WorldWideScience

Sample records for bombardment mass spectroscopy

  1. Geologic constraints on Rhea's bombardment mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leight, Clarissa; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.

    2016-10-01

    The mid-sized moons (MSMs) of Saturn display a peculiar set of properties that indicate the system may have been altered early in its history. The MSMs have a large spread in silicate content and diverse inferred thermal and physical histories that, unlike the Galilean satellites, do not demonstrate a trend with semi-major axis or size, which would indicate orbital evolution was a significant driver of their thermal histories. Rather, these features may indicate a significant role for impact-induced thermal and physical evolution. Geophysical properties along with measured crater counts can be used to constrain the bombardment history of the MSMs. Here we apply a fully three-dimensional Monte Carlo cratering model along with Rhea's measured cratering to provide constraints on the cumulative bombardment mass (Mb) experienced by the moon. The classic Nice model estimates Rhea's cumulative bombardment mass (MNice) to be 8.4x10^19 kg; our preliminary results suggest Rhea experienced a bombardment of 0.05 MNice < Mb < 0.06 MNice. Results agree well with similar constraints from Iapetus and provide further support to the Nice II model, which suggests a reduced bombardment for the outer solar system due to the planetesimals having higher kinetic energies. The inferred Mb and typical impact characteristics suggests Rhea may avoid runaway differentiation.

  2. Structural analysis of xyloglucan oligosaccharides by [sup 1]H-N. M. R. spectroscopy and fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, W.S.; Halbeek, H. van; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1990-01-01

    A method to determine rapidly the identities and proportions of the oligosaccharide repeating-units in plant cell-wall xyloglucans by 1D [sup 1]H-N.M.R. spectroscopy was developed. Six of the most commonly found xyloglucan oligosaccharide subunits (including three subunits that had not been fully characterized previously) were prepared by endo-(I [yields] 4)-[beta]-D-glucanase digestion of xyloglucans from various plant species. The oligosaccharides were reduced to the corresponding oligoglycosyl-alditols, purified, and characterized by glycosyl composition and linkage analysis, [sup 1]H-N.M.R. spectroscopy, and f.a.b.-mass spectrometry. Correlations between the [sup 1]H-N.M.R. spectra and the structures of the oligoglycosyl-alditols can be used to identify oligoglycosyl-alditols derived from xyloglucans of unknown structure. The identities and relative amounts of the oligosaccharide subunits of xyloglucans isolated from tamarind seed and rapeseed hulls were determined on this basis.

  3. Chiral recognition detected by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, M

    1997-01-01

    Detection of chiral recognition in various intermolecular interaction systems using mass spectrometry has become important for the modern fields of analytical chemistry, organic chemistry, and biochemistry due to the characteristic nature of the rapid method and the trace amount needed. This review presents the various methods for detecting and evaluating chiral recognition used primarily in fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Emphasis is put on fundamentals and applications of these methods for variously existing enantioselective intermolecular interaction systems.

  4. Optical, mass, and auger spectra from e-bombarded KBr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, E.T.; Kamada, M.

    1988-01-01

    We have measured the mass spectrum and optical emission lines of neutral potassium atoms ejected from KBr at T = 300/degree/K and 443/degree/K bombarded by 2-keV electrons. The room-temperature data may be complicated by the nonstoichiometry of the alkali-enriched sample surface and seem difficult to interpret. The high-temperature sample, which maintains the proper stoichiometry, produces data in support of gas-phase excitation of alkali atoms desorbed from the surface. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry of carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Breeman, R.B. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Schmitz, H.H.; Schwartz, S.J. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Positive ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) using a double-focusing mass spectrometer with linked scanning at constant B/E and high-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) was used to differentiate 17 different cartenoids, including {beta}-apo-8{prime}- carotenal, astaxanthin, {alpha}-carotene, {beta}-carotene, {gamma}-carotene, {zeta}-carotene, canthaxanthin, {beta}-cryptoxanthin, isozeaxanthin bis (pelargonate), neoxanthin, neurosporene, nonaprene, lutein, lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene, and zeaxanthin. The carotenoids were either synthetic or isolated from plant tissues. The use of FAB ionization minimized degradation or rearrangement of the carotenoid structures due to the inherent thermal instability generally ascribed to these compounds. Instead of protonated molecules, both polar xanthophylls and nonpolar carotenes formed molecular ions, M{sup {center_dot}+}, during FAB ionization. Following collisionally activated dissociation, fragment ions of selected molecular ion precursors showed structural features indicative of the presence of hydroxyl groups, ring systems, ester groups, and aldehyde groups and the extent of aliphatic polyene conjugation. The fragmentation patterns observed in the mass spectra herein may be used as a reference for the structural determination of carotenoids isolated from plant and animal tissues. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Structure determination of adipokinetic hormones using fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry; An unknown adipokinetic hormone (AKH-III) from Locusta migratoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heerma, W.; Versluis, C.; Lankhof, H. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Faculty of Chemistry, Department of Analytical Molecular Spectrometry); Oudejans, R.C.H.M.; Kooiman, F.P.; Beenakkers, A.M.T. (Utrecht University (Netherlands). Department of Experimental Zoology)

    1991-08-01

    Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry combined with various tandem mass spectrometric techniques and accurate mass measurement were used to elucidate the structure of an unknown biologically active peptide isolated from Locusa migratoria. (author). 23 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 schemes.

  7. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy of ion-bombarded Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Elswijk, H.B.; Loenen, van E.J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    1992-01-01

    Surfaces of Si(111)-(7×7) and Si(100)-(2×1) were bombarded by 3-keV Ar+ ions at doses of ≤1012 ions cm-2 to study the effect of individual ion impacts on the atomic structure of surfaces. Atom-resolved images show damaged regions of missing and displaced atoms. Current-imaging tunneling spectroscop

  8. Fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectrometry: a mass spectral investigation of some of the insulins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, M; Bordoli, R S; Elliott, G J; Tyler, A N; Bill, J C; Green, B N

    1984-04-01

    Mass measurements of the protonated molecules [M + H]+ of four insulins are presented. In addition, structurally significant fragment ions are observed in the mass spectrum and metastable scanning has been used to link these ions to the protonated molecule.

  9. Diamond-like carbon layers modified by ion bombardment during growth and researched by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocourek, Tomáš; Jelínek, Miroslav; Písařík, Petr; Remsa, Jan; Janovská, Michaela; Landa, Michal; Zemek, Josef; Havránek, Vladimír

    2017-09-01

    Biocompatible Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films were prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition technique using the laser energy density of 10 J cm-2 on the graphite target. The surface of the grown film was modified during the deposition by bombardment with argon, xenon, nitrogen or oxygen ions. The ion energy (up to 150 eV) was changed by gun voltage and by ionic current. The films with high and low diamond/graphite content were prepared. Physical and mechanical properties of biocompatible DLC thin layers prepared by hybrid laser technology were studied. The composition of layers and the content trace elements were determined by the methods of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Particle Induced X-ray Emission. The content of sp2 and sp3 bonds was measured using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. For different energy of argon and oxygen ions the maximum of sp3 bonds content was found (83.63% of sp3 bonds for argon ions). All films were smooth, which was confirmed by profilometry and Atomic Force Microscopy measurements. Maximum roughness Ra and RMS was did not exceed 1 nm. The Younǵs and shear moduli were studied by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy. The Young's Modulus attained the value of 601 GPa and the shear Modulus attained the value of 253 GPa at the energy of 30 eV of Ar ions. The influence of ion bombardment on DLC film properties is discussed.

  10. On-line analysis of penicillin blood levels in the live rat by combined microdialysis/fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, R.M.; Lin, S. N.

    1990-01-01

    The combination of microdialysis and fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry has been used to follow the pharmacokinetics of penicillin G directly in the blood-stream of a live rat. After the intramuscular injection of the antibiotic, the blood dialysate was allowed to flow into the mass spectrometer via the continuous-flow/fast-atom bombardment interface. Tandem mass spectrometry provided the means for isolating and recording the ion fragments produced from the drug as the dialysate was expo...

  11. Spectroscopy for the Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Robert J.; Hopkins, Scott; Power, William P.; Leung, Tong; Hepburn, John

    2015-06-01

    Undergraduate students in all areas of science encounter one or more types of spectroscopy as an essential tool in their discipline, but most never take the advanced physics or chemistry courses in which the subject is normally taught. To address this problem, for over 20 years our department has been teaching a popular Introductory Spectroscopy course that assumes as background only a one-term introductory chemistry course containing a unit on atomic theory, and a familiarity with rudimentary calculus. This survey course provides an introduction to microwave, infrared, Raman, electronic, photoelectron and NMR spectroscopy in a manner that allows students to understand many of these phenomena as intuitive generalizations of the problem of a particle in a 1-D box or a particle-on-a-ring, and does not require any high level mathematics.

  12. Carbon cluster diagnostics-I: Direct Recoil Spectroscopy (DRS) of Ar+ and Kr+ bombarded graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Shoaib; Qayyum, A; Ahmad, B; Bahar, K; Arshed, W

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the energy spectra of multiply charged positive and negative carbon ions recoiling from graphite surface under 100 and 150 keV argon and krypton ion bombardment are presented. With the energy spectrometer set at recoil angle of 79.5 degrees, direct recoil (DR) peaks have been observed with singly as well as multiply charged carbon ions , where n = 1 to 6. These monatomic and cluster ions have been observed recoiling with the characteristic recoil energy E(DR) . We have observed sharp DR peaks. A collimated projectile beam with small divergence is supplemented with a similar collimation before the energy analyzer to reduce the background of sputtered ions due to scattered projectiles.

  13. Mass spectrometric identification of C60 fragmentation regimes under energetic Cs+ bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Zeeshan, Sumaira; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Three C60 fragmentation regimes in fullerite bombarded by Cs+ are identified as a function of its energy. C2 is the major species sputtered at all energies. For E(Cs+) < 1 keV C2 emissions dominate. C2 and C1 have highest intensities between 1 and 3 keV with increasing contributions from C3 and C4. Intensities of all fragments maximize around 2 keV. Above 3 keV, fragments densities stabilize. The roles of and the contributions from direct recoils and collision cascades are determined. Maximum direct recoil energy delivered to the C60 fullerite cage is 210 eV at which only C2 emissions occur is identified and an explanation provided. The three fragmentation regimes under continued Cs+ bombardment eventually lead to complete destruction of the C60 cages transforming fullerite into amorphous carbon

  14. Comparative mass spectrometric analyses of Photofrin oligomers by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, M M; Tabei, K; Tsao, R; Pastel, M J; Pandey, R K; Berkenkamp, S; Hillenkamp, F; de Vries, M S

    1999-06-01

    Photofrin (porfimer sodium) is a porphyrin derivative used in the treatment of a variety of cancers by photodynamic therapy. This oligomer complex and a variety of porphyrin monomers, dimers and trimers were analyzed with five different mass spectral ionization techniques: fast atom bombardment, UV and IR matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, electrospray ionization, and laser desorption/jet-cooling photoionization. All five approaches resulted in very similar oligomer distributions with an average oligomer length of 2.7 +/- 0.1 porphyrin units. In addition to the Photofrin analysis, this study provides a side-by-side comparison of the spectra for the five different mass spectrometric techniques.

  15. Metabolism of cycloate in radish leaf: metabolite identification by packed capillary flow fast atom bombardment tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B C; Barnes, J P; Staub, R E; Walker, F H; Kerlinger, N

    1994-10-01

    The metabolism of cycloate, a thiocarbamate herbicide, was investigated in mature radish leaf. Twelve new metabolites were identified by liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis using fast atom bombardment and packed capillary liquid chromatography columns. Full-scan and tandem mass spectrometric methods were employed. Application of the on-column focusing technique resulted in identifications with injections of as little as 15 ng of metabolite (20 ppb in radish). This injection technique allows the practical use of packed capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry in sample-limited applications. Cycloate is oxidized to several ring-hydroxylated isomers that are subsequently glucosylated and esterified with malonic acid. Cycloate is also conjugated with glutathione. Metabolic hydrolysis of the glutathione conjugate formed a cysteine conjugate that is further metabolized by amidation with either malonic or acetic acid. Transamination of the cysteine conjugate gave a thiolactic acid derivative. Metabolites were also identified that were the result of both ring-hydroxylation and conjugation with glutathione. One of these, an N-acetylcysteine conjugate, is the first report of a mercapturic acid in plants. The structures of two of the new metabolites were confirmed by chemical synthesis.

  16. Fast atom bombardment mass spectral analysis of three new oxidative products of primaquine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sukesh N.; Dua, V. K.

    2004-03-01

    FAB mass spectrum of 5,5-di-[6-methoxy-8-(4'-amino-1'butyl amino)] quinoline (PI) was recorded in three different concentrations to establish the structure of new oxidative products of primaquine and also the effect of matrix on percentage relative abundance of molecular as well as fragment ions which were demonstrated first time. At three concentrations, three different behaviors of matrix, molecular and fragment ions were observed. At higher concentration (>1 nM) molecular ion behaved as a base peak, but due to side reaction with matrix certain extra peak were also obtained. Thus, the higher concentration was interesting to show the side reaction of analyte with m-nitro-benzyl alcohol (NBA) but not for molecular weight determination. At the lowest concentration (NBA as a matrix was recorded in between 0.6 and 1 nM concentrations for the structural elucidation of new compounds. Molecular ions and fragment ions of 5,5-di-[6-methoxy-8-(4'-amino-1' butyl amino)] quinoline (PI), 6-methoxy-5,8-di-[4'amino-1'-methyl butyl amino] quinoline (PII), and 5,5-di-[7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-8(4'-amino-1'-methyl butyl amino)] quinoline (PIII) were identified. The fragment ions were obtained due to ring cleavages, Retero-Diels-Alder reaction (RDA), loss of side chain, proton transfer and substituted groups of the ring. On the basis of the fragmentation schemes and molecular ion peaks the structure of three new compounds PI, PII and PIII were proposed. In vitro studies showed that the compounds PI and PII had four times more gametocytocidal activity than primaquine but the compound 6-methoxy-5,8-di-[4'-amino-1'-methyl butyl amino] quinoline (PII) was found to have good gametocytocidal activity against Plasmodium yoelli infected mice at 10 mg kg-1 dose in vivo. Therefore, the spectra reported might serve as reference for the development of new molecules for the radical cure of relapsing malaria.

  17. Oxidation of nickel surfaces by low energy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saric, Iva [Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Rijeka (Croatia); Center for Micro and Nano Sciences and Technologies, University of Rijeka (Croatia); Peter, Robert; Kavre, Ivna; Badovinac, Ivana Jelovica; Petravic, Mladen [Center for Micro and Nano Sciences and Technologies, University of Rijeka (Croatia); Department of Physics, University of Rijeka (Croatia)

    2016-03-15

    We have studied formation of oxides on Ni surfaces by low energy oxygen bombardment using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Different oxidation states of Ni ions have been identified in XPS spectra measured around Ni 2p and O 1s core-levels. We have compared our results with thermal oxidation of Ni and shown that ion bombardment is more efficient in creating thin oxide films on Ni surfaces. The dominant Ni-oxide in both oxidation processes is NiO (Ni{sup 2+} oxidation state), while some Ni{sub 2}O{sub 3} contributions (Ni{sup 3+} oxidation state) are still present in all oxidised samples. The oxide thickness of bombarded Ni samples, as determined by SIMS, was shown to be related to the penetration depth of oxygen ions in Ni.

  18. Valence-band states of ion-bombarded polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, A. (Istituto di Metodologie e Tecnologie per la Microelettronica, CNR, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania, Italy (IT)); Foti, G. (Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, Corso Italia 57, 95129 Catania, (Italy)); Hwu, Y. (Synchrotron Radiation Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589-3097 (USA)); Margaritondo, G. (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Department de Physique, PHB-Ecublens, CH 1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland))

    1991-08-01

    Ion-bombarded polystyrene with a 0.5-keV Ar{sup +} beam has been investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy performed with synchrotron radiation. After a dose of 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} the evolution of the valence band of the bombarded sample towards an amorphous carbonlike configuration is reported. From the analysis of valence-band spectra we estimated the out-diffusion of hydrogen and showed that its electronic states remain well identified and stable until the hydrogen presence is about 35% with respect to the pristine sample. Finally, comparison with mass spectroscopy measurements on deuterated polystyrene has been performed to determine hydrogen evolution during the ion irradiation.

  19. Constraining exoplanet mass from transmission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Julien; Seager, Sara

    2013-12-20

    Determination of an exoplanet's mass is a key to understanding its basic properties, including its potential for supporting life. To date, mass constraints for exoplanets are predominantly based on radial velocity (RV) measurements, which are not suited for planets with low masses, large semimajor axes, or those orbiting faint or active stars. Here, we present a method to extract an exoplanet's mass solely from its transmission spectrum. We find good agreement between the mass retrieved for the hot Jupiter HD 189733b from transmission spectroscopy with that from RV measurements. Our method will be able to retrieve the masses of Earth-sized and super-Earth planets using data from future space telescopes that were initially designed for atmospheric characterization.

  20. Laser fluorescence spectroscopy of zinc neutrals originating from laser-irradiated and ion-bombarded zinc sulfide and zinc surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlinghaus, H. F.; Calaway, W. F.; Young, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Chase, L. L.

    Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, employing high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) as a probe, have been used to measure the yield and velocity distribution of Zn atoms ejected from a ZnS single crystal under irradiation by 308 nm photons. By comparison with the known ion sputtering yield for pure zinc, the absolute yield was determined to be 10 to the 10th power atoms/pulse at a laser fluence of 30 mJ/sq cm. The velocity distribution of the Zn atoms could be fitted by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, having characteristic temperature of approx 2300 K. In addition, Doppler-shift techniques have been combined with TOF measurements in order to separate prompt from delayed emission of ablated atoms, as well as to probe possible molecular or cluster fragmentation. The results obtained suggest the possibility of molecular or cluster emission from ZnS.

  1. Magic-angle thermal desorption mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Steven W.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1990-02-01

    Accurate quantitative measurements of desorption rates or adsorbate coverages in thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDS) using line-of-sight mass spectrometers are hindered by the fact that the angular distributions of desorption flux can vary widely from desorbate to desorbate, ranging from cos 1ø to cos 9 ø for most species studied to date (ø = polar angle from surface normal). These differences can easily lead to errors exceeding 400% in measuring the relative desorption rates of different species. We show here that, by placing the mass spectrometer's ion source or entrance aperture at a "magic-angle" ø mthese errors can be reduced to less than 26% maximum deviation (or ± 7% standard deviation). Depending upon the sample-to-detector distance, ø m varies from ~ 42° to 34°. It is recommended that TDS experiments be performed at this "magic-angle" for improvement in the quantitative accuracy of coverage or rate measurements.

  2. Electric Propulsion Induced Secondary Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Rashied; Landis, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    A document highlights a means to complement remote spectroscopy while also providing in situ surface samples without a landed system. Historically, most compositional analysis of small body surfaces has been done remotely by analyzing reflection or nuclear spectra. However, neither provides direct measurement that can unambiguously constrain the global surface composition and most importantly, the nature of trace composition and second-phase impurities. Recently, missions such as Deep Space 1 and Dawn have utilized electric propulsion (EP) accelerated, high-energy collimated beam of Xe+ ions to propel deep space missions to their target bodies. The energies of the Xe+ are sufficient to cause sputtering interactions, which eject material from the top microns of a targeted surface. Using a mass spectrometer, the sputtered material can be determined. The sputtering properties of EP exhaust can be used to determine detailed surface composition of atmosphereless bodies by electric propulsion induced secondary mass spectroscopy (EPI-SMS). EPI-SMS operation has three high-level requirements: EP system, mass spectrometer, and altitude of about 10 km. Approximately 1 keV Xe+ has been studied and proven to generate high sputtering yields in metallic substrates. Using these yields, first-order calculations predict that EPI-SMS will yield high signal-to-noise at altitudes greater than 10 km with both electrostatic and Hall thrusters.

  3. Ion bombardment of polyimide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, B. J.; Vasile, M. J.

    1989-07-01

    Surface modification techniques such as wet chemical etching, oxidizing flames, and plasma treatments (inert ion sputtering and reactive ion etching) have been used to change the surface chemistry of polymers and improve adhesion. With an increase in the use of polyimides for microelectronic applications, the technique of ion sputtering to enhance polymer-to-metal adhesion is receiving increased attention. For this study, the argon-ion bombardment surfaces of pyromellitic dianhydride and oxydianiline (PMDA--ODA) and biphenyl tetracarboxylic dianhydride and phenylene diamine (BPDA--PDA) polyimide films were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as a function of ion dose. Graphite and high-density polyethylene were also examined by XPS for comparison of C 1/ital s/ peak width and binding-energy assignments. Results indicate that at low ion doses the surface of the polyimide does not change chemically, although adsorbed species are eliminated. At higher doses the chemical composition is altered and is dramatically reflected in the C 1/ital s/ spectra where graphiticlike structures become evident and the prominent carbonyl peak is reduced significantly. Both polyimides demonstrate similar chemical changes after heavy ion bombardment. Atomic composition of PMDA--ODA and BPDA--PDA polymers are almost identical after heavy ion bombardment.

  4. Mass loss from red giants - Infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannier, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    A discussion is presented of IR spectroscopy, particularly high-resolution spectroscopy in the approximately 1-20 micron band, as it impacts the study of circumstellar envelopes. The molecular bands within this region contain an enormous amount of information, especially when observed with sufficient resolution to obtain kinematic information. In a single spectrum, it is possible to resolve lines from up to 50 different rotational/vibrational levels of a given molecule and to detect several different isotopic variants. When high resolution techniques are combined with mapping techniques and/or time sequence observations of variable stars, the resulting information can paint a very detailed picture of the mass-loss phenomenon. To date, near-IR observations have been made of 20 molecular species. CO is the most widely observed molecule and useful information has been gleaned from the observed rotational excitation, kinematics, time variability and spatial structure of its lines. Examples of different observing techniques are discussed in the following sections.

  5. Electron bombardment of water adsorbed on Zr(0001) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Ankrah, S; Ramsier, R D

    2003-01-01

    A study of the effects of electron bombardment on water adsorbed on Zr(0001) is reported. Zirconium surfaces are dosed with isotopic water mixtures at 160 K followed by electron bombardment (485 eV). The system is then probed by low energy electron diffraction, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). No evidence is found that would indicate preferential mixing of hydrogen from the bulk with isotopic water dissociation products during TPD. However, electron bombardment results in the sharpening of a hydrogen/deuterium desorption peak near 320 K and the production of water near 730 K at low water exposures. In addition, although water does not oxidize Zr(0001) thermally, electron bombardment of adsorbed water induces a shift of about 2 eV in the Zr AES features indicating that the surface is partially oxidized by electron bombardment.

  6. Evaluation of biochars by temperature programmed oxidation/mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar from the thermochemical conversion of biomass was evaluated by Temperature Programmed Oxidation (TPO) coupled with mass spectroscopy. This technique can be used to assess the oxidative reactivity of carbonaceous solids where higher temperature reactivity indicates greater structural order. ...

  7. Chronology and Sources of Lunar Impact Bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija

    2011-01-01

    The Moon has suffered intense impact bombardment ending at 3.9 Gyr ago, and this bombardment probably affected all of the inner Solar System. Basin magnetization signatures and lunar crater size-distributions indicate that the last episode of bombardment at about 3.85 Gyr ago was less extensive than previously thought. We explore the contribution of the primordial Mars-crosser population to early lunar bombardment. We find that Mars-crosser population initially decays with a 80-Myr half-life, with the long tail of survivors clustering on temporarily non-Mars-crossing orbits between 1.8 and 2 AU. These survivors decay with half-life of about 600 Myr and are progenitors of the extant Hungaria asteroid group in the same region. We estimate the primordial Mars-crosser population contained about 0.01-0.02 Earth masses. Such initial population is consistent with no lunar basins forming after 3.8 Gya and the amount of mass in the Hungaria group. As they survive longer and in greater numbers than other primordial pop...

  8. Illusory Late Heavy Bombardments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnke, Patrick; Harrison, T Mark

    2016-09-27

    The Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB), a hypothesized impact spike at ∼3.9 Ga, is one of the major scientific concepts to emerge from Apollo-era lunar exploration. A significant portion of the evidence for the existence of the LHB comes from histograms of (40)Ar/(39)Ar "plateau" ages (i.e., regions selected on the basis of apparent isochroneity). However, due to lunar magmatism and overprinting from subsequent impact events, virtually all Apollo-era samples show evidence for (40)Ar/(39)Ar age spectrum disturbances, leaving open the possibility that partial (40)Ar* resetting could bias interpretation of bombardment histories due to plateaus yielding misleadingly young ages. We examine this possibility through a physical model of (40)Ar* diffusion in Apollo samples and test the uniqueness of the impact histories obtained by inverting plateau age histograms. Our results show that plateau histograms tend to yield age peaks, even in those cases where the input impact curve did not contain such a spike, in part due to the episodic nature of lunar crust or parent body formation. Restated, monotonically declining impact histories yield apparent age peaks that could be misinterpreted as LHB-type events. We further conclude that the assignment of apparent (40)Ar/(39)Ar plateau ages bears an undesirably high degree of subjectivity. When compounded by inappropriate interpretations of histograms constructed from plateau ages, interpretation of apparent, but illusory, impact spikes is likely.

  9. Mass spectroscopy of Picrotoxanolides of Coriaria, Coriamyrtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre Galvis Luis Enrique

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for the identification and characterization of coriamyrtin, a toxic sesquiterpene lactone ocurring in Colombian material of Goriam microphylla. Poir., is provided by means of mass spectral data, discussions of the fragmentation patterns of the molecule and analogies with the related compound, tutin.Se presenta evidencia para la caracterización e identificación de
    Coriamirtina, una lactona sesquiterpénica de carácter tóxico presente en material colombiano de Goria:m microphylla. Poir., mediante el  análisis de espectroscopia de masas, una discusión de los patrones de fragmentación de la molécula y analogías con tutina.

  10. Fission fragment mass distributions via prompt -ray spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L S Danu; D C Biswas; B K Nayak; R K Choudhury

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of fragment masses formed in nuclear fission is one of the most striking features of the process. Such measurements are very important to understand the shape evolution of the nucleus from ground state to scission through intermediate saddle points. The fission fragment mass distributions, generally obtained via conventional methods (i.e., by measuring the energy and/or the velocity of the correlated fission fragments) are limited to a mass resolution of 4–5 units. On the other hand, by employing the -ray spectroscopy, it is possible to estimate the yield of individual fission fragments. In this work, determination of the fission fragment mass distribution by employing prompt -ray spectroscopy is described along with the recent results on 238U(18O, f) and 238U(32S, f) systems.

  11. Determination of optical damage cross-sections and volumes surrounding ion bombardment tracks in GaAs using coherent acoustic phonon spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigerwald, A.; Hmelo, A. B.; Varga, K.; Feldman, L. C.; Tolk, N.

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of coherent acoustic phonon spectroscopy analysis of band-edge optical modification of GaAs irradiated with 400 keV Ne++ for doses between 1011-1013 cm-2. We relate this optical modification to the structural damage density as predicted by simulation and verified by ion channeling analysis. Crystal damage is observed to cause optical modification that reduces the amplitude of the optoacoustic signal. The depth-dependent nature of the optoacoustic measurement allows us to determine optical damage cross-sections along the ion track, which are found to vary as a function of position along the track. Unexpectedly, we find that this optical modification is primarily dependent on the structural damage density and insensitive to the specific defect configuration along the ion track, suggesting that a simple model of defect density along the track is sufficient to characterize the observed optical changes. The extent of optical modification is strongly probe frequency-dependent as the frequency is detuned from the GaAs band edge. As determined from the experimental measurements, the spatial extent of optical modification exceeds the spatial extent of the structural disorder by an order of magnitude.

  12. Improvements to TITAN's mass measurement and decay spectroscopy capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascar, D.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Alanssari, M.; Chowdhury, U.; Even, J.; Finlay, A.; Gallant, A. T.; Good, M.; Klawitter, R.; Kootte, B.; Li, T.; Leach, K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Mayer, A. J.; Schultz, B. E.; Schupp, R.; Short, D. A.; Andreoiu, C.; Dilling, J.; Gwinner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of β -stability than ever before goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their less exotic counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity, and open the door to access isotopes not available from the ISOL method via in-trap decay and recapture. This was recently demonstrated during TITAN's mass measurement of 30 Al. The EBIT's decay spectroscopy setup was commissioned with a successful branching ratio and half-life measurement of 124 Cs. Charge breeding in the EBIT increases the energy spread of the ion bunch sent to the Penning trap for mass measurement, so a new Cooler PEnning Trap (CPET), which aims to cool highly charged ions with an electron plasma, is undergoing offline commissioning. Already CPET has demonstrated the trapping and self-cooling of a room-temperature electron plasma that was stored for several minutes. A new detector has been installed inside the CPET magnetic field which will allow for in-magnet charged particle detection.

  13. Enhanced diffusion and precipitation in Cu: In alloys due to low energy ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivaud, L.; Ward, I. D.; Eltoukhy, A. H.; Greene, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of low energy Ar + ion bombardment on supersaturated Cu: 10at%-In alloys at room temperature were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Both 1 and 3 keV Ar + bombardment resulted in the preferential sputter removal of In. The surface and altered layer remained supersaturated however, and ion bombardment enhanced diffusion was sufficient to allow the precipitation of In-rich δ-phase (~30 at% In) particles in the near-surface region. The average precipitate size and number density in samples bombarded with 3 keV Ar + ions were ~200 Å and 10 10 cm -2 as compared to 150 A and 10 9 cm -2 in samples bombarded at 1 keV. The ion bombardment induced precipitates nucleated within the grains rather than, as was observed for thermally induced precipitates, at grain boundaries.

  14. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  15. Optical Spectroscopy of 2MASS Color-Selected Ultracool Subdwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; Kirkpatrick, J D; Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2006-01-01

    We present Gemini GMOS and Magellan LDSS-3 optical spectroscopy for seven ultracool subdwarf candidates color-selected from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Five are identified as late-type subdwarfs, including the previously reported sdM9.5 SSSPM 1013-1356 and L subdwarf 2MASS 1626+3925, and a new sdM8.5 2MASS 0142+0523. 2MASS 1640+1231 exhibits spectral features intermediate between a late-type M dwarf and subdwarf, similar to the previously identified high proper motion star SSSPM 1444-2019, and we classify both sources as mild subdwarfs, d/sdM9. 2MASS 1227-0447 is a new ultracool extreme subdwarf, spectral type esdM7.5. Spectral model fits yield metallicities that are consistent with these metallicity classifications. Effective temperatures track with numerical subtype within a metallicity class, although they are not equivalent across metallicity classes. As a first attempt to delineate subtypes in the L subdwarf regime we classify 2MASS 1626+3925 and the previously identified 2MASS 0532+8246 as sdL4 and s...

  16. Laser ablation mass spectroscopy of nineteenth century daguerreotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Danel L. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Golovlev, Valerie V. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Gresalfi, Michael J. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Chaney, John A. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Feigerle, Charles S. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Miller, John C. [Life Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6125 (United States); Romer, Grant [International Museum of Photography and Film, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave., Rochester, New York 14607-2298 (United States); Messier, Paul [Boston Art Conservation, 60 Oak Square Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02135 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Laser desorption mass spectroscopy has been used to characterize both modern and {approx}150-year-old daguerreotypes. Such investigations are a necessary prelude to attempts to clean them of tarnish and other contaminants by laser ablation of the surface layers. Both positive- and negative-ion time-of-flight spectra were obtained following YAG laser ablation/desorption at 1064, 532, and 355 nm. Major peaks obtained from several daguerreotypes reveal expected elements from the substrate (Ag, Cu) as well as the developing (Hg) and gilding (Au) processes. Silver clusters (Ag{sub n}) may reflect surface desorption of molecules or, alternatively, aggregates formed in the ejection process. Silver sulfide molecules observed from old daguerreotypes are the signature of the tarnishing process. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  17. Improvements to TITAN's Mass Measurement and Decay Spectroscopy Capabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lascar, D; Chowdhury, U; Finlay, A; Gallant, A T; Good, M; Klawitter, R; Kootte, B; Leach, K G; Lennarz, A; Leistenschneider, E; Schultz, B E; Schupp, R; Short, D A; Andreoiu, C; Dilling, J; Gwinner, G

    2015-01-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of $\\beta$-stability goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their more stable counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN) facility deploys three ion traps, with a fourth in the commissioning phase, to perform and support Penning trap mass spectrometry and in-trap decay spectroscopy on some of the shortest-lived nuclei ever studied. We report on recent advances and updates to the TITAN facility since the 2012 EMIS Conference. TITAN's charge breeding capabilities have been improved and in-trap decay spectroscopy can be performed in TITAN's electron beam ion trap (EBIT). Higher charge states can improve the precision of mass measurements, reduce the beam-time requirements for a given measurement, improve beam purity and opens the door to access, via in-trap decay and recapture, isotope...

  18. Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions

    CERN Document Server

    Polfer, Nicolas C

    2014-01-01

    This lecture notes book presents how enhanced structural information of biomolecular ions can be obtained from interaction with photons of specific frequency - laser light. The methods described in the book ""Laser photodissociation and spectroscopy of mass-separated biomolecular ions"" make use of the fact that the discrete energy and fast time scale of photoexcitation can provide more control in ion activation. This activation is the crucial process producing structure-informative product ions that cannot be generated with more conventional heating methods, such as collisional activation. Th

  19. A Review on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyalakshmi G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy is routinely used in many diverse research fields such as earth, environmental, life and forensic sciences and in food, material, chemical, semiconductor and nuclear industries. The high ion density and the high temperature in a plasma provide an ideal atomizer and element ionizer for all types of samples and materials introduced by a specialised devices .outstanding properties such as high sensitivity, relative salt tolerance, compound-independent element response and highest quantitation accuracy lead to the unchallenged performance of ICPMS in efficiently detecting, identifying and reliably quantifying trace element. The increasing availability of relevant reference compounds and high separation selectively extend the molecular identification capability of ICPMS hyphenated to species – specific separation techniques

  20. Characterization of a Continuous Wave Laser for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy Analysis in Nuclear Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    OF A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER FOR RESONANCE IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS by Sunny G. Lau June 2015 Thesis...IONIZATION MASS SPECTROSCOPY ANALYSIS IN NUCLEAR FORENSICS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Sunny G. Lau 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...200 words) The application of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) to nuclear forensics involves the use of lasers to selectively ionize

  1. Ion bombardment in RF photoguns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozdeyev,E.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V. N.

    2009-05-04

    A linac-ring eRHIC design requires a high-intensity CW source of polarized electrons. An SRF gun is viable option that can deliver the required beam. Numerical simulations presented elsewhere have shown that ion bombardment can occur in an RF gun, possibly limiting lifetime of a NEA GaAs cathode. In this paper, we analytically solve the equations of motion of ions in an RF gun using the ponderomotive potential of the Rf field. We apply the method to the BNL 1/2-cell SRF photogun and demonstrate that a significant portion of ions produced in the gun can reach the cathode if no special precautions are taken. Also, the paper discusses possible mitigation techniques that can reduce the rate of ion bombardment.

  2. Photoelectron Spectroscopy,Photoionization Mass Spectroscopy,and Theoretical Study on CCI3SSCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Du; Li Yao; Mao-fa Ge

    2008-01-01

    Trichloromethanesulfenyl thiocyanate,CCI3SSCN,was generated and studied by photoelectron spectroscoy (PES),photoionization mass spectroscopy(PIMS),and theoretical calculations.This molecule exhibits a gaucho conformation,and the torsional angle around S-S bond is 91.4° due to the sulfur-sulfur lone pair interactions.After ionization,the ground-state cationic-radical form of CC13SSCN+ adopts a trans planar main-atom structure with Cs symmetry.The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of CCI3SSCN corresponds to the electrons mainly localized on the sulfur 3p lone pair MO.The first ionization energy is determined to be 10.40 eV.

  3. Thermal effects of impact bombardments on Noachian Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Oleg; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2016-05-01

    Noachian (prior to ca. 3700 Ma) terranes are the oldest and most heavily cratered landscapes on Mars, with crater densities comparable to the ancient highlands of the Moon and Mercury. Intense early cratering affected Mars by melting and fracturing its crust, draping large areas in impact ejecta, generating regional-scale hydrothermal systems, and increasing atmospheric pressure (and thereby, temperature) to periodically re-start an otherwise moribund hydrological cycle. Post primary-accretionary bombardment scenarios that shaped early Mars can be imagined in two ways: either as a simple exponential decay with an approximately 100 Myr half-life, or as a "sawtooth" timeline characterized by both faster-than-exponential decay from primary accretion and relatively lower total delivered mass. Indications are that a late bombardment spike was superposed on an otherwise broadly monotonic decline subsequent to primary accretion, of which two types are investigated: a classical "Late Heavy Bombardment" (LHB) peak of impactors centered at ca. 3900 Ma that lasted 100 Myr, and a protracted bombardment typified by a sudden increase in impactor flux at ca. 4100-4200 Ma with a correspondingly longer decay time (≤400 Myr). Numerical models for each of the four bombardment scenarios cited above show that the martian crust mostly escaped exogenic melting from bombardment. We find that depending on the chosen scenario, other physical effects of impacts were more important than melt generation. Model output shows that between 10 and 100% of the Noachian surface was covered by impact craters and blanketed in resultant (hot) ejecta. If early Mars was generally arid and cold, impact-induced heating punctuated this surface state by intermittently destabilizing the near-subsurface cryosphere to generate regional-scale hydrothermal systems. Rather than being deleterious to the proclivity of Noachian Mars to host an emergent biosphere, this intense early impact environment instead

  4. Chlorococcalean microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutes biodiesel characterization with Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati SONAWANE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Chlorococcalean microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutes was found in fresh water Godawari reservoir, Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra State, India. Microalgae are modern biomass for the production of liquid biofuel due to its high solar cultivation efficiency. The collection, harvesting and drying processes were play vital role in converting algal biomass into energy liquid fuel. The oil extraction was the important step for the biodiesel synthesis. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME synthesis was carried through base catalyzed transesterification method. The product was analyzed by using the hyphened techniques like Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GCMS. FT-IR Spectroscopy was results the ester as functional group of obtained product while the Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy was results the six type of fatty acid methyl ester with different concentration. Ankistrodesmus convolutes biodiesel consist of 46.5% saturated and 49.14% unsaturated FAME.

  5. Influence of the ion bombardment of O{sub 2} plasmas on low-k materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonck, Patrick, E-mail: verdonck@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Samara, Vladimir [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Goodyear, Alec [Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferchichi, Abdelkarim; Van Besien, Els; Baklanov, Mikhail R. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Braithwaite, Nicholas [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-31

    In this study, special tests were devised in order to investigate the influence of ion bombardment on the damage induced in low-k dielectrics by oxygen plasmas. By placing a sample that suffered a lot of ion bombardment and one which suffered little ion bombardment simultaneously in the same plasma, it was possible to verify that ion bombardment in fact helped to protect the low-k film against oxygen plasma induced damage. Exhaustive analyses (ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, water contact angle analysis) show that ion bombardment induced the formation of a denser top layer in the film, which then hampered further penetration of active oxygen species deeper into the bulk. This was further confirmed by other tests combining capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that, at least for these plasmas, ion bombardment may help to reduce plasma induced damage to low-k materials.

  6. A collinear tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer for infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG GuanJun; CHI ChaoXian; XING XiaoPeng; DING ChuanFan; ZHOU MingFei

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus based on collinear tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometer has been designed for the measurement of infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions in the gas phase.The ions from a pulsed laser vaporization supersonic ion source are skimmed and mass separated by a Wiley-McLaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer.The ion of interest is mass selected,decelerated and dissociated by a tunable IR laser.The fragment and parent ions are reaccelerated and mass analyzed by the second time-of-flight mass spectrometer.A simple new assembly integrated with mass gate,deceleration and reacceleration ion optics was designed,which allows us to measure the infrared spectra of mass selected ions with high sensitivity and easy timing synchronization.

  7. Thermal decomposition of CH3CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Zhang, Xu; Nimlos, Mark R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg; Osborn, David L.; David, Donald E.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W.; Stanton, John F.; Ellison, G. Barney

    2012-10-01

    A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 μs after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 μs) are identified: H, H2, CH3, CO, CH2=CHOH, HC≡CH, H2O, and CH2=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH3CHO (+M) → CH3 + H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH2CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

  8. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  9. Effects of low and high energy ion bombardment on ETFE polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamisawa, R. A.; De Almeida, A.; Abidzina, V.; Parada, M. A.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.

    2007-04-01

    The polymer ethylenetetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) is used as anti-adherent coatings for food packages and radiation dosimeters. In this work, we compare the damage induced in ETFE bombarded with 100 keV Si ions with that induced by 1 MeV proton bombardment. The damage depends on the type, energy and intensity of the irradiation. Irradiated films were analyzed with optical absorption photospectrometry, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the structural changes caused by ion irradiation. Computer simulations were performed to evaluate the radiation damage.

  10. Challenges to Constraining Exoplanet Masses via Transmission Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalha, Natasha E.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; Mbarek, Rostom

    2017-02-01

    MassSpec, a method for determining the mass of a transiting exoplanet from its transmission spectrum alone, was proposed by de Wit & Seager. The premise of this method relies on the planet’s surface gravity being extracted from the transmission spectrum via its effect on the atmospheric scale height, which in turn determines the strength of absorption features. Here, we further explore the applicability of MassSpec to low-mass exoplanets—specifically those in the super-Earth size range for which radial velocity determinations of the planetary mass can be extremely challenging and resource intensive. Determining the masses of these planets is of the utmost importance because their nature is otherwise highly unconstrained. Without knowledge of the mass, these planets could be rocky, icy, or gas-dominated. To investigate the effects of planetary mass on transmission spectra, we present simulated observations of super-Earths with atmospheres made up of mixtures of H2O and H2, both with and without clouds. We model their transmission spectra and run simulations of each planet as it would be observed with James Webb Space Telescope using the NIRISS, NIRSpec, and MIRI instruments. We find that significant degeneracies exist between transmission spectra of planets with different masses and compositions, making it impossible to unambiguously determine the planet’s mass in many cases.

  11. Methods and Approaches to Mass Spectroscopy Based Protein Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is a review of current mass spectrometers and the role in the field of proteomics. Various instruments are discussed and their strengths and weaknesses are highlighted. In addition, the methods of protein identification using a mass spectrometer are explained as well as data vali...

  12. Tailoring surface properties of polymeric blend material by ion beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Z. I.; Abdul-Kader, A. M.; Rizk, R. A. M.; Ali, M.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, LDPE/SBR polymer blend samples were bombarded with 130 keV He and 320 keV Ar ions at different fluencies ranging from 1×1013 to 2×1016 ions cm-2. The changes in surface properties of the ion-bombarded polymers were investigated with ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The variations in the wettability, surface free energy and spreading coefficient of ion beam bombarded LDPE polymer blend samples have been studied. The UV-vis analysis revealed that the transmission spectra shifted towards lower energy region after bombardment with increasing ion fluence. This shift clearly reflects decrease in optical band gap. A remarkable decrease in the PL intensity with increasing ion beam fluence was observed. The EDX study indicates the oxygen uptake increases with increasing ion fluence. Contact angle measurements showed that wettability, surface free energy and spreading coefficient of LDPE blends samples have increased with increasing ion fluence. This increase in the wettability and surface free energy of the bombarded samples are attributed to formation of oxidized layer on the polymer surface, which apparently occurs after exposure of bombarded samples to the air.

  13. Improvements to TITAN's Mass Measurement and Decay Spectroscopy Capabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lascar, D.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Alanssari, M.; Chowdhury, U.; Even, J.; Finlay, A.; Gallant, A. T.; Good, M.; Klawitter, R.; Kootte, B.; Leach, T. Li K. G.; Lennarz, A.; Leistenschneider, E.; Mayer, A. J.; Schultz, B. E.; Schupp, R.; Short, D. A.; Andreoiu, C.; Dilling, J.; Gwinner, G.

    2016-01-01

    The study of nuclei farther from the valley of $\\beta$-stability goes hand-in-hand with shorter-lived nuclei produced in smaller abundances than their more stable counterparts. The measurement, to high precision, of nuclear masses therefore requires innovations in technique in order to keep up.

  14. Spectroscopy of Young Planetary Mass Candidates with Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jayawardhana, R; Jayawardhana, Ray; Ivanov, Valentin D.

    2006-01-01

    It is now well established that many young brown dwarfs exhibit characteristics similar to classical T Tauri stars, including infrared excess from disks and emission lines related to accretion. Whether the same holds true for even lower mass objects, namely those near and below the Deuterium-burning limit, is an important question. Here we present optical spectra of six isolated planetary mass candidates in Chamaeleon II, Lupus I and Ophiuchus star-forming regions, recently identified by Allers and collaborators to harbor substantial mid-infrared excesses. Our spectra, from ESO's Very Large Telescope and New Technology Telescope, show that four of the targets have spectral types in the ~M9-L1 range, and three of those also exhibit H_alpha. Their luminosities are consistent with masses of ~5-15 M_{Jupiter} according to models of Chabrier, Baraffe and co-workers, thus placing these four objects among the lowest mass brown dwarfs known to be surrounded by circum-sub-stellar disks. Our findings bolster the idea t...

  15. Effects of xe post-bombardment on carbonitrides produced in a low-carbon nitrogen-implanted steel

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, Livio; Ramos, Stella Maris Moura; Vasquez, Adalberto; Zawislak, Fernando Claudio; Behar, Moni

    1990-01-01

    The effects of Xe bombardment on carbonitrides produced by N implantation in a low-carbon steel are studied via conversion electron Mossbauer spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. The results show two main features: dissolution and reprecipitation of the produced carbonitrides and modification of the thermal behavior of the precipitates. Recently we have performed similar experiments bombarding samples of the same steel with He and Ar. Comparison of the experiments shows that irradiatio...

  16. Mass loss from red giants - Results from ultraviolet spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    New instrumentation in space, primarily the IUE spacecraft, has enabled the application of ultraviolet spectroscopic techniques to the determination of physical properties and reliable mass loss rates for red giant winds. One important result is the determination of where in the H-R diagram are found stars with hot outer atmospheres and with cool winds. So far it appears that single cool stars, except perhaps the so-called hybrid stars, have either hot outer atmospheres or cool winds but not both. The C II resonance (1335 A) and intersystem (2325 A) multiplets have been used to derive temperatures, densities, and geometrical extents for the chromospheric portions of red giant winds, with the result that the red giants and the earlier giants with hot coronae have qualitatively different chromospheres. Mass loss rates can now be derived accurately from the analysis of asymmetric emission lines, such as the Mg II resonance lines, and from P Cygni profile lines of atoms in the dominant ionization stage when a hot star is available to probe the wind of a red giant. The Zeta Aur systems, consisting of a K-M supergiant and a main sequence B star are important systems for reliable mass loss rates for the red supergiant components are becoming available.

  17. E × B ion mass spectroscopy in magnetised plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellblom, K. G.; Armstrong, R. J.

    1995-02-01

    A spectrometer based on the E × B drift during the transit time of the ion through a cross field region has been tested in a hydrogen plasma in the Blaamann toroidal plasma device [T. Brundtland, Vacuum 43 (1992) 185]. The magnetic field B, is the field of the device. The electric field E, which is imposed and oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field, is swept with a time long compared to the ion transit time. The ions are accelerated along the magnetic field as they enters the cross field region giving them a velocity and a transit time proportional to the charge over the mass.

  18. Spectroscopy and photometry for low-mass stars in Praesepe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Scott D.; Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Herter, Terry

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained spectral types, H alpha equivalent widths, and optical photometry for a small sample of late K and M dwarf candidate members of the Praesepe open cluster. At least for the small sample of stars we have observed, all of the Paesepe members later than M2 have H alpha in emission. The chromospheric activity of the Praesepe satrs is essentially the same as that for Hyades members of the same mass, as expected since the two clusters are thought to be the same age.

  19. Intracellular protein mass spectroscopy using mid-infrared laser ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, K.; Suzuki, S.

    2007-07-01

    Large-scale analysis of proteins, which can be regarded as functional biomolecule, assumes an important role in the life science. A MALDI using an ultraviolet laser (UV-MALDI) is one of ionization methods without fragmentation and has achieved conformation analysis of proteins. Recently, protein analysis has shifted from conformation analysis to functional and direct one that reserves posttranslational modifications such as the sugar chain addition and phosphorylation. We have proposed a MALDI using a mid-infrared tunable laser (IR-MALDI) as a new ionization method. IR-MALDI is promising because most biomolecules have a specific absorption in mid-infrared range, and IR-MALDI is expected to offer; (1) use of various matrices, (2) use of biomolecules such as water and lipid as the matrix, and (3) super-soft ionization. First, we evaluated the wavelength dependence of ionization of different matrices using a difference frequency generation (DFG) laser, which can tune the wavelength within a range from 5.5 to 10.0 μm. As results, ionization was specifically occurred at 5.8 μm which the C=O vibration stretching bond in matrix material and mass spectrum was observed. Next, protein mass spectrum was observed in the culture cells, MIN6, which secrete insulin, without the conventional cell-preparation processes. We demonstrate that the IR-MALDI has an advantage over the conventional method (UV-MALDI) in direct analysis of intracellular proteins.

  20. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: Reliable techniques for analysis of Parthenium mediated vermicompost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, P.; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Venckatesh, Rajendran

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy have been carried out to investigate the chemical composition of Parthenium mediated vermicompost. Four different concentrations of Parthenium and cow dung mixtures were vermicomposted using the earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae). FT-IR spectra reveal the absence of Parthenin toxin (sesquiterpene lactone) and phenols in vermicompost which was obtained from high concentration of cow dung mixed treatments. GC-MS analysis shows no phenolic compounds and predominant level of intermediate metabolites such as 4,8,12,16-Tetramethylheptadecan-4-olide (7.61%), 2-Pentadecanone, 6,10,14-trimethyl- (5.29%) and Methyl 16-methyl-heptadecanoate (4.69%) during the vermicomposting process. Spectral results indicated that Parthenin toxin and phenols can be eradicated via vermicomposting if mixed with appropriate quantity of cow dung.

  1. Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and optical characterization of a-C-H and BN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, J. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Warner, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The amorphous dielectrics a-C:H and BN were deposited on III-V semiconductors. Optical band gaps as high as 3 eV were measured for a-C:H generated by C4H10 plasmas; a comparison was made with bad gaps obtained from films prepared by CH4 glow discharges. The ion beam deposited BN films exhibited amorphous behavior with band gaps on the order of 5 eV. Film compositions were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The optical properties were characterized by ellipsometry, UV/VIS absorption, and IR reflection and transmission. Etching rates of a-C:H subjected to O2 dicharges were determined.

  2. Spectroscopy of electroproduced light to medium mass lambda hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baturin, Pavlo [Florida Intl Univ., Miami, FL (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and at the same time performs a generalization of the above mentioned interaction for systems with a third quark flavor – strangeness [1]. Production reactions of Λ particles and hypernuclei, as well as spectroscopy and decay modes, provide valuable information on the hyperon interaction. For example, analysis of Λ and hypernuclear decay modes gives knowledge of the properties of weak interactions. The study of the energy of ground and excited states exposes the laws of baryon distribution inside of the nucleus. Investigation of ΛN and ΛΛ potentials is important for baryon-baryon theories that include strange quarks, e.g. SU(3). These potentials are more short-ranged than the ones for NN and therefore the additional degrees of freedom play an essential role.

  3. Low energy ion bombardment enhanced diffusion, segregation, and phase transformations in Cu:In alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivaud, L.; Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Materials Research Lab.; Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Coordinated Science Lab.; Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Dept. of Metallurgy and Mining Engineering)

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy were used to investigate the effects of low energy Ar/sup +/ ion bombardment of supersaturated Cu:In alloys. Ion bombardment always resulted in the preferential sputtering of In although for sample temperatures Tsub(s) approximately > 250/sup 0/C, In loss due to preferential sputtering was increasingly compensated by radiation enhanced surface segregation. At room temperature, the steady state In concentration in the altered layer during irradiation remained supersaturated and enhanced diffusion to ion bombardment-created point defect sinks resulted in the volume precipitation of randomly dispersed In-rich delta phase particles in the near-surface region. Thermally induced precipitates nucleated only at grain boundaries and were only observed at Tsub(s) >= 250/sup 0/C. The average size and number density of radiation-induced precipitates increased with increasing ion bombardment energy Esub(f). Upon termination of ion bombardment at Tsub(s) >= 250/sup 0/C, the In surface concentration always returned to approximately 30 at%. The recovery time for this process decreased with increasing Tsub(s) and Esub(f) due to fast diffusion through near-surface regions containing residual damage such as dislocation loops. The measured widths of the compositionally altered layers were on the order of the ion penetration range.

  4. Infrared ion spectroscopy inside a mass-selective cryogenic 2D linear ion trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismesia, Adam P; Tesler, Larry F; Bell, Matthew R; Bailey, Laura S; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2017-07-27

    We demonstrate operation of the first cryogenic 2D linear ion trap (LIT) with mass-selective capabilities. This trap presents a number of advantages for infrared ion "action" spectroscopy studies, particularly those employing the "tagging/messenger" spectroscopy approach. The high trapping efficiencies, trapping capacities, and low detection limits make 2D LITs a highly suitable choice for low-concentration analytes from scarce biological samples. In our trap, ions can be cooled down to cryogenic temperatures to achieve higher-resolution infrared spectra, and individual ions can be mass selected prior to irradiation for a background-free photodissociation scheme. Conveniently, multiple tagged analyte ions can be mass isolated and efficiently irradiated in the same experiment, allowing their infrared spectra to be recorded in parallel. This multiplexed approach is critical in terms of increasing the duty cycle of infrared ion spectroscopy, which is currently a key weakness of the technique. The compact design of this instrument, coupled with powerful mass selection capabilities, set the stage for making cryogenic infrared ion spectroscopy viable as a bioanalytical tool in small molecule identification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Reactive ion beam etching studies of tungsten with CF sub 4 /argon mixtures using ion scattering spectroscopy and SIMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, T.I.; Deshmukh, V.G.I. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern (UK)); Armour, D.G. (Salford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten foil was bombarded at 550 eV with ion beams generated from CF{sub 4}/Ar gas mixtures. The chemical compositions of the bombarded surface and etch products were determined using Ion Scattering Spectroscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry respectively. As the ratio CF{sub 4}/Ar was increased, the tungsten surface became covered with fluorine atoms. The products observed were positive ions of W, WF, and WF{sub 2}, with WF{sub 2} being only formed above a threshold concentration of CF{sub 4} in the gas mixture. (author).

  6. [Discussion on diagenesis of Xilingang pluton-constrained by X-ray Fluorescence spectroscopy, plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Kun; Chen, Guo-Neng; Zhang, Ke; Huang, Hai-Hua

    2013-05-01

    The results on Xilingang pluton, mainly consisting of red beds, granites containing numerous debris of red beds and granites, obtained by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy show: (1) Xilingang pluton from red beds, granites containing numerous debris of red beds to granites has obvious characteristics of decreasing silicon and alkali content, and rising ignition loss, dark mineral content and oxidation index; (2) Chondrite-normalized REE distribution curves and primitive mantle-normalized spider diagram for trace elements of redbed, granites containing numerous debris of red beds and granites have a good consistency, the distribution characteristics of elements are similar to Nanling transformation-type granite; (3) The value of Raman spectrogram characteristic peak of quartz crystal in Xilingang granite decreased from the center of quartz crystal, and FWHM is steady. According to the above, the authors believe that Xilingang granite formed was related to in-situ melting of red beds and underlying strata and magma consolidation. Volatile components were discharged continuously, and oxidation index decreased gradually in the melting process. In the process of diagenesis, the top of pluton tend to be an ongoing silicon and alkali increase, while TFeO and MgO continue to migrate to bottom, and crystallization environment is a relatively closed and steady system.

  7. Compositional and Optical Properties of Titan Haze Analogs Using Aerosol Mass Spectrometry, Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugelow, M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Tolbert, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The organic haze that surrounds Saturn's moon Titan is formed through the photolysis and electron initiated dissociation of methane and nitrogen. The chemical pathways leading to haze formation and the resulting haze optical properties are still highly uncertain. Here we examine the compositional and optical properties of Titan haze aerosol analogs. By studying these properties together, the impact of haze on Titan's radiative balance can be better understood. The aerosol analogs studied are produced from different initial methane concentrations (0.1, 2 and 10% CH4) using spark discharge excitation. To determine the complex refractive index of the aerosol, we combine two spectroscopic techniques, one that measures absorption and one that measures extinction: photoacoustic spectroscopy coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy (PASCaRD). This technique provides the benefit of a high precision determination of the imaginary component of the refractive index (k), along with the highly sensitive determination of the real component of the refractive index (n). The refractive indices are retrieved at two wavelengths, 405 and 532 nm, using the PASCaRD system. To yield aerosol composition, quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry is used. Compositional information is obtained from a technique that uses isotopically labeled and unlabeled methane gas. I will present preliminary data on the complex refractive indices of Titan aerosol analogs at both wavelengths, in conjunction with the aerosol composition as a percent by weight of carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen. The correlation of optical and chemical properties should be useful for remote sensing instruments probing Titan haze.

  8. JYFLTRAP: a penning trap for precision mass spectroscopy and isobaric purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eronen, T.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Elomaa, V.V.; Gorelov, D.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Kopecky, S.; Moore, I.D.; Penttilae, H.; Rahaman, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Szerypo, J.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    In this article a comprehensive description and performance of the double Penning-trap setup JYFLTRAP will be detailed. The setup is designed for atomic mass measurements of both radioactive and stable ions and additionally serves as a very high-resolution mass separator. The setup is coupled to the IGISOL facility at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae. The trap has been online since 2003 and it was shut down in the summer of 2010 for relocation to the upgraded IGISOL facility. Numerous atomic mass and decay energy measurements have been performed using the time-of-flight ion-cyclotron resonance technique. The trap has also been used in several decay spectroscopy experiments as a high-resolution mass filter. (orig.)

  9. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  10. Solvation of Lithium Irons in Mixed Organic Electrolyte Solutions by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, Yoshiharu; FUKUSHIMA, Tsuyoshi; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; ARAKAWA, Ryuichi

    2002-01-01

    Solvation of lithium ions in mixed organic electrolyte solutions for secondary lithium batteries was investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy. The electrolyte solutions were mixed binary solutions of diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethylene carbonate (EC),γ-butyrolactone (GBL), and propylene carbonate (PC) containing LiClO4. Lithium ions solvated mainly to two solvent molecules. The order of the inclination of the solvent molecules solvating to lithium ions...

