manual conjugation of the 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) bifunctional chelator and radiolabeling in aqueous solution. The radiolabeled conjugate was subjected to in vitro and in vivo studies to determine its specificity for the GRPR and its pharmacokinetic profile. A T-47D tumor-bearing mouse was imaged with microPET/CT and microMRI imaging. Results: The {sup 64}Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2} targeting vector was determined to specifically localize in GRPR-positive tissue. Accumulation was observed in the tumor in sufficient quantities to allow for identification of tumors in microPET imaging procedures. For example, uptake and retention in T-47D xenografts at 1, 4 and 24 h were determined to be 2.27{+-}0.08, 1.35{+-}0.14 and 0.28{+-}0.07 % ID/g, respectively. Conclusions: The {sup 64}Cu-NO2A-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH{sub 2} produced high-quality microPET images. The pharmacokinetic profile justifies investigation of this bioconjugate as a potentially useful diagnostic/therapeutic agent. Additionally, the bioconjugate would serve as a good starting point for modification and optimization of similar agents to maximize tumor uptake and minimize nontarget accumulation.

  5. SU-E-I-82: PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Prostate Cancer Imaging: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, F [Delfin Farmacos e Derivados Ltda, Lauro De Freitas, Bahia (Brazil); Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saude Publica, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Silva, D da [Delfin Farmacos e Derivados Ltda, Lauro De Freitas, Bahia (Brazil); Rodrigues, L [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saude Publica, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to review new and clinical practice PET radiopharmaceuticals for prostate cancer imaging. Methods: PET radiopharmaceuticals were reviewed on the main databases. Availability, dosimetry, accuracy and limitations were considered. Results: The following radioisotopes with respective physical half-life and mean positron energy were found: {sup 18}F (109,7 min, 249,8 keV), {sup 89}Zr (78,4 hs, 395,5 keV), {sup 11}C (20,4 min, 385,7 keV) and {sup 68}Ga (67,8 min, 836 keV). {sup 68}Ga was the only one not produced by cyclotron. Radiopharmaceuticals uptake by glucose metabolism ({sup 18}F-FDG), lipogenesis ({sup 11}C-Choline and {sup 11}C-Acetate), amino acid transport (Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC), bone matrix ({sup 18}F-NaF), prostatespecific membrane antigen ({sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup 89}Zr-J591), CXCR receptors ({sup 89}Ga-Pentixafor), adrenal receptors ({sup 18}F-FDHT) and gastrin release peptide receptor (bombesin analogue). Most of radiopharmaceuticals are urinary excretion, so bladder is the critical organ. 11C-choline (pancreas), Anti-{sup 18}FFACBC (liver) and {sup 18}F-FBDC (stomach wall) are the exception. Higher effective dose was seen {sup 18}F-NaF (27 μSv/MBq) while the lowest was {sup 11}CAcetate (3,5 μSv/MBq). Conclusion: Even though {sup 18}F-FDG has a large availability its high urinary excretion and poor uptake to slow growing disease offers weak results for prostate cancer. Better accuracy is obtained when {sup 18}F-NaF is used for bone metastatic investigation although physicians tend to choose bone scintigraphy probably due to its cost and practice. Many guidelines in oncology consider {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F labeled with Choline the gold standard for biochemical relapse after radical treatment. Local, lymph node and distant metastatic relapse can be evaluated at same time with this radiopharmaceutical. There is no consensus over bigger urinary excretion for {sup 18}F labeling. Anti-{sup 18}F-FACBC, {sup 68}Ga-PSMA and {sup

  6. Ligation-based assembly for constructing mouse synthetic scFv libraries by chain shuffling with in vivo-amplified VH and VL fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Michiru; Jian, Nan; Yamamoto, Keiko; Seto, Haruyo; Nishida, Yuichi; Tonoyama, Yasuhiro; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Nishi, Yoshisuke