  11. Measurements of the mass absorption cross section of atmospheric soot particles using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmann, S.; Birmili, W.; Weinhold, K.; Müller, K.; Spindler, G.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2013-11-01

    Soot particles are a major absorber of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere. The mass absorption cross section is an essential quantity to describe this light absorption process. This work presents new experimental data on the mass absorption cross section of soot particles in the troposphere over Central Europe. Mass absorption cross sections were derived as the ratio between the light absorption coefficient determined by multiangle absorption photometry (MAAP) and the soot mass concentration determined by Raman spectroscopy. The Raman method is sensitive to graphitic structures present in the particle samples and was calibrated in the laboratory using Printex®90 model particles. Mass absorption cross sections were determined for a number of seven observation sites, ranging between 3.9 and 7.4 m2 g-1depending on measurement site and observational period. The highest values were found in a continentally aged air mass in winter, where soot particles were assumed to be mainly internally mixed. Our values are in the lower range of previously reported values, possibly due to instrumental differences to the former photometer and mass measurements. Overall, a value of 5.3m2 g-1from orthogonal regression over all samples is considered to be representative for the soot mass absorption cross section in the troposphere over Central Europe.

  12. Towards Identification of Super Heavy Elements by Means of Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schury, Peter; Ito, Yuta; Wada, Michiharu; Arai, Fumiya; Kaji, Daiya; Morimoto, Kouji; Morita, Kosuke; Sonoda, Tetsu; Katayama, Ichirou

    2014-09-01

    The present standard technique for determining the identity of Super Heavy Elements is by alpha-decay spectroscopy, wherein chains of alpha-decays to well-known species provide unique fingerprints to identify the parent nucleus. However, as advances in production capabilities bring us closer to the much-anticipated ``island of stability,'' decay spectroscopy will become less tenable. It is already seen that the heaviest elements, those above Z = 113, decay chains all terminate in spontaneous fission before reaching well-known nuclei. As the island of stability is more closely approached, alpha-decay will be replaced by beta-decay and spontaneous fission while half-lives become exceedingly long. To work towards overcoming the looming limitations in identification via decay spectroscopy, we have installed a multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph coupled to the GARIS-II separator at RIKEN. The device has been proven to be highly efficient and capable of accurate high-precision mass measurements. In initial studies we will aim to make precision mass measurements of trans-uranium elements up through Lr to validate the device. We will describe the progress of this project and describe the long-range strategy.

  13. Multi-fibre optical spectroscopy of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in Upper Sco

    CERN Document Server

    Lodieu, N; Hambly, N C

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained multi-fibre intermediate-resolution optical spectroscopy of 94 photometric and proper motion selected low-mass star and brown dwarf candidates in Upper Sco with AAT/AAOmega. We have estimated the spectral types and measured the equivalent widths of youth and gravity diagnostic features to confirm the spectroscopic membership of about 95% of the candidates extracted from 6.5 square degrees in Upper Sco. We also detect lithium in the spectra with the highest signal-to-noise, consolidating our conclusions about their youth. Furthermore, we derive an estimate of our selections using spectroscopic data obtained for a large number of stars falling into the instrument's field-of-view. We have estimated the effective temperatures and masses for each new spectroscopic member using the latest evolutionary models available for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Combining the current optical spectroscopy presented here with near-infrared spectroscopy obtained for the faintest photometric candidates, we con...

  14. Electronic structure of nitinol surfaces oxidized by low-energy ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M., E-mail: mpetravic@phy.uniri.hr; Varasanec, M.; Peter, R.; Kavre, I. [Department of Physics and Center for Micro and Nano Sciences and Technologies, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka (Croatia); Metikos-Hukovic, M. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Yang, Y.-W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30077, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    We have studied the electronic structure of nitinol exposed to low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. XPS spectra reveal a gradual transformation of nitinol surfaces into TiO{sub 2} with increased dose of implanted oxygen. No oxidation of Ni atoms has been detected. NEXAFS spectra around O K-edge and Ti L{sub 2,3}-edge, reflecting the element-specific partial density of empty electronic states, exhibit features, which can be attributed to the creation of molecular orbitals, crystal field splitting, and the absence of long-range order, characteristic of the amorphous TiO{sub 2}. Based on these results, we discuss the oxidation kinetics of nitinol under low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment.

  15. Electronic structure of nitinol surfaces oxidized by low-energy ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petravic, M.; Varasanec, M.; Peter, R.; Kavre, I.; Metikos-Hukovic, M.; Yang, Y.-W.

    2014-06-01

    We have studied the electronic structure of nitinol exposed to low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment, using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. XPS spectra reveal a gradual transformation of nitinol surfaces into TiO2 with increased dose of implanted oxygen. No oxidation of Ni atoms has been detected. NEXAFS spectra around O K-edge and Ti L2,3-edge, reflecting the element-specific partial density of empty electronic states, exhibit features, which can be attributed to the creation of molecular orbitals, crystal field splitting, and the absence of long-range order, characteristic of the amorphous TiO2. Based on these results, we discuss the oxidation kinetics of nitinol under low-energy oxygen-ion bombardment.

  16. The Northwest Frontier: Spectroscopy of N sim Z Nuclei Below Mass 100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, R.; Nara Singh, B. S.; Steer, A. N.; Jenkins, D. G.; Bentley, M. A.; Brock, T.; Davies, P.; Glover, R.; Pattabiraman, N. S.; Scholey, C.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Jakobsson, U.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Perua, P.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotslainen, P.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Lister, C. J.; Butler, P. A.; Dimmock, M.; Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Cederwall, B.; Hadinia, B.; Sandzelius, M.; Atac, A.; Betterman, L.; Blazhev, A.; Braun, N.; Finke, F.; Geibel, K.; Ilie, G.; Iwasaki, H.; Jolie, J.; Reiter, P.; Scholl, C.; Warr, N.; Boutachkov, P.; Caceres, L.; Domingo, C.; Engert, T.; Farinon, F.; Gerl, J.; Goel, N.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Kurz, N.; Kojuharov, I.; Pietri, S.; Nociforo, C.; Prochazka, A.; Wollersheim, H.-J.; Eppinger, K.; Faestermann, T.; Hinke, C.; Hoischen, R.; Kruecken, R.; Gottardo, A.; Liu, Z.; Woods, P.; Grebosz, J.; Merchant, E.; Nyberg, J.; Soderstrom, P.-A.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Steer, S.; Pfutzner, M.; Rudolph, D.

    2009-03-01

    The spectroscopy and structure of excited states of N sim Z nuclei in the mass 70-100 region has been investigated using two techniques. In the A sim 70-80 region fusion evaporation reactions coupled with the recoil- beta -tagging method have been employed at Jyvaskyla to study low-lying states in odd-odd N = Z nuclei. Results from these and other data for known odd-odd nuclei above mass 60 will be discussed. In the heavier mass 90 region a fragmentation experiment has been performed using the RISING/FRS setup at GSI. This experiment was primarily aimed at searching for spin gap isomers in nuclei around A sim 96. The objectives of the latter experiment will be discussed.

  17. Rapid determination of sucrose in chocolate mass using near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Filho, Paulo Augusto

    2009-01-12

    This paper reports the results of a rapid method to determine sucrose in chocolate mass using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We applied a broad-based calibration approach, which consists in putting together in one single calibration samples of various types of chocolate mass. This approach increases the concentration range for one or more compositional parameters, improves the model performance and requires just one calibration model for several recipes. The data were modelled using partial least squares (PLS) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The MLR models were developed using a variable selection based on the coefficient regression of PLS and genetic algorithm (GA). High correlation coefficients (0.998, 0.997, 0.998 for PLS, MLR and GA-MLR, respectively) and low prediction errors confirms the good predictability of the models. The results show that NIR can be used as rapid method to determine sucrose in chocolate mass in chocolate factories.

  18. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of atoms and molecules using VUV synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostko, Oleg; Kim, Sang Kyu; Leone, Stephen R; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-31

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation (Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) has been performed for Ar, N(2), O(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, C(2)H(2), and C(6)H(6). MATI allows for a better determination of ionization energies compared to those derived from photoionization efficiency curves traditionally used in synchrotron photoionization mass spectrometry. The separation of the long-lived Rydberg state from the directly formed prompt ion, essential for a meaningful MATI spectrum, has been accomplished by employing an arrangement of ion optics coupled to unique electric field pulsing schemes. For Ar, a number of resolved bands below the ionization energy are observed, and these are ascribed to high-n,l Rydberg states prepared in the MATI scheme. The first vibrational state resolved MATI spectra of N(2) and O(2) are reported, and spectral characteristics are discussed in comparison with previously reported threshold photoelectron spectroscopic studies. Although MATI performed with synchrotron radiation is intrinsically less sensitive compared to laser-based sources, this work demonstrates that MATI spectroscopy performed with widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is a complementary technique for studying the ionization spectroscopy of polyatomic molecules.

  19. Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  20. Large Acceptance Spectrometers for Invariant Mass Spectroscopy of Exotic Nuclei and Future Development

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T

    2015-01-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also explore the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  1. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  2. Laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and stringent constraint on the antiproton charge and mass

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S; Von Egidy, T; Hartmann, F J; Hori, Masaki; Horváth, D; Ishikawa, T; Ketzer, B; Kumakura, M; Maierl, C; Morita, N; Pohl, R; Sugai, I; Torii, H A; Widmann, E; Yamazaki, T

    2000-01-01

    The antiprotonic helium atom-molecule (atomcule in short), pe/sup -/ He/sup 2+/=pHe/sup +/, first discovered at KEK and studied in detail at LEAR, is a unique metastable existence interfacing between matter and antimatter. Our recent high-resolution laser spectroscopy of pHe /sup +/ has reached a precision of 0.5 ppm, and the agreement between our experimental values of transition energies and the calculations has become better than 2 ppm. This agreement in turn sets a severe constraint on the antiproton charge and mass. Future possibilities at the new antiproton decelerator (AD) are also discussed. (12 refs).

  3. A Movable Mass Spectroscopy Sampling Apparatus for Measuring Spatial Distribution of Neutral Radicals in Silane Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-Kui; LIN Kui-Xun; LIN Xuan-Ying; QIU Gui-Ming; ZHU Zu-Song

    2005-01-01

    @@ A movable mass spectroscopy gas sampling apparatus has been established and a straight-line fit ofsilane depletion fraction f is proposed.The spatial density distributions of SiHn (n = 0-3) radicals in silane radio frequency glow discharge have been measured by a mass spectrometer.The experimental results demonstrate that the densities of the neutral radicals have the peak value near the middle position of electrodes, and the densities of SiH2 and SiHs are higher than those of Si and SiH in silane plasma.This reveals that SiH2 and SiH3 may be the primary precursors in forming the a-Si:H film.

  4. Mass spectroscopy of the ion flux produced during inductively coupled plasma nitriding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodko, D. V.; Kaziev, A. V.; Ageychenkov, D. G.; Meshcheryakova, E. A.; Pisarev, A. A.; Tumarkin, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Ion fluxes on the surface of sample embedded in inductively coupled plasma have been studied in conditions typical for titanium alloy nitriding: total pressure 0.44 Pa, Ar/N2 = 70%/30%, and RF power 1500 W. The gas composition was independently monitored by the quadrupole analyser. The ion fluxes were sampled using a specially designed electrostatic extractor and then analysed with a magnetic sector mass-separator. The extractor design allowed us to apply a bias voltage to the plasma facing electrode thus imitating interaction of ions with the surface during the plasma processing. The ion fluxes of Ar+, {{{N}}}2{}+, and N+ on the surface were measured. The mass spectroscopy diagnostics unit is suitable for extensive ion content studies in the plasma technology facilities.

  5. Synergy of decay spectroscopy and mass spectrometry for the study of exotic nuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Stanja, Juliane

    With only two ingredients, atomic nuclei exhibit a rich structure depending on the ordering of the different proton- and neutron-occupied states. This ordering can give rise to excited states with exceptionally long half-lives, also known as isomers, especially near shell closures. On-line mass spectrometry can often be compromised by the existence of such states that may even be produced in higher proportion than the ground state. This thesis presents the first results obtained from a nuclear spectroscopy setup coupled with the high-resolution Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, at CERN’s radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE. The isomerism in the neutron-deficient thallium isotopes was investigated. The data on $^{184,190,193−195}$Tl allow an improvement of existing mass values as well as a mass-spin- state assignment in $^{ 190,193,194}$Tl. Due to the presence of the ground and isomeric state for $^{ 194}$Tl the excitation energy of the latter was determined for the first time experimentally. Syste...

  6. Synergy of decay spectroscopy and mass spectrometry for the study of exotic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanja, Juliane

    2013-04-12

    With only two ingredients, atomic nuclei exhibit a rich structure depending on the ordering of the different proton- and neutron-occupied states. This ordering can give rise to excited states with exceptionally long half-lives, also known as isomers, especially near shell closures. On-line mass spectrometry can often be compromised by the existence of such states that may even be produced in higher proportion than the ground state. This thesis presents the first results obtained from a nuclear spectroscopy setup coupled with the high-resolution Penning-trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, at CERN's radioactive ion beam facility ISOLDE. The isomerism in the neutron-deficient thallium isotopes was investigated. The data on {sup 184,190,193-195}Tl allow an improvement of existing mass values as well as a mass-spin-state assignment in {sup 190,193,194}Tl. Due to the presence of the ground and isomeric state for {sup 194}Tl the excitation energy of the latter was determined for the first time experimentally. Systematic trends in the vicinity of the Z = 82 shell closure have been discussed.

  7. Thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}CHO studied by matrix infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Piech, Krzysztof M.; Reed, Beth; Ellison, G. Barney [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Zhang Xu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109-8099 (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Ahmed, Musahid; Golan, Amir; Kostko, Oleg [Chemical Sciences Division, LBNL MS 6R-2100, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Osborn, David L. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 969 MS 9055, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States); David, Donald E. [Integrated Instrument Design Facility, CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0216 (United States); Urness, Kimberly N.; Daily, John W. [Center for Combustion and Environmental Research, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427 (United States); Stanton, John F. [Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-10-28

    A heated SiC microtubular reactor has been used to decompose acetaldehyde and its isotopomers (CH{sub 3}CDO, CD{sub 3}CHO, and CD{sub 3}CDO). The pyrolysis experiments are carried out by passing a dilute mixture of acetaldehyde (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of a buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 50-200 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range 1200-1900 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 50-200 {mu}s after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 {mu}Torr. The reactor has been modified so that both pulsed and continuous modes can be studied, and results from both flow regimes are presented. Using various detection methods (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and both fixed wavelength and tunable synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectrometry), a number of products formed at early pyrolysis times (roughly 100-200 {mu}s) are identified: H, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, CO, CH{sub 2}=CHOH, HC{identical_to}CH, H{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 2}=C=O; trace quantities of other species are also observed in some of the experiments. Pyrolysis of rare isotopomers of acetaldehyde produces characteristic isotopic signatures in the reaction products, which offers insight into reaction mechanisms that occur in the reactor. In particular, while the principal unimolecular processes appear to be radical decomposition CH{sub 3}CHO (+M) {yields} CH{sub 3}+ H + CO and isomerization of acetaldehyde to vinyl alcohol, it appears that the CH{sub 2}CO and HCCH are formed (perhaps exclusively) by bimolecular reactions, especially those involving hydrogen atom attacks.

  8. Effect of low energy ion bombardment on structure and photoluminescence characterization of Al-doped ZnO thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Chenggang; Yu, Tao; Wu, Zaofeng; Wu, Xuemei [Department of Physics, Soochow University, Soochow 215006 (China); Zhuge, Lanjian, E-mail: ljzhuge@suda.edu.cn [Analysis and Testing Center, Soochow University, Soochow 215006 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films are prepared by dual ion-beam assisted sputter deposition at room temperature. An assisting argon ion beam (ion energy E{sub i} = 0-300 eV) directly bombards the substrate surface to modify the properties of the AZO films. The effects of assisting ion beam energy on the characteristics of AZO films were investigated based on transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence measurement. With increasing assisting ion beam bombardment, the crystalline quality of the AZO films was improved and the oxygen vacancies were increased observably. Two red emissions originating from the oxygen vacancies in the films appear at 1.71 and 1.64 eV. This study suggests that wide-band-gap materials could act as effective visible light emitters and ion beam bombardment provides a simple route to synthesize such materials. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films were prepared by dual ion-beam sputter deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By assisting-ion beam bombardment, AZO films have a better c-axis orientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystalline quality of AZO films was improved by assisting-ion beam bombardment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two red emissions originate from the oxygen vacancies in the films.

  9. Overview literature on matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS): basics and its applications in characterizing polymeric materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Jagtap; A H Ambre

    2005-10-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy (MALDI MS) is a technique which allows the measurement of molecular mass > 200,000 Daltons by ionization and vapourization without degradation. This technique is useful for the mass analysis of synthetic polymers, which have very low volatility. The basic principles of and its applications for polymer characterization have been discussed in this paper. In addition, the possibilities of combining MALDI MS with chromatographic and other analytical techniques have also been discussed.

  10. Impact-driven ice loss in outer Solar System satellites: Consequences for the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D. G.

    2012-05-01

    We use recent hydrodynamical results (Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.G., Stewart, S.S. [2011]. Icarus, 214, 724-738) for the production of water vapor by hypervelocity impacts on ice targets to assess which present-day major satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus would have lost mass due to impact vaporization during an era of massive bombardment similar to the Late Heavy Bombardment in the inner Solar System. Using impactor populations suggested by recent work (Charnoz, S., Morbidelli, A., Dones, L., Salmon, J. [2009]. Icarus, 199, 413-428; Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M. [2010]. Nat. Geosci., 3, 164-167), we find that several satellites would have lost all their HO; we suggest that the most likely resolution of this paradox is that either the LHB delivered ≈10 times less mass to the outer Solar System than predicted by the standard Nice Model, or that the inner satellites formed after the LHB.

  11. Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  12. Evolution of clusters in energetic heavy ion bombarded amorphous graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, M N; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Carbon clusters have been generated by a novel technique of energetic heavy ion bombardment of amorphous graphite. The evolution of clusters and their subsequent fragmentation under continuing ion bombardment is revealed by detecting various clusters in the energy spectra of the direct recoils emitted as a result of collision between ions and the surface constituents.

  13. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

  14. Study of selected benzyl azides by UV photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, R. M.; Olariu, R. I.; Lameiras, J.; Martins, F. T.; Dias, A. A.; Langley, G. J.; Rodrigues, P.; Maycock, C. D.; Santos, J. P.; Duarte, M. F.; Fernandez, M. T.; Costa, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    Benzyl azide and the three methylbenzyl azides were synthesized and characterized by mass spectrometry (MS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UVPES). The electron ionization fragmentation mechanisms for benzyl azide and their methyl derivatives were studied by accurate mass measurements and linked scans at constant B/ E. For benzyl azide, in order to clarify the fragmentation mechanism, labelling experiments were performed. From the mass analysis of methylbenzyl azides isomers it was possible to differentiate the isomers ortho, meta and para. The abundance and nature of the ions resulting from the molecular ion fragmentation, for the three distinct isomers of substituted benzyl azides, were rationalized in terms of the electronic properties of the substituent. Concerning the para-isomer, IRC calculations were performed at UHF/6-31G(d) level. The photoionization study of benzyl azide, with He(I) radiation, revealed five bands in the 8-21 eV ionization energies region. From every photoelectron spectrum of methylbenzyl azides isomers it has been identified seven bands, on the same range as the benzyl azide. Interpretation of the photoelectron spectra was accomplished applying Koopmans' theorem to the SCF orbital energies obtained at HF/6-311++G(d, p) level.

  15. High-resolution mass-selective UV spectroscopy of pseudoephedrine: evidence for conformer-specific fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaminkov, R; Chervenkov, S; Delchev, V; Neusser, H J

    2011-09-01

    Using resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization spectroscopy with mass resolution of jet-cooled molecules, a low-resolution S(1) ← S(0) vibronic spectrum of pseudoephedrine was recorded at the mass channels of three distinct fragments with m/z = 58, 71, and 85. Two of the fragments, with m/z = 71 and 85, are observed for the first time for this molecule. The vibronic spectra recorded at different mass channels feature different patterns, implying that they originate from different conformers in the cold molecular beam, following conformer-specific fragmentation pathways. Highly resolved spectra of all prominent vibronic features were measured, and from their analysis based on genetic algorithms, the molecular parameters of the conformers giving rise to the respective bands have been determined. Comparing the experimental results with those obtained from high-level ab initio quantum chemistry calculations, the observed prominent vibronic bands have been assigned to originate from four distinct conformers. The conformers are separated into two groups that have different fragmentation pathways determined by the different intramolecular interactions.

  16. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Strazzulla, Giovanni [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  17. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  18. Inferring the Composition of Super-Jupiter Mass Companions of Pulsars with Radio Line Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Alak; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-02-01

    We propose using radio line spectroscopy to detect molecular absorption lines (such as OH at 1.6–1.7 GHz) before and after the total eclipse of black widow and other short orbital period binary pulsars with low-mass companions. The companion in such a binary may be ablated away by energetic particles and high-energy radiation produced by the pulsar wind. The observations will probe the eclipsing wind being ablated by the pulsar and constrain the nature of the companion and its surroundings. Maser emission from the interstellar medium stimulated by a pulsar beam might also be detected from the intrabinary medium. The short temporal resolution allowed by the millisecond pulsars can probe this medium with the high angular resolution of the pulsar beam.

  19. Infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry of luminescent, nonluminescent, and metal quenched porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, J.; Andsager, D.; Abu Hassan, L.; Nayfeh, H.M.; Nayfeh, M.H. (Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

    1994-08-15

    Porous silicon with varying optical properties (luminescent, nonluminescent, and metal quenched) is investigated by transmission infrared (IR) spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS and transmission IR data are presented which show a lack of correlation between the optical properties of similarly prepared luminescent and nonluminescent porous silicon samples and the concentrations of the chemical elements and bonds detected therein. Similar results are obtained for a comparison of IR spectra before and after dissolving the topmost layers ([similar to]2000 A) of a luminescent sample in a KOH solution, exposing the nonluminescent porous material below. Finally, IR and SIMS results for luminescent porous silicon quenched by metal ion solutions show a large increase in oxygen after quenching, but it is argued that the increased oxygen is unlikely to be directly responsible for the quenching of luminescence.

  20. Mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of 1-bromopropane through dissociative intermediate states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Wang, Yanmei; Tang, Bifeng; Zheng, Qiusha; Zhang, Bing

    2006-02-01

    One-color two-photon ionization of 1-bromopropane, resulting in the 1-C 3H 7Br + ions in the X2E and X2E electronic states, is investigated using mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy. The adiabatic ionization energies of two spin states are found to be 82 257 ± 5 and 84 823 ± 5 cm -1, respectively. The two-photon MATI spectrum exhibits an extensive vibrational structure. The active modes, including the C-Br stretching, the CH 2-Br wagging, the CH 2 and the CH 3 rocking modes, are observed and reliable values for these vibrational frequencies are obtained. We have also performed ab initio and density functional calculations, which provide interpretation for our experimental finding.

  1. Heavy quark meson spectroscopy at CDF (X(3872) mass and evidence for Y(4140))

    CERN Document Server

    Wick, Felix

    2010-01-01

    With growing datasets collected by the CDF II experiment, studies of the spectroscopy of mesons containing heavy quarks become more exciting. The CDF experiment has good capabilities in both charm and bottom sector. This capability allowed also to contribute to the study of the zoo of states called X,Y,Z. In this area we present a recent update of the mass measurement of X(3872). The result m(X(3872)) = 3871.61 +- 0.16 +- 0.19 MeV is currently the most precise measurement in the world. In addition, we report evidence for a new narrow resonance, Y(4140), the first to be seen in the J/psi phi decay mode, using 2.7 invfb of exclusive B+ to J/psi phi K+ decays.

  2. Determination of the first ionization potential of actinides by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, S. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Albus, F. [Institu fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dibenberger, R.; Erdmann, N.; Funk, H. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Hasse, H. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Herrmann, G. [Institut fuer Kernchemiess Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Huber, G.; Kluge, H.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Rao, P.M. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Bombay (India); Riegel, J.; Trautmann, N. [Institut fuer Kernchemie Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Urban, F. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-04-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used for the precise determination of the first ionization potential of transuranium elements. The first ionization potentials (IP) of americium and curium have been measured for the first time to IP{sub {ital Am}}=5.9738(2) and IP{sub {ital Cm}}=5.9913(8) eV, respectively, using only 10{sup 12} atoms of {sup 243}Am and {sup 248}Cm. The same technique was applied to thorium, neptunium, and plutonium yielding IP{sub T{sub H}}=6.3067(2), IP{sub N{sub P}}=6.2655(2), and IP{sub {ital Pu}}=6.0257(8) eV. The good agreement of our results with the literature data proves the precision of the method which was additionally confirmed by the analysis of Rydberg seris of americium measured by RIMS. {copyright}American Institute of Physics 1995

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy study of tert-butylarsine stability and purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, M. E.; Breiland, W. G.; Bruskas, L. A.; Killeen, K. P.

    2000-06-01

    We have used gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) to study the decomposition of TBA ( tert-butylarsine, H 2AsC(CH 3) 3) in storage containers at room temperature. Over a four-week period, as much as 1% of the TBA decomposed to arsine and isobutane in a stainless-steel bottle. Several freeze-thaw purification schemes were tested. Use of a liquid-nitrogen bath left a substantial amount of arsine and isobutane in the bottle, while an ice water bath removed all of the arsine but left residual isobutane. Evacuation of the storage container at room temperature removed both arsine and isobutane to below the GCMS detection limits. However, this approach did lead to significant TBA loss. Storing TBA in a Teflon-lined bottle and in a high-surface-to-volume stainless-steel container did not change the decomposition rate measurably, suggesting that stainless-steel surfaces do not promote TBA decomposition.

  4. Improvements in bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium purity as determined with gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARTRAM,MICHAEL E.

    2000-03-08

    Bis(cyclopentadienyl)magnesium (MgCp2) is used commonly as a source for doping nitride materials with magnesium. Increased oxygen incorporation known to accompany the use of MgCp2 makes the purity of this precursor an important consideration in nitride CVD. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS) methods have now been developed for the identification of volatile impurities in MgCp2. Diethylether, an oxygen containing organic compound (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}), and additional organic impurities were found in the MgCp2 supplied by three manufacturers. Subsequent refinements in the synthetic processes by these companies have resulted in the availability of MgCp2 free of ether and other organic impurities as determined by GCMS.

  5. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field $\\phi = \\phi_0 \\cos(m_\\phi t)$, can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the Standard Model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive new limits on the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of $\\phi$ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to $2-3$ orders of magnitude.

  6. Campaign 1.7 Pu Aging. Development of Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhaus, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    The first application of Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) to an aged plutonium surface has resulted in a rich set of surface chemistry data, as well as some unexpected results. FY15 was highlighted by not only the first mapping of hydrogen-containing features within the metal, but also a prove-in series of experiments using the system’s Sieverts Reaction Cell. These experiments involved successfully heating the sample to ~450 oC for nearly 24 hours while the sample was dosed several times with hydrogen, followed by an in situ ToF-SIMS analysis. During this year, the data allowed for better and more consistent identification of the myriad peaks that result from the SIMS sputter process. In collaboration with the AWE (U.K), the system was also fully aligned for sputter depth profiling for future experiments.

  7. Characterization of peptide attachment on silicon nanowires by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, Ievgen; Dupré, Mathieu; Cantel, Sonia; Enjalbal, Christine; Drobecq, Hervé; Szunerits, Sabine; Melnyk, Oleg; Boukherroub, Rabah; Coffinier, Yannick

    2017-02-27

    In this paper, we report an original method to immobilize a model peptide on silicon nanowires (SiNWs) via a photolinker attached to the SiNWs' surface. The silicon nanowires were fabricated by a metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) method. Then, direct characterization of the peptide immobilization on SiNWs was performed either by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) or by laser-desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). XPS allowed us to follow the peptide immobilization and its photorelease by recording the variation of the signal intensities of the different elements present on the SiNW surface. Mass spectrometry was performed without the use of an organic matrix and peptide ions were produced via a photocleavage mechanism. Indeed, thanks to direct photorelease achieved upon laser irradiation, a recorded predictable peak related to the molecular peptide ion has been detected, allowing the identification of the model peptide. Additional MS/MS experiments confirmed the photodissociation site and confirmed the N-terminal immobilization of the peptide on SiNWs.

  8. High Resolution, Long - Slit Spectroscopy of VY CMa: The Evidence for Localized High Mass Loss Events

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, R M; Ruch, G; Wallerstein, G; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Ruch, Gerald; Wallerstein, George

    2004-01-01

    High spatial and spectral resolution spectroscopy of the OH/IR supergiant VY CMa and its circumstellar ejecta reveals evidence for high mass loss events from localized regions on the star occurring over the past 1000 years. The reflected absorption lines and the extremely strong K I emission lines show a complex pattern of velocities in the ejecta. We show that the large, dusty NW arc, expanding at 50 km/sec with respect to the embedded star, is kinematically distinct from the surrounding nebulosity and was ejected about 400 years ago. Other large, more filamentary loops were probably expelled as much as 800 to 1000 years ago while knots and small arcs close to the star resulted from more recent events 100 to 200 years ago. The more diffuse, uniformly distributed gas and dust is surprisingly stationary with little or no velocity relative to the star. This is not what we would expect for the circumstellar material from an evolved red supergiant with a long history of mass loss. We therefore suggest that the hi...

  9. IUE spectroscopy of U Cephei during the mass flow outburst of 1986 June

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccluskey, George E., Jr.; Kondo, Yoji; Olson, Edward C.

    1988-01-01

    The interacting Algol-type binary U Cep underwent another of its irregularly occurring transient high-mass flow events during June 1986. For the first time, high-resolution ultraviolet spectroscopy of U Cep during such an event was possible. High-resolution spectra in the far-ultraviolet and near-ultraviolet were obtained with IUE. These spectra show that the ultraviolet continuum decreased by factors of 1.2 to 3.0 during the greatest activity. In addition, one or more narrow absorption components with radial velocities as high as -500 km/s appeared in association with a number of C, Si, Al, Fe, Zn, and Mg lines. The Mg II doublet developed a flat-bottomed appearance with a residual intensity of about 0.31 and a width of at least 800 km/s. These phenomena are interpreted in terms of high-velocity gas streams, mass loss from the system, and the formation of an optically thick equatorial bulge around the B star.

  10. The effect of crystal orientation on the behavior of a polycrystalline tungsten surface under focused Ga{sup +} ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran Guang, E-mail: gran@xmu.edu.cn [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Wu Shenghua [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu Xiang; Wu Jihong [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li, Ning [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zu Xiaotao [Department of Applied Physics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan 610054 (China); Wang Lumin, E-mail: lmwang@umich.edu [School of Energy Research, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We in situ investigated the microstructure evolution during FIB bombardment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The irradiation behaviors depended significantly on the crystal orientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tungsten grain with (0 0 1) crystal orientation showed good irradiation resistance. - Abstract: The effect of crystal orientation on the behavior of a tungsten surface under a 30 keV focused Ga{sup +} ion beam with different bombardment angles has been investigated by in situ scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results indicate that the grains of tungsten with various orientations behave quite differently. Grains with a (0 0 1) direction parallel to the ion beam always maintain a much smoother surface morphology with less mass removal after ion bombardment, indicating a lower sputtering yield. The orientation dependence of surface sputtering of tungsten can be used to guide the fabrication of tungsten-based first wall component in a nuclear fusion reactor.

  11. Single voxel 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal mass lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is an established technique for evaluation of malignant tumors in brain, breast, prostate, etc., However, its efficacy in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK mass lesions is yet to be established. We present our experience with MRS of these lesions. Materials and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and single-voxel 1 H MRS was performed in 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign and malignant MSK tumors/mass lesions each, on a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. MRS was performed with echo times (TE of 40, 135 and 270 ms. A clearly identifiable peak at 3.2 ppm in at least two of the three spectra acquired at the three TE was taken as positive for choline. MRS imaging and enhancement patterns were compared in these two groups and were analyzed by a Radiologist blinded to the histopathological findings. Results: Ages of patients in the malignant age group ranged from 2 to 65 years (M: F - 19:11 while that of patients in the benign group ranged from 7 months to 56 years (M: F - 17:13. There were two patients with Type I curve, 18 with Type II curve and 10 with Type III curve on dynamic contrast enhanced images in the malignant group while there were no patients with Type I curve, 5 with Type II curve and 25 with Type III curve in the benign group. The sensitivity of MRS for predicting malignancy was 60%, specificity was 93.33%, positive predictive value was 90%, negative predictive value was 70% and accuracy was 76.66%. Conclusion: MRS is a promising technique for evaluation of MSK mass lesions. The accuracy at present remains low. We recommend that it be used as an adjunct to routine MRI.

  12. Detection of trace gases from fermentation processes using photoacoustic spectroscopy and proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boamfă-Ivan, Elena Iuliana

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents novel interdisciplinary Physics - Biology research work that employed Photoacoustic Spectroscopy and Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry. Both techniques were used in biological studies of trace gasses emitted by crop plants and fruit under stress situations. The findings

  13. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  14. Ions Bombardment in Thin Films and Surface Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许沭华; 任兆杏

    2003-01-01

    Ions bombardment is very important in thin films and surface processing. The ionenergy and ion flux are two important parameters in ion bombardment. The ion current densitymainly dependent on the plasma density gives the number of energetic ions bombarding thesubstrate. The self-bias voltage in plasma sheath accelerates plasma ions towards the substrate.RF discharge can increase plasma density and RF bias can also provide the insulator substrate witha plasma sheath. In order to choose and control ion energy, ion density, the angle of incidence,and ion species, ion beam sources are used. New types of electrodeless ion sources (RF, MW,ECR-MW) have been introduced in detail. In the last, the effects of ion bombardment on thinfilms and surface processing are presented.

  15. Actinide production from xenon bombardments of curium-248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    Production cross sections for many actinide nuclides formed in the reaction of /sup 129/Xe and /sup 132/Xe with /sup 248/Cm at bombarding energies slightly above the coulomb barrier were determined using radiochemical techniques to isolate these products. These results are compared with cross sections from a /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction at a similar energy. When compared to the reaction with /sup 136/Xe, the maxima in the production cross section distributions from the more neutron deficient projectiles are shifted to smaller mass numbers, and the total cross section increases for the production of elements with atomic numbers greater than that of the target, and decreases for lighter elements. These results can be explained by use of a potential energy surface (PES) which illustrates the effect of the available energy on the transfer of nucleons and describes the evolution of the di-nuclear complex, an essential feature of deep-inelastic reactions (DIR), during the interaction. The other principal reaction mechanism is the quasi-elastic transfer (QE). Analysis of data from a similar set of reactions, /sup 129/Xe, /sup 132/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe with /sup 197/Au, aids in explaining the features of the Xe + Cm product distributions, which are additionally affected by the depletion of actinide product yields due to deexcitation by fission. The PES is shown to be a useful tool to predict the general features of product distributions from heavy ion reactions.

  16. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L.; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J.

    2016-11-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims: Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods: GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results: An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims comparing the de-reddened continuum with the spectral energy distribution expected from an irradiated disc model and different donor star templates. Conclusions: We tentatively propose that GRS 1758-258 does not host a giant star companion. Instead, a main sequence star with mid-A spectral type appears to better agree with our data. The main impacts of this finding are the possibility that we are dealing with an intermediate mass system and, in this case, the prediction of an orbital period significantly shorter than previously proposed.

  17. Sensitive Detection and Identification of Isovanillin Aerosol Particles at the pg/cm3 Mass Concentration Level using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    Particles at the pg/cm3 Mass Concentration Level Using Raman Spectroscopy* R. L. Aggarwal1, S. Di Cecca, L. W. Farrar, Shabshelowitz, A...and identification of isovanillin (C8H8O3, CAS No. 621‐59‐0; Molecular mass 152.15; Density 1.41) aerosol particles of mass concentration MC of 1.8...optical particle sizer. (iv) Aerosol flow cell, fabricated by the U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), with two

  18. Asteroid 4 Vesta: Dynamical and collisional evolution during the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirani, S.; Turrini, D.

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is the only currently identified asteroid for which we possess samples in the form of meteorites. These meteorites revealed us that Vesta is a differentiated body and that its differentiation produced a relatively thin basaltic crust that survived intact over its entire collisional history. The survival of the vestan basaltic crust has long been identified as a pivotal constraint in the study of the evolution of the asteroid belt and the Solar System but, while we possess a reasonably good picture of the effects of the last 4 Ga on such a crust, little is known about the effects of earlier events like the Late Heavy Bombardment. In this work we address this gap in our knowledge by simulating the Late Heavy Bombardment on Vesta in the different dynamical scenarios proposed for the migration of the giant planets in the broad framework of the Nice Model. The results of the simulations allowed us to assess the collisional history of the asteroid during the Late Heavy Bombardment in terms of produced crater population, surface saturation, mass loss and mass gain of Vesta and number of energetic or catastrophic impacts. Our results reveal that planet-planet scattering is a dynamically favorable migration mechanism for the survival of Vesta and its crust. The number of impacts of asteroids larger than about 1 km in diameter estimated as due to the LHB is 31 ± 5, i.e. about 5 times larger than the number of impacts that would have occurred in an unperturbed main belt in the same time interval. The contribution of a possible extended belt to the collisional evolution of Vesta during the LHB is quite limited and can be quantified in 2 ± 1 impacts of asteroids with diameter greater than or equal to 1 km. The chance of energetic and catastrophic impacts is less than 10% and is compatible with the absence of giant craters dated back to 4 Ga ago and with the survival of the asteroid during the Late Heavy Bombardment. The mass loss caused by the bombardment

  19. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Study of tert-Butylarsine Stability and Purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartram, M.E.; Breiland, W.G.; Bruskas, L.A.; Killeen, K.P.

    1999-07-20

    TBA (tert-butylarsine, H{sub 2}AsC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) has been demonstrated to be an effective arsenic precursor for the deposition of compound semiconductors such as GaAs by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition). TBA is used as a liquid (bubbler) source in MOCVD and is a less toxic alternative to the more commonly used gaseous arsine (AsH{sub 3}). Materials and device performance using TBA have in many cases equaled or surpassed those using arsine. This includes the first observation of fractional quantum Hall behavior in a two dimensional electron gas structure grown by MOCVD. Despite the beneficial characteristics, the use of TBA in our laboratories has revealed some inconsistent behavior. Small pressure rises have been observed in the TBA bubbler sources when left unused over a period of many days. Measurements of the TBA partial pressure using UV absorption revealed that new absorption peaks could be observed after storage. The features of the absorption profile were insufficient to ascribe to a specific chemical species. Attempts to remove the gaseous impurities with liquid nitrogen freeze-pump-thaw techniques had limited success. Unfortunately, there is no published information on the room temperature decomposition of TBA. In this paper, we present a series of GCMS (gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) analyses designed to determine the stability of TBA and identify its decomposition products in storage containers. The GCMS is also used to evaluate several methods for in-situ purification of TBA.

  20. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spur, Eva-Margarete [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases. (orig.)

  1. Progress of laser ablation for accelerator mass spectroscopy at ATLAS utilizing an ECRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Kondev, F.; Nusair, O.; Peters, C.; Paul, M.; Bauder, W.; Collon, P.

    2014-02-01

    Beams of ions from the laser ablation method of solid materials into an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasma have been used for the first time in experiments at ATLAS. Initial accelerator mass spectroscopy experiments using laser ablation for actinides and samarium have been performed. Initial results of coupling the laser system to the ECR source have guided us in making a number of changes to the original design. The point of laser impact has been moved off axis from the center of the ECR injection side. Motor control of the laser positioning mirror has been replaced with a faster and more reliable piezo-electric system, and different raster scan patterns have been tested. The use of the laser system in conjunction with a multi-sample changer has been implemented. Two major problems that are being confronted at this time are beam stability and total beam intensity. The status of the development will be presented and ideas for further improvements will be discussed.

  2. Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of the intermediate mass protostar NGC7129 FIRS 2

    CERN Document Server

    Fich, M; van Kempen, T A; McCoey, C; Fuente, A; Caselli, P; Kristensen, L E; Plume, R; Cernicharo, J; Herczeg, G J; van Dishoeck, E F; Wampfler, S; Gaufre, P; Gill, J J; Javadi, H; Justen, M; Laauwen, W; Luinge, W; Ossenkopf, V; Pearson, J; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Bergin, E; Benz, A O; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Bruderer, S; Codella, C; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Doty, S D; Encrenaz, P; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Helmich, F; Herpin, F; Hogerheijde, M R; Jacq, T; Jorgensen, J K; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; Marseille, M; Melnick, G; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Risacher, C; Santiago, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; Tafalla, M; van der Tak, F; Visser, R; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A

    2010-01-01

    Aims: We present preliminary results of the first Herschel spectroscopic observations of NGC7129 FIRS2, an intermediate mass star-forming region. We attempt to interpret the observations in the framework of an in-falling spherical envelope. Methods: The PACS instrument was used in line spectroscopy mode (R=1000-5000) with 15 spectral bands between 63 and 185 microns. This provided good detections of 26 spectral lines seen in emission, including lines of H2O, CO, OH, O I, and C II. Results: Most of the detected lines, particularly those of H2O and CO, are substantially stronger than predicted by the spherical envelope models, typically by several orders of magnitude. In this paper we focus on what can be learned from the detected CO emission lines. Conclusions: It is unlikely that the much stronger than expected line emission arises in the (spherical) envelope of the YSO. The region hot enough to produce such high excitation lines within such an envelope is too small to produce the amount of emission observed....

  3. Pyrolysis of Polytrimethylene Terephthalate (PTT) Fiber by Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN He-sheng

    2007-01-01

    Pyrolysis of polytrimethylene terephthalate (PTT) fiber has been investigated by pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy in the temperature range from 400℃ to 750℃ in order to observe the possible effect of the temperature on its composition of pyrolysates. At 400℃, pyrolysis of molecular chain could occur, only 13 pyrolysates could be identified. The trimethylene moieties bound to the macromolecular core by ester bonds are cleaved at around 400℃. At 550℃ -750℃, pyrolysis of molecular chain could completely take place, 46 pyrolysates could be found. As the temperature increases, the compositions of pyrolysate are distinctly increased. Several compounds, especially benzoic acid, monopropenyl-p-phthalate, 2 - propenyl benzoate, di - 2 - propenyl ester, 1,4 -benzenedicarboxylic acid, benzene, 1, 5 - hexadiene, biphenyl and 1, 3 - propanediol dibenzoate could be formed. The thermal degradation mechanism, which is determined by structure and amount of the thermal decomposition products, are described. During pyrolysis of polytrimethylene terephthalate, polymeric chain scissions take place a peeling reaction as a successive removal of the dimer units from the polymeric chain. The chain scissions are followed by the elimination reaction, linkage action and secondary reactions, which bring about a variety fragment.

  4. Optical spectroscopy of the microquasar GRS 1758-258: a possible intermediate mass system?

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J

    2016-01-01

    Context. GRS 1758-258 is one of two prototypical microquasars towards the Galactic Center direction discovered almost a quarter of a century ago. The system remains poorly studied in the optical domain due to its counterpart being a very faint and absorbed target in a crowded region of the sky. Aims. Our aim is to investigate GRS 1758-258 in order to shed light on the nature of the stellar binary components. In particular, the main physical parameters of the donor star, such as the mass or the spectral type, are not yet well constrained. Methods. GRS 1758-258 has remained so far elusive to optical spectroscopy owing to its observational difficulties. Here, we use this traditional tool of stellar astronomy at low spectral resolution with a 10 m class telescope and a long slit spectrograph. Results. An improved spectrum is obtained as compared to previous work. The quality of the data does not allow the detection of emission or absorption features but, nevertheless, we manage to partially achieve our aims compa...

  5. Determination of Residual Acrylamide in Medical Polyacrylamide Hydrogel by High Performance Liquid Chromatography tandem Mass Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-WEI LI; HUI LI; ZHI-FEI LIU; QUN QIAO

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine residual acrylamide in medical polyacrylamide hydrogel by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS). Methods After 13C3 labeled acrylamide was added, the sample was extracted with water and then cleaned up with ExtrelutTM 20. The polyaerylamide hydrogel sample and 20 clinical cases were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS and isotope dilution quantifying technique in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. Results Acrylamide was separated from polyacrylamide hydrogel. The concentration of acrylamide in polyacrylamide hydrogel ranged from 3.9×109 to 3.1×108g/L in the 20 clinical cases. The peak area was favorable linear and the range was up to 3 000 μg/L. The recovery rate was 103.1% with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.20%, when the mark level was 50 μg/L. Conclusion HPLC-MS is a rapid, accurate, and sensitive method for the determination of residual acrylamide in medical polyacrylamide hydrogel.

  6. Analysis of Ascarosides from Caenorhabditis elegans Using Mass Spectrometry and NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Noguez, Jaime H.; Zhou, Yue; Butcher, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes a family of water-soluble small molecules, known as the ascarosides, into its environment and uses these ascarosides in chemical communication. The ascarosides are derivatives of the 3,6-dideoxysugar ascarylose, modified with different fatty acid-derived side chains. C. elegans uses specific ascarosides, which are together known as the dauer pheromone, to trigger entry into the stress-resistant dauer larval stage. In addition, C. elegans uses specific ascarosides to control certain behaviors, including mating attraction, aggregation, and avoidance. Although in general the concentration of the ascarosides in the environment increases with population density, C. elegans can vary the types and amounts of ascarosides that it secretes depending on the culture conditions under which it has been grown and its developmental history. Here, we describe how to grow high-density worm cultures and the bacterial food for those cultures, as well as how to extract the culture medium to generate a crude pheromone extract. Then, we discuss how to analyze the types and amounts of ascarosides in that extract using mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24014355

  7. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  8. Bombardment-induced segregation and redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, N.Q.; Wiedersich, H.

    1986-04-01

    During ion bombardment, a number of processes can alter the compositional distribution and microstructure in near-surface regions of alloys. The relative importance of each process depends principally on the target composition, temperature, and ion characteristics. In addition to displacement mixing leading to a randomization of atomic locations, and preferential loss of alloying elements by sputtering, which are dominant at relatively low temperatures, several thermally-activated processes, including radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and Gibbsian adsorption, also play important roles. At elevated temperatures, nonequilibrium point defects induced by ion impacts become mobile and tend to anneal out by recombination and diffusion to extended sinks, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and free surfaces. The high defect concentrations, far exceeding the thermodynamic equilbrium values, can enhance diffusion-controlled processes, while persistent defect fluxes, originating from the spatial non-uniformity in defect production and annihilation, give rise to local redistribution of alloy constituents because of radiation-induced segregation. Moreover, when the alloy is maintained at high temperature, Gibbsian adsorption, driven by the reduction in free energy of the system, occurs even without irradiation; it involves a compositional perturbation in a few atom layers near the alloy surface. The combination of these processes leads to the complex development of a compositionally-modified layer in the subsurface region. In the present paper, selected examples of these different phenomena and their synergistic effects on the evolution of the near-surface compositions of alloys during sputtering and ion implantation at elevated temperatures are discussed. 74 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  10. AES, EELS and TRIM simulation method study of InP(100 subjected to Ar+, He+ and H+ ions bombardment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidri B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS have been performed in order to investigate the InP(100 surface subjected to ions bombardment. The InP(100 surface is always contaminated by carbon and oxygen revealed by C-KLL and O-KLL AES spectra recorded just after introduction of the sample in the UHV spectrometer chamber. The usually cleaning process of the surface is the bombardment by argon ions. However, even at low energy of ions beam (300 eV indium clusters and phosphorus vacancies are usually formed on the surface. The aim of our study is to compare the behaviour of the surface when submitted to He+ or H+ ions bombardment. The helium ions accelerated at 500V voltage and for 45 mn allow removing contaminants but induces damaged and no stoichiometric surface. The proton ions were accelerated at low energy of 500 eV to bombard the InP surface at room temperature. The proton ions broke the In-P chemical bonds to induce the formation of In metal islands. Such a chemical reactivity between hydrogen and phosphorus led to form chemical species such as PH and PH3, which desorbed from the surface. The chemical susceptibly and the small size of H+ advantaged their diffusion into bulk. Since the experimental methods alone were not able to give us with accuracy the disturbed depth of the target by these ions. We associate to the AES and EELS spectroscopies, the TRIM (Transport and Range of Ions in Matter simulation method in order to show the mechanism of interaction between Ar+, He+ or H+ ions and InP and determine the disturbed depth of the target by argon, helium or proton ions.

  11. Making Mass Spectrometry See the Light: The Promises and Challenges of Cryogenic Infrared Ion Spectroscopy as a Bioanalytical Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismesia, Adam P; Bailey, Laura S; Bell, Matthew R; Tesler, Larry F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2016-05-01

    The detailed chemical information contained in the vibrational spectrum of a cryogenically cooled analyte ion would, in principle, make infrared (IR) ion spectroscopy a gold standard technique for molecular identification in mass spectrometry. Despite this immense potential, there are considerable challenges in both instrumentation and methodology to overcome before the technique is analytically useful. Here, we discuss the promise of IR ion spectroscopy for small molecule analysis in the context of metabolite identification. Experimental strategies to address sensitivity constraints, poor overall duty cycle, and speed of the experiment are intimately tied to the development of a mass-selective cryogenic trap. Therefore, the most likely avenues for success, in the authors' opinion, are presented here, alongside alternative approaches and some thoughts on data interpretation.

  12. Determination of the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio by precision laser spectroscopy of $\\overline{p}He^{+}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, M; Eades, John; Gomikawa, K; Hayano, R S; Ono, N; Pirkl, Werner; Widmann, E; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Barna, D; Horváth, D

    2006-01-01

    A femtosecond optical frequency comb and continuous-wave pulse- amplified laser were used to measure 12 transition frequencies of antiprotonic helium to fractional precisions of (9-16) 10/sup -9lifetimes hitherto unaccessible to our precision laser spectroscopy method. Comparisons with three-body QED calculations yielded an antiproton-to-electron mass ratio of M/sub pmacron//m/sub e/=1836.152 674(5).

  13. FRAGMENTATION STUDIES OF D6,7-ANHIDROERITROMISIN-A BY LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROSCOPY (LC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairan Khairan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Semisynthesis of D6,7-Anhydroerythromycin-A was done by biomodification technique by addition of 0.2% INH into a culture fermentation of Saccharopolyspora erythraea ATCC 11635 in medium Hutchinson. The aim of this research is to studies of fragmentation pattern from new matabolite of D6,7-Anhydroerythromycin-A by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS and the ionization of mass spectroscopy is use by ESI (Electrospray Ionization pattern. The FT-IR spectrometric analyzes showed a stretching vibration of C=C conjugated group at wave number 1602.7 cm-1. This C=C conjugated vibration indicated the existence of double bond between C6 and C7 (D6,7, this confirmed that isolate contained D6,7-Anhydroerythromycin-A (the possibility of D6,7 was positive. For complementation, a LC-MS (Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy analyzes using ESI-MS (Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectroscopy ionization pattern was conducted to the isolate which resulted Quassimolecular ions [M+H]+ of D7,8- and D6,7-Anhydroerythromycin-A. LC-MS spectrogram of the isolate, which gave two peaks of m/z 732.2460 and m/z 716.2522, confirmed that the m/z 732.2460 possibly was D7,8-Anhydroerythromycin-A, while the m/z 716.2502 and m/z 715.2522 possibly were D6,7-Anhydroerythromycin-A.   Keywords: isoniazid, enoyl reduction, D6,7-Anhidroeritromisin-A, fragmentation, LC-MS.

  14. Emission of neutral molecules from ion-bombarded thiol self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postawa, Z. E-mail: zp@castor.if.uj.edu.pl; Meserole, C.A.; Cyganik, P.; Szymonska, J.; Winograd, N

    2001-08-01

    We have investigated ion-stimulated desorption of neutral molecules emitted from 8 keV Ar{sup +} ion-bombarded self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of phenethyl mercaptan (PEM) C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-SH and 2-(4{sup '}-methyl-biphenyl-4yl)-ethanethiol (BP2) CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}-SH deposited on Au(1 1 1) substrate. Neutral molecules were detected by laser postionization mass spectrometry. Only molecular fragments were detected from ion-bombarded systems. The mass spectra obtained for sputtered and gas phase fragments indicate that molecules recorded during ion bombardment were indeed emitted from the surface and were not the result of photofragmentation induced by the ionizing laser beam. From experimentally obtained time-of-flight (TOF) distributions, it was determined that the majority of desorbed neutral molecules leave the surface with very low translational energies. As the sample temperature is reduced, the distributions become broader and shift to longer flight times. The shift is more pronounced for molecules from BP2 and increases with the mass of the recorded molecular fragment. We postulate that the emission of molecules is initiated by processes which gently break molecular bonds (e.g., chemical reactions, secondary electrons). The formed fragments are loosely bound to the surface and can be removed by evaporation. At the investigated temperature range (170-350 K), the observed emission delay is attributed to the time required for the molecule to evaporate from the surface and is not influenced by the bond breaking rate.

  15. Testing mixed action approaches to meson spectroscopy with twisted mass sea quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Berlin, Joshua; Wagner, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We explore and compare three mixed action setups with Wilson twisted mass sea quarks and different valence quark actions: (1) Wilson twisted mass, (2) Wilson twisted mass + clover and (3) Wilson + clover. Our main goal is to reduce lattice discretization errors in mesonic spectral quantities, in particular to reduce twisted mass parity and isospin breaking.

  16. Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Welding through Ar bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Kucukkal, Mustafa U

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes show promise as nanoscale transistors, for nanocomputing applications. This use will require appropriate methods for creating electrical connections between distinct nanotubes, analogous to welding of metallic wires at larger length scales, but methods for performing nanoscale chemical welding are not yet sufficiently understood. This study examined the effect of Ar bombardment on the junction of two crossed single-walled carbon nanotubes, to understand the value and limitations of this method for generating connections between nanotubes. A geometric criterion was used to assess the quality of the junctions formed, with the goal of identifying the most productive conditions for experimental ion bombardment. In particular, the effects of nanotube chirality, Ar impact kinetic energy, impact particle flux and fluence, and annealing temperature were considered. The most productive bombardment conditions, leading to the most crosslinking of the tubes with the smallest loss of graphit...

  17. IR and UV irradiations on ion bombarded polycrystalline silver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, Anwar, E-mail: anwarlatif@uet.edu.p [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan); Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Bhatti, K.A.; Rafique, M.S.; Rizvi, Z.H. [Department of Physics, University of Engineering and Technology, Lahore 54890 (Pakistan)

    2010-10-15

    Ion bombarded polycrystalline fine polished silver surfaces are exposed to Nd:YAG (1064 nm, 10 mJ, 12 ns) and KrF excimer (248 nm, 57 mJ, 20 ns) lasers to examine structural and morphological changes employing X-ray diffractometry and optical microscopy, respectively. Irradiation causes considerable changes in grain sizes. Hydrodynamic sputtering is found to be dominant in heat affected zones (HAZs). Craters with irregular boundary and non-uniform thermal conduction are resulted on laser ablated surfaces of ion bombarded specimens. No disturbance takes place in the d-spacing of the planes of irradiated samples.

  18. Spectroscopy and photometry of the dwarf nova BZ Ursae Majoris and the CV linewidth/K, mass-ratio relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, J. S.; Honeycutt, R. K.; Schlegel, E. M.; Webbink, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Time-resolved spectroscopy of the dwarf nova BZ Ursae Majoris (BZ UMa) reveals periodic velocity variations in the hydrogen emission lines with P = 97.9 +/- 0.1 min and K = 73 +/- 6 km/s. CCD photometry over a 16-month interval shows three outbursts of about 4 mag with a mean separation of 181 days. The mean full width at half maximum (FWHM) for the hydrogen beta emission is large, prompting a recalibration of the FWHM/K vs. mass ratio relation, giving a mass ratio (M(sub RD)/M(sub WD)) of 0.20 for BZ UMa. The short period, long outburst interval, and small mass ratio support the suggestion of BZ UMa being in the SU Ursae Majoris subclass of dwarf novae.

  19. H-atom bombardment of CO2, HCOOH and CH3CHO containing ices

    CERN Document Server

    Bisschop, S E; Van Dishoeck, E F; Linnartz, H

    2007-01-01

    Context: Hydrogenation reactions are expected to be among the most important surface reactions on interstellar ices. However, solid state astrochemical laboratory data on reactions of H-atoms with common interstellar ice constituents are largely lacking. Aims: The goal of our laboratory work is to determine whether and how carbon dioxide (CO2), formic acid (HCOOH) and acetaldehyde (CH3CHO) react with H-atoms in the solid state at low temperatures and to derive reaction rates and production yields. Methods: Pure CO2, HCOOH and CH3CHO interstellar ice analogues are bombarded by H-atoms in an ultra-high vacuum experiment. The ices are monitored by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and the reaction products are detected in the gas phase through temperature programmed desorption to determine the destruction and formation yields as well as the corresponding reaction rates. Results: Within the sensitivity of our set-up we conclude that H-atom bombardment of pure CO2 and HCOOH ice does not result in detecta...

  20. Photon emission produced by Kr+ ions bombardment of Cr and Cr2O3 targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujlaidi, A. El; Hammoum, K.; Jadoual, L.; Jourdani, R.; Ait El Fqih, M.; Aouchiche, H.; Kaddouri, A.

    2015-01-01

    The sputter induced photon spectroscopy technique was used to study the luminescence spectra of the species sputtered from chromium powder and its oxide Cr2O3, during 5 keV Kr+ ions bombardment in vacuum better than 10-7 torr. The optical spectra recorded between 350 and 470 nm exhibit discrete lines which are attributed to neutral excited atoms of chromium (Cr I lines). The experiments are also performed under 10-5 torr ultra pure oxygen partial pressure. The results demonstrate that the measured intensities of the emitted photons are always higher in the presence of oxygen and even higher than those obtained for Cr2O3 target. In the presence of oxygen vapor we assume that an oxide film is formed on the chromium surface which is responsible of the increase of photon emission. This variation in the intensities is correctly explained in the model of electron transfer processes between the excited sputtered atom and the bombarded surface. This model suggests that the structure formed on the Cr surface in the case of oxygenated chromium is closer to that of Cr2O3 oxide.

  1. Aluminum work function: Effect of oxidation, mechanical scraping and ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinet, P.; Lemogne, T.; Montes, H.

    1985-01-01

    Surface studies have been performed on aluminum polycrystalline surfaces which have been mechanically scraped. Such studies were initiated in order to understand surface effects occurring in tribological processes which involve rubbing surfaces and the effects of adsorption of oxygen. To characterize the surfaces, the following three different experimental approaches have been used: (1) X.P.S. (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), in order to check the cleanliness of the surfaces and follow the adsorption and oxidation kinetics; (2) Analysis of the work function changes by following the energy spectra of secondary electrons emitted under low energy electron bombardment; and (3) Analysis of photoemission intensities under U.V. excitation. The reference state being chosen to be the surface cleaned by ion bombardment and exposures to oxygen atmospheres have been shown to lower the work function of clean polycrystalline aluminum by 1.2 eV. The oxygen pressure is found to affect only the kinetics of these experiments. Mechanical scraping has been shown to induce a decrease ( 0.3 eV) in the work function, which could sharply modify the kinetics of adsorption on the surface.