    2014-10-01

    In vitro assembly of two or three PCR fragments using primers is a common method of constructing scFv fragments for display on the surface of phage. However, mismatch annealing often occurs during in this step, leading to cloning and display of incomplete Fab or scFv fragments. To overcome this limitation, we developed a ligation-based two-fragment assembly (LTFA) protocol that involved separately cloning VH and Vκ fragments into the high-copy-number plasmid pUC18. The VH and Vκ fragments had randomized complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and were joined with a peptidyl linker composed of (G4S)3. Using this approach, complete sequences of scFv fragments were successfully constructed, and the sequencing of 83 scFv clones revealed that none of the sequences, including the linker region, contained deletions or mutations. In contrast, linker sequences generated using a conventional two-fragment PCR assembly (TFPA) protocol often contained sequence anomalies, including large truncations. Using the LTFA protocol, a final library size of 1.0×10(8)cfu was achieved. Examination of the amino acid profiles of the generated scFv fragments within the randomized regions introduced using degenerate codons did not detect any bias from that expected based on stochastic distribution. After several cycles of panning with this library, antigen-specific scFvs against two reference antigens, hen egg lysozyme and streptavidin were detected. In addition, scFvs with specificity against peptidyl antigens in the loop region of the Medaka ortholog of human C6orf89, which encodes a histone deacetylase enhancer that interacts with the bombesin receptor, were also obtained. The LTFA protocol developed here is robust and allows for the easy construction of integral scFv fragments compared with conventional TFPA. Utilizing LTFA, other CDRs can be readily combined. This approach also allows for the in vitro maturation of scFv fragments by separately introducing randomization in CDRs or

  7. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy and Near Infrared Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection: Receptor-targeted and Native Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yang

    Optical spectroscopy and imaging using near-infrared (NIR) light provides powerful tools for non-invasive detection of cancer in tissue. Optical techniques are capable of quantitative reconstructions maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties, thus can map in vivo the differences in the content of certain marker chromophores and/or fluorophores in normal and cancerous tissues (for example: water, tryptophan, collagen and NADH contents). Potential clinical applications of optical spectroscopy and imaging include functional tumor detection and photothermal therapeutics. Optical spectroscopy and imaging apply contrasts from intrinsic tissue chromophores such as water, collagen and NADH, and extrinsic optical contrast agents such as Indocyanine Green (ICG) to distinguish disease tissue from the normal one. Fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging also gives high sensitivity and specificity for biomedical diagnosis. Recent developments on specific-targeting fluorophores such as small receptor-targeted dye-peptide conjugate contrast agent offer high contrast between normal and cancerous tissues hence provide promising future for early tumour detection. This thesis focus on a study to distinguish the cancerous prostate tissue from the normal prostate tissues with enhancement of specific receptor-targeted prostate cancer contrast agents using optical spectroscopy and imaging techniques. The scattering and absorption coefficients, and anisotropy factor of cancerous and normal prostate tissues were investigated first as the basis for the biomedical diagnostic and optical imaging. Understanding the receptors over-expressed prostate cancer cells and molecular target mechanism of ligand, two small ICG-derivative dye-peptides, namely Cypate-Bombesin Peptide Analogue Conjugate (Cybesin) and Cypate-Octreotate Peptide Conjugate (Cytate), were applied to study their clinical potential for human prostate cancer detection. In this work, the steady-state and time

  8. 68Ga-NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) PET/CT in Healthy Volunteers and Glioma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Li, Deling; Lang, Lixin; Zhu, Zhaohui; Wang, Ling; Wu, Peilin; Niu, Gang; Li, Fang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-01-01