  2. Impurity Studies of Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te Crystals Using Photoluminescence and Glow Discharge Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Scripa, Rosalie N.

    2005-01-01

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te semiconductor crystal is a highly promising material for room temperature x- and gamma-ray detector applications because of its high resistivity, long carrier lifetime, and relatively high hole and electron mobilities. This paper reports the investigation of the impurities in several Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te (x = 0.20) crystals grown using the vertical Bridgman method under a Cd overpressure. The impurity concentrations were measured using glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS). The energy states of the impurities were studied using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at liquid helium temperature. The PL spectra showed a series of sharp high energy lines which are associated with free excitons and excitons bound to impurities as donors and acceptors in the crystals. The impurities also contributed to donor-acceptor pair recombination. The correlation between the GDMS and PL results will be reported.

  3. Protons from the alpha-particle bombardment of 23Na

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperus, J.

    1964-01-01

    Resonances in the yield of ground-state protons from alpha-particle bombardment of 23Na were investigated in the energy range Eα = 1.0 – 3.3 MeV. At least thirty-eight resonances were observed. Resonance energies and strengths are presented. At nine resonances angular distribution measurements lead

  4. Stable transformation of the oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, using microprojectile bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvitanich, Cristina; Judelson, Howard S.

    2003-01-01

    Germinated asexual sporangia, zoospores, and mycelia of Phytophthora infestans were transformed to G418-resistance by microprojectile bombardment. After optimization, an average of 14 transformants/shot were obtained, using 10(6) germinated sporangia and gold particles coated with 1 microg...

  5. Infrared ion spectroscopy in a modified quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer at the FELIX free electron laser laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonathan; Berden, Giel; Gebhardt, Christoph R.; Oomens, Jos

    2016-10-01

    We report on modifications made to a Paul-type quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and discuss its application in infrared ion spectroscopy experiments. Main modifications involve optical access to the trapped ions and hardware and software coupling to a variety of infrared laser sources at the FELIX infrared free electron laser laboratory. In comparison to previously described infrared ion spectroscopy experiments at the FELIX laboratory, we find significant improvements in efficiency and sensitivity. Effects of the trapping conditions of the ions on the IR multiple photon dissociation spectra are explored. Enhanced photo-dissociation is found at lower pressures in the ion trap. Spectra obtained under reduced pressure conditions are found to more closely mimic those obtained in the high-vacuum conditions of an Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. A gas-mixing system is described enabling the controlled addition of a secondary gas into helium buffer gas flowing into the trap and allows for ion/molecule reactions in the trap. The electron transfer dissociation (ETD) option of the mass spectrometer allows for IR structure characterization of ETD-generated peptide dissociation products.

  6. Damage analysis of benzene induced by keV fullerene bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, B. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: bartlomiej.czerwinski@uj.edu.pl; Rzeznik, L.; Paruch, R. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Garrison, B.J. [Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Postawa, Z. [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2009-05-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations have been used to investigate the damage of a benzene crystal induced by 5 keV C{sub 20}, C{sub 60}, C{sub 120} and C{sub 180} fullerene bombardment. The sputtering yield, the mass distributions, and the depth distributions of ejected organic molecules are analyzed as a function of the size of the projectile. The results indicate that all impinging clusters lead to the creation of almost hemispherical craters, and the process of crater formation only slightly depends on the size of the fullerene projectile. The total sputtering yield as well as the efficiency of molecular fragmentation are the largest for 5 keV C{sub 20}, and decrease with the size of the projectile. Most of the molecules damaged by the projectile impact are ejected into the vacuum during cluster irradiation. Similar behavior does not occur during atomic bombardment where a large portion of fragmented benzene molecules remain inside the crystal after projectile impact. This 'cleaning up' effect may explain why secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analysis of some organic samples with cluster projectiles can produce significantly less accumulated damage compared to analysis performed with atomic ion beams.

  7. Search for η′ mesic nuclei by missing-mass spectroscopy of the 12C(p,d reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yoshiki K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a missing-mass spectroscopy experiment of the 12C(p, d reaction at 2.5 GeV proton energy in order to search for η′ mesic nuclei. An excitation-energy spectrum of 11C was obtained around the η′ production threshold. As no significant peak structure was observed in the spectrum, upper limits of the formation cross section of η′ mesic nuclei have been determined. Preliminary results of the experiment as well as future prospects are given.

  8. Halide ions complex and deprotonate dipicolinamides and isophthalamides: assessment by mass spectrometry and UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasel, I Alexandru; Yamnitz, Carl R; Winter, Rudolph K; Gokel, George W

    2010-12-03

    The F(-), Cl(-), and Br(-) binding selectivity of bis(p-nitroanilide)s of dipicolinic and isophthalic acids was studied by using competitive electrospray mass spectrometry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Both hosts prefer binding Cl(-) over either F(-) or Br(-). Host deprotonation was observed to some extent in all experiments in which the host was exposed to halide ions. When F(-) was present, host deprotonation was often the major process, whereas little deprotonation was observed by Cl(-) or Br(-), which preferred complexation. A solution of either host changed color when mixed with a F(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), di- or triphenylacetate solution.

  9. TRIGA-SPEC: A setup for mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy at the research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    CERN Document Server

    Ketelaer, J; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Block, M; Eberhardt, K; Eitel, G; Ferrer, R; Geppert, C; George, S; Herfurth, F; Ketter, J; Nagy, Sz; Neidherr, D; Neugart, R; Nörtershäuser, W; Repp, J; Smorra, C; Trautmann, N; Weber, C

    2008-01-01

    The research reactor TRIGA Mainz is an ideal facility to provide neutron-rich nuclides with production rates sufficiently large for mass spectrometric and laser spectroscopic studies. Within the TRIGA-SPEC project, a Penning trap as well as a beam line for collinear laser spectroscopy are being installed. Several new developments will ensure high sensitivity of the trap setup enabling mass measurements even on a single ion. Besides neutron-rich fission products produced in the reactor, also heavy nuclides such as 235-U or 252-Cf can be investigated for the first time with an off-line ion source. The data provided by the mass measurements will be of interest for astrophysical calculations on the rapid neutron-capture process as well as for tests of mass models in the heavy-mass region. The laser spectroscopic measurements will yield model-independent information on nuclear ground-state properties such as nuclear moments and charge radii of neutron-rich nuclei of refractory elements far from stability. This pub...

  10. Elemental mass spectroscopy of remote surfaces from laser-induced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, W.; DeYoung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The elemental mass analysis of laser-produced ions from Al, Cu, Ge, Ag, and a lunar simulant target when irradiated by a 400-mJ, 8-ns, Nd: YAG laser at 1 x 10(exp 9) W/cm(exp 2), is reported. Ions traveled down a 11.1-m evacuated tube to an ion-trap 1-m time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer where an elemental mass spectrum was recorded. The amount of target material removed per laser pulse and the ionization fraction were measured. The ion spatial distribution was measured at 11.1-m distance and found to be near a fourth-power cosine distribution. These results indicate the ability to mass analyze a surface over a distance of many kilometers for lunar and asteroid surface elemental mass analysis by a remote satellite or lunar rover.

  11. Missing Mass Spectroscopy of η′ Mesic Nuclei with the (p,d Reaction at GSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yoshiki K.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We plan a missing-mass spectroscopy experiment of η′ mesic nuclei with the 12C(p,dη′⊗11C reaction to study in-medium properties of the η′ meson. In nuclear medium, due to restoration of chiral symmetry, the mass of the η′ meson may be reduced, and η′ bound states in a nucleus may exist. The experiment will be started at GSI with a 2.5 GeV proton beam using FRS as a spectrometer and will be continued at Super-FRS at FAIR. The plan of the experiment and development of a Cherenkov detector and an optics mode are described.

  12. Role of excipients in hydrate formation kinetics of theophylline in wet masses studied by near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna C; Airaksinen, Sari; Karjalainen, Milja

    2004-01-01

    . Anhydrous theophylline was chosen as the hydrate-forming model drug compound and two excipients, silicified microcrystalline cellulose (SMCC) and alpha-lactose monohydrate, with different water absorbing properties, were used in formulation. An early stage of wet massing was studied with anhydrous...... theophylline and its 1:1 (w/w) mixtures with alpha-lactose monohydrate and SMCC with 0.1g/g of purified water. The changes in the state of water were monitored using near-infrared spectroscopy, and the conversion of the crystal structure was verified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). SMCC decreased...... the hydrate formation rate by absorbing water, but did not inhibit it. The results suggest that alpha-lactose monohydrate slightly increased the hydrate formation rate in comparison with a mass comprising only anhydrous theophylline....

  13. Ion-bombardment induced morphology change of device related SiGe multilayer heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, C., E-mail: Christian.Hofer@unileoben.ac.at [Institute of Physics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Teichert, C., E-mail: Christian.Teichert@unileoben.ac.at [Institute of Physics, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz Josef Str. 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Oehme, M.; Werner, J.; Lyutovich, K.; Kasper, E. [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Ion assisted molecular beam epitaxy bears the potential to tune morphological and structural parameters of semiconductor heterolayers for opto- and nanoelectronic applications. The morphology evolution and the degree of relaxation are influenced by the ion beam parameters and the strain of the heteroepitaxial film. In this work, the morphology of silicon germanium (SiGe) layers due to Si{sup +}-ion beam treatment during growth is investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) as a function of ion energy and ion flux density. Ion energies range from 100 eV to 1000 eV. The AFM measurements are used to determine the roughness distribution across the wafers. A regular pattern of SiGe crystallites is found, where the damage due to low ion energy Si{sup +}-ion bombardment is medium and the degree of relaxation, determined by Raman spectroscopy, is below 25%.

  14. Spectroscopy of the DA white dwarfs - Automatic atmospheric parameterization and mass distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmahan, Robert K.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the automatic calculation of the atmospheric parameters (Teff and log g) of hydrogen-rich degenerate stars from low-resolution spectra is described, and then applied to the spectra of 53 DA white dwarfs. A value for the width of the DA mass distribution of sigma M/solar-M not greater than +0.10 is obtained using the proposed approach. The data indicate that the distribution is asymmetrically skewed to low masses; however, there is also evidence of a high-mass non-Gaussian tail.

  15. Optical spectroscopy of isolated planetary mass objects in the sigma Orionis cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Barrado y Navascués, D; Béjar, V J S; Rebolo, R; Martín, E L; Mundt, R; Bailer-Jones, C A L

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained low resolution optical spectra of 15 isolated planetary mass objects (IPMOs) in the sigma Orionis cluster, and derived spectral types by comparison with nearby M and L dwarfs. The spectral types are in the range late M - mid L, in agreement with our expectations based on colors and magnitudes for bona fide members. Therefore, most of these objects have masses below the deuterium burning limit. About 2/3 show H(alpha) in emission at our spectral resolution. From our spectroscopic and photometric data, we infer that three IPMOs in this sample may be binaries with components of similar masses. These results confirm that the substellar mass function of the sigma Orionis cluster, in the form dN/dM, keeps rising in the planetary domain.

  16. On the evaluation of air mass factors for atmospheric near-ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliski, Lori M.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of UV-visible twilight absorption measurements of atmospheric chemical constituents is dependent on how well the optical path, or air mass factor, of light collected by the spectrometer is understood. A simple single scattering model and a Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme have been developed to study the effects of multiple scattering, aerosol scattering, surface albedo and refraction on air mass factors for scattered light observations. At fairly short visible wavelengths (less than about 450 nm), stratospheric air mass factors are found to be relatively insensitive to multiple scattering, surface albedo and refraction, as well as aerosol scattering by background aerosols. Longer wavelengths display greater sensitivity to refraction and aerosol scattering. Tropospheric air mass factors are found to be highly dependent on aerosol scattering, surface albedo and, at long visible wavelengths (about 650 nm), refraction. Absorption measurements of NO2 and O4 are shown to support these conclusions.

  17. On the evaluation of air mass factors for atmospheric near-ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliski, Lori M.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The interpretation of UV-visible twilight absorption measurements of atmospheric chemical constituents is dependent on how well the optical path, or air mass factor, of light collected by the spectrometer is understood. A simple single scattering model and a Monte Carlo radiative transfer scheme have been developed to study the effects of multiple scattering, aerosol scattering, surface albedo and refraction on air mass factors for scattered light observations. At fairly short visible wavelengths (less than about 450 nm), stratospheric air mass factors are found to be relatively insensitive to multiple scattering, surface albedo and refraction, as well as aerosol scattering by background aerosols. Longer wavelengths display greater sensitivity to refraction and aerosol scattering. Tropospheric air mass factors are found to be highly dependent on aerosol scattering, surface albedo and, at long visible wavelengths (about 650 nm), refraction. Absorption measurements of NO2 and O4 are shown to support these conclusions.

  18. Sputtered neutral Si nC m clusters as a monitor for carbon implantation during C 60 bombardment of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wucher, A.; Kucher, A.; Winograd, N.; Briner, C. A.; Krantzman, K. D.

    2011-06-01

    The incorporation of carbon atoms into a silicon surface under bombardment with 40-keV C60+ ions is investigated using time-of-flight mass spectrometry of sputtered neutral and ionized Si nC m clusters. The neutral particles emitted from the surface are post-ionized by strong field infrared photoionization using a femtosecond laser system operated at a wavelength of 1400/1700 nm. From the comparison of secondary ion and neutral spectra, it is found that the secondary ion signals do not reflect the true partial sputter yields of the emitted clusters. The measured yield distribution is interpreted in terms of the accumulating carbon surface concentration with increasing C 60 fluence. The experimental results are compared with those from recent molecular dynamics simulations of C 60 bombardment of silicon.

  19. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-Type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. III. Radial Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean; Romanowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    There is good evidence that the centers of massive early-type galaxies have a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) compared to the IMF of the Milky Way. Here we study the radial variation of the IMF within such galaxies, using a combination of high quality Keck spectroscopy and a new suite of stellar population synthesis models that cover a wide range in metallicity. As in the previous studies in this series, the models are fitted directly to the spectra and treat all elemental abundance ratios as free parameters. Using newly obtained spectroscopy for six galaxies, including deep data extending to ~1Re for the galaxies NGC1407, NGC1600, and NGC2695, we find that the IMF varies strongly with galactocentric radius. For all six galaxies the IMF is bottom-heavy in the central regions, with average mass-to-light ratio "mismatch" parameter a~2.5 at r=0. The IMF rapidly becomes more bottom-light with increasing radius, flattening off near the Milky Way value (a~1.1) at R>0.4Re. A consequence is that the ...

  20. Integral field spectroscopy of supernova explosion sites: constraining mass and metallicity of the progenitors - I. Type Ib and Ic supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Maeda, Keiichi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Pereira, Rui; Usuda, Tomonori; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of 11 type-Ib/c supernova explosion sites in nearby galaxies has been obtained using UH88/SNIFS and Gemini-N/GMOS. The use of integral field spectroscopy enables us to obtain both spatial and spectral information of the explosion site, allowing the identification of the parent stellar population of the supernova progenitor star. The spectrum of the parent population provides metallicity determination via strong-line method and age estimation obtained via comparison with simple stellar population (SSP) models. We adopt this information as the metallicity and age of the supernova progenitor, under the assumption that it was coeval with the parent stellar population. The age of the star corresponds to its lifetime, which in turn gives the estimate of its initial mass. With this method we were able to determine both the metallicity and initial (ZAMS) mass of the progenitor stars of the type Ib and Ic supernovae. We found that on average SN Ic explosion sites are more metal-rich and you...

  1. QCD spectroscopy and quark mass renormalisation in external magnetic fields with Wilson fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Gunnar; Endrodi, Gergely; Glaessle, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    We study the change of the QCD spectrum of low-lying mesons in the presence of an external magnetic field using Wilson fermions in the quenched approximation. Motivated by qualitative differences observed in the spectra of overlap and Wilson fermions for large magnetic fields, we investigate the dependence of the additive quark mass renormalisation on the magnetic field. We provide evidence that the magnetic field changes the critical quark mass both in the free case and on our quenched ensemble. The associated change of the bare quark mass with the magnetic field affects the spectrum and is relevant for the magnetic field dependence of a number of related quantities. We derive Ward identities for lattice and continuum QCD+QED from which we can extract the current quark masses. We also report on a first test of the tuning of the quark masses with the magnetic field using the current quark masses, and show that this tuning resolves the qualitative discrepancy between the Wilson and overlap spectra.

  2. Absorption of hydrogen in vanadium, enhanced by ion bombardment; Ionenbeschussunterstuetzte Absorption des Wasserstoffs in Vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, H.; Lammers, M. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany); Mueller, K.H. [Inst. fuer Technologie- und Wissenstransfer, Soest (Germany)]|[Paderborn Univ. (Gesamthochschule), Soest (Germany). Fachbereich 16 - Elektrische Energietechnik; Kiss, G.; Kemeny, Z. [Technical Univ. Budapest (Hungary)

    1998-12-31

    Prior to hydrogen implantation into vanadium, the vanadium specimen usually is exposed to an activation process and is then heated at 1 atm hydrogen to temperatures between 500 and 600 C, subsequently cooled down in several steps. Within this temperature range, hydrogen solubility increases with declining temperature. A decisive factor determining hydrogen absorption is the fact that at temperatures above 250 C, oxygen desorbs from the material surface and thus no longer inhibits hydrogen absorption. Therefore a different approach was chosen for the experiments reported: Hydrogen absorption under UHV conditions at room temperature. After the usual activation process, the vanadium surface was cleaned by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment. Thus oxygen absorption at the specimen surface (and new reactions with oxygen from the remaining gas) could be avoided, or removed. By means of thermal desorption mass spectrometry (TDMS), hydrogen absorption as a function of argon ion dose was analysed. TDMS measurements performed for specimens treated by ion bombardment prior to H{sup 2} exposure showed two H{sup 2} desorption peaks, in contrast to the profiles measured with specimens not exposed to ion bombardment. It is assumed that the ion bombardment disturbs the crystal structure so that further sites for hydrogen absorption are produced. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Bei der Beladung von Vandium mit Wasserstoff wird ueblicherweise die Probe nach einer Aktivierungsprozedur bei 1 atm Wasserstoff auf Temperaturen im Bereich von 500 bis 600 C hochgeheizt und danach schrittweise abgekuehlt. In diesem Temperaturbereich nimmt die Wasserstoffloeslichkeit mit abnehmender Temperatur zu. Entscheidend fuer die Beladung ist aber auch die Tatsache, dass bei Temperaturen groesser 250 C Sauerstoff von der Oberflaeche desorbiert und dadurch die Absorption von Wasserstoff nicht mehr blockieren kann. Im Rahmen der hier beschriebenen Untersuchungen sollte die Wasserstoffbeladung unter UHV-Bedingungen bei

  3. Cluster primary ion bombardment of organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollmer, F

    2004-06-15

    In order to evaluate their potential for molecular surface analysis, we applied monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au, Bi) as well as polyatomic (SF{sub 5}, Au{sub n}, Bi{sub n}, C{sub 60}) primary ions to a series of organic samples. For the model system Irganox 1010 on LDPE we determined the secondary ion yield, the disappearance cross section and the resulting ion formation efficiency as a function of the primary ion energy. As a general result the efficiency is improved with the mass of the monoatomic primary ion. A further increase is obtained by the use of polyatomic primary ions. According to this, highest efficiencies are obtained for C{sub 60}, the lowest for Ga. Additionally, molecular imaging was performed on real world samples (electronic components, pharmaceuticals): for this a cluster LMIS operated with Ga, AuGe or Bi was applied. The results reveal the potential of cluster SIMS to overcome existing limitations and to establish TOF-SIMS for new applications in the fields of polymers, biology and medicine.

  4. Cluster primary ion bombardment of organic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmer, F.

    2004-06-01

    In order to evaluate their potential for molecular surface analysis, we applied monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au, Bi) as well as polyatomic (SF 5, Au n, Bi n, C 60) primary ions to a series of organic samples. For the model system Irganox 1010 on LDPE we determined the secondary ion yield, the disappearance cross section and the resulting ion formation efficiency as a function of the primary ion energy. As a general result the efficiency is improved with the mass of the monoatomic primary ion. A further increase is obtained by the use of polyatomic primary ions. According to this, highest efficiencies are obtained for C 60, the lowest for Ga. Additionally, molecular imaging was performed on real world samples (electronic components, pharmaceuticals): for this a cluster LMIS operated with Ga, AuGe or Bi was applied. The results reveal the potential of cluster SIMS to overcome existing limitations and to establish TOF-SIMS for new applications in the fields of polymers, biology and medicine.

  5. Black Hole Masses of Intermediate-Redshift Quasars: Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Matthias; Grupe, Dirk; Komossa, S

    2009-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of ten luminous, intermediate redshift quasars observed with SofI at the NTT of ESO/La Silla. With these rest-frame optical spectra we probe the Hb -[OIII] emission line region. Using the standard scaling relation involving the width of the Hb line and the continuum luminosity, we measure black hole masses in the range of ~2x10^9 to 10^10 Msol. We also used SDSS spectra to probe MgII2798 and CIV1549 emission lines and used these for black hole mass measurements as well. The massive black holes we observe could not have grown by simple radiatively efficient accretion at the observed accretion rate starting from seeds of up to thousand solar masses. About 10% of the observed black hole mass must have been accumulated by earlier merger events and radiatively inefficient accretion. Radiatively efficient accretion would further grow these BHs to masses of several 10^9 Msol in 2 to 3 e-folding times i.e. in several 10^8yrs. The Hb-based Eddington luminosity ratios are in the range o...

  6. Jovian Early Bombardment: planetesimal erosion in the inner asteroid belt

    CERN Document Server

    Turrini, Diego; Magni, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid belt is an open window on the history of the Solar System, as it preserves records of both its formation process and its secular evolution. The progenitors of the present-day asteroids formed in the Solar Nebula almost contemporary to the giant planets. The actual process producing the first generation of asteroids is uncertain, strongly depending on the physical characteristics of the Solar Nebula, and the different scenarios produce very diverse initial size-frequency distributions. In this work we investigate the implications of the formation of Jupiter, plausibly the first giant planet to form, on the evolution of the primordial asteroid belt. The formation of Jupiter triggered a short but intense period of primordial bombardment, previously unaccounted for, which caused an early phase of enhanced collisional evolution in the asteroid belt. Our results indicate that this Jovian Early Bombardment caused the erosion or the disruption of bodies smaller than a threshold size, which strongly depen...

  7. HST Hα grism spectroscopy of ROLES: a flatter low-mass slope for the z ∼ 1 SSFR-mass relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramraj, Riona; Gilbank, David G.; Blyth, Sarah-Louise; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bower, Richard G.; Balogh, Michael L.

    2017-04-01

    We present measurements of star formation rates (SFRs) for dwarf galaxies (M* ∼ 108.5 M_{⊙}) at z ∼ 1 using near-infrared slitless spectroscopy from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by targeting and measuring the luminosity of the Hα emission line. Our sample is derived from the Redshift One LDSS3 Emission Line Survey (ROLES), which used [O II]λ3727 as a tracer of star formation to target very low stellar masses down to very low SFRs (∼0.1 M_{⊙} yr-1) at this epoch. Dust corrections are estimated using SED fits and we find, by comparison with other studies using Balmer decrement dust corrections, that we require a smaller ratio between the gas phase and stellar extinction than the nominal Calzetti relation, in agreement with recent findings by other studies. By stacking the Wide-Field Camera (WFC)3 spectra at the redshifts obtained from ground-based [O II] detections, we are able to push the WFC3 spectra to much lower SFRs and obtain the most complete spectroscopic measurement of the low-mass end of the SSFR-mass relation to date. We measure a flatter low-mass power-law slope (-0.47 ± 0.04) than found by other (shallower) H α-selected samples (≈-1), although still somewhat steeper than that predicted by the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) simulation (-0.14 ± 0.05), hinting at possible missing physics not modelled by EAGLE or remaining incompleteness for our H α data.

  8. Introduction of a valence space in QRPA: Impact on vibrational mass parameters and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechaftois, F., E-mail: francois.lechaftois@cea.fr; Péru, S. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France); Deloncle, I. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France); CSNSM, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France)

    2015-10-15

    For the first time, using a unique finite range interaction (D1M Gogny force), a fully coherent and time-feasible calculation of the Bohr Hamiltonian vibrational mass is envisioned in a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov + Quasiparticle Random Phase Approximation (QRPA) framework. In order to reach handable computation time, we evaluate the feasibility of this method by considering the insertion of a valence space for QRPA. We validate our approach in the even-even tin isotopes comparing the convergence scheme of the mass parameter with those of built-in QRPA outputs: excited state energy and reduced transition probability. The seeming convergence of these intrinsic quantities is shown to be misleading and the difference with the theoretical expected value is quantified. This work is a primary step towards the systematic calculation of mass parameters.

  9. Thermo-mechanical design aspects of mercury bombardment ion thrusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelker, D. E.; Kami, S.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design criteria are presented as background considerations for solving problems associated with the thermomechanical design of mercury ion bombardment thrusters. Various analytical procedures are used to aid in the development of thruster subassemblies and components in the fields of heat transfer, vibration, and stress analysis. Examples of these techniques which provide computer solutions to predict and control stress levels encountered during launch and operation of thruster systems are discussed. Computer models of specific examples are presented.

  10. Measurement of the charged pion mass using X-ray spectroscopy of exotic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    The $5g-4f$ transitions in pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen were measured simultaneously by using a gaseous nitrogen-oxygen mixture at 1.4\\,bar. Due to the precise knowledge of the muon mass the muonic line provides the energy calibration for the pionic transition. A value of (139.57077\\,$\\pm$\\,0.00018)\\,MeV/c$^{2}$ ($\\pm$\\,1.3ppm) is derived for the mass of the negatively charged pion, which is 4.2ppm larger than the present world average.

  11. Direct observation of the mass renormalization in SrVO3 by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, t.

    2010-05-03

    We have performed an angle-resolved photoemission study of the three-dimensional perovskite-type SrVO{sub 3}. Observed spectral weight distribution of the coherent part in the momentum space shows cylindrical Fermi surfaces consisting of the V 3d t{sub 2g} orbitals as predicted by local-density approximation (LDA) band-structure calculation. The observed energy dispersion shows a moderately enhanced effective mass compared to the LDA results, corresponding to the effective mass enhancement seen in the thermodynamic properties. Contributions from the bulk and surface electronic structures to the observed spectra are discussed based on model calculations.

  12. Herschel/HIFI spectroscopy of the intermediate mass protostar NGC 7129 FIRS 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnstone, D.; Fich, M.; McCoey, C.

    2010-01-01

    Herschel/HIFI observations of water from the intermediate mass protostar NGC 7129 FIRS 2 provide a powerful diagnostic of the physical conditions in this star formation environment. Six spectral settings, covering four H216O and two H218O lines, were observed and all but one H218O line were...... are consistent with emission from water arising in the envelope around the intermediate mass protostar, and the abundance of H2O is constrained to ˜10-7 for the outer envelope. Additionally, the presence of a narrow self-absorption component for the lowest energy lines is likely due to self-absorption from...

  13. Transformation of Dendrobium orchid using particle bombardment of protocorms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnle, A R; Sugii, N

    1992-08-01

    Transformed dendrobium orchids (Dendrobium x Jaquelyn Thomas hybrids) were recovered from protocorms bombarded by particles coated with the plasmid pGA482GG/cpPRV4, which contains the plant expressible Nos-NPT II and papaya ringspot virus (PRV) coat protein (CP) genes. Approximately 280 protocorms from four crosses were bombarded and potentially transformed tissues were identified by growth and green color on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 2% sucrose and 50-100 mg 1(-1) kanamycin sulfate. Kanamycin concentrations that prevented growth of nontransformed tissues could not be used for long-term selection because such levels suppressed the regeneration of potentially transformed tissues. PCR and restriction analysis 21 months after treatment found 13 of 13 plants from two crosses, which appeared kanamycin-tolerant, to contain the Nos-NPT II gene, while only one of these plants carried the vector-linked PRV CP-gene. These results support use of particle bombardment for transformation of this important ornamental monocot.

  14. Genetic transformation of Pinus taeda by particle bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A protocol is presented for genetically engineering loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) using particle bombardment. This protocol enabled the routine transformation of loblolly pine plants that were previously difficult to transform. Mature zygotic embryos were used to be bombarded and to generate organogenic callus and transgenic regenerated plants. Plasmid pB48.215 DNA contained a synthetic Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) cryIAc coding sequence flanked by the double cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and nopaline synthase (Nos) terminator sequences, and the selectable marker gene, neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) controlled by the promoter of the nopaline synthase gene was introduced into loblolly pine tissues by particle bombardment. The transformed tissues were proliferated and selected by kanamycin resistance conferred by the introduced NPTII gene. Shoot regeneration was induced from the kanamycin-resistant callus, and transgenic plantlets were then produced. The presence of the introduced genes in the transgenic loblolly pine plants was confirmed by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) analysis, by Southern blot analysis, and insect feeding assays. The recovered transgenic plants were acclimatized and then established in soil.

  15. The role of impact bombardment history in lunar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, T.; Zhu, M.-H.; Wünnemann, K.; Werner, S. C.

    2017-04-01

    The lunar surface features diverse impact structures originating from its early bombardment; the largest among them are the lunar basins. Basin-forming impacts delivered large amounts of energy to the target and expelled lots of material that deposited as an insulating blanket in the vicinity of the impact. Here, we investigate how such processes may have altered the lunar evolution. We combine lunar basin chronologies with numerical models of basin formation and 3D thermochemical mantle convection and analyse the role of single generic impacts resulting in basins with varying diameter, formation time, location and ejecta properties. The direct effects of a single impact are enhanced melt generation as well as thermal and heat flux anomalies, but these are limited to ∼ 100 Myr following the impact. We use these insights in multi-impact scenarios more relevant for the Moon, which lead to a widespread ejecta blanket and make impact-induced effects more substantial. Lunar contraction history may be altered by the impact bombardment in favour of an early expansion phase as suggested by recent observations. Moreover, imprints of the early bombardment may be kept in the thermal and compositional state of the Moon's interior until modern times. These can be as large as those induced by uncertainties in bulk lunar heat content, if surface insulation due to ejecta is efficient. In this case, model-predicted present-day thermal profiles match independent constraints better if the bulk Moon is not significantly enriched in refractory elements compared to Earth.

  16. Deviations from Born-Oppenheimer mass scaling in spectroscopy and ultracold molecular physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lutz, Jesse J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate Born-Oppenheimer breakdown (BOB) effects (beyond the usual mass scaling) for the electronic ground states of a series of homonuclear and heteronuclear alkali-metal diatoms, together with the Sr$_2$ and Yb$_2$ diatomics. Several widely available electronic structure software packages are used to calculate the leading contributions to the total isotope shift for commonly occurring isotopologs of each species. Computed quantities include diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections (mass shifts) and isotopic field shifts. Mass shifts dominate for light nuclei up to and including K, but field shifts contribute significantly for Rb and Sr and are dominant for Yb. We compare the {\\em ab initio} mass-shift functions for Li$_2$, LiK and LiRb with spectroscopically derived ground-state BOB functions from the literature. We find good agreement in the values of the functions for LiK and LiRb at their equilibrium geometries, but significant disagreement with the shapes of the functions for all 3 systems. The diff...

  17. Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopy of ices toward low-mass embedded protostars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogert, ACA; Pontoppidan, KM; Lahuis, F; Jorgensen, JK; Augereau, JC; Blake, GA; Brooke, TY; Dullemond, CP; Evans, NJ; Geers, [No Value; Hogerheijde, MR; Kessler-Silacci, J; Knez, C; Morris, P; Noriega-Crespo, A; Schoier, FL; van Dishoeck, EF; Allen, LE; Harvey, PM; Koerner, DW; Mundy, LG; Myers, PC; Padgett, DL; Sargent, AI; Stapelfeldt, KR

    2004-01-01

    Sensitive 5-38 mum Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based 3-5 mum spectra of the embedded low-mass protostars B5 IRS1 and HH 46 IRS show deep ice absorption bands superposed on steeply rising mid-infrared continua. The ices likely originate in the circumstellar envelopes. The CO2 bending mode at 1

  18. Discovery of secondary metabolites from Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains using genome mining and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome sequencing, data mining and mass spectrometry were used to identify secondary metabolites produced by several Bacillus spp. biocontrol strains. These biocontrol strains have shown promise in managing Fusarium head blight in wheat. Draft genomes were produced and screened in silico using genom...

  19. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-ray Binaries : Accretion Disk Contamination and Compact Object Mass Determination in V404 Cyg and Cen X-4

    CERN Document Server

    Khargharia, Juthika; Robinson, Edward L

    2010-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) broadband (0.80--2.42 $\\mu$m) spectroscopy of two low mass X-ray binaries: V404 Cyg and Cen X-4. One important parameter required in the determination of the mass of the compact objects in these systems is the binary inclination. We can determine the inclination by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations of the Roche-lobe filling donor star, but the contamination of the donor star light from other components of the binary, particularly the accretion disk, must be taken into account. To this end, we determined the donor star contribution to the infrared flux by comparing the spectra of V404 Cyg and Cen X-4 to those of various field K-stars of known spectral type. For V404 Cyg, we determined that the donor star has a spectral type of K3 III. We determined the fractional donor contribution to the NIR flux in the H- and K-bands as $0.98 \\pm .05$ and $0.97 \\pm .09$, respectively. We remodeled the H-band light curve from \\citet{sanwal1996} after correcting for the donor star contribution...

  20. Neutrino mass sensitivity by MAC-E-Filter based time-of-flight spectroscopy with the example of KATRIN

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrink, Nicholas; Martin, Eric L; Robertson, R G Hamish; Zacher, Michael; Weinheimer, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The KATRIN experiment aims at a measurement of the neutrino mass with a 90 % C.L. sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c$^2$ by measuring the endpoint region of the tritium $\\beta$ decay spectrum from a windowless gaseous molecular tritium source using an integrating spectrometer of the MAC-E-Filter type. We discuss the idea of using the MAC-E-Filter in a time-of-flight mode (MAC-E-TOF) in which the neutrino mass is determined by a measurement of the electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrum that depends on the neutrino mass. MAC-E-TOF spectroscopy here is a very sensitive method since the $\\beta$-electrons are slowed down to distinguishable velocities by the MAC-E-Filter. Their velocity depends strongly on their surplus energy above the electric retarding potential. Using MAC-E-TOF, a statistical sensitivity gain is expected. Because a small number of retarding-potential settings is sufficient for a complete measurement, in contrast to about 40 different retarding potentials used in the standard MAC-E-Filter mode, there is a ...

  1. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  2. Determination of alkylphenol and alkylphenolethoxylates in biota by liquid chromatography with detection by tandem mass spectrometry and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Afonso, I.; Loyo-Rosales, J.E.; de la Paz Aviles, M.; Rattner, B.A.; Rice, C.P.

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative method for the simultaneous determination of octylphenol, nonylphenol and the corresponding ethoxylates (1 to 5) in biota is presented. Extraction methods were developed for egg and fish matrices based on accelerated solvent extraction followed by a solid-phase extraction cleanup, using octadecylsilica or aminopropyl cartridges. Identification and quantitation were accomplished by liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) and compared to the traditional liquid chromatography with fluorescence spectroscopy detection. LC-MS-MS provides high sensitivity and specificity required for these complex matrices and an accurate quantitation with the use of 13C-labeled internal standards. Quantitation limits by LC-MS-MS ranged from 4 to 12 ng/g in eggs, and from 6 to 22 ng/g in fish samples. These methods were successfully applied to osprey eggs from the Chesapeake Bay and fish from the Great Lakes area. Total levels found in osprey egg samples were up to 18 ng/g wet mass and as high as 8.2 ug/g wet mass in the fish samples.

  3. Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy for Analysis of Biological Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Timothy J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55% (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the eight week study, cecal and distal-colon contents samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal-colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

  4. Adaptive Optics Assisted 3D spectroscopy observations for black hole mass measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Pastorini, Guia

    2006-01-01

    The very high spatial resolution provided by Adaptive Optics assisted spectroscopic observations at 8m-class telescopes (e.g. with SINFONI at the VLT) will allow to greatly increase the number of direct black hole (BH) mass measurements which is currently very small. This is a fundamental step to investigate the tight link between galaxy evolution and BH growth, revealed by the existing scaling relations between $M_{BH}$ and galaxy structural parameters. I present preliminary results from SIN...

  5. Spectroscopy of Intermediate Mass Members of the Orion OB1a and b associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Sherry, William; Kim, Serena; Brittain, Sean

    2010-08-01

    OB associations are ideal sites for probing the formation of low mass stars. There has been little systematic study of the low mass stars in the largest nearby OB association, Orion OB1, aside from the Orion Nebula and σ Ori clusters. In an attempt to map the mass function and its spatial variation from 40 to below 0.01 M_⊙, we have completed a near-IR (JHK) survey of about 18 square degrees in the Orion OB1a and OB1b associations using the CPAPIR camera on the SMARTS/CTIO 1.5m telescope, supplemented by a VRI survey using the Steward Observatory Bok/90Prime and the KPNO 4m/MOSAIC cameras, as well as deep 4m/NEWFIRM images. The photometry reveals thousands of candidate association members. We request time with HYDRA to obtain spectra of the brighter candidate members (V<19), in order to confirm youth and membership from Li abundances, chromospheric activity, and radial velocities.

  6. HPLC separation and GC-MS identification of the polar components of coal liquids. [High pressure liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, M.; Tanabe, K.; Uchino, H.; Yokoyama, S.; Sanada, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The polar components in the 200-400 C fraction of Akabira coal liquids were separated by high pressure liquid chromatography using an amine-based column. By varying the CHCl/sub 3/ concentration in the solvent, basic, neutral and acid fractions were obtained. These were then investigated separately using infrared spectroscopy, flame ionization detection-gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The basic fraction contained alkyltetrahydroquinolines, the neutral fraction, alkylphenols and alkylcarbazoles; and the acid fraction, alkylphenols. 15 references.

  7. Systematic effects in the measurement of the negatively charged pion mass using laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Obreshkov, Boyan

    2016-01-01

    The collision-induced shift and broadening of selected dipole transition lines of pionic helium in gaseous helium at low temperatures up to $T=12$ K and pressure up to a few bar are calculated within variable phase function approach. We predict blue shift of the resonance frequencies of the $(n,l)=(16,15) \\rightarrow (16,14) $ and $(16,15) \\rightarrow (17,14)$ unfavored transitions and red shift for the favored transition $(17,16) \\rightarrow (16,15)$. The result may be helpful in reducing the systematic error in proposed future experiments for determination of the negatively charged pion mass from laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms.

  8. Pb distribution in bones from the Franklin expedition: synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and laser ablation/mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ronald Richard; Naftel, Steven; Macfie, Sheila; Jones, Keith; Nelson, Andrew [The University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Synchrotron micro-X-ray Fluorescence has been used to map the metal distribution in selected bone fragments representative of remains associated with the Franklin expedition. In addition, laser ablation mass spectroscopy using a 25 {mu}m diameter circular spot was employed to compare the Pb isotope distributions in small regions within the bone fragments. The X-ray Fluorescence mapping shows Pb to be widely distributed in the bone while the Pb isotope ratios obtained by laser ablation within small areas representative of bone with different Pb exchange rates do not show statistically significant differences. These results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that faulty solder seals in tinned meat were the principle source of Pb in the remains of the expedition personnel. (orig.)

  9. Liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/visible photodiode array analysis of selected colchicum species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Ahmad A; Al-Serini, Ala'a; Qasaymeh, Rana M; Ma'aya'h, Amani S; Tawaha, Khaled; El-Elimat, Tamam; Alali, Feras Q

    2012-01-01

    An in-house strategy to dereplicate colchicinoid alkaloids was recently developed by our team. It aimed at quickly identifying Colchicum constituents using LC-MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy) and LC-UV/Vis PDA (liquid chromatography-ultraviolet/ visible photodiode array) techniques. In this project, our goal was to validate the developed method through analysing the alkaloid-rich fractions of three Colchicum species that had been previously studied phytochemically using the traditional bioactivity-guided fractionation methodology. The analysed species were Colchicum tauri Siehe ex Stefanoff, Colchicum stevenii Kunth, and Colchicum tunicatum Feinbr., all belonging to the family Colchicaceae. In addition to identifying the compounds previously isolated and characterized by the traditional methodology, the new strategy succeeded in tentatively identifying a set of known compounds, but new to the species.

  10. Combined use of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry for cell surface analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dague, Etienne; Delcorte, Arnaud; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the surface properties of microbial cells is a major challenge of current microbiological research and a key to efficiently exploit them in biotechnology. Here, we used three advanced surface analysis techniques with different sensitivity, probing depth, and lateral resolution, that is, in situ atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry, to gain insight into the surface properties of the conidia of the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We show that the native ultrastructure, surface protein and polysaccharide concentrations, and amino acid composition of three mutants affected in hydrophobin production are markedly different from those of the wild-type, thereby providing novel insight into the cell wall architecture of A. fumigatus. The results demonstrate the power of using multiple complementary techniques for probing microbial cell surfaces.

  11. Near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the low Galactic latitude globular cluster 2MASS-GC03

    CERN Document Server

    Carballo-Bello, Julio A; Borissova, J; Smith, L C; Kurtev, R; Lucas, P W; Bidin, Ch Moni; Alonso-Garcia, J; Minniti, D; Palma, T; Dekany, I; Medina, N; Moyano, M; Villanueva, V; Kuhn, M A

    2016-01-01

    We present deep near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the globular cluster 2MASS-GC03 projected in the Galactic disk using MMIRS on the Clay telescope (Las Campanas Observatory) and VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea survey (VVV) data. Most probable cluster member candidates were identified from near-infrared photometry. Out of ten candidates that were followed-up spectroscopically, five have properties of cluster members, from which we calculate = -0.9 +- 0.2 and a radial velocity of v_r > = -78 +- 12km/s. A distance of 10.8kpc is estimated from 3 likely RRLyrae members. Given that the cluster is currently at a distance of 4.2kpc from the Galactic center, the cluster's long survival time of an estimated 11.3 +- 1.2Gyr strengthens the case for its globular-cluster nature. The cluster has a hint of elongation in the direction of the Galactic center.

  12. Study of Polymer Material Aging by Laser Mass Spectrometry, UV-Visible Spectroscopy, and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junien Exposito

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyed natural rubber (NR and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR, designed for outdoor applications, were exposed to an accelerated artificial aging in xenon light. The aging results in the deterioration of the exposed surface material properties. The ability of dyed polymers to withstand prolonged sunlight exposure without fading or undergoing any physical deterioration is largely determined not only by the photochemical characteristics of the absorbing dyestuff itself but also by the polymer structure and fillers. Results obtained by laser mass spectrometry, UV-visible spectroscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy indicate that dyed filled NR and SBR samples behave differently during the photo-oxidation. The fading of the dyed polymers was found to be promoted in the NR sample. This can be correlated with LDI-FTICRMS results, which show the absence of [M-H]− orange pigment pseudomolecular ion and also its fragment ions after aging. This is confirmed by both EDX and UV/Vis spectroscopy. EDX analysis indicates a concentration of chlorine atoms, which can be considered as a marker of orange pigment or its degradation products, only at the surface of SBR flooring after aging. Reactivity of radicals formed during flooring aging has been studied and seems to greatly affect the behavior of such organic pigments.

  13. Influence of ion beam bombardment on surface roughness of K9 glass substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Huang, Guojun; Hang, Lingxia

    2010-10-01

    Ion beam bombardment optical substrate surface has become an important part of process of optical thin films deposition. In this work, the K9 optical glass is bombarded by the broad beam cold cathode ion source. The dependence of the K9 glass surface roughness on the ion beam bombardment time, the ion energy, the distance and incident angle are all investigated, respectively. Surface roughness of K9 glass is measured using Talysurf CCI. The experimental results show that when the ion energy is 800ev, the bombardment distance of 20cm, with the ion beam bombardment time increased, the K9 substrate surface roughness first increase and then decrease. When the ion beam bombardment distance is 20cm, bombardment time is 10min, with the bombardment energy increases, substrate surface roughness increase first and then decrease, especially in the ion energy greater than 1200ev, the optical substrate surface roughness rapidly increases. When the ion energy is 800 eV, bombardment time is 10min, with the bombardment distance increase, substrate surface roughness decrease gradually. Furthermore, the incident angle of ion beam plays an important role in improving the K9 glass surface roughness.

  14. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. III. Radial Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Conroy, Charlie; Villaume, Alexa; Brodie, Jean; Romanowsky, Aaron J.

    2017-06-01

    There is good evidence that the centers of massive early-type galaxies have a bottom-heavy stellar initial mass function (IMF) compared to that of the Milky Way. Here we study the radial variation of the IMF within such galaxies, using a combination of high-quality Keck spectroscopy and a new suite of stellar population synthesis models that cover a wide range in metallicity. As in the previous studies in this series, the models are fitted directly to the spectra and treat all elemental abundance ratios as free parameters. Using newly obtained spectroscopy for six galaxies, including deep data extending to ˜ 1{R}{{e}} for the galaxies NGC 1407, NGC 1600, and NGC 2695, we find that the IMF varies strongly with galactocentric radius. For all six galaxies the IMF is bottom-heavy in the central regions, with average mass-to-light ratio “mismatch” parameter α \\equiv {({\\text{}}M/L)/({\\text{}}M/L)}{MW}≈ 2.5 at R = 0. The IMF rapidly becomes more bottom-light with increasing radius, flattening off near the Milky Way value (α ≈ 1.1) at R> 0.4{R}{{e}}. A consequence is that the luminosity-weighted average IMF depends on the measurement aperture: within R={R}{{e}} we find }L=1.3{--}1.5, consistent with recent lensing and dynamical results from SLACS and {{ATLAS}}3{{D}}. Our results are also consistent with several earlier studies that were based on analyses of radial gradients of line indices. The observed IMF gradients support galaxy formation models in which the central regions of massive galaxies had a different formation history than their outer parts. Finally, we make use of the high signal-to-noise central spectra of NGC 1407 and NGC 2695 to demonstrate how we can disentangle IMF effects and abundance effects.

  15. Characterization of bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction of organic waste by NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardis, Irene; Chiaberge, Stefano; Fiorani, Tiziana; Spera, Silvia; Battistel, Ezio; Bosetti, Aldo; Cesti, Pietro; Reale, Samantha; De Angelis, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Solid wastes of organic origins are potential feedstocks for the production of liquid biofuels, which could be suitable alternatives to fossil fuels for the transport and heating sectors, as well as for industrial use. By hydrothermal liquefaction, the wet biomass is partially transformed into a water-immiscible, oil-like organic matter called bio-oil. In this study, an integrated NMR spectroscopy/mass spectrometry approach has been developed for the characterization of the hydrothermal liquefaction of bio-oil at the molecular level. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy were used for the identification of functional groups and gauging the aromatic carbon content in the mixture. GC-MS analysis revealed that the volatile fraction was rich in fatty acids, as well as in amides and esters. High-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) has been applied in a systematic way to fully categorize the bio-oil in terms of different classes of components, according to their molecular formulas. Most importantly, for the first time, by using this technique, and for the liquefaction bio-oil characterization in particular, FT-MS data have been used to develop a methodology for the determination of the aromatic versus aliphatic carbon and nitrogen content. It is well known that, because they resist hydrogenation and represent sources of polluting species, both aromatic molecules and nitrogen-containing species raise concerns for subsequent upgrading of bio-oil into a diesel-like fuel. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Invariant-Mass Spectroscopy of Extremely Neutron-Rich Nuclei with SAMURAI at RIBF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yosuke; Nakamura, Takashi; Achouri, N. Lynda; Aumann, Thomas; Baba, Hidetada; Delaunay, Franck; Doornenbal, Pieter; Fukuda, Naoki; Gibelin, Julien; Hwang, Jongwon; Inabe, Naohito; Isobe, Tadaaki; Kameda, Daisuke; Kanno, Daiki; Kim, Sunji; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Toshio; Kubo, Toshiyuki; Leblond, Sylvain; Lee, Jenny; Marqués, F. Miguel; Minakata, Ryogo; Motobayashi, Tohru; Murai, Daichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Muto, Kotomi; Nakashima, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Noritsugu; Navin, Alahari; Nishi, Seijiro; Ogoshi, Shun; Orr, Nigel A.; Otsu, Hideaki; Sato, Hiromi; Satou, Yoshiteru; Shimizu, Yohei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kento; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Tanaka, Ryuki; Togano, Yasuhiro; Tuff, Adam G.; Vandebrouck, Marine; Yoneda, Ken-ichiro

    A first experimental campaign for three physics programs using a spectrometer SAMURAI, which is newly constructed at RIBF at RIKEN, was performed in May 2012. In this campaign, the unbound nuclei 25O and 26O produced by one-proton removal reactions at ˜200 MeV/nucleon were investigated by means of invariant mass method. High statistics data compared with previous experiments could be obtained together with good particle identification resolution for outgoing heavy ion. Preliminary results show high performance of the SAMURAI spectrometer combined with high intense RI beams provided by RIBF.

  17. Invariant mass spectroscopy of 17C via one-neutron knockout reaction from 18C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunji; Samurai Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The nuclei away from the β-stability line are expected to have exotic nuclear structures. For example, the ground states of neutron-rich carbon isotopes, 15C, 17C, and 19C, have been predicted to be 5/2+ states in the naive shell model. However, they were identified as 1/2+, 3/2+, and 1/2+, respectively, due to the halo structure and/or nuclear deformation. To understand the properties of the valence orbit relative to the inner orbit in those neutron-rich carbon isotopes, the study of the negative parity states is decisive. The present study focuses on the low-lying negative parity states in 17C above the neutron decay threshold. The experiment was performed for the C(18C,17C*) one-neutron knockout reaction channel at 250 MeV/nucleon using the SAMURAI spectrometer at RIKEN-RIBF, during the first physics runs of the apparatus. The nucleon knockout reaction utilizing the secondary beams in inverse kinematics has become recognized as a sensitive tool for spectroscopy of the nuclei far from the β-stability line. In the presentation, details of the measurement and analysis will be reported together with new results on the low-lying negative parity states in 17C.

  18. Using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy fingerprint analyses to document process and progress of oil degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roques, D.E.; Overton, E.B.; Henry, C.B. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    One of the challenges in testing the effectiveness of bioremediation products is the lack of a standardized testing protocol. One requirement of any such evaluation is baseline and benchmark analyses of the oil and its degradation processes. The method described uses high resolution gas chromatography maw spectroscopy (GC/MS). This method has been adapted from oil fingerprinting techniques used by our group for oil spill response to major spills such as T/V Exxon Valdez and T/V Megaborg. It results in a high degree of chemical and spectral resolution from a single analysis that allows quantification of saturated hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sulfur heterocycles and selected biomarkers such as hopanes and steranes. High resolution GC/MS and compound specific analyses are a viable and efficient method of analyzing the extent and progress of oil bioremediation and that it should be possible to standardize the method for monitoring the biodegradation of oil. Data are also presented that show increased useful information obtained from this method and suggest possible future uses for this expanded database. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  20. HERSCHEL-HIFI spectroscopy of the intermediate mass protostar NGC7129 FIRS 2

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, D; McCoey, C; van Kempen, T A; Fuente, A; Kristensen, L E; Cernicharo, J; Caselli, P; Visser, R; Plume, R; Herczeg, G J; van Dishoeck, E F; Wampfler, S; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Bergin, E; Benz, A O; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Bruderer, S; Codella, C; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Doty, S D; Encrenaz, P; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Helmich, F; Herpin, F; Hogerheijde, M R; Jacq, T; Jørgensen, J K; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; Marseille, M; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Pearson, J; Risacher, C; Santiago-García, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; Tafalla, M; van der Tak, F; Wyrowski, F; Yıldız, U A; Caux, E; Honingh, N; Jellema, W; Schieder, R; Teyssier, D; Whyborn, N

    2010-01-01

    HERSCHEL-HIFI observations of water from the intermediate mass protostar NGC7129 FIRS 2 provide a powerful diagnostic of the physical conditions in this star formation environment. Six spectral settings, covering four H216O and two H218O lines, were observed and all but one H218O line were detected. The four H2 16 O lines discussed here share a similar morphology: a narrower, \\approx 6 km/s, component centered slightly redward of the systemic velocity of NGC7129 FIRS 2 and a much broader, \\approx 25 km/s component centered blueward and likely associated with powerful outflows. The narrower components are consistent with emission from water arising in the envelope around the intermediate mass protostar, and the abundance of H2O is constrained to \\approx 10-7 for the outer envelope. Additionally, the presence of a narrow self-absorption component for the lowest energy lines is likely due to self-absorption from colder water in the outer envelope. The broader component, where the H2O/CO relative abundance is fou...

  1. Ion composition experiment. [ISEE-C solar wind ion mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, M. A.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Bochsler, P. A.; Geiss, J.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation using a novel ion mass spectrometer for measuring the ionic composition of the solar wind from the ISEE-C spacecraft is described. The resolution and dynamic range of the instrument are sufficient to be able to resolve up to twelve individual ions or groups of ions. This will permit the solution of a number of fundamental problems related to solar abundances and the formation of the solar wind. The spectrometer is composed of a stigmatic Wien filter and hemispherical electrostatic energy analyzer. The use of curved electric field plates in the filter results in a substantial saving of weight with respect to a conventional filter of the same resolution and angular acceptance. The spectrometer is controlled by a microprocessor based on a special purpose computer which has three modes of operations: full and partial survey modes and a search mode. In the search mode, the instrument locks on to the solar wind. This allows four times the time resolution of the full survey mode and yields a full mass spectrum every 12.6 min.

  2. 'Bubble chamber model' of fast atom bombardment induced processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosevich, Marina V; Shelkovsky, Vadim S; Boryak, Oleg A; Orlov, Vadim V

    2003-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning FAB mechanisms, referred to as a 'bubble chamber FAB model', is proposed. This model can provide an answer to the long-standing question as to how fragile biomolecules and weakly bound clusters can survive under high-energy particle impact on liquids. The basis of this model is a simple estimation of saturated vapour pressure over the surface of liquids, which shows that all liquids ever tested by fast atom bombardment (FAB) and liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were in the superheated state under the experimental conditions applied. The result of the interaction of the energetic particles with superheated liquids is known to be qualitatively different from that with equilibrium liquids. It consists of initiation of local boiling, i.e., in formation of vapour bubbles along the track of the energetic particle. This phenomenon has been extensively studied in the framework of nuclear physics and provides the basis for construction of the well-known bubble chamber detectors. The possibility of occurrence of similar processes under FAB of superheated liquids substantiates a conceptual model of emission of secondary ions suggested by Vestal in 1983, which assumes formation of bubbles beneath the liquid surface, followed by their bursting accompanied by release of microdroplets and clusters as a necessary intermediate step for the creation of molecular ions. The main distinctive feature of the bubble chamber FAB model, proposed here, is that the bubbles are formed not in the space and time-restricted impact-excited zone, but in the nearby liquid as a 'normal' boiling event, which implies that the temperature both within the bubble and in the droplets emerging on its burst is practically the same as that of the bulk liquid sample. This concept can resolve the paradox of survival of intact biomolecules under FAB, since the part of the sample participating in the liquid-gas transition via the bubble mechanism has an ambient temperature

  3. Unraveling the benzocaine-receptor interaction at molecular level using mass-resolved spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Edurne; León, Iker; Millán, Judith; Cocinero, Emilio J; Jaeqx, Sander; Rijs, Anouk M; Lesarri, Alberto; Fernández, José A

    2013-10-31

    The benzocaine-toluene cluster has been used as a model system to mimic the interaction between the local anesthetic benzocaine and the phenylalanine residue in Na(+) channels. The cluster was generated in a supersonic expansion of benzocaine and toluene in helium. Using a combination of mass-resolved laser-based experimental techniques and computational methods, the complex was fully characterized, finding four conformational isomers in which the molecules are bound through N-H···π and π···π weak hydrogen bonds. The structures of the detected isomers closely resemble those predicted for benzocaine in the inner pore of the ion channels, giving experimental support to previously reported molecular chemistry models.

  4. Large pore dermal microdialysis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy shotgun proteomic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Sørensen, Mette A; Codrea, Marius C

    2013-01-01

    phases of the study; trauma due to implantation of the dialysis device, a post implantation steady-state period, and after induction of vasodilatation and plasma extravasation. For shotgun proteomics, the proteins were extracted and digested with trypsin. Peptides were separated by capillary and nanoflow...... HPLC systems, followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) on a Quadrupole-TOF hybrid instrument. The MS/MS spectra were merged and mapped to a human target protein database to achieve peptide identification and protein inference. ResultsResults showed variation in protein amounts and profiles for each......, and complement factors, make up the major load of proteins in all three test conditions. ConclusionShotgun proteomics allowed the identification of more than 150 proteins in microdialysis samples from human skin. This highlights the opportunities of LC-MS/MS to study the complex molecular interactions...

  5. A proposed method for measurement of cosmic-ray mass composition based on geomagnetic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the geomagnetic Lorentz force on the muon component of extensive air shower (EAS) has been studied in a Monte Carlo generated simulated data sample. This geomagnetic field affects the paths of muons in an EAS, causing a local contrast or polar asymmetry in the abundance of positive and negative muons about the shower axis. The asymmetry can be approximately expressed as a function of transverse separation between the positive and negative muons barycentric positions in the EAS through opposite quadrants across the shower core in the shower front plane. In the present study, it is found that the transverse muon barycenter separation and its maximum value obtained from the polar variation of the parameter are higher for iron primaries than protons for highly inclined showers. Hence, in principle, these parameters can be exploited to the measurement of primary cosmic-ray mass composition. Possibility of practical realization of the proposed method in a real experiment is briefly discussed.

  6. Spitzer Spectroscopy of Low-Mass Dwarfs - Clouds and Chemistry at the Bottom of the IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    Brown dwarfs and low-mass stars show evidence of complicated atmospheres, including a variety of molecular species and clouds. Infrared observations are one of the best probes of the physics of these objects, but up until recently these observations have been limited in studies from ground-based telescopes by atmospheric absorption and insufficient sensitivity. With the launch of the Spitzer Space Telescope with its Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument we now have the capability to undertake a systematic study of the atmospheric structure and chemistry in these cool objects. The IRS Dim Suns team has compiled spectra from objects ranging from M1 dwarfs with effective temperatures 3,800K of down to T8 dwarfs with effective temperatures of 700. This talk will present these results and discuss their implications for our understanding of cool dwarf atmospheric physics and structure.

  7. Strategies for the analysis of coal by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiber, L; Fink, H; Niessner, R; Panne, U

    2002-09-01

    The potential of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was investigated for the inorganic characterization of different coal samples pressed into pellets. Reference analysis was performed by microwave-assisted digestion of the ground samples followed by ICP-MS analysis of the resulting solutions. Two different laser ablation sampling procedures were compared. For continuous sampling, three sites of the pellet were sampled for approximately one minute, whereas for sequential sampling 15 sites were sampled for two seconds, respectively. The qualitative results of the two procedures were equivalent, but continuous sampling allowed faster analysis and better precision (RSD about 10%) than sequential sampling (RSD 10-20%). Different normalization procedures with internal and extrinsic standards were investigated and allowed a quantitative determination of Al, Ti, Zn, Ni, and V with measurement uncertainties below 10% and Fe, Si, and Sn with measurement uncertainties below 20%.

  8. Strategies for the analysis of coal by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiber, L.; Fink, H.; Niessner, R.; Panne, U. [Institute of Hydrochemistry, Technical University of Munich, Marchioninistr. 17, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2002-09-01

    The potential of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was investigated for the inorganic characterization of different coal samples pressed into pellets. Reference analysis was performed by microwave-assisted digestion of the ground samples followed by ICP-MS analysis of the resulting solutions. Two different laser ablation sampling procedures were compared. For continuous sampling, three sites of the pellet were sampled for approximately one minute, whereas for sequential sampling 15 sites were sampled for two seconds, respectively. The qualitative results of the two procedures were equivalent, but continuous sampling allowed faster analysis and better precision (RSD about 10%) than sequential sampling (RSD 10-20%). Different normalization procedures with internal and extrinsic standards were investigated and allowed a quantitative determination of Al, Ti, Zn, Ni, and V with measurement uncertainties below 10% and Fe, Si, and Sn with measurement uncertainties below 20%. (orig.)

  9. A proposed method for measurement of cosmic-ray mass composition based on geomagnetic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rajat K.; Dam, Sandip

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the geomagnetic Lorentz force on the muon component of extensive air shower (EAS) has been studied in a Monte Carlo generated simulated data sample. This geomagnetic field affects the paths of muons in an EAS, causing a local contrast or polar asymmetry in the abundance of positive and negative muons about the shower axis. The asymmetry can be approximately expressed as a function of transverse separation between the positive and negative muons barycentric positions in the EAS through opposite quadrants across the shower core in the shower front plane. In the present study, it is found that the transverse muon barycenter separation and its maximum value obtained from the polar variation of the parameter are higher for iron primaries than protons for highly inclined showers. Hence, in principle, these parameters can be exploited to the measurement of primary cosmic-ray mass composition. Possibility of practical realization of the proposed method in a real experiment is briefly discussed.

  10. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    DilVrtilek, Saeqa; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. observation of one of the two objects has taken place and the data were received in late November. The second object is yet to be observed. Over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  11. Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-Ray Binaries: New Insights into Accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtilek, Saeqa Dil; Mushotzky, Richard F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This project is to observe two low mass X-ray binaries, chosen for their X-ray brightness, low column density, and diversity of accretion behavior. The high spectral resolution of the RGS, the broad energy range and tremendous collecting power of EPIC, and simultaneous optical monitoring with the OM are particularly well-suited to these studies. The second of two objects was not observed until September of 2002. Data analysis for the new observation is underway. over the next year we will: investigate the physical conditions of the emitting gas using emission and recombination line diagnostics to determine temperatures, densities, elemental abundances, and ionization structure; study the behavior of emission features as a function of binary orbit; and test and improve models of X-ray line emission developed by us over the past decade. We will gain insight on both the geometry of the accretion flow and on the evolutionary history of LMXBs.

  12. Spitzer Spectroscopy of Low-Mass Dwarfs - Clouds and Chemistry at the Bottom of the IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    Brown dwarfs and low-mass stars show evidence of complicated atmospheres, including a variety of molecular species and clouds. Infrared observations are one of the best probes of the physics of these objects, but up until recently these observations have been limited in studies from ground-based telescopes by atmospheric absorption and insufficient sensitivity. With the launch of the Spitzer Space Telescope with its Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument we now have the capability to undertake a systematic study of the atmospheric structure and chemistry in these cool objects. The IRS Dim Suns team has compiled spectra from objects ranging from M1 dwarfs with effective temperatures 3,800K of down to T8 dwarfs with effective temperatures of 700. This talk will present these results and discuss their implications for our understanding of cool dwarf atmospheric physics and structure.

  13. Limits on intermediate-mass black holes in six Galactic globular clusters with integral-field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lützgendorf, Nora; Gebhardt, Karl; Baumgardt, Holger; Noyola, Eva; de Zeeuw, P Tim; Neumayer, Nadine; Jalali, Behrang; Feldmeier, Anja

    2012-01-01

    The formation of supermassive black holes at high redshift still remains a puzzle to astronomers. Their growth becomes reasonable only when starting from a massive seed black hole with mass of the order of 10^2 - 10^5 M_SUN. Intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) are therefore an important field of research. Especially the possibility of finding them in the centers of globular clusters has recently drawn attention. The search for IMBHs in the centers of globular clusters could therefore shed light on the process of black-hole formation and cluster evolution. We are investigating six galactic globular clusters for the presence of an IMBH at their centers. Based on their kinematic and photometric properties, we selected the globular clusters NGC 1851, NGC 1904 (M79), NGC 5694, NGC 5824, NGC 6093 (M80) and NGC 6266 (M62). We use integral field spectroscopy in order to obtain the central velocity-dispersion profile of each cluster. We compute the cluster photometric center and the surface brightness profile using ...

  14. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Estado de México (Mexico); Villalobos, S. [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia, Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 48-3, 62251, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  15. Spectroscopy of the extreme-ultraviolet source Feige 24 - The binary orbit and the mass of the white dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Charles, P. A.; Bowyer, S.; Margon, B.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for coude spectroscopy of the extreme-ultraviolet white dwarf Feige 24. Radial velocities of the H-alpha, He I 5876-A, and He I 6678-A emission lines, and the underlying M-dwarf absorption features, were determined from spectrograms obtained with the Lick 3-m telescope. The velocities show a binary period of 4.239(+ or - 0.0015) days. The emission-line and absorption-line velocities agree in phase, which indicates that the emission lines originate in the atmosphere of the M-dwarf secondary as a result of reprocessing of the EUV radiation. This effect is modeled, and the observed amplitude of the emission-line variability is used to place a lower limit on the orbital inclination. From these and other data it is shown that the mass of the white dwarf lies between 0.46 and 1.24 solar masses. Some possible implications for the evolution of binary stars are briefly discussed.

  16. Sputtering of Ag under C{sub 60}{sup +} and Ga{sup +} projectile bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, S.; Szakal, C.; Smiley, E.J.; Postawa, Z.; Wucher, A.; Garrison, B.J.; Winograd, N

    2004-06-15

    Cluster ion bombardment often results in large secondary ion yield enhancements relative to atomic ion bombardment. The yields of neutral particles and secondary ions sputtered from a silver surface were investigated through experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. The results show that the neutral Ag yield produced by 15 keV C{sub 60}{sup +} bombardment is 5.6-fold higher than that found for 15 keV Ga{sup +} bombardment, which is in agreement with simulations. The enhancement effect is observed to be about the same for both neutral species and their corresponding secondary ions. Experimental results also indicate that the Ag neutral species produced by C{sub 60}{sup +} bombardment have emission velocity distributions that maximize at much lower values than those observed by Ga{sup +} bombardment, suggesting the presence of non-linear collision cascades.

  17. a Bombardment Heated Lanthanum-Hexaboride Thermionic Cathode Electron Gun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herniter, Marc Efrem

    This dissertation concerns the development and operation of a high current density Pierce-type electron gun with a 0.75-inch-diameter lanthanum hexaboride (LaB _6) thermionic cathode. The objective of this research is to achieve as high a current density as possible from the lanthanum hexaboride cathode. The topics which are addressed are the cathode heating and control system, the Pierce-type electron gun design, and the high voltage pulsing and isolation system. Lanthanum hexaboride is used as a cathode material in applications where high current density and resistance to chemical poisoning are important. Applications include free electron lasers and high power microwave generation. A four stage Marx generator capable of producing 140-kV-peak pulses with a 16 mus decay time constant is used to pulse the electron gun. The cathode is heated to temperatures greater than 1800 ^circ C by electron bombardment from a tungsten filament. Both temperature-limited and space -charge-limited bombardment methods have been investigated. The temperature-limited method is open-loop unstable. Analog and digital control circuits have been developed to control this instability. A simple heating model has been developed and criteria for constructing a controllable system have been established. An instability in the heating system which is caused by evaporation of lanthanum hexaboride from the cathode is discussed. This evaporation reduces the work function of the bombarding filament and makes the temperature -limited bombardment system uncontrollable. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 115 kV achieving beam current densities of 30 A/cm ^2. The electron gun operated dependably up to voltages of 90 kV achieving temperature-limited currents of 50 A. Due to the high fields at the tip of the Pierce -focusing electrode the gun would usually arc at voltages greater than 90 kV. Electron gun operation has been observed in the temperature-limited and space-charge-limited regimes. The

  18. Long-term optical variability of high-mass X-ray binaries. II. Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig, P.; Nersesian, A.; Zezas, A.; Gkouvelis, L.; Coe, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Context. High-mass X-ray binaries are bright X-ray sources. The high-energy emission is caused by the accretion of matter from the massive companion onto a neutron star. The accreting material comes from either the strong stellar wind in binaries with supergiant companions or the cirscumstellar disk in Be/X-ray binaries. In either case, the Hα line stands out as the main source of information about the state of the accreting material. Aims: We present the results of our monitoring program to study the long-term variability of the Hα line in high-mass X-ray binaries. Our aim is to characterise the optical variability timescales and study the interaction between the neutron star and the accreting material. Methods: We fitted the Hα line with Gaussian profiles and obtained the line parameters and equivalent width. The peak separation in split profiles was used to determine the disk velocity law and estimate the disk radius. The relative intensity of the two peaks (V/R ratio) allowed us to investigate the distribution of gas particles in the disk. The equivalent width was used to characterise the degree of variability of the systems. We also studied the variability of the Hα line in correlation with the X-ray activity. Results: Our results can be summarised as follows: i) we find that Be/X-ray binaries with narrow orbits are more variable than systems with long orbital periods; ii) we show that a Keplerian distribution of gas particles provides a good description of the disks in Be/X-ray binaries, as it does in classical Be stars; iii) a decrease in the Hα equivalent width is generally observed after major X-ray outbursts; iv) we confirm that the Hα equivalent width correlates with disk radius; v) while systems with supergiant companions display multi-structured profiles, most of the Be/X-ray binaries show, at some epoch, double-peak asymmetric profiles, which indicates that density inhomogeneities is a common property in the disk of Be/X-ray binaries; vi) the

  19. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  20. Electronic and Optical Properties of Aluminum Oxide Before and After Surface Reduction by Ar+ Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tahir

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of a-Al2O3 after induced by 3-keV Ar+ sputtering have been studied quantitatively by use of reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy (REELS spectra. The band gap values of a-Al2O3 was determined from the onset values of the energy loss spectrum to the background level of REELS spectra as a function of time Ar+ bombardment. The bandgap changes from 8.4 eV before sputtering to 6.2 eV after 4 minutes of sputtering.The optical properties of α-Al2O3 thin films have been determined by comparing the experimental cross section obtained from reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy with the theoretical inelastic scattering cross section, deduced from the simulated energy loss function (ELF by using QUEELS-ε(k-REELS software. The peak assignments are based on ELF and compared with reported data on the electronic structure of α-Al2O3 obtained using different techniques. The results demonstrate that the electronic and optical properties before and after surface reduction will provide further understanding in the fundamental properties of α-Al2O3 which will be useful in the design, modeling and analysis of devices applications performance.

  1. Plasma damage mechanisms in low k organosilicate glass and their inhibition by Ar ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi, Haseeb; Kelber, Jeffry A., E-mail: kelber@unt.edu [Center for Electronic Materials Processing and Integration and Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photons with or without O{sub 2}, and O radicals point to distinct mechanisms of carbon abstraction in nanoporous organosilicate glass (OSG) films. VUV alone in the absence of O{sub 2} results in Si-CH{sub 3} bond scission and recombination preferentially at silicon monomethyl sites, obeying diffusion kinetics. In contrast, the presence of O{sub 2} interferes with recombination, resulting in diffusion-dominated carbon loss kinetics, enhanced Si oxidation, and greatly accelerating the rate of carbon loss in both the near surface and bulk regions of the OSG, at both monomethyl and dimethyl sites. Carbon abstraction due to exposure to (O({sup 3}P)) does not follow diffusion kinetics, and such interactions yield a SiO{sub 2}-like surface layer inhibiting further O diffusion. Results indicate that diffusion-dominated carbon abstraction kinetics previously observed for OSG exposure to O{sub 2} plasma damage is primarily attributable to the diffusion of O{sub 2} down OSG nanopores, reacting at photoactivated sites, rather than the diffusion of O radicals. OSG pretreatment by 900 eV Ar{sup +} bombardment effectively inhibits both VUV + O{sub 2} and O damage mechanisms by formation of ∼1 nm thick SiO{sub 2}-like surface region that inhibits both O and O{sub 2} diffusion.

  2. Adaptive Optics Assisted 3D spectroscopy observations for black hole mass measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorini, G

    2006-01-01

    The very high spatial resolution provided by Adaptive Optics assisted spectroscopic observations at 8m-class telescopes (e.g. with SINFONI at the VLT) will allow to greatly increase the number of direct black hole (BH) mass measurements which is currently very small. This is a fundamental step to investigate the tight link between galaxy evolution and BH growth, revealed by the existing scaling relations between $M_{BH}$ and galaxy structural parameters. I present preliminary results from SINFONI K-band spectroscopic observations of a sample of 5 objects with $M_{BH}$ measurements obtained with the Reverberation Mapping (RM) technique. This technique is the starting point to derive the so-called virial $M_{BH}$ estimates, currently the only way to measure $M_{BH}$ at high redshift. Our goal is to assess the reliability of RM by measuring $M_{BH}$ with both gas and stellar kinematical methods and to investigate whether active galaxies follow the same $M_{BH}$-galaxy correlations as normal ones.

  3. Spectroscopy and kinematics of low-mass members of young moving groups

    CERN Document Server

    Galvez-Ortiz, M C; Pinfield, D J; Jenkins, J S; Folkes, S L; Perez, A E Garcia; Day-Jones, A C; Burningham, B; Jones, H R A; Barnes, J R; Pokorny, R S

    2010-01-01

    We study a target sample of 68 low-mass objects (with spectral types in the range M4.5-L1) previously selected via photometric and astrometric criteria, as possible members of five young moving groups: the Local Association (Pleiades moving group, age=20 - 150 Myr), the Ursa Mayor group (Sirius supercluster, age=300 Myr), the Hyades supercluster (age=600 Myr), IC 2391 supercluster (age=35 - 55 Myr) and the Castor moving group (age=200 Myr). In this paper we assess their membership by using different kinematic and spectroscopic criteria. We use high resolution echelle spectroscopic observations of the sample to measure accurate radial velocities (RVs). Distances are calculated and compared to those of the moving group from the literature, we also calculate the kinematic Galactic components (U,V,W) of the candidate members and apply kinematic criterion of membership to each group. In addition we measure rotational velocities (v sin i) to place further constraints on membership of kinematic members. We find that...

  4. Spectroscopy across the brown dwarf/planetary mass boundary - I. Near-infrared JHK spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Patience, J; De Rosa, R J; Vigan, A; Witte, S; Rice, E; Helling, Ch; Hauschildt, P

    2012-01-01

    With a uniform VLT SINFONI data set of nine targets, we have developed an empirical grid of J,H,K spectra of the atmospheres of objects estimated to have very low substellar masses of \\sim5-20 MJup and young ages of \\sim1-50 Myr. Most of the targets are companions, objects which are especially valuable for comparison with atmosphere and evolutionary models, as they present rare cases in which the age is accurately known from the primary. Based on the sample youth, all objects are expected to have low surface gravity, and this study investigates the critical early phases of the evolution of substellar objects. The spectra are compared with grids of five different theoretical atmosphere models. This analysis represents the first systematic model comparison with infrared spectra of young brown dwarfs. The fits to the full JHK spectra of each object result in a range of best fit effective temperatures of +/-150-300K whether or not the full model grid or a subset restricted to lower log(g) values is used. This eff...

  5. Water in low-mass star-forming regions with Herschel: HIFI spectroscopy of NGC1333

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, L E; van Dishoeck, E F; Yıldız, U A; Doty, S D; Herczeg, G J; Liu, F -C; Parise, B; Jørgensen, J K; van Kempen, T A; Brinch, C; Wampfler, S F; Bruderer, S; Benz, A O; Hogerheijde, M R; Deul, E; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Bergin, E A; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G A; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Caselli, P; Cernicharo, J; Codella, C; Daniel, F; de Graauw, Th; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Encrenaz, P; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; Helmich, F; Herpin, F; Jacq, T; Johnstone, D; Kaufman, M J; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; Marseille, M; McCoey, C; Melnick, G; Neufeld, D; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Pearson, J C; Plume, R; Risacher, C; Santiago-Garcia, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; Tafalla, M; Tielens, A G G M; van der Tak, F; Wyrowski, F; Beintema, D; de Jonge, A; Dieleman, P; Ossenkopf, V; Roelfsema, P; Stutzki, J; Whyborn, N

    2010-01-01

    'Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel' (WISH) is a key programme dedicated to studying the role of water and related species during the star-formation process and constraining the physical and chemical properties of young stellar objects. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on the Herschel Space Observatory observed three deeply embedded protostars in the low-mass star-forming region NGC1333 in several H2-16O, H2-18O, and CO transitions. Line profiles are resolved for five H16O transitions in each source, revealing them to be surprisingly complex. The line profiles are decomposed into broad (>20 km/s), medium-broad (~5-10 km/s), and narrow (20 km/s), indicating that its physical origin is the same as for the broad H2-16O component. In one of the sources, IRAS4A, an inverse P Cygni profile is observed, a clear sign of infall in the envelope. From the line profiles alone, it is clear that the bulk of emission arises from shocks, both on small (<1000 AU) and large scales along the out...

  6. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  7. Optical spectroscopy and initial mass function of z = 0.4 red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baitian; Worthey, Guy

    2017-05-01

    Spectral absorption features can be used to constrain the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in the integrated light of galaxies. Spectral indices used at low redshift are in the far red, and therefore increasingly hard to detect at higher and higher redshifts as they pass out of atmospheric transmission and CCD detector wavelength windows. We employ IMF-sensitive indices at bluer wavelengths. We stack spectra of red, quiescent galaxies around z = 0.4 from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. The z = 0.4 red galaxies have 2 Gyr average ages so that they cannot be passively evolving precursors of nearby galaxies. They are slightly enhanced in C and Na, and slightly depressed in Ti. Split by luminosity, the fainter half appears to be older, a result that should be checked with larger samples in the future. We uncover no evidence for IMF evolution between z = 0.4 and now, but we highlight the importance of sample selection, finding that an SDSS sample culled to select archetypal elliptical galaxies at z ˜ 0 is offset towards a more bottom-heavy IMF. Other samples, including our DEEP2 sample, show an offset towards a more spiral galaxy-like IMF. All samples confirm that the reddest galaxies look bottom-heavy compared with bluer ones. Sample selection also influences age-colour trends: red, luminous galaxies always look old and metal rich, but the bluer ones can be more metal poor, the same abundance or more metal rich, depending on how they are selected.

  8. Optical spectroscopy and initial mass function of z = 0.4 red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baitian; Worthey, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Spectral absorption features can be used to constrain the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in the integrated light of galaxies. Spectral indices used at low redshift are in the far red, and therefore increasingly hard to detect at higher and higher redshifts as they pass out of atmospheric transmission and CCD detector wavelength windows. We employ IMF-sensitive indices at bluer wavelengths. We stack spectra of red, quiescent galaxies around z = 0.4, from the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. The z = 0.4 red galaxies have 2 Gyr average ages so that they cannot be passively evolving precursors of nearby galaxies. They are slightly enhanced in C and Na, and slightly depressed in Ti. Split by luminosity, the fainter half appears to be older, a result that should be checked with larger samples in the future. We uncover no evidence for IMF evolution between z = 0.4 and now, but we highlight the importance of sample selection, finding that an SDSS sample culled to select archetypal elliptical galaxies at z˜0 is offset toward a more bottom heavy IMF. Other samples, including our DEEP2 sample, show an offset toward a more spiral galaxy-like IMF. All samples confirm that the reddest galaxies look bottom heavy compared with bluer ones. Sample selection also influences age-color trends: red, luminous galaxies always look old and metal-rich, but the bluer ones can be more metal-poor, the same abundance, or more metal-rich, depending on how they are selected.

  9. Interpretation of discrepancies in mass spectroscopy data obtained from different experimental configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Many helium mass spectrometer leak detectors at KSC employ sampling systems that feature hand held sniffer probes. Authors of general leakage-testing literature recommend sniffer probes for leak location but not for quantitative leakage measurement. Their use in the latter application at KSC involves assumptions that may be subtle. The purpose of the research effort reported herein was to establish the significance of indicated leak rates displayed by sniffer-probe equipped leak detectors and to determine whether the use of alternative hardware or testing procedures may reduce the uncertainty of leakage measurements made with them. The report classifies probe-type sampling systems for helium leak detectors according to their internal plumbing (direct or branched), presents a basic analysis of the fluid dynamics in the sampling system in the branched-conduit case, describes the usual test method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio (a.k.a permeation ratio), and describes a concept for a sponge-tipped probe whose external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio promises to be lower than that of a simple-ended probe. One conclusion is that the main source of uncertainty in the use of probe-type sampling systems for leakage measurement is uncertainty in the external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio. In contrast, the present method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio is quantitative and satisfactory. The implication is that probes of lower external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio must be developed before this uncertainty may be reduced significantly.

  10. Dip Spectroscopy of the Low Mass X-Ray Binary XB 1254-690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.; Church, M. J.; BalucinskaChurch, M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We observed the low mass X-ray binary XB 1254-690 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in 2001 May and December. During the first observation strong dipping on the 3.9-hr orbital period and a high degree of variability were observed, along with "shoulders" approx. 15% deep during extended intervals on each side of the main dips. The first observation also included pronounced flaring activity. The non-dip spectrum obtained using the PCA instrument was well-described by a two-component model consisting of a blackbody with kT = 1.30 +/- 0.10 keV plus a cut-off power law representation of Comptonized emission with power law photon index 1.10 +/- 0.46 and a cut-off energy of 5.9(sup +3.0, sub -1.4) keV. The intensity decrease in the shoulders of dipping is energy-independent, consistent with electron scattering in the outer ionized regions of the absorber. In deep dipping the depth of dipping reached 100%, in the energy band below 5 keV, indicating that all emitting regions were covered by absorber. Intensity-selected dip spectra were well-fit by a model in which the point-like blackbody is rapidly covered, while the extended Comptonized emission is progressively overlapped by the absorber, with the, covering fraction rising to 95% in the deepest portion of the dip. The intensity of this component in the dip spectra could be modeled by a combination of electron scattering and photoelectric absorption. Dipping did not occur during the 2001 December observation, but remarkably, both bursting and flaring were observed contemporaneously.

  11. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  12. Self-terminated etching of GaN with a high selectivity over AlGaN under inductively coupled Cl2/N2/O2 plasma with a low-energy ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yaozong; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hongwei; Dai, Shujun; He, Junlei; Feng, Meixin; Sun, Qian; Zhang, Jijun; Zhao, Yanfei; DingSun, An; Yang, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Etching of GaN/AlGaN heterostructure by O-containing inductively coupled Cl2/N2 plasma with a low-energy ion bombardment can be self-terminated at the surface of the AlGaN layer. The estimated etching rates of GaN and AlGaN were 42 and 0.6 nm/min, respectively, giving a selective etching ratio of 70:1. To study the mechanism of the etching self-termination, detailed characterization and analyses were carried out, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). It was found that in the presence of oxygen, the top surface of the AlGaN layer was converted into a thin film of (Al,Ga)Ox with a high bonding energy, which effectively prevented the underlying atoms from a further etching, resulting in a nearly self-terminated etching. This technique enables a uniform and reproducible fabrication process for enhancement-mode high electron mobility transistors with a p-GaN gate.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of graphene bombardment with Si ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xin-Mao; Gao, Ting-Hong; Yan, Wan-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Tian; Xie, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (Tersoff-ZBL) potential and adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) potential are performed to study the effect of irradiated graphene with silicon ion at several positions and energy levels of 0.1-1000 eV. The simulations reveal four processes: absorption, replacement, transmission and damage. At energies below 110 eV, the dominant process is absorption. For atom in group (a), the process that takes place is replacement, in which the silicon ion removes one carbon atom and occupies the place of the eliminated atom at the incident energy of 72-370 eV. Transmission is present at energies above 100 eV for atom in group (d). Damage is a very important process in current bombardment, and there are four types of defects: single vacancy, replacement-single vacancy, double vacancy and nanopore. The simulations provide a fundamental understanding of the silicon bombardment of graphene, and the parameters required to develop graphene-based devices by controlling defect formation.

  14. Study and optimisation of SIMS performed with He{sup +} and Ne{sup +} bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillatsch, L.; Vanhove, N.; Dowsett, D. [Department “Science and Analysis of Materials” (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public – Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Sijbrandij, S.; Notte, J. [Carl Zeiss Microscopy LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Wirtz, T., E-mail: wirtz@lippmann.lu [Department “Science and Analysis of Materials” (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public – Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2013-10-01

    The combination of the high-brightness He{sup +}/Ne{sup +} atomic level ion source with the detection capabilities of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) opens up the prospect of obtaining chemical information with high lateral resolution and high sensitivity on the Zeiss ORION helium ion microscope (HIM). A feasibility study with He{sup +} and Ne{sup +} ion bombardment is presented in order to determine the performance of SIMS analyses using the HIM. Therefore, the sputtering yields, useful yields and detection limits obtained for metallic (Al, Ni and W) as well as semiconductor samples (Si, Ge, GaAs and InP) were investigated. All the experiments were performed on a Cameca IMS4f SIMS instrument which was equipped with a caesium evaporator and oxygen flooding system. For most of the elements, useful yields in the range of 10{sup −4} to 3 × 10{sup −2} were measured with either O{sub 2} or Cs flooding. SIMS experiments performed directly on the ORION with a prototype secondary ion extraction and detection system lead to results that are consistent with those obtained on the IMS4f. Taking into account the obtained useful yields and the analytical conditions, such as the ion current and typical dwell time on the ORION HIM, detection limits in the at% range and better can be obtained during SIMS imaging at 10 nm lateral resolution with Ne{sup +} bombardment and down to the ppm level when a lateral resolution of 100 nm is chosen. Performing SIMS on the HIM with a good detection limit while maintaining an excellent lateral resolution (<50 nm) is therefore very promising.

  15. The DiskMass Survey. VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Martinsson, Thomas P K; Westfall, Kyle B; Bershady, Matthew A; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R; Swaters, Rob A

    2013-01-01

    We present ionized-gas (OIII) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as much as three disk scale lengths (h_R). These data have been derived from PPak IFU spectroscopy (4980-5370A), observed at a mean resolution of R=7700 (sigma_inst=17km/s). These data are a fundamental product of our survey and will be used in companion papers to, e.g., derive the detailed (baryonic+dark) mass budget of each galaxy in our sample. Our presentation provides a comprehensive description of the observing strategy, data reduction, and analysis. Along with a clear presentation of the data, we demonstrate: (1) The OIII and stellar rotation curves exhibit a clear signature of asymmetric drift with a rotation difference that is 11% of the maximum rotation speed of the galaxy disk, comparable to measurements in the solar neighborhood in the Milky Way. (2) The e-folding length of the stellar velocity dispersion is two times h_R on average, as expected for a disk with a ...

  16. Near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the low Galactic latitude globular cluster 2MASS-GC 03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Bello, Julio A.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; Smith, L. C.; Kurtev, R.; Lucas, P. W.; Moni Bidin, Ch.; Alonso-García, J.; Minniti, D.; Palma, T.; Dékány, I.; Medina, N.; Moyano, M.; Villanueva, V.; Kuhn, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    We present deep near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the globular cluster 2MASS-GC 03 projected in the Galactic disc using MMT and Magellan Infrared Spectrograph on the Clay Telescope (Las Campanas Observatory) and VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea Survey data. Most probable cluster member candidates were identified from near-infrared photometry. Out of 10 candidates that were followed-up spectroscopically, 5 have properties of cluster members, from which we calculate = - 0.9 ± 0.2 and a radial velocity of = - 78 ± 12 km s-1. A distance of 10.8 kpc is estimated from three likely RR Lyrae members. Given that the cluster is currently at a distance of 4.2 kpc from the Galactic Centre, the cluster's long survival time of an estimated 11.3 ± 1.2 Gyr strengthens the case for its globular-cluster nature. The cluster has a hint of elongation in the direction of the Galactic Centre.

  17. Combined Reversed Phase HPLC, Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy for a Fast Separation and Efficient Identification of Phosphatidylcholines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In respect of the manifold involvement of lipids in biochemical processes, the analysis of intact and underivatised lipids of body fluids as well as cell and tissue extracts is still a challenging task, if detailed molecular information is required. Therefore, the advantage of combined use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC, mass spectrometry (MS, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy will be shown analyzing three different types of extracts of the ubiquitous membrane component phosphatidylcholine. At first, different reversed phase modifications were tested on phosphatidylcholines (PC with the same effective carbon number (ECN for their applicability in lipid analysis. The results were taken to improve the separation of three natural PC extract types and a new reversed phase (RP-HPLC method was developed. The individual species were characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR and positive or negative ion mode quadrupole time of flight (q-TOF-MS as well as MS/MS techniques. Furthermore, ion suppression effects during electrospray ionisation (ESI, difficulties, limits, and advantages of the individual analytical techniques are addressed.

  18. Zebrafish brain lipid characterization and quantification by ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amerongen, Yvonne F; Roy, Upasana; Spaink, Herman P; de Groot, Huub J M; Huster, Daniel; Schiller, Jürgen; Alia, A

    2014-06-01

    Lipids play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. Zebrafish models for these diseases have been recently developed. The detailed brain lipid composition of the adult zebrafish is not known, and therefore, the representativeness of these models cannot be properly evaluated. In this study, we characterized the total lipid composition of healthy adult zebrafish using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A close resemblance of the zebrafish brain composition is shown in comparison to the human brain. Moreover, several lipids involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (i.e., cholesterol, phosphatidylcholine, docosahexaenoic acid, and further, polyunsaturated fatty acids) are detected and quantified. These lipids might represent useful biomarkers in future research toward human therapies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with high-performance thin-layer chromatography was used for further characterization of zebrafish brain lipids. Our results show that the lipid composition of the zebrafish brain is rather similar to the human brain and thus confirms that zebrafish represents a good model for studying various brain diseases.

  19. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnan, Suriyavathana; Palanisamy, Subha; Subramanian, Senthilkumar; Selvaraj, Sumathi; Mari, Kavitha Rani; Kuppulingam, Ramalingam

    2016-08-01

    Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV) were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy) tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases.

  20. Phytochemical Profile of Erythrina variegata by Using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriyavathana Muthukrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural products derived from plant sources have been utilized to treat patients with numerous diseases. The phytochemical constituents present in ethanolic leaf extract of Erythrina variegata (ELEV were identified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS analyses. Shade dried leaves were powdered and extracted with ethanol for analyses through HPLC to identify selected flavonoids and through GC-MS to identify other molecules. The HPLC analysis of ELEV showed the presence of gallic and caffeic acids as the major components at concentrations of 2.0 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively, as well as other components. GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of 3-eicosyne; 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-2-hexadecen-1-ol; butanoic acid, 3-methyl-3,7-dimethyl-6-octenyl ester; phytol; 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, diundecyl ester; 1-octanol, 2-butyl-; squalene; and 2H-pyran, 2-(7-heptadecynyloxy tetrahydro-derivative. Because pharmacopuncture is a new evolving natural mode that uses herbal extracts for treating patients with various ailments with minimum pain and maximum effect, the results of this study are particularly important and show that ELEV possesses a wide range of phytochemical constituents, as indicated above, as effective active principle molecules that can be used individually or in combination to treat patients with various diseases.

  1. Comparison of selenium determination in liver samples by atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksa, Irina Rudik; Buckley, Carol L; Carpenter, Nancy P; Poppenga, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element that is often deficient in the natural diets of domestic animal species. The measurement of Se in whole blood or liver is the most accurate way to assess Se status for diagnostic purposes. This study was conducted to compare hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy (HG-AAS) with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the detection and quantification of Se in liver samples. Sample digestion was accomplished with magnesium nitrate and nitric acid for HG-AAS and ICP-MS, respectively. The ICP-MS detection was optimized for 82Se with yttrium used as the internal standard and resulted in a method detection limit of 0.12 microg/g. Selenium was quantified by both methods in 310 samples from a variety of species that were submitted to the Toxicology Laboratory at New Bolton Center (Kennett Square, PA) for routine diagnostic testing. Paired measurements for each sample were evaluated by a mean difference plot method. Limits of agreement were used to describe the maximum differences likely to occur between the 2 methods. Results suggest that under the specified conditions ICP-MS can be reliably used in place of AAS for quantitation of tissue Se at or below 2 microg/g to differentiate between adequate and deficient liver Se concentrations.

  2. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS and air mass factor concept for a multiply scattering vertically inhomogeneous medium: theoretical consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rozanov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS technique is widely used to retrieve amounts of atmospheric species from measurements of the direct solar light transmitted through the Earth's atmosphere as well as of the solar light scattered in the atmosphere or reflected from the Earth's surface. For the transmitted direct solar light the theoretical basis of the DOAS technique represented by the Beer-Lambert law is well studied. In contrast, scarcely investigated is the theoretical basis and validity range of the DOAS method for those cases where the contribution of the multiple scattering processes is not negligible. Our study is intended to fill this gap by means of a theoretical investigation of the applicability of the DOAS technique for the retrieval of amounts of atmospheric species from observations of the scattered solar light with a non-negligible contribution of the multiple scattering.

    Starting from the expansion of the intensity logarithm in the functional Taylor series we formulate the general form of the DOAS equation. The thereby introduced variational derivative of the intensity logarithm with respect to the variation of the gaseous absorption coefficient, which is often referred to as the weighting function, is demonstrated to be closely related to the air mass factor. Employing some approximations we show that the general DOAS equation can be rewritten in the form of the weighting function (WFDOAS, the modified (MDOAS, and the standard DOAS equations. For each of these forms a specific equation for the air mass factor follows which, in general, is not suitable for other forms of the DOAS equation. Furthermore, the validity range of the standard DOAS equation is quantitatively investigated using a suggested criterion of a weak absorption.

    The results presented in this study are intended to provide a basis for a better understanding of the applicability range of different forms of the DOAS equation as

  3. Amorphization of silicon by bombardment with oxygen ions of energy below 5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovskii, P.V.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tkachev, V.D.

    1977-04-01

    Silicon was bombarded with /sup 16/O/sup +/ ions of 1.0 and 3.0 keV energies at room temperature. This bombardment created point defects which joined up to form amorphous layers about 100 A thick. (AIP)

  4. Evidence Supporting an Early as Well as Late Heavy Bombardment on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting an intense early bombardment on the Moon in addition to the traditional Late Heavy Bombardment at approx. 4 BY ago include the distribution of N(50) Crater Retention Ages (CRAs) for candidate basins, a variety of absolute age scenarios for both a "young" and an "old" Nectaris age, and the decreasing contrasts in both topographic relief and Bouguer gravity with increasing CRA.

  5. 33 CFR 334.950 - Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. 334.950 Section 334.950 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.950 Pacific Ocean at San Clemente Island, California; Navy shore bombardment areas. (a) The... degrees true, 5.35 nautical miles; thence 040.4 degrees true to the beach. (3) The waters of the...

  6. Changes of Dust Grain Properties Under Particle Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlů, J.; Richterová, I.; Fujita, D.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2008-09-01

    The dust in space environments is exposed to particle bombardment. Under an impact of ions, electrons, and photons, the charge of a particular grain changes and, in some cases, the grain structure can be modified. The present study deals with spherical melamine formaldehyde resin grains that are frequently used in many dusty plasmas and microgravity experiments and it concentrates on the influence of the electron beam impact on a grain size. We have performed series of experiments based on the SEM technique. Our investigation has shown that the electron impact can cause a significant increase of the grain size. We discuss changes of material properties and consequences for its applications in laboratory and space experiments.

  7. Analysis of LED degradation; proton-bombarded GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooft, G.W. ' t; Opdorp, C. van (Philips Gloeilampenfabrieken N.V., Eindhoven (Netherlands). Forschungslaboratorium)

    1984-03-01

    An analysis is given of the degradation of light-emitting, Zn-diffused GaAs diodes after proton bombardment. Use is made of a generally applicable method by which the external bulk quantum efficiency and the injection efficiency of an LED can be determined separately. Owing to the increase of non-radiative recombination being larger in the bulk than in the space-charge region, the injection efficiency at constant current first starts to increase and then decreases as a function of irradiation fluence. Furthermore, it is shown that the apparent bulk quantum efficiency decreases superlinearly with the irradiation fluence. This is consistent with the theory for a linear-graded pn junction and the assumption that the concentration of additional killer centres is directly proportional to the irradiation fluence.

  8. Sputtering of W-Mo alloy under ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of plasma density in the vicinity of the W-Mo alloy source in the process of dou ble-glow discharge plasma surface alloying was diagnosed using the moveable Langmuir probe. The sputtering law, surface composition and morphological variation of the W-Mo alloy source was studied. The experimental results show that there exists obvious preferential sputtering on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source under the argon ion bombardment; the stable period is reached after a transitional period, and the preferential sputtering occurs in a definite range of composition(mole fraction): 70 % ~ 75 % Mo, 22 % ~ 25 % W; there appears segregation on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source.

  9. Compact electron gun based on secondary emission through ionic bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Babacar; Bonnet, Jean; Schmid, Thomas; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2011-01-01

    We present a new compact electron gun based on the secondary emission through ionic bombardment principle. The driving parameters to develop such a gun are to obtain a quite small electron gun for an in-flight instrument performing Electron Beam Fluorescence measurements (EBF) on board of a reentry vehicle in the upper atmosphere. These measurements are useful to characterize the gas flow around the vehicle in terms of gas chemical composition, temperatures and velocity of the flow which usually presents thermo-chemical non-equilibrium. Such an instrument can also be employed to characterize the upper atmosphere if placed on another carrier like a balloon. In ground facilities, it appears as a more practical tool to characterize flows in wind tunnel studies or as an alternative to complex electron guns in industrial processes requiring an electron beam. We describe in this paper the gun which has been developed as well as its different features which have been characterized in the laboratory.

  10. Blistering and flaking of amorphous alloys bombarded with He ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The blistering and flaking behavior of many kinds of amorphous al loys under helium ion bombardment at room temperature was investigated. Helium ions with energies of 40keV and 60keV were implanted within the fluence range (1.0~4.0)×1018ions/cm2. The surface topography of samples after irradiation was observed by using a scanning electron microscope. The diameter of blister and the thickness of exfoliated blister lids were measured. The results showed that many kinds of surface topography characteristics appeared for different fluences, energies and amorphous alloys, such as flaking, blistering, exfoliation, blister rupture, secondgeneration blistering and porous structure. The dependdence of surface damage modesand the critical fluence for the onset of blistering and flaking on the sort of materials and ion energy was discussed.

  11. Bombarding Cancer: Biolistic Delivery of therapeutics using Porous Si Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilony, Neta; Tzur-Balter, Adi; Segal, Ester; Shefi, Orit

    2013-08-01

    A new paradigm for an effective delivery of therapeutics into cancer cells is presented. Degradable porous silicon carriers, which are tailored to carry and release a model anti-cancer drug, are biolistically bombarded into in-vitro cancerous targets. We demonstrate the ability to launch these highly porous microparticles by a pneumatic capillary gene gun, which is conventionally used to deliver cargos by heavy metal carriers. By optimizing the gun parameters e.g., the accelerating gas pressure, we have successfully delivered the porous carriers, to reach deep targets and to cross a skin barrier in a highly spatial resolution. Our study reveals significant cytotoxicity towards the target human breast carcinoma cells following the delivery of drug-loaded carriers, while administrating empty particles results in no effect on cell viability. The unique combination of biolistics with the temporal control of payload release from porous carriers presents a powerful and non-conventional platform for designing new therapeutic strategies.

  12. Topographical and Chemical Imaging of a Phase Separated Polymer Using a Combined Atomic Force Microscopy/Infrared Spectroscopy/Mass Spectrometry Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Tamin; Karácsony, Orsolya; Bocharova, Vera; Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the use of a hybrid atomic force microscopy/infrared spectroscopy/mass spectrometry imaging platform was demonstrated for the acquisition and correlation of nanoscale sample surface topography and chemical images based on infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The infrared chemical imaging component of the system utilized photothermal expansion of the sample at the tip of the atomic force microscopy probe recorded at infrared wave numbers specific to the different surface constituents. The mass spectrometry-based chemical imaging component of the system utilized nanothermal analysis probes for thermolytic surface sampling followed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of the gas phase species produced with subsequent mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup, operation, and image correlation procedures are discussed, and the multimodal imaging capability and utility are demonstrated using a phase separated poly(2-vinylpyridine)/poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer thin film. The topography and both the infrared and mass spectral chemical images showed that the valley regions of the thin film surface were comprised primarily of poly(2-vinylpyridine) and hill or plateau regions were primarily poly(methyl methacrylate). The spatial resolution of the mass spectral chemical images was estimated to be 1.6 μm based on the ability to distinguish surface features in those images that were also observed in the topography and infrared images of the same surface.

  13. Thermally assisted desorption processes in electron bombarded alkali halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodziej, J.; Czuba, P.; Piatkowski, P.; Postawa, Z.; Kempter, V.; Szymonski, M. (Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland). Inst. Fizyki)

    The desorption of alkali and halogen atoms induced by the interaction of energetic electrons with surfaces of alkali halide crystals has been studied by means of an angular-resolved and mass-selected time-of-flight spectroscopy. It has been found that a considerable fraction of halogen atoms was ejected with hyperthermal energies of the order of 0.1 eV. However, alkali atoms and the remaining part of halogen emission had thermal (Maxwellian) spectra of kinetic energies. In this paper we will report on systematic investigations of these thermal desorption processes for single crystal (100) NaCl, KCl, KBr, RbBr, and Kl surfaces. The relative yield of the thermal component has been measured as a function of electron beam energy and beam current density at various sample temperatures. It will be shown that thermal halogen emission can be explained by thermally assisted diffusion of interstitial halogen atoms produced in the bulk of the crystal from decaying self-trapped excitons. The origin of the alkali atom component will be described as due to neutralization and subsequent thermal evaporation of excess alkali atoms from the halogen deficient surface. (Author).

  14. Systematic analysis of neutron yields from thick targets bombarded by heavy ions and protons with moving source model

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, T; Nakamura, T

    2002-01-01

    A simple phenomenological analysis using the moving source model has been performed on the neutron energy spectra produced by bombarding thick targets with high energy heavy ions which have been systematically measured at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) facility (located in Chiba, Japan) of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). For the bombardment of both heavy ions and protons in the energy region of 100-500 MeV per nucleon, the moving source model incorporating the knock-on process could be generally successful in reproducing the measured neutron spectra within a factor of two margin of accuracy. This phenomenological analytical equation is expressed having several parameters as functions of atomic number Z sub p , mass number A sub p , energy per nucleon E sub p for projectile, and atomic number Z sub T , mass number A sub T for target. By inputting these basic data for projectile and target into this equation we can easily estimate the secondary neutron energy spectra at an emi...

  15. Destruction and Re-Accretion of Mid-Size Moons During an Outer Solar System Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, E. I.; Owen, M.

    2014-12-01

    To explain the lunar Late Heavy Bombardment the Nice Model (Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., & Levison, H. 2005, Nature, 435, 459; Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., & Levison, H. 2005, Nature, 435, 459) invokes a period of dynamical instability, occurring long after planet formation, that destabilizes both the main asteroid belt and a remnant exterior planetesimal disk. As a side effect of explaining the lunar LHB, this model also predicts an LHB-like period in the outer Solar System. With higher collision probabilities and impact energies due to gravitational focusing by the giant planets the inner satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus would have experienced a bombardment much more severe than the one supposedly responsible for the lunar basins. The concern is that such bombardment should have resulted in significant, even catastrophic modification of the mid-size satellites. Here we look at the problem of satellite survival during a hypothetical outer Solar System LHB. Using a Monte-Carlo approach we calculate, for 10 satellites of Saturn and Uranus, the probability of having experienced at least one catastrophic collision during an LHB. We use a scaling law for the energy required to disrupt a target in a gravity-dominated collision derived from new SPH simulations. These simulations extend the scaling law previously obtained by Benz & Asphaug (1999, Icarus, 142, 5) to larger targets. We then simulate randomized LHB impacts by drawing from appropriate size and velocity distributions, with the total delivered mass as a controlled parameter. We find that Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Hyperion, and Miranda experience at least one catastrophic impact in every simulation. In most simulations, Mimas, Enceladus, and Tethys experience multiple catastrophic impacts, including impacts with energies several times that required to completely disrupt the target. The implication is that these close-in, mid-size satellites could not have survived a Late Heavy

  16. Characterization of CdZnTe after argon ion beam bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensalah, H., E-mail: hakima.bensalah@uam.es [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Hortelano, V. [GdS-Optronlab Group, Departamento Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Plaza, J.L. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, O. [GdS-Optronlab Group, Departamento Fisica Materia Condensada, Universidad de Valladolid, Edificio I-D, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Crocco, J.; Zheng, Q.; Carcelen, V.; Dieguez, E. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-12-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After argon irradiation using low fluence, the defects on surface were removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The PL intensity increases after irradiation. This increase should be related to the improved quality of the CdZnTe surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Irradiation process lead to an elimination of Te precipitates from the surfaces of the CdZnTe samples. - Abstract: The objective of this work is to analyze the effects of argon ion irradiation process on the structure and distribution of Te inclusions in Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te crystals. The samples were treated with different ion fluences ranging from 2 to 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The state of the samples before and after irradiation were studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Cathodoluminescence, Photoluminescence, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The effect of the irradiation on the surface of the samples was clearly observed by SEM or AFM. Even for small fluences a removal of polishing scratches on the sample surfaces was observed. Likely correlated to this effect, an important enhancement in the luminescence intensity of the irradiated samples was observed. An aggregation effect of the Te inclusions seems to occur due to the Ar bombardment, which are also eliminated from the surfaces for the highest ion fluences used.

  17. Effects of supersonic fine particle bombarding on thermal cyclic failure lifetime of thermal barrier coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ya-jun; LIN Xiao-ping; WANG Zhi-ping; WANG Li-jun; JI Zhao-hui; DONG Yun

    2010-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating(TBC)consisting of a NiCoCrAlY bond coat(BC)and a ZrO2-8 wt.%Y2O3 topcoat(TC)was fabricated on the nickel-base supcralloy by air plasma spray(APS).The BC was trea-ted by supersonic fine particle bombarding(SFPB).Thermal cyclic failure and residual stress in thermally grown oxide(TGO)scale were studied by SEM with EDS and ruby fluorescence spectroscopy(RFS).As shown in the results,after treated by SFPB,thickening of TGO was relatively slow,which reduced the level of growth stress.The TBC with SFPB treatment was still remained well undergoing 350 times of thermal cycle.However,after thermal cycle with the same times,the separation of TC was observed in TBC without SFPB treatment.The residual stress analysis by RFS showed that the residual stress of SFPB-treated TBC increased with the increasing number of thermal cycle.The residual stress of conventional TBC reached a value of 650MPa at 350 times of cycle and that of SFPB-treated TBC only reached 532 MPa at 400 times of cycle.The BC with SFPB treatment after 400 times of cycle was analyzed by RFS,the high stress value was not observed in local thickened region of TGO.Thermal cycling resistance of TBC can be improved by the SFPB technology.

  18. Asteroid 4 Vesta: dynamical and collisional evolution during the Late Heavy Bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Pirani, S

    2016-01-01

    Vesta is the only currently identified asteroid for which we possess samples, which revealed us that the asteroid is differentiated and possesses a relatively thin basaltic crust that survived to the evolution of the asteroid belt and the Solar System. However, little is know about the effects of past events like the Late Heavy Bombardment on this crust. We address this gap in our knowledge by simulating the LHB in the different dynamical scenarios proposed for the migration of the giant planets in the broad framework of the Nice Model. The results of simulations generate information about produced crater population, surface saturation, mass loss and mass gain of Vesta and number of energetic or catastrophic impacts during LHB. Our results reveal that planet-planet scattering is a dynamically favourable migration mechanism for the survival of Vesta and its crust. The number of impacts on Vesta estimated as due to the LHB is $31\\pm5$, i.e. about 5 times larger than the number of impacts that would have occurre...

  19. Calculation of the enrichment of the giant planet envelopes during the "late heavy bombardment"

    CERN Document Server

    Matter, Alexis; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The giant planets of our solar system possess envelopes consisting mainly of hydrogen and helium but are also significantly enriched in heavier elements relatively to our Sun. In order to better constrain how these heavy elements have been delivered, we quantify the amount accreted during the so-called "late heavy bombardment", at a time when planets were fully formed and planetesimals could not sink deep into the planets. On the basis of the "Nice model", we obtain accreted masses (in terrestrial units) equal to $0.15\\pm0.04 \\rm\\,M_\\oplus$ for Jupiter, and $0.08 \\pm 0.01 \\rm\\,M_\\oplus$ for Saturn. For the two other giant planets, the results are found to depend mostly on whether they switched position during the instability phase. For Uranus, the accreted mass is $0.051 \\pm 0.003 \\rm\\,M_\\oplus$ with an inversion and $0.030 \\pm 0.001 \\rm\\,M_\\oplus$ without an inversion. Neptune accretes $0.048 \\pm 0.015 \\rm\\,M_\\oplus$ in models in which it is initially closer to the Sun than Uranus, and $0.066 \\pm 0.006 \\rm\\,...

  20. Determination of carrier concentration dependent electron effective mass and scattering time of n-ZnO thin film by terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, J.; Tay, C. B. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Deng, L. Y. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhang, X. H.; Chai, J. W. [Institute of Materials and Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Qin, H. [Department of Chemical and Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Liu, H. W. [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Venkatesan, T. [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chua, S. J., E-mail: elecsj@nus.edu.sg [Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Materials and Research Engineering, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-01-21

    We demonstrated a novel and widely accessible method for determining the electron effective mass and scattering time of ZnO films with different carrier concentrations by combining terahertz time-domain spectroscopy with Hall measurement. The terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) transmission spectra (0.1–2THz) were well described by Drude model. It is found that electron effective mass varied from 0.23m{sub 0} to 0.26m{sub 0} as the electron concentration changes from 5.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} to 4.0 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3}. The carrier concentration dependent characteristic is ascribed to the non-parabolicity of conduction band. Free carrier localization mechanism explained the discrepancy in mobilities obtained from THz-TDS and Hall measurements.

  1. Ion bombardment measurements and simulations of a low temperature VHF PECVD SiH4-H2 discharge in the a-Si:H to μc-Si:H transition regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landheer, K.; Goedheer, W. J.; Poulios, I.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    We studied ion bombardment during amorphous silicon layer deposition for hydrogen dilutions 5 to 59 with mass resolved IED measurements and simulations. The trends in the peak position of H2+ and SiHy+ IEDs with increasing hydrogen dilution show good agreement between measurements and simulations. A

  2. Integral field spectroscopy of supernova explosion sites: constraining mass and metallicity of the progenitors -- II. Type II-P and II-L supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Aldering, Greg; Arimoto, Nobuo; Maeda, Keiichi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Pereira, Rui; Usuda, Tomonori; Hashiba, Yasuhito

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen explosion sites of type II-P and II-L supernovae in nearby galaxies have been observed using integral field spectroscopy, enabling both spatial and spectral study of the explosion sites. We used the properties of the parent stellar population of the coeval supernova progenitor star to derive its metallicity and initial mass (c.f. Paper I). The spectrum of the parent stellar population yields the estimates of metallicity via strong-line method, and age via comparison with simple stellar population (SSP) models. These metallicity and age parameters are adopted for the progenitor star. Age, or lifetime of the star, was used to derive initial (ZAMS) mass of the star by comparing with stellar evolution models. With this technique, we were able to determine metallicity and initial mass of the SN progenitors in our sample. Our result indicates that some type-II supernova progenitors may have been stars with mass comparable to SN Ib/c progenitors.

  3. Chemical analysis of surfaces by resonance ionization mass spectroscopy associated to ionic pulverization; Analyse chimique de surfaces par spectrometrie d`ionisation resonante associee a la pulverisation ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, P.

    1995-12-19

    This work shows that if resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was first applied in isotopic separation, it`s also an analyzing method adapted to the study of semi-conductor materials and thin foils. We have improved this technic: a neodymium laser coupled with a dye laser, a new argon ions gun, a gallium ions gun and a new collection optic for the secondary ions quadrupole spectrometer to allow quantitative and selective measurements. (S.G.). 84 refs.

  4. OH concentration in an atmospheric-pressure methane-air flame from molecular-beam mass spectrometry and laser-absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Yoon, S.; Knuth, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    In evaluating experimental techniques for studying premixed atmospheric-pressure methane-air flames, analysts demonstrated that the molecular-beam mass-spectrometry technique adequately measures OH concentration, given careful design of the sampling probe and appropriate consideration for possible mass interferences. Perturbation of the OH concentration profile using various sampling probes indicates the importance of minimizing the length of the sampling-orifice channel to reduce composition relaxation during sampling. The accuracy of the MBMS method was determined by comparing the results with those from a laser-absorption spectroscopy system.

  5. Efficient and rapid C. elegans transgenesis by bombardment and hygromycin B selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inja Radman

    Full Text Available We report a simple, cost-effective, scalable and efficient method for creating transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans that requires minimal hands-on time. The method combines biolistic bombardment with selection for transgenics that bear a hygromycin B resistance gene on agar plates supplemented with hygromycin B, taking advantage of our observation that hygromycin B is sufficient to kill wild-type C. elegans at very low concentrations. Crucially, the method provides substantial improvements in the success of bombardments for isolating transmitting strains, the isolation of multiple independent strains, and the isolation of integrated strains: 100% of bombardments in a large data set yielded transgenics; 10 or more independent strains were isolated from 84% of bombardments, and up to 28 independent strains were isolated from a single bombardment; 82% of bombardments yielded stably transmitting integrated lines with most yielding multiple integrated lines. We anticipate that the selection will be widely adopted for C. elegans transgenesis via bombardment, and that hygromycin B resistance will be adopted as a marker in other approaches for manipulating, introducing or deleting DNA in C. elegans.

  6. Enhanced End-Contacts by Helium Ion Bombardment to Improve Graphene-Metal Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunpeng Jia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Low contact resistance between graphene and metals is of paramount importance to fabricate high performance graphene-based devices. In this paper, the impact of both defects induced by helium ion (He+ bombardment and annealing on the contact resistance between graphene and various metals (Ag, Pd, and Pt were systematically explored. It is found that the contact resistances between all metals and graphene are remarkably reduced after annealing, indicating that not only chemically adsorbed metal (Pd but also physically adsorbed metals (Ag and Pt readily form end-contacts at intrinsic defect locations in graphene. In order to further improve the contact properties between Ag, Pd, and Pt metals and graphene, a novel method in which self-aligned He+ bombardment to induce exotic defects in graphene and subsequent thermal annealing to form end-contacts was proposed. By using this method, the contact resistance is reduced significantly by 15.1% and 40.1% for Ag/graphene and Pd/graphene contacts with He+ bombardment compared to their counterparts without He+ bombardment. For the Pt/graphene contact, the contact resistance is, however, not reduced as anticipated with He+ bombardment and this might be ascribed to either inappropriate He+ bombardment dose, or inapplicable method of He+ bombardment in reducing contact resistance for Pt/graphene contact. The joint efforts of as-formed end-contacts and excess created defects in graphene are discussed as the cause responsible for the reduction of contact resistance.

  7. Cometary impact rates on the Moon and planets during the late heavy bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, H.; Wiśniowski, T.; Gabryszewski, R.; Wajer, P.; Wójcikowski, K.; Szutowicz, S.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Morbidelli, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The Nice model predicts that the trans-planetary planetesimal disk made a large or even dominant contribution to the cratering in the inner solar system during the late heavy bombardment (LHB). In the presence of evidence that lunar craters and mare basins may be mainly of asteroidal origin, there is a dilemma of the missing comets that is not yet resolved. Aims: We aim to revisit the problem of cometary impact rates on the Moon and the terrestrial planets during the LHB with a flexible model, allowing us to study the influences of physical destruction of comets, the mass of the primordial disk, and the distribution of this mass over the entire size range. Methods: We performed a Monte Carlo study of the dynamics of the cometary LHB projectiles and derive the impact rates by calculating individual collision probabilities for a huge sample of projectile orbits. We used Minimum Orbit Intersection Distances (MOIDs) according to a new scheme introduced here. Different calculations were performed using different models for the physical evolution of comet nuclei and for the properties of the primordial, trans-planetary disk. Results: Based on the capture probability of Jupiter Trojans, we find a best fit radius of the largest LHB comet impacting the Moon for a low-mass primordial disk. For this disk mass, the LHB cratering of the Moon, Mercury and Mars were dominated by asteroids. However, some smaller lunar maria were likely preceded by comet impacts. The volatile delivery to the Earth and Mars by LHB comets was much less than their water inventories. Conclusions: There is no excessive cometary cratering, if the LHB was caused by a late planetary instability in the Nice Model. The Earth and Mars obtained their water very early in their histories. The Noachian water flows on Mars cannot be attributed to the arrival of LHB-related H2O or CO2.

  8. Ionic bombardment of stainless steel by nitrogen and nickel ions immersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Ling; HU Yong-jun; XU jian; MENG Ji-long

    2008-01-01

    A new nitriding process was used to carry out the ionic bombardment, in which nickel ion was introduced. The microstructure, composition and properties of the treated stainless steel were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy(SEM), micro-hardness test and electrochemistry method. The results show that the hardness of the stainless steel is greatly increased after ionic bombardment under nitrogen and nickel ions immersion. Vickers' hardness as high as Hv1268 is obtained. The bombarded stainless steel is of a little reduction in corrosion resistance, as compared with the original stainless steel. However, as compared with the traditional ion-nitriding stainless steel, the corrosion resistance is greatly improved.