    This work was designed to study the safety, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR)– targeting, 68Ga-labeled bombesin (BBN) peptide derivative PET tracer, NOTA-Aca-BBN(7–14) (denoted as 68Ga-BBN) in healthy volunteers and to assess the level of receptor expression in glioma patients. Methods Four healthy volunteers (2 male and 2 female) underwent whole-body PET/CT at multiple time points after a bolus injection of 68Ga-BBN (111 ± 148 MBq). Regions of interest were drawn manually over major organs, and time–activity curves were obtained. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Twelve patients with glioma diagnosed by contrast-enhanced MRI underwent PET/CT at 30–45 min after 68Ga-BBN injection. Within 1 wk afterward, the tumor was surgically removed and immunohistochemical staining of tumor samples against GRPR was performed and correlated with the PET/CT results. Results 68Ga-BBN was well tolerated in all healthy volunteers, with no adverse symptoms being noticed or reported. 68Ga-BBN cleared rapidly from the circulation and was excreted mainly through the kidneys and urinary tract. The total effective dose equivalent and effective dose were 0.0335 ± 0.0079 and 0.0276 ± 0.0066 mSv/MBq, respectively. In glioma patients, all MRI-identified lesions showed high signal intensity on 68Ga-BBN PET/CT. SUVmax and SUVmean were 2.08 ± 0.58 and 1.32 ± 0.37, respectively. With normal brain tissue as background, tumor-to-background ratios were 24.0 ± 8.85 and 13.4 ± 4.54 based on SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively. The immunohistochemical staining confirmed a positive correlation between SUV and GRPR expression level (r2 = 0.71, P < 0.001). Conclusion 68Ga-BBN is a PET tracer with favorable pharmacokinetics and a favorable dosimetry profile. It has the potential to evaluate GRPR expression in glioma patients and guide GRPR-targeted therapy of glioma. PMID:26449838

  9. Imaging tumors with peptide-based radioligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, T. M.; Gotthardt, M.; Barth, A.; Behe, M. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    derivatives of gastrin showed excellent targeting of CCK-B receptor expressing tissues in animals and patients. A variety of further peptide-based radioligands, e.g. among many others, gastrin-releasing peptide/bombesin, neurotensin, substance-P, pan-somatostatin (somatostatin derivatives which bind to all five receptor subtypes) or glucagon-like peptide-1 (glp-1) analogs (the latter for the specific detection of insulinomas), is currently under development. Summarizing, radiolabeled regulatory peptides have opened new horizons in nuclear oncology for diagnosis (and potential internal radionuclide therapy). Future work will probably reveal a multitude of novel potentially clinically useful peptide-based radioligands.

  10. Evaluation the influence of Polyethylene glycol in circulation and biodistribution of pH-sensitive liposomes, radiolabeled with Technetium 99m in experimental models; Avaliacao da influencia do polietilenoglicol na circulacao e biodistribuicao de lipossomas pH-sensiveis, radiomarcados com Tecnecio 99m em modelos experimentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Shirleide Santos

    2016-07-01

    Liposomes are lipid vesicles widely studied throughout the world as nanocarriers for different substances. The hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG) might be added onto the surface of liposomes to prolong the circulation time by reducing the opsonization of the vesicles, leading to a reduced uptake by the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). Several studies claim that the molecular weight of the PEG, as well as combination of different types of PEG with different molecular weights may alter the pharmacokinetics of the liposome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of molecular weight and PEG combinations with different chain sizes in the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of pH-sensitive liposomes containing {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin complex (7-14 ) in tumor models (4T1 and Ehrlich). Eight liposomal formulations were prepared, the results showed that the liposomes exhibited adequate chemical and physical-chemical properties, such as mean diameter less than 300nm, monodisperse populations, neutral zeta potential, and encapsulation content of 26.4 to 38.7%. The images obtained by transmission electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-TEM) allowed visualization of unilamellar vesicles with an average diameter of 90 nm. There was no difference in blood half-life (T1/2), thereby for the composition of liposomes used in this study, PEG did not increase blood circulation time. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic images showed high uptake by organs of the SMF, liver and spleen. The PEG2000 formulation showed higher concentration in blood. Liposomes with DSPE, PEG2000 or PEG1000 / 5000 showed higher uptake in the tumor compared to the contralateral muscle, but there was no statistical difference between the formulations when tumor-to-muscle ratio, obtained in the biodistribution studies or scintigraphic images, was analyzed. The results suggest that for this specific formulation, the addition of PEG was not efficient for increasing

  11. Development of a specific radiopharmaceutical based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with HYNIC-peptide/mannose for the sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer; Desarrollo de un radiofarmaco especifico basado en nanoparticulas de oro funcionalizadas con HYNIC-peptido/manosa para la deteccion de ganglio centinela en cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo G, B. E.