  9. Step formation on the ion-bombarded Ag(100) surface studied by LEED and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teichert, C. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)); Ammer, C. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)); Klaua, M. (Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany))

    1994-11-16

    The development of the morphology of an Ag(100) single-crystal surface bombarded with 600 eV Ar[sup +] ions at 170 K and at room temperature is studied by spot profile analysis of LEED. A temperature-dependent saturation of the step density is observed and a distinct smoothing of the surface after bombardment occurs already at room temperature. Under out-of-phase condition the LEED spots show a fourfold shape that differs in orientation at both temperatures. Monte Carlo simulations of the atom removal including thermal surface diffusion reveal at 170 K the formation of left angle 100 right angle and left angle 110 right angle step edges with equal probability, whereas at room temperature rearrangement processes at the steps lead to the preferential formation of the close-packed left angle 110 right angle edges. The intensity distribution under out-of-phase condition calculated from the Monte Carlo snap shots exhibits the same temperature dependence of the spot shapes as observed experimentally. The interlayer mass transport occurring during annealing at room temperature is found to be based on jumps running downward the left angle 100 right angle step edges. (orig.)

  10. Modelling and simulation of surface morphology driven by ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yewande, E.O.

    2006-05-02

    Non-equilibrium surfaces, at nanometer length scales, externally driven via bombardment with energetic particles are known to exhibit well ordered patterns with a variety of applications in nano-technology. These patterns emerge at time scales on the order of minutes. Continuum theory has been quite successful in giving a general picture of the processes that interplay to give the observed patterns, as well as how such competition might determine the properties of the nanostructures. However, continuum theoretical descriptions are ideal only in the asymptotic limit. The only other theoretical alternative, which happens to be more suitable for the characteristic length-and time-scales of pattern formation, is Monte Carlo simulation. In this thesis, surface morphology is studied using discrete solid-on-solid Monte Carlo models of sputtering and surface diffusion. The simulations are performed in the context of the continuum theories and experiments. In agreement with the experiments, the ripples coarsen with time and the ripple velocity exhibits a power-law behaviour with the ripple wavelength, in addition, the exponent was found to depend on the simulation temperature, which suggests future experimental studies of flux dependence. Moreover, a detailed exploration of possible topographies, for different sputtering conditions, corresponding to different materials, was performed. And different surface topographies e.g. holes, ripples, and dots, were found at oblique incidence, without sample rotation. With sample rotation no new topography was found, its only role being to destroy any inherent anisotropy in the system. (orig.)

  11. On Universality in Sputtering Yields Due to Cluster Bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruch, Robert J; Garrison, Barbara J; Mlynek, Maksymilian; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2014-09-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations, in which atomic and molecular solids are bombarded by Arn (n = 60-2953) clusters, are used to explain the physics that underlie the "universal relation" of the sputtering yield Y per cluster atom versus incident energy E per cluster atom (Y/n vs E/n). We show that a better representation to unify the results is Y/(E/U0) versus (E/U0)/n, where U0 is the sample cohesive energy per atom or molecular equivalent, and the yield Y is given in the units of atoms or molecular equivalents for atomistic and molecular solids, respectively. In addition, we identified a synergistic cluster effect. Specifically, for a given (E/U0)/n value, larger clusters produce larger yields than the yields that are only proportional to the cluster size n or equivalently to the scaled energy E/U0. This synergistic effect can be described in the high (E/U0)/n regime as scaling of Y with (E/U0)(α), where α > 1.

  12. The ballistic performance of the bombard Mons Meg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Lewtas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bombard Mons Meg, located in Edinburgh Castle, with a diameter of 19 inches (48 cm, was one of the largest calibre cannons ever built. Constructed in 1449 and presented to King James II of Scotland in 1454, Mons Meg was used in both military and ceremonial roles in Scotland until its barrel burst in 1680. This paper examines the history, internal, external and terminal ballistics of the cannon and its shot. The likely muzzle velocity was estimated by varying the propellant type and the cannon profile was investigated to identify weak spots in the design that may have led to its failure. Using the muzzle velocity calculated from the internal ballistics, simulations were performed with granite and sandstone shot for varying launch angle and ground temperature. The likely trajectory and range of the cannonballs are described. The internal and external ballistics informed the initial conditions of the terminal ballistic impact scenarios. The performance of the cannonball against both period and modern targets, in the form of a pseudo-castle wall and a monolithic concrete target, respectively, were simulated and are presented and discussed.

  13. The ballistic performance of the bombard Mons Meg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian LEWTAS; Rachael MCALISTER; Adam WALLIS; Clive WOODLEY; Ian CULLIS

    2016-01-01

    The bombard Mons Meg, located in Edinburgh Castle, with a diameter of 19 inches (48 cm), was one of the largest calibre cannons ever built. Constructed in 1449 and presented to King James II of Scotland in 1454, Mons Meg was used in both military and ceremonial roles in Scotland until its barrel burst in 1680. This paper examines the history, internal, external and terminal ballistics of the cannon and its shot. The likely muzzle velocity was estimated by varying the propellant type and the cannon profile was investigated to identify weak spots in the design that may have led to its failure. Using the muzzle velocity calculated from the internal ballistics, simulations were performed with granite and sandstone shot for varying launch angle and ground temperature. The likely trajectory and range of the cannonballs are described. The internal and external ballistics informed the initial conditions of the terminal ballistic impact scenarios. The performance of the cannonball against both period and modern targets, in the form of a pseudo-castle wall and a monolithic concrete target, respectively, were simulated and are presented and discussed.

  14. Did Saturn's rings form during the Late Heavy Bombardment ?

    CERN Document Server

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Dones, Luke H; Salmon, Julien

    2008-01-01

    The origin of Saturn\\' s massive ring system is still unknown. Two popular scenarios - the tidal splitting of passing comets and the collisional destruction of a satellite - rely on a high cometary flux in the past. In the present paper we attempt to quantify the cometary flux during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) to assess the likelihood of both scenarios. Our analysis relies on the so-called Nice model of the origin of the LHB (Tsiganis et al., 2005; Morbidelli et al., 2005; Gomes et al., 2005) and on the size distribution of the primordial trans-Neptunian planetesimals constrained in Charnoz & Morbidelli (2007). We find that the cometary flux on Saturn during the LHB was so high that both scenarios for the formation of Saturn rings are viable in principle. However, a more detailed study shows that the comet tidal disruption scenario implies that all four giant planets should have comparable ring systems whereas the destroyed satellite scenario would work only for Saturn, and perhaps Jupiter. This is ...

  15. SPH Simulations of Volatiles Loss from Icy Satellites During a Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D.; Asphaug, E. I.; Owen, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The present day ice-to-silicate ratio in satellites of the outer solar system can be used to constrain dynamical models of solar system formation [1]. The reason is that a period of intense impact activity after formation of the planets, implied by some dynamical models [2,3,4], could have resulted in significant mass loss, of ice preferentially, from these satellites. The location of Jovian and Saturnian satellites inside the gravity well of these giant planets implies high impact velocities, perhaps as high as 30 km/s [5]. Combined with small satellite masses, a Late Heavy Bombardment may well lead to a significant fraction of a satellite's mass ejected. In a previous study, Nimmo and Korycansky [1] calculate, using a scaling law for vaporization of ice from craters [6], the total expected ice loss from satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. They find that many satellites should have lost significant fractions (>10%) of their water ice. As many of these satellites do not appear to be significantly depleted in volatiles, this raises questions about the timing or intensity of a late heavy bombardment. (See also [4]). But this conclusion depends on some key assumptions regarding the distribution of impactor sizes and velocities, and, critically, the expected mass loss during a single impact. Here we compare predictions of impact-driven mass loss using direct hydrodynamical simulations of the relevant impact events, with the scaling law originally developed for cratering by small impactors [6]. The main advantage of this approach is that we can consider impacts between comparably sized bodies, where a cratering scaling law does not strictly apply. Another advantage of a direct hydro simulation is that we can track escaping mass, rather than vapor production. This is most significant for lower velocity impacts, typical of accretion [7,8]. This method should also be less sensitive to the choice of equation of state. To resolve preferential ice loss during impacts

  16. Distinguishing Benign from Malignant Pancreatic and Periampullary Lesions Using Combined Use of 1H-NMR Spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Yarrow J.; Farshidfar, Farshad; Weljie, Aalim M.; Kopciuk, Karen A.; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G.; Sutherland, Francis R.; Vogel, Hans J.; Bathe, Oliver F.

    2017-01-01

    Previous work demonstrated that serum metabolomics can distinguish pancreatic cancer from benign disease. However, in the clinic, non-pancreatic periampullary cancers are difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. Therefore, to test the clinical utility of this technology, we determined whether any pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma could be distinguished from benign masses and biliary strictures. Sera from 157 patients with malignant and benign pancreatic and periampullary lesions were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Multivariate projection modeling using SIMCA-P+ software in training datasets (n = 80) was used to generate the best models to differentiate disease states. Models were validated in test datasets (n = 77). The final 1H-NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS metabolomic profiles consisted of 14 and 18 compounds, with AUROC values of 0.74 (SE 0.06) and 0.62 (SE 0.08), respectively. The combination of 1H-NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS metabolites did not substantially improve this performance (AUROC 0.66, SE 0.08). In patients with adenocarcinoma, glutamate levels were consistently higher, while glutamine and alanine levels were consistently lower. Pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinomas can be distinguished from benign lesions. To further enhance the discriminatory power of metabolomics in this setting, it will be important to identify the metabolomic changes that characterize each of the subclasses of this heterogeneous group of cancers. PMID:28098776

  17. Particle-In-Cell/Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Back Bombardment in Photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji; Corlett, John; Staples, John

    2009-03-02

    In this paper, we report on studies of ion back bombardment in high average current dc and rf photoinjectors using a particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo method. Using H{sub 2} ion as an example, we observed that the ion density and energy deposition on the photocathode in rf guns are order of magnitude lower than that in a dc gun. A higher rf frequency helps mitigate the ion back bombardment of the cathode in rf guns.

  18. Fractionation of a coal tar pitch by ultra-filtration, and characterization by size exclusion chromatography, UV-fluorescence and laser desorption-mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthe George; Trevor J. Morgan; Patricia Alvarez; Marcos Millan; Alan A. Herod; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2010-10-15

    Ultra-filtration (UF) provides a new way of generating narrow bands of sample in the fractionation of coal and petroleum-derived liquids. It allows larger quantities of high-mass fractions to be recovered, making more detailed investigations possible, through the use of techniques requiring larger amounts of sample. In this work, UF-separated fractions have been used to study molecular mass distributions of a coal tar pitch, used as laboratory standard. The pitch was fractionated by solvent solubility into three fractions. These were further fractionated by ultra-filtration, using membranes specific to protein molecular sizes classed as '1 kDa', '5 kDa', '10 kDa' and '100 kDa'. Planar chromatography was used as a tertiary fractionation method, to sub-divide the UF-fractions. The various fractions were examined by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), UV-fluorescence spectroscopy and laser desorption-mass spectrometry (LD-MS). There was good agreement between mass estimates based on SEC and LD-MS of the smaller UF-fractions, with evidence for the presence of material with molecular masses ranging between 800 and 10,000 u. Examining the largest UF fractions of the pitch-pyridine-insoluble sample also gave clear evidence for material with molecular masses above 10,000 u. Taken together, however, the LD-MS data showed progressively diminishing differences, as the sizes of the UF membranes, and the likely molecular masses of the sample fractions, increased. One likely explanation is incomplete sampling during the laser desorption procedure. The evidence suggests that the upper mass limit detectable for these and similar samples by LD-MS has been reached. Despite these reservations, LD-MS appears as the best method to date, for investigating the mass ranges of samples derived from coal tar pitch and heavy petroleum fractions. 51 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. First online multireflection time-of-flight mass measurements of isobar chains produced by fusion-evaporation reactions: Toward identification of superheavy elements via mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schury, P.; Wada, M.; Ito, Y.; Kaji, D.; Arai, F.; MacCormick, M.; Murray, I.; Haba, H.; Jeong, S.; Kimura, S.; Koura, H.; Miyatake, H.; Morimoto, K.; Morita, K.; Ozawa, A.; Rosenbusch, M.; Reponen, M.; Söderström, P.-A.; Takamine, A.; Tanaka, T.; Wollnik, H.

    2017-01-01

    Using a multireflection time-of-flight mass spectrograph located after a gas cell coupled with the gas-filled recoil ion separator GARIS-II, the masses of several α -decaying heavy nuclei were directly and precisely measured. The nuclei were produced via fusion-evaporation reactions and separated from projectilelike and targetlike particles using GARIS-II before being stopped in a helium-filled gas cell. Time-of-flight spectra for three isobar chains, 204Fr-204Rn-204At-204Po , 205Fr-205Rn-205At-205Po-205Bi , and 206Fr-206Rn-206At , were observed. Precision atomic mass values were determined for Fr-206204, Rn,205204, and At,205204. Identifications of 205Bi, Po,205204, 206Rn, and 206At were made with N ≲10 detected ions, representing the next step toward use of mass spectrometry to identify exceedingly low-yield species such as superheavy element ions.

  20. Back bombardment for dispenser and lanthanum hexaboride cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Bakr

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The back bombardment (BB effect limits wide usage of thermionic rf guns. The BB effect induces not only ramping-up of a cathode’s temperature and beam current, but also degradation of cavity voltage and beam energy during a macropulse. This paper presents a comparison of the BB effect for the case of dispenser tungsten-base (DC and lanthanum hexaboride (LaB_{6} thermionic rf gun cathodes. For each, particle simulation codes are used to simulate the BB effect and electron beam dynamics in a thermionic rf gun cathode. A semiempirical equation is also used to investigate the stopping range and deposited heat power of BB electrons in the cathode material. A numerical simulation method is used to calculate the change of the cathode temperature and current density during a single macropulse. This is done by solving two differential equations for the rf gun cavity equivalent circuit and one-dimensional thermal diffusion equation. High electron emission and small beam size are required for generation of a high-brightness electron beam, and so in this work the emission properties of the cathode are taken into account. Simulations of the BB effect show that, for a pulse of 6  μs duration, the DC cathode experiences a large change in the temperature compared with LaB_{6}, and a change in current density 6 times higher. Validation of the simulation results is performed using experimental data for beam current beyond the gun exit. The experimental data is well reproduced using the simulation method.

  1. Characterization of Low-mass, Wide-separation Substellar Companions to Stars in Upper Scorpius: Near-infrared Photometry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lachapelle, François-René; Gagné, Jonathan; Jayawardhana, Ray; Janson, Markus; Helling, Christiane; Witte, Soeren

    2015-01-01

    We present new 0.9-2.45 $\\mu$m spectroscopy ($R \\sim 1000$), and $Y$, $J$, $H$, $K_s$, $L^\\prime$ photometry, obtained at Gemini North, of three low-mass brown dwarf companions on wide orbits around young stars of the Upper Scorpius OB association: HIP 78530 B, [PGZ2001] J161031.9-191305 B, and GSC 06214-00210 B. We use these data to assess the companions' spectral type, temperature, surface gravity and mass, as well as the ability of the BT-Settl and Drift-Phoenix atmosphere models to reproduce the spectral features of young substellar objects. For completeness, we also analyze the archival spectroscopy and photometry of the Upper Scorpius planetary mass companion 1RXS J160929.1-210524 b. Based on a comparison with model spectra we find that the companions, in the above order, have effective temperatures of 2700, 2500, 2300 and 1700 K. These temperatures are consistent with our inferred spectral types, respectively M7 $\\beta$, M9 $\\gamma$, M9 $\\gamma$, and L4 $\\gamma$. From bolometric luminosities estimated ...

  2. The DiskMass Survey. VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-01-01

    We present ionized-gas ([Oiii]λ5007 Å) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (hR). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 Å observed at a mea

  3. The DiskMass Survey : VI. Gas and stellar kinematics in spiral galaxies from PPak integral-field spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2013-01-01

    We present ionized-gas ([OIII]lambda 5007 angstrom) and stellar kinematics (velocities and velocity dispersions) for 30 nearly face-on spiral galaxies out to as many as three K-band disk scale lengths (h(R)). These data have been derived from PPak integral-field-unit spectroscopy from 4980-5370 angs

  4. INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROSCOPY OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION SITES: CONSTRAINING THE MASS AND METALLICITY OF THE PROGENITORS. I. TYPE Ib AND Ic SUPERNOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Doi, Mamoru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Hashiba, Yasuhito [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aldering, Greg [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arimoto, Nobuo [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Pereira, Rui [CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Usuda, Tomonori, E-mail: hanindyo.kuncarayakti@ipmu.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Integral field spectroscopy of 11 Type Ib/Ic supernova (SN Ib/Ic) explosion sites in nearby galaxies has been obtained using UH88/SNIFS and Gemini-N/GMOS. The use of integral field spectroscopy enables us to obtain both spatial and spectral information about the explosion site, enabling the identification of the parent stellar population of the SN progenitor star. The spectrum of the parent population provides metallicity determination via strong-line method and age estimation obtained via comparison with simple stellar population models. We adopt this information as the metallicity and age of the SN progenitor, under the assumption that it was coeval with the parent stellar population. The age of the star corresponds to its lifetime, which in turn gives the estimate of its initial mass. With this method we were able to determine both the metallicity and initial (zero-age main sequence) mass of the progenitor stars of SNe Ib and Ic. We found that on average SN Ic explosion sites are more metal-rich and younger than SN Ib sites. The initial mass of the progenitors derived from parent stellar population age suggests that SN Ic has more massive progenitors than SN Ib. In addition, we also found indication that some of our SN progenitors are less massive than {approx}25 M{sub Sun }, indicating that they may have been stars in a close binary system that have lost their outer envelope via binary interactions to produce SNe Ib/Ic, instead of single Wolf-Rayet stars. These findings support the current suggestions that both binary and single progenitor channels are in effect in producing SNe Ib/Ic. This work also demonstrates the power of integral field spectroscopy in investigating SN environments and active star-forming regions.

  5. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, J.; Galiová, M.; Novotný, K.; Červenka, R.; Reale, L.; Novotný, J.; Liška, M.; Samek, O.; Kanický, V.; Hrdlička, A.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 μm in a up to cm × cm area of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  6. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: kaiser@fme.vutbr.cz; Galiova, M.; Novotny, K.; Cervenka, R. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Reale, L. [Faculty of Sciences, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio (Coppito 1), 67010 L' Aquila (Italy); Novotny, J.; Liska, M.; Samek, O. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, V.; Hrdlicka, A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Agronomy, Mendel University of Agriculture and Forestry, Zemedelska 1, 613 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-01-15

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 {mu}m in a up to cm x cm area of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  7. Composition and mechanisms analysis of aromatic telechelic oligomers by mass spectroscopy; Analyse de la composition et de mecanismes de polymerisation d`oligomeres telecheliques aromatiques par spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerval, V.

    1997-10-22

    The aim of this work was to apply mass spectrometry, on the one hand to the characterization of telechelic oligo-imides with oxazoline and lactane end-caps and, on the other hand to the determination of the thermal reticulation mechanism of nadimides. First bis-oxazoline and buslactane end-capped, oligomers used to form blocks copolymers were studied by liquid secondary ion mass spectroscopy (LSIMS) and Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF). An acetamide end-cap by-product was detected. Then the analysis was modified to avoid the formation of this by-product which was unable to copolymerize. Secondly, to circumvent the experimental difficulties related to crosslinked networks, the study of the thermal polymerization of nadimides was performed ones (LSIMS, electroscopy, MALDI-TOF) led to the determination of the polynadimide structure. Thanks to MS/MS studies the nature of the linkages and the structure of the end-caps were established. Finally, this work evidenced the opportunity to use mass spectrometry to analyze synthetic polymers. (author) 222 refs.

  8. Luminosities and masses for three central stars of planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds from ultraviolet spectroscopy with the IUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecher, T. P.; Savedoff, M. P.; Maran, S. P.; Gull, T. R.; Aller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    Physical parameters of the central stars of the planetary nebulae (PN) P40, N2, and N5 are determined from UV observations by the IUE spacecraft and emission line-data. The observations took place on May 23 and 26, 1981. Derived properties, such as the H-beta, color excess, nebular hydrogen emission, helium emission, and stellar continuum emission, the stellar radius, surface gravity, Zanstra temperature, luminosity, absolute bolometric magnitude, apparent visual magnitude, mass, and Zanstra parameter for the three PN central stars are presented. All the masses were over one solar mass, suggesting a specific PN nuclei mass. The finding was corroborated by all luminosities exceeding the Eddington luminosity for a 0.6 solar mass star, which has previously been calculated for the white dwarf core of a PN.

  9. Penning trap mass measurements and laser spectroscopy on neutron-rich fission products extracted from the research reactor TRIGA-Mainz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibach, Martin; Ketelaer, Jens; Ketter, Jochen; Knuth, Konstantin [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Blaum, Klaus; Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhardt, Klaus; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Herfurth, Frank [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Smorra, Christian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    TRIGA-SPEC is a setup for Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy on short-lived neutron-rich nuclides located at the research reactor TRIGA-Mainz. It is dedicated to the determination of nuclear ground-state properties like masses and charge-radii. The nuclides are produced by neutron-induced fission of an actinide target located in a target chamber near the reactor core. It is required to extract the nuclides fast and with high efficiency from the target chamber in order to make precision experiments on short-living species with half-lives in the order of 1s. To this end, they are flushed out with a helium gas jet containing carbon aerosols and transported through a skimmer region to an ECR ion source. The characterisation of the carbon aerosol generator and the verification of transported fission products are presented.

  10. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VI. Comparing the Mass and Light in MACSJ0416.1-2403 using Frontier Field imaging and GLASS spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Hoag, Austin; Treu, Tommaso; Bradač, Maruša; Schmidt, Kasper B; Wang, Xin; Brammer, Gabriel B; Broussard, Adam; Amorin, Ricardo; Castellano, Marco; Fontana, Adriano; Merlin, Emiliano; Schrabback, Tim; Trenti, Michele; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2016-01-01

    We present a strong and weak gravitational lens model of the galaxy cluster MACSJ0416.1-2403, constrained using spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) and Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. We search for emission lines in known multiply imaged sources in the GLASS spectra, obtaining secure spectroscopic redshifts of 31 multiple images belonging to 16 distinct source galaxies. The GLASS spectra provide the first spectroscopic measurements for 6 of the source galaxies. The weak lensing signal is acquired from 884 galaxies in the F606W HFF image. By combining the weak lensing constraints with 15 multiple image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and 9 multiple image systems with photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster on an adaptive grid. The resulting total mass density map is compared with a stellar mass density map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields imaging data to study the relative distribution of stellar and total m...

  11. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    OpenAIRE

    Romins Brasca; Luciana Ines Vergara; Mario César Guillermo Passeggi; Julio Ferrón

    2007-01-01

    The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0) oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+) chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+).

  12. Chemical changes of titanium and titanium dioxide under electron bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romins Brasca

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron induced effect on the first stages of the titanium (Ti0 oxidation and titanium dioxide (Ti4+ chemical reduction processes has been studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Using factor analysis we found that both processes are characterized by the appearance of an intermediate Ti oxidation state, Ti2O3 (Ti3+.

  13. GC-MS in the analysis of organic compounds in meteorites. [Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, J. G.; Romiez, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    The application of an analytical approach combining gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has shown that the amino acid composition of meteorite extracts is quite complex. A computer was used in the evaluation of the data obtained in the investigations. The computer programs developed have been concerned solely with the mass spectra of amino acids. Specialized programs have been written to determine the number of carbon atoms in an amino acid which is a member of any of three subclasses.

  14. Combining light microscopy, dielectric spectroscopy, MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry, FTIR spectromicroscopy and multivariate data mining for morphological and physiological bioprocess characterization of filamentous organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Andreas E; Koch, Cosima; Helmel, Michaela; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Macfelda, Karin; Lendl, Bernhard; Allmaier, Günter; Herwig, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Along with productivity and physiology, morphological growth behavior is the key parameter in bioprocess design for filamentous fungi. Lacking tools for fast, reliable and efficient analysis however, fungal morphology is still commonly tackled by empirical trial-and-error techniques during strain selection and process development procedures. Bridging the gap, this work presents a comprehensive analytical approach for morphological analysis combining automated high-throughput microscopy, multi-frequency dielectric spectroscopy, MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry and FTIR spectromicroscopy. Industrial fed-batch production processes were investigated in fully instrumented, automated bioreactors using the model system Penicillium chrysogenum. Physiological process characterization was based on the determination of specific conversion rates as scale-independent parameters. Conventional light microscopic morphological analysis was based on holistic determination of time series for more than 30 morphological parameters and their frequency distributions over the respective parameter range by automated high-throughput light microscopy. Characteristic protein patterns enriched in specific morphological and physiological states were further obtained by MALDI intact cell mass spectrometry. Spatial resolution of molecular biomass composition was facilitated by FTIR spectromicroscopy. Real-time in situ monitoring of morphological process behavior was achieved by linking multi-frequency dielectric spectroscopy with above outlined off-line methods. Data integration of complementing orthogonal techniques for morphological and physiological analysis together with multivariate modeling of interdependencies between morphology, physiology and process parameters facilitated complete bioprocess characterization. The suggested approach will thus help understanding morphological and physiological behavior and, in turn, allow to control and optimize those complex processes.

  15. High mass resolution, high angular acceptance time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for planetary missions under the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David T.

    1991-01-01

    This final report covers three years and several phases of work in which instrumentation for the Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) were successfully developed. There were two main thrusts to this research: (1) to develop and test methods for electrostatically scanning detector field-of-views, and (2) to improve the mass resolution of plasma mass spectrometers to M/delta M approximately 25, their field-of-view (FOV) to 360 degrees, and their E-range to cover approximately 1 eV to 50 keV. Prototypes of two different approaches to electrostatic scanning were built and tested. The Isochronous time-of-flight (TOF) and the linear electric field 3D TOF devices were examined.

  16. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Sangwijit, K. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Phanchaisri, B. [Institute of Science and Technology Research, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S. [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion bombardment could induce DNA transfer into E. coli cells. • The DNA transfer induction depended on ion energy and fluence. • The mechanism was associated with the bacterial cell envelope structure. • A mechanism phase diagram was proposed to summarize the mechanism. - Abstract: As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10–20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  17. Studies of Improving the Frequency of Indica Rice Transformation by Biolistic Bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In order to improve the frequency of indica rice transformation by biolistic bombardment, suitable culture conditions for embryonic calli,an optimal selection scheme for resistant calli and seedlings, and optimum bombardment parameters a investigated by using 14 commercially important indica rice cultivars. The main results show that the CC medium with 36g/L mannitol is a scheme subculture medium in which the browning of indica rice calli can be mitigated significantly; The concentration of 30~40mg/L Hyg or 150~200mg/L G418 or 10~20 mg/L Basta is suitable for selection of resistant calli; The transformation parameters of 100μg gold powder absorbing 0.2μg DNA per shot and 900 psi helium pressure and 6 cm bombardment distance and bombarded twice for each plate give the best result; Keeping the target calli on osmotic medium containing 60g/L mannitol from 12 ~24h before bombardment to 24~48h after it can increase the efficiencies of transformation . Furthermore, some transgenic indica rice plants are obtained using this optimized transformation system.

  18. On the origin of microcraters on the surface of ion beam bombarded plant cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2006-01-01

    Ion bombardment of plant and bacterial cellular material has recently been used as a tool for the transfer of exogenous DNA macromolecules into the cell interior region. The precise mechanism that leads to the transfer of macromolecules through the cell envelope is not yet clear, however it has been observed that the ion bombardment is accompanied by the formation of "microcraters" on the cell wall, and it is possible that these features provide channels for the macromolecule transfer. Thus the nature and origin of the microcraters is of importance to understanding the DNA transfer phenomenon as well as being of fundamental interest. We report here on some scanning electron microscope observations we have made of onion skin cells that have been subjected to electron beam bombardment of sufficiently high power density to damage the cell wall. The damage seen is much less than and different from the microcraters formed subsequent to ion bombardment. We speculate that the microcraters may originate from the explosive release of gas generated in the biomaterial by ion bombardment.

  19. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab: A Quadruple System Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Mass Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    We present Keck/NIRC2 and OSIRIS near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab, a young (1--3 Myr) hierarchical quadruple system comprising a low-mass star, two brown dwarfs, and a planetary-mass companion in Taurus. All four components show spectroscopic signs of low surface gravity, and both 2M0441+2301 Aa and Ab possess Pa$\\beta$ emission indicating they each harbor accretion subdisks. Astrometry spanning 2008--2014 reveals orbital motion in both the Aab (0.23" separation) and Bab (0.095" separation) pairs, although the implied orbital periods of $>$300 years means dynamical masses will not be possible in the near future. The faintest component (2M0441+2301 Bb) has an angular $H$-band shape, strong molecular absorption (VO, CO, H$_2$O, and FeH), and shallow alkali lines, confirming its young age, late spectral type (L1 $\\pm$ 1), and low temperature ($\\approx$1800~K). With individual masses of 200$^{+100}_{-50}$ Mjup, 35 $\\pm$ 5 Mjup, 19 $\\pm$ 3 Mjup, and 9.8 $\\pm$ 1.8 Mjup, 2M0441+2301 AabBa...

  20. DeNovoID: a web-based tool for identifying peptides from sequence and mass tags deduced from de novo peptide sequencing by mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, Brian D; Ruotti, Victor; Twigger, Simon N; Greene, Andrew S

    2005-07-01

    One of the core activities of high-throughput proteomics is the identification of peptides from mass spectra. Some peptides can be identified using spectral matching programs like Sequest or Mascot, but many spectra do not produce high quality database matches. De novo peptide sequencing is an approach to determine partial peptide sequences for some of the unidentified spectra. A drawback of de novo peptide sequencing is that it produces a series of ordered and disordered sequence tags and mass tags rather than a complete, non-degenerate peptide amino acid sequence. This incomplete data is difficult to use in conventional search programs such as BLAST or FASTA. DeNovoID is a program that has been specifically designed to use degenerate amino acid sequence and mass data derived from MS experiments to search a peptide database. Since the algorithm employed depends on the amino acid composition of the peptide and not its sequence, DeNovoID does not have to consider all possible sequences, but rather a smaller number of compositions consistent with a spectrum. DeNovoID also uses a geometric indexing scheme that reduces the number of calculations required to determine the best peptide match in the database. DeNovoID is available at http://proteomics.mcw.edu/denovoid.

  1. ANALYTICAL MODELING OF ELECTRON BACK-BOMBARDMENT INDUCED CURRENT INCREASE IN UN-GATED THERMIONIC CATHODE RF GUNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelen, J. P. [Fermilab; Sun, Y. [Argonne; Harris, J. R. [AFRL, NM; Lewellen, J. W. [Los Alamos Natl. Lab.

    2016-09-28

    In this paper we derive analytical expressions for the output current of an un-gated thermionic cathode RF gun in the presence of back-bombardment heating. We provide a brief overview of back-bombardment theory and discuss comparisons between the analytical back-bombardment predictions and simulation models. We then derive an expression for the output current as a function of the RF repetition rate and discuss relationships between back-bombardment, fieldenhancement, and output current. We discuss in detail the relevant approximations and then provide predictions about how the output current should vary as a function of repetition rate for some given system configurations.

  2. Nanostructuring of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surfaces by low energy Ar{sup +} bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, Noelia; Palacio, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.palacio@uam.es

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ar{sup +} bombardment of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surfaces leads to the formation of an altered layer where the composition is different from that of the bulk. • Ar{sup +} bombardment of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surfaces leads to the formation of short-range hexagonal order nanostructures. • The height of the nanostructures is equal to the thickness of the altered layer produced during bombardment. • There is a close relationship between the nanostructuring of the surface and the altered layer formed during bombardment. - Abstract: The surface modifications undergoing on a Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} surface bombarded with Ar{sup +} have been studied using surface analysis techniques (XPS, ARXPS and AFM). It has been observed that ion bombardment produces an altered layer composed of Ta suboxides as a consequence of the preferential sputtering of oxygen atoms. ARXPS measurements carried out on the bombarded surfaces can be explained using a model in which the altered layer consist of suboxide islands, with coverage 85% and thickness 2.88 nm. Moreover, AFM measurements show that ion bombardment leads to the formation of short-range hexagonal order nanostructures with characteristic parameters fully consistent with those found in ARXPS for the island model, therefore indicating the close relationship between the nanostructuring of the surface and the altered layer formed during bombardment.

  3. The Impact Rate on Solar System Satellites During the Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dones, Henry C. Luke; Levison, H. F.

    2012-10-01

    Nimmo and Korycansky (2012; henceforth NK12) found that if the outer Solar System underwent a Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) in the Nice model, the mass striking the icy satellites at speeds up to tens of km/s would have vaporized so much ice that moons such as Mimas, Enceladus, and Miranda would have been devolatilized. NK12's possible explanations of this apparent discrepancy with observations include (1) the mass influx was a factor of 10 less than that in the Nice model; (2) the mass distribution of the impactors was top-heavy, so that luck might have saved some of the moons from suffering large, vapor-removing impacts; or (3) the inner moons formed after the LHB. NK12 calculated the mass influx onto the satellites from the lunar impact rate estimated by Gomes et al. (2005) and scaling factors calculated by Zahnle et al. (1998, 2003; also see Barr and Canup 2010). Production of vapor in hypervelocity impacts was calculated from Kraus et al. (2011). We are calculating impact rates onto the giant planets and their moons in the context of the "Nice II" model (Levison et al. 2011). We find that NK12's assumed influx is an overestimate, by an amount we are quantifying. We will discuss implications for the origin of icy satellites. We thank the NASA Lunar Science Institute (http://lunarscience.nasa.gov/) for support. Barr, A.C., Canup, R.M., Nature Geoscience 3, 164-167 (2010). Gomes, R., Levison, H.F., Tsiganis, K., Morbidelli, A., Nature 435, 466-469 (2005). Kraus, R.G., Senft, L.E., Stewart, S.T., Icarus 214, 724-738 (2011). Levison, H.F., Morbidelli, A., Tsiganis, K., Nesvorný, D., Gomes, R., Astron. J. 142, article id. 152 (2011). Nimmo, F., Korycansky, D.G., Icarus 219, 508-510 (2012). Zahnle, K., Dones, L., Levison, H.F., Icarus 136, 202-222 (1998). Zahnle, K., Schenk, P., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Icarus 163, 263-289 (2003).

  4. The Black Hole Mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar Dynamical Measurement from Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Onken, Christopher A; Brown, Jonathan S; McGregor, Peter J; Peterson, Bradley M; Bentz, Misty C; Ferrarese, Laura; Pogge, Richard W; Vestergaard, Marianne; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Riffel, Rogemar A

    2014-01-01

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (Mbh) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini NIFS spectrograph. When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how chi-squared is computed--probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the BH mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are Mbh~(3.76+/-1.15)E7 Msun (1-sigma error) and M/L(H-band)~0.34+/-0.03 Msun/Lsun (3-sigma error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our BH mass measurement is consistent with estimates fr...

  5. Fundamental Stellar Parameters with HST/FGS Dynamical Masses and HST/STIS Spectroscopy of M Dwarf Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sergio; Henry, Todd J.; Benedict, George Fritz; Jao, Wei-Chun; White, Russel; RECONS Team

    2017-01-01

    Mass is the most fundamental stellar parameter, and yet model independent dynamical masses can only be obtained for a small subset of closely separated binaries. The high angular resolution needed to characterize individual components of those systems means that little is known about the details of their atmospheric properties. We discuss the results of HST/STIS observations yielding spatially resolved optical spectra for six closely separated M dwarf systems, all of which have HST/FGS precision dynamical masses for the individual components ranging from 0.4 to 0.076 MSol. We assume coevality and equal metallicity for the components of each system and use those constraints to perform stringent tests of the leading atmospheric and evolutionary model families throughout the M dwarf mass range. We find the latest models to be in good agreement with observations. We discuss specific spectral diagnostic features such as the well-known gravity sensitive Na and K lines and address ways to break the temperature-metallicity-gravity degeneracy that often hinders the interpretation of these features. We single out a comparison between the systems GJ 469 AB and G 250-29 AB, which have nearly identical mass configurations but different metallicities, thus causing marked differences in atmospheric properties and overall luminosities.This work is funded by NASA grant HST-GO-12938. and By the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship program through NSF grant AST-1400680.

  6. The black hole mass of NGC 4151. II. Stellar dynamical measurement from near-infrared integral field spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Valluri, Monica; Brown, Jonathan S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); McGregor, Peter J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bentz, Misty C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Office 610, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Vestergaard, Marianne [Dark Cosmology Centre, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Instituto de Física, CP 15051, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Riffel, Rogemar A., E-mail: christopher.onken@anu.edu.au, E-mail: mvalluri@umich.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900 Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-08-10

    We present a revised measurement of the mass of the central black hole (M{sub BH} ) in the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4151. The new stellar dynamical mass measurement is derived by applying an axisymmetric orbit-superposition code to near-infrared integral field data obtained using adaptive optics with the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). When our models attempt to fit both the NIFS kinematics and additional low spatial resolution kinematics, our results depend sensitively on how χ{sup 2} is computed—probably a consequence of complex bar kinematics that manifest immediately outside the nuclear region. The most robust results are obtained when only the high spatial resolution kinematic constraints in the nuclear region are included in the fit. Our best estimates for the black hole mass and H-band mass-to-light ratio are M{sub BH} ∼ 3.76 ± 1.15 × 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} (1σ error) and Y{sub H} ∼ 0.34 ± 0.03 M{sub ☉}/L{sub ☉} (3σ error), respectively (the quoted errors reflect the model uncertainties). Our black hole mass measurement is consistent with estimates from both reverberation mapping (3.57{sub −0.37}{sup +0.45}×10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}) and gas kinematics (3.0{sub −2.2}{sup +0.75}×10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}; 1σ errors), and our best-fit mass-to-light ratio is consistent with the photometric estimate of Y{sub H} = 0.4 ± 0.2 M{sub ☉}/L{sub ☉}. The NIFS kinematics give a central bulge velocity dispersion σ{sub c} = 116 ± 3 km s{sup –1}, bringing this object slightly closer to the M{sub BH}-σ relation for quiescent galaxies. Although NGC 4151 is one of only a few Seyfert 1 galaxies in which it is possible to obtain a direct dynamical black hole mass measurement—and thus, an independent calibration of the reverberation mapping mass scale—the complex bar kinematics makes it less than ideally suited for this purpose.

  7. ANALYSIS OF PASSIVATED SURFACES FOR MASS SPECTROMETER INLET SYSTEMS BY AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajo, H.; Clark, E.

    2010-09-01

    Stainless steel coupons approximately 0.5' in diameter and 0.125' thick were passivated with five different surface treatments and an untreated coupon was left as a control. These surface treatments are being explored for use in tritium storage containers. These coupons were made to allow surface analysis of the surface treatments using well-know surface analysis techniques. Depth profiles using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on these coupons to characterize the surface and near surface regions. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were collected as well. All of the surface treatments studied here appear to change the surface morphology dramatically, as evidenced by lack of tool marks on the treated samples. In terms of the passivation treatment, Vendors A-D appeared to have oxide layers that were very similar in thickness to each other (0.7-0.9 nm thick) as well as the untreated samples (the untreated sample oxide layers appeared to be somewhat larger). Vendor E's silicon coating appears to be on the order of 200 nm thick.

  8. Alteration of the UV-visible reflectance spectra of H2O ice by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, N. J.; Boring, J. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Baragiola, R. A.; Shi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite in the Jovian and Saturnian system exhibit differences in reflectivity between their 'leading' and 'trailing' surfaces which can affect the local vapor pressure. Since these differences are thought to be due to differences in the flux of bombarding magnetospheric ions, the influence of ion impact on the UV-visible reflectance of water ice surfaces (20-90 K) by keV ion bombardment was studied. An observed decrease in reflectance in the UV is attributed to rearrangement processes that affect the physical microstructure and surface 'roughness'. The ratio in reflectance of bombarded to freshly deposited films is compared to the ratio of the reflectance of the leading and trailing hemispheres for Europa and Ganymede.

  9. Alteration of the UV-visible reflectance spectra of H2O ice by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, N. J.; Boring, J. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Baragiola, R. A.; Shi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Satellite in the Jovian and Saturnian system exhibit differences in reflectivity between their 'leading' and 'trailing' surfaces which can affect the local vapor pressure. Since these differences are thought to be due to differences in the flux of bombarding magnetospheric ions, the influence of ion impact on the UV-visible reflectance of water ice surfaces (20-90 K) by keV ion bombardment was studied. An observed decrease in reflectance in the UV is attributed to rearrangement processes that affect the physical microstructure and surface 'roughness'. The ratio in reflectance of bombarded to freshly deposited films is compared to the ratio of the reflectance of the leading and trailing hemispheres for Europa and Ganymede.

  10. Self-heating effect induced by ion bombardment on polycrystalline Al surface nanostructures evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Wang; Y Zhen; H Wjiang; J T Liu

    2012-06-01

    We studied the self-heating effect during ion bombardment process on polycrystalline Al foils. An anisotropic surface morphology evolution has been observed. The adjacent peaks’ fusion along the direction perpendicular to the ion beam projection smoothen the surface. Fusion along the parallel direction has been suppressed due to Ar+ ion bombardment. It attributes to the result of the competition between the isotropic thermal effect, due to the self-heating effect by energy exchange between incident ions and Al surface, and the suppression by continuous ion bombardment with a certain incident angle. Varying the incident ion beam angle with the angular range 32° < < 82°, the ripple wave vector, , is found to be parallel to the ion beam direction, whereas for > 82° , is perpendicular to the beam direction. The critical angle, c, is close to 82°, which is different from Bradley and Harper’s prediction and attributes to the self-heating effect.

  11. The Effect of Diffusion Barrier and Bombardment on Adhesive Strength of CuCr Alloy Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGJian-feng; SONGZhong-xiao; XUKe-wei; WANGYuan

    2004-01-01

    A novel co-sputtering method that combined magnetron sputtering (MS) with ion beam sputtering (IBS) was used to fabricate CuCr alloy films without breaking vacuum after depositing diffusion barrier with IBS. Different bombardment energies were used to improve the comprehensive properties of Cu alloy film. The results indicated that the effects of diffusion barriers and bombardment energy on adhesive strength could be evaluated by a rolling contact fatigue adhesion test. Diffusion barrier can enhance the adhesive strength, and the adhesion of CuCr/CrN was higher than that of CuCr/TiN. When bombarding energy was higher, the adhesive strength of CuCr/TiN films was higher due to the broader transition zone.

  12. Transient gene expression of b-glucuronidase in citrus thin epicotyl transversal sections using particle bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bespalhok Filho João C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to optimize the conditions for transient gene expression through particle bombardment on Carrizo citrange (Citrus sinensis x Poncirus trifoliata thin epicotyl sections. The best conditions for transient GUS expression were: M-25 tungsten particles, 1550 psi helium pressure, 9 cm distance between specimen and DNA/particle holder and culture of explants in a high osmolarity medium (0.2 M mannitol + 0.2 M sorbitol 4 h prior and 20 h after bombardment. Under these conditions, an average of 102 blue spots per bombardment (20 explants/plate were achieved. This protocol is currently being used for transformation of Carrizo citrange and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis.

  13. The influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the secondary ion emission behavior of polymer additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Pijpers, P.; Verlaek, R

    2003-01-15

    The secondary ion (SI) emission behavior of pure polymer systems is meanwhile well understood. However, common plastics not only consist of the polymer host material but also contain a variety of additives normally present in low concentrations only. In order to better understand the parameters governing the SI emission of these trace compounds we performed a systematic study on the influence of the analysis parameters (primary ion (PI) type, PI energy, electron bombardment for charge compensation, etc.) using model systems. Samples were prepared by spin coating (sub)monolayers of Irganox 1010 onto additive-free low density polyethylene (LDPE). The SI parameters yield, disappearance cross-section and efficiency (yield per damaged area) were determined for PI bombardment with Ga{sup +}, Cs{sup +}, and SF{sub 5}{sup +}. Furthermore the damaging influence of electron bombardment for charge compensation on the organic surface layers was investigated.

  14. The influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the secondary ion emission behavior of polymer additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Pijpers, P.; Verlaek, R.

    2003-01-01

    The secondary ion (SI) emission behavior of pure polymer systems is meanwhile well understood. However, common plastics not only consist of the polymer host material but also contain a variety of additives normally present in low concentrations only. In order to better understand the parameters governing the SI emission of these trace compounds we performed a systematic study on the influence of the analysis parameters (primary ion (PI) type, PI energy, electron bombardment for charge compensation, etc.) using model systems. Samples were prepared by spin coating (sub)monolayers of Irganox 1010 onto additive-free low density polyethylene (LDPE). The SI parameters yield, disappearance cross-section and efficiency (yield per damaged area) were determined for PI bombardment with Ga +, Cs +, and SF 5+. Furthermore the damaging influence of electron bombardment for charge compensation on the organic surface layers was investigated.

  15. Nanometer-scale sharpening and surface roughening of ZnO nanorods by argon ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatterjee, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal@iitbbs.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Behera, Akshaya K. [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751013 (India); Banerjee, Amarabha; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Som, Tapobrata [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Ayyub, Pushan, E-mail: pushan@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-07-01

    We report the effects of exposing a hydrothermally grown, single crystalline ZnO nanorod array to a beam of 50 keV argon ions at room temperature. High resolution electron microscopy reveals that the ion bombardment results in a nanometer-scale roughening of the nanorod sidewalls, which were almost atomically flat in the pristine sample. Ion bombardment further causes the flat, Almost-Equal-To 100 nm diameter nanorod tips to get sharpened to ultrafine points less than 10 nm across. While tip sharpening is attributed to preferential sputtering, the formation of crystalline surface protuberances can be ascribed to surface instability due to curvature dependent sputtering and surface diffusion under argon-ion bombardment. Both the nanoscale roughening as well as the tip sharpening are expected to favorably impact a wide variety of applications, such as those involving catalysis, gas sensing, solar cells, field emission and gas discharge.

  16. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Quasars at z~3 and Estimates of Their Supermassive Black Hole Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Yuriko; Minowa, Yosuke; Morokuma, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Minezaki, Takeo; Oi, Nagisa; Nagao, Tohru; Kawatatu, Nozomu; Matsuoka, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of new infrared spectroscopic observations of 37 quasars at z~3, selected based on the optical r'-band magnitude and the availability of nearby bright stars for future imaging follow-up with Adaptive Optics system. The supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses (M_BH) were successfully estimated in 28 out of 37 observed objects from the combination of the H_beta emission linewidth and continuum luminosity at rest-frame 5100A. Comparing these results with those from previous studies of quasars with similar redshift, our sample exhibited slightly lower (~ -0.11 dex in median) Eddington ratios; and, the SMBH masses are slightly (~ 0.38 dex in median) higher. The SMBH growth time, t_grow, was calculated by dividing the estimated SMBH mass by the mass accretion rate measured using optical luminosity. We found, given reasonable assumptions, that t_grow was smaller than the age of the universe at the redshift of individual quasars for a large fraction of observed sources, suggesting that the SMBHs ...

  17. Multi-Object and Long-Slit Spectroscopy of Very Low Mass Brown Dwarfs in Orion Nebular Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Suenaga, Takuya; Kuzuhara, Masayuki; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Ishii, Miki; Lucas, Philip W

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a H- and K-band multi-object and long-slit spectroscopic survey of substellar mass candidates in the outer regions of the Orion Nebula Cluster. The spectra were obtained using MOIRCS on the 8.2-m Subaru telescope and ISLE on the 1.88-m telescope of Okayama Astronomical Observatory. Eight out of twelve spectra show strong water absorptions and we confirm that their effective temperatures are M6) from a chi-square fit to synthetic spectra. We plot our sources on an HR diagram overlaid with theoretical isochrones of low-mass objects and identify three new young brown dwarf candidates. One of the three new candidates is a cool object near the brown dwarf and planetary mass boundary. Based on our observations and those of previous studies, we determine the stellar (0.08 < M/Msun < 1) to substellar (0.03 < M/Msun < 0.08) mass number ratio in the outer regions of the Orion nebular cluster to be 3.5 +/- 0.8. In combination with the number ratio reported for the central region (3...

  18. Structure of [M + H − H2O]+ from Protonated Tetraglycine Revealed by Tandem Mass Spectrometry and IRMPD Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bythell, B. J.; Dain, Ryan P.; Curtice, Stephanie S.; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Groenewold, Gary S.; la Paizs, Bé; van Stipdonk, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation were used to investigate loss of H2O or CH3OH from protonated versions of GGGX (where X = G, A, and V), GGGGG, and the methyl esters of these peptides. In addition, wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation

  19. Masses of the Planetary Nebula Central Stars in the Galactic Globular Cluster System from HST Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, George H.; De Marco, Orsola; Davies, James; Lotarevich, I.; Bond, Howard E.; Harrington, J. Patrick; Lanz, Thierry

    2017-02-01

    The globular cluster (GC) system of our Galaxy contains four planetary nebulae (PNe): K 648 (or Ps 1) in M15, IRAS 18333-2357 in M22, JaFu 1 in Pal 6, and JaFu 2 in NGC 6441. Because single-star evolution at the low stellar mass of present-epoch GCs was considered incapable of producing visible PNe, their origin presented a puzzle. We imaged the PN JaFu 1 with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to obtain photometry of its central star (CS) and high-resolution morphological information. We imaged IRAS 18333-2357 with better depth and resolution, and we analyzed its archival HST spectra to constrain its CS temperature and luminosity. All PNe in Galactic GCs now have quality HST data, allowing us to improve CS mass estimates. We find reasonably consistent masses between 0.53 and 0.58 M ⊙ for all four objects, though estimates vary when adopting different stellar evolutionary calculations. The CS mass of IRAS 18333-2357, though, depends strongly on its temperature, which remains elusive due to reddening uncertainties. For all four objects, we consider their CS and nebula masses, their morphologies, and other incongruities to assess the likelihood that these objects formed from binary stars. Although generally limited by uncertainties (∼0.02 M ⊙) in post-AGB tracks and core mass versus luminosity relations, the high-mass CS in K 648 indicates a binary origin. The CS of JaFu 1 exhibits compact, bright [O iii] and Hα emission, like EGB 6, suggesting a binary companion or disk. Evidence is weaker for a binary origin of JaFu 2. Based, in part, on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained [from the Data Archive] at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-11558.

  20. THE NEXT GENERATION VIRGO CLUSTER SURVEY. IV. NGC 4216: A BOMBARDED SPIRAL IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Ferriere, Etienne [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CNRS/INSU, Universite Paris Diderot, CEA/IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen D. J.; MacArthur, Lauren A. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Mihos, J. Christopher [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Vollmer, Bernd [Observatoire Astronomique, Universite de Strasbourg and CNRS UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Balogh, Michael L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada); Carlberg, Ray G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Durrell, Patrick R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Emsellem, Eric; Michel-Dansac, Leo [Universite de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5574, 9 av. Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval (France); Mei, Simona; Van Driel, Wim, E-mail: sanjaya.paudel@cea.fr [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place J. Janssen, F-92190 Meudon Cedex (France)

    2013-04-20

    group which already ventured toward the central regions of Virgo Cluster. In any case, compared to the other spiral galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, but also to those located in lower density environments, NGC 4216 seems to suffer an unusually heavy bombardment. Further studies will be needed to determine whether, given the surface brightness limit of our survey, about 29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, the number of observed streams around that galaxy is as predicted by cosmological simulations or conversely, whether the possible lack of similar structures in other galaxies poses a challenge to the merger-based model of galaxy mass assembly.

  1. Structure of [M + H - H(2)O](+) from protonated tetraglycine revealed by tandem mass spectrometry and IRMPD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J; Dain, Ryan P; Curtice, Stephanie S; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D; Groenewold, Gary S; Paizs, Béla; Van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2010-04-22

    Multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation were used to investigate loss of H(2)O or CH(3)OH from protonated versions of GGGX (where X = G, A, and V), GGGGG, and the methyl esters of these peptides. In addition, wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation was used to characterize the [M + H - H(2)O](+) product derived from protonated GGGG and the major MS(3) fragment, [M + H - H(2)O - 29](+) of this peak. Consistent with the earlier work [ Ballard , K. D. ; Gaskell , S. J. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 1993 , 4 , 477 - 481 ; Reid , G. E. ; Simpson , R. J. ; O'Hair , R. A. J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 1999 , 190/191 , 209 -230 ], CID experiments show that [M + H - H(2)O](+) is the dominant peak generated from both protonated GGGG and protonated GGGG-OMe. This strongly suggests that the loss of the H(2)O molecule occurs from a position other than the C-terminal free acid and that the product does not correspond to formation of the b(4) ion. Subsequent CID of [M + H - H(2)O](+) supports this proposal by resulting in a major product that is 29 mass units less than the precursor ion. This is consistent with loss of HN horizontal lineCH(2) rather than loss of carbon monoxide (28 mass units), which is characteristic of oxazolone-type b(n) ions. Comparison between experimental and theoretical infrared spectra for a group of possible structures confirms that the [M + H - H(2)O](+) peak is not a substituted oxazolone but instead suggests formation of an ion that features a five-membered ring along the peptide backbone, close to the amino terminus. Additionally, transition structure calculations and comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra of the [M + H - H(2)O - 29](+) peak also support this proposal.

  2. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab: A Quadruple System Spanning the Stellar to Planetary Mass Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2015-10-01

    We present Keck/NIRC2 and OSIRIS near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of 2M0441+2301 AabBab, a young (1-3 Myr) hierarchical quadruple system comprising a low-mass star, two brown dwarfs, and a planetary-mass companion in Taurus. All four components show spectroscopic signs of low surface gravity, and both 2M0441+2301 Aa and Ab possess Paβ emission indicating they each harbor accretion subdisks. Astrometry spanning 2008-2014 reveals orbital motion in both the Aab (0.″23 separation) and Bab (0.″095 separation) pairs, although the implied orbital periods of >300 years mean dynamical masses will not be possible in the near future. The faintest component (2M0441+2301 Bb) has an angular H-band shape, strong molecular absorption (VO, CO, H2O, and FeH), and shallow alkali lines, confirming its young age, late spectral type (L1 ± 1), and low temperature (≈1800 K). With individual masses of {200}-50+100 MJup, 35 ± 5 MJup, 19 ± 3 MJup, and 9.8 ± 1.8 MJup, 2M0441+2301 AabBab is the lowest-mass quadruple system known. Its hierarchical orbital architecture and mass ratios imply that it formed from the collapse and fragmentation of a molecular cloud core, demonstrating that planetary-mass companions can originate from a stellar-like pathway analogous to higher-mass quadruple star systems as first speculated by Todorov et al. More generally, cloud fragmentation may be an important formation pathway for the massive exoplanets that are now regularly being imaged on wide orbits. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  3. Chemotaxonomic studies of nine Paris species from China based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanzhong; Liu, Ehu; Li, Ping

    2017-03-18

    Paris species, which contain steroid saponins, have been used as herb folk medicines in Asia. In the present study, a comprehensive strategy based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was firstly proposed to evaluate the chemotaxonomic relationships of nine Paris species sampled from different geographical regions in China. Principle component analysis (PCA) based on FT-IR data revealed chemical similarities in term of the nine species and geographical regions, indicating the accumulation of metabolites affected by the combination of geographical factors and species. The chemotaxonomic relationships of four species supported the morphological taxonomy and implied ancestry from P. polyphylla. After high-efficiency chromatographic separation, ions trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IT-TOFMS) and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QQQ-MS) were used to identify unknown metabolites and simultaneously determine six key compounds (polyphyllin I, II, V, VI, VII and gracillin) in Paris species, respectively. The tentative identification of 22 steroid saponins was indicative of a common biosynthetic pathway in Paris species. Phytoecdysones, gracillin and open-chain steroid saponins were considered as key precursors. According to Pearson's correlation analysis, an insignificant correlation was found between diosgenin-type and pennogenin-type saponins belonging to the same biosynthetic pathways in the current stage. Our results could provide a reasonable foundation for chemotaxonomy or further studies of Paris species.

  4. Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: Femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Ruaridh; Makhija, Varun; Veyrinas, Kévin; Stolow, Albert; Lee, Jason W. L.; Burt, Michael; Brouard, Mark; Vallance, Claire; Wilkinson, Iain; Lausten, Rune; Hockett, Paul

    2017-07-01

    The Pixel-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) camera allows for 3D charged particle imaging measurements, in which the particle time-of-flight is recorded along with (x, y) position. Coupling the PImMS camera to an ultrafast pump-probe velocity-map imaging spectroscopy apparatus therefore provides a route to time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging, with both high count rates and large dynamic range, thus allowing for rapid measurements of complex photofragmentation dynamics. Furthermore, the use of vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths for the probe pulse allows for an enhanced observation window for the study of excited state molecular dynamics in small polyatomic molecules having relatively high ionization potentials. Herein, preliminary time-resolved multi-mass imaging results from C2F3I photolysis are presented. The experiments utilized femtosecond VUV and UV (160.8 nm and 267 nm) pump and probe laser pulses in order to demonstrate and explore this new time-resolved experimental ion imaging configuration. The data indicate the depth and power of this measurement modality, with a range of photofragments readily observed, and many indications of complex underlying wavepacket dynamics on the excited state(s) prepared.

  5. Sub-Doppler two-photon-excitation Rydberg spectroscopy of atomic xenon: mass-selective studies of isotopic and hyperfine structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Mitsuhiko; He, Yabai; Baldwin, Kenneth G. H.; Orr, Brian J.

    2016-03-01

    Mass-selective sub-Doppler two-photon excitation (TPE) spectroscopy is employed to resolve isotopic contributions for transitions to high-energy Rydberg levels of xenon in an atomic beam, using narrowband pulses of coherent ultraviolet light at 205-213 nm generated by nonlinear-optical conversion processes. Previous research (Kono et al 2013 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 46 35401), has determined isotope energy shifts and hyperfine structure for 33 high-energy Rydberg levels of gas-phase xenon and accessed Rydberg levels at TPE energies in the range of 94 100-97 300 cm-1 with unprecedented spectroscopic resolution. The new isotopic-mass-resolved results were obtained by adding a pulsed free-jet atomic-beam source and a mass-selective time-of-flight detector to the apparatus in order to discern individual xenon isotopes and extract previously unresolved spectroscopic information. Resulting isotope energy shifts and hyperfine-coupling parameters are examined with regard to trends in principal quantum number n and in atomic angular-momentum quantum numbers, together with empirical and theoretical precedents for such trends.

  6. Measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio using a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter for total decay energy spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Andrew S; Bond, Evelyn M; Croce, Mark P; Holesinger, Terry G; Kunde, Gerd J; Rabin, Michael W; Wolfsberg, Laura E; Bennett, Douglas A; Hays-Wehle, James P; Schmidt, Dan R; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel N

    2015-04-07

    We have developed a new category of sensor for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio from aqueous solution samples with advantages over existing methods. Aqueous solution plutonium samples were evaporated and encapsulated inside of a gold foil absorber, and a superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter detector was used to measure the total reaction energy (Q-value) of nuclear decays via heat generated when the energy is thermalized. Since all of the decay energy is contained in the absorber, we measure a single spectral peak for each isotope, resulting in a simple spectral analysis problem with minimal peak overlap. We found that mechanical kneading of the absorber dramatically improves spectral quality by reducing the size of radioactive inclusions within the absorber to scales below 50 nm such that decay products primarily interact with atoms of the host material. Due to the low noise performance of the microcalorimeter detector, energy resolution values of 1 keV fwhm (full width at half-maximum) at 5.5 MeV have been achieved, an order of magnitude improvement over α-spectroscopy with conventional silicon detectors. We measured the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio of two samples and confirmed the results by comparison to mass spectrometry values. These results have implications for future measurements of trace samples of nuclear material.

  7. Combining Fourier transform nuclear quadrupole resonance (FT-NQR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) to study the electronic structure of titanocene dichlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubišta, Jiří; Civiš, Martin; Spaněl, Patrik; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2012-03-21

    A combination of nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy (NQR) and mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to observe trends in electronic structure in three titanocenes: bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium dichloride (η(5)-C(5)H(5))(2)TiCl(2), bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) titanium dichloride (η(5)-C(5)(CH(3))(5))(2)TiCl(2) and dimethylsilylene-bridged ansa bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium dichloride Si(CH(3))(2)(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(2)TiCl(2). Using MS, electron ionisation mass spectra of these compounds are presented within the context of the entire homologous series with one to five methyl groups on each cyclopentadienyl ligand. A dedicated NQR spectrometer was constructed for this study with a sensitivity sufficient to precisely determine the NQR resonant frequency of (35)Cl atoms using 3 g samples of these titanocenes. The observed frequencies are thus 11.784, 11.930 and 10.863 MHz at 298 K. The results demonstrate that NQR using a relatively simple apparatus can be used as a sensitive and cost effective probe into the molecular structure of organometallic chlorides, which complements the information inferred from the mass spectra.

  8. The c2d Spitzer spectroscopy survey of ices around low-mass young stellar objects, III: CH4

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J; Lahuis, Fred; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2008-01-01

    CH4 is proposed to be the starting point of a rich organic chemistry. Solid CH4 abundances have previously been determined mostly toward high mass star forming regions. Spitzer/IRS now provides a unique opportunity to probe solid CH4 toward low mass star forming regions as well. Infrared spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope are presented to determine the solid CH4 abundance toward a large sample of low mass young stellar objects. 25 out of 52 ice sources in the $c2d$ (cores to disks) legacy have an absorption feature at 7.7 um, attributed to the bending mode of solid CH4. The solid CH4 / H2O abundances are 2-8%, except for three sources with abundances as high as 11-13%. These latter sources have relatively large uncertainties due to small total ice column densities. Toward sources with H2O column densities above 2E18 cm-2, the CH4 abundances (20 out of 25) are nearly constant at 4.7+/-1.6%. Correlation plots with solid H2O, CH3OH, CO2 and CO column densities and abundances relative to H2O reveal a closer...

  9. Real-Time Analysis of Individual Airborne Microparticles Using Laser Ablation Mass Spectroscopy and Genetically Trained Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, E.P.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-01-22

    We are developing a method for analysis of airborne microparticles based on laser ablation of individual molecules in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Airborne particles enter the spectrometer through a differentially-pumped inlet, are detected by light scattered from two CW laser beams, and sampled by a pulsed excimer laser as they pass through the center of the ion trap electrodes. After the laser pulse, the stored ions are separated by conventional ion trap methods. The mass spectra are then analyzed using genetically-trained neural networks (NNs). A number of mass spectra are averaged to obtain training cases which contain a recognizable spectral signature. Averaged spectra for a bacteria and a non-bacteria are shown to the NNs, the response evaluated, and the weights of the connections between neurodes adjusted by a Genetic Algorithm (GA) such that the output from the NN ranges from 0 for non-bacteria to 1 for bacteria. This process is iterated until the population of the GA converges or satisfies predetermined stopping criteria. Using this type of bipolar training we have obtained generalizing NNs able to distinguish five new bacteria from five new non-bacteria, none of which were used in training the NN.

  10. Comparison of Se and Te clusters produced by ion bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzyna Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructures based on tellurium and selenium are materials used as components for the manufacturing topological insulators. Therefore it is crucial to precisely characterize these materials. In this work the emission of selenium and tellurium cluster ions, sputtered by Bi+ primary ion guns, was investigated by using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF SIMS. It has been found that BixTex and BixSex clusters appear in addition to Sex and Tex clusters in the mass range up to ~ 1300 m/z. Local maxima or minima (magic numbers are observed in the ion intensity versus a number of atoms per cluster for both positive and negative ions spectra for all types of clusters and primary ions used. These extrema can be attributed to different yield and stability of certain clusters but also to fragmentation of high-mass clusters.

  11. Ion-Bombardment of X-Ray Multilayer Coatings - Comparison of Ion Etching and Ion Assisted Deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puik, E. J.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Zeijlemaker, H.; Verhoeven, J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of two forms of ion bombardment treatment on the reflectivity of multilayer X-ray coatings were compared: ion etching of the metal layers, taking place after deposition, and ion bombardment during deposition, the so-called ion assisted deposition. The ion beam was an Ar+ beam of 200 eV,

  12. Current opportunities and challenges of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and mass spectrometry imaging for mapping cancer metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gigin; Chung, Yuen-Li

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is known to have unique metabolic features such as Warburg effect. Current cancer therapy has moved forward from cytotoxic treatment to personalized, targeted therapies, with some that could lead to specific metabolic changes, potentially monitored by imaging methods. In this paper we addressed the important aspects to study cancer metabolism by using image techniques, focusing on opportunities and challenges of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-MRS, positron emission tomography (PET), and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) for mapping cancer metabolism. Finally, we highlighted the future possibilities of an integrated in vivo PET/MR imaging systems, together with an in situ MSI tissue analytical platform, may become the ultimate technologies for unraveling and understanding the molecular complexities in some aspects of cancer metabolism. Such comprehensive imaging investigations might provide information on pharmacometabolomics, biomarker discovery, and disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment response monitoring for clinical medicine.

  13. OH concentration in an atmospheric-pressure methane-air flame from molecular-beam mass spectrometry and laser-absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattolica, R.J.; Yoon, S.; Knuth, E.L.

    1980-12-01

    The concentration of the OH radical in a stoichiometric methane-air flat flame at atmospheric pressure was measured with both laser-absorption spectroscopy and molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). The nonequilibrium peak OH concentrations and the OH decay rate measured from the two techniques were in good agreement. The OH profile from the MBMS measurements, however, was shifted downstream from the absorption measurements by approximately 5 times the sampling-orifice diameter. A comparison of temperature profiles from thermocouple measurements and from a molecular-beam time-of-flight technique exhibited a similar downstream shift. The MBMS measurements effectively sampled the gas properties approximately five orifice diameters ahead of the sampling-probe tip. Perturbation of the OH concentration profile using various sampling probes indicate the importance of minimizing the length of the sampling-orifice channel to reduce composition relaxation during sampling.

  14. Characterization of gate oxynitrides by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantification of nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, S; Fanciulli, M

    2002-01-01

    We present a methodology for the quantitative estimation of nitrogen in ultrathin oxynitrides by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We consider an innovative approach to TOF-SIMS depth profiling, by elemental distribution of single species as sum of peaks containing such species. This approach is very efficient in overcoming matrix effect arising when quantifying elements were distributed in silicon and silicon oxide. We use XPS to calibrate TOF-SIMS and to obtain quantitative information on nitrogen distribution in oxynitride thin layers. In the method we propose we process TOF-SIMS and XPS data simultaneously to obtain a quantitative depth profile.

  15. Adulteration Identification of Commercial Honey with the C-4 Sugar Content of Negative Values by an Elemental Analyzer and Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Isotope Ratio Mass Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hao; Luo, Donghui; Xian, Yanping; Luo, Haiying; Guo, Xindong; Li, Chao; Zhao, Mouming

    2016-04-27

    According to the AOAC 998.12 method, honey is considered to contain significant C-4 sugars with a C-4 sugar content of >7%, which are naturally identified as the adulteration. However, the authenticity of honey with a C-4 sugar content of sugars (sucrose, glucose, and fructose), δ(2)H and δ(18)O values, sucrose content, and reducing sugar content of honey using an elemental analyzer and liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectroscopy, was first developed to demonstrate the authenticity of honey with a C-4 sugar content of sugar content (%) sugar content (%) sugar content (%) sugars as well. A very strong correlation is also observed between δ(13)C honey values and δ(13)C protein values of both honey groups. For the δ(18)O value, the C-4 sugar content (%) sugar content (%) sugar content of sugar content of <0%.

  16. Elucidation of flavonoids from Carissa congesta, Polyalthia longifolia, and Benincasa hispida plant extracts by hyphenated technique of liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav M Doshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carissa congesta (CC, Polyalthia longifolia (PL, and Benincasa hispida (BH are economically important plants. Objective: Current research encompasses identification of quercetin and rutin and their analogues by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS from the selected plant species. Materials and Methods: Fresh roots, leaves, and seeds of CC, PL, and BH plants respectively were shade-dried followed by extraction and elucidation of rutin and quercetin by LC-MS. Results: Structural elucidation of CC, PL, and BH extracts revealed the presence of flavonoids such as quercetin (m/z 301 and rutin (m/z 610 as the parent ions along with presence of close analogues such as quercetin-O-hexoside, Vicenin 2, quercetin-3-O-xyloside/arabinoside, and quercetin-3-O-glucoside were identified as fragments. Conclusions: Thus, CC, PL, and BH extracts revealed the presence of flavonoids belonging to the class of flavonols such as rutin and quercetin.

  17. Standard test method for the determination of impurities in plutonium metal: acid digestion and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 This Test Method covers the determination of 58 trace elements in plutonium (Pu) metal. The Pu sample is dissolved in acid, and the concentration of the trace impurities are determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). 1.2 This Test Method is specific for the determination of trace impurities in Pu metal. It may be applied to other types of Pu materials, such as Pu oxides, if the samples are dissolved and oxidized to the Pu(IV) state. However, it is the responsibility of the user to evaluate the performance of other matrices. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this method to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use of this standard.

  18. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability.

  19. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HIGH-MASS γ-RAY BINARY 1FGL J1018.6−5856: A PROBABLE NEUTRON STAR PRIMARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Peacock, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Cheung, C. C. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Salinas, Ricardo [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-11-10

    We present medium-resolution optical spectroscopy with the SOAR telescope of the O star secondary of the high-mass γ-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6–5856 to help determine whether the primary is a neutron star or black hole. We find that the secondary has a low radial velocity semi-amplitude of 11–12 km s{sup −1}, with consistent values obtained for H and He absorption lines. This low value strongly favors a neutron star primary: while a black hole cannot be excluded if the system is close to face on, such inclinations are disallowed by the observed rotation of the secondary. We also find the high-energy (X-ray and γ-ray) flux maxima occur when the star is behind the compact object along our line of sight, inconsistent with a simple model of anisotropic inverse Compton scattering for the γ-ray photons.

  20. Investigation of heavy-metal accumulation in selected plant samples using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiová, M.; Kaiser, J.; Novotný, K.; Novotný, J.; Vaculovič, T.; Liška, M.; Malina, R.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2008-12-01

    Single-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were applied for mapping the silver and copper distribution in Helianthus Annuus L. samples treated with contaminant in controlled conditions. For Ag and Cu detection the 328.07 nm Ag(I) and 324.75 nm Cu(I) lines were used, respectively. The LIBS experimental conditions (mainly the laser energy and the observation window) were optimized in order to avoid self-absorption effect in the measured spectra. In the LA-ICP-MS analysis the Ag 107 and Cu 63 isotopes were detected. The capability of these two analytical techniques for high-resolution mapping of selected trace chemical elements was demonstrated.

  1. Gold nanoparticles bridging infra-red spectroscopy and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct analysis of over-the-counter drug and botanical medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Siu-Leung; Tang, Ho-Wai; Ng, Kwan-Ming

    2016-05-05

    With a coating of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and Chinese herbal medicine granules in KBr pellets could be analyzed by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Surface-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). FT-IR spectroscopy allows fast detection of major active ingredient (e.g., acetaminophen) in OTC drugs in KBr pellets. Upon coating a thin layer of AuNPs on the KBr pellet, minor active ingredients (e.g., noscapine and loratadine) in OTC drugs, which were not revealed by FT-IR, could be detected unambiguously using AuNPs-assisted LDI-MS. Moreover, phytochemical markers of Coptidis Rhizoma (i.e. berberine, palmatine and coptisine) could be quantified in the concentrated Chinese medicine (CCM) granules by the SALDI-MS using standard addition method. The quantitative results matched with those determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Being strongly absorbing in UV yet transparent to IR, AuNPs successfully bridged FT-IR and SALDI-MS for direct analysis of active ingredients in the same solid sample. FT-IR allowed the fast analysis of major active ingredient in drugs, while SALDI-MS allowed the detection of minor active ingredient in the presence of excipient, and also quantitation of phytochemicals in herbal granules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tandem Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) and/or Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (LA-ICP-OES) for the analysis of samples of geological interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropeza, D.

    2016-12-01

    A highly innovative laser ablation sampling instrument (J200 Tandem LA - LIBS) that combines the capabilities and analytical benefits of LIBS, LA-ICP-MS and LA-ICP-OES was used for micrometer-scale, spatially-resolved, elemental analysis of a wide variety of samples of geological interest. Data collected using ablation systems consisted of nanosecond (Nd:YAG operated 266nm) and femtosecond lasers (1030 and 343nm). An ICCD LIBS detector and Quadrupole based mass spectrometer were selected for LIBS and ICP-MS detection, respectively. This tandem instrument allows simultaneous determination of major and minor elements (for example, Si, Ca, Na, and Al, and trace elements such as Li, Ce, Cr, Sr, Y, Zn, Zr among others). The research also focused on elemental mapping and calibration strategies, specifically the use of emission and mass spectra for multivariate data analysis. Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) is shown to minimize and compensate for matrix effects in the emission and mass spectra improving quantitative analysis by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS, respectively. The study provides a benchmark to evaluate analytical results for more complex geological sample matrices.

  3. Analysis of cardiac tissue by gold cluster ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyosiova, M.; Chorvatova, A.; Chorvat, D.; Biro, Cs.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Specific molecules in cardiac tissue of spontaneously hypertensive rats are studied by using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The investigation determines phospholipids, cholesterol, fatty acids and their fragments in the cardiac tissue, with special focus on cardiolipin. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid typical for cardiomyocyte mitochondrial membrane and its decrease is involved in pathologic conditions. In the positive polarity, the fragments of phosphatydilcholine are observed in the mass region of 700-850 u. Peaks over mass 1400 u correspond to intact and cationized molecules of cardiolipin. In animal tissue, cardiolipin contains of almost exclusively 18 carbon fatty acids, mostly linoleic acid. Linoleic acid at 279 u, other fatty acids, and phosphatidylglycerol fragments, as precursors of cardiolipin synthesis, are identified in the negative polarity. These data demonstrate that SIMS technique along with Au 3+ cluster primary ion beam is a good tool for detection of higher mass biomolecules providing approximately 10 times higher yield in comparison with Au +.

  4. The influences of plasma ion bombarded on crystallization, electrical and mechanical properties of Zn-In-Sn-O films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.J. [Instrument Center, Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, F.Y., E-mail: fyhung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang, S.J. [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liao, J.D.; Weng, C.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hu, Z.S. [Institute of Microelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, Center for Micro/Nano Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    The quality of co-sputtering derived Zn-In-Sn-O (ZITO) film was adjusted by different gas (oxygen and argon) induced plasma ions bombarding (PIB) treatment. The result showed that the film conductivity could be improved after plasma bombardment. The increment of oxygen vacancies and plasma bombard-induced thermal energy were main reasons. Notably, the efficiency of Ar plasma bombarded for improved conductivity not only was better but also had a smoother surface morphology. Due to Ar ions will not react with metal atoms to form oxide and possessed a higher momentum. In addition, the O-rich layer on the ultra-surface not only was removed but also enhanced film reliability by plasma bombarded that could enhance the performance of optoelectronic devices.

  5. High-Resolution spectroscopy of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-67

    CERN Document Server

    Cottam, J; Brinkman, A C; Den Herder, J M; Erd, Christian

    2001-01-01

    We present initial results from observations of the low-mass X-ray binary EXO 0748-67 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on board the XMM-Newton Observatory. The spectra exhibit discrete structure due to absorption and emission from ionized neon, oxygen, and nitrogen. We use the quantitative constraints imposed by the spectral features to develop an empirical model of the circumsource material. This consists of a thickened accretion disk with emission and absorption in the plasma orbiting high above the binary plane. This model presents challenges to current theories of accretion in X-ray binary systems.

  6. Sub-ppm laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and a CPT-violation limit on the antiprotonic charge and mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, M; Eades, J; Hayano, R S; Ishikawa, T; Sakaguchi, J; Widmann, E; Yamaguchi, H; Torii, H A; Juhász, B; Horváth, D; Yamazaki, T

    2001-08-27

    Six laser-resonant transitions have been detected in metastable antiprotonic helium atoms produced at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. They include UV transitions from the last metastable states in the v = n-l-1 = 0 and 1 cascades. Zero-density frequencies were obtained from measured pressure shifts with fractional precisions between 1.3 x 10(-7) and 1.6 x 10(-6). By comparing these with QED calculations and the antiproton cyclotron frequency, we deduce that the antiproton and proton charges and masses agree to within 6 x 10(-8) with a confidence level of 90%.

  7. L-band Spectroscopy with Magellan-AO/Clio2: First Results on Young Low-mass Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jordan M.; Eisner, Josh; Skemer, Andy; Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hinz, Phil; Puglisi, Alfio

    2016-09-01

    L-band spectroscopy is a powerful probe of cool low-gravity atmospheres: the P, Q, and R branch fundamental transitions of methane near 3.3 μm provide a sensitive probe of carbon chemistry; cloud thickness modifies the spectral slope across the band; and {{{H}}}3+ opacity can be used to detect aurorae. Many directly imaged gas-giant companions to nearby young stars exhibit L-band fluxes distinct from the field population of brown dwarfs at the same effective temperature. Here we describe commissioning the L-band spectroscopic mode of Clio2, the 1-5 μm instrument behind the Magellan adaptive-optics system. We use this system to measure L-band spectra of directly imaged companions. Our spectra are generally consistent with the parameters derived from previous near-infrared spectra for these late M to early L type objects. Therefore, deviations from the field sequence are constrained to occur below 1500 K. This range includes the L-T transition for field objects and suggests that observed discrepancies are due to differences in cloud structure and CO/CH4 chemistry.

  8. L-band Spectroscopy with Magellan-AO/Clio2: First Results on Young Low-Mass Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Jordan M; Skemer, Andy; Morzinski, Katie M; Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Rodigas, Timothy J; Hinz, Phil; Puglisi, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    L-band spectroscopy is a powerful probe of cool low-gravity atmospheres: The P, Q, and R branch fundamental transitions of methane near 3.3 $\\mu$m provide a sensitive probe of carbon chemistry; cloud thickness modifies the spectral slope across the band; and H$_{3}^{+}$ opacity can be used to detect aurorae. Many directly imaged gas-giant companions to nearby young stars exhibit L-band fluxes distinct from the field population of brown dwarfs at the same effective temperature. Here we describe commissioning the L-band spectroscopic mode of Clio2, the 1-5 $\\mu$m instrument behind the Magellan adaptive-optics system. We use this system to measure L-band spectra of directly imaged companions. Our spectra are generally consistent with the parameters derived from previous near-infrared spectra for these late M to early L type objects. Therefore, deviations from the field sequence are constrained to occur below 1500 K. This range includes the L-T transition for field objects and suggests that observed discrepancies...

  9. Photon emission produced by Kr{sup +} ions bombardment of Cr and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boujlaidi, A. El, E-mail: a.elboujlaidi@uca.ma [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Hammoum, K. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Jadoual, L.; Jourdani, R. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ait El Fqih, M. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco); Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Arts et Métiers (ENSAM), Université Hassan II Mohammedia – Casablanca (Morocco); Aouchiche, H. [Laboratoire de Mécanique, Structures et Energétique, Université Mouloud Mammeri de Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Kaddouri, A. [Equipe de Spectroscopie and Imagerie Atomiques des Matériaux, Université Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2015-01-15

    The sputter induced photon spectroscopy technique was used to study the luminescence spectra of the species sputtered from chromium powder and its oxide Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, during 5 keV Kr{sup +} ions bombardment in vacuum better than 10{sup −7} torr. The optical spectra recorded between 350 and 470 nm exhibit discrete lines which are attributed to neutral excited atoms of chromium (Cr I lines). The experiments are also performed under 10{sup −5} torr ultra pure oxygen partial pressure. The results demonstrate that the measured intensities of the emitted photons are always higher in the presence of oxygen and even higher than those obtained for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target. In the presence of oxygen vapor we assume that an oxide film is formed on the chromium surface which is responsible of the increase of photon emission. This variation in the intensities is correctly explained in the model of electron transfer processes between the excited sputtered atom and the bombarded surface. This model suggests that the structure formed on the Cr surface in the case of oxygenated chromium is closer to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

  10. Transgene organisation in potato after particle bombardment-mediated (co-) transformation using plasmids and gene cassettes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romano, A.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Bernardi, J.; Visser, R.G.F.; Mooibroek, A.

    2003-01-01

    Protocols for efficient co-transformation of potato internodes with genes contained in separate plasmids or gene cassettes (i.e., linear PCR fragments comprising a promoter-gene-terminator) using particle bombardment were established. Twenty-eight out of 62 (45%) and 11 out of 65 (17%) plants transf

  11. Particle bombardment and the genetic enhancement of crops: myths and realities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altpeter, F.; Baisakh, N.; Beachy, R.; Bock, R.; Capell, T.; Christou, P.; Daniell, H.; Datta, K.; Datta, S.; Dix, P.J.; Fauquet, C.; Huang, N.; Kohli, A.; Mooibroek, H.; Nicholson, L.; Nguyen, T.T.; Nugent, G.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Romano, A.; Somers, D.A.; Stoger, E.; Taylor, N.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2005-01-01

    DNA transfer by particle bombardment makes use of physical processes to achieve the transformation of crop plants. There is no dependence on bacteria, so the limitations inherent in organisms such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens do not apply. The absence of biological constraints, at least until DNA ha

  12. Direct and Recoil-Induced Electron Emission from Ion-Bombarded Solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmen, G.; Svensson, B.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1979-01-01

    atoms. The direct contribution, which has been treated by several authors in previous studies, shows a behavior that is determined primarily by the electronic stopping power of the bombarding ion, while the indirect contribution is nonproportionally related to the nuclear stopping power. This latter...

  13. Orienterende Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB) experimenten met de VG-70-SQ massaspectrometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hove GJ ten; Boer AC den; Burgers PC; Jong APJM de

    1988-01-01

    Eerste orienterende metingen met fast atom bombardment (FAB) ionisatietechniek zijn uitgevoerd. De techniek werd toegepast bij de analyse van korte-keten polypeptiden (n=2-5), cyclosporine, NADP en microperoxidase. Onderzocht werd de invloed van de aard van de matrix (glycerol, thioglycerol) op

  14. Erosion of lithium coatings on TZM molybdenum and graphite during high-flux plasma bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abrams, T.; Jaworski, M. A.; Kaita, R.; Stotler, D. P.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; van den Berg, M. A.; van der Meiden, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The rate at which Li films will erode under plasma bombardment in the NSTX-U divertor is currently unknown. It is important to characterize this erosion rate so that the coatings can be replenished before they are completely depleted. An empirical formula for the Li erosion rate as a

  15. Theoretical simulations of atomic and polyatomic bombardment of an organic overlayer on a metallic substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Krantzman, K D; Delcorte, A; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Our previous molecular dynamics simulations on initial test systems have laid the foundation for understanding some of the effects of polyatomic bombardment. In this paper, we describe simulations of the bombardment of a more realistic model system, an overlayer of sec-butyl-terminated polystyrene tetramers on a Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace substrate. We have used this model system to study the bombardment with Xe and SF sub 5 projectiles at kinetic energies ranging from 0.50 to 5.0 keV. SF sub 5 sputters more molecules than Xe, but a higher percentage of these are damaged rather than ejected intact when the bombarding energy is greater than 0.50 keV. Therefore, at energies comparable to experimental values, the efficiency, measured as the yield-to-damage ratio, is greater with Xe than SF sub 5. Stable and intact molecules are generally produced by upward moving substrate atoms, while fragments are produced by the upward and lateral motion of reflected projectile atoms and fragments from the target molecul...

  16. Particle Bombardment of Ex Vivo Skin to Deliver DNA and Express Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokol, Ena; Nijenhuis, Miranda; Sjollema, Klaas A; Jonkman, Marcel F; Pas, Hendri H; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2017-01-01

    Particle bombardment of gold microparticles coated with plasmids, which are accelerated to high velocity, is used for transfection of cells within tissue. Using this method, cDNA encoding proteins of interest introduced into ex vivo living human skin enables studying of proteins of interest in real

  17. Modified morphology of graphene sheets by Argon-atom bombardment: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao-Lin; Zhang, Kai-Wang; Wang, Ru-Zhi; Liu, Wen-Liang; Zhong, Jian-Xin

    2011-12-01

    By a molecular dynamics method, we simulated the process of Argon-atom bombardment on a graphene sheet with 2720 carbon atoms. The results show that, the damage of the bombardment on the graphene sheet depends not only on the incident energy but also on the particle flux density of Argon atoms. To compare and analyze the effect of the incident energy and the particle flux density in the Argon-atom bombardment, we defined the impact factor on graphene sheet by calculating the broken-hole area. The results indicate that, there is an exponential accumulated-damage for the impact of both the incident energy and the particle flux density and there is a critical incident energy ranging from 20-30 eV/atom in Argon-atom bombardment. Different configurations, such as sieve-like and circle-like graphene can be formed by controlling of different particle flux density as the incident energy is more than the critical value. Our results supply a feasible method on fabrication of porous graphene-based materials for gas-storages and molecular sieves, and it also helps to understand the damage mechanism of graphene-based electronic devices under high particle radiation.

  18. Mass spectrometry and /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of compounds modeling the glycopeptide linkage of glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumberg, K.; Bush, C.A.

    1982-01-15

    The properties of several compounds useful as models for three-dimensional conformational studies and the investigation of the chemical degradation of glycopeptide linkages both of the N- and O-glycosidic type are described. Using the method of differential chemical shift in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O as solvents, the carbon NMR spectrum of N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine, 1-N-acetyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranosylamine, and 1-N-acetyl-2-acetamido-..beta..-D-glycopyranosylamine has been assigned. Electron impact mass spectra of the peracetylated derivatives of the latter two compounds show a peak apparently unique to glycopyranosylamides at m/e = 269, no analog of which is observed in the mass spectra of other peracetylated sugars. As models of the ..cap alpha..-O-glycosidic linkage, fully assigned carbon NMR spectra of ..cap alpha..-methyl-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), ..cap alpha..-methyl-3-O-methyl GalNAc, and -GlcNAc as well as the disaccharide Glc-..beta..-l ..-->.. 3 GalNAc are reported. Because certain anomalies in the chemical shifts and /sup 1/J/sub CH/ observed in the disaccharide and in O-glycosylated glycoproteins are not observed in the simple model compounds, they may result from conformational interactions in the glycopeptides.

  19. Spectroscopy of brown dwarf candidates in IC 348 and the determination of its substellar IMF down to planetary masses

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, C Alves; Bouvier, J; Duchene, G; Bouy, H; Maschberger, T; Hudelot, P

    2012-01-01

    Context. Brown dwarfs represent a sizable fraction of the stellar content of our Galaxy and populate the transition between the stellar and planetary mass regime. There is however no agreement on the processes responsible for their formation. Aims. We have conducted a large survey of the young, nearby cluster IC 348, to uncover its low-mass brown dwarf population and study the cluster properties in the substellar regime. Methods. Deep optical and near-IR images taken with MegaCam and WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) were used to select photometric candidate members. A spectroscopic follow-up of a large fraction of the candidates was conducted to assess their youth and membership. Results. We confirmed spectroscopically 16 new members of the IC 348 cluster, including 13 brown dwarfs, contributing significantly to the substellar census of the cluster, where only 30 brown dwarfs were previously known. Five of the new members have a L0 spectral type, the latest-type objects found to date in thi...

  20. Orbital parameters, masses and distance to Beta Centauri determined with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer and high resolution spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, J; Seneta, E B; Tango, W J; Booth, A J; O'Byrne, J W; Thorvaldson, E D; Ausseloos, M; Aerts, C; Uytterhoeven, K

    2004-01-01

    The bright southern binary star beta Centauri (HR 5267) has been observed with the Sydney University Stellar Interferometer (SUSI) and spectroscopically with the ESO CAT and Swiss Euler telescopes at La Silla. The interferometric observations have confirmed the binary nature of the primary component and have enabled the determination of the orbital parameters of the system. At the observing wavelength of 442 nm the two components of the binary system have a magnitude difference of 0.15. The combination of interferometric and spectroscopic data gives the following results: orbital period 357 days, semi-major axis 25.30 mas, inclination 67.4 degrees, eccentricity 0.821, distance 102.3 pc, primary and secondary masses M1 = M2 = 9.1 solar masses and absolute visual magnitudes of the primary and secondary M1V = -3.85 and M2V = -3.70. The high accuracy of the results offers a fruitful starting point for future asteroseismic modelling of the pulsating binary components.

  1. Microanalysis of Ar and He bombarded biomedical polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manso Silvan, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: miguel.manso@uam.es; Gago, R. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Valsesia, A. [European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy); Climent Font, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Duart, J.M. Martinez [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Rossi, F. [European Commission, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via Enrico Fermi, 21020 Ispra (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Implantations onto polyethyleneglycol, polycaprolactone and polymethylmethacrylate, carried out with Ar and He ions at 25 and 100 KeV with fluences of 5 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, have been made with identical ion currents (20 {mu}A) but different sweep areas in order to take into account the effect of the ion flux on the composition and structure of these biopolymers. Vibrational (Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy), microanalytical (Rutherford backscattering and energy recoil detection) and microscopic techniques (atomic force microscopy) confirm that, even in this low fluence regime, the ion flux effect is responsible of scaled modifications. More interestingly, these techniques indicate that the damage seems to be higher for He. All these factors suggest that He could be preferentially used to engineer biomedical polymers exploiting the tailoring opportunities offered by ion flux effects.

  2. Comparative gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of essential oils extracted using 4 methods from the leaves of Eucalyptus globulus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eucalyptus globulus L. (family, Myrtaceae is one of the world′s most widely planted genera. E. globulus L., commonly referred to as Tasmanian blue gum, is a fast growing, evergreen tree, native to Tasmania and South-East Australia. Apart from its extensive use in pulp industry, it is also produces Oleum Eucalypti (eucalyptus oil that is extracted on commercial scale in many countries such as China, India, South Africa, Portugal, Brazil, and Tasmania, as a raw material in perfumery, cosmetics, food beverage, aromatherapy, and phytotherapy. Materials and Methods: Traditional hydrodistillation (HD, solvent extraction (SE, ultrasonication (US, and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE were conducted for the extraction of essential oil from the leaves of E. globulus. Each oil was evaluated in terms of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPTLC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR fingerprinting with qualitative and semi-quantitative composition of the isolated essential oil by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GCMS, the extract yield of essential oil was 2.60%, 2.2%, 2.0%, and 3.6% v/w, respectively, for HD, SE, US, and SFE. Results: A total of 53 compounds were identified by GCMS. Comparative analysis indicated that SFE was favorable for extraction of monoterpene hydrocarbon, sesquiterpene hydrocarbon, and oxygenated sesquiterpene hydrocarbon. HD, SE, and US had certain advantages in the extraction of aliphatic saturated hydrocarbons organic acid and esters. Overlay, FTIR spectra of oil samples obtained by four extraction methods were superimposed with each other showing similar components. The maximum separation of compound seen at 254 nm and lesser at 366 nm by HPTLC fingerprinting which again showed superimposed chromatograms. Conclusion: It is concluded that different extraction method may lead to different yields of essential oils where the choice of appropriate method is very important to obtained more desired

  3. Mapping of magnesium and of different protein fragments in sea urchin teeth via secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robach, J S; Stock, S R; Veis, A

    2006-07-01

    Mature portions of sea urchin are comprised of a complex array of reinforcing elements yet are single crystals of high and very high Mg calcite. How a relatively poor structural material (calcite) can produce mechanically competent structures is of great interest. In teeth of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus, we recorded high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) maps of Mg, Ca ,and specific amino acid fragments of mineral-related proteins including aspartic acid (Asp). SIMS revealed strong colocalization of Asp residues with very high Mg. Demineralized specimens showed serine localization on membranes between crystal elements and reduced Mg and aspartic acid signals, further emphasizing colocalization of very high Mg with ready soluble Asp-rich protein(s). The association of Asp with nonequilibrium, very high magnesium calcite provides insight to the makeup of the macromolecules involved in the growth of two different composition calcites and the fundamental process of biomineralization.

  4. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of 2-hydroxypyridine

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, D H; Choi, K W; Choi, Y S; Kim, S K

    2002-01-01

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectra of 2-hydroxypyridines existing as lactims (2-pyridionl) in a molecular beam are obtained via (1+1') two-photon process to give accurate ionization energies of 8.9344 +- 0.0005 and 8.9284 +- 0.0005 eV for 2-pyridinol (2Py-OH) and its deuterated analogue (2Py-OD), respectively. Resonantly-enhanced two-photon ionization spectra of these compounds are also presented to give vibrational structures of their S sub 1 states. Vibrational frequencies of 2Py-OH and 2Py-OD in ionic ground states are accurately determined from MATI spectra taken via various S sub 1 intermediate states, and associated vibrational modes are assigned with the aid of ab initio calculations.

  5. A New Method for Characterizing Very-Low-Mass Companions with Low Resolution Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Emily L; Zimmerman, Neil; Roberts, Lewis C; Hinkley, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    We present a new and computationally efficient method for characterizing very low mass companions using low resolution ($R\\sim$30) near-infrared ($YJH$) spectra from high contrast imaging campaigns with integral field spectrograph (IFS) units. We conduct a detailed quantitative comparison of the efficacy of this method through tests on simulated data comparable in spectral coverage and resolution to the currently operating direct imaging systems around the world. In particular, we simulate Project 1640 data as an example of the use, accuracy, and precision of this technique. We present results from comparing simulated spectra of M, L, and T dwarfs with a large and finely-sampled grid of synthetic spectra using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques. We determine the precision and accuracy of effective temperature and surface gravity inferred from fits to PHOENIX dusty and cond, which we find reproduce the low-resolution spectra of all objects within the adopted flux uncertainties. Uncertainties in effective temp...

  6. Connecting the dots: a correlation between ionizing radiation and cloud mass-loss rate traced by optical integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A. F.; Gritschneder, M.; Dale, J. E.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Preibisch, T.; Ramsay, S.; Reiter, M.; Testi, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionized gas, study the ionization fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionized jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip, we determine the incident ionizing photon flux Q0, pil originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate dot{M} of the pillar tips due to photoevaporation caused by the incident ionizing radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M16, and with a total of 10 analysed pillars, find tight correlations between the ionizing photon flux and the electron density, the electron density and the distance from the ionizing sources, and the ionizing photon flux and the mass-loss rate. The combined MUSE data sets of pillars in regions with different physical conditions and stellar content therefore yield an empirical quantification of the feedback effects of ionizing radiation. In agreement with models, we find that dot{M}∝ Q_0,pil^{1/2}.

  7. The stellar initial mass function in red-sequence galaxies: 1-micron spectroscopy of Coma Cluster galaxies with Subaru/FMOS

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Russell J; Carter, David

    2012-01-01

    To investigate possible variations in the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in red-sequence galaxies, we have obtained infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/FMOS for a sample of 92 red-sequence galaxies in the Coma cluster. Velocity dispersions, ages and element abundances for these galaxies have been previously determined from optical data. By stacking the FMOS spectra in the rest frame, removing sky-subtraction residuals and other artefacts fixed in the observed frame, we derive composite spectra in the 9600-10500 Angstrom range for galaxies grouped according to their velocity dispersion or Mg/Fe ratio. We measure the Wing-Ford band of FeH and a new index centred on a CaI line at 10345 Angstrom; these features are strong in cool dwarf stars, and hence reflect the form of the IMF at low mass (<0.5M_sun) The CaI line, unlike the Wing-Ford band and other `classical' IMF indicators (NaI doublet, CaII triplet), is unaffected by the abundance of sodium. We compare the measured indices against predictions from sp...

  8. Product mass transfer resistance directly determined during freeze-drying cycle runs using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and pore diffusion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuu, Wei Y; O'Bryan, Kevin R; Hardwick, Lisa M; Paul, Timothy W

    2011-08-01

    The pore diffusion model is used to express the dry layer mass transfer resistance, [Formula: see text], as a function of the ratio r(e)/?, where r(e) is the effective pore radius and ? is the tortuosity factor of the dry layer. Using this model, the effective pore radius of the dry layer can be estimated from the sublimation rate and product temperature profiles measured during primary drying. Freeze-drying cycle runs were performed using the LyoStar II dryer (FTS Systems), with real-time sublimation rate profiles during freeze drying continuously measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The formulations chosen for demonstration of the proposed approach include 5% mannitol, 5% sucrose, 5% lactose, 3% mannitol plus 2% sucrose, and a parenteral nutrition formulation denoted VitaM12. The three different methods used for determination of the product resistance are: (1) Using both the sublimation rate and product temperature profiles, (2) using the sublimation rate profile alone, and (3) using the product temperate profile alone. Unlike the second and third methods, the computation procedure of first method does not need solution of the complex heat and mass transfer equations.

  9. The mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relations at z>2 using VLT and Subaru near-infrared spectroscopy of zCOSMOS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, C; Ziegler, B; Contini, T; Montero, E Perez; Peng, Y; Balestra, I

    2014-01-01

    In the local universe, there is good evidence that, at a given stellar mass M, the gas-phase metallicity Z is anti-correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies. It has also been claimed that the resulting Z(M,SFR) relation is invariant with redshift - the so-called Fundamental Metallicity Relation (FMR). Given a number of difficulties in determining metallicities, especially at higher redshifts, the form of the Z(M,SFR) relation and whether it is really independent of redshift is still very controversial. To explore this issue at z>2, we used VLT-SINFONI and Subaru-MOIRCS near-infrared spectroscopy of 20 zCOSMOS-deep galaxies at 2.12 galaxies of a given mass have much higher SFRs than the local SDSS galaxies. We find that the zCOSMOS galaxies are consistent with a non-evolving FMR if we use the physically-motivated formulation of the Z(M,SFR) relation from Lilly et al. (2003), but not if we use the empirical formulation of Mannucci et al. (2010).

  10. Elemental and molecular analysis of metal containing biomolecules using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and sonic spray ionization mass spectrometry: A step towards full integration and simultaneous analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmatakis, Konstantinos; Pergantis, Spiros A.; Anglos, Demetrios

    2016-12-01

    A novel methodology is proposed that combines sonic spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS) with laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analyzing metal-containing biomolecules and complexes. Focusing pulses from a nanosecond laser (Nd:YAG, λ = 1064 nm) in the microdroplet ensemble produced by a pneumatic nebulizer yielded LIBS spectra that enabled highly sensitive detection of several metal ions in aqueous and aqueous methanolic solutions. Based on the calibration curve method, LOD values at the ng/mL level were achieved for Ca (15 ng/mL), Ba (27 ng/mL), Cu (67 ng/mL) and Fe (650 ng/mL) with accuracy > 90%. LIBS measurements were performed for the first time on aerosols of solutions of known biomolecules such as superoxide dismutase and alpha-lactalbumin, which led to the reliable determination of the concentration of Cu and Ca, respectively, both in the range of a few μg/mL. In parallel, the relative molecular mass of the metalloproteins was determined by separate SSI-MS measurements performed using an identical pneumatic nebulizer based sample introduction system. This is a first step towards the ultimate aim of integrating the two analytical techniques by use of a single pneumatic nebulization system for simultaneous sample introduction for both LIBS and SSI-MS. Such a system is expected to greatly enhance our capabilities to simultaneously acquire molecular and atomic data.

  11. The mass-metallicity and fundamental metallicity relations at z > 2 using very large telescope and Subaru near-infrared spectroscopy of zCOSMOS galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, C.; Ziegler, B. L. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Lilly, S. J.; Peng, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Contini, T. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, CNRS, 14 avenue Édouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Pérez Montero, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apartado de Correos 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Balestra, I., E-mail: christian.maier@univie.ac.at [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85741 Garching b. München (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    In the local universe, there is good evidence that, at a given stellar mass M, the gas-phase metallicity Z is anti-correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies. It has also been claimed that the resulting Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with redshift—the so-called 'fundamental metallicity relation' (FMR). Given a number of difficulties in determining metallicities, especially at higher redshifts, the form of the Z(M, SFR) relation and whether it is really independent of redshift is still very controversial. To explore this issue at z > 2, we used VLT-SINFONI and Subaru-MOIRCS near-infrared spectroscopy of 20 zCOSMOS-deep galaxies at 2.1 < z < 2.5 to measure the strengths of up to five emission lines: [O II] λ3727, Hβ, [O III] λ5007, Hα, and [N II] λ6584. This near-infrared spectroscopy enables us to derive O/H metallicities, and also SFRs from extinction corrected Hα measurements. We find that the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) of these star-forming galaxies at z ≈ 2.3 is lower than the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) MZR by a factor of three to five, a larger change than found by Erb et al. using [N II]/Hα-based metallicities from stacked spectra. We discuss how the different selections of the samples and metallicity calibrations used may be responsible for this discrepancy. The galaxies show direct evidence that the SFR is still a second parameter in the MZR at these redshifts. However, determining whether the Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with epoch depends on the choice of extrapolation used from local samples, because z > 2 galaxies of a given mass have much higher SFRs than the local SDSS galaxies. We find that the zCOSMOS galaxies are consistent with a non-evolving FMR if we use the physically motivated formulation of the Z(M, SFR) relation from Lilly et al., but not if we use the empirical formulation of Mannucci et al.

  12. The Mass-Metallicity and Fundamental Metallicity Relations at z > 2 Using Very Large Telescope and Subaru Near-infrared Spectroscopy of zCOSMOS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, C.; Lilly, S. J.; Ziegler, B. L.; Contini, T.; Pérez Montero, E.; Peng, Y.; Balestra, I.

    2014-09-01

    In the local universe, there is good evidence that, at a given stellar mass M, the gas-phase metallicity Z is anti-correlated with the star formation rate (SFR) of the galaxies. It has also been claimed that the resulting Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with redshift—the so-called "fundamental metallicity relation" (FMR). Given a number of difficulties in determining metallicities, especially at higher redshifts, the form of the Z(M, SFR) relation and whether it is really independent of redshift is still very controversial. To explore this issue at z > 2, we used VLT-SINFONI and Subaru-MOIRCS near-infrared spectroscopy of 20 zCOSMOS-deep galaxies at 2.1 extinction corrected Hα measurements. We find that the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) of these star-forming galaxies at z ≈ 2.3 is lower than the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) MZR by a factor of three to five, a larger change than found by Erb et al. using [N II]/Hα-based metallicities from stacked spectra. We discuss how the different selections of the samples and metallicity calibrations used may be responsible for this discrepancy. The galaxies show direct evidence that the SFR is still a second parameter in the MZR at these redshifts. However, determining whether the Z(M, SFR) relation is invariant with epoch depends on the choice of extrapolation used from local samples, because z > 2 galaxies of a given mass have much higher SFRs than the local SDSS galaxies. We find that the zCOSMOS galaxies are consistent with a non-evolving FMR if we use the physically motivated formulation of the Z(M, SFR) relation from Lilly et al., but not if we use the empirical formulation of Mannucci et al. AND SUBARU

  13. Combining single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy to evaluate the release of colloidal arsenic from environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Bolea, Eduardo; O'Day, Peggy A; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Garrido, Fernando; Laborda, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Detection and sizing of natural colloids involved in the release and transport of toxic metals and metalloids is essential to understand and model their environmental effects. Single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) was applied for the detection of arsenic-bearing particles released from mine wastes. Arsenic-bearing particles were detected in leachates from mine wastes, with a mass-per-particle detection limit of 0.64 ng of arsenic. Conversion of the mass-per-particle information provided by SP-ICP-MS into size information requires knowledge of the nature of the particles; therefore, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to identify scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) as the main species in the colloidal particles isolated by ultrafiltration. The size of the scorodite particles detected in the leachates was below 300-350 nm, in good agreement with the values obtained by TEM. The size of the particles detected by SP-ICP-MS was determined as the average edge of scorodite crystals, which show a rhombic dipyramidal form, achieving a size detection limit of 117 nm. The combined use of SP-ICP-MS and XAS allowed detection, identification, and size determination of scorodite particles released from mine wastes, suggesting their potential to transport arsenic. Graphical abstract Analytical approach for the detection and size characterization of As-bearing particles by SP-ICP-MS and XAS in environmental samples.

  14. Irradiation damage simulation of Zircaloy-4 using argon ions bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dequan Peng; Xinde Bai; Feng Pan

    2008-01-01

    To simulate irradiation damage, argon ion was implanted in the Zircaloy-4 with the fluence ranging from 1×1016 to 1×1017 cm-2, using accelerating implanter at an extraction voltage of 190 kV and liquid nitrogen temperature. Then the influence of argon ion implantation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of Zircaloy-4 was studied. The valence states of elements in the surface layer of the samples wcrc analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Transmission clcctron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the microstructure of the argon-implanted samples. The potentiodynamic polarization technique was employed to evaluate the aqueous corrosion resistance of implanted Zircaloy-4 in 1 mol/L H2SO4 solution. It is found that there appear bubbles on the surface of the samples when the argon flucncc is 1×1016 cm-2. The microstructure of argon-implanted samples changes from amor-phous to partial amorphous, then to polycrystallinc, and again to amorphous. The corrosion resistance of implanted samples linearly declines with the increase of flucnce approximately, which is attributed to the linear increase of the irradiation damage.

  15. Quantification of anandamide, oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide in rodent brain tissue using high performance liquid chromatography–electrospray mass spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Liput

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Reported concentrations for endocannabinoids and related lipids in biological tissues can vary greatly; therefore, methods used to quantify these compounds need to be validated. This report describes a method to quantify anandamide (AEA, oleoylethanolamide (OEA and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA from rodent brain tissue. Analytes were extracted using acetonitrile without further sample clean up, resolved on a C18 reverse-phase column using a gradient mobile phase and detected using electrospray ionization in positive selected ion monitoring mode on a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method produced high recovery rates for AEA, OEA and PEA, ranging from 98.1% to 106.2%, 98.5% to 102.2% and 85.4% to 89.5%, respectively. The method resulted in adequate sensitivity with a lower limit of quantification for AEA, OEA and PEA of 1.4 ng/mL, 0.6 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. The method was reproducible as intraday and interday accuracies and precisions were under 15%. This method was suitable for quantifying AEA, OEA and PEA from rat brain following pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase.

  16. Origin of the hot gas in low-mass protostars: Herschel-PACS spectroscopy of HH 46

    CERN Document Server

    van Kempen, T A; Herczeg, G J; Visser, R; van Dishoeck, E F; Wampfler, S F; Bruderer, S; Benz, A O; Doty, S D; Brinch, C; Hogerheijde, M R; Jørgensen, J K; Tafalla, M; Neufeld, D; Bachiller, R; Baudry, A; Benedettini, M; Bergin, E A; Bjerkeli, P; Blake, G A; Bontemps, S; Braine, J; Caselli, P; Cernicharo, J; Codella, C; Daniel, F; di Giorgio, A M; Dominik, C; Encrenaz, P; Fich, M; Fuente, A; Giannini, T; Goicoechea, J R; de Graauw, Th; Helmich, F; Herpin, F; Jacq, T; Johnstone, D; Kaufman, M J; Larsson, B; Lis, D; Liseau, R; Marseille, M; McCoey, C; Melnick, G; Nisini, B; Olberg, M; Parise, B; Pearson, J C; Plume, R; Risacher, C; Santiago-Garcia, J; Saraceno, P; Shipman, R; van der Tak, F; Wyrowski, F; Yildiz, U A; Ciechanowicz, M; Dubbeldam, L; Glenz, S; Huisman, R; Lin, R H; Morris, P; Murphy, J A; Trappe, N

    2010-01-01

    'Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel' (WISH) is a Herschel Key Programme aimed at understanding the physical and chemical structure of young stellar objects (YSOs) with a focus on water and related species. The low-mass protostar HH 46 was observed with the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) on the Herschel Space Observatory to measure emission in H2O, CO, OH, [OI], and [CII] lines located between 63 and 186 um. The excitation and spatial distribution of emission can disentangle the different heating mechanisms of YSOs, with better spatial resolution and sensitivity than previously possible. Far-IR line emission is detected at the position of the protostar and along the outflow axis. The OH emission is concentrated at the central position, CO emission is bright at the central position and along the outflow, and H2O emission is concentrated in the outflow. In addition, [OI] emission is seen in low-velocity gas, assumed to be related to the envelope, and is also seen shifted up to 170 km...

  17. Real-time mass spectroscopy analysis of Li-ion battery electrolyte degradation under abusive thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulupeau, B.; Delobel, B.; Cahen, S.; Fontana, S.; Hérold, C.

    2017-02-01

    The lithium-ion batteries are widely used in rechargeable electronic devices. The current challenges are to improve the capacity and safety of these systems in view of their development to a larger scale, such as for their application in electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium-ion batteries use organic solvents because of the wide operating voltage. The corresponding electrolytes are usually based on combinations of linear, cyclic alkyl carbonates and a lithium salt such as LiPF6. It has been reported that in abusive thermal conditions, a catalytic effect of the cathode materials lead to the formation fluoro-organics compounds. In order to understand the degradation phenomenon, the study at 240 °C of the interaction between positive electrode materials (LiCoO2, LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2, LiMn2O4 and LiFePO4) and electrolyte in dry and wet conditions has been realized by an original method which consists in analyzing by mass spectrometry in real time the volatile molecules produced. The evolution of specific gases channels coupled to the NMR reveal the formation of rarely discussed species such as 2-fluoroethanol and 1,4-dioxane. Furthermore, it appears that the presence of water or other protic impurities greatly influence their formation.

  18. The low-mass YSO CB230-A: investigating the protostar and its jet with NIR spectroscopy and Spitzer observations

    CERN Document Server

    Massi, Fabrizio; Brand, Jan; di Fabrizio, Luca; Wouterloot, Jan

    2008-01-01

    A jet from the low-mass YSO CB230-A had been discovered in NIR narrow-band images. We aim to investigate the physical properties of the region from where the jet is launched. Our analysis was carried out using low-resolution NIR spectra acquired with the camera NICS at the TNG telescope, with JH and HK grisms and a 1 arcsec-wide slit. These observational data were complemented with infrared photometric data from the Spitzer space telescope archive. The relevant physical properties of CB230-A were constrained by SED fitting of fluxes from the NIR to the mm. The YSO spectrum exhibits a significant number of atomic and molecular emission and absorption features. The characteristics of this spectrum suggest that we are observing a region in the close vicinity of CB230-A, i. e. its photosphere and/or an active accretion disk. The spectra of the knots in the jet contain a large number of emission lines, including a rich set of [FeII] lines. Emission due to H2 and [FeII] are not spatially correlated, confirming that...

  19. Connecting the dots: a correlation between ionising radiation and cloud mass-loss rate traced by optical integral field spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, A F; Dale, J E; Ginsburg, A; Klaassen, P D; Mottram, J C; Preibisch, T; Ramsay, S; Reiter, M; Testi, L

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph MUSE mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionised gas, study the ionisation fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionised jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip we determine the incident ionising photon flux $Q_\\mathrm{0,pil}$ originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate $\\dot{M}$ of the pillar tips due to photo-evaporation caused by the incident ionising radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M...

  20. Genetic engineering, high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy elucidate the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Birgit; Studt, Lena; Wiemann, Philipp; Osmanov, Helena; Kleigrewe, Karin; Köhler, Jens; Krug, Isabel; Tudzynski, Bettina; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi can be highly bioactive, ranging from antibiotic to cancerogenic properties. In this study we were able to identify a new, yet unknown metabolite produced by Fusarium fujikuroi, an ascomycetous rice pathogen. With the help of genomic engineering and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) followed by isolation and detailed structure elucidation, the new substance could be designated as an unknown bikaverin precursor, missing two methyl- and one hydroxy group, hence named oxo-pre-bikaverin. Though the bikaverin gene cluster has been extensively studied in the past, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway remained elusive due to a negative feedback loop that regulates the genes within the cluster. To decipher the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway and to overcome these negative regulation circuits, the structural cluster genes BIK2 and BIK3 were overexpressed independently in the ΔΔBIK2/BIK3+OE::BIK1 mutant background by using strong constitutive promoters. Using the software tool MZmine 2, the metabolite profile of the generated mutants obtained by HPLC-HRMS was compared, revealing further intermediates.

  1. Stability of the proton-to-electron mass ratio tested with molecular spectroscopy using an optical link to frequency reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amy-Klein, Anne; Lopez, Olivier; Daussy, Christophe; Kefelian, Fabien; Chardonnet, Christian [LPL, CNRS, Universite Paris-13, Villetaneuse (France); Shelkovnikov, Alexander [LPL, CNRS, Universite Paris-13, Villetaneuse (France); Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Butcher, Robert J. [LPL, CNRS, Universite Paris-13, Villetaneuse (France); Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Jiang, Haifeng; Santarelli, Giorgio [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC (France)

    2010-07-01

    Time and frequency metrology has experienced a lot of developments since ten years leading to the possibility of many fundamental tests of physics, as, for example, the search for a temporal variation of fundamental constants. However these tests are limited to macroscopic resonators or atomic systems while molecular systems are still difficult to probe with a high sensitivity, since experiments on molecules lacks of absolute frequency measurements set-ups. In that context, we have developed an optical link between our lab and the LNE-SYRTE, which allows us to benefit from their frequency references. Using this link, we performed the first experimental comparison of a molecular clock to an atomic clock, which gives a direct line to the proton-to-electron mass ratio stability. Recently, we extended the frequency dissemination technique to non-dedicated fibers of the telecommunication network simultaneously carrying digital data from the Internet traffic. This is very challenging for the development of transcontinental atomic and molecular clocks comparisons.

  2. Organic Chemistry of Low-Mass Star-Forming Cores. I. 7 mm Spectroscopy of Chamaeleon MMSl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martn A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirtstroem, Eva S.; Smith, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 32-50 GHz in the vicinity of Chamaeleon MMS1. This chemically rich dense cloud core harbors an extremely young, very low luminosity protostellar object and is a candidate first hydrostatic core. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon chains, and methanol. The polyyne emission peak lies about 5000 AU from the protostar, whereas methanol peaks about 15,000 AU away. Averaged over the telescope beam, the molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10(exp 6) / cubic cm and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 5-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains are very large and are indicative of a nonequilibrium carbon chemistry; C6H and HC7N column densities are 5.9(sup +2.9) (sub -1.3) x 10(exp 11) /cubic cm and 3.3 (sup +8.0)(sub -1.5) x 10(exp 12)/sq cm, respectively, which are similar to the values found in the most carbon-chain-rich protostars and prestellar cores known, and are unusually large for star-forming gas. Column density upper limits were obtained for the carbon chain anions C4H(-) and C6H(-), with anion-to-neutral ratios [C4H(-)]/[C4H] < 0.02% and [C6H(-l)]/[C6H] < 10%, consistent with previous observations in interstellar clouds and low-mass protostars. Deuterated HC,3 and c-C3H2 were detected. The [DC3N]/[HC,N] ratio of approximately 4% is consistent with the value typically found in cold interstellar gas.

  3. Comparison of Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Genetic Analysis of Lignocellulose Chemical Composition in Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxing Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic analysis of wood chemical composition is often limited by the cost and throughput of direct analytical methods. The speed and low cost of Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR overcomes many of these limitations, but it is an indirect method relying on calibration models that are typically developed and validated with small sample sets. In this study, we used >1500 young greenhouse grown trees from a clonally propagated single Populus family, grown at low and high nitrogen, and compared FT-NIR calibration sample sizes of 150, 250, 500 and 750 on calibration and prediction model statistics, and heritability estimates developed with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS wood chemical composition. As calibration sample size increased from 150 to 750, predictive model statistics improved slightly. Overall, stronger calibration and prediction statistics were obtained with lignin, S-lignin, S/G ratio, and m/z 144 (an ion from cellulose, than with C5 and C6 carbohydrates, and m/z 114 (an ion from xylan. Although small differences in model statistics were observed between the 250 and 500 sample calibration sets, when predicted values were used for calculating genetic control, the 500 sample set gave substantially more similar results to those obtained with the pyMBMS data. With the 500 sample calibration models, genetic correlations obtained with FT-NIR and pyMBMS methods were similar. Quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis with pyMBMS and FT-NIR predictions identified only three common loci for lignin traits. FT-NIR identified four QTLs that were not found with pyMBMS data, and these QTLs were for the less well predicted carbohydrate traits.

  4. Organic Chemistry of Low-Mass Star-Forming Cores. I. 7 mm Spectroscopy of Chamaeleon MMSl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martn A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirtstroem, Eva S.; Smith, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 32-50 GHz in the vicinity of Chamaeleon MMS1. This chemically rich dense cloud core harbors an extremely young, very low luminosity protostellar object and is a candidate first hydrostatic core. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon chains, and methanol. The polyyne emission peak lies about 5000 AU from the protostar, whereas methanol peaks about 15,000 AU away. Averaged over the telescope beam, the molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10(exp 6) / cubic cm and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 5-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains are very large and are indicative of a nonequilibrium carbon chemistry; C6H and HC7N column densities are 5.9(sup +2.9) (sub -1.3) x 10(exp 11) /cubic cm and 3.3 (sup +8.0)(sub -1.5) x 10(exp 12)/sq cm, respectively, which are similar to the values found in the most carbon-chain-rich protostars and prestellar cores known, and are unusually large for star-forming gas. Column density upper limits were obtained for the carbon chain anions C4H(-) and C6H(-), with anion-to-neutral ratios [C4H(-)]/[C4H] < 0.02% and [C6H(-l)]/[C6H] < 10%, consistent with previous observations in interstellar clouds and low-mass protostars. Deuterated HC,3 and c-C3H2 were detected. The [DC3N]/[HC,N] ratio of approximately 4% is consistent with the value typically found in cold interstellar gas.