    2012-07-01

    ) which was retained during 24 h with minimal kidney accumulation (0.98 {+-} 0.10% Id) and negligible uptake in all other tissues. In order to design a pharmaceutical formulation for the instant preparation of stable m ultimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition based on gold nanoparticles, a freeze-dried kit formulation of {sup 99m}Tc-ethylenediamine-N, N-diacetic acid (EDDA)/hydrazino nicotinyl (HYNIC)-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide ({sup 99m}Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC, previously approved by the Mexican Ministry of Health) (vial 1) and a second vial containing 1.5 ml of Au-Np solution plus 10 {mu}L of thiol-mannose, Lys{sup 3}-bombesin, or cyclo[Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys-(Cys)] (c[RGDfK(C)] (approximately 285 molecules per Au-Np) (vial 2) were prepared. M ultimeric radiopharmaceuticals prepared from kit showed a radiochemical purity of 96 {+-} 2%. The far-infrared spectra showed a characteristic band at 279 {+-} 1 cm{sup -1}, which was assigned to the Au-S bond. UV-Vis and XP S also indicated that the Au-Np were functionalized with peptides or mannose. Radiopharmaceuticals showed specific recognition for receptors expressed in cancer cells or rat liver cells. Micro-SPECT/CT images showed clear tumour uptake and lymph node accumulation. The kit demonstrated excellent stability during storage at 4 C for 6 months. This study demonstrated that {sup 99m}Tc-Au-Np-mannose remains within the first lymph node during 24 h and therefore might be useful as a target-specific radiopharmaceutical for SLND using 1-day or 2-day conventional protocols. Likewise, m ultimeric systems of {sup 99m}Tc-Au-Np-mannose, {sup 99m}Tc-Au-Np-RGD and {sup 99m}Tc-Au-Np-Lys{sup 3}-bombesin prepared from kits exhibited properties suitable as target-specific agents for molecular imaging of tumours and sentinel lymph node. (Author)

  12. Multi-functional system of radiotherapy and thermal phototherapy for tumors that over-express receptors of the gastrin releasing peptide; Sistema multifuncional de radioterapia y fototerapia termica para tumores que sobre-expresan receptores del peptido liberador de gastrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez M, N. P.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare and characterize a multifunctional system of {sup 177}Lu and {sup 99m}Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to Tat(49 57)-Lys{sup 3} bombesin ({sup 177}Lu/{sup 99m}Tc- AuNP-Tat-Bn) and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose in GRP receptor positive PC3 tumours induced in mice (human prostate cancer cells), as well as to evaluate the thermal effect produced by the multifunctional system in PC3 cancer cells. The preparation of the system involved the conjugation of Bn-Tat, DOTA-GGC and HYNICTOC peptides to AuNP of 20 nm or 5 nm in diameter. The radiolabeling of the system with {sup 99m}Tc was carried out through the ligand HYNIC-TOC and with the {sup 177}Lu through DOTA-GGC. The functionalization of peptides to AuNP, was accomplished through a spontaneous reaction of thiol groups. The system was characterized by spectroscopic techniques while radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion molecular chromatography and ultrafiltration. Various internalization trials and non-specific binding were tested to demonstrate the affinity of the system to PC3 cells. The thermal effect was evaluated incubating the system into PC3 cells and irradiating it with a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam and monitoring the temperature; after irradiation, cell viability was measured. In the evaluation of absorbed dose in mice with induced tumours, the system was administered intratumorally and later, mice were sacrificed, relevant organs and tumor were extracted, activity was quantified and radiopharmaceutical models were obtained for each organ and tumor to be used in the accumulated activity and absorbed dose calculation by the MIRD methodology. Finally, to establish the system location at cellular level, fluorescent images of the system incubated in PC3 cells were acquired with an epi fluorescent microscope. Tem, UV-Vis, XP S and Far-IR spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that AuNPs were functionalized with peptides through interactions with