  5. Stability of gas-phase tartaric acid anions investigated by quantum chemistry, mass spectrometry, and infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonner, Ralf; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; May, Amanda L; Steill, Jeffrey D; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Campagna, Shawn R; Compton, Robert N

    2012-05-17

    In an effort to understand the chemical factors that stabilize dianions, experimental and theoretical studies on the stability of the tartrate dianion were performed. Quantum chemical calculations at the coupled cluster level reveal only a metastable state with a possible decomposition pathway (O(2)C-CH(OH)-CH(OH)-CO(2))(2-) → (O(2)C-CH(OH)-CH(OH))(•-) + CO(2) + e(-) explaining the observed gas-phase instability of this dianion. Further theoretical data were collected for the bare dianion, this molecule complexed to water, sodium, and a proton, in both the meso and l forms as well as for the uncomplexed radical anion and neutral diradical. The calculations suggest that the l-tartrate dianion is more thermodynamically stable than the dianion of the meso stereoisomer and that either dianion can be further stabilized by association with a separate species that can help to balance the charge of the molecular complex. Mass spectrometry was then used to measure the energy needed to initiate collisionally induced dissociation of the racemic tartrate dianion and for the proton and sodium adducts of both the racemic and meso form of this molecule. Infrared action spectra of the dianion stereoisomers complexed with sodium were also acquired to determine the influence of the metal ion on the vibrations of the dianions and validate the computationally predicted structures. These experimental data support the theoretical conclusions and highlight the instability of the bare tartrate dianion. From the experimental work, it could also be concluded that the pathway leading to dissociation is under kinetic control because the sodium adduct of the racemic stereoisomer dissociated at lower collisional energy, although it was calculated to be more stable, and that decomposition proceeded via C-C bond dissociation as computationally predicted. Taken together, these data provide insight into the gas-phase stability of the tartrate dianion and highlight the role of adducts in

  6. Organic Chemistry of Low-Mass Star-Forming Cores. I. 7 mm Spectroscopy of Chamaeleon MMSl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martn A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirtstroem, Eva S.; Smith, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 32-50 GHz in the vicinity of Chamaeleon MMS1. This chemically rich dense cloud core harbors an extremely young, very low luminosity protostellar object and is a candidate first hydrostatic core. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon chains, and methanol. The polyyne emission peak lies about 5000 AU from the protostar, whereas methanol peaks about 15,000 AU away. Averaged over the telescope beam, the molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10(exp 6) / cubic cm and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 5-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains are very large and are indicative of a nonequilibrium carbon chemistry; C6H and HC7N column densities are 5.9(sup +2.9) (sub -1.3) x 10(exp 11) /cubic cm and 3.3 (sup +8.0)(sub -1.5) x 10(exp 12)/sq cm, respectively, which are similar to the values found in the most carbon-chain-rich protostars and prestellar cores known, and are unusually large for star-forming gas. Column density upper limits were obtained for the carbon chain anions C4H(-) and C6H(-), with anion-to-neutral ratios [C4H(-)]/[C4H] mass protostars. Deuterated HC,3 and c-C3H2 were detected. The [DC3N]/[HC,N] ratio of approximately 4% is consistent with the value typically found in cold interstellar gas.

  7. Hydrothermal liquefaction oil and hydrotreated product from pine feedstock characterized by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Cort, John R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hallen, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Olarte, Mariefel [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schmidt, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schaub, Tanner [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  8. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Zielińska, Dobrochna [Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw, Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927 Warsaw (Poland); Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia [Chemical Faculty, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Kijowska, Agnieszka [National Museum in Warsaw, Aleje Jerozolimskie 3, 00-495 Warsaw (Poland); Wagner, Barbara, E-mail: barbog@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th–14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers. - Highlights: • The analytical procedure for examination of unique wall paintings was proposed. • Identification of pigments and supporting layers of wall-paintings was obtained. • Heterogeneous samples were mapped with the use of LA-ICPMS. • Anatase in the sub-surface regions of samples was detected by Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Photoabsorption and time-of-flight mass spectroscopy for gas-phase trimethyl phosphate following valence shell excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homem, M.G.P.; Rosa, L.F.S.; Farenzena, L.S.; Hasse, A. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Iza, P. [Escuela Superior Politecnica del Litoral, Guayaquil Guaya (Ecuador); Cavasso Filho, R.L. [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil); Lee, M.T.; Iga, I. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In this work we report an experimental study on photoabsorption of trimethyl phosphate (TMP) molecules in the vacuum-ultraviolet energy range. More specifically, absolute photoabsorption cross sections and photoionization yields are measured and reported in the (11.11-21.45) eV energy range. The photoionization and neutral-decay cross sections in absolute scale are also derived and reported. Details of our experimental setup and procedure for cross-section determination can be found in our previous work [1]. Essentially, the measurements were performed using a double-ion-chamber technique [2]. The experimental cross-section results are analyzed in comparison with PES measurements. Oscillator strengths sum rules over the extrapolated experimental data gives a value of 71.6 au for the static dipole polarizability of TMP, which is in excellent agreement with the value of 72.3 au reported in literature. In addition, the ionic dissociation in the same energy range has been studied by time-of-flight mass spectrometry [3]. The detected product cations are C{sub 3}H{sub 9}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, CH{sub 3}O{sub 4}P{sup +}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}O{sub 3}P{sup +}, PO{sub 4}{sup +}, CH{sub 5}O{sub 2}P{sup +}, PO{sub 3}{sup +}, and CH{sub 3}{sup +}. The observed ionic branching ratios are converted in absolute scale by using the measured photoionization cross sections. The presence of two ionic metastable states corresponding to the C{sub 3}H{sub 9}O{sub 4}P{sup +} and CH{sub 3}O{sub 4}P{sup +} fragments are reported and their metastable ion mean lives are estimated in (152{+-}5) ns and (248{+-}30) ns. The results and discussion will be presented during the workshop. [1] M. G. P. Homem, P. Iza, L. S. Farenzena, R. L. Cavasso-Filho, M. T. Lee and I. Iga, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42, 235204 (2009). [2] J. A. R. Samson and Lifeng Yin, J. Opt. Soc. Am B 6, 2326 (1989). [3] F. Burmeister, L. H. Coutinho, R. R. T. Marinho, M. G. P. Homem, M. A

  10. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY OF LOW-MASS STAR-FORMING CORES. I. 7 mm SPECTROSCOPY OF CHAMAELEON MMS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Wirstroem, Eva S. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Smith, Robert G., E-mail: martin.cordiner@nasa.gov [School of Physical, Environmental, and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2012-01-10

    Observations are presented of emission lines from organic molecules at frequencies 32-50 GHz in the vicinity of Chamaeleon MMS1. This chemically rich dense cloud core harbors an extremely young, very low luminosity protostellar object and is a candidate first hydrostatic core. Column densities are derived and emission maps are presented for species including polyynes, cyanopolyynes, sulphuretted carbon chains, and methanol. The polyyne emission peak lies about 5000 AU from the protostar, whereas methanol peaks about 15,000 AU away. Averaged over the telescope beam, the molecular hydrogen number density is calculated to be 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} and the gas kinetic temperature is in the range 5-7 K. The abundances of long carbon chains are very large and are indicative of a non-equilibrium carbon chemistry; C{sub 6}H and HC{sub 7}N column densities are 5.9{sup +2.9}{sub -1.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and 3.3{sup +8.0}{sub -1.5} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, respectively, which are similar to the values found in the most carbon-chain-rich protostars and prestellar cores known, and are unusually large for star-forming gas. Column density upper limits were obtained for the carbon-chain anions C{sub 4}H{sup -} and C{sub 6}H{sup -}, with anion-to-neutral ratios [C{sub 4}H{sup -}]/[C{sub 4}H] < 0.02% and [C{sub 6}H{sup -}]/[C{sub 6}H] < 10%, consistent with previous observations in interstellar clouds and low-mass protostars. Deuterated HC{sub 3}N and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} were detected. The [DC{sub 3}N]/[HC{sub 3}N] ratio of approximately 4% is consistent with the value typically found in cold interstellar gas.

  11. Erosion of Be and deposition of C and O due to bombardment with C{sup +} and CO{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, W.; Goldstrass, P.; Linsmeier, Ch. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    The bombardment of Be with 3 and 5 keV C{sup +} and CO{sup +} at normal incidence is investigated experimentally and by computer simulation with the program TRIDYN. The deposited amount of C and O is determined experimentally and found in good agreement with calculated data for C bombardment. Chemical erosion dominates at higher fluences for CO{sup +} bombardment. Calculations are then used to determine the sputter yield of Be at steady state conditions as a function of the plasma edge electron temperature for two C impurity concentrations in the incident D flux, typical for fusion plasmas. The fluence to reach steady state conditions is also investigated. (author)

  12. Transfer of Bt-toxin protein gene into maize by high-velocity microprojectile bombardments and regeneration of transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国英; 杜天兵; 张宏; 谢友菊; 戴景瑞; 米景九; 李太源; 田颖川; 乔利亚; 莽克强

    1995-01-01

    Bt-toxin protein gene was successfully transferred into maize by the microprojectile bombard-ments of cell suspension,embryogenic calli and immature embryos with a Chinese-made particle gun(JQ-700).Although the bombarded embryogenic calli and immature embryos produced less mean transformants per dishthan the cell suspensions,they were the suitable materials for maize transformation because their culture andregeneration have been achieved in most maize cultivars.The evaluation on the resistance of transgenic plantsto corn borer shows the significant difference between them,from highly resistant to susceptible.

  13. Formation mechanism and yield of molecules ejected from ZnS, CdS, and FeS{sub 2} during ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikzad, S.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Tombrello, T.A. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Div. of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy

    1994-03-01

    Neutral species ejected from single crystals of ZnS, CdS, and FeS{sub 2} during ion bombardment by 3 keV Ar{sup +} were detected by laser post-ionization followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. While metal atoms (Fe, Zn, Cd) and S{sub 2} were the dominant species observed, substantial amounts of S, FeS, Zn{sub 2}, ZnS, Cd{sub 2}, and CdS were also detected. The experimental results demonstrate that molecules represent a larger fraction of the sputtered yield than was previously believed from secondary ion mass spectrometry experiments. In addition, the data suggest that the molecules are not necessarily formed from adjacent atoms in the solid and that a modified form of the recombination model could provide a mechanism for their formation.

  14. Atomic Oxygen (ATOX) simulation of Teflon FEP and Kapton H surfaces using a high intensity, low energy, mass selected, ion beam facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vered, R.; Grossman, E.; Lempert, G. D.; Lifshitz, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A high intensity (greater than 10(exp 15) ions/sq cm) low energy (down to 5 eV) mass selected ion beam (MSIB) facility was used to study the effects of ATOX on two polymers commonly used for space applications (Kapton H and Teflon FEP). The polymers were exposed to O(+) and Ne(+) fluences on 10(exp 15) - 10(exp 19) ions/sq cm, using 30eV ions. A variety of analytical methods were used to analyze the eroded surfaces including: (1) atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphology measurements; (2) total mass loss measurements using a microbalance; (3) surface chemical composition using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and (4) residual gas analysis (RGA) of the released gases during bombardment. The relative significance of the collisional and chemical degradation processes was evaluated by comparing the effects of Ne(+) and O(+) bombardment. For 30 eV ions it was found that the Kapton is eroded via chemical mechanisms while Teflon FEP is eroded via collisional mechanisms. AFM analysis was found very powerful in revealing the evolution of the damage from its initial atomic scale (roughness of approx. 1 nm) to its final microscopic scale (roughness greater than 1 micron). Both the surface morphology and the average roughness of the bombarded surfaces (averaged over 1 micron x 1 micron images by the system's computer) were determined for each sample. For 30 eV a non linear increase of the Kapton roughness with the O(+) fluence was discovered (a slow increase rate for fluences phi less than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm, and a rapid increase rate for phi greater than 5 x 10(exp 17) O(+)/sq cm). Comparative studies on the same materials exposed to RF and DC oxygen plasmas indicate that the specific details of the erosion depend on the simulation facility emphasizing the advantages of the ion beam facility.

  15. Structural and surface coverage effects on CO oxidation reaction over carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles studied by quadrupole mass spectrometry and diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Seng Kian; Bernardet, Véronique P; Franco, Alejandro A; Lemaire, Olivier; Gelin, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    The CO oxidation reaction on carbon-supported Pt nanoparticles (average size of 2.8 to 7.7 nm) was studied under flowing conditions at atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 300 and 353 K by coupling quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). The Pt loading was varied between 20 and 60 wt%. Gases diluted in He (0.5 mol%) were used together with Ar as a tracer. Reactions with CO and O2 introduced separately onto the samples were studied by QMS, applying successive step changes of the reaction mixtures. Variations in the rate of the reactions were observed and correlated with changes of the calculated coverage of the Pt surface by CO and/or O adspecies at varying steps of the experiment. The transient reaction of CO(g) with adsorbed O (Oad) was fast and mass transport-limited while that of O2(g) with adsorbed CO (COad) was sluggish. Following the same experimental procedures, FTIR spectra of adsorbed CO after varying steps were recorded, confirming the variations of COad and Oad as determined by QMS and indicating changes in the CO distribution over varying types of Pt surface sites. The influence of the adlayer composition (co-adsorption of COad and Oad), the particle size/structure and some possible surface reconstruction effects on the CO oxidation rate were evidenced and discussed. The structure of the Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon appears as an important factor for the efficiency of the so-called O2 bleeding as a CO mitigation strategy in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  16. Gas-phase structure of amyloid-β (12-28) peptide investigated by infrared spectroscopy, electron capture dissociation and ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thi Nga; Poully, Jean Christophe; Lecomte, Frédéric; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Manil, Bruno; Desfrançois, Charles; Chirot, Fabien; Lemoine, Jerome; Dugourd, Philippe; van der Rest, Guillaume; Grégoire, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    The gas-phase structures of doubly and triply protonated Amyloid-β12-28 peptides have been investigated through the combination of ion mobility (IM), electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry, and infrared multi-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy together with theoretical modeling. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to explore the conformational space of these protonated peptides, from which several classes of structures were found. Among the low-lying conformers, those with predicted diffusion cross-sections consistent with the ion mobility experiment were further selected and their IR spectra simulated using a hybrid quantum mechanical/semiempirical method at the ONIOM DFT/B3LYP/6-31 g(d)/AM1 level. In ECD mass spectrometry, the c/z product ion abundance (PIA) has been analyzed for the two charge states and revealed drastic differences. For the doubly protonated species, N - Cα bond cleavage occurs only on the N and C terminal parts, while a periodic distribution of PIA is clearly observed for the triply charged peptides. These PIA distributions have been rationalized by comparison with the inverse of the distances from the protonated sites to the carbonyl oxygens for the conformations suggested from IR and IM experiments. Structural assignment for the amyloid peptide is then made possible by the combination of these three experimental techniques that provide complementary information on the possible secondary structure adopted by peptides. Although globular conformations are favored for the doubly protonated peptide, incrementing the charge state leads to a conformational transition towards extended structures with 310- and α-helix motifs.

  17. Simultaneous Counter-Ion Co-Deposition a Technique Enabling Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy Studies Using Low-Energy Beams of Mass-Selected Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Ryan M.; Moore, David T.

    2014-06-01

    Matrix isolation spectroscopy was first developed in Pimentel's group during the 1950's to facilitate spectroscopic studies of transient species. Cryogenic matrices of condensed rare gases provide an inert chemical environment with facile energy dissipation and are transparent at all wavelengths longer than vacuum UV, making them ideal for studying labile and reactive species such as radicals, weakly bound complexes, and ions. Since frozen rare gases are poor electrolytes, studies of ions require near-equal populations of anions and cations in order to stabilize the number densities required for spectroscopic experiments. Many techniques for generation of ions for using in matrix isolation studies satisfy this criterion intrinsically, however when ion beams generated in external sources are deposited, the counter-ions typically arise via secondary processes that are at best loosely controlled. It has long been recognized that it would be desirable to stabilize deposition of mass-selected ions generated in an external source using simultaneous co-deposition of a beam of counter-ions, however previous attempts to achieve this have been reported as unsuccessful. The Moore group at Lehigh has demonstrated successful experiments of this type, using mass-selected anions generated from a metal cluster source, co-deposited with a balanced current of cations generated in a separate electron ionization source. This talk will focus on the details of the technique, and present some results from proof-of-concept studies on anionic copper carbonyl complexes formed in argon matrices following co-deposition of Cu- with Ar+ or Kr+. Funding support from NSF CAREER Award CHE-0955637 is gratefully acknowledged. Whittle et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22, p.1943 (1954); Becker et al., J. Chem. Phys. 25, p.224 (1956). Godbout et al., J. Chem. Phys. 96, p.2892 (1996). Sabo et al., Appl. Spectrosc. 45, p. 535 (1991).

  18. Disruption and reaccretion of midsized moons during an outer solar system Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D. G.; Asphaug, E.; Owen, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the problem of satellite survival during a hypothetical Late Heavy Bombardment in the outer solar system, as predicted by the Nice model (Tsiganis, Gomes, Morbidelli, and Levison 2005, Nature 435). Using a Monte Carlo approach we calculate, for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus, the probability of experiencing a catastrophic collision during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB). We find that Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, and Miranda experience at least one catastrophic impact in every simulation. Because reaccretion is expected to be rapid, these bodies will have emerged as scrambled mixtures of rock and ice. Tidal heating may have subsequently modified the latter three, but in the nominal LHB model Mimas should be a largely undifferentiated, homogeneous body. A differentiated Mimas would imply either that this body formed late or that the Nice model requires significant modification.

  19. Combined molecular dynamics and analytical model for repetitive cluster bombardment of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Barbara J., E-mail: bjg@psu.edu [Department of Chemistry, 104 Chemistry Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Paruch, Robert J.; Postawa, Zbigniew [Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of repetitive bombardment of solids by keV cluster beams have generated so much data that easy interpretations are not possible. Moreover, although the MD simulations remove 3–4 nm of material, that is not sufficient material to determine a depth profile. The recently developed steady-state statistical sputtering model (SS-SSM) uses information from the MD simulations and incorporates it into a set of differential equations to predict a depth profile. In this study the distributions that provide the input to the SS-SSM are compared for simulations of 15 keV bombardment of Ag(1 1 1) by C{sub 60}, Au{sub 3} and Ar{sub 872} cluster beams.

  20. Computer simulation of the bombardment of a copper film on graphene with argon clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Y. Galashev; O.R. Rakhmanova

    2015-01-01

    The process of graphene clean of copper film by bombarding of Ar13 clusters is investigated by the method of molec-ular dynamics. The kinetic energies of clusters are 5, 10, 20, and 30 eV and incident angles areθ=90◦, 75◦, 60◦, 45◦, and 0◦. It is obtained that the cluster energy should be in the interval 20 eV–30 eV for effective graphene cleaning. There is no cleaning effect at vertical incidence (θ =0◦) of Ar13 clusters. The bombardments at 45◦ and 90◦ incident angles are the most effective ones at a moderate and large amount of deposited copper respectively.

  1. Luminescence effects of ion-beam bombardment of CdTe surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvera, J., E-mail: javier.olvera@uam.e [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Dpto. de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Martinez, O. [Optronlab Group, Dpto. Fisica Materia Condensada, Edificio I-D, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belen 1, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Plaza, J.L.; Dieguez, E. [Laboratorio de Crecimiento de Cristales, Dpto. de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    In the present work, we report the effect of low-energy ion bombardment on CdTe surfaces. The effect is revealed by FESEM images and photoluminescence (PL) measurements carried out before and after irradiation of CdTe polycrystals by means of an ion-beam sputtering (IBS) system. An important improvement in the luminescence of CdTe was observed in the irradiated areas, related to defect-free surfaces.

  2. Directional emission of nonthermal halogen atoms by electron bombardment of alkali halides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postawa, Z.; Szymonski, M.

    1989-06-15

    We present the first experimental results on angle-resolved kinetic-energydistributions of halogen atoms desorbed from single crystals of alkali halidesbecause of electron bombardment. We found that the ejection of nonthermal Bratoms from the (100) surface of KBr is strongly forward peaked along thenormal. We suggest that this effect is caused by a thin damaged layer on thesurface due to a strong nonstoichiometry of the erosion process itself.

  3. Erosion of thin carbon layer on metal surface by hydrogen ion bombardment at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Hirotaka, Morita, Kenji, Horino, Yuji, Itoh, Noriaki

    1985-10-01

    In this letter, we report experimental results on the erosion of thin carbon layers segregated on nickel surfaces caused by hydrogen ion bombardements at elevated temperatures. The erosion yield of the segregated carbon layers at temperatures of around 900 K was found to depend on their thickness and for the layers with a thicknes less than 20 A the yield near the 900 K was found to be nearly the same as the physical sputtering yield. (orig./RK).

  4. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS. Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application.

  5. In situ flow cell for combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mass spectrometry at high photon energies under solar thermochemical looping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothensteiner, Matthäus; Jenni, Joel; Emerich, Hermann; Bonk, Alexander; Vogt, Ulrich F.; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-08-01

    An in situ/operando flow cell for transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and combined XAS/XRD measurements in a single experiment under the extreme conditions of two-step solar thermochemical looping for the dissociation of water and/or carbon dioxide was developed. The apparatus exposes materials to relevant conditions of both the auto-reduction and the oxidation sub-steps of the thermochemical cycle at ambient temperature up to 1773 K and enables determination of the composition of the effluent gases by online quadrupole mass spectrometry. The cell is based on a tube-in-tube design and is heated by means of a focusing infrared furnace. It was tested successfully for carbon dioxide splitting. In combined XAS/XRD experiments with an unfocused beam, XAS measurements were performed at the Ce K edge (40.4 keV) and XRD measurements at 64.8 keV and 55.9 keV. Furthermore, XRD measurements with a focused beam at 41.5 keV were carried out. Equimolar ceria-hafnia was auto-reduced in a flow of argon and chemically reduced in a flow of hydrogen/helium. Under reducing conditions, all cerium(iv) was converted to cerium(iii) and a cation-ordered pyrochlore-type structure was formed, which was not stable upon oxidation in a flow of carbon dioxide.

  6. Ultra high vacuum high precision low background setup with temperature control for thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDA-MS) of hydrogen in metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlikin, Sergiy V; Borodin, S; Vogel, D; Rohwerder, M

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly developed UHV-based high precision low background setup for hydrogen thermal desorption analysis (TDA) of metallic samples is presented. Using an infrared heating with a low thermal capacity enables a precise control of the temperature and rapid cool down of the measurement chamber. This novel TDA-set up is superior in sensitivity to almost every standard hydrogen analyzer available commercially due to the special design of the measurement chamber, resulting in a very low hydrogen background. No effects of background drift characteristic as for carrier gas based TDA instruments were observed, ensuring linearity and reproducibility of the analysis. This setup will prove to be valuable for detailed investigations of hydrogen trapping sites in steels and other alloys. With a determined limit of detection of 5.9×10(-3)µg g(-1) hydrogen the developed instrument is able to determine extremely low hydrogen amounts even at very low hydrogen desorption rates. This work clearly demonstrates the great potential of ultra-high vacuum thermal desorption mass spectroscopy instrumentation.

  7. [Analysis of X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry of Pangxidong Composite Granitoid Pluton and Its Implications for Magmatic Differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chang-yu; Ding, Ru-xin; Li, Hong-zhong; Zhou, Yong-zhang; Niu, Jia; Zhang, Jie-tang

    2015-11-01

    Pangxidong composite granitoid pluton located in the southwestern margin of Yunkai massif. The metamorphic grade of this pluton increases from outside to inside, that is, banded-augen granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites distribute in order from edge to core. X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Plasma Mass Spectrometry are conducted to study the geochemical characteristics of the three types of rocks. The result shows that all the three types of rocks are peraluminous rocks and their contents of main elements and rare earth elements change gradually. From granitic gneisses to granites, the contents of Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂, total rare earth elements and light rare earth elements increase, but the contents of SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements decrease. It is suggested that the phylogenetic relationship exists between granitic gneisses, gneissoid granites and granites during the multi-stage tectonic evolution process. Furthermore, the remelting of metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in Yunkai massif is probably an important cause of granitoid rocks forming. The evolutionary mechanism is probably that SiO₂ and heavy rare earth elements were melt out from the protolith and gradually enriched upward, but Al₂O₃, CaO, MgO, TiO₂ and light rare earth elements enriched downward.

  8. Comparison of the Detection Characteristics of Trace Species Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Laser Breakdown Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application. PMID:25769051

  9. Gold-decorated titania nanotube arrays as dual-functional platform for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Syuhei; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurita, Masahiro; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Kawasaki, Hideya

    2014-06-11

    In this report, we demonstrate gold-decorated titania nanotube arrays (Au-TNA substrate) as a dual-functional platform for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS). The Au nanoparticles are grown on the substrate using vapor deposition of Au. The resulting substrates perform better than Au colloids in terms of the reproducibility of the SERS measurements, long-term stability of the fabricated structures, and clean surface of the Au. The nanostructure of the Au-TNA substrate was designed to optimize the SALDI-MS and SERS performance. Excellent reproducibility of the SERS measurements using the Au-TNA substrate was obtained, with a standard error less than 6 %. SALDI activity was also demonstrated for the same Au-TNA substrates. Finally, the Au-TNA substrate was used for combined SERS and SALDI-MS analysis (i) to discriminate the structural isomers of pyridine compounds (para-, meta-, and ortho-pyridinecarboxylic acid) and (ii) to detect polycarbamate, a dithiocarbamate fungicide. These results are difficult to obtain using either approach alone.

  10. Comparison of the detection characteristics of trace species using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Yan, Junjie; Liu, Jiping

    2015-03-11

    The rapid and precise element measurement of trace species, such as mercury, iodine, strontium, cesium, etc. is imperative for various applications, especially for industrial needs. The elements mercury and iodine were measured by two detection methods for comparison of the corresponding detection features. A laser beam was focused to induce plasma. Emission and ion signals were detected using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and laser breakdown time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LB-TOFMS). Multi-photon ionization and electron impact ionization in the plasma generation process can be controlled by the pressure and pulse width. The effect of electron impact ionization on continuum emission, coexisting molecular and atomic emissions became weakened in low pressure condition. When the pressure was less than 1 Pa, the plasma was induced by laser dissociation and multi-photon ionization in LB-TOFMS. According to the experimental results, the detection limits of mercury and iodine in N2 were 3.5 ppb and 60 ppb using low pressure LIBS. The mercury and iodine detection limits using LB-TOFMS were 1.2 ppb and 9.0 ppb, which were enhanced due to different detection features. The detection systems of LIBS and LB-TOFMS can be selected depending on the condition of each application.

  11. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry for determination of Cr in soils from Brits District, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Ambushe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS is an emerging analytical technique, which can be used to perform elemental analysis of any material, irrespective of its physical state. In this study, the LIBS technique has been applied for quantification of total Cr in soil samples collected from polluted areas of Brits, North West Province, South Africa. A Q-switched neodymium-yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd-YAG laser (10 Hz, λ = 1064 nm was employed for generation of a laser-induced plasma on the surface of the soil sample. The atomic emission lines were recorded using an Andor Shamrock SR-303i spectrometer, fitted with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD camera. Detailed investigation of experimental parameters such as gate delay time, gate width and laser pulse energy was conducted. Soil samples were dried, finely ground, sieved and thereafter pelletized before LIBS analysis. Calibration curve for the quantification of Cr was constructed using certified reference materials of soils and sediments. The concentrations of Cr in soil samples varied from 111 to 3180 mg/kg. In order to test the validity of the LIBS results, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was also employed for determination of Cr. The results obtained using LIBS were found to be in good agreement with those of ICP-MS.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v29i3.3

  12. Delivering Microwave Spectroscopy to the Masses: a Design of a Low-Cost Microwave Spectrometer Operating in the 18-26 GHZ Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steber, Amanda; Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Advances in chip-level microwave technology in the communications field have led to the possibilities of low cost alternatives for current Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectrometers. Many of the large, expensive microwave components in a traditional design can now be replaced by robust, mass market monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). "Spectrometer on a board" designs are now feasible that offer dramatic cost reduction for microwave spectroscopy. These chip-level components can be paired with miniature computers to produce compact instruments that are operable through USB. A FTMW spectrometer design using the key MMIC components that drive cost reduction will be presented. Two dual channel synthesizers (Valon Technology Model 5008), a digital pattern generator (Byte Paradigm Wav Gen Xpress), and a high-speed digitizer/arbitrary waveform generator combination unit (Tie Pie HS-5 530 XM) form the key components of the spectrometer for operation in the 18-26.5 GHz range. The design performance is illustrated using a spectrometer that is being incorporated into a museum display for astrochemistry. For this instrument a user interface, developed in Python, has been developed and will be shown.

  13. Mechanism and kinetics of tyrosinase inhibition by glycolic acid: a study using conventional spectroscopy methods and hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupling with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Da; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; He, Na; McClements, David Julian

    2017-01-25

    Tyrosinase is an enzyme that promotes enzymatic browning of fruits and vegetables, thereby reducing product quality. A variety of analytical tools were used to characterize the interactions between tyrosinase and a natural tyrosinase inhibitor (glycolic acid). Hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupling with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was used to elucidate the interaction mechanism between glycolic acid and tyrosinase. UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that glycolic acid inhibited tyrosinase activity in a mixed-type manner with an IC50 of 83 ± 14 μM. The results of these techniques suggested that glycolic acid bound to tyrosinase through hydrophobic attraction, and this interaction led to a pronounced conformational change of the enzyme molecules. HDX-MS analysis showed that the activity of tyrosinase was primarily inhibited by a structural perturbation of its active site (His 263). This study provides a comprehensive understanding of the interaction between glycolic acid and tyrosinase, which could lead to new approaches to control tyrosinase activity in foods and other products.

  14. Evaluation of the Forensic Utility of Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry for Printing Ink Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Trejos, Tatiana; Almirall, José R

    2016-05-01

    Improvements in printing technology have exacerbated the problem of document counterfeiting, prompting the need for analytical techniques that better characterize inks for forensic analysis and comparisons. In this study, 319 printing inks (toner, inkjet, offset, and Intaglio) were analyzed directly on the paper substrate using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). As anticipated, the high sensitivity of LA-ICP-MS pairwise comparisons resulted in excellent discrimination (average of ~ 99.6%) between different ink samples from each of the four ink types and almost 100% correct associations between ink samples known to originate from the same source. SEM-EDS analysis also resulted in very good discrimination for different toner and intaglio inks (>97%) and 100% correct association for samples from the same source. SEM-EDS provided complementary information to LA-ICP-MS for certain ink types but showed limited utility for the discrimination of inkjet and offset inks.

  15. A novel aeration-assisted homogenous liquid-liquid microextration for determination of thorium and uranium in water and hair samples by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyseh, Somayeh; Niazi, Ali

    2016-01-15

    A novel method based on aeration-assisted homogeneous liquid-liquid microextraction using high density solvent is presented, which is combined with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy in which simultaneous preconcentration and determination of thorium and uranium with arsenazo III as the chelating reagent is carried out. To achieve optimum conditions, several parameters such as pH, concentration of arsenazo III, extraction and homogenous solvent types and their volumes, salt concentration and extraction time were investigated. Under which, the calibration graphs were linear in the range of 0.5-600.0ng L(-1) for thorium and 0.3-550.0ng L(-1) for uranium. Good linearities were obtained for both analytes with R(2) values larger than 0.9990. The limits of detection (LOD, 3Sb/m, n=5) of this method were 0.12 and 0.09ng L(-1), and the enrichment factors were estimated to be 370 and 410 for thorium and uranium, respectively. The proposed method was applied to determine the thorium and uranium in human hair and different environmental water samples. Acceptable recoveries ranged from 99.4% to 100.7% with standard deviation of 0.05 to 0.17.

  16. Enhanced characterization of oil sands acid-extractable organics fractions using electrospray ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Hewitt, L Mark; Dixon, D George

    2015-05-01

    The open pit oil sands mining operations north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, are accumulating tailings waste at a rate approximately equal to 4.9 million m(3) /d. Naphthenic acids are among the most toxic components within tailings to aquatic life, but structural components have largely remained unidentified. In the present study, electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) were used to characterize fractions derived from the distillation of an acid-extractable organics (AEO) mixture isolated from oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). Mean molecular weights of each fraction, and their relative proportions to the whole AEO extract, were as follows: fraction 1: 237 Da, 8.3%; fraction 2: 240 Da, 23.8%; fraction 3: 257 Da, 26.7%; fraction 4: 308 Da, 18.9%; fraction 5: 355 Da, 10.0%. With increasing mean molecular weight of the AEO fractions, a concurrent increase occurred in the relative abundance of nitrogen-, sulfur-, and oxygen-containing ions, double-bond equivalents, and degree of aromaticity. Structures present in the higher-molecular-weight fractions (fraction 4 and fraction 5) suggested the presence of heteroatoms, dicarboxyl and dihydroxy groups, and organic acid compounds with the potential to function as estrogens. Because organic acid compositions become dominated by more recalcitrant, higher-molecular-weight acids during natural degradation, these findings are important in the context of oil sands tailings pond water remediation.

  17. Analytical procedure for characterization of medieval wall-paintings by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syta, Olga; Rozum, Karol; Choińska, Marta; Zielińska, Dobrochna; Żukowska, Grażyna Zofia; Kijowska, Agnieszka; Wagner, Barbara

    2014-11-01

    Analytical procedure for the comprehensive chemical characterization of samples from medieval Nubian wall-paintings by means of portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF), laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy (RS) was proposed in this work. The procedure was used for elemental and molecular investigations of samples from archeological excavations in Nubia (modern southern Egypt and northern Sudan). Numerous remains of churches with painted decorations dated back to the 7th-14th century were excavated in the region of medieval kingdoms of Nubia but many aspects of this art and its technology are still unknown. Samples from the selected archeological sites (Faras, Old Dongola and Banganarti) were analyzed in the form of transfers (n = 26), small fragments collected during the excavations (n = 35) and cross sections (n = 15). XRF was used to collect data about elemental composition, LA-ICPMS allowed mapping of selected elements, while RS was used to get the molecular information about the samples. The preliminary results indicated the usefulness of the proposed analytical procedure for distinguishing the substances, from both the surface and sub-surface domains of the wall-paintings. The possibility to identify raw materials from the wall-paintings will be used in the further systematic, archeometric studies devoted to the detailed comparison of various historic Nubian centers.

  18. Identification of Natural Dyes in Ancient Textiles by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihye; Kim, Min Jung; van Elslande, Elsa; Walter, Philippe; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-11-01

    The identification of dyes in archaeological remains is a long standing challenge. Major problems include contamination by environmental conditions over long periods of time, small amounts and limited availability of excavated samples, and low concentrations of dyestuff in the obtained samples. To address these issues, highly sensitive and non-destructive techniques are required. In response, in this work, two non-destructive analytical techniques, Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS), were used for dye detection and the analysis results are compared. TOF-SIMS provides high detection efficiency for the analysis of organic materials whereas SERS is a useful technique for the detection of dyes in ancient textiles. An Ag colloid was employed to surmount the limitations of normal Raman measurement such as background fluorescence and weak Raman signals in small amounts of components. To identify the dyes used in ancient textiles, standard samples prepared using various dyestuffs and historical samples were analyzed with TOF-SIMS and Raman techniques. From the TOF-SIMS and the SERS spectra, dyestuffs such as alizarin, berberine, an indigo were identified in ancient textiles. The results suggest that TOF-SIMS and SERS are efficient non-destructive techniques for the characterization of archaeological textiles.

  19. Effect of Ar bombardment on the electrical and optical properties of low-density polyethylene films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-11-01

    The influence of low-energy Ar ion beam irradiation on both electrical and optical properties of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films is presented. The polymer films were bombarded with 320 keV Ar ions with fuences up to $1 \\times 10^{15}$ cm$^{−2}$. Electrical properties of LDPE films were measured and the effect of ion bombardment on the DC conductivity, dielectric constant and loss was studied. Optically, the energy gap, the Urbach’s energy and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster were estimated for all polymer samples using theUV–Vis spectrophotometry technique. The obtained results showed slight enhancement in the conductivity and dielectric parameters due to the increase in ion fluence. Meanwhile, the energy gap and the Urbach’s energyvalues showed significant decrease by increasing the Ar ion fluence. It was found that the ion bombardment induced chain scission in the polymer chain causing some carbonization. An increase in the number of carbonatoms per cluster was also observed.

  20. Polygonisation of ionic single crystals - a new effect of swift ion bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turos, A.; Nowicki, L. [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Garrido, F.; Thome, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Fromknecht, R. [Research Center Karlsruhe, INFP, Karlsruhe (Germany); Domagala, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    1999-05-01

    Isostructural oxide single crystals of the fluorite structure: stabilized cubic zirconia and UO{sub 2} were bombarded at room temperature with 72 MeV iodine ions or 340 MeV Xe ions, respectively. The aim of this paper was the study of structural transformations induced by ion bombardment in two different regimes: at 72 MeV where the radiation damage production is strongly influenced by collision cascades and at higher energies where the ionization mechanism prevails. The structure of as-grown and implanted single crystals was examined using the RBS/channeling technique and X-ray diffraction analysis. Some of the samples were also investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that the residual damage depends strongly on energy loss mechanism, and hence on the incident ion energy. At high incident energies solidification of latent tracks in UO{sub 2} leads to their polygonisation. Since the energy of 72 MeV is too low for latent track formation, the resulting damage is composed of dislocation and clusters and is similar to that created by the ion bombardment at low energies. The amount of defects was strongly enhanced by the interaction of ionised regions with collision cascades. (author) 14 refs, 4 figs

  1. Transgenic peanut plants obtained by particle bombardment via somatic embryogenesis regeneration system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    After pre-culture and treatment of osmosis,cotyledons of immature peanut(Arachis hypogaea L.)zygotic embryos were transformed via particle bombardment with a plasmid containing a chimeric hph gene conferring resistance to hygromycin and a chimeric intron-gus gene.Selection for hygromycin resistant calluses and somatic embryos was initiated at 10th d post-bombardment on medium containing 10-25 mg/L hygromycin.Under continuous selection,hygromycin resistant plantlets were regenerated from somatic embryos and were recovered from nearly 1.6% of the bombarded cotyledons.The presence and integration of foreign DNA in regenerated hygromycin resistant plants was confirmed by PCR(polymerase chain reaction)for the intron-gus gene and by Southern hybridization of the hph gene.GUS enzyme activity was detected in leaflets from transgenic plants but not from control,non-transformed plants.The production of transgenic plants are mainly based on a newly improved somatic embryogenesis regeneration system developed by us.

  2. CEMS studies of structural modifications of metallic glasses by ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglierini, M.; Lančok, A.; Pavlovič, M.

    2010-05-01

    Fe76Mo8Cu1B15 and Fe74Nb3Cu1Si16B6 amorphous metallic alloys were exposed to ion bombardment with nitrogen ions and protons to ensure different degree of radiation damage. The radiation damage profiles were calculated in the “full cascade” mode. Conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry was employed to scan structural modifications in the surface regions of the irradiated alloys. In Fe76Mo8Cu1B15, the irradiation with 130 keV N+ has caused a significant increase of the hyperfine magnetic fields and isomer shift due to changes in topological and chemical short-range order (SRO), respectively. No appreciable effects were revealed after bombardment with 80 keV H+ ions. Fe74Nb3Cu1Si16B6 amorphous metallic alloy was irradiated by 110 keV N+ and 37 keV H+ and only changes in chemical SRO were revealed after bombardment with nitrogen ions. The observed alternations of the structure depend primarily on the total number of displacements of the resonant atoms which are closely related to the fluence as well as type and energy of the incident ions.

  3. Optical absorption enhancement of CdTe nanostructures by low-energy nitrogen ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Asl Soleimani, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanostructures by means of RF magnetron sputtering followed by low-energy ion implantation and post-thermal treatment. We have thoroughly studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of these nanostructures. The effects of nitrogen ion bombardment on the structural parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as crystal size, microstrain, and dislocation density have been examined. From x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis it could be deduced that N+ ion fluence and annealing treatment helps to form (3 0 0) orientation in the crystalline structure of cadmium-telluride films. Fluctuations in optical properties like the optical band gap and absorption coefficient as a function of N+ ion fluences have been observed. The annealing of the sample irradiated by a dose of 1018 ions cm-2 has led to great enhancement in the optical absorption over a wide range of wavelengths with a thickness of 250 nm. The enhanced absorption is significantly higher than the observed value in the original CdTe layer with a thickness of 3 μm. Surface properties such as structure, grain size and roughness are noticeably affected by varying the nitrogen fluences. It is speculated that nitrogen bombardment and post-annealing treatment results in a smaller optical band gap, which in turn leads to higher absorption. Nitrogen bombardment is found to be a promising method to increase efficiency of thin film solar cells.

  4. Ion-bombardment-enhanced diffusion during the growth of sputtered superlattice thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E.

    1978-08-15

    A technique is presented for determining the enhancement in solid-state diffusion caused by low-energy ion bombardment. In this technique, superlattice films are grown under varying conditions of ion bombardment and the amplitude of the resulting composition modulation wave is determined by analyzing x-ray diffraction satellite peaks surrounding the central Bragg peaks. The amplitude is in turn related to the enhanced diffusion coefficient D* (x) which may be expressed as D*/sub 0/ exp(-x/delta) where delta is a characteristic diffusion length of the ion-bombardment-produced defects. This approach was confirmed experimentally using InSb/GaSb superlattice structures grown by multitarget sputtering, each sample having equilayer thicknesses between 12 and 30 A. D* was found to increase as the sputtering pressure was decreased. Measured values of D* averaged over the enhanced diffusion region were on the order of 10/sup -17/ cm/sup 2//sec compared to a thermal interdiffusion coefficient of approximately 10/sup -22/ cm/sup 2//sec at the film growth temperature of 250 /sup 0/C.

  5. Array-based photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autrey, S. Thomas; Posakony, Gerald J.; Chen, Yu

    2005-03-22

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous or sequential, rapid analysis of multiple samples by photoacoustic spectroscopy are disclosed. A photoacoustic spectroscopy sample array including a body having at least three recesses or affinity masses connected thereto is used in conjunction with a photoacoustic spectroscopy system. At least one acoustic detector is positioned near the recesses or affinity masses for detection of acoustic waves emitted from species of interest within the recesses or affinity masses.

  6. The effect of CH4/H2 ratio on the surface properties of HDPE treated by CHx ion beam bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wanyu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Ju, Dongying; Sato, Susumu; Tsunoda, Teruo

    2016-06-01

    The surface of high density polyethylene (HDPE) substrate was bombarded by the CHx group ion beam, which was generated by the mixture of CH4/H2. Varying the CH4/H2 ratio, HDPE surfaces with different chemical bond structures and properties were obtained. Raman and XPS results show that sp2 and sp3 bond structures are formed at HDPE surface bombarded by CHx group ions. The sp3 bond fraction at bombarded HDPE surface depends on the H2 ratio in CH4/H2 mixture, because the H ion/atom/molecule can improve the growth of sp3 bond structure. For HDPE surface bombarded by CH4/H2 = 50/50, sp3 bond fraction reaches the maximum of 30.5%, the surface roughness decreases to 17.04 nm, and the static contact angle of polar H2O molecule increased to 140.2∘.

  7. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase transformations of 5β-scymnol and identification of oxoscymnol transformation products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Linda L; Hodges, Lynn D; Wynne, Paul M; Kalafatis, Nicolette; Wright, Paul F A; Macrides, Theodore A

    2011-01-01

    A new and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation procedure coupled with tandem mass spectroscopy (MS and MS(2)) detection was developed to identify for the first time the oxidation products of 5β-scymnol [(24R)-(+)-5β-cholestan-3α,7α,12α,24,26,27-hexol] catalysed by bacterial hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) reactions in vitro. The authentic scymnol (MW 468) standard yielded a protonated molecular ion [M+H](+) at m/z 469 Da, and higher mass adduct ions attributed to [M+NH(4)](+) (m/z 486), [M+H+CH(3)OH](+) (m/z 501) and [M+H+CH(3)COOH](+) (m/z 530). (24R)-(+)-5β-Cholestan-3-one-7α,12α,24,26,27-pentol (3-oxoscymnol, m/z 467 Da, relative retention time (RRT)=0.89) was identified as the principle molecular species of scymnol in the reaction with 3α-HSD pure enzyme. [S](0.5) for the reaction of 3α-HSD with scymnol as substrate was 0.7292 mM. (24R)-(+)-5β-cholestan-7-one-3α,12α,24,26,27-pentol (7-oxoscymnol, m/z 467 Da, RRT=0.79) and (24R)-(+)-5β-cholestan-12-one-3α,7α,24,26,27-pentol (12-oxoscymnol, m/z 467 Da, RRT=0.81) were similarly identified as principle molecular species in the respective 7α-HSD and 12α-HSD reactions. Polarity of the oxoscymnol species was established as 7-oxoscymnol>12-oxoscymnol>3-oxoscymnol>scymnol (in order from most polar to least polar). Confirmation that 5β-scymnol is an oxidative substrate for steroid-metabolising enzymes was made possible by the use of sophisticated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) techniques that will likely provide the basis for further exploration of scymnol as a therapeutic compound.

  8. Deep-level transient spectroscopy of low-energy ion-irradiated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkovsky, Vladimir; Privitera, V.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

     During electron-gun deposition of metal layers on semiconductors, the semiconductor is bombarded with low-energy metal ions creating defects in the outermost surface layer. For many years, it has been a puzzle why deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra of the as-deposited, electron-gun...

  9. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Grill, P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2012-01-01

    satisfactorily explain the observed disparity in NMR transverse relaxation of the four marine DOM samples. Likewise, the presence of metal ions in isolated marine DOM remained near constant or declined from surface to depth for important paramagnetic ions like Mn, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu. Iron in particular, a strong complexing paramagnetic ion, was found most abundant by a considerable margin in surface (FISH) marine DOM for which well resolved COSY cross peaks were observed. Hence, facile relationships between metal content of isolated DOM (which does not reflect authentic marine DOM metal content) and transverse NMR relaxation were not observed. High field (12 T) negative electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectra showed at first view rather conforming mass spectra for all four DOM samples with abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks from surface to bottom DOM and similar fractions (~50%) of assigned molecular compositions throughout all DOM samples. The average mass increased from surface to bottom DOM by about 10 Dalton. The limited variance of FTICR mass spectra probably resulted from a rather inherent conformity of marine DOM at the mandatory level of intrinsic averaging provided by FTICR mass spectrometry, when many isomers unavoidably project on single nominal mass peaks. In addition, averaging from ion suppression added to the accordance observed. The proportion of CHO and CHNO molecular series increased from surface to depth whereas CHOS and especially CHNOS molecular series markedly declined. The abundance of certain aromatic CHOS compounds declined with water depth. For future studies, COSY NMR spectra appear best suited to assess organic molecular complexity of marine DOM and to define individual DOM molecules of yet unknown structure and function. Non-target organic structural spectroscopy at the level demonstrated here covered nearly all carbon present in marine DOM. The exhaustive characterization of

  10. Progressing towards more quantitative analytical pyrolysis of soil organic matter using molecular beam mass spectroscopy of whole soils and added standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddix, Michelle L.; Magrini-Bair, Kim; Evans, Robert J.; Conant, Richard T.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Morris, Sherri J.; Calderón, Francisco; Paul, Eldor A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is extremely complex. It is composed of hundreds of different organic substances and it has been difficult to quantify these diverse substances in a dynamic-ecosystem functioning standpoint. Analytical pyrolysis has been used to compare chemical differences between soils, but its ability to measure the absolute amount of a specific compound in the soil is still in question. Our objective was to assess whether utilizing pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectroscopy (py-MBMS) to define the signature of known reference compounds (adenine, indole, palmitic acid, etc.) and biological samples (chitin, fungi, cellulose, etc.) separately and when added to whole soils it was possible to make py-MBMS more quantitative. Reference compounds, spanning a wide variety of compound categories, and biological samples, expected to be present in SOM, were added to three soils from Colorado, Ohio, and Massachusetts that have varying total C, % clay, and clay type. Py-MBMS, a rapid analysis technique originally developed to analyze complex biomolecules, flash pyrolyzes soil organic matter to form products that are often considered characteristic of the original molecular structure. Samples were pyrolyzed at 550 degrees C by py-MBMS. All samples were weighed and %C and %N determined both before and after pyrolysis to evaluate mass loss, C loss, and N loss for the samples.An average relationship of r2 = 0.76 (P = 0.005) was found for the amount of cellulose added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C relative to the ion intensity of select mass/charge of the compound.There was a relationship of r2 = 0.93 (P < 0.001) for the amount of indole added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C and the ion intensity of the associated mass variables (mass/charge). Comparing spectra of pure compounds with the spectra of the compounds added to soil and isolated clay showed that interference could occur based on soil type and compound with the Massachusetts soil with high C (55

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  12. STABILITY OF EXTRATERRESTRIAL GLYCINE UNDER ENERGETIC PARTICLE RADIATION ESTIMATED FROM 2 keV ELECTRON BOMBARDMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maté, B.; Tanarro, I.; Escribano, R.; Moreno, M. A.; Herrero, V. J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (IEM-CSIC), Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-20

    The destruction of solid glycine under irradiation with 2 keV electrons has been investigated by means of IR spectroscopy. Destruction cross sections, radiolysis yields, and half-life doses were determined for samples at 20, 40, 90, and 300 K. The thickness of the irradiated samples was kept below the estimated penetration depth of the electrons. No significant differences were obtained in the experiments below 90 K, but the destruction cross section at 300 K was larger by a factor of 2. The radiolysis yields and half-life doses are in good accordance with recent MeV proton experiments, which confirms that electrons in the keV range can be used to simulate the effects of cosmic rays if the whole sample is effectively irradiated. In the low temperature experiments, electron irradiation leads to the formation of residues. IR absorptions of these residues are assigned to the presence CO{sub 2}, CO, OCN{sup −}, and CN{sup −} and possibly to amide bands I to III. The protection of glycine by water ice is also studied. A water ice film of ∼150 nm is found to provide efficient shielding against the bombardment of 2 keV electrons. The results of this study show also that current Monte Carlo predictions provide a good global description of electron penetration depths. The lifetimes estimated in this work for various environments ranging from the diffuse interstellar medium to the inner solar system, show that the survival of hypothetical primeval glycine from the solar nebula in present solar system bodies is not very likely.

  13. N(50) Crater Retention Ages for an Expanded Inventory of Lunar Basins: Evidence for an Early Heavy Bombardment and a Late Heavy Bombardment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Herbert; Burgess, Emily

    2012-01-01

    LOLA topography and LOLA-derived crustal thickness data provide evidence for a population of impact basins on the Moon that is likely a factor 2 larger than the classical lists based on photogeology. Frey (2012) determined N(50) crater retention ages (CRAs) for 83 candidate basins > 300 km in diameter by counting LOLA-identified craters superimposed over the whole area of the basins. For some basins identified in topography or model crustal thickness it is not possible to unambiguously identify the crater rim as is traditionally done. Also, Quasi-Circular Depressions (QCDs) > 50 km in diameter are recognizable in the mare-filled centers of many basins. Even though these are not apparent in image data, they likely represent buried impact craters superimposed on the basin floor prior to mare infilling and so should be counted in determining the age of the basin. Including these as well as the entire area of the basins improves the statistics, though the error bars are still large when using only craters > 50 km in diameter. The distribution of N(50) CRAs had two distinct peaks which did not depend on whether the basins were named (based on photogeology) or recognized first in topography or crustal thickness data. It also did not depend on basin diameters (both larger and smaller basins made up both peaks) and both peaks persisted even when weaker candidates were excluded. Burgess (2012, unpublished data) redid the counts for 85 basins but improved on the earlier effort by adjusting the counting area where basins overlap. The two peak distribution of N(50) ages was confirmed, with a younger peak at N(50) 40-50 and an older peak at N(50) 80-90 (craters > 50 km diameter per million square km). We suggest this could represent two distinct populations of impactors on the Moon: one producing an Early Heavy Bombardment (EHB) that predates Nectaris and the second responsible for the more widely recognized Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB).

  14. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2013-03-01

    High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM) isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin) and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone), 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum), 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone) and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor) and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed exceptional

  15. Ethylene hydrogenation catalysis on Pt(111) single-crystal surfaces studied by using mass spectrometry and in situ infrared absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillekaratne, Aashani; Simonovis, Juan Pablo; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene promoted by a Pt(111) single crystal was studied by using a ultrahigh-vacuum surface-science instrument equipped with a so-called high-pressure cell. Kinetic data were acquired continuously during the catalytic conversion of atmospheric-pressure mixtures of ethylene and hydrogen by using mass spectrometry while simultaneously characterizing the surface species in operando mode by reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). Many observations reported in previous studies of this system were corroborated, including the presence of adsorbed alkylidyne intermediates during the reaction and the zero-order dependence of the rate of hydrogenation on the pressure of ethylene. In addition, the high quality of the kinetic data, which could be recorded continuously versus time and processed to calculate time-dependent turnover frequencies (TOFs), afforded a more detailed analysis of the mechanism. Specifically, deuterium labeling could be used to estimate the extent of isotope scrambling reached with mixed-isotope-substituted reactants (C2H4 + D2 and C2D4 + H2). Perhaps the most important new observation from this work is that, although extensive H-D exchange takes place on ethylene before being fully converted to ethane, the average stoichiometry of the final product retains the expected stoichiometry of the gas mixture, that is, four regular hydrogen atoms and two deuteriums per ethane molecule in the case of the experiments with C2H4 + D2. This means that no hydrogen atoms are removed from the surface via their inter-recombination to produce X2 (X = H or D). It is concluded that, under catalytic conditions, hydrogen surface recombination is much slower than ethylene hydrogenation and H-D exchange.

  16. Probing the orientation of electrostatically immobilized cytochrome C by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and sum frequency generation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, Joe E; Weidner, Tobias; Ramey, Dennis; Pruzinsky, Leah; Castner, David G

    2013-12-01

    By taking advantage of the electron pathway through the heme group in cytochrome c (CytoC) electrochemists have built sensors based upon CytoC immobilized onto metal electrodes. Previous studies have shown that the electron transfer rate through the protein is a function of the position of this heme group with respect to the electrode surface. In this study a detailed examination of CytoC orientation when electrostatically immobilized onto both amine (NH3(+)) and carboxyl (COO(-)) functionalized gold is presented. Protein coverage, on both surfaces, was monitored by the change in the atomic % N, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Spectral features within the in situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectra, acquired for the protein interacting with positively and negatively charged surfaces, indicates that these electrostatic interactions do induce the protein into a well ordered film. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry data demonstrated a clear separation between the two samples based on the intensity differences of secondary ions stemming from amino acids located asymmetrically within CytoC (cysteine: C2H6NS(+); glutamic acid: C4H6NO(+) and C4H8NO2 (+); leucine: C5H12N(+)). For a more quantitative examination of orientation, we developed a ratio comparing the sum of the intensities of secondary-ions stemming from the amino acid residues at either end of the protein. The 50 % increase in this ratio, observed between the protein covered NH3 (+) and COO(-) substrates, indicates opposite orientations of the CytoC on the two different surfaces.

  17. Qualitative and quantitative spectro-chemical analysis of dates using UV-pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehder, A O; Habibullah, Y B; Gondal, M A; Baig, Umair

    2016-08-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is demonstrated for the spectral analysis of nutritional and toxic elements present in several varieties of date fruit samples available in the Saudi Arabia market. The method analyzes the optical emission of a test sample when subjected to pulsed laser ablation. In this demonstration, our primary focus is on calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), as nutritional elements, and on chromium (Cr), as a toxic element. The local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) condition was confirmed prior to the elemental characterization of date samples to ensure accuracy of the LIBS analysis. This was achieved by measuring parameters associated with the plasma, such as the electron temperature and the electron number density. These plasma parameters aid interpretation of processes such as ionization, dissociation, and excitation occurring in the plasma plume formed by ablating the date palm sample. The minimum detection limit was established from calibration curves that involved plotting the LIBS signal intensity as a function of standard date samples with known concentrations. The concentration of Ca and Mg detected in different varieties of date samples was between 187 and 515 and 35-196mgL(-1) respectively, while Cr concentration measured between 1.72 and 7.76mgL(-1). In order to optimize our LIBS system, we have studied how the LIBS signal intensity depends on the incident laser energy and the delay time. In order to validate our LIBS analysis results, standard techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were also applied on an identical (duplicate) date samples as those used for the LIBS analysis. The LIBS results exhibit remarkable agreement with those obtained from the ICP-MS analysis. In addition, the finger print wavelengths of other elements present in date samples were also identified and are reported here, which has not been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  18. Single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy analysis of size and number concentration in mixtures of monometallic and bimetallic (core-shell) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrifield, Ruth C; Stephan, Chady; Lead, Jamie R

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to separate and measure the physical and chemical properties of monometallic and bimetallic engineered nanoparticles (NPs), especially when mixtures are similar in size and at low concentration. We report that single particle inductively coupled mass spectroscopy (SP-ICP-MS), alongside field flow fractionation (FFF), has allowed for the accurate measurement of size and particle number concentrations of mixed metallic nanoparticles (NPs) containing monometallic NPs of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) and a bimetallic core-shell structured NP (Au@Ag) of equivalent size. Two sets of these NPs were measured. The first contained only 60nm particles, where the Au@Ag NP had a 30nm core and 15nm shell to make a total diameter of 60nm. The second contained only 80nm particles (Au@Ag NP core particle of 50nm with a 15nm shell). FFF separation was used here as a sizing technique rather than a separation technique. It was used to confirm that suspensions containing either individual or mixtures of the Au 60nm, Ag 60nm and AuAg 60nm suspensions eluted together and were of the same size. Similarly, FFF was used to show that suspensions containing individual or mixtures of the equivalent 80nm, eluted together and were of the same size. Although the 60nm and 80nm suspensions did not elute at the same time they were not run together. SP-ICP-MS is then used to identify the size and concentration of the particles within the suspension. Successful separation of the NPs was effected and the limits of the instrument were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mass spectrometry and photoelectron spectroscopy of o-, m-, and p-terphenyl cluster anions: the effect of molecular shape on molecular assembly and ion core character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Masaaki; Ando, Naoto; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2008-06-26

    Mass spectrometry and photoelectron spectroscopy of o-, m-, and p-terphenyl cluster anions, (o-TP)n(-) (n = 2-100), (m-TP)n(-) (n = 2-100), and (p-TP)n(-) (n = 1-100), respectively, are conducted to investigate the effect of molecular shape on the molecular aggregation form and the resultant ion core character of the clusters. For (o-TP)n(-) and (m-TP)n(-), neither magic numbers nor discernible isomers are observed throughout the size range. Furthermore, their vertical detachment energies (VDEs) increase up to large n and depend linearly on n(-1/3), implying that they possess a three-dimensional (3D), highly reorganized structure encompassing a monomeric anion core. For (p-TP)n(-), in contrast, prominent magic numbers of n = 5, 7, 10, 12, and 14 are observed, and the VDEs show pronounced irregular shifts below n = 10, while they remain constant above n = 14 (isomer A). These results can be rationalized with two-dimensional (2D) orderings of p-TP molecules and different types of 2D shell closure at n = 7 and 14, the monomeric and multimeric anion core, respectively. Above n = 16, the new feature (isomer B) starts to appear at the higher binding side of isomer A, and it becomes dominant with n, while isomer A gradually disappears for larger sizes. In contrast to isomer A, the VDEs of isomer B continuously increase with the cluster size. This characteristic size evolution suggests that the transition to modified 2D aggregation forms from 2D ones occurs at around n = 20.

  20. Analysis of accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds in plants by ion chromatography with mass spectrometric detection and by atomic emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anne-Christine; Kutschera, Kristin; Mattusch, Jürgen; Otto, Matthias

    2008-12-01

    Phenylated arsenic compounds occur as highly toxic contaminants in former military areas where they were formed as degradation products of chemical warfare agents. Some phenylarsenic compounds such as roxarsone and aminophenylarsonic acids were applied as food additive and veterinary drugs in stock-breeding and therefore pose an environmental risk in agricultural used sites. Very few data exist in the literature concerning uptake and effects of phenylarsenic compounds in plants growing on contaminated soils. In this study, the accumulation, extractability, and metabolization of five different phenylarsenic compounds, phenylarsonic acid, p- and o-aminophenylarsonic acid, phenylarsine oxide, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid called roxarsone, by the terrestrial plant Tropaeolum majus were investigated. Ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to differentiate these arsenic compounds, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used for total arsenic quantification. All compounds considered were taken up by the roots and transferred to stalks, leaves, and flowers. The strongest accumulation was observed for unsubstituted phenylarsonic acid followed by its trivalent analogue phenylarsine oxide that was mostly oxidized in soil whereas the amino- or nitro- and hydroxy-substituted phenylarsonic acids were accumulated to a smaller degree. The highest extraction yield of 90% for ground leaf material was achieved by 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.7, in a two-step extraction with a total extraction time of 24h. The extraction of higher amounts of arsenic (50-70% of total arsenic present in leaves depending on arsenic species application) from non-ground intact leaves with deionized water in comparison with the buffer (20-40% of total arsenic) is ascribed to osmotic effects. The arsenic species analysis revealed a cleavage of the amino groups from the phenyl ring for plants treated with aminophenylarsonic acids

  1. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  2. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of aging effects on the mineral fibers treated with aminopropylsilane and quaternary ammonium compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafar, Ashar; Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan; Sodhi, R.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to investigate the aging effects on the aminopropylsilane (APS) and quaternary ammonium surfactant-treated mineral fibers. APS-coated mineral fiber samples were treated with cationic surfactant...... (PCA) was applied to the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry spectra, and an increase in the intensities of APS characteristic peaks were observed after aging. The observed increase in the signals of APS originates from underlying silanized fibers after the removal of the surfactant...

  3. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2012-01-01

    were not observed.

    High field (12 T negative electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectra showed at first view rather conforming mass spectra for all four DOM samples with abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks from surface to bottom DOM and similar fractions (~50% of assigned molecular compositions throughout all DOM samples. The average mass increased from surface to bottom DOM by about 10 Dalton. The limited variance of FTICR mass spectra probably resulted from a rather inherent conformity of marine DOM at the mandatory level of intrinsic averaging provided by FTICR mass spectrometry, when many isomers unavoidably project on single nominal mass peaks. In addition, averaging from ion suppression added to the accordance observed. The proportion of CHO and CHNO molecular series increased from surface to depth whereas CHOS and especially CHNOS molecular series markedly declined. The abundance of certain aromatic CHOS compounds declined with water depth. For future studies, COSY NMR spectra appear best suited to assess organic molecular complexity of marine DOM and to define individual DOM molecules of yet unknown structure and function. Non-target organic structural spectroscopy at the level demonstrated here covered nearly all carbon present in marine DOM. The exhaustive characterization of complex unknowns in mbox{marine} DOM will reveal a meaningful assessment of individual marine biogeosignatures which carry the holistic memory of the oceanic water masses (Koch et al., 2011.

  4. Fabrication of nano ion–electron sources and nano-probes by local electron bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezeq, Moh’d, E-mail: mohd.rezeq@kustar.ac.ae [Department of Applied Mathematics and Sciences, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.B. 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.B. 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ali, Ahmed; Barada, Hassan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.B. 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • A new method for fabricating nanotips with an apex radius around 1 nm is introduced. • This clean process depends only on the physical electron bombardment mechanism. • This method can be applied to any metal or heavily doped semiconductor materials. • The produced single atom nanotips are ideal as sources of electron and ion beams. • These nanotips are advantageous for nano lithography and scanning probe microscopy. - Abstract: A new method for fabricating nano ion–electron sources and nano probes with an apex in the range of 1 nm is introduced. The method is based on bombarding a regular tip apex with electrons extracted and accelerated from a nearby source by the electric field. This can be achieved by placing a metal ring around a precursor metal tip at a level below the tip apex in a field ion microscope (FIM). The metal ring is then heated, by a grounded DC power source, to a temperature below the thermionic emission value. The electric field between the tip and the hot ring is high enough to cause electrons to be extracted from the metal ring, i.e. Schottky field emission, and then accelerated to the shank with energy sufficient to dislodge atoms from the shank. An atomic scale apex with a single atom end can be obtained by monitoring the evolution of the tip apex due to the movement of mobile atoms while adjusting the tip electric field and the temperature of the metal ring. As this method depends only on the electron bombardment mechanism, this makes it a clean process that can be applied to any metal or heavily doped semiconductor materials appropriate for generating a high electric field for FIM applications.

  5. Cosmic Bombardment IV: Averting catastrophe in the here-and-now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, L.; Hyde, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Ledebuhr, A.

    1994-09-23

    At the present time, it is at least arguable that large-scale cosmic bombardment has been a major driver of the evolution of the terrestrialbiosphere. The fundamental motivation of the present paper is the (high) likelihood that the advent and rise of the human species hasn`t coincided with the cessation of soft and hard collisions in the Asteroid Belt or in the Oort Cloud, and that we will either stop the cosmic bombardment or it will eventually stop us. In the foregoing, briefly reviewed the prospects for active planetary defenses against cosmic bombardment in the very near-term, employing only technologies which exist now and could be brought-to-bear in a defensive system on a one-decade time-scale. We sketch various means and mechanisms from a physicist`s viewpoint by which such defensive systems might detect threat objects, launch interdiction machinery toward them and operate such machinery in their vicinity to alternately deflect, disperse or vaporize objects in the 0.1-10 km-diameter range, the ones whose size and population constitute the greatest threats to our biosphere. We conclude that active defenses of all types are readily feasible against 0.1 kmdiameter incoming cosmic bomblets and that even complete vaporization-class defenses are feasible against 1 km-diameter class objects of all compositions. When facing Great Extinctors of up to 10 km diameter, the feasible defensive methods depend upon the object`s size and composition. Dispersion defenses are feasible against all threat-classes, as are deflection approaches for bomblets up to {approximately} 10 km diameter; vaporization-level protection is, however, available only against dirty snowballs` of the {approximately} 1--2 km diameter class. Great Extinctors of sizes significantly greater than 10 km diameter challenge contemporary human technology ever more severely; fortunately, they appear to be rare on the several Aeon time-scales over which Sol will shift its spectral class.

  6. Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Microstructure of titanium nitride thin films controlled by ion bombardment in a magnetron-sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, R. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Kuzel, R. Jr. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Valvoda, V. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Fakulta Matematicko-Fyzikalni); Kadlec, S. (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Physics); Musil, J. (Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Physics)

    1994-05-01

    The structure of titanium nitride thin films deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering on high chromium steel substrates was studied by X-ray diffraction. In order to characterize relations between the microstructure of sputtered TiN films and the deposition conditions, the parameter E[sub p] was introduced as the average energy transmitted from bombarding particles (ions, electrons, neutrals, photons) to one condensing particle of the film. A transition from a porous to a compact microstructure was found with increasing E[sub p]. The possible inhomogeneity of titanium nitride films is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Angular distribution of sputtered atoms induced by low-energy heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lai; ZHANG Zhu-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The sputtering yield angular distributions have been calculated based on the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields for Ni and Motargets bombarded by low-energy Hg+ ion. The calculated curves show excellent agreement with the corresponding Wehner's experimental results of sputtering yield angular distribution. The fact clearly demonstrated the intrinsic relation between the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields and the sputtering yield angular distribution. This intrinsic relation had been ignored in Yamamura's papers (1981,1982) due to some obvious mistakes.

  9. Computer simulation of chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, J H; Roth, J; Eckstein, W

    2003-01-01

    Chemical erosion of graphite due to hydrogen ion bombardment has been investigated theoretically by applying a model of chemical erosion to the TRIDYN code. The model involves the formation of methane at the end of the ion track as well as the kinetic emission of hydrocarbons from the target surface. Model calculations were performed for ion energies ranging from 10 to 1000 eV and at target temperatures ranging from 300 to 900 K. Good agreement between calculated and measured erosion yields is obtained.

  10. Aspects of Metal Surface Glowing Mechanisms with Intensive Electron Beam Bombardment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Barsuk

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives a brief description and analysis of the main physical processes which can have an effect on the glowing nature of metal element surfaces in different electric vacuum devices when they are bombarded by electron beams. It has been found that the electron glowing effects on metal surfaces according to the electron energy can be explained with the help of the transition scattering on plasma waves or just with the classical transition radiation effect. This fact is rather important in terms of classical physics interpretation of the observed glowing effects on metal surface elements and techniques optimization of metal and electron beams diagnostics as well.

  11. Investigation of energy thresholds of atomic and cluster sputtering of some elements under ion bombardment

    CERN Document Server

    Atabaev, B G; Lifanova, L F

    2002-01-01

    Threshold energies of sputtering of negative cluster ions from the Si(111) surface were measured at bombardment by Cs sup + , Rb sup + , and Na sup + ions with energy of 0.1-3.0 keV. These results are compared with the calculations of the similar thresholds by Bohdansky etc. formulas (3) for clusters Si sub n sup - and Cu sub n sup - with n=(1-5) and also for B, C, Al, Si, Fe, Cu atoms. Threshold energies of sputtering for the above elements were also estimated using the data from (5). Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and theoretical results was obtained. (author)

  12. Mechanisms of pattern formation in grazing-incidence ion bombardment of Pt(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, H; Redinger, A.; Messlinger, S.; Stoian, G.; Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Linke, U.; Michely, T.

    2006-01-01

    Ripple patterns forming on Pt(111) due to 5 keV Ar+ grazing-incidence ion bombardment were investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy in a broad temperature range from 100 to 720 K and for ion fluences up to 3x10(20) ions/m(2). A detailed morphological analysis together with molecular dynamics simulations of single ion impacts allow us to develop atomic scale models for the formation of these patterns. The large difference in step edge versus terrace damage is shown to be crucial for rippl...

  13. Surface layer evolution caused by the bombardment with ionized metal vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döbeli, M., E-mail: doebeli@phys.ethz.ch [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Schafmattstrasse 20, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Dommann, A.; Maeder, X.; Neels, A. [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique CSEM SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Passerone, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Rudigier, H. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); Scopece, D. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Überlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Widrig, B.; Ramm, J. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein)

    2014-08-01

    The evolution of the composition of tungsten carbide and silicon surfaces initiated by the bombardment with Zr and Cr ions has been investigated as a function of the substrate bias voltage. Surface composition profiles were measured by Rutherford backscattering and have been compared with the results obtained by the TRIDYN simulation program. It is found that the general dependence of film thickness on substrate bias is satisfactorily reproduced by this model. Deviations between experiment and simulation are attributed to possible partial oxidation of the surface or uncertainties in the charge state distribution of metal ions. The results confirm that TRIDYN facilitates the predictability of the nucleation of metallic vapor at substrate surfaces.

  14. Production Yield of C-H Cluster From Carbon Material Bombarded by MeV Ions%MeV 离子轰击碳样品引起的碳氢团簇产额

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坤; 郑涛; 郭猜; 杨江燕; 田继挺; 聂锐; 马宏骥; 丁富荣

    2014-01-01

    利用北京大学2×1.7 MV静电串列加速器产生的1.5 MeV Au2+和Si+束流轰击碳纳米管样品,用二次离子飞行时间质谱方法分析了二次离子成分,通过质量已知的样品的定标,确认了轰击产生的二次离子质量。分析束流轰击后的二次离子产额,发现在此能量下二次离子产额与离子在物质中射程的横向歧离表现出正相关。%Using the time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry method , the production yield of C-H cluster from carbon material bombarded by MeV ions was investigated .In the experiment ,Si+ and Au2+ ions generated by the 2 × 1.7MV tandem accelerator of Peking University were chosen as the primary ion beams .The mass of the secondary ion was calibrated by the sample with known mass .By analyzing the mass spectrum of the secondary ion bombarded by different ions ,it is found that the yield is related to the lateral straggling of ions in the material at this energy region .

  15. Effect of bombardment with iron ions on the evolution of helium, hydrogen, and deuterium blisters in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutov, V. F.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Sokhatskii, A. S.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of bombardment with iron ions on the evolution of gas porosity in silicon single crystals has been studied. Gas porosity has been produced by implantation hydrogen, deuterium, and helium ions with energies of 17, 12.5, and 20 keV, respectively, in identical doses of 1 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature. For such energy of bombarding ions, the ion doping profiles have been formed at the same distance from the irradiated surface of the sample. Then, the samples have been bombarded with iron Fe10+ ions with energy of 150 keV in a dose of 5.9 × 1014 cm-2. Then 30-min isochoric annealing has been carried out with an interval of 50°C in the temperature range of 250-900°C. The samples have been analyzed using optical and electron microscopes. An extremely strong synergetic effect of sequential bombardment of silicon single crystals with gas ions and iron ions at room temperature on the nucleation and growth of gas porosity during postradiation annealing has been observed. For example, it has been shown that the amorphous layer formed in silicon by additional bombardment with iron ions stimulates the evolution of helium blisters, slightly retards the evolution of hydrogen blisters, and completely suppresses the evolution of deuterium blisters. The results of experiments do not provide an adequate explanation of the reason for this difference; additional targeted experiments are required.

  16. Residual stress in nano-structured stainless steel (AISI 316L) prompted by Xe+ ion bombardment at different impinging angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucatti, S.; Droppa, R.; Figueroa, C. A.; Klaus, M.; Genzel, Ch.; Alvarez, F.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of low energy (316L steel) is reported. The results take into account the influence of the ion incident angle maintaining constant all other bombarding parameters (i.e., ion energy and current density, temperature, and doses). The bombarded surface topography shows that ions prompt the formation of nanometric regular patterns on the surface crystalline grains and stressing the structure. The paper focalizes on the study of the surface residual stress state stemming from the ion bombardment studied by means of the "sin2 ψ" and "Universal Plot" methods. The analysis shows the absence of shear stress in the affected material region and the presence of compressive in-plane residual biaxial stress (˜200 MPa) expanding up to ˜1 μm depth for all the studied samples. Samples under oblique bombardment present higher compressive stress values in the direction of the projected ion beam on the bombarded surface. The absolute value of the biaxial surface stress difference (σ11-σ22) increases on ion impinging angles, a phenomenon associated with the momentum transfer by the ions. The highest stress level was measured for ion impinging angles of 45° ( σ 11 = -380 ± 10 MPa and σ 22 = -320 ± 10 MPa). The different stresses obtained in the studied samples do not affect significantly the formation of characteristic surface patterns.

  17. Enhanced field emission from compound emitters of carbon nanotubes and ZnO tetrapods by electron beam bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lou, Chaogang; Zhao, Zhiwei; Jing, Chen; Wang, Baoping

    2011-06-01

    The enhancement of field emission from compound emitters of carbon nanotubes and ZnO tetrapods by the electron beam bombardment is reported. After 20 minutes electron bombardment with 6 keV energy, a few bird-nest micro structures are formed in the compound emitters array. As the simulation results shown, the electric field and field emission current density at the tip of ZnO tetrapod are increased due to the influences of these bird-nest micro structures. From the measurement of the field emission performance, it can be seen that the turn-on electric field and threshold electric field of the field emitter array decrease to 0.4 V/microm and 2.4 V/microm respectively. They have decreased 62% and 15% after the electron bombardment. After the electron bombardment, the emission sites density is increased. The field emission images show that the uniformity of field emission has been improved obviously after the proper electron bombardment. The methodology proposed in this paper has a promising application in the field emission devices.

  18. High-field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hertkorn

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High-performance, non-target, high-resolution organic structural spectroscopy was applied to solid phase extracted marine dissolved organic matter (SPE-DOM isolated from four different depths in the open South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3° E, 18° S; Angola Basin and provided molecular level information with extraordinary coverage and resolution. Sampling was performed at depths of 5 m (Angola Current; near-surface photic zone, 48 m (Angola Current; fluorescence maximum, 200 m (still above Antarctic Intermediate Water, AAIW; upper mesopelagic zone and 5446 m (North Atlantic Deep Water, NADW; abyssopelagic, ~30 m above seafloor and produced SPE-DOM with near 40% carbon yield and beneficial nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxation properties, a crucial prerequisite for the acquisition of NMR spectra with excellent resolution. 1H and 13C NMR spectra of all four marine SPE-DOM showed smooth bulk envelopes, reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap, with a few percent of visibly resolved signatures and variable abundances for all major chemical environments. The abundance of singly oxygenated aliphatics and acetate derivatives in 1H NMR spectra declined from surface to deep marine SPE-DOM, whereas C-based aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM increased in abundance. Surface SPE-DOM contained fewer methyl esters than all other samples, likely a consequence of direct exposure to sunlight. Integration of 13C NMR spectra revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to depth, reflecting a progressive oxygenation, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Aliphatic branching increased with depth, whereas the fraction of oxygenated aliphatics declined for methine, methylene and methyl carbon. Lipids in the oldest SPE-DOM at 5446 m showed a larger share of ethyl groups and methylene carbon than observed in the other samples. Two-dimensional NMR spectra showed

  19. Topographical characterization of Ar-bombarded Si(1 1 1) surfaces by atomic force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Niebieskikwiat, D G; Pregliasco, G R; Gayone, J E; Grizzi, O; Sanchez, E A

    2002-01-01

    We used atomic force microscopy to study the topographical changes induced on Si(1 1 1) surfaces by 10-22 keV Ar sup + bombardment. The irradiation was carried on normal to the surface with doses in the 1-60x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2 range. We observed a first generation of blisters at a critical dose around 3x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2 , which flakes off at 19x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2 , and a second generation of smaller blisters between 35 and 45x10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2. Measurements of the mean surface height show that at low irradiation doses the surface inflates because of voids produced by Ar sup + implantation. For doses greater than 20x10 sup 1 sup 6 Ar sup + /cm sup 2 the height decreases linearly because of sputtering, with a slope corresponding to a sputtering yield of 1.4. Finally, we present electron spectra produced during grazing proton bombardment of samples whose topography has been modified by Ar irradiation.

  20. Bombardment induced ion transport - part IV: ionic conductivity of ultra-thin polyelectrolyte multilayer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesp, Veronika; Hermann, Matthias; Schäfer, Martin; Hühn, Jonas; Parak, Wolfgang J; Weitzel, Karl-Michael

    2016-02-14

    The dependence of the ionic conductance of ultra-thin polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films on the temperature and the number of bilayers has been investigated by the recently developed low energy bombardment induced ion transport (BIIT) method. To this end multilayers of alternating poly(sodium 4-styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) layers were deposited on a metal electrode and subsequently bombarded by a low energy potassium ion beam. Ions are transported through the film according to the laws of electro-diffusion towards a grounded backside electrode. They are neutralized at the interface between the polymer film and the metal electrode. The detected neutralization current scales linearly with the acceleration potential of the ion beam indicating Ohmic behavior for the (PAH/PSS)x multilayer, where x denotes the number of bilayers. The conductance exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on the number of bilayers, x. For 2 ≤ x ≤ 8 the conductance increases non-linearly with the number of bilayers. For x ≥ 8 the conductance decreases with increasing number of bilayers. The variation of the conductance is rationalized by a model accounting for the structure dependence of the conductivity. The thinnest sample for which the conductance has been measured is the single bilayer reflecting properties dominated by the interface. The activation energy for the ion transport is 0.49 eV.

  1. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Growth and Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Naoto; Matsuura, Hideharu; Matsuda, Akihisa

    1989-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the effect of ion bombardment during the growth of amorphous silicon-germanium alloy films from silane and germane rf-glow discharge. Independent control of the plasma and the ion flux and energy is obtained by using a triode configuration. The ion contribution to the total deposition rate can reach 20% on negatively biased substrates. Although the Si and Ge composition of the film does not depend on the ion flux and energy, the optical, structural and electronic properties are drastically modified at low deposition temperatures when the maximum ion energy increases up to 50 eV, and remain constant above 50 eV. For a Ge atomic concentration of 37% and a temperature of 135°C, the optical gap decreases from 1.67 to 1.45 eV. This is correlated with a modification of hydrogen bonding configurations. Silicon dihydride sites disappear and preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon is reduced in favour of germanium. Moreover the photoconductivity increases which shows that ion bombardment is a key parameter to optimize the quality of low band gap amorphous silicon-germanium alloys.

  2. The effects of energetic proton bombardment on polymeric materials: Experimental studies and degradation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, D. R.; Gupta, A.; Smith, M. V.; Fornes, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes 3 MeV proton bombardment experiments on several polymeric materials of interest to NASA carried out on the Tandem Van De Graff Accelerator at the California Institute of Technology's Kellogg Radiation Laboratory. Model aromatic and aliphatic polymers such as poly(1-vinyl naphthalene) and poly(methyl methacrylate), as well as polymers for near term space applications such as Kapton, Epoxy and Polysulfone, have been included in this study. Chemical and physical characterization of the damage products have been carried out in order to develop a model of the interaction of these polymers with the incident proton beam. The proton bombardment methodology developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and reported here is part of an ongoing study on the effects of space radiation on polymeric materials. The report is intended to provide an overview of the mechanistic, as well as the technical and experimental, issues involved in such work rather than to serve as an exhaustive description of all the results.

  3. Angular and energy dependence of ion bombardment of Mo/Si multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorma, H.J.; Louis, E.; Bijkerk, F.;

    1997-01-01

    The process of ion bombardment is investigated for the fabrication of Mo/Si multilayer x-ray mirrors using e-beam evaporation. The ion treatment is applied immediately after deposition of each of the Si layers to smoothen the layers by removing an additional thickness of the Si layer. In this study...... the parameters of Kr+ ion bombardment have been optimized within the energy range 300 eV-2 keV and an angular range between 20 degrees and 50 degrees. The optical performance of the Mo/Si multilayers is determined by absolute measurements of the near-normal-incidence reflectivity at 14.4 nm wavelength...... are found to be 2 keV at 50 degrees angle of incidence with respect to the surface. These settings result in 47% reflectivity at 85 degrees (lambda = 14.4 nm) for a 16-period Mo/Si multilayer mirror, corresponding to an interface roughness of 0.21 nm rms. Analysis shows that the interface roughness...

  4. Modeling the reduction of gross lithium erosion observed under high-flux deuterium bombardment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrams, T., E-mail: tabrams@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Jaworski, M.A.; Kaita, R.; Nichols, J.H.; Stotler, D.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); De Temmerman, G.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Associate EURATOM-FOM, BL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    Both thin (<1 μm) and thick (∼500 μm) lithium films under high-flux deuterium and neon plasma bombardment were studied in the linear plasma device Magnum-PSI at ion fluxes >10{sup 24} m{sup −2} s{sup −1} and surface temperatures <700 °C. During Ne plasma exposures, Li erosion rates inferred from measurements of Li–I radiation exceed Langmuir Law evaporation, but no previous results exist to benchmark the binary collision approximation (BCA) and thermal sputtering measurements. Measured Li erosion rates during D plasma bombardment were compared to the adatom-evaporation model of thermal sputtering with an additional reduction term to account for the relative D/Li composition of the Li film. This model captures the qualitative evolution of the Li erosion yield but still overestimates the measured erosion by a factor of 5–10. This suggests that additional refinements to the mixed-material model are needed.

  5. Influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the emission of molecular secondary ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Kollmer, F.; Moellers, R.; Niehuis, E

    2004-06-15

    In order to further our understanding of the secondary ion emission behavior from organic surfaces, we have performed a systematic study on the influence of the primary ion parameters. As model sample Irganox 1010 on low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used. Both monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au) and polyatomic (Au{sub 2}, Au{sub 3}, SF{sub 5}, C{sub 60}) primary ions were used. Additionally, the primary ion energy was varied. The data were evaluated by calculating secondary ion yields, disappearance cross sections and ion formation efficiencies (yield/damage cross section). The results show that heavier monoatomic ions are more efficient than lighter ones and that polyatomic primary ions are more efficient than monoatomic ones. Highest efficiency values are found for C{sub 60} bombardment at 20 keV. Compared to Ga bombardment the efficiency gain in this case is more than 2000-fold. Additionally it can be shown that the higher efficiency is correlated with a softer ionization, i.e. less fragmentation. The results suggest a much more homogeneous energy distribution in the sample surface by polyatomic primary ions compared to monoatomic ones.

  6. Influence of primary ion bombardment conditions on the emission of molecular secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, R.; Hagenhoff, B.; Kollmer, F.; Möllers, R.; Niehuis, E.

    2004-06-01

    In order to further our understanding of the secondary ion emission behavior from organic surfaces, we have performed a systematic study on the influence of the primary ion parameters. As model sample Irganox 1010 on low density polyethylene (LDPE) was used. Both monoatomic (Ga, Cs, Au) and polyatomic (Au 2, Au 3, SF 5, C 60) primary ions were used. Additionally, the primary ion energy was varied. The data were evaluated by calculating secondary ion yields, disappearance cross sections and ion formation efficiencies (yield/damage cross section). The results show that heavier monoatomic ions are more efficient than lighter ones and that polyatomic primary ions are more efficient than monoatomic ones. Highest efficiency values are found for C 60 bombardment at 20 keV. Compared to Ga bombardment the efficiency gain in this case is more than 2000-fold. Additionally it can be shown that the higher efficiency is correlated with a softer ionization, i.e. less fragmentation. The results suggest a much more homogeneous energy distribution in the sample surface by polyatomic primary ions compared to monoatomic ones.

  7. A liquid-like model for the morphology evolution of ion bombarded thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, L., E-mail: luca.repetto@unige.it [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lo Savio, R. [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Šetina Batič, B. [Inštitut Za Kovinske Materiale in Tehnologije, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Firpo, G.; Angeli, E.; Valbusa, U. [Department of Physics and Nanomed Labs, Università di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Thin solid films exposed to ion irradiation exhibit a peculiar evolution that can differ substantially from what is observed for bulk samples. The phenomenology of the patterns that self-organize on the substrate is very rich, with morphologies that display several degrees of order upon the modification of initial film characteristics and irradiation parameters. This richness paves the way for the fabrication of novel functional surfaces, but it is also an indication of the complexity of the underlying driving mechanisms. A remarkable simplification for the comprehension of these phenomena can come from the noteworthy similarity of the obtained patterns with those showing up when liquids dewet from their substrates. Here, we analyze the possibility to apply a liquid-like model to explain the morphology evolution of ion bombarded thin films for the whole phenomenology showing up in experiments. In establishing this connection between liquids and ion bombarded thin films, we propose to use also for liquids the insight gained for our system with recent experiments that stress the importance of the substrate topography for the selection of the dewetting mechanism. If confirmed, this result would lead to a reconsideration of the importance of capillary waves in spinodal dewetting, and will help to understand the low reproducibility of the related experimental results.

  8. Effect of straining graphene on nanopore creation using Si cluster bombardment: A reactive atomistic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdiyorov, G. R.; Mortazavi, B.; Ahzi, S.; Peeters, F. M.; Khraisheh, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene nanosheets have recently received a revival of interest as a new class of ultrathin, high-flux, and energy-efficient sieving membranes because of their unique two-dimensional and atomically thin structure, good flexibility, and outstanding mechanical properties. However, for practical applications of graphene for advanced water purification and desalination technologies, the creation of well controlled, high-density, and subnanometer diameter pores becomes a key factor. Here, we conduct reactive force-field molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of external strain on nanopore creation in the suspended graphene by bombardment with Si clusters. Depending on the size and energy of the clusters, different kinds of topography were observed in the graphene sheet. In all the considered conditions, tensile strain results in the creation of nanopores with regular shape and smooth edges. On the contrary, compressive strain increases the elastic response of graphene to irradiation that leads to the formation of net-like defective structures with predominantly carbon atom chains. Our findings show the possibility of creating controlled nanopores in strained graphene by bombardment with Si clusters.

  9. Synergistic effects of vacuum ultraviolet radiation, ion bombardment, and heating in 193 nm photoresist roughening and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nest, D.; Graves, D. B.; Engelmann, S.; Bruce, R. L.; Weilnboeck, F.; Oehrlein, G. S.; Andes, C.; Hudson, E. A.

    2008-04-01

    The roles of ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) photons, Ar+ ion bombardment and heating in the roughening of 193nm photoresist have been investigated. Atomic force microscopy measurements show minimal surface roughness after UV/VUV-only or ion-only exposures at any temperature. Simultaneous UV/VUV, ion bombardment, and heating to surface temperatures of 60-100°C result in increased surface roughness, and is comparable to argon plasma-exposed samples. Ion bombardment creates a modified near-surface layer while UV/VUV radiation results in loss of carbon-oxygen bonds up to a depth of ˜100nm. Enhanced roughness is only observed in the presence of all three effects.

  10. Comparative analysis of transgenic tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) plants obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Caixia; Long, Danfeng; Lenk, Ingo; Nielsen, Klaus Kristian

    2008-10-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and particle bombardment are the two most widely used methods for genetically modifying grasses. Here, these two systems are compared for transformation efficiency, transgene integration and transgene expression when used to transform tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.). The bar gene was used as a selectable marker and selection during tissue culture was performed using 2 mg/l bialaphos in both callus induction and regeneration media. Average transformation efficiency across the four callus lines used in the experiments was 10.5% for Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and 11.5% for particle bombardment. Similar transgene integration patterns and co-integration frequencies of bar and uidA were observed in both gene transfer systems. However, while GUS activity was detected in leaves of 53% of the Agrobacterium transformed lines, only 20% of the bombarded lines showed GUS activity. Thus, Agrobacterium-mediated transformation appears to be the preferred method for producing transgenic tall fescue plants.

  11. Chemical characterization of latent fingerprints by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, mega electron volt secondary mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging: an intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Melanie J; Bright, Nicholas J; Croxton, Ruth S; Francese, Simona; Ferguson, Leesa S; Hinder, Stephen; Jickells, Sue; Jones, Benjamin J; Jones, Brian N; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ojeda, Jesus J; Webb, Roger P; Wolstenholme, Rosalind; Bleay, Stephen

    2012-10-16

    The first analytical intercomparison of fingerprint residue using equivalent samples of latent fingerprint residue and characterized by a suite of relevant techniques is presented. This work has never been undertaken, presumably due to the perishable nature of fingerprint residue, the lack of fingerprint standards, and the intradonor variability, which impacts sample reproducibility. For the first time, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry, high-energy secondary ion mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to target endogenous compounds in fingerprints and a method is presented for establishing their relative abundance in fingerprint residue. Comparison of the newer techniques with the more established gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging shows good agreement between the methods, with each method detecting repeatable differences between the donors, with the exception of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, for which quantitative analysis has not yet been established. We further comment on the sensitivity, selectivity, and practicability of each of the methods for use in future police casework or academic research.

  12. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VI. Comparing the Mass and Light in MACS J0416.1-2403 Using Frontier Field Imaging and GLASS Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, A.; Huang, K.-H.; Treu, T.; Bradač, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Wang, X.; Brammer, G. B.; Broussard, A.; Amorin, R.; Castellano, M.; Fontana, A.; Merlin, E.; Schrabback, T.; Trenti, M.; Vulcani, B.

    2016-11-01

    We present a model using both strong and weak gravitational lensing of the galaxy cluster MACS J0416.1-2403, constrained using spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) and Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data. We search for emission lines in known multiply imaged sources in the GLASS spectra, obtaining secure spectroscopic redshifts of 30 multiple images belonging to 15 distinct source galaxies. The GLASS spectra provide the first spectroscopic measurements for five of the source galaxies. The weak lensing signal is acquired from 884 galaxies in the F606W HFF image. By combining the weak lensing constraints with 15 multiple image systems with spectroscopic redshifts and nine multiple image systems with photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster on an adaptive grid. The resulting map of total mass density is compared with a map of stellar mass density obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields imaging data to study the relative distribution of stellar and total mass in the cluster. We find that the projected stellar mass to total mass ratio, f ⋆, varies considerably with the stellar surface mass density. The mean projected stellar mass to total mass ratio is =0.009+/- 0.003 (stat.), but with a systematic error as large as 0.004-0.005, dominated by the choice of the initial mass function. We find agreement with several recent measurements of f ⋆ in massive cluster environments. The lensing maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available to the broader community in the standard HFF format.

  13. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  14. Early Solar System Bombardment: Exploring the Echos of Planetary Migration and Lost Ice Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, William

    2017-01-01

    Heavily cratered surfaces on the Moon, Mars, Mercury show the terrestrial planets were battered by an intense bombardment during their first billion years or more, but the timing, sources, and dynamical implications of these impacts are controversial. The Late Heavy Bombardment refers to impact events that occurred after stabilization of planetary lithospheres such that they could be preserved as craters. Lunar melt rocks and meteorite shock ages point toward a discrete episode of elevated impact flux between ~3.5 to ~4.2 Ga and a relative quiescence between ~4.0-4.2 to ~4.4 Ga. Evidence from Precambrian impact spherule layers suggest a long-lived tail of terrestrial impactors lasted to ~2.0-2.5 Ga.Dynamical models that include populations residual from primary accretion and destabilized by giant planet migration can potentially account for observations, although all have pros and cons. The most parsimonious solution to match constraints is a hybrid model with discrete early, post-accretion and later, planetary instability-driven impactor populations.For the latter, giant planet instability models can successfully reproduce the orbits of the giant planets, the origin/properties of Jupiter/Neptune Trojans, irregular satellites, the structure of the main asteroid and Kuiper belts, and the presence of comet-like bodies in the main belt, Hilda, and Trojan asteroid populations. The best solutions, however, postulate there were once five giant planets: Jupiter, Saturn, and three ice giants, one that was eventually ejected out of the Solar System by a Jupiter encounter. Intriguing evidence for this “lost” ice giant planet can be found in the orbital properties of bodies captured in the main asteroid belt.The applicability of giant planet instabilities to exoplanet systems seems likely, with the initial configuration of giant planet orbits a byproduct of their early migration and subsequent capture into mutual mean motion resonances. The question is how long can a

  15. Combined use of direct analysis in real-time/Orbitrap mass spectrometry and micro-Raman spectroscopy for the comprehensive characterization of real explosive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Maxime C; Schwarzenberg, Adrián; Schramm, Sébastien; Cole, Richard B

    2016-08-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART™) high-resolution Orbitrap™ mass spectrometry (HRMS) in combination with Raman microscopy was used for the detailed molecular level characterization of explosives including not only the charge but also the complex matrix of binders, plasticizers, polymers, and other possible organic additives. A total of 15 defused military weapons including grenades, mines, rockets, submunitions, and mortars were examined. Swabs and wipes were used to collect trace (residual) amounts of explosives and their organic constituents from the defused military weapons and micrometer-size explosive particles were transferred using a vacuum suction-impact collection device (vacuum impactor) from wipe and swap samples to an impaction plate made of carbon. The particles deposited on the carbon plate were then characterized using micro-Raman spectroscopy followed by DART-HRMS providing fingerprint signatures of orthogonal nature. The optical microscope of the micro-Raman spectrometer was first used to localize and characterize the explosive charge on the impaction plate which was then targeted for identification by DART-HRMS analysis in both the negative and positive modes. Raman spectra of the explosives TNT, RDX and PETN were acquired from micrometer size particles and characterized by the presence of their characteristic Raman bands obtained directly at the surface of the impaction plate nondestructively without further sample preparation. Negative mode DART-HRMS confirmed the types of charges contained in the weapons (mainly TNT, RDX, HMX, and PETN; either as individual components or as mixtures). These energetic compounds were mainly detected as deprotonated species [M-H](-), or as adduct [M + (35)Cl](-), [M + (37)Cl](-), or [M + NO3](-) anions. Chloride adducts were promoted in the heated DART reagent gas by adding chloroform vapors to the helium stream using an "in-house" delivery method. When the polarity was switched to positive mode

  16. Photoelectron photoion molecular beam spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevor, D.J.

    1980-12-01

    The use of supersonic molecular beams in photoionization mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy to assist in the understanding of photoexcitation in the vacuum ultraviolet is described. Rotational relaxation and condensation due to supersonic expansion were shown to offer new possibilities for molecular photoionization studies. Molecular beam photoionization mass spectroscopy has been extended above 21 eV photon energy by the use of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) facilities. Design considerations are discussed that have advanced the state-of-the-art in high resolution vuv photoelectron spectroscopy. To extend gas-phase studies to 160 eV photon energy, a windowless vuv-xuv beam line design is proposed.

  17. The Bombardment of the Earth During the Hadean and Early Archean Eras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.; Bottke, W. F.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.; Morbidelli, A.; Wuennemann, K.; Kring, D. A.; Bierhaus, M.

    2013-12-01

    Our knowledge of the Earth during the Hadean and early Archean eons (ca 4.5-3.5 Ga) is very limited, mainly because few rocks older than 3.8 Ga have been found (e.g. Harrison 2009). Hadean-era zircons have allowed us to glean important insights into this era, but their data has led to considerably different evolution models for the evolution of the early Earth; some predict a hellish world dominated by a molten surface with a sporadic steam atmosphere (e.g. Pollack 1997), while others have predicted a tranquil, cool surface with stable oceans (e.g. Wilde et al 2001; Valley et al 2002). To understand whether either model (or both) could be right, we believe it is useful to quantitatively examine the post Moon-forming impact bombardment of the early Earth. Over the last several years, through a combination of observations (e.g., Marchi et al 2012), theoretical models (e.g., Bottke et al 2012), and geochemical constraints from lunar rock (e.g. highly siderophile elements -HSE- abundances delivered to the Moon by impactors; the global number of lunar basins; the record of Archean-era impact spherule beds on Earth; Walker 2009; Neumann et al 2012), we have constructed a calibrated model of the early lunar impactor flux (Morbidelli et al 2012). Our results have now been extrapolated to the Earth, where they can make predictions about its early bombardment. Using a Monte Carlo code to account for the stochastic nature of major impacts, and constraining our results by the estimated HSE abundances of Earth's mantle (that were presumably delivered by impactors; Walker 2009; Bottke et al. 2010), we find the following trends. In the first ~100-200 Myr after the formation of the Moon, which we assume was created ~4.5 Ga, the Earth was almost entirely resurfaced by impacts. This bombardment, which included numerous D > 1000 km diameter impactors, should have vigorously mixed the crust and upper mantle. Between ~4.1-4.3 Ga, the impactor flux steadily decreased; though an uptick

  18. Surface Erosion of GaN Bombarded by Highly Charged 208Pbq+-Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Qing; ZHANG Chong-Hong; YANG Yi-Tao; YAO Cun-Feng; LI Bing-Sheng; JIN Yun-Fan; SUN You-Mei; SONG Shu-Jian

    2008-01-01

    Surface change of gallium nitride specimens after bombardment by highly charged Pbq+-ions (q=25, 35) at room temperature is studied by means of atomic force microscopy. The experimental results reveal that the surface of GaN specimens is significantly etched and erased. An unambiguous step-up is observed. The erosion depth not only strongly depends on the charge state of ions, but also is related to the incident angle of Pbq+ -ions and the ion dose. The erosion depth of the specimens in 60°incidence (tilted incidence) is significantly deeper than that of the normal incidence. The erosion behaviour of specimens has little dependence on the kinetic energy of ion (E,k=360, 700keV). On the other hand, surface roughness of the irradiated area is obviously decreased due to erosion compared with the un-irradiated area. A flat terrace is formed.

  19. Blazed diffraction gratings produced by ion bombardment of pre-patterned solid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Matt P.; Bradley, R. Mark

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method of producing high quality blazed gratings and carry out simulations of it. By combining the near perfect periodicity produced by conventional lithographic methods with the tendency of ion sputtering to produce terraced topographies, this fabrication procedure could produce highly ordered, faceted surfaces on amorphous materials. Our approach differs from previous uses of ion bombardment to fabricate blazed gratings, and has the unique advantage that it could be used as the initial step in the fabrication of high efficiency multilayer-coated blazed gratings. Our numerical investigations of the relevant equations of motion demonstrate that our method produces efficient blazed gratings for a broad range of parameter values. We also develop concrete predictions regarding the optimal implementation of our proposed procedure, and show that high quality blazed gratings can emerge even if additional linear or nonlinear terms are present in the equation of motion.

  20. Howard Zinn, La bombe. De l'inutilité des bombardements aériens

    OpenAIRE

    Erbs, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Avec La bombe, Howard Zinn signe son dernier ouvrage. Historien, intellectuel réputé, engagé au côté des mouvements contestataires américains, Howard Zinn a marqué les consciences grâce à ses écrits critiques sur le pouvoir et ses structures. La bombe reprend un texte original, « Hiroshima : briser le silence », publié en 1995 à l’occasion du 50e anniversaire du bombardement atomique du Japon. L’auteur souhaite y subvertir les discours prônant la nécessité des attaques atomiques contre le Jap...

  1. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  2. Molecular dynamics study on low-energy sputtering of carbon material by Xe ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, T.; Hyakutake, T.

    2013-05-01

    The low-energy sputtering of carbon material under Xe ion bombardment is studied through the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. For the normal incidence of Xe, the MD result of sputtering yield almost agrees with the experimental result by Williams et al. (AIAA-2004-3788). However, the experimental result shows a less incident angle dependence than the MD result because the experiment performed on a rough surface. It is found that the sputtered particles have memory of the projectile because the sputtered particles by the low-energy projectile undergo only a few collisions before the ejection. Low density of an amorphous carbon surface brings the decrease of the sputtering yield and the increase of high-energy sputtered atoms.

  3. Influences of edge localized mode-like pulsed plasma bombardment on deuterium retention in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Nakatsuka, M.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) subjected to pulsed D plasma bombardment (surface absorbed energy density Q ~0.5-0.7 MJ m-2 at ~0.3-0.5 ms) has been investigated in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. A high temperature desorption peak of D2 appears at ~1000-1100 K following transients at ~0.5 MJ m-2. At a higher Q ~0.7 MJ m-2, the total amount of D retained in W is significantly reduced. Nano-sized helium (He) bubbles, created by steady-state He plasma pre-exposure at ~573 K, slightly lower D retention, while a significant reduction is observed for a W fuzzy surface formed by steady-state high temperature (~1100 K) He plasma pre-exposure.

  4. Binary collision model for neon Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1986-01-01

    A model is developed to account for the angle-resolved Auger spectra from neon ion bombardment of the aluminum surface recently obtained by Pepper and Aron. The neon is assumed to be excited in a single asymmetric neon-aluminum-collision and scattered back into the vacuum where it emits an Auger electron. The velocity of the Auger electron acquires a Doppler shift by virtue of the emission from a moving source. The dependence of the Auger peak shape and energy on the incident ion energy, angle of incidence and on the angle of Auger electron emission with respect to the surface is presented. Satisfactory agreement with the angle resolved experimental observations is obtained. The dependence of the angle-integrated Auger yield on the incident ion energy and angle of incidence is also obtained and shown to be in satisfactory agreement with available experimental evidence.

  5. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    , and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear...... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Less than 0.03% of 6-aminocaproic acid was converted to 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid after 30 days of storage at 80 °C. Degradation products of 6-aminocaproic acid were also observed after storage at the applied temperatures, e.g., dimer, trimer...

  6. Diffusion enhancement due to low-energy ion bombardment during sputter etching and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, A. H.; Greene, J. E.

    1980-08-01

    The effects of low-energy ion bombardment on enhancing elemental diffusion rates at both heterojunction interfaces during film deposition and over the compositionally altered layer created during sputter etching alloy targets have been considered. Depth dependent enhanced interdiffusion coefficients, expressed as D*(x)=D*(0) exp(-x/Ld), where D*(0) is more than five orders of magnitude greater than thermal diffusion values, were measured in InSb/GaSb multilayer structures deposited by multitarget bias sputering. D*(0) was determined from the amplitude u of the compositional modulation in the multilayered films (layer thicknesses between 20 and 45 Å) as measured by superlattice x-ray diffraction techniques. The value of D*(0) was found to increase from 3×10-17 to 1×10-16 cm2/sec as the applied substrate bias was increased from 0 to -75 V. However even at Va=0, the diffusion coefficient was enhanced owing to an induced substrate potential with respect to the positive space-charge region in the Ar discharge. The diffusion length of Ld of the ion bombardment created defects was ˜1000 Å. Enhanced diffusion also has a significiant effect on the altered layer thickness xe and the total sputtering time te (or ion dose) required to reach steady state during ion etching of multielement targets. The effects of using an exponentially depth dependent versus a constant value of the enhanced diffusion coefficient on calculated values of xe and te in single-phase binary alloys were considered. The results show that both xe and te are considerably larger using a depth dependent D*(x), when Ld

  7. Possible wave formation and martensitic transformation of iron particles in copper single crystals during argon ion bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thölén, Anders Ragnar; Li, Chang-Hai; Easterling, K.E.

    1983-01-01

    Thin single crystal copper specimens (thickness ~250 nm) containing coherent iron particles (diameter 40–50 nm) have been bombarded with argon ions (5, 80, and 330 keV). During this process some of the iron particles transform to martensite. The transformation was observed near the exposed surface...

  8. Radiation in the wavelength range 120-900 nm from keV electron bombardment of solid hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Sørensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    The emission of light from hydrogenic pellet material has been studied in a special experimental set-up. The measurements show that the intensity of light from particle bombarded solid hydrogens is very small and that none of the well known lines for the gas phase are emitted from the solid. The ...

  9. New experimental capability to investigate the hypervelocity micrometeoroid bombardment of cryogenic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew Oakleigh; Dee, Richard; Gudipati, Murthy S.; Horányi, Mihály; James, David; Kempf, Sascha; Munsat, Tobin; Sternovsky, Zoltán; Ulibarri, Zach

    2016-02-01

    Ice is prevalent throughout the solar system and beyond. Though the evolution of many of these icy surfaces is highly dependent on associated micrometeoroid impact phenomena, experimental investigation of these impacts has been extremely limited, especially at the impactor speeds encountered in space. The dust accelerator facility at the Institute for Modeling Plasmas, Atmospheres, and Cosmic Dust (IMPACT) of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute has developed a novel cryogenic system that will facilitate future study of hypervelocity impacts into ice and icy regolith. The target consists of a copper block, cooled by liquid nitrogen, upon which layers of vapor-deposited ice, pre-frozen ice, or icy regolith can be built in a controlled and quantifiable environment. This ice can be grown from a variety of materials, including H2O, CH3OH, NH3, and slurries containing nanophase iron. Ice temperatures can be varied between 96 K and 150 K and ice thickness greater than 150 nm can be accurately measured. Importantly, the composition of ion plumes created during micrometeoroid impacts onto these icy layers can be measured even in trace amounts by in situ time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. In this paper, we present the fundamental design components of the cryogenic target chamber at IMPACT and proof-of-concept results from target development and from first impacts into thick layers of water ice.

  10. Constraints on planetesimal disk mass from the cratering record and equatorial ridge on Iapetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Valentin, E. G.; Barr, A. C.; Lopez Garcia, E. J. [Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, Brown University, 324 Brook Street, Box 1846, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Kirchoff, M. R. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 200, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Schenk, P. M., E-mail: ervalentin@usra.edu [Lunar and Planetary Institute, 3600 Bay Area Boulevard, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Iapetus, the outermost regular satellite of Saturn, has a drastic albedo dichotomy and an equatorial circumferential ridge that reaches heights of 20 km and widths of 70 km. This moon is thought to have formed concurrently with Saturn, and so would have experienced an intense bombardment after its formation. The ridge, which has been inferred to be one of the most ancient features on Iapetus' surface, could reasonably be expected to have been eroded by impacts; however, it has retained long continuous sections and a nearly pristine triangular shape with ridge slopes reaching ∼40°. We use these observations, along with crater counts on Iapetus' surface, to constrain the total bombardment mass experienced by the satellite since its formation. The ridge morphology and the global crater population recorded on Iapetus both suggest similar bombardment masses, indicating the ridge is indeed ancient. We find that the inferred total bombardment mass incident on Iapetus is less than 20% of the bombardment predicted by the classic Nice model for early solar system evolution. Our results, though, support the recently proposed scenarios of planetesimal-driven migration of the young outer planets including more realistic disk conditions.

  11. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  12. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA MASS EMISSION FLUX FROM HOG WASTE EFFLUENT SPRAYING OPERATION USING OPEN PATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY WITH VERTICAL RADIAL PLUME MAPPING ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emission of ammonia from concentrated animal feeding operations represents an increasingly important environmental issue. Determination of total ammonia mass emission flux from extended area sources such as waste lagoons and waste effluent spraying operations can be evaluated usi...

  13. The nuclear regions of NGC 7582 from [NeII] spectroscopy at 12.8 microns - an estimate of the black hole mass

    CERN Document Server

    Wold, M; Käufl, H U; Siebenmorgen, R

    2006-01-01

    We present a high-resolution (R~16,000) spectrum and a narrow-band image centered on the [NeII]12.8 micron line of the central kpc region of the starburst/Seyfert2 galaxy NGC 7582. The galaxy has a rotating circum-nuclear starburst disk, shown at great detail at a diffraction-limited resolution of 0.4 arcsec. The high spatial resolution allows us to probe the dynamics of the [NeII] gas in the nuclear regions, and to estimate the mass of the central black hole. We construct models of gas disks rotating in the combined gravitational potential from the stellar bulge and a central black hole, and derive a black hole mass of 5.5 x 10^7 solar masses with a 95% confidence interval of [3.6,8.1] x 10^7 solar masses. The black hole mass combined with stellar velocity dispersion measurements from the literature shows that the galaxy is consistent with the local M-sigma relation. This is the first time that a black hole mass in a galaxy except our own Milky Way system has been estimated from gas dynamics in the mid-infra...

  14. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  15. Surface and subsurface oxidation of Mo2C/Mo(100): low-energy ion-scattering, auger electron, angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron, and mass spectroscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovári, László; Kiss, János; Farkas, Arnold P; Solymosi, Frigyes

    2005-03-17

    The interaction of oxygen with a carburized Mo(100) surface was investigated at different temperatures (300-1000 K). The different information depths of low-energy ion-scattering (LEIS) spectroscopy, with topmost layer sensitivity, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) allowed us to discriminate between reactions on the topmost layer and subsurface transformations. According to ARXPS measurements, a carbide overlayer was prepared by the high-temperature decomposition of C(2)H(4) on Mo(100), and the carbon distribution proved to be homogeneous with a Mo(2)C stoichiometry down to the information depth of XPS. O(2) adsorbs dissociatively on the carbide layer at room temperature. One part of the chemisorbed oxygen is bound to both C and Mo sites, indicated by LEIS. Another fraction of oxygen atoms probably resides in the hollow sites not occupied by C. The removal of C from the outermost layer by O(2), in the form of CO, detected by mass spectroscopy (MS), was observed at 500-600 K. The carbon-depleted first layer is able to adsorb more oxygen compared to the Mo(2)C/Mo(100) surface. Applying higher doses of O(2) at 800 K results in the inward diffusion of O and the partial oxidation of Mo atoms. This process, however, is not accompanied by the removal of C from subsurface sites. The depletion of C from the bulk starts only at 900 K (as shown by MS, AES, and XPS), very probably by the diffusion of C to the surface followed by its reaction with oxygen. At T(ads) = 1000 K, the carbon content of the sample, down to the information depth of XPS, decreased further, accompanied by the attenuation of the C concentration gradient and a substantially decreased amount of oxygen.

  16. Bacterial spore survival after exposure to HZE particle bombardment -implication for the lithopanspermia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Berger, Thomas; Matthiä, Daniel; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Kitamura, H.; Reitz, Guenther

    Based on their unique resistance to various space parameters, bacterial spores (mainly spores of Bacillus subtilis) are one of the model systems used for astrobiological studies. More re-cently, spores of B. subtilis have been applied for experimental research on the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of life. Since its first postulation by Arrhenius in 1903, the pansper-mia hypothesis has been revisited many-times, e.g. after the discovery of several lunar and Martian meteorites on Earth [1,2]. These information provided intriguing evidence that rocks may naturally be transferred between the terrestrial planets. The scenario of panspermia, now termed "lithopanspermia" involves three basic hypothetical steps: (i) the escape process, i.e. removal to space of biological material, which has survived being lifted from the surface to high altitudes; (ii) interim state in space, i.e., survival of the biological material over time scales comparable with interplanetary or interstellar passage; (iii) the entry process, i.e. nondestruc-tive deposition of the biological material on another planet [2]. In our research, spores of B. subtilis were used to study the effects of galactic cosmic radiation on spore survival and induced mutations. On an interplanetary journey, outside a protective magnetic field, spore-containing rocks would be exposed to bombardment by high-energy charged particle radiation from galac-tic sources and from the sun. Air-dried spore layers on three different host materials (i.e., non-porous igneous rocks (gabbro), quartz, and spacecraft analog material (aluminum)) were irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (Helium and Iron) with a LET (linear energy transfer) ˆ of 2 and 200 keV/Am, at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (HIMAC) at the National In-stitute of Radiological Sciences, (NIRS), Chiba, Japan in the frame of the HIMAC research project 20B463 "Characterization of heavy ion-induced damage in Bacillus subtilis spores and their global

  17. Terahertz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    In this presentation I will review methods for spectroscopy in the THz range, with special emphasis on the practical implementation of the technique known ad THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). THz-TDS has revived the old field of far-infrared spectroscopy, and enabled a wealth of new...... activities that promise commercial potential for spectroscopic applications in the THz range. This will be illustrated with examples of spectroscopy of liquids inside their bottles as well as sensitive, quantitative spectroscopy in waveguides....

  18. Complementary online aerosol mass spectrometry and offline FT-IR spectroscopy measurements: Prospects and challenges for the analysis of anthropogenic aerosol particle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Peter; Drewnick, Frank; Bierl, Reinhard; Borrmann, Stephan

    2017-10-01

    The aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is well established in investigating highly time-resolved dynamics of submicron aerosol chemical composition including organic aerosol (OA). However, interpretation of mass spectra on molecular level is limited due to strong fragmentation of organic substances and potential reactions inside the AMS ion chamber. Results from complementary filter-based FT-IR absorption measurements were used to explain features in high-resolution AMS mass spectra of different types of OA (e.g. cooking OA, cigarette smoking OA, wood burning OA). Using this approach some AMS fragment ions were validated in this study as appropriate and rather specific markers for a certain class of organic compounds for all particle types under investigation. These markers can therefore be used to get deeper insights in the chemical composition of OA based on AMS mass spectra in upcoming studies. However, the specificity of other fragment ions such as C2H4O2+ (m/z 60.02114) remains ambiguous. In such cases, complementary FT-IR measurements allow the interpretation of highly time-resolved AMS mass spectra at the level of molecular functional groups. Furthermore, this study discusses the challenges in reducing inorganic interferences (e.g. from water and ammonium salts) in FT-IR spectra of atmospheric aerosols to decrease spectral uncertainties for better comparisons and, thus, to get more robust results.

  19. Flow angle from intermediate mass fragment measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, F.; Crochet, P.; Dona, R.; De Schauenburg, B.; Wagner, P.; Alard, J.P.; Andronic, A.; Basrak, Z.; Bastid, N.; Belyaev, I.; Bendarag, A.; Berek, G.; Best, D.; Caplar, R.; Devismes, A.; Dupieux, P.; Dzelalija, M.; Eskef, M.; Fodor, Z.; Gobbi, A.; Grishkin, Y.; Herrmann, N.; Hildenbrand, K.D.; Hong, B.; Kecskemeti, J.; Kirejczyk, M.; Korolija, M.; Kotte, R.; Lebedev, A.; Leifels, Y.; Merlitz, H.; Mohren, S.; Moisa, D.; Neubert, W.; Pelte, D.; Petrovici, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Plettner, C.; Reisdorf, W.; Schuell, D.; Seres, Z.; Sikora, B.; Simion, V.; Siwek-Wilczynska, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stockmeir, M.; Vasiliev, M.; Wisniewski, K.; Wohlfarth, D.; Yushmanov, I.; Zhilin, A

    1999-02-15

    Directed sideward flow of light charged particles and intermediate mass fragments was measured in different symmetric reactions at bombarding energies from 90 to 800 A MeV. The flow parameter is found to increase with the charge of the detected fragment up to Z = 3-4 and then turns into saturation for heavier fragments. Guided by simple simulations of an anisotropic expanding thermal source, we show that the value at saturation can provide a good estimate of the flow angle, {theta}{sub flow}, in the participant region. It is found that {theta}{sub flow} depends strongly on the impact parameter. The excitation function of {theta}{sub flow} reveals striking deviations from the ideal hydrodynamical scaling. The data exhibit a steep rise of {theta}{sub flow} to a maximum at around 250 - 400 A MeV, followed by a moderate decrease as the bombarding energy increases further.

  20. Diffusion enhancement due to low-energy ion bombardment during sputter etching and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltoukhy, A.H.; Greene, J.E.

    1980-08-01

    The effects of low-energy ion bombardment on enhancing elemental diffusion rates at both heterojunction interfaces during film deposition and over the compositionally altered layer created during sputter etching alloy targets have been considered. Depth dependent enhanced interdiffusion coefficients, expressed as D*(x)=D*(0) exp(-x/L/sub d/), where D*(0) is more than five orders of magnitude greater than thermal diffusion values, were measured in InSb/GaSb multilayer structures deposited by multitarget bias sputering. D*(0) was determined from the amplitude u of the compositional modulation in the multilayered films (layer thicknesses between 20 and 45 A) as measured by superlattice x-ray diffraction techniques. The value of D*(0) was found to increase from 3 x 10/sup -17/ to 1 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2//sec as the applied substrate bias was increased from 0 to -75 V. However even at V/sub a/=0, the diffusion coefficient was enhanced owing to an induced substrate potential with respect to the positive space-charge region in the Ar discharge. The diffusion length of L/sub d/ of the ion bombardment created defects was approx.1000 A. Enhanced diffusion also has a significiant effect on the altered layer thickness x/sub e/ and the total sputtering time t/sub e/ (or ion dose) required to reach steady state during ion etching of multielement targets. The effects of using an exponentially depth dependent versus a constant value of the enhanced diffusion coefficient on calculated values of x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ in single-phase binary alloys were considered. The results show that both x/sub e/ and t/sub e/ are considerably larger using a depth dependent D*(x), when L/sub d/D*(0)/v, the usual case for most sputtering applications, the two solutions approach each other